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1

Financial Models for Integrated Behavioral Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrated behavioral health care or “integrated care” is a distinct service delivery model aimed at early identification and appropriate intervention with that portion of medical\\/surgical patients presenting with behavioral health issues. The clinical rationale for integrated care and the potential for medical cost offset savings have been clearly substantiated in available research (Cummings, 2007; O’Donohue, Ferguson & Cummings, 2002), but

Blake Chaffee

2

Community Dental Health Promotion for Children: Integrating Applied Behavior Analysis and Public Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article examines community dental health promotion for children in terms of factors impacting children's dental health (water fluoridation, dental health education, behavior change strategies, use of dental services, and dental phobias). Proposed is a large scale behavior change approach to public dental health which integrates applied…

Kramer, Kathryn D.; Geller, E. Scott

1987-01-01

3

INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENTS IN BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE HEALTH: UNPRECEDENTED OPORTUNITIES FOR BEHAVIOR ANALYSTS  

PubMed Central

The use of mobile devices is growing worldwide in both industrialized and developing nations. Alongside the worldwide penetration of web-enabled devices, the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are increasingly modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., improving one’s diet and exercising more). Behavior analysts have the opportunity to promote health by combining effective behavioral methods with technological advancements. The objectives of this paper are (1) to highlight the public health gains that may be achieved by integrating technology with a behavior analytic approach to developing interventions, and (2) to review some of the currently, under-examined issues related to merging technology and behavior analysis (enhancing sustainability, obtaining frequent measures of behavior, conducting component analyses, evaluating cost-effectiveness, incorporating behavior analysis in the creation of consumer-based applications, and reducing health disparities). Thorough consideration of these issues may inspire the development, implementation, and dissemination of innovative, efficacious interventions that substantially improve global public health.

KURTI, ALLISON N.; DALLERY, JESSE

2015-01-01

4

The roles of the behavioral health professional in integrated systems.  

PubMed

It is surprising that integration has only recently re-emerged as a major issue in healthcare. It has taken the economic pressures of managed care and the demands from employers for accountability to place integration in the spotlight. Without these pressures, we would most likely continue to focus our attention in behavioral health on the preservation of traditional professional roles and boundaries, instead of focusing on prevention and developing processes that produce the best outcome for the patient at the lowest possible cost. Integration challenges traditional roles and processes, forcing institutions in our field to change. Role change, as sociologists know, can be profoundly disorienting to individuals and is often vehemently resisted by groups and institutions who have an investment in the status quo. That is where we are now in this field despite our current enthusiasm for this rather innocent-looking concept called integration. We should be confident that the innovators in healthcare will succeed. The economy and quality-of-care concerns demand it. I hope they receive something more than a lukewarm reception. PMID:10187568

Dixon, K

1998-12-01

5

The integration of behavioral health interventions in children's health care: services, science, and suggestions.  

PubMed

Because the integration of mental or behavioral health services in pediatric primary care is a national priority, a description and evaluation of the interventions applied in the healthcare setting is warranted. This article examines several intervention research studies based on alternative models for delivering behavioral health care in conjunction with comprehensive pediatric care. This review describes the diverse methods applied to different clinical problems, such as brief mental health skills, clinical guidelines, and evidence-based practices, and the empirical outcomes of this research literature. Next, several key treatment considerations are discussed to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of these interventions. Some practical suggestions for overcoming key service barriers are provided to enhance the capacity of the practice to deliver behavioral health care. There is moderate empirical support for the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility of these interventions for treating internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Practical strategies to extend this work and address methodological limitations are provided that draw upon recent frameworks designed to simplify the treatment enterprise (e.g., common elements). Pediatric primary care has become an important venue for providing mental health services to children and adolescents due, in part, to its many desirable features (e.g., no stigma, local setting, familiar providers). Further adaptation of existing delivery models may promote the delivery of effective integrated interventions with primary care providers as partners designed to address mental health problems in pediatric healthcare. PMID:24588366

Kolko, David J; Perrin, Ellen

2014-01-01

6

The Integration of Behavioral Health Interventions in Children’s Health Care: Services, Science, and Suggestions  

PubMed Central

Objective Because the integration of mental or behavioral health services in pediatric primary care is a national priority, a description and evaluation of the interventions applied in the healthcare setting is warranted. This paper examines several intervention research studies based on alternative models for delivering behavioral health care in conjunction with comprehensive pediatric care. Method This review describes the diverse methods applied to different clinical problems, such as brief mental health skills, clinical guidelines, and evidence-based practices (EBP), and the empirical outcomes of this research literature. Next, several key treatment considerations are discussed to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of these interventions. Some practical suggestions for overcoming key service barriers are provided to enhance the capacity of the practice to deliver behavioral health care. Results There is moderate empirical support for the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility of these interventions for treating internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Practical strategies to extend this work and addressing methodological limitations are provided that draw upon recent frameworks designed to simplify the treatment enterprise (e.g., common elements). Discussion Pediatric primary care has become an important venue for providing mental health services to children and adolescents due, in part, to its many desirable features (e.g., no stigma, local setting, familiar providers). Further adaptation of existing delivery models may promote the delivery of effective integrated interventions with primary care providers as partners designed to address mental health problems in pediatric healthcare. PMID:24588366

Kolko, David J.; Perrin, Ellen C.

2014-01-01

7

Facilitating Culturally Integrated Behaviors among Allied Health Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cultural integration, an ongoing process of cultural awareness, competence, and action, is essential for allied health professionals. It may be fostered through a curriculum emphasizing critical reflection and active and experiential learning, including immersion in other cultures. (Contains 19 references.) (SK)

Barrett, Katherine

2002-01-01

8

Integrating Men’s Health and Masculinity Theories to Explain Colorectal Cancer Screening Behavior  

PubMed Central

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. Although CRC screening has been found to reduce CRC incidence and mortality, current screening rates among men are suboptimal due to various practical and psychosocial barriers. One potential barrier to CRC screening identified in qualitative studies with men is the threat to masculinity that endoscopic screening methods pose. Indeed, beliefs about masculinity have been predictive of other preventive health behaviors among men. In this review paper, we propose a novel conceptual framework to explain men’s CRC screening behavior that integrates masculinity norms, gender role conflict, men’s health care experiences, behaviors, and beliefs, and social and background variables. This framework has the potential to guide future research on men’s CRC screening behaviors and other health behaviors and may inform gender-sensitive interventions which target masculinity beliefs to increase preventive health behaviors. PMID:23813927

Christy, Shannon M.; Mosher, Catherine E.; Rawl, Susan M.

2013-01-01

9

Social Ecology of Asthma: Engaging Stakeholders in Integrating Health Behavior Theories and Practice-Based Evidence through Systems Mapping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a process for integrating health behavior and social science theories with practice-based insights using participatory systems thinking and diagramming methods largely inspired by system dynamics methods. This integration can help close the gap between research and practice in health education and health behavior by offering…

Gillen, Emily M.; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Yeatts, Karin B.; Hernandez, Michelle L.; Smith, Timothy W.; Lewis, Megan A.

2014-01-01

10

Integrative Health Coaching and Motivational interviewing: Synergistic Approaches to Behavior Change in Healthcare.  

PubMed

As rates of preventable chronic diseases and associated costs continue to rise, there has been increasing focus on strategies to support behavior change in healthcare. Health coaching and motivational interviewing are synergistic but distinct approaches that can be effectively employed to achieve this end. However, there is some confusion in the literature about the relationship between these two approaches. The purpose of this review is to describe a specific style of health coaching-integrative health coaching-and motivational interviewing, including their origins, the processes and strategies employed, and the ways in which they are similar and different. We also provide a case example of how integrative health coaching and motivational interviewing might be employed to demonstrate how these approaches are synergistic but distinct from each other in practice. This information may be useful for both researchers and clinicians interested in investigating or using behavior change interventions to improve health and cost outcomes in chronic disease. PMID:24416683

Simmons, Leigh Ann; Wolever, Ruth Q

2013-07-01

11

Professional competencies and training needs of professional social workers in integrated behavioral health in primary care.  

PubMed

The Affordable Care Act has led to a widespread movement to integrate behavioral health services into primary care settings. Integrated behavioral health (IBH) holds promise for treating mild to moderate psychiatric disorders in a manner that more fully addresses the biopsychosocial spectrum of needs of individuals and families in primary care, and for reducing disparities in accessing behavioral health care. For behavioral health practitioners, IBH requires a shift to a brief, outcome-driven, and team-based model of care. Despite the fact that social workers comprise the majority of behavioral health providers in IBH settings, little research has been done to assess the extent to which social workers are prepared for effective practice in fast-paced primary care. We conducted a survey of social workers (N = 84) in IBH settings to assess the following: (1) Key competency areas for social work practice in IBH settings and (2) Self-rated preparedness for effective practice in IBH settings. Online snowball sampling methods were used over a period of 1 month. Results indicate that social workers feel prepared for general practice in IBH settings, but would benefit from additional training in IBH-specific competency areas identified in the survey. Findings can help guide social work training to improve workforce preparedness for practice in IBH settings in the wake of health care reform. PMID:24028739

Horevitz, Elizabeth; Manoleas, Peter

2013-01-01

12

mHealth for Mental Health: Integrating Smartphone Technology in Behavioral Healthcare  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid growth in the use of smartphones has opened a new world of opportunities for use in behavioral health care. Mobile phone software applications (apps) are available for a variety of useful tasks to include symptom assessment, psychoeducation, resource location, and tracking of treatment progress. The latest two-way communication functionality of smartphones also brings new capabilities for telemental health.

David D. Luxton; Russell A. McCann; Nigel E. Bush; Matthew C. Mishkind; Greg M. Reger

2011-01-01

13

Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention  

E-print Network

Overweight and obesity Tobacco use Substance abuse Responsible sexual behavior Mental health InjuryHealth Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal

Meagher, Mary

14

The Behavioral Intervention Technology Model: An Integrated Conceptual and Technological Framework for eHealth and mHealth Interventions  

PubMed Central

A growing number of investigators have commented on the lack of models to inform the design of behavioral intervention technologies (BITs). BITs, which include a subset of mHealth and eHealth interventions, employ a broad range of technologies, such as mobile phones, the Web, and sensors, to support users in changing behaviors and cognitions related to health, mental health, and wellness. We propose a model that conceptually defines BITs, from the clinical aim to the technological delivery framework. The BIT model defines both the conceptual and technological architecture of a BIT. Conceptually, a BIT model should answer the questions why, what, how (conceptual and technical), and when. While BITs generally have a larger treatment goal, such goals generally consist of smaller intervention aims (the "why") such as promotion or reduction of specific behaviors, and behavior change strategies (the conceptual "how"), such as education, goal setting, and monitoring. Behavior change strategies are instantiated with specific intervention components or “elements” (the "what"). The characteristics of intervention elements may be further defined or modified (the technical "how") to meet the needs, capabilities, and preferences of a user. Finally, many BITs require specification of a workflow that defines when an intervention component will be delivered. The BIT model includes a technological framework (BIT-Tech) that can integrate and implement the intervention elements, characteristics, and workflow to deliver the entire BIT to users over time. This implementation may be either predefined or include adaptive systems that can tailor the intervention based on data from the user and the user’s environment. The BIT model provides a step towards formalizing the translation of developer aims into intervention components, larger treatments, and methods of delivery in a manner that supports research and communication between investigators on how to design, develop, and deploy BITs. PMID:24905070

Schueller, Stephen M; Montague, Enid; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Rashidi, Parisa

2014-01-01

15

The behavioral intervention technology model: an integrated conceptual and technological framework for eHealth and mHealth interventions.  

PubMed

A growing number of investigators have commented on the lack of models to inform the design of behavioral intervention technologies (BITs). BITs, which include a subset of mHealth and eHealth interventions, employ a broad range of technologies, such as mobile phones, the Web, and sensors, to support users in changing behaviors and cognitions related to health, mental health, and wellness. We propose a model that conceptually defines BITs, from the clinical aim to the technological delivery framework. The BIT model defines both the conceptual and technological architecture of a BIT. Conceptually, a BIT model should answer the questions why, what, how (conceptual and technical), and when. While BITs generally have a larger treatment goal, such goals generally consist of smaller intervention aims (the "why") such as promotion or reduction of specific behaviors, and behavior change strategies (the conceptual "how"), such as education, goal setting, and monitoring. Behavior change strategies are instantiated with specific intervention components or "elements" (the "what"). The characteristics of intervention elements may be further defined or modified (the technical "how") to meet the needs, capabilities, and preferences of a user. Finally, many BITs require specification of a workflow that defines when an intervention component will be delivered. The BIT model includes a technological framework (BIT-Tech) that can integrate and implement the intervention elements, characteristics, and workflow to deliver the entire BIT to users over time. This implementation may be either predefined or include adaptive systems that can tailor the intervention based on data from the user and the user's environment. The BIT model provides a step towards formalizing the translation of developer aims into intervention components, larger treatments, and methods of delivery in a manner that supports research and communication between investigators on how to design, develop, and deploy BITs. PMID:24905070

Mohr, David C; Schueller, Stephen M; Montague, Enid; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Rashidi, Parisa

2014-01-01

16

Six-month outcomes of an integrated assertive community treatment team serving adults with complex behavioral health and housing needs.  

PubMed

Assertive community treatment (ACT) and integrated dual disorders treatment (IDDT) have individually proven effective for treatment of adults with complex behavioral health and housing needs. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an ACT team that delivered integrated care consistent with IDDT principles. Participants included 60 adults with a history of chronic homelessness and co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. Measures assessing mental health, substance use, and residential stability were completed at intake to the program and then 6 months later. Participants reported statistically significant improvements in mental health symptomatology and residential stability over time, although there were no changes in substance use. Findings support the effectiveness of the intervention for improving mental health and housing stability among adults with complex behavioral health and housing needs. Fidelity data support the notion that multiple evidence-based interventions can be integrated while still maintaining adequate fidelity to individual components. PMID:24346225

Young, M Scott; Barrett, Blake; Engelhardt, Mark A; Moore, Kathleen A

2014-05-01

17

The H1N1 crisis: a case study of the integration of mental and behavioral health in public health crises.  

PubMed

In substantial numbers of affected populations, disasters adversely affect well-being and influence the development of emotional problems and dysfunctional behaviors. Nowhere is the integration of mental and behavioral health into broader public health and medical preparedness and response activities more crucial than in disasters such as the 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic. The National Biodefense Science Board, recognizing that the mental and behavioral health responses to H1N1 were vital to preserving safety and health for the country, requested that the Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee recommend actions for public health officials to prevent and mitigate adverse behavioral health outcomes during the H1N1 pandemic. The subcommittee's recommendations emphasized vulnerable populations and concentrated on interventions, education and training, and communication and messaging. The subcommittee's H1N1 activities and recommendations provide an approach and template for identifying and addressing future efforts related to newly emerging public health and medical emergencies. The many emotional and behavioral health implications of the crisis and the importance of psychological factors in determining the behavior of members of the public argue for a programmatic integration of behavioral health and science expertise in a comprehensive public health response. PMID:22490939

Pfefferbaum, Betty; Schonfeld, David; Flynn, Brian W; Norwood, Ann E; Dodgen, Daniel; Kaul, Rachel E; Donato, Darrin; Stone, Brook; Brown, Lisa M; Reissman, Dori B; Jacobs, Gerard A; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Jones, Russell T; Herrmann, Jack; Ursano, Robert J; Ruzek, Josef I

2012-03-01

18

Integrating behavioral health services for homeless mothers and children in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes an innovative trauma-informed care management model in which mental health, substance abuse, and support services are integrated for homeless families in primary care. The rationale for service integration in a health care setting is discussed and the conceptual underpinnings of the model are elaborated, drawing from the literature and clinical experience. Service encounter data collected by each

Linda F. Weinreb; Joanne Nicholson; Valerie Williams; Frances Anthes

2007-01-01

19

Social ecology of asthma: engaging stakeholders in integrating health behavior theories and practice-based evidence through systems mapping.  

PubMed

This article describes a process for integrating health behavior and social science theories with practice-based insights using participatory systems thinking and diagramming methods largely inspired by system dynamics methods. This integration can help close the gap between research and practice in health education and health behavior by offering a systematic approach to bring together stakeholders across multiple domains. In this process we create a diagram using constructs from multiple health behavior theories at all levels of the social ecological framework as variables in causal loop diagrams. The goal of this process is to elucidate the reciprocal relationships between explanatory factors at various levels of the social ecological framework that render so many public health problems intractable. To illustrate, we detail a theory-based, replicable process for creating a qualitative diagram to enrich understanding of caregiver and provider behavior around adherence to pediatric asthma action plans. We describe how such diagramming can serve as the foundation for translating evidence into practice to address real-world challenges. Key insights gained include recognition of the complex, multilevel factors affecting whether, and how effectively, parents/caregivers and medical providers co-create an asthma action plan, and important "feedback" dynamics at play that can support or derail ongoing collaboration. Although this article applies this method to asthma action plan adherence in children, the method and resulting diagrams are applicable and adaptable to other health behaviors requiring continuous, daily action. PMID:23709516

Gillen, Emily M; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Yeatts, Karin B; Hernandez, Michelle L; Smith, Timothy W; Lewis, Megan A

2014-02-01

20

Organizational factors influencing implementation of evidence-based practices for integrated treatment in behavioral health agencies.  

PubMed

Objective. In recent years, New Mexico has prioritized integrated treatment for cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders within its public behavioral health system. This report describes factors likely to be important when implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in community agencies. Methods. Our mixed-method research design consisted of observations, semistructured interviews, and surveys undertaken with employees at 14 agencies at baseline and after 18 months. We developed four-agency typologies based on iterative coding and analysis of observations and interviews. We then examined survey data from employees at the four exemplar agencies to validate qualitative findings. Results. Financial resources and strong leadership impacted agency capacity to train providers and implement EBPs. Quantitative analysis of service provider survey responses from these agencies (N = 38) supported qualitative findings and demonstrated significant mean score differences in leadership, organizational climate, and attitudes toward EBPs in anticipated directions. Conclusion. The availability of strong leadership and financial resources were key components to initial implementation success in this study of community agencies in New Mexico. Reliance only on external funding poses risks for sustainment when demoralizing work climates precipitate employee turnover. Strong agency leadership does not always compensate for deficient financial resources in vulnerable communities. PMID:24772411

Bonham, Caroline A; Sommerfeld, David; Willging, Cathleen; Aarons, Gregory A

2014-01-01

21

Organizational Factors Influencing Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Integrated Treatment in Behavioral Health Agencies  

PubMed Central

Objective. In recent years, New Mexico has prioritized integrated treatment for cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders within its public behavioral health system. This report describes factors likely to be important when implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in community agencies. Methods. Our mixed-method research design consisted of observations, semistructured interviews, and surveys undertaken with employees at 14 agencies at baseline and after 18 months. We developed four-agency typologies based on iterative coding and analysis of observations and interviews. We then examined survey data from employees at the four exemplar agencies to validate qualitative findings. Results. Financial resources and strong leadership impacted agency capacity to train providers and implement EBPs. Quantitative analysis of service provider survey responses from these agencies (N = 38) supported qualitative findings and demonstrated significant mean score differences in leadership, organizational climate, and attitudes toward EBPs in anticipated directions. Conclusion. The availability of strong leadership and financial resources were key components to initial implementation success in this study of community agencies in New Mexico. Reliance only on external funding poses risks for sustainment when demoralizing work climates precipitate employee turnover. Strong agency leadership does not always compensate for deficient financial resources in vulnerable communities. PMID:24772411

Bonham, Caroline A.; Sommerfeld, David; Willging, Cathleen; Aarons, Gregory A.

2014-01-01

22

Key Principles in Providing Integrated Behavioral Health Services for Young Children and Their Families: The "Starting Early Starting Smart" Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) project, an early intervention program that has been developed in the context of the national, multi-site program and evaluation. The emphasis in SESS is on the integration of behavioral health services into easily accessible, non-threatening settings where caregivers naturally and…

Hanson, Lori, Comp.; Deere, David, Comp.; Lee, Carol Amundson, Comp.; Lewin, Amy, Comp.; Seval, Carolyn, Comp.

23

Relationships between parenting styles and risk behaviors in adolescent health: an integrative literature review.  

PubMed

Research over the past 20 years suggests that the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship significantly affects the development of risk behaviors in adolescent health. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of studies published between 1996-2007 that address specific relationships between parenting styles and six priority adolescent risk behaviors. The review supports the substantial influence of parenting style on adolescent development. Adolescents raised in authoritative households consistently demonstrate higher protective and fewer risk behaviors than adolescents from non-authoritative families. There is also considerable evidence to show that parenting styles and behaviors related to warmth, communication and disciplinary practices predict important mediators, including academic achievement and psychosocial adjustment. Careful examination of parenting style patterns in diverse populations, particularly with respect to physical activity and unintentional injury, will be a critical next step in the development of efficacious, culturally tailored adolescent health promotion interventions. PMID:18392544

Newman, Kathy; Harrison, Lynda; Dashiff, Carol; Davies, Susan

2008-01-01

24

Health Behaviors and Wellness  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Optimizing the health and quality of life for people who have survived cancer requires a continuing focus on health promotion\\u000a and behavior change to reduce behavioral health risks. A focus on optimizing health behavior is critical for people surviving\\u000a cancer because they are at increased risk for the development of chronic health conditions. Some of these conditions may develop\\u000a from

Robyn Osborn; Tricia L. Psota; Jaesin Sa; Tracy Sbrocco

25

Integrating the theory of planned behavior and attitude functions: implications for health campaign design.  

PubMed

This study argues that the integration of the theory of planned behavior and attitude functions can provide a more detailed theoretical explanation and more precise practical guidance regarding behavioral prediction. Relying on a survey of 549 undergraduate students, this research found that individuals' intentions to regularly participate in physical activity were predicted by their utilitarian and self-esteem maintenance attitudes, the effects of which were further moderated by individuals' strength of self-monitoring and self-esteem, respectively. In addition to theoretical implications, this research indicates that campaign planners should consider the use of more-detailed attitude constructs and design functionally matched messages according to the target's personality traits. PMID:19657825

Wang, Xiao

2009-07-01

26

myPace: an integrative health platform for supporting weight loss and maintenance behaviors.  

PubMed

Obesity is a major health concern caused by unhealthy eating behaviors. Digital weight loss interventions have adopted mobile technology primarily in order to support self-monitoring. However, many available apps are not designed as a part of dietetic practice; therefore, a distinct gap in the research exists relating to technology that supports the patient-practitioner relationship. This paper presents myPace, which is a complete weight loss and management system that is deployed via a smartphone and a PC. It connects dietitians and patients between face-to-face consultations and extends the relationship through patients' regular progress updates and dietitians' tailored and timely advice, for sustained behavior change. The prototype was developed from research into behavior change for weight loss, which furthermore was underpinned by theory and tenets of human support models, such as the supportive accountability framework. We report on an early-phase system design goals via a formative research process, which aimed to implement theoretical principles and match practical dietetic practice. To that end, only the clinical end user's perspective was sought through a coaching think-aloud protocol on the first iteration of the prototype and interviews with dietitians. Findings show that the system has many positive design features, but which require further development in order for the system to be fully acceptable within dietetic practice and motivate patient engagement. PMID:25438329

Barnett, Julie; Harricharan, Michelle; Fletcher, Dave; Gilchrist, Becky; Coughlan, Jane

2015-01-01

27

Utilizing a Positive Behavior Support Approach to Achieve Integrated Mental Health Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although experts in early childhood mental health services make clear the need to infuse mental health services into all program components, many have suggested that the mental health services in the majority of Head Start programs are narrowly focused and that mental health consultants are often used in limited ways (see D. J. Cohen, Solnit, &…

Frey, Andy; Young, Scott; Gold, Allene; Trevor, Earl

2008-01-01

28

Integrating primary care and behavioral health with four special populations: Children with special needs, people with serious mental illness, refugees, and deaf people.  

PubMed

Special patient populations can present unique opportunities and challenges to integrating primary care and behavioral health services. This article focuses on four special populations: children with special needs, persons with severe and persistent mental illness, refugees, and deaf people who communicate via sign language. The current state of primary care and behavioral health collaboration regarding each of these four populations is examined via Doherty, McDaniel, and Baird's (1996) five-level collaboration model. The section on children with special needs offers contrasting case studies that highlight the consequences of effective versus ineffective service integration. The challenges and potential benefits of service integration for the severely mentally ill are examined via description of PRICARe (Promoting Resources for Integrated Care and Recovery), a model program in Colorado. The discussion regarding a refugee population focuses on service integration needs and emerging collaborative models as well as ways in which refugee mental health research can be improved. The section on deaf individuals examines how sign language users are typically marginalized in health care settings and offers suggestions for improving the health care experiences and outcomes of deaf persons. A well-integrated model program for deaf persons in Austria is described. All four of these special populations will benefit from further integration of primary care and mental health services. PMID:24820687

Pollard, Robert Q; Betts, William R; Carroll, Jennifer K; Waxmonsky, Jeanette A; Barnett, Steven; deGruy, Frank V; Pickler, Laura L; Kellar-Guenther, Yvonne

2014-01-01

29

Integrating behavior, mechanics and physiology  

E-print Network

· Animal behavior and orientation · Swimming mechanics · When combined with other sensors providesIntegrating behavior, mechanics and physiology: use of acceleration sensors to study shark behavior behind observed behaviors · Variety of sensors available, but not utilized · Some modification

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

30

Health behavior models compared  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compares the health belief, Fishbein\\/Ajzen, and PRECEDE models to predict changes in smoking, exercise, and consumption of sweet and fried foods over an eight-month interval. Data were collected from a panel of 326 adults in two large cities of the western United States. The PRECEDE model accounted for more variance in behavior than both the Fishbein\\/Ajzen and health

Patricia D. Mullen; James C. Hersey; Donald C. Iverson

1987-01-01

31

Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, and Schooling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The positive correlation between schooling and good health is well documented. One explanation is that schooling helps people choose healthier life-styles by improving their knowledge of the relationships between health behaviors and health outcomes. That is, schooling improves the household's allocative efficiency in producing health. This empirical study uses direct measures of health knowledge to test this explanation. Part of

Donald S. Kenkel

1991-01-01

32

Changing Health Behavior in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author considers the need for changing health behavior in youth. The author begins by discussing how people learn health behavior which could help educators in understanding the reasons why it is often difficult to effect changes--and how educators may succeed. If the aim of health educators is to change behavior, the author…

Hochbaum, Godfrey M.

2010-01-01

33

Integrated structural health monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the authors opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

2001-01-01

34

Skin: Behavior and Health Connection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students become better aware of how their personal behavior and the environment can have a considerable impact on their health in general, particularly the health of their skin. In this exercise, students draw a model of a healthy and unhealthy person. This prompts a discussion on behavior and environmental behaviors that affect health. They also learn what good health is and the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Finally, the students determine their skin types.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science; )

2006-09-07

35

The relationship of life stressors, mood disorder, and health care utilization in primary care patients referred for integrated behavioral health services.  

PubMed

Exposure to stressful life events, mood disorder, and health care utilization were evaluated in 102 low-income, primarily minority patients receiving behavioral health and medical services at a safety-net primary care clinic. Exposure to major stressors was far higher in this sample than in the general population, with older patients having lower stress scores. Proportions of patients who met the criteria for clinical depression and anxiety were higher than in normative samples of primary care patients. Stress exposure was higher in the patients who met the criterion for clinical anxiety but was unrelated to clinical depression. Contrary to expectation, anxiety, depression, or stress exposure was not related to service utilization. Latter findings are discussed in terms of the influence of the provision of behavioral health services, the highly skewed distribution of major stressor scores, and the likely greater influence of individual differences in minor stressor exposure on utilization in this population. PMID:25265268

Sadock, Elizabeth; Auerbach, Stephen M; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Aggarwal, Arpita; Lanoye, Autumn

2014-10-01

36

Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics  

E-print Network

Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics substance abuse and dependence ­ opponent process Behaviors develop gradually rather than being acquired "all at once" Substance abuse of all kinds;Substance abuse: Links Conflict with parents and family problems Impulsivity Stress Seems

Meagher, Mary

37

Health Behavior in Ecological Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health is best understood within an ecological context. Accordingly, health promotion involves processes that foster supportive environments and healthful behavior. Thus, effective health promotion programs are typically multilevel, focusing not only on the population at risk but also on the environmental conditions that contribute so importantly…

Simons-Morton, Bruce

2013-01-01

38

Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Behaviors  

PubMed Central

The inverse relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) and unhealthy behaviors such as tobacco use, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been well demonstrated empirically but encompass diverse underlying causal mechanisms. These mechanisms have special theoretical importance because disparities in health behaviors, unlike disparities in many other components of health, involve something more than the ability to use income to purchase good health. Based on a review of broad literatures in sociology, economics, and public health, we classify explanations of higher smoking, lower exercise, poorer diet, and excess weight among low-SES persons into nine broad groups that specify related but conceptually distinct mechanisms. The lack of clear support for any one explanation suggests that the literature on SES disparities in health and health behaviors can do more to design studies that better test for the importance of the varied mechanisms. PMID:21909182

Pampel, Fred C.; Krueger, Patrick M.; Denney, Justin T.

2011-01-01

39

Does Formal Integration Between Child Welfare And Behavioral Health Agencies Result in Improved Placement Stability For Adolescents Engaged With Both Systems?  

PubMed Central

National survey data were used to assess whether child welfare agency ties to behavioral health care providers improved placement stability for adolescents served by both systems. Adolescents initially at home who were later removed tended to have fewer moves when child welfare and behavioral health were in the same larger agency. Joint training of child welfare and behavioral health staff was negatively associated with numbers of moves as well as numbers of days out of home. PMID:22894016

Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline

2013-01-01

40

Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics  

E-print Network

of vulnerability #12;Substance abuse: Links " Conflict with parents and family problems " Impulsivity " StressHealth-Compromising Behaviors characteristics substance abuse and dependence ­ opponent process theory ­ incentive salience ­ frontal executive effects alcohol abuse and dependence smoking #12

Meagher, Mary

41

Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

42

Mental Health 1: Human Behavior  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, from Science NetLinks, provides students with a sound introduction and historical overview of the important figures and discoveries that have greatly advanced the study of human behavior since the early 1900s. This lesson is the first of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

Science Netlinks

2002-07-29

43

Does Formal Integration between Child Welfare and Behavioral Health Agencies Result in Improved Placement Stability for Adolescents Engaged with Both Systems?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National survey data were used to assess whether child welfare agency ties to behavioral health care providers improved placement stability for adolescents served by both systems. Adolescents initially at home who were later removed tended to have fewer moves when child welfare and behavioral health were in the same larger agency. Joint training…

Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline

2012-01-01

44

Clustering of Health-Related Behaviors and Their Determinants: Possible Consequences for School Health Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Characterizing school health promotion is its category-by-category approach, in which each separate health-related behavior\\u000a is addressed independently. Such an approach creates a risk that extra-curricular activities become overloaded, and that teaching\\u000a staff are distracted by continuous innovations. Within the health promotion sector there are thus increasing calls for an\\u000a integrative approach to health-related behaviors. However, a meaningful integrative approach to

Carin H. Wiefferink; Louk Peters; Femke Hoekstra; Geert Ten Dam; Goof J. Buijs; Theo G. W. M. Paulussen

2006-01-01

45

Integrating health and mental health: opportunities in undergraduate health programs.  

PubMed

A common goal of mental health professionals is to increase the degree of integration of mental health within the primary health care system. Achieving interpretation of mental health within the larger health care system requires teaching diagnostic and treatment skills, as well as a value orientation which ascribes greater importance to mental health and mental health problems. Teaching a new value orientation is best introduced early in one's educational career rather than postponing such intervention until post-graduate medical residency programs. Results of a survey are presented which indicate the variable mental health content included in undergraduate health related programs. The goal of greater integration between mental health and health can clearly be furthered by beginning to teach this critical value orientation in undergraduate health programs. PMID:10275387

Selig, S

1986-01-01

46

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Rick Gibbons is a professor at Iowa State University who conducts research on the social psychology of health behavior, including adolescent health risk behaviors, such as drinking and drug use, and health promotion, such as exercise and UV protection.

47

Social and behavioral history information in public health datasets.  

PubMed

Social and behavioral history is increasingly recognized as integral for understanding important determinants of disease and critical for patient care, research, clinical guidelines, and public health policies. Social and behavioral history information in the public health domain, specifically large public health surveys, has not been well described. In this study, a content analysis was performed and information model constructed and contrasted with clinically-based models for each of three widely used public health surveys: BRFSS (Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System), NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), and NHIS (National Health Interview Survey). Survey items were predominantly related to alcohol use, drug use, occupation, and tobacco use. Although the clinical social history information model was similar, public health social history demonstrated additional complexity in coding temporality, degree of exposure, and certainty. Our results give insight into ongoing efforts to integrate clinical and public health information resources for improving and measuring health. PMID:23304335

Melton, Genevieve B; Manaktala, Sharad; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Chen, Elizabeth S

2012-01-01

48

Health Literacy and Women's Health-Related Behaviors in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food…

Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N.

2012-01-01

49

Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

1974-01-01

50

Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics  

E-print Network

Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics substance abuse and dependence alcohol abuse at once" ! Substance abuse of all kinds are predicted by some of the same factors ! Interventions need to be matched to stage of vulnerability #12;Substance abuse: Links ! Conflict with parents and family problems

Meagher, Mary

51

Health Instruction Packages: Behavioral Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These four learning modules present text and exercises designed to help allied health students understand various elements of positive interaction with people. The first module, "Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs" by Dianne Mackey, defines human needs, presents Maslow's theories, and helps the learner identify behaviors that reflect the presence of…

Mackey, Dianne Dee; And Others

52

eHealth communication and behavior change: promise and performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional health communication interventions have often failed to show significant changes in people's behaviors. Guidance from social semiotic frameworks suggests that health communication interventions can be improved by incorporating greater participation by the intended audiences of users, paying greater attention to social contexts, and increasing broad use of integrated multimedia dissemination strategies. The use of eHealth communication has great promise

Linda Neuhauser; Gary L. Kreps

2010-01-01

53

Developing Behavioral Theory with the Systematic Integration of Community Social Capital Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health behavior theories state that social environments influence health behaviors, but theories of how this occurs are relatively underdeveloped. This article systematically surveys community social capital concepts in health behavior literature and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates these concepts into existing behavioral theory.…

Samuel, Laura J.; Commodore-Mensah, Yvonne; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl R.

2014-01-01

54

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system (Management: storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation). Presentation discusses: (1) ISHM Capability Development. (1a) ISHM Knowledge Model. (1b) Standards for ISHM Implementation. (1c) ISHM Domain Models (ISHM-DM's). (1d) Intelligent Sensors and Components. (2) ISHM in Systems Design, Engineering, and Integration. (3) Intelligent Control for ISHM-Enabled Systems

Figueroa, Fernando

2012-01-01

55

Behavioral disorders: the new public health crisis.  

PubMed

Behavioral health has become a public health crisis. No other public health crises are as widespread or contribute as much to the burden of illness in the U.S. as do behavioral health disorders. By 2020, mental and substance use disorders will surpass all physical diseases worldwide as major causes of disability. Yet state and federal governments continue to make steep cuts to funding for public behavioral health services. We cannot afford to wait for the next national tragedy to recognize that behavioral health disorders are a public health crisis deserving of our nation's attention and support. PMID:22201033

Rosenberg, Linda

2012-01-01

56

Integration of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior and Transactional Model of Stress and Coping as a Tool for Understanding Retention in HIV Care Across the Lifespan.  

PubMed

Retaining people living with HIV (PLWH) in care over the lifespan is critical to quality and longevity of life. Individual health behavior decisions that affect care retention are complicated and multifactorial. Current health behavior theories are inadequate in isolation to guide retention in care research. Two existing models, Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior, and Lazarus and Folkman's Transactional Model of Stress and Coping have both guided research with PLWH, although not related to retention in care. Integration of these models may more comprehensively inform care retention research and practice across the lifespan as it incorporates not only intra- and inter-personal characteristics and relationships but also the stress and coping experiences inevitable when living with a chronic illness such as HIV. PMID:25665883

Graham, Lucy J

2015-01-01

57

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Ralf Schwarzer is a professor of psychology at the Freie Universitat of Berlin, Germany, who works on the role of perceived self-efficacy in the adoption and maintenance of health behaviors (see Schwarzer et al., in press, Annals of Behavioral Medicine). He is in particular involved in theory building, conducting studies to examine the causal mechanisms that link health cognitions to health behaviors.

58

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Ajzen, I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision processes, 50, 179-211. ), the TRA illustrates many of the issues surrounding the conceptualization and measurement of intentions and other proximal antecedents to health behavior.

59

Valuing ecosystem integrity and health  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread concern for valuing ecosystem integrity and health, in Congressional legislation, in policy for ecosystem management, sustainable development, and environmental quality. Both integrity and health are combined fact-value words that significantly mix science and advocacy. Science orients policy, though policy also orients science. Recent ecological science raises questions about the mix of stability and historical change in ecosystems, about how structure and process combine to form biotic communities, about order and disorder in natural systems, and the scales on which these occur. Concern for sustainable development mixes the concern for a sustainable biosphere. Ecosystem integrity and health require much restoration of degraded environments, but restoration goals also mix science and values. A traditional attitude toward nature as resources to be for several centuries, is being challenged by an attitude toward nature as resources to be managed by sound scientific management, increasingly successful for several centuries, is being challenged by an attitude of responsibility for harmonizing culture with nature. This will require an unprecendented mix of science, ethics, and policy in the century ahead. It would be a tragic failure of human culture, especially of modern scientifically advanced culture, if it were further to degrade the integrity, health, and biodiversity achieved over many millennia, leaving a still more depauperate Earth. Homo sapiens, improverishing people and the planet, would not be the {open_quotes}wise{close_quotes} species at all.

Rolston, H. III

1995-12-31

60

Health Behaviors Research Branch Fact Sheet  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Instit?te U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Instit?tes of Health Health Behaviors Research Branch The Health Behaviors Research Branch (HBRB) provides scientific leadership and supports research in effective ps?chosocial,

61

Behavioral Science & Health Capstone Spring 2010  

E-print Network

questions you could address on this topic include: Should we focus on cancer research instead? Is restoringBSH 5000 Behavioral Science & Health Capstone Spring 2010 The Behavioral Science & Health (BSH than improving health outcomes and reducing health care costs via electronic medical records

Tipple, Brett

62

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Department of Behavioral and Community Health  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Department of Behavioral and Community Health Undergraduate Internship the community health internship. It is hoped that this information will facilitate mutual understanding degree (BS) in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health (DBCH) at the University of Maryland

Hill, Wendell T.

63

Research and Practice Opportunities at the Intersection of Health Education, Health Behavior, and Genomics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers and practitioners in health behavior and health education (HBHE) can play a pivotal leadership role in the integration of genomic advances to improve the public's health. The purpose of this article is to outline research and practice opportunities at the intersection of genomics and HBHE. We begin this article by briefly summarizing…

Wang, Catharine; Bowen, Deborah J.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.

2005-01-01

64

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived susceptibility is a major component of threat perception in the Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1966 xClose Rosenstock, I.M. (1966). Why people use health services. Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly , 44, 94-127. ; Becker, 1974 xClose Becker, M.H. (ed). (1974) The health belief model and personal health behavior. Health Education Monographs , 2, 324-508.

65

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

There is little question that social influence is an important determinant of health-related behaviors, including not only cigarette smoking and alcohol use but a range of other behaviors as well. Thus the basic question for new research on health behavior is not necessarily whether social influence should be studied, but what aspect should be measured.

66

Health Risk Behavior in Foster Youth  

PubMed Central

Problem Adolescent health problems are predominantly caused by risk behavior. Foster adolescents have disproportionately poor health; therefore identification of risk behavior is critical. Method A secondary analysis of data from a larger study investigated the health risk behavior of 56 foster youth using the CHIP-AE. Findings Foster youth had some increased risk behavior. Younger adolescents and those in kinship care had less risky behavior. Youth had more risk behavior when: in group homes, parental death, histories of physical or emotional abuse, or history of attempted suicide. Conclusions These results point to areas of strength and vulnerability in foster youth. PMID:19490278

Gramkowski, Bridget; Kools, Susan; Paul, Steven; Boyer, Cherrie; Monasterio, Erica; Robbins, Nancy

2010-01-01

67

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Meg Gerrard is a professor at Iowa State University who has published widely on health cognitions associated with adolescent risk behaviors such as unprotected sex, tanning, smoking, drinking and substance use. Her research has been designed to increase our understanding of the way people make decisions associated with health risk and health maintenance behaviors. Dr.

68

Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and…

Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

2012-01-01

69

Behavioral Science and Health Capstone Spring 2009  

E-print Network

address on this topic include: Should we focus on cancer research instead? Is restoring a person's abilityBSH 5000 Behavioral Science and Health Capstone Spring 2009 The Behavioral Science and Health (BSH outcomes and reducing health care costs via electronic medical records, a technological advance. However

Tipple, Brett

70

Effective elements of school health promotion across behavioral domains: a systematic review of reviews  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Most school health education programs focus on a single behavioral domain. Integrative programs that address multiple behaviors may be more efficient, but only if the elements of change are similar for these behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine which effective elements of school health education are similar across three particular behavioral domains. METHODS: A systematic review

Louk WH Peters; Gerjo Kok; Geert TM Ten Dam; Goof J Buijs; Theo GWM Paulussen

2009-01-01

71

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Most prominent health behavior theories include self-efficacy (or similar constructs). Self-efficacy is a proximal and direct predictor of intention and of behavior. According to Social Cognitive Theory (SCT; Bandura, 1997 xClose Bandura, A. (1997).

72

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The general definition of social influence is that health-related behavior is influenced by a person's social context. The behavioral social context can be represented by the behaviors of individual peers or family members (e.g., smoking) with whom the person interacts regularly, or by behaviors observed in a larger social environment such as the neighborhood in which a person lives.

73

Communication Apprehension and Health Communication and Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finds that specific communication apprehension showed moderate to large negative effects on health communication (talking with physician, seeking health information) and almost no effects on health behaviors (tobacco use, exercise, health fairs) except diet; and that general-trait communication apprehension showed similar, though smaller, effects…

Booth-Butterfield, Steve; Beynon, William; Chory, Rebecca

1997-01-01

74

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [14 Credit Hours] IHS 10000 Careers in Health Sciences and Human for graduation IHS 44010 Research Design and Statistical Methods for the Health Professions 3 PHIL 40005 Health

Sheridan, Scott

75

Improving Maladaptive Behaviors Using Sensory Integration Techniques.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the use of sensory integration techniques to reduce the maladaptive behaviors that interfered with the learning of nine high school students with mental impairments attending a special school. Maladaptive behaviors identified included rocking, toe walking, echolalia, resistance to change, compulsive behaviors, aggression,…

Shuman, Theresa

76

Accessing Specialty Behavioral Health Treatment in Private Health Plans  

PubMed Central

Connecting people to mental health and substance abuse services is critical, given the extent of unmet need. The way health plans structure access to care can play a role. This study examined treatment entry procedures for specialty behavioral health care in private health plans, and their relationship with behavioral health contracting arrangements, focusing primarily on initial entry into outpatient treatment. The data source was a nationally representative health plan survey on behavioral health services in 2003 (N= 368 plans with 767 managed care products; 83% response rate). Most health plan products initially authorized six or more outpatient visits if authorization was required, did not routinely conduct telephonic clinical assessment, had standards for timely access, and monitored wait time. Products with carve-outs differed on several treatment entry dimensions. Findings suggest that health plans focus on timely access and typically do not heavily manage initial entry into outpatient treatment. PMID:19104944

Merrick, Elizabeth L.; Horgan, Constance M.; Garnick, Deborah W.; Reif, Sharon; Stewart, Maureen T.

2015-01-01

77

Employer integration of health promotion and health protection programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper seeks to describe the evolution of an integrated approach to health and productivity management that combines the disciplines of worksite health promotion and occupational safety and health, and to offer advice on how to implement such an integrated approach. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper takes the form of a review of the literature, focusing on the psychological,

Ron Z. Goetzel; Ronald J. Ozminkowski; Jennie Bowen; Maryam J. Tabrizi

2008-01-01

78

Adolescent Health Status, Behaviors and Cardiovascular Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tracked levels of risk indicators over 4-year period in 356 high school students, assessing health status and behavior. Subjects were identified as potentially at risk if scores equaled or exceeded seventy-fifth percentile for age, sex, and race. Results indicated that 54 percent of at-risk group had negative health behaviors, some of which…

Adeyanju, Matthew

1990-01-01

79

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The construct of perceived benefits is defined as beliefs about the positive outcomes associated with a behavior in response to a real or perceived threat. The perceived benefit construct is most often applied to health behaviors and is specific to an individual's perception of the benefits that will accrue by engaging in a specific health action.

80

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The concept of perceived barriers is both important and central to a variety of prominent health behavior theories. There are a number of validated barrier measures available for use that target screening for cancer and other diseases, and especially for preventive health behaviors.

81

Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

82

Cognitive orientation and health-protective behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to present a new theoretical framework for dealing with health-protective behaviors (HPBs), including\\u000a behaviors designed to prevent diseases or maintain health after it has become impaired. In the first part, we present and\\u000a evaluate four common theories applied with regard to HPBs (health belief model, reasoned action, subjective expected utility,\\u000a and protection motivation). The

Shulamith Kreitler; Hans Kreitlert

1997-01-01

83

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Meg Gerrard Meg Gerrard is a professor at Iowa State University who has published widely on health cognitions associated with adolescent risk behaviors such as unprotected sex, tanning, smoking, drinking and substance use. Her research has been designed to increase our understanding of the way people think about the risks associated with these behaviors, and the reciprocal relation between perceptions and behavior. Dr.

84

Health Risk Behaviors and Academic Achievement  

MedlinePLUS

... 2009 † Health-Risk Behaviors Percentage of U.S. high school students who engaged in each risk behavior, by type of grades mostly earned A’s B’s C’s D’s/F’s Unintentional Injury and Violence-Related Behaviors Rarely or never wore a seat ...

85

Moving Behavioral Medicine to the Front Line: A Model for the Integration of Behavioral and Medical Sciences in Primary Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychologists have an unprecedented opportunity to influence primary medical care systems where chronic conditions, somatic symptoms, and health-threatening behaviors are prevalent. The authors developed a new model to incorporate behavioral medicine expertise into existing primary care practice with the purpose of delivering integrated, comprehensive, and efficient health care through physician training and direct patient care services. This model moves psychologists

Sheri D. Pruitt; Joshua C. Klapow; JoAnne E. Epping-Jordan; Timothy R. Dresselhaus

1998-01-01

86

Parental and Child Health Beliefs and Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal interviews concerning health beliefs and behav iors were conducted with a parent and child in each of 250 households. Index scores were constructed for parental and child health beliefs, and these scores were entered, along with demographic variables, in a series of multiple regression analyses predicting child health beliefs and behaviors. The age of the child was the variable

T. E. Dielman; Sharon Leech; Marshall H. Becker; Irwin M. Rosenstock; W. J. Horvath; Susan M. Radius

1982-01-01

87

Toward the Integration of Education and Mental Health in Schools  

PubMed Central

Education and mental health integration will be advanced when the goal of mental health includes effective schooling and the goal of effective schools includes the healthy functioning of students. To build a solid foundation for this reciprocal agenda, especially within the zeitgeist of recent educational reforms, a change in the fundamental framework within which school mental health is conceptualized is needed. This change involves acknowledging a new set of priorities, which include: the use of naturalistic resources within schools to implement and sustain effective supports for students' learning and emotional/behavioral health; inclusion of integrated models to enhance learning and promote health; attention to improving outcomes for all students, including those with serious emotional/ behavioral needs; and strengthening the active involvement of parents. A strong research agenda to support these new priorities is essential. PMID:20309623

Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Kutash, Krista; Seidman, Edward

2010-01-01

88

Behavioral Health and Performance, Risk to Mitigation Strategy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This poster reviews the working of the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) group, which supports the research element which manages an integrated program for future space flight. The BHP operations group supports astronauts and their families in all phases of the International Space Station Mission, and post mission effects.

Leveton, Lauren; Whitemire, Alexandra

2009-01-01

89

INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, HUMAN HEALTH AND SOCIOECONOMICS  

EPA Science Inventory

This research involves collaboration with other ORD Labs and Centers, as well as external collaborators, to foster integration of assessment approaches used to evaluate human health and ecological risks and to demonstrate integrated environmental socioeconomic approaches. Part...

90

The interdependence of behavioral and somatic health: implications for conceptualizing health and measuring treatment outcomes  

PubMed Central

Purpose The interdependence of behavioral and somatic aspects of various health conditions warrants greater emphasis on an integrated care approach. Theory We propose that integrated approaches to health and wellness require comprehensive and empirically-valid outcome measures to assess quality of care. Method We discuss the transition from independent to integrated treatment approaches and provide examples of new systems for integrated assessment of treatment outcome. Results Evidence suggests that support for an independent treatment approach is waning and momentum is building towards more integrated care. In addition, research evidence suggests integrated care improves health outcomes, and both physicians and patients have favorable impressions of integrated care. Conclusions As treatment goals in the integrated perspective expand to take into account the intimate relationships among mental illness, overall health, and quality of life, clinicians need to develop outcome measures that are similarly comprehensive. Discussion Increased recognition, by researchers, providers, and insurers, of the interdependence between behavioral and physical health holds great promise for innovative treatments that could significantly improve patients' lives. PMID:17627294

LaBrie, Richard A.; LaPlante, Debi A.; Peller, Allyson J.; Christensen, Donald E.; Greenwood, Kristina L.; Straus, John H.; Garmon, Michael S.; Browne, Cheryl; Shaffer, Howard J.

2007-01-01

91

Association Between Health Beliefs and Health Behavior in Early Pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Folate-supplementation significantly reduces the risk of neural tube defects. The aim of this research was to reveal associations\\u000a between health beliefs and folate -supplementation as well as other elements of health behavior among Hungarian women early\\u000a in their pregnancy. Three-hundred and seven women in early pregnancy completed the second part of Health and Illness Scale.\\u000a Factor structure of health beliefs

Tamás Bödecs; Boldizsár Horváth; Enik? Szilágyi; Marietta Diffellné Németh; János Sándor

92

From school health to integrated health: expanding our children's public mental health system.  

PubMed

There is a substantial unmet need for mental health and substance abuse services in the USA. In 2009, the Institute of Medicine recommended increased early identification and intervention for young people with mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. With the expansion of integrated models in primary care settings, we now have the chance to improve outcomes for young people with mental health conditions, just as we have by improving the early identification and treatment of other preventable and/or treatable conditions such as obesity, asthma, or HIV. This is a moment of great opportunity to fundamentally change how young people access mental health care in our country. Through strategic integration of care, we can increase access to care for those who would not seek out mental health services because of the stigma or inconvenience of reaching out to a mental health provider; we can identify those who need care earlier and reduce the impact of mental illness on individuals, family, and community through early identification and treatment; and we can purposefully embed integration into provider training programs for both primary care and mental health providers to ensure sustainability. PMID:24912970

Adelsheim, Steven

2014-08-01

93

Integrating oral health into the interdisciplinary health sciences curriculum.  

PubMed

Oral health inequities for older adults warrant new models of interprofessional education and collaborative practice. The Innovations in Interprofessional Oral Health: Technology, Instruction, Practice and Service curricular model at Bouvé College of Health Sciences aims to transform health professions education and primary care practice to meet global and local oral health challenges. Innovations in simulation and experiential learning help to advance interprofessional education and integrate oral health care as an essential component of comprehensive primary health care. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly clinic is an exemplary model of patient-centeredness and interprofessional collaborative practice for addressing unmet oral health needs of its patient population. PMID:25201545

Dolce, Maria C; Aghazadeh-Sanai, Nona; Mohammed, Shan; Fulmer, Terry T

2014-10-01

94

Predictors of Health Behavior from a Behavior-Analytic Orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The frequencies of American college students' positive self-talk, emotional reactions, and other positive thoughts for engaging in five health behaviors were assessed and found to be highly correlated; they then were combined into a composite measure. A similar composite resulted for negative self-talk, emotional reactions, and other negative thoughts for engaging in unhealthy alternative behaviors. Effortfulness and pleasantness of the

John C. Birkimer; Perri B. Druen; Jerry W. Holland; Margaret Zingman

1996-01-01

95

Prioritizing integrated mHealth strategies for universal health coverage.  

PubMed

As countries strive toward universal health coverage, mobile wireless technologies-mHealth tools-in support of enumeration, registration, unique identification, and maintenance of health records will facilitate improved health system performance. Electronic forms and registry systems will enable routine monitoring of the coverage of essential interventions for individuals within relevant target populations. A cascading model is presented for prioritizing and operationalizing the role of integrated mHealth strategies. PMID:25214614

Mehl, Garrett; Labrique, Alain

2014-09-12

96

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Measures of Perceived Control, Mastery, and Empowerment Mastery. Pearlin and Schooler (1978) xClose Pearlin, L.I., and Schooler, C., (1978). The structure of coping. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 19, 2-21.

97

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Theories 2 Measures and Measurements 3 Similar Constructs 4 References 5 Measures Appendix 6 Published Examples Download Full Text (PDF) Other Constructs Barriers Dispositional Optimism Environments Illness

98

Performance Dynamics In Military Behavioral Health Clinics  

E-print Network

The prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other related behavioral health conditions among active duty service members and their families has grown over 100% in the past six years and are estimated to ...

Lyan, Dmitriy Eduard

99

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 General Definition 2 Use of the Construct in Health Behavior Theories 3 Measures and Measurements 4 Similar Constructs 5 Measurement and Methodological Issues 6 References 7 Measures Appendix 8 Published Examples Download Full Text

100

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Description & Theoretical Background 2 Use in Health Behavior Theories 3 Measures and Measurement 4 Similar Constructs 5 References 6 Measures Appendix 7 Published Examples Download Full Text (PDF) Other Constructs Barriers Dispositional

101

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 General Description & Theoretical Background 2 Definitions of Perceived Vulnerability in Health Behavior Theories 3 Measurement and Methodological Issues 4 Similar Constructs 5 References 6 Published Examples Download Full Text

102

Performance dynamics in military behavioral health clinics  

E-print Network

The prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other related behavioral health conditions among active duty service members and their families has grown over 100% in the past six years and are now estimated ...

Lyan, Dmitriy Eduard

2013-01-01

103

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Although BI does have very good predictive validity, it is still the case that it doesn't explain 70% to 80% of the variance in health behavior, which raises the methodological question (with theoretical implications) of why?

104

NISTIR 7988 Integrating Electronic Health Records  

E-print Network

NISTIR 7988 Integrating Electronic Health Records into Clinical Workflow: An Application of Human;NISTIR 7988 Integrating Electronic Health Records into Clinical Workflow: An Application of Human Factors Nicholas Gibson, Implementation Consultant, Itentive Healthcare Solutions Gary Gartner, M.D., M.S., User

105

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Two important factors when deciding which measures to use in health research would be the type of behavior being examined and the age of the population being assessed. For health-promoting behaviors, such as those related to diet and nutrition, medical regimen, sun protection, exercise, etc., standard BI measures should work well, especially if accompanied by implementation intentions—where and when to exercise, which diet to follow, or which sunscreen to use.

106

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The concept of perceived barriers has been used in behavioral medicine for a long time in one form or another. The earliest widespread use of the barriers concept was associated with the Health Belief Model, as described in the following section. Webster's dictionary defines a barrier as "something that impedes or separates". Interestingly, the concept of barriers to accomplishment of a goal or a specified health behavior is assumed to be so straightforward that it is often left undefined.

107

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies Health Services Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies ­ Health Services ­ Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-IHS-HLSV] College Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [14 Credit Hours] IHS 10000 Careers in Health Sciences and Human Credit Hours] Requirement: apply for graduation IHS 44010 Research Design and Statistical Methods

Sheridan, Scott

108

Chapter Five: Health-Compromising Behaviors  

E-print Network

Chapter Five: Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics substance abuse and dependence opponent causes of death Behaviors develop gradually rather than being acquired "all at once" Substance abuse of vulnerability #12;Substance abuse: Links Conflict with parents and family problems Impulsivity Stress Seems

Meagher, Mary

109

College Student Adjustment and Health Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the relationship between student adjustment theory and college student health behaviors. Specifically, this research examined first-year freshmen college student physical activity and nutrition behaviors and impact on adjustment to college (N = 37,564). The design for this study was a non-experimental "ex post facto"…

Hall, Lisa Anne

2010-01-01

110

Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

2012-01-01

111

Health Educators: Role Modeling and Smoking Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined cigarette smoking among health educators, their views about the effects of this behavior upon their audiences and beliefs about smoking in light of their professional role. Smokers and nonsmokers were significantly less included than former smokers to feel the role of health education is to convince people not to smoke. (Author/ABL)

Brennan, Andrew J. J.; Galli, Nicholas

1985-01-01

112

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Barriers are a central part of many theories of health behavior. The health belief model (HBM) was one of the earliest to prominently feature perceived barriers (Becker et al., 1979 xClose Becker, M. H., Maiman, L. A., Kirscht, J. P., Haefner, D. P., Drachman, R.

113

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Using normative beliefs in the context of the theory of reasoned action Historically, there has been a strong tendency for health researchers to use normative beliefs in the context of the theory of reasoned action to predict and influence health behaviors. One strategy has been as follows.

114

DCCPS: BRP: Health Behaviors Research Branch  

Cancer.gov

The Food Attitudes and Behaviors (FAB) Survey was developed by staff at NCI with the goal of evaluating a variety of factors that may be related to fruit and vegetable intake among adults. The FAB Survey contains 65 questions in 8 sections. FAB measures attitudes and beliefs, general health, shopping, fruit and vegetable consumption, eating behaviors, physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and food preferences. Conventional constructs include self-efficacy, barriers, social support, and knowledge of recommendations related to fruit and vegetable intake.

115

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Weinstein, N.D. (1982). Unrealistic optimism about susceptibility to health problems. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 5, 441-460. ) is the belief that one is less vulnerable to health problems in general, or to a specific health problem, than peers. People consistently show this tendency, especially when they perceive that the problem is controllable or rare and when they lack experience with the problem.

116

Feasibility and Preliminary Outcomes From a Pilot Study of an Integrated Health-Mental Health Promotion Program in School Mental Health Services  

PubMed Central

The prevalence of unmet health and mental health needs among youth has spurred the growing consensus to develop strategies that integrate services to promote overall well-being. This pilot study reports on the feasibility and outcomes of a theory-driven, family-focused, integrated health-mental health promotion program for underserved adolescents receiving school mental health services. Parent and adolescent assessments conducted prior to and following the brief, 6-session promotion program showed significant improvements in family support, youth self-efficacy, health behaviors, and mental health outcomes. Clinician reports contributed to a characterization of the feasibility, acceptability, and future recommendations for the integrated program. PMID:24297005

George, Melissa W.; Trumpeter, Nevelyn N.; Wilson, Dawn K.; McDaniel, Heather L.; Schiele, Bryn; Prinz, Ron; Weist, Mark D.

2014-01-01

117

Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

2013-01-01

118

Self-rated health in rural Appalachia: health perceptions are incongruent with health status and health behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Appalachia is characterized by poor health behaviors, poor health status, and health disparities. Recent interventions have\\u000a not demonstrated much success in improving health status or reducing health disparities in the Appalachian region. Since one's\\u000a perception of personal health precedes his or her health behaviors, the purpose of this project was to evaluate the self-rated\\u000a health of Appalachian adults in relation

Brian N Griffith; Gretchen D Lovett; Donald N Pyle; Wayne C Miller

2011-01-01

119

Health monitoring techniques using integrated sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Advanced high performance materials and components such as CFRP, GFRP and Smart Structures require improved testing techniques. The first part of our contribution deals with nonlinear vibrometry as a defect selective non-destructive testing method. This method uses higher harmonics (which are generated only at defects) to locate the defect by scanning across the surface of the sample with a laser interferometer. For input coupling of the elastic wave both an external (like ultrasound welding converters) or internal (integrated piezo actuators) excitation source can be used. The external detection tools are a microphone or a scanning laser vibrometer. With this technique, we characterized Smart Structures made of aerospace materials and composites with embedded piezoelectric actuators. The next part is about health monitoring techniques and diagnostics where integrated elements are used for excitation and detection. Thus, we monitored the transfer function over a large frequency spectrum and especially its changes caused e.g. by defects. Changes in the properties of structures by fatigue, impacts, and thermoplasticity have been successfully observed. Also the changes in reinforced plastics under tensile stress have been monitored. The results were correlated with destructive measurements. For health monitoring we also present the impedance analysis of embedded piezo ceramic sensors. A defect causes changes in the modal response of the hole structure and that effect can be detected using the phase angle of the electric impedance of the piezo element. Additionally some types of defects cause a non-linear behavior of the structure which was verified by extracting higher harmonics as a reaction to sinusoidal single frequency excitation.

Pfleiderer, Klaus; Stoessel, Rainer; Busse, Gerhard

2003-08-01

120

INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Interconnections between Human Health and Ecological Integrity emanates from a June 2000 Pellston Workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA. Jointly sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society of Toxicology (SOT), the workshop was motivated by...

121

EXAMINING THE LONGITUDINAL IMPACT OF ASSETS AND INCOME ON IMMIGRANT HEALTH BEHAVIORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The foreign born population is an integral part of U.S. society and continues to experience a steady numerical increase. This study uses longitudinal data to determine the effects of culture and acculturation on the health behaviors of the foreign born. Drawing from the behavioral model of health service utilization for vulnerable populations (Gelberg, Andersen, & Leake, 2000), the assets effects

Jacqueline Kagotho

2009-01-01

122

Integrating Health Belief Model and Technology Acceptance Model: An Investigation of Health-Related Internet Use  

PubMed Central

Background Today, people use the Internet to satisfy health-related information and communication needs. In Malaysia, Internet use for health management has become increasingly significant due to the increase in the incidence of chronic diseases, in particular among urban women and their desire to stay healthy. Past studies adopted the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Health Belief Model (HBM) independently to explain Internet use for health-related purposes. Although both the TAM and HBM have their own merits, independently they lack the ability to explain the cognition and the related mechanism in which individuals use the Internet for health purposes. Objective This study aimed to examine the influence of perceived health risk and health consciousness on health-related Internet use based on the HBM. Drawing on the TAM, it also tested the mediating effects of perceived usefulness of the Internet for health information and attitude toward Internet use for health purposes for the relationship between health-related factors, namely perceived health risk and health consciousness on health-related Internet use. Methods Data obtained for the current study were collected using purposive sampling; the sample consisted of women in Malaysia who had Internet access. The partial least squares structural equation modeling method was used to test the research hypotheses developed. Results Perceived health risk (?=.135, t 1999=2.676) and health consciousness (?=.447, t 1999=9.168) had a positive influence on health-related Internet use. Moreover, perceived usefulness of the Internet and attitude toward Internet use for health-related purposes partially mediated the influence of health consciousness on health-related Internet use (?=.025, t 1999=3.234), whereas the effect of perceived health risk on health-related Internet use was fully mediated by perceived usefulness of the Internet and attitude (?=.029, t 1999=3.609). These results suggest the central role of perceived usefulness of the Internet and attitude toward Internet use for health purposes for women who were health conscious and who perceived their health to be at risk. Conclusions The integrated model proposed and tested in this study shows that the HBM, when combined with the TAM, is able to predict Internet use for health purposes. For women who subjectively evaluate their health as vulnerable to diseases and are concerned about their health, cognition beliefs in and positive affective feelings about the Internet come into play in determining the use of health-related Internet use. Furthermore, this study shows that engaging in health-related Internet use is a proactive behavior rather than a reactive behavior, suggesting that TAM dimensions have a significant mediating role in Internet health management. PMID:25700481

2015-01-01

123

Health Risk Behaviors among California College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health risk behaviors among students attending 4-year colleges in California were examined. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey for College Students was administered in a two-stage (29 universities, 5,652 students) random sample. All campuses and 3,810 (69%) students participated in the survey. In the 30 days preceding the survey, 36.7% of the students had binged at least once while drinking; 25.3%

Kevin Patrick; Jennifer R. Covin; Mark Fulop; Karen Calfas; Chris Lovato

1997-01-01

124

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Because personal control is a central concept in many theories of human behavior and has generated extensive research, a considerable number of different control constructs and types of control have been studied. This can be helpful to a health behavior researcher who has a clear idea of what type of control is most relevant to a particular study, but can cause confusion for those who are less familiar with the area.

125

Toward greater integration of the health system  

Microsoft Academic Search

As demand for hospital and emergency services grows there will be pressure to improve the integration of primary, acute and continuing care services. Research on ambulatory sensitive care conditions suggests that a significant proportion of hospital use is potentially preventable by primary health and community care services. The desire for better health outcomes and reduced use of acute care suggests

Hal Swerissen

2002-01-01

126

Integrated System Health Management Development Toolkit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This software toolkit is designed to model complex systems for the implementation of embedded Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) capability, which focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, and predict future anomalies), and to provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) to control systems for safe and effective operation.

Figueroa, Jorge; Smith, Harvey; Morris, Jon

2009-01-01

127

Supervisory Guidance and Behavioral Integrity: Relationships With Employee Citizenship and Deviant Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the effects of supervisory guidance (providing instruction to employees) and behavioral integrity (a pattern of word-deed alignment) on employee organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and deviant behavior. Results revealed a pattern of Supervisory Guidance × Behavioral Integrity interaction effects, such that relationships between guidance and outcome variables were dependent on the level of behavioral integrity exhibited by supervisors.

Brian R. Dineen; Roy J. Lewicki; Edward C. Tomlinson

2006-01-01

128

An Integrated Approach for Gear Health Prognostics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, an integrated approach for gear health prognostics using particle filters is presented. The presented method effectively addresses the issues in applying particle filters to gear health prognostics by integrating several new components into a particle filter: (1) data mining based techniques to effectively define the degradation state transition and measurement functions using a one-dimensional health index obtained by whitening transform; (2) an unbiased l-step ahead RUL estimator updated with measurement errors. The feasibility of the presented prognostics method is validated using data from a spiral bevel gear case study.

He, David; Bechhoefer, Eric; Dempsey, Paula; Ma, Jinghua

2012-01-01

129

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

This section refers to articles that may be helpful. Some articles are classic publications describing the constructs in their theoretical contexts. Others are examples of research that has used the constructs to study health-related behaviors such as mammography, smoking, and nutrition.

130

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Given the limited scope of this review, I have focused on 1) barriers to cancer screening, 2) barriers to health behaviors related to cancer prevention and management-such as cigarette smoking cessation, exercise, and following a healthy eating pattern, and 3) a scale that uses response options not covered above.

131

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Rawl, S., Champion, V., Menon, U., Loehrer, P., Vance, G., Hunter, C., et al. (2001). Differences on health beliefs by stage of readiness to screen for colorectal cancer among first-degree relatives of affected individuals. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 23(Supplement), S202.

132

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Stage theories assume that behavior change involves movement through a sequence of discrete stages, that different variables influence different stage transitions, and that effective interventions need to be matched to stage (Sutton, 2005 xClose Sutton, S. (2005). Stage theories of health behaviour. In M.

133

Perceived Behavioral Integrity: Relationships with Employee Attitudes, Well-Being, and Absenteeism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relationships between the behavioral integrity of managers as perceived by employees and employee attitudes (job satisfaction\\u000a and life satisfaction), well-being (stress and health), and behaviors (absenteeism) were tested using data from the 2002 National\\u000a Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,820). Using multivariate and univariate analysis, perceived behavioral integrity (PBI) was positively related to job\\u000a and life satisfaction and negatively related

David J. Prottas

2008-01-01

134

Performance Improvement in Behavioral Health Care: Collateral Effects of Planned Treatment Integrity Observations as an Applied Example of Schedule-Induced Responding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With rising interest in the role of treatment integrity on student outcomes, research has primarily focused on isolating the techniques and procedures necessary to improve staff's acquisition and maintenance of adequate levels of integrity. Despite increasing numbers of publications on this topic, there has been little discussion of the variables…

Reed, Derek D.; Fienup, Daniel M.; Luiselli, James K.; Pace, Gary M.

2010-01-01

135

Factors Associated with Physician Discussion of Health Behaviors with Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behaviors developed in adolescence influence health later in life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of health care provider's discussion of health behaviors with overweight and non-overweight adolescents and identify demographic and health behaviors related to exercise, hours of television viewing, and weight issues associated with these discussions. A Cross sectional survey of urban adolescents was

Won S. Choi; Edward F. Ellerbeck; Harsohena Kaur; Niaman Nazir; Jasjit S. Ahluwalia

2006-01-01

136

Behavior change, health, and health disparities: An introduction  

PubMed Central

This Special Issue of Preventive Medicine (PM) focuses on behavior change, health, and health disparities, topics of fundamental importance to improving population health in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. While the U.S. health care system and those of other industrialized countries were developed to manage infectious disease and acute illnesses, it is chronic health conditions that most need to be understood and managed in the 21st century. The evidence is clear that personal behavior patterns like cigarette smoking and physical inactivity/obesity are critically important proximal causes of chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, site-specific cancers, type-2 diabetes) and as such behavior change will need to be a key component of their management. As the outstanding contributions to this Special Issue illustrate, substantial headway is being made in advancing knowledge including developing effective prevention and treatment strategies, with cigarette smoking being an excellent example that change is possible. That said, cigarette smoking continues to be responsible for approximately 480,000 premature deaths annually in the U.S. alone and 5 million globally. So more needs to be done, especially in economically disadvantaged populations. The same certainly applies to the challenges of the obesity epidemic, which of course is a more recent problem and understandably efforts to curtail it are in earlier stages of development. PMID:25456804

Higgins, Stephen T.

2015-01-01

137

Integrated Systems Health Management for Space Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is a system engineering discipline that addresses the design, development, operation, and lifecycle management of components, subsystems, vehicles, and other operational systems with the purpose of maintaining nominal system behavior and function and assuring mission safety and effectiveness under off-nominal conditions. NASA missions are often conducted in extreme, unfamiliar environments of space, using unique experimental spacecraft. In these environments, off-nominal conditions can develop with the potential to rapidly escalate into mission- or life-threatening situations. Further, the high visibility of NASA missions means they are always characterized by extraordinary attention to safety. ISHM is a critical element of risk mitigation, mission safety, and mission assurance for exploration. ISHM enables: In-space maintenance and repair; a) Autonomous (and automated) launch abort and crew escape capability; b) Efficient testing and checkout of ground and flight systems; c) Monitoring and trending of ground and flight system operations and performance; d) Enhanced situational awareness and control for ground personnel and crew; e) Vehicle autonomy (self-sufficiency) in responding to off-nominal conditions during long-duration and distant exploration missions; f) In-space maintenance and repair; and g) Efficient ground processing of reusable systems. ISHM concepts and technologies may be applied to any complex engineered system such as transportation systems, orbital or planetary habitats, observatories, command and control systems, life support systems, safety-critical software, and even the health of flight crews. As an overarching design and operational principle implemented at the system-of-systems level, ISHM holds substantial promise in terms of affordability, safety, reliability, and effectiveness of space exploration missions.

Uckun, Serdar

2005-01-01

138

Folk belief, illness behavior and mental health in Taiwan.  

PubMed

In this paper, an overview of the literature relevant to the issues of illness behavior and help-seeking behavior in relation to mental health and illness, focusing on the Taiwan area is presented. Arguments for the prioritization and appreciation of the folk perspective of mental illness and health are addressed. The traditional medical beliefs in the Chinese culture that emphasize integration and continuity, instead of differentiation, of/between body and mind, person and nature, nature and super-nature, the visible (with form) and the invisible (without form), and yang and yin, have laid the basis for the theoretical framework of somatization as normative illness behavior rather than psychologization, and also dissociation as normative illness behavior rather than repression. A case report on folk psychotherapy is given here to illustrate the argument. The continuum models illustrated in this paper, either the shen-kuei syndrome in its broad sense extending from koro to neurasthenia, frigophobia or the spirit possession syndrome in its broad sense extending from the pathological and peripheral (Hsieh-ping) to the normative and ritual (shamanism), could well remind us of the powerful influence of the folk and popular contexts of culture that underlie illness behavior in relation to mental health in Taiwan. PMID:9607258

Wen, J K

1998-03-01

139

The Effects of Widowhood on Physical and Mental Health, Health Behaviors, and Health Outcomes: The Women's Health Initiative  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether widowhood was associated with physical and mental health, health behaviors, and health outcomes using a cross-sectional (N = 72,247) and prospective (N = 55,724) design in women aged 50–79 years participating in the Women's Health Initiative observational study (85.4% White). At baseline, married women reported better physical and mental health and generally better health behaviors than

Sara Wilcox; Kelly R. Evenson; Aaron Aragaki; Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller; Charles P. Mouton; Barbara Lee Loevinger

2003-01-01

140

Structure of Health Risk Behavior Among High School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors test the contention of R. Jessor's (1977) problem behavior theory that adolescent health risk behaviors comprise a single behavioral syndrome. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) and cluster analysis are used to analyze data from a statewide survey of high school students' (n = 5,537) health risk behaviors. A classical MDS analysis was calculated to test the dimensionality of the behaviors.

Karen Basen-Engquist; Elizabeth W. Edmundson; Guy S. Parcel

1996-01-01

141

Estimates of Preventability and Their Relation to Health Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It was hypothesized that a person's estimates of the preventability of health problems would be related to health behaviors such that a person who engages in healthful behavior should make higher estimates of preventability. A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between causal attribution of health problems and health-related…

Poole, Gary D.

142

Integration of basic sciences in health's courses.  

PubMed

Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and compares failure rate, global final grade, approved student final grade, grade distribution and students' satisfaction with teacher conduction between integrated curriculum and traditional learning in health courses from Anhembi Morumbi University-a private institution from Brazil. Comparison between integrated and traditional curriculum was based on students' records obtained from first-year health sciences students. A total of 1,697 records from 2005 to 2007 (nonintegrated curriculum) and 785 records from 2008 (integrated curriculum) were selected for this study and they were necessary to get information about students' grades. Moreover, a questionnaire was applied in order to cover student's satisfaction with teacher conduction. The data presented in this study indicated that the integrated curriculum based on PBL was related to an improvement in student's grades and satisfaction compared with traditional teaching. We believe that the effectiveness in health education will be a combination of "classical" presentation of contents associated to actively involved students in the educational process and methodology based on problems in order to create the stimulus for the undergraduates continue to integrate basic and clinical investigation. PMID:22615229

Azzalis, L A; Giavarotti, L; Sato, S N; Barros, N M T; Junqueira, V B C; Fonseca, F L A

2012-01-01

143

Community Health Workers in Brazil's Unified Health System: A Framework of their Praxis and Contributions to Patient Health Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Community Health Workers (CHWs) play a pivotal role in primary care, serving as liaisons between community members and medical providers. However, the growing reliance of health care systems worldwide on CHWs has outpaced research explaining their praxis – how they combine indigenous and technical knowledge, overcome challenges and impact patient outcomes. This paper thus articulates the CHW Praxis and Patient Health Behavior Framework. Such a framework is needed to advance research on CHW impact on patient outcomes and to advance CHW training. The project that originated this framework followed Community-Based Participatory Research principles. A team of U.S.-Brazil research partners, including CHWs, worked together from conceptualization of the study to dissemination of its findings. The framework is built on an integrated conceptual foundation including learning/teaching and individual behavior theories. The empirical base of the framework comprises in-depth interviews with 30 CHWs in Brazil's Unified Health System, Mesquita, Rio de Janeiro. Data collection for the project which originated this report occurred in 2008–10. Semi-structured questions examined how CHWs used their knowledge/skills; addressed personal and environmental challenges; and how they promoted patient health behaviors. This study advances an explanation of how CHWs use self-identified strategies – i.e., empathic communication and perseverance – to help patients engage in health behaviors. Grounded in our proposed framework, survey measures can be developed and used in predictive models testing the effects of CHW praxis on health behaviors. Training for CHWs can explicitly integrate indigenous and technical knowledge in order for CHWs to overcome contextual challenges and enhance service delivery. PMID:22305469

Pinto, Rogério M.; da Silva, Sueli Bulhões; Soriano, Rafaela

2012-01-01

144

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Selected 2011 National Health Risk Behaviors and Health Outcomes by Sex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

145

A Qualitative Study Exploring Facilitators for Improved Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Programs: Mental Health Service Users' Perspectives  

PubMed Central

Objective. Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20–25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study sought to potentially enhance health initiatives by exploring (1) facilitators that help mental health service users engage in better health behaviors and (2) the types of health programs mental health service users want to develop. Methods. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups was conducted with 37 mental health service users attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center, in Northern British Columbia, Canada. Results. Four major facilitator themes were identified: (1) factors of empowerment, self-value, and personal growth; (2) the need for social support; (3) pragmatic aspects of motivation and planning; and (4) access. Participants believed that engaging with programs of physical activity, nutrition, creativity, and illness support would motivate them to live more healthily. Conclusions and Implications for Practice. Being able to contribute to health behavior programs, feeling valued and able to experience personal growth are vital factors to engage mental health service users in health programs. Clinicians and health care policy makers need to account for these considerations to improve success of health improvement initiatives for this population. PMID:24895667

Graham, Candida; de Leeuw, Sarah; Griffiths, Brenda

2014-01-01

146

Understanding Differences in Health Behaviors by Education  

PubMed Central

Using a variety of data sets from two countries, we examine possible explanations for the relationship between education and health behaviors, known as the education gradient. We show that income, health insurance, and family background can account for about 30 percent of the gradient. Knowledge and measures of cognitive ability explain an additional 30 percent. Social networks account for another 10 percent. Our proxies for discounting, risk aversion, or the value of future do not account for any of the education gradient, and neither do personality factors such as a sense of control of oneself or over one’s life. PMID:19963292

Cutler, David M.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

2009-01-01

147

SOURCE REDUCTION BEHAVIOR AS AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE IMPACT OF A PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION CAMPAIGN IN AN INTEGRATED VECTOR MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR THE ASIAN TIGER MOSQUITO  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3)...

148

Assuring public health professionals are prepared for the future: the UAB public health integrated core curriculum.  

PubMed Central

In response to calls to improve public health education and our own desire to provide a more relevant educational experience to our Master of Public Health students, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Public Health designed, developed, and instituted a fully integrated public health core curriculum in the fall of 2001. This curriculum combines content from discipline-specific courses in biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology, health administration, and the social and behavioral sciences, and delivers it in a 15 credit hour, team-taught course designed in modules covering such topics as tobacco, infectious diseases, and emergency preparedness. Weekly skills-building sessions increase student competence in data analysis and interpretation, communication, ethical decision-making, community-based interventions, and policy and program planning. Evaluations affirm that the integrated core is functioning as intended: as a means to provide critical content in the core disciplines in their applied context. As public health education continues to be debated, the UAB public health integrated core curriculum can serve as one model for providing quality instruction that is highly relevant to professional practice. PMID:16224982

Petersen, Donna J.; Hovinga, Mary E.; Pass, Mary Ann; Kohler, Connie; Oestenstad, R. Kent; Katholi, Charles

2005-01-01

149

Integrated women’s health program  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed Residents in family medicine residency programs require comprehensive training in women’s health best practices and resources. Objective of program To provide a framework for the development and implementation of an integrated women’s health curriculum for family medicine residency programs. Program description Objectives for each element of the program were the basis for planning the curriculum. Residents experienced primary care obstetrics clinic and on-call shifts, 24-hour off-service on-call shifts, women’s health horizontals, and a women’s health workshop, all of which were integrated into a 6-month family medicine block time. Residents worked with family physicians, obstetricians and gynecologists, and multidisciplinary health care team members in clinical settings. Teaching objectives were aligned with CanMEDS–Family Medicine core competencies. Creation of this program and its implementation were accomplished by dedicated teachers, administrators, and faculty members involved in curriculum planning. Conclusion The program design and implementation resulted in an improved comprehensive women’s health training experience for residents, which was integrated into a family medicine context. Ongoing evaluation and innovation will serve to continually improve this program. PMID:25642486

Koppula, Sudha

2014-01-01

150

The Effect of Individual Factors on Health Behaviors Among College Students: The Mediating Effects of eHealth Literacy  

PubMed Central

Background College students’ health behavior is a topic that deserves attention. Individual factors and eHealth literacy may affect an individual’s health behaviors. The integrative model of eHealth use (IMeHU) provides a parsimonious account of the connections among the digital divide, health care disparities, and the unequal distribution and use of communication technologies. However, few studies have explored the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors, and IMeHU has not been empirically investigated. Objective This study examines the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors using IMeHU. Methods The Health Behavior Scale is a 12-item instrument developed to measure college students’ eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. The eHealth Literacy Scale is a 12-item instrument designed to measure college students’ functional, interactive, and critical eHealth literacy. A nationally representative sample of 525 valid college students in Taiwan was surveyed. A questionnaire was administered to collect background information about participants’ health status, degree of health concern, major, and the frequency with which they engaged in health-related discussions. This study used Amos 6.0 to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to identify the best measurement models for the eHealth Literacy Scale and the Health Behavior Scale. We then conducted a multiple regression analysis to examine the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors. Additionally, causal steps approach was used to explore indirect (mediating) effects and Sobel tests were used to test the significance of the mediating effects. Results The study found that perceptions of better health status (t520=2.14-6.12, P<.001-.03) and greater concern for health (t520=2.58-6.95, P<.001-.003) influenced college students’ development of 3 dimensions of eHealth literacy and adoption of healthy eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. Moreover, eHealth literacy played an intermediary role in the association between individual factors and health behaviors (Sobel test=2.09-2.72, P<.001-.03). Specifically, higher levels of critical eHealth literacy promoted students’ health status and their practice of multiple positive health behaviors, including eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. Conclusions Because this study showed that eHealth literacy mediates the association between individual factors and health behaviors, schools should aim to enhance students’ eHealth literacy and promote their health behaviors to help them achieve high levels of critical eHealth literacy. Although some of the study’s hypotheses were not supported in this study, the factors that influence health behaviors are complex and interdependent. Therefore, a follow-up study should be conducted to further explore how these factors influence one another. PMID:25499086

Chiang, ChiaHsun

2014-01-01

151

The importance of context in understanding behavior and promoting health.  

PubMed

Behavior, the roles of behavior in health, health promotion, health, quality of life, and death are all context-dependent. This paper begins with a review of behavioral and ecological models, emphasizing their shared emphasis on context. It then turns to genetics and the importance of contexts in understanding genetic influences. Jumping from genes to geography, it examines how spatial analysis provides both a model and framework for considering contextual influence. Continuing with analytic models, it returns to genetics, and considers how it provide models for integrating our understanding of broad social and community influences. The paper extends this thinking through multilevel analysis and proposes "analytic multilevel designs" as a way of studying "context focused interventions" (as opposed to context independent interventions for which conventional experimental designs are often well-suited). It closes with reflections on ways in which we cultivate and extend our knowledge base and on the intellectual contexts of positivism and postmodernism that surround behavioral and ecological thinking. PMID:18347900

Fisher, Edwin B

2008-02-01

152

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Social Pressure Theory. A development in social learning theory gave more emphasis to the role of peers, and posited that adoption of a health risk behavior (e.g., trying cigarettes) was influenced by explicit social pressure from peers in group contexts. Here it was suggested that peers might provide offers of cigarettes and then apply social pressure, through taunts or criticism, to teens who did not immediately go along with the offers (Evans, 1984 xClose Evans, R. I. (1984).

153

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Victoria Champion is a Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research at Indiana University School of Nursing and Program Leader for the Cancer Prevention and Control program of the Indiana University Cancer Center. She has published widely on health behaviors related to cancer screening as well as development of instruments to measure theoretical constructs related to screening. Dr. Champion has been NIH funded since 1984 and her program of research has resulted in identifying cost-effective interventions to increase mammography screening.

154

Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach  

PubMed Central

Background The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. Methods A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Results Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Conclusion Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices. Multi-national research may provide guidance about how to scale up eye health interventions that are integrated into primary health systems. PMID:23506686

2013-01-01

155

Project Summary for: Integrating and Mapping Community Health Assessment Information  

E-print Network

Project Summary for: Integrating and Mapping Community Health Assessment Information Grant Duration health information from a variety of data sources to support community health improvement planning in Wisconsin. Partners prioritized and developed these "Maps for CHIPPs" (Community Health Improvement

156

Integrated health systems: promise and performance.  

PubMed

Today's ¿virtually¿ and vertically integrated health systems increasingly are much better positioned than the multihospital systems of the 1980s to respond to the healthcare challenges of the twenty-first century. The authors argue that the control of the health services ¿value chain¿ will devolve naturally to those market players who have the comparative advantage in coordinating the flows of information, human, and physical resources along the continuum of services required to improve and maintain the health of populations. Available evidence does not render a clear verdict on whether superior performance is generated by the virtual integration of strategic alliances and affiliations or the vertical integration represented by unified single ownership of all system components. While inertia, acute care-based ¿mental models,¿ weak incentives, and insufficiently developed information systems represent important barriers to the creation and sustainability of integrated systems, the authors argue that system evolution is occurring and offers promise of enhanced efficiency and patient benefit. However, the full potential of these systems will only be realized as they accept explicit accountability for meeting the health needs of their local communities. The transition from ¿covered lives¿ to accountability for the community population is crucial. PMID:10159629

Conrad, D A; Shortell, S M

1996-01-01

157

Associations Between Attachment Representations and Health Behaviors in Late Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we tested the associations among attachment ratings and health behaviors by relationship status. For individuals in relationships, attachment security was associated positively with health promotion and quality sleep and negatively with risk behaviors; fearfulness was associated positively with risk behaviors. With the exception of sleep behaviors, associations with security and fearfulness were reversed for single participants. Associations

Elaine Scharfe; Deborah Eldredge

2001-01-01

158

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

159

The development of health protective behaviors among college students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses structural equation modeling and a panel design to explain participation in health protective behavior (HPB) among college students. The direct, indirect, and total effects of gender, social influences (parental and peer behavior), social attachments (activity involvement, social support, and romantic involvement), social triggers (personal health, acute illnesses, and personal or family health crisis), health value, and effort

Gregory L. Weiss; Daniel L. Larsen; W. Kevin Baker

1996-01-01

160

Instrumentation in Health Education and the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey (AHRBS) Instrument  

E-print Network

This journal article format dissertation examined aspects of survey research methodology in health education. In the first study, the author examined articles published in Health Education and Behavior, Health Education Journal, Health Education...

Smith, Matthew L.

2010-01-14

161

Providing primary health care through integrated microfinance and health services in Latin America.  

PubMed

The simultaneous burdens of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in middle-income countries. The poor are at particular risk, with lower access to health care and higher rates of avoidable mortality. Integrating health-related services with microfinance has been shown to improve health knowledge, behaviors, and access to appropriate health care. However, limited evidence is available on effects of fully integrating clinical health service delivery alongside microfinance services through large scale and sustained long-term programs. Using a conceptual model of health services access, we examine supply- and demand-side factors in a microfinance client population receiving integrated services. We conduct a case study using data from 2010 to 2012 of the design of a universal screening program and primary care services provided in conjunction with microfinance loans by Pro Mujer, a women's development organization in Latin America. The program operates in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru. We analyze descriptive reports and administrative data for measures related to improving access to primary health services and management of chronic diseases. We find provision of preventive care is substantial, with an average of 13% of Pro Mujer clients being screened for cervical cancer each year, 21% receiving breast exams, 16% having a blood glucose measurement, 39% receiving a blood pressure measurement, and 46% having their body mass index calculated. This population, with more than half of those screened being overweight or obese and 9% of those screened having elevated glucose measures, has major risk factors for diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease without intervention. The components of the Pro Mujer health program address four dimensions of healthcare access: geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, and acceptability. Significant progress has been made to meet basic health needs, but challenges remain to ensure that health care provided is of reliable quality to predictably improve health outcomes over time. PMID:25792337

Geissler, Kimberley H; Leatherman, Sheila

2015-05-01

162

The Implications of Death for Health: A Terror Management Health Model for Behavioral Health Promotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces a terror management health model (TMHM). The model integrates disparate health and social psychology literatures to elucidate how the conscious and nonconscious awareness of death can influence the motivational orientation that is most operative in the context of health decisions. Three formal propositions are presented.…

Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie

2008-01-01

163

AIDS, empire, and public health behaviorism.  

PubMed

Much of the current health approach to designing HIV/AIDS interventions in resource-poor settings involves behavior-change initiatives, particularly those adopting education-based and "culturally competent" frameworks for the reduction of HIV-associated "risk behaviors." This article reviews the evidence and social assumptions behind this approach to preventing HIV transmission, and argues that these approaches are often inadequate or misguided, particularly in their conflation of the concept of "culture" with social circumstances. By analyzing the socioeconomic circumstances that constrain individual agency, and by combining data from prevention literature with analyses of international trade agreements and the controversies over antiretroviral drug distribution, the author argues that the movement of capital and the maintenance of inequality are central to the problems associated with behavior-change initiatives and must be addressed through new paradigms in order to respond appropriately to the global AIDS pandemic. Hardt and Negri's paradigm of "Empire"--that is, examining the system through which social inequalities are maintained not only between countries but also within them--offers prospects for the design of new interventions and targets for public health workers and social movements. PMID:15088679

Basu, Sanjay

2004-01-01

164

Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Work-Rest Cycles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BHP Program Element Goal: Identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration and return to terrestrial life. BHP Requirements: a) Characterize and assess risks (e.g., likelihood and consequences). b) Develop tools and technologies to prevent, monitor, and treat adverse outcomes. c) Inform standards. d) Develop technologies to: 1) reduce risks and human systems resource requirements (e.g., crew time, mass, volume, power) and 2) ensure effective human-system integration across exploration mission.

Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra

2011-01-01

165

Putting It Together: Finding Success in Behavior Change Through Integration of Services  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The purpose of this analysis and commentary was to explore the rationale for an integrated approach, within and outside the office, to help patients pursue healthy behaviors. METHODS We examined the role of integration, building on (1) patterns observed in a limited qualitative evaluation of 17 Prescription for Health projects, (2) several national policy initiatives, and (3) selected research literature on behavior change. RESULTS The interventions evaluated in Prescription for Health not only identified unhealthy behaviors and advised change, but also enabled patients to access information at home, use self-help methods, obtain intensive counseling, and receive follow-up. Few practices can replicate such a model with the limited staff and resources available in their offices. Comprehensive assistance can be offered to patients, however, by integrating what is feasible in the office with additional services available through the community and information media. CONCLUSIONS Blending diverse clinical and community services into a cohesive system requires an infrastructure that fosters integration. Such a system provides the comprehensive model on which the quality of both health promotion and chronic illness care depend. Integrating clinical and community services is only the first step toward the ideal of a citizen-centered approach, in which diverse sectors within the community—health care among them—work together to help citizens sustain healthy behaviors. The integration required to fulfill this ideal faces logistical challenges but may be the best way for a fragmented health care system to fully serve its patients. PMID:16049077

Woolf, Steven H.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Krist, Alex; Bartz, Claudia; Flocke, Susan A.; Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Rothemich, Stephen F.; Wald, Ellen R.

2005-01-01

166

Outcome mapping for health system integration.  

PubMed

Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care. PMID:23526058

Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

2013-01-01

167

Outcome mapping for health system integration  

PubMed Central

Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care. PMID:23526058

Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

2013-01-01

168

Diabetes, Diet-Health Behavior, and Obesity  

PubMed Central

High-quality diets play an important role in diabetes prevention. Appropriate dietary adherence can improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, and thus contribute to lifestyle improvement. However, previous research suggests that dietary adherence is arguably among the most difficult cornerstones of diabetes management. The objectives of this study are (1) to estimate whether and to what extent individuals diagnosed with diabetes show significant differences in diet quality [healthy eating index (HEI)] compared to healthy individuals, (2) to quantify whether and to what extent diabetics experience significantly higher outcomes of body mass index (BMI), and (3) to estimate whether and to what extent dietary supplementation impacts diabetes patient’s diet quality and/or BMI outcomes. We use data from the 2007–2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The NHANES is the primary, randomized, and nationally representative survey used to assess the health and nutritional status in the U.S. We apply propensity score matching (PSM) to account for selection bias and endogeneity between self-reported diet and health behavir (treatment) and BMI outcomes. We control for an individual’s BMI as to capture the impact of past dietary behavior in its impact on HEI. Matching results suggest that regular dietary supplement consumption is associated with significant lower BMI outcomes of almost 1?kg/m2. The close relationship between diabetes and obesity has been at the center of the diet-health policy debate across Canada and the U.S. Knowledge about this linkage may help to improve the understanding of the factors that impact dietary choices and their overall health outcomes, which may lead to a more efficient and effective promotion of dietary guidelines, healthy food choices, and targeted consumer health and lifestyle policies. PMID:25852643

Anders, Sven; Schroeter, Christiane

2015-01-01

169

Changing Health Behavior in Youth: Plus 40 Years  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For those in health education, the year 1969 marked the debut of "School Health Review," the forerunner to the current "American Journal of Health Education." The inaugural issue of "School Health Review," in September of 1969 included the article, "Changing Health behavior in Youth," by Dr. Godfrey M. Hochbaum. This article reviews the 1969…

Valois, Robert F.; Zullig, Keith J.; Young, Michael; Kammermann, Sandra K.

2010-01-01

170

Department of Health and Behavior Studies Teachers College  

E-print Network

population-wide health status cannot be achieved without learning and literacy skills. Thus, the mission health and literacy; Health Studies, which focuses on health promotion and disease preventionHBS Department of Health and Behavior Studies Teachers College Columbia University Annual End

Qian, Ning

171

System Justification, Mental Health, and Behavior Among Disadvantaged Mothers and Their Children  

PubMed Central

Integrating social psychological research with work in child development, this study explored relationships between system justification (Jost & Banaji, 1994), maternal mental health and child externalizing behavior among low-income immigrants and racial/ethnic minorities. Dominican, Mexican and African-American families (N = 239) were assessed when children were 14-, 24- and 36-months old. SEM was used to explore longitudinal relationships between maternal system justification and mental health and associations with child behavior. Earlier mental health was negatively related to later system justification and system justification was negatively related to children’s externalizing behavior. Implications for system justification theory, child development and immigration are discussed. PMID:25035527

Godfrey, Erin B.

2014-01-01

172

Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

2007-01-01

173

Multiple Health Behavior Change Research: An Introduction and Overview  

PubMed Central

In 2002, the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s special interest group on Multiple Health Behavior Change was formed. The group focuses on the interrelationships among health behaviors and interventions designed to promote change in more than one health behavior at a time. Growing evidence suggests the potential for multiple-behavior interventions to have a greater impact on public health than single-behavior interventions. However, there exists surprisingly little understanding of some very basic principles concerning multiple health behavior change (MHBC) research. This paper presents the rationale and need for MHBC research and interventions, briefly reviews the research base, and identifies core conceptual and methodological issues unique to this growing area. The prospects of MHBC for the health of individuals and populations are considerable. PMID:18319098

Prochaska, Judith J.; Spring, Bonnie; Nigg, Claudio R.

2008-01-01

174

Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Patterns Are Associated With Selected Adolescent Health Risk Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE. Little is known about how physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior, and various adolescent health risk behaviors are associated. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between PA and sedentary behavior patterns and an array of risk behaviors, including leading causes of adolescent morbidity\\/mortality. METHODS. Nationally representative self-reported data were collected (National Lon- gitudinal Study of Adolescent Health;

Melissa C. Nelson; Penny Gordon-Larsen

2009-01-01

175

Registered Nurses’ and Behavior Health Associates’ Responses to Violent Inpatient Interactions on Behavioral Health Units  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Violence carried out by patients against nursing staff unsettles and threatens coworkers as they care for individuals admitted to inpatient psychiatric units. OBJECTIVE: This study explored nursing staff’s individual and group responses to violent incidents performed by patients against caregivers. DESIGN: This qualitative study used focus groups to collect data from professional nurses and behavioral health associations (N =

Patti Rager Zuzelo; Staci Silver Curran; Mary Ann Zeserman

2012-01-01

176

Time series clustering analysis of health-promoting behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Health promotion must be emphasized to achieve the World Health Organization goal of health for all. Since the global population is aging rapidly, ComCare elder health-promoting service was developed by the Taiwan Institute for Information Industry in 2011. Based on the Pender health promotion model, ComCare service offers five categories of health-promoting functions to address the everyday needs of seniors: nutrition management, social support, exercise management, health responsibility, stress management. To assess the overall ComCare service and to improve understanding of the health-promoting behavior of elders, this study analyzed health-promoting behavioral data automatically collected by the ComCare monitoring system. In the 30638 session records collected for 249 elders from January, 2012 to March, 2013, behavior patterns were identified by fuzzy c-mean time series clustering algorithm combined with autocorrelation-based representation schemes. The analysis showed that time series data for elder health-promoting behavior can be classified into four different clusters. Each type reveals different health-promoting needs, frequencies, function numbers and behaviors. The data analysis result can assist policymakers, health-care providers, and experts in medicine, public health, nursing and psychology and has been provided to Taiwan National Health Insurance Administration to assess the elder health-promoting behavior.

Yang, Chi-Ta; Hung, Yu-Shiang; Deng, Guang-Feng

2013-10-01

177

Lifestyle and Clinical Health Behaviors and PSA Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the association of lifestyle and clinical health behaviors with prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests. The study used cross-sectional data from the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). We used Stata 8.0 to take into account the complex sample design in analyses. Both lifestyle and clinical health behaviors

Norris, Cynthia; McFall, Stephanie

2006-01-01

178

Integrated care: meeting mental health needs after the Gulf oil spill.  

PubMed

This column describes an integrated behavioral health initiative in primary care clinics in Louisiana parishes affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Louisiana Mental and Behavioral Health Capacity Project is an integral part of the Gulf Region Health Outreach Program and is funded from the Deepwater Horizon Medical Benefits Class Action Settlement. Using a public health approach, the Department of Psychiatry of the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center developed an interprofessional collaboration model of care to provide culturally tailored and time-sensitive on-site and telemedicine services to adults and children affected by the disaster. Results indicate a high level of acceptance of the services and reductions in both mental health symptoms and general medical symptoms. Primary care clinic staff also report increased confidence and resilience to meet future disasters. The approach could be used by communities at risk of disasters and by rural communities with limited mental health resources. PMID:24584523

Osofsky, Howard J; Osofsky, Joy D; Wells, John H; Weems, Carl

2014-03-01

179

Integrated Behavior Change Techniques for Alcoholics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following behavior modification procedures were studied with hospitalized alcoholics: videotaped self-confrontation of drunken behavior, discrimination training for blood alcohol concentration, aversion training for overconsumption, discriminated avoidance practice, alcohol education, alternatives training, and behavior counseling. Some…

Vogler, Roger E.; And Others

1975-01-01

180

Perceived control in relation to socioeconomic and behavioral resources for health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perceived control is a personality characteristic that contributes to well-being, but few studies have attempted to integrate the functions of perceived control with those of other determinants of health. This research tested two hypotheses about the functions of perceived control: (a) individual differences in perceived control would account for socioeconomic differences in self-rated health status; (b) performance of health-related behaviors

Daniel S. Bailis; Alexander Segall; Michael J. Mahon; Judith G. Chipperfield; Elaine M. Dunn

2001-01-01

181

Early Prevention of Severe Neurodevelopmental Behavior Disorders: An Integration  

PubMed Central

There is a very substantial literature over the past 50 years on the advantages of early detection and intervention on the cognitive, communicative, and social-emotional development of infants and toddlers at risk for developmental delay due to premature birth or social disadvantage. Most of these studies excluded children with severe delays or other predisposing conditions, such as genetic or brain disorders. Many studies of children with biological or socio-developmental risk suggest that behavior disorders appear as early as three years and persist into adulthood if not effectively treated. By contrast, little is known about the infants and toddlers with established risk for severe delays, who make up a significant proportion of the population with dual diagnoses later in life. In the past decade, there has been a growing interest in early detection and intervention with children aged birth to three years, e.g. the P.L.99-457, Part C Birth-Three population, who may have disabilities and severe behavior problems, e.g. aggression, self-injury, and repetitive stereotyped behaviors. The available research is scattered in the behavior analytic literature, in the child development literature, as well as in the child mental health and psychiatry literature, the developmental disability literature, the animal modeling literature, and the genetics literature. The goal of this introductory overview is to integrate these literatures, by cross-referencing members of these various groups who have worked in this field, in order to provide the reader with an integrated picture of what is known and of future directions that need more research. PMID:23139733

Schroeder, Stephen R.; Courtemanche, Andrea

2012-01-01

182

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

183

The Importance of Context in Understanding Behavior and Promoting Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavior, the roles of behavior in health, health promotion, health, quality of life, and death are all context-dependent.\\u000a This paper begins with a review of behavioral and ecological models, emphasizing their shared emphasis on context. It then\\u000a turns to genetics and the importance of contexts in understanding genetic influences. Jumping from genes to geography, it\\u000a examines how spatial analysis provides

Edwin B. Fisher

2008-01-01

184

DCCPS: Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior: Faculty  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Jeffrey Fisher is a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Connecticut and the founding Director of its Center for Health, Intervention, and Prevention. He has published extensively on factors associated with HIV risk behavior and has done conceptual and empirical work in the area of increasing HIV preventive behavior, as well as health behavior change in other domains. He has designed, implemented, and evaluated several effective HIV risk behavior change interventions in multiple populations.

185

Social disparities, health risk behaviors, and cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Overall cancer incidence rates decreased in the most recent time period in both men and women, largely due to improvements in surgical therapeutic approaches (tertiary prevention) and screening programs (secondary prevention), but differences in cancer incidence and survival according to socioeconomic status are documented worldwide. Health risk behaviors, defined as habits or practices that increase an individual’s likelihood of harmful health outcomes, are thought to mediate such inequalities. Discussion Obesity has been related with increased cancer incidence and mortality due to imbalance of leptin and adiponectin which are connected to activation of PI3K, MAPK, and STAT3 pathways and decreasing insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and mTOR signaling via activation of 5 AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), respectively. Physical activity has been associated to prevent cancer by the aforementioned obesity-related mechanisms, but also increasing level of circulating vitamin D, which has been related to lower risk of several cancers, and increasing prostaglandin F2a and reducing prostaglandin E2, which are both related with cancer prevention and promotion, respectively. A large number of different substances may induce themselves a direct cytotoxicity and mutagenic action on cells by smoking, whereas alcohol promote immune suppression, the delay of DNA repair, inhibition of the detoxification of carcinogens, the production of acetaldehyde, and the contribution to abnormal DNA methylation. The combined smoking and alcohol drinking habits have been shown to increase cancer risk by smoke action of increasing the acetaldehyde burden following alcohol consumption and alcohol action of enhancing the activation of various procarcinogens contained in tobacco smoke. Conclusions Interventions at the social level may be done to increase awareness about cancer risks and promote changing in unhealthy behaviors. PMID:24267900

2013-01-01

186

Help Preferences among Employees Who Wish to Change Health Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine the help preferences of employees in the Danish police who had acknowledged that they wished to change health behaviors. In addition, we explored whether preferences varied with age, gender, chronic health concerns, positive expectations of good health, and past experiences of in-house health promotion services (i.e.,…

Persson, Roger; Cleal, Bryan; Jakobsen, Mette Øllgaard; Villadsen, Ebbe; Andersen, Lars L.

2014-01-01

187

Can Marriage Reduce Risky Health Behavior for African-Americans?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper estimates whether marriage can improve health outcomes for African-Americans through changes in risky health behaviors\\u000a like smoking, drinking, and drug use. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health and propensity\\u000a score matching methodology to account for the potential selection bias, the results show that marriage does lead to a reduction\\u000a in risky health behaviors, specifically

Mir M. AliOlugbenga Ajilore; Olugbenga Ajilore

2011-01-01

188

Rethinking global health research: towards integrative expertise  

PubMed Central

The Bamako Call for Action on Research for Health stresses the importance of inter-disciplinary, inter-ministerial and inter-sectoral working. This challenges much of our current research and postgraduate research training in health, which mostly seeks to produce narrowly focused content specialists. We now need to compliment this type of research and research training, by offering alternative pathways that seek to create expertise, not only in specific narrow content areas, but also in the process and context of research, as well as in the interaction of these different facets of knowledge. Such an approach, developing 'integrative expertise', could greatly facilitate better research utilisation, helping policy makers and practitioners work through more evidence-based practice and across traditional research boundaries. PMID:19643021

MacLachlan, Malcolm

2009-01-01

189

Integration of a Mobile-Integrated Therapy with Electronic Health Records: Lessons Learned  

PubMed Central

Background: Responses to the chronic disease epidemic have predominantly been standardized in their approach to date. Barriers to better health outcomes remain, and effective management requires patient-specific data and disease state knowledge be presented in methods that foster clinical decision-making and patient self-management. Mobile technology provides a new platform for data collection and patient–provider communication. The mobile device represents a personalized platform that is available to the patient on a 24/7 basis. Mobile-integrated therapy (MIT) is the convergence of mobile technology, clinical and behavioral science, and scientifically validated clinical outcomes. In this article, we highlight the lessons learned from functional integration of a Food and Drug Administration-cleared type 2 diabetes MIT into the electronic health record (EHR) of a multiphysician practice within a large, urban, academic medical center. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with integration stakeholder groups: mobile and EHR software and information technology teams, clinical end users, project managers, and business analysts. Interviews were summarized and categorized into lessons learned using the Architecture for Integrated Mobility® framework. Results: Findings from the diverse stakeholder group of a MIT–EHR integration project indicate that user workflow, software system persistence, environment configuration, device connectivity and security, organizational processes, and data exchange heuristics are key issues that must be addressed. Conclusions: Mobile-integrated therapy that integrates patient self-management data with medical record data provides the opportunity to understand the potential benefits of bidirectional data sharing and reporting that are most valuable in advancing better health and better care in a cost-effective way that is scalable for all chronic diseases. PMID:23759392

Peeples, Malinda M.; Iyer, Anand K.; Cohen, Joshua L.

2013-01-01

190

Adolescent Health Behavior and Conventionality-Unconventionality: An Extension of Problem-Behavior Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examined the relation of psychosocial and behavioral conventionality-unconventionality to health-related behavior in cross-sectional data from 1,588 male and female 7th to 12th graders. Conventionalityunconventionality was represented by personality, perceived social environment, and behavior variables selected from the social-psychological framework of problem-behavior theory (R. Jessor & S. L. Jessor, 1977). Greater psychosocial conventionality correlates with more regular involvement in health-related behavior

John E. Donovan; Richard Jessor; Frances M. Costa

1991-01-01

191

Determinants of health literacy and health behavior regarding infectious respiratory diseases: a pathway model  

PubMed Central

Background Health literacy has been defined as the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand the basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Currently, few studies have validated the causal pathways of determinants of health literacy through the use of statistical modeling. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a health literacy model at an individual level that could best explain the determinants of health literacy and the associations between health literacy and health behaviors even health status. Methods Skill-based health literacy test and a self-administrated questionnaire survey were conducted among 3222 Chinese adult residents. Path analysis was applied to validate the model. Results The model explained 38.6% of variance for health literacy, 11.7% for health behavior and 2.3% for health status: (GFI?=?0.9990; RMR?=?0.0521; ?2?=?10.2151, P?=?0.1159). Education has positive and direct effect on prior knowledge (??=?0.324) and health literacy (??=?0.346). Health literacy is also affected by prior knowledge (??=?0.245) and age (??=?-0.361). Health literacy is a direct influencing factor of health behavior (??=?0.101). The most important factor of health status is age (??=?0.107). Health behavior and health status have a positive interaction effect. Conclusion This model explains the determinants of health literacy and the associations between health literacy and health behaviors well. It could be applied to develop intervention strategies to increase individual health literacy, and then to promote health behavior and health status. PMID:23521806

2013-01-01

192

Health Plans' Disease Management Programs: Extending across the Medical and Behavioral Health Spectrum?  

PubMed Central

While the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes, but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health, and depression program characteristics are highly variable. PMID:18806594

Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M.; Garnick, Deborah W.; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

2015-01-01

193

Severity of Mental Health Impairment and Trajectories of Improvement in an Integrated Primary Care Clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To model typical trajectories for improvement among patients treated in an integrated primary care behavioral health service, multilevel models were used to explore the relationship between baseline mental health impairment level and eventual mental health functioning across follow-up appointments. Method: Data from 495 primary care patients (61.1% female, 60.7% Caucasian, 37.141 ± 12.21 years of age) who completed the

Craig J. Bryan; Meghan L. Corso; Kent A. Corso; Chad E. Morrow; Kathryn E. Kanzler; Bobbie Ray-Sannerud

2012-01-01

194

Health and Problem Behavior Among People With Intellectual Disabilities  

PubMed Central

Good health significantly improves a person's quality of life. However, people with intellectual disabilities disproportionately have more health problems than the general population. Further complicating the matter is that people with more severe disabilities often cannot verbalize health complications they are experiencing, which leads to health problems being undiagnosed and untreated. It is plausible these conditions can interact with reinforcement contingencies to maintain problem behavior because of the increased incidence of health problems among people with intellectual disabilities. This paper reviews common health problems influencing problem behavior and reinforcement processes. A clear implication of this review is the need for comprehensive functional assessments of problem behavior involving behavior analysts and health professionals. PMID:22532888

May, Michael E; Kennedy, Craig H

2010-01-01

195

Importance of all movement behaviors in a 24 hour period for overall health.  

PubMed

Physical inactivity and childhood obesity are well-recognized public health concerns that are associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. Historically, the benefits of physical activity (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity-MVPA) to overall health have dominated discussions and emerging evidence indicates that a broader, more integrated approach is needed to better understand and address current public health crises. Existing guidelines for children and youth around the world only focus on MVPA, and recently sedentary behavior, despite an accumulating body of evidence showing that light-intensity physical activity (LPA) such as walking can provide important health benefits. Furthermore, there is accumulating support for the importance of adequate sleep and that these behaviors moderate the health impact of each other. Ignoring the other components of the movement continuum (i.e., sleep, sedentary time, LPA) while focusing efforts exclusively on MVPA (accounting for <5% of the time in a 24 h period) limits the potential to optimize the health benefits of movement behaviors. In order to address this limitation, experts in Canada are currently developing the world's first Integrated 24 Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth to help advance an integrated healthy active living agenda that has the potential to significantly improve the overall health and well-being of children and youth. PMID:25485978

Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Carson, Valerie; Gray, Casey E; Tremblay, Mark S

2014-12-01

196

Dimensions of emotional intelligence related to physical and mental health and to health behaviors  

PubMed Central

In this paper the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and health is examined. The current work investigated the dimensions of EI are sufficient to explain various components of physical and mental health, and various categories of health-related behaviors. A sample of 855 participants completed two measures of EI, the Trait Meta-Mood Scale and trait emotional intelligence questionnaire, a measure of health, the Health Survey SF-36 Questionnaire (SF-36); and a measure of health-related behaviors, the health behavior checklist. The results show that the EI dimensions analyzed are better predictors of mental health than of physical health. The EI dimensions that positively explain the Mental Health Component are Well-Being, Self-Control and Sociability, and negatively, Attention. Well-Being, Self-Control and Sociability positively explain the Physical Health Component. EI dimensions predict a lower percentage of health-related behaviors than they do health components. Emotionality and Repair predict the Preventive Health Behavior category, and only one dimension, Self-Control, predicts the Risk Taking Behavior category. Older people carry out more preventive behaviors for health.

Fernández-Abascal, Enrique G.; Martín-Díaz, María Dolores

2015-01-01

197

Integration: the firm and the health care sector.  

PubMed

Integration in health care is a key goal of health reform in United States and England. Yet past efforts in the 1990s to better integrate the delivery system were of limited success. Building on work by Bevan and Janus on delivery integration, this article explores integration through the lens of economic theories of integration. Firms generally integrate to increase efficiency through economies of scale, to improve their market power, and resolve the transaction costs involved with multiple external suppliers. Using the United States and England as laboratories, we apply concepts of economic integration to understand why integration does or does not occur in health care, and whether expectations of integrating different kinds of providers (hospital, primary care) and health and social services are realistic. Current enthusiasm for a more integrated health care system expands the scope of integration to include social services in England, but retains the focus on health care in the United States. We find mixed applicability of economic theories of integration. Economies of scale have not played a significant role in stimulating integration in both countries. Managerial incentives for monopoly or oligopoly may be more compelling in the United States, since hospitals seek higher prices and more leverage over payers. In both countries the concept of transaction costs could explain the success of new payment and budgeting methods, since health care integration ultimately requires resolving transaction costs across different delivery organizations. PMID:24759287

Laugesen, Miriam J; France, George

2014-07-01

198

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Description & Theoretical Background 2 Measurement and Methodological Issues 3 Type of Behavior as a Moderator of the Intention - Behavior Relation 4 Other Proximal Antecedents: Implementation Intentions, Behavioral Expectation, and

199

Behavioral health in the Department of Defense Patient-Centered Medical Home: history, finance, policy, work force development, and evaluation.  

PubMed

Integrating behavioral health services into the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an important component for meeting the goals of easy access, whole person, coordinated, and integrated care. Unlike most PCMH initiatives, the Department of Defense's (DoD) Military Health System (MHS) launched its PCMH initiative with integrated behavioral health services. This integration facilitates the MHS's goal to meet its strategic imperatives under the "Quadruple Aim" of (1) maximizing readiness, (2) improving the health of the population, (3) enhancing the patient experience of care (including quality, access, and reliability), and (4) responsibly managing per capita cost of care. The MHS experience serves as a guide to other organizations. We discuss the historical underpinnings, funding, policy, and work force development strategies that contributed to integrated behavioral healthcare being a mandated component of the MHS's PCMH. PMID:24073135

Hunter, Christopher L; Goodie, Jeffrey L

2012-09-01

200

Investigating Integrated Socio-Technical Approaches to Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the socio-technical approaches being developed in the Center for Health Informatics and Computing (CHIC) for addressing issues within healthcare that necessitate the integration of information systems with clinical and managerial development. A brief description of the health provision in the UK is given as a background to understanding the need for integrated interventions and approaches in health

Christopher J. Atkinson; Tillal Eldabi; Ray J. Paul; Athanasia Pouloudi

2001-01-01

201

Adolescent Cigarette Smoking: Health-Related Behavior or Normative Transgression?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations among measures of adolescent behavior were examined to determine whether cigarette smoking fits into a structure of problem behaviors—behaviors that involve norma- tive transgression—or a structure of health-related behaviors, or both. In an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 1782 male and female high school adolescents, four first-order problem behavior latent variables—sexual intercourse experience, alcohol abuse, illicit drug use,

Mark S. Turbin; Richard Jessor; Frances M. Costa

2000-01-01

202

Adolescent Cigarette Smoking: Health-Related Behavior or Normative Transgression?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations among measures of adolescent behavior were examined to determine whether cigarette smoking fits into a structure of problem behaviors—behaviors that involve normative transgression—or a structure of health-related behaviors, or both. In an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 1782 male and female high school adolescents, four first-order problem behavior latent variables—sexual intercourse experience, alcohol abuse, illicit drug use, and

Mark S. Turbin; Richard Jessor; Frances M. Costa

2000-01-01

203

World Health Organization behavioral science research: Problems and prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stated goals of World Health Organization-supported behavioral research are applied: to contribute to planning and policy decision-making, and to improve health care delivery methods. The evidence suggests the organization is getting less for its behavioral research dollar than it ought to: much research has been of poor quality, and researchers often appear more concerned with research design elegance than

George M. Foster

1987-01-01

204

Risk behaviors and health: Contrasting individual and population perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses risk behaviors, seem- ingly voluntary actions of individuals that have adverse health consequences. The central theme is to examine these behaviors from two contrasting perspectives, that of the individual and that of the population as a whole. It is argued that distinguishing between individual and pop- ulation views is important for understanding and inter- preting health risk

Robert W. Jeffery

1989-01-01

205

Informed-Consent Issues with Adolescent Health Behavior Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To identify the informed-consent issues when conducting adolescent health behavior research. Methods: A literature review was conducted across diverse academic fields about the informed-consent issues that were relevant to adolescent health behavior research. Results: Issues included defining consent, assent and permission, minimal…

Olds, R. Scott

2003-01-01

206

Adolescent Health Problems: Behavioral Perspectives. Advances in Pediatric Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the relationship between adolescent risk-taking behaviors and health. The health-related problems of adolescents frequently are manifestations of social, economic, or behavioral factors. Following an overview (Siegal), the chapters in the first section of the book explore general and conceptual issues: (1) "Epidemiology of…

Wallander, Jan L., Ed.; Siegel, Lawrence J., Ed.

207

Rural Adolescent Health Risk Behaviors: Age, Gender, and Ethnic Differences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of health risk behaviors was administered to a representative sample of 7,776 Idaho students in grades 8-12. Respondents were 86% White, 6% Hispanic, 4% American Indian, 3% Asian, and 2% Black. These rural adolescents reported that they had engaged in some health risk behaviors at rates comparable to those of other U.S. adolescents: 57%…

Salzman, Stephanie A.; Girvan, James T.

208

Developing Behavioral Theory With the Systematic Integration of Community Social Capital Concepts  

PubMed Central

Health behavior theories state that social environments influence health behaviors, but theories of how this occurs are relatively underdeveloped. This article systematically surveys community social capital concepts in health behavior literature and proposes a conceptual framework that integrates these concepts into existing behavioral theory. Fifty-three studies tested associations between community social capital concepts and physical activity (38 studies), smoking (19 studies), and diet (2 studies). Trustworthiness of community members was consistently associated with more health-promoting and less disease-promoting behaviors in 19 studies. Neighborly reciprocity showed mixed results in 10 studies. Reporting a good sense of community was associated with more physical activity in only 5 of 16 studies. Neighborhood collective efficacy, which includes social cohesion and informal social control, was inconsistently associated with behaviors in 22 studies. Behavioral social norms were associated with smoking and physical activity in 2 of 6 studies, and neighborhood modeling of physical activity was associated with increased activity in 12 of 17 studies, with 1 opposing result. This review identifies several community social capital–related concepts that are, at times, associated with both health-promoting and disease-promoting behaviors and often have no associations. Theory explains these findings by describing the relationships and interactions among these concepts. Using these findings, this article proposes a conceptual framework that integrates community social capital concepts into existing behavioral theory. Iterative empirically based theory development is needed to address these concepts, which affect behaviors. These results can also inform theoretically based community-based and socially tailored interventions. PMID:24092886

Samuel, Laura J.; Commodore-Mensah, Yvonne; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl R.

2014-01-01

209

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior  

E-print Network

treating cocaine addiction, with compulsive drug- seeking behavior contributing to the problem. In order a critical role in compul- sive drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors. Cocaine is thought to induce hypofunc-mail: sulinvil@indiana.edu Editor: Susan U. Linville #12;2 Cocaine Addiction Relapse is a major issue when

Menczer, Filippo

210

The ABCs of incentive-based treatment in health care: a behavior analytic framework to inform research and practice.  

PubMed

Behavior plays an important role in health promotion. Exercise, smoking cessation, medication adherence, and other healthy behavior can help prevent, or even treat, some diseases. Consequently, interventions that promote healthy behavior have become increasingly common in health care settings. Many of these interventions award incentives contingent upon preventive health-related behavior. Incentive-based interventions vary considerably along several dimensions, including who is targeted in the intervention, which behavior is targeted, and what type of incentive is used. More research on the quantitative and qualitative features of many of these variables is still needed to inform treatment. However, extensive literature on basic and applied behavior analytic research is currently available to help guide the study and practice of incentive-based treatment in health care. In this integrated review, we discuss how behavior analytic research and theory can help treatment providers design and implement incentive-based interventions that promote healthy behavior. PMID:24672264

Meredith, Steven E; Jarvis, Brantley P; Raiff, Bethany R; Rojewski, Alana M; Kurti, Allison; Cassidy, Rachel N; Erb, Philip; Sy, Jolene R; Dallery, Jesse

2014-01-01

211

The ABCs of incentive-based treatment in health care: a behavior analytic framework to inform research and practice  

PubMed Central

Behavior plays an important role in health promotion. Exercise, smoking cessation, medication adherence, and other healthy behavior can help prevent, or even treat, some diseases. Consequently, interventions that promote healthy behavior have become increasingly common in health care settings. Many of these interventions award incentives contingent upon preventive health-related behavior. Incentive-based interventions vary considerably along several dimensions, including who is targeted in the intervention, which behavior is targeted, and what type of incentive is used. More research on the quantitative and qualitative features of many of these variables is still needed to inform treatment. However, extensive literature on basic and applied behavior analytic research is currently available to help guide the study and practice of incentive-based treatment in health care. In this integrated review, we discuss how behavior analytic research and theory can help treatment providers design and implement incentive-based interventions that promote healthy behavior. PMID:24672264

Meredith, Steven E; Jarvis, Brantley P; Raiff, Bethany R; Rojewski, Alana M; Kurti, Allison; Cassidy, Rachel N; Erb, Philip; Sy, Jolene R; Dallery, Jesse

2014-01-01

212

Knowledge and Behavioral Effects in Cardiovascular Health: Community Health Worker Health Disparities Initiative, 2007–2010  

PubMed Central

Introduction Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and disparities in cardiovascular health exist among African Americans, American Indians, Hispanics, and Filipinos. The Community Health Worker Health Disparities Initiative of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) includes culturally tailored curricula taught by community health workers (CHWs) to improve knowledge and heart-healthy behaviors in these racial/ethnic groups. Methods We used data from 1,004 community participants in a 10-session curriculum taught by CHWs at 15 sites to evaluate the NHLBI’s health disparities initiative by using a 1-group pretest–posttest design. The curriculum addressed identification and management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. We used linear mixed effects and generalized linear mixed effects models to examine results. Results Average participant age was 48; 75% were female, 50% were Hispanic, 35% were African American, 8% were Filipino, and 7% were American Indian. Twenty-three percent reported a history of diabetes, and 37% reported a family history of heart disease. Correct pretest to posttest knowledge scores increased from 48% to 74% for heart healthy knowledge. The percentage of participants at the action or maintenance stage of behavior change increased from 41% to 85%. Conclusion Using the CHW model to implement community education with culturally tailored curricula may improve heart health knowledge and behaviors among minorities. Further studies should examine the influence of such programs on clinical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24524426

Hurtado, Margarita; Yang, Manshu; Evensen, Christian; Windham, Amy; Ortiz, Gloria; Tracy, Rachel; Ivy, Edward Donnell

2014-01-01

213

Social capital and risk and protective behaviors: a global health perspective  

PubMed Central

Social capital and health research has emerged as a focus of contemporary behavioral epidemiology, while intervention research is seeking more effective measures to increase health protective behaviors and decrease health-risk behaviors. In this review we explored current literature on social capital and health outcomes at the micro-, mesa-, and macro-levels with a particular emphasis on research that incorporates a social capital framework, and adolescent and young adult engagement in risk behaviors. These data indicate that across a broad range of socio-cultural and economic contexts, social capital can affect individuals’ risk for negative health outcomes and their engagement in risk behaviors. Further research is needed which should focus on differentiating and measuring positive and negative social capital within both mainstream and alternative social networks, assessing how social constructions of gender, ethnicity, and race – within specific cultural contexts – mediate the relationship between social capital and risk and/or protective behaviors. This new research should integrate the existing research within historical socioeconomic and political conditions. In addition, social capital scales need to be developed to be both culturally and developmentally appropriate for use with adolescents living in a diversity of settings. Despite the proliferation of social capital research, the concept remains underutilized in both assessment and intervention development for adolescents’ and young adults’ engagement in risk behaviors and their associated short- and long-term poor health outcomes. PMID:23243387

Kaljee, Linda M; Chen, Xinguang

2011-01-01

214

“White Box” Epidemiology and the Social Neuroscience of Health Behaviors: The Environmental Affordances Model  

PubMed Central

Crucial advances have been made in our knowledge of the social determinants of health and health behaviors. Existing research on health disparities, however, generally fails to address a known paradox in the literature: While blacks have higher risk of medical morbidity relative to non-Hispanic whites, blacks have lower rates of common stress-related forms of psychopathology such as major depression and anxiety disorders. In this article we propose a new theoretical approach, the Environmental Affordances Model, as an integrative framework for the origins of both physical and mental health disparities. We highlight early empirical support and a growing body of experimental animal and human research on self-regulatory health behaviors and stress coping that is consistent with the proposed framework. We conclude that transdisciplinary approaches, such as the Environmental Affordances Model, are needed to understand the origins of group-based disparities to implement effective solutions to racial and ethnic group inequalities in physical and mental health. PMID:24224131

Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Hudson, Darrell; Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Rafferty, Jane A.; Lee, Hedwig; Jackson, James S.

2013-01-01

215

Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors of California Community College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore the sexual and reproductive health behaviors of students from 13 community college campuses in California. Participants: Heterosexual college students, ages 18 to 24, who have had sexual intercourse (N = 4,487). Methods: The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) survey was…

Trieu, Sang Leng; Bratton, Sally; Marshak, Helen Hopp

2011-01-01

216

Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, and Clinical Behaviors: Implications for Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the impact of practitioners' attitudes and knowledge of sexual health on clinical behaviors. Sexual health topics are often areas of concern for clients of any age in counseling. Thus, counselors must be trained and equipped to address sexual health across the life span. This study explored whether child and adolescent…

Russell, Elizabeth B.

2012-01-01

217

Peer Mentoring for Health Behavior Change: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Peer mentoring can be a powerful complement to health instruction. Mentoring has been used to change health behaviors and promote sustainable lifestyle patterns in adults and, more recently, among adolescents. Purpose: This article reviews the use of peer mentoring to promote health practices and describes how this approach can be used…

Petosa, R. L.; Smith, Laureen H.

2014-01-01

218

Mental Health Issues and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional and behavioral challenges are significantly impacted by mental health issues. Teachers and other school staff need mental health knowledge to work more effectively with these students. Collaboration with mental health professionals and sharing of information is essential. [For complete volume, see ED539318.

DeLoach, Kendra P.; Dvorsky, Melissa; Miller, Elaine; Paget, Michael

2012-01-01

219

Behavioral Systems Analysis in Health and Human Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a behavioral systems approach to improve operational performance in health and human service organizations. This article provides six performance truths that are relevant to any organization and a case study from a community mental health network of agencies. A comprehensive analysis, as described here, will help health and…

McGee, Heather M.; Diener, Lori H.

2010-01-01

220

Ethical Theories for Promoting Health through Behavioral Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Arguments based on the philosophies of natural law, utilitarianism, paternalism, and distributive justice are examined for their pertinence to health behavior change strategies. Health educators should prepare individuals to make health-generating decisions but may need to limit the conditions under which they intervene. (Author/PP)

O'Connell, Janelle K.; Price, James H.

1983-01-01

221

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Research to understand the impact of neighborhoods on health has grown significantly over the past decade as public health has more fully embraced a social ecological perspective. Neighborhood effects have been documented for a broad range of health and social outcomes, including birth weight, injury, mental health, and physical activity, among others (Diez-Roux, 2001 xClose Diez-Roux, A. (2001). Investigating neighborhood and area effects on health.

222

AN ENERGY SYSTEMS PERPECTIVE OF ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY AND ECOSYSTEM HEALTH  

EPA Science Inventory

The integrity and health of society's life-supporting ecosystems establishes a fundamental constraint on economic growth and development. Energy Systems Theory provides a theoretical basis for defining, measuring and interpreting the concepts of ecological integrity and ecosystem...

223

Integrated electronic health records management system.  

PubMed

Computer systems and communication technologies are making a strong and influential presence in the different fields of medicine. The cornerstone of a functional medical information system represents the electronic health records management system. Due to a very sensitive nature of medical information, such systems are faced with a number of stringent requirements, like security and confidentiality of patients' related data, different media type's management, diversity of medical data that need to be processed etc. At present most clinical software systems are closed with little or no operability between them, and the medical information are locked in a variety of different incompatible databases. As the result of these facts, it is very hard for the developers to provide the solution for an integrated health computing environment, which would considerably improve the quality of medical care in general. This paper presents the framework for a functional EHR management system that meets these demands, but also follows the initiative taken by the Next Generation Network (NGN) approach, which includes user mobility, service transparency and common communication platform for transferring and serving different types of information, services and media. PMID:17095822

Di Giacomo, P; Ricci, Fabrizio L; Bocchi, Leonardo

2006-01-01

224

Innovations in integrative health care education.  

PubMed

Content on integrative healthcare and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is now being taught in hundreds of educational programs across the country. Nursing, medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathic, and other programs all are finding creative and innovative ways to include these approaches into new models of education and practice. In this column, we will spotlight such innovations in integrative health care and CAM education. The goal is to present readers with specific educational interventions that they may wish to adapt into new or ongoing educational efforts at their institution or program. We invite you to submit brief descriptions of efforts in your institutions that reflect the creativity, diversity, and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Please submit to either Dr. Sierpina at vssierpi@utmb.edu or Dr. Kreitzer at. Submissions should be brief, 300 to 400 words, because we plan to synopsize several projects in each issue. We also wish to link the information in the summary to a larger body of information at a Web site or other resource, so please include that information as well as your e-mail contact. PMID:16781517

Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

2005-03-01

225

Innovations in integrative health care education.  

PubMed

Content on integrative healthcare and complementary and alternative medicine is now being taught in hundreds of educational programs across the country. Nursing, medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathic, and other programs all are finding creative and innovative ways to include these approaches into new models of education and practice. In this column we spotlight such innovations in integrative health care and CAM education. The goal is to present readers with specific educational interventions that they may wish to adapt into new or ongoing educational efforts at their institution or program. We invite you to submit brief descriptions of efforts in your institutions that reflect the creativity, diversity, and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Please submit to either Dr. Sierpina at or Dr. Kreitzer at . Submissions should be brief, 300-400 words, as we plan to synopsize several projects in each issue. We also wish to link the information in the summary to a larger body of information at a website or other resource, so please include that information as well as your e-mail contact. PMID:16781556

Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Sierpina, Victor S

2005-07-01

226

Covariations of Adolescent Weight-Control, Health-Risk and Health-Promoting Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed the prevalence of dieting, investigating clusters of risk behaviors among adolescents. Data from the 1999 South Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that weight control behaviors related to several other important health behaviors. Differences existed between adolescents who used extreme weight loss measures and moderate dieters…

Rafiroiu, Anca Codruta; Sargent, Roger G.; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Drane, Wanzer J.; Valois, Robert F.

2003-01-01

227

Ecological Modelling 140 (2001) 18 Integrating ecology with human demography, behavior, and  

E-print Network

Ecological Modelling 140 (2001) 1­8 Integrating ecology with human demography, behavior an urgent need to integrate ecology with human demography, behavior, and socioeconomics in order issue, which integrate ecological, human demographic, behavioral, social, and economic factors through

2001-01-01

228

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The perceived benefits construct is defined as an individual's belief that specific positive outcomes will result from a specific behavior. Research conducted over the last three decades has demonstrated the use of this construct in predicting behavior, but several measurement issues continue to warrant attention when employing a perceived benefits scale. First, perception of benefit is specific to a behavior and the more specifically the behavior is defined, the higher the predictive validity of the scale.

229

77 FR 42313 - Recharter of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2012-07-18

230

Special issue: Behavioral Economics and Health Annual Symposium.  

PubMed

The application of behavioral economics to health and health care has captured the imagination of policymakers across the political spectrum. The idea is that many people are irrational in predictable ways, and that this both contributes to unhealthy behaviors like smoking and holds one of the keys to changing those behaviors. Because health care costs continue to increase, and a substantial portion of costs are incurred because of unhealthy behaviors, employers and insurers have great interest in using financial incentives to change behaviors. However, it is in the details that complexity and controversies emerge. Who should the targets be, and what outcomes should be rewarded? How should incentives be structured, to maximize their effectiveness and minimize unintended consequences? In what situations should we be intervening to affect decisions by people who may prefer to be obese or to smoke, and in what situations should we accept their preferences? To begin to answer these questions, the Penn-CMU Roybal P30 Center on Behavioral Economics and Health held its first annual Behavioral Economics and Health Symposium on March 24-25, 2011 with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The symposium drew more than 50 researchers, scholars, and health professionals from a variety of disciplines, including medicine, public health, economics, law, management, marketing, and psychology. They heard perspectives on behavioral economics from public and private funders, the CEO of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, and the CEO of stickK.com, a start-up company that uses online, voluntary commitment contracts to help people achieve their goals. Participants formed eight working groups to review the current state-of-the-art in a variety of clinical contexts and to consider how behavioral economics could inform a research agenda to improve health. This Issue Brief summarizes the findings of these working groups and the symposium. PMID:21949955

2011-09-01

231

Health Risk Behavior and Sexual Assault Among Ethnically Diverse Women.  

PubMed

Sexual assault is associated with a number of health risk behaviors in women. It has been hypothesized that these risk behaviors, such as hazardous drinking, may represent women's attempts to cope with psychological distress, such as symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, extant research has failed to evaluate these relationships among ethnic minority samples or identify the mechanisms responsible for this association. The current study examined sexual assault history and two health risk behaviors (hazardous drinking and engaging in sexual behavior to regulate negative affect) in a diverse sample of 1,620 college women. Depression and anxiety were examined as mediators of the relationship between sexual assault and health risk behaviors. There was evidence of moderated mediation, such that for European American women, but not for ethnic minority women, both forms of psychological distress were significant mediators of the sexual assault/hazardous drinking relationship. In contrast, among all ethnic groups, the relationship between sexual assault and both forms of psychological distress was mediated by the use of sexual behavior as an affect regulation strategy. Results support a need to evaluate the assault experiences of ethnically diverse women, as well as the impact of the assault on their postassault experiences including health risk behaviors and psychological adjustment. Additionally, results suggest that practitioners should carefully assess health risk behaviors among victims of sexual assault and be aware that there may be differences in the risk factors and motives for these behaviors among women of various ethnic backgrounds. PMID:24223467

Littleton, Heather L; Grills-Taquechel, Amie E; Buck, Katherine S; Rosman, Lindsey; Dodd, Julia C

2013-03-01

232

Self-Compassion, Affect, and Health-Promoting Behaviors.  

PubMed

Objective: Emerging theory and research suggest that self-compassion promotes the practice of health behaviors, and implicates self-regulation as an explanatory factor. However, previous investigations focused only on behavior intentions or health risk behaviors, and did not investigate the role of emotions. This study expands on this research using a small-scale meta-analysis approach with our own data sets to examine the associations of self-compassion with a set of health-promoting behaviors, and test the roles of high positive affect and low negative affect as potential explanatory mechanisms. Method: Fifteen independent samples (N = 3,252) with correlations of self-compassion with the frequency of self-reported health-promoting behaviors (eating habits, exercise, sleep behaviors, and stress management) were meta-analyzed. Eight of these samples completed measures of positive and negative affect. Results: Self-compassion was positively associated with the practice of health-promoting behaviors across all 15 samples. The meta-analysis revealed a small effect size (average r = .25; p < .001) of self-compassion and health behaviors, with low variability. Tests of the indirect effects of self-compassion on health behaviors through positive and negative affect with multiple mediator analyses revealed small effects for each. Separate meta-analyses of the indirect effects (IE) were significant for positive (average IE = .08; p < .001) and negative affect (average IE = .06; p < .001), and their combined indirect effects (average IE = .15; p < .0001). Conclusion: Self-compassion may be an important quality to cultivate for promoting positive health behaviors, due in part to its association with adaptive emotions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25243717

Sirois, Fuschia M; Kitner, Ryan; Hirsch, Jameson K

2014-09-22

233

Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Challenging Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables…

Devlin, Sarah; Healy, Olive; Leader, Geraldine; Hughes, Brian M.

2011-01-01

234

Holistic Health Care for Native Women: An Integrated Model  

PubMed Central

Providing health care services to Native women has become a challenge owing to the severity of illness—in particular, diabetes, alcoholism, and arthritis—in this group today. If comprehensive health care is to be offered, coordination of services between health and mental health practitioners is needed. Gathering together to support each other has been a traditional custom for Native women. An integrated health care model is discussed that offers Native women an opportunity to deal with the challenge of mental health and health issues through traditional activities, enhancing their physical and spiritual health and receiving education while creating an atmosphere of empowerment and mutual support. PMID:12356594

Napoli, Maria

2002-01-01

235

Workplace mental health: developing an integrated intervention approach  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health problems are prevalent and costly in working populations. Workplace interventions to address common mental health problems have evolved relatively independently along three main threads or disciplinary traditions: medicine, public health, and psychology. In this Debate piece, we argue that these three threads need to be integrated to optimise the prevention of mental health problems in working populations. Discussion To realise the greatest population mental health benefits, workplace mental health intervention needs to comprehensively 1) protect mental health by reducing work–related risk factors for mental health problems; 2) promote mental health by developing the positive aspects of work as well as worker strengths and positive capacities; and 3) address mental health problems among working people regardless of cause. We outline the evidence supporting such an integrated intervention approach and consider the research agenda and policy developments needed to move towards this goal, and propose the notion of integrated workplace mental health literacy. Summary An integrated approach to workplace mental health combines the strengths of medicine, public health, and psychology, and has the potential to optimise both the prevention and management of mental health problems in the workplace. PMID:24884425

2014-01-01

236

76 FR 67731 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2011-11-02

237

77 FR 15372 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2012-03-15

238

78 FR 14798 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-03-07

239

76 FR 58007 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2011-09-19

240

76 FR 26300 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2011-05-06

241

Evolution of an integrated public health surveillance system.  

PubMed

There is a growing recognition in maternal and child health of the importance of social, behavioral, biological, and genetic factors across the entire life course. Unfortunately, most state maternal and child health surveillance systems are not designed to readily address longitudinal research questions or track and follow children across multiple programs over time. The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) recently integrated its birth defects registry, newborn hearing screening tracking and management system, and electronic birth certificate (EBC) into a robust, Web-based surveillance system called the Virginia Vital Events and Screening Tracking System (VVESTS). Completely redesigning the existing birth defects and newborn hearing screening system (the Virginia Infant Screening and Infant Tracking System--VISITS I) with minimal disruption of ongoing reporting presented a number of challenges. Because VVESTS had different requirements such as required fields and data validations, extensive data preparation was required to ensure that existing VISITS I data would be included in the new system (VISITS II). Efforts included record deduplication, conversion of free text fields into discrete variables, dealing with missing/invalid data, and linkage with birth certificate data. VISITS II serves multiple program needs; improves data quality and security; automates linkages within families, across programs, and over time; and improves the ability of VDH to provide children with birth defects and their families necessary follow-up services and enhanced care coordination. PMID:22097701

Chapman, Derek A; Ford, Nancy; Tlusty, Susan; Bodurtha, Joann N

2011-01-01

242

Cognitions in cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies; toward an integrative model  

Microsoft Academic Search

There seems to be a lack of a coherent and integrative theory and theoretically informed manuals in cognitive behavioral therapies that could negatively impact both the program of CBT as a platform for psychotherapy integration, as well as its efficacy and effectiveness. Although CBT is the golden psychological treatment for various disorders, overall, about 30–40% of the patients are still

Daniel David; Aurora Szentagotai

2006-01-01

243

The organizing vision of integrated health information systems.  

PubMed

The notion of 'integration' in the context of health information systems is ill-defined yet in widespread use. We identify a variety of meanings ranging from the purely technical integration of information systems to the integration of services. This ambiguity (or interpretive flexibility), we argue, is inherent rather than accidental: it is a necessary prerequisite for mobilizing political and ideological support among stakeholders for integrated health information systems. Building on this, our aim is to trace out the career dynamics of the vision of 'integration/ integrated'. The career dynamics is the transformation of both the imaginary and the material (technological) realizations of the unfolding implementation of the vision of integrated care. Empirically we draw on a large, ongoing project at the University Hospital of North Norway (UNN) to establish an integrated health information system. PMID:18775828

Ellingsen, Gunnar; Monteiro, Eric

2008-09-01

244

The Impact of an Integrated Population Health Enhancement and Disease Management Program on Employee Health Risk, Health Conditions, and Productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the impact of an integrated population health enhancement program on employee health risks, health conditions, and productivity. Specifically, we analyzed changes in these measures among a cohort of 543 employees who completed a health risk assessment in both 2003 and 2005. We compared these findings with 2 different sets of employees who were not offered health enhancement

Ron Loeppke; Sean Nicholson; Michael Taitel; Matthew Sweeney; Vince Haufle; Ronald C. Kessler

2008-01-01

245

Health Care and Family and Consumer Sciences Education: An Integrative Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses ecological systems theory as a foundation for integrating health care and its public policy issues into family and consumer sciences classrooms. Offers teachers alternative perspectives on consumer behavior changes and needs in heath care systems and policies. Contains 24 references. (JOW)

Montgomery, Ruth; Rider, Mary Ellen

2001-01-01

246

Mental Health Characteristics and Health-Seeking Behaviors of Adolescent School-Based Health Center Users and Nonusers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the mental health risk profile and health utilization behaviors of adolescent school-based health center (SBHC) users and nonusers and discuss the role that SBHCs can play in addressing adolescent health needs. Methods: The sample included 4640 students in grades 9 and 11 who completed the…

Amaral, Gorette; Geierstanger, Sara; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire

2011-01-01

247

DCCPS: Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior: Schedule  

Cancer.gov

General Information Course Overview Schedule Application Frequently Asked Questions 6th Annual Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior Theory July 14–July 21, 2012 Schedule Please note that 2012 general schedule is based on the Detailed Course

248

Rethinking behavioral health processes by using design for six sigma.  

PubMed

Clinical evidence-based practices are strongly encouraged and commonly utilized in the behavioral health community. However, evidence-based practices that are related to quality improvement processes, such as Design for Six Sigma, are often not used in behavioral health care. This column describes the unique partnership formed between a behavioral health care provider in the greater Pittsburgh area, a nonprofit oversight and monitoring agency for behavioral health services, and academic researchers. The authors detail how the partnership used the multistep process outlined in Design for Six Sigma to completely redesign the provider's intake process. Implementation of the redesigned process increased access to care, decreased bad debt and uncollected funds, and improved cash flow--while consumer satisfaction remained high. PMID:25642607

Lucas, Anthony G; Primus, Kelly; Kovach, Jamison V; Fredendall, Lawrence D

2015-02-01

249

DCCPS: Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior: Application  

Cancer.gov

General Information Course Overview Schedule Application Frequently Asked Questions 6th Annual Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior Theory July 14–July 21, 2012 Application The application for the 2012 ATI can now be accessed. Please follow

250

Behavioral health and disasters: looking to the future.  

PubMed

Along with other manmade and natural disasters, oil spills produce profound and long-term impacts on the behavioral health of their survivors. Although previous and ongoing research has focused on producing evidence of the breadth and depth of these impacts, future efforts must begin to translate this evidence into developing and implementing policies, programs, and practices that effectively contribute to their prevention and mitigation. Drawing upon a conceptual framework of the behavioral health impacts of oil spills developed from data collected in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, this paper examines potential interventions designed to prevent or mitigate biopsychosocial, interpersonal, and intrapersonal impacts on behavioral health. Future efforts to translate behavioral health research into effective practice will require the formation and maintenance of academic-community partnerships for the purpose of building resilience to these impacts and providing targeted services to those most vulnerable to their long-term consequences. PMID:24443145

Palinkas, Lawrence A

2015-01-01

251

NASA Human Research Program: Behavioral Health and Performance Program Element  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the performance errors associated with sleep loss, fatigue and psychomotor factors during manned space flight. Short and long term behavioral health factors are also addressed

Leveton, Lauren B.

2009-01-01

252

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived vulnerability, also called perceived susceptibility, perceived likelihood, and perceived probability, reflects an individual's belief about the likelihood of a health threat's occurrence or the likelihood of developing a health problem. Perceptions of event likelihood are central to both expectancy-value theory in social psychology and to subjective-expected utility theory in economics. The earliest work using the construct of perceived susceptibility in the health domain sought to determine why people use health services and included research by Hochbaum (1958)x Close Hochbaum, G.M. (1958).

253

Health Attitudes, Health Cognitions, and Health Behaviors among Internet Health Information Seekers: Population-Based Survey  

PubMed Central

Background Using a functional theory of media use, this paper examines the process of health-information seeking in different domains of Internet use. Objective Based on an analysis of the 1999 HealthStyles data, this study was designed to demonstrate that people who gather information on the Internet are more health-oriented than non-users of Internet health information. Methods The Porter Novelli HealthStyles database, collected annually since 1995, is based on the results of nationally representative postal mail surveys. In 1999, 2636 respondents provided usable data for the HealthStyles database. Independent sample t-tests and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results The results showed that individuals who searched for health information on the Internet were indeed more likely to be health-oriented than those who did not. Consumers who sought out medical information on the Internet reported higher levels of health-information orientation and healthy activities, as well as stronger health beliefs than those who did not search for medical news on the Internet. It was observed that those who reported searching for information about drugs and medications on the Internet held stronger health beliefs than the non-searchers. Comparison of individuals who reported seeking out information about specific diseases on the Internet with individuals who did not showed those who sought out disease-specific information on the Internet to be more health-oriented. Finally, consumers who sought out healthy lifestyle information on the Internet were more health conscious and more health-information oriented than those who did not. They were also more likely to hold stronger health-oriented beliefs and to engage in healthy activities. Conclusions The results support the functional theory of Internet use. Internet searchers who used the Internet for a wide range of health purposes were typically more health oriented than non-searchers. PMID:15249264

2004-01-01

254

A behavior-analytic view of psychological health  

PubMed Central

This paper argues that a behavioral analysis of psychological health is useful and appropriate. Such an analysis will allow us to better evaluate intervention outcomes without resorting only to the assessment of pathological behavior, thus providing an alternative to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual system of conceptualizing behavior. The goals of such an analysis are to distinguish between people and outcomes using each term of the three-term contingency as a dimension to consider. A brief review of other efforts to define psychological health is provided. Laboratory approaches to a behavioral analysis of healthy behavior are presented along with shortcomings in our science that impede our analysis. Finally, we present some of the functional characteristics of psychological health that we value. PMID:22478160

Follette, William C.; Bach, Patricia A.; Follette, Victoria M.

1993-01-01

255

Health behavior and college students: Does Greek affiliation matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The college years offer an opportunity for new experiences, personal freedom, and identity development; however, this period\\u000a is also noted for the emergence of risky health behaviors that place college students at risk for health problems. Affiliation\\u000a with on-campus organizations such as fraternities or sororities may increase a students’ risk given the rituals and socially\\u000a endorsed behaviors associated with Greek

Lori A. J. Scott-Sheldon; Kate B. Carey; Michael P. Carey

2008-01-01

256

Consumer Health Informatics--integrating patients, providers, and professionals online.  

PubMed

Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of personal health data, clinical e-mail, online pharmacies, and shared decision-making tools. Consumer Health Informatics will become integrated with medical care, electronic medical records, and patient education to impact the whole process and business of health care. PMID:12238015

Klein-Fedyshin, Michele S

2002-01-01

257

Intergenerational Health Disparities: Socioeconomic Status, Women's Health Conditions, and Child Behavior Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

c SYNOPSIS Objective. Relatively little is known about the intergenerational mechanisms that lead to social disparities in child health. We examined whether the association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and child behavior problems is mediated by maternal health conditions and behavior. Methods. Prospective cohort data (1979-1998) on 2,677 children and their mothers were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of

Robert S. Kahn; Kathryn Wilson

258

Integrating mental health in welfare evaluation: An Empirical application  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents simple measures of individual and family mental health indices based on axiomatic foundations and integrates mental health into a neoclassical model that allows for proper substitution possibilities in the family preferences and quantifies its significance in family utility. We find that mental health effects are far more important than the effect of consumption or children's schooling in

Sanghamitra Das; Abhiroop Mukhopadhyay; Tridip Ray

2007-01-01

259

Integrating Mental Health in Welfare Evaluation: An Empirical Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents simple measures of individual and family mental health indices based on axiomatic foundations and integrates mental health into a neoclassical model that allows for proper substitution possibilities in the family preferences and quantifies its significance in family utility. We find that mental health effects are far more important than the effect of consumption or children's schooling in

Sanghamitra Das; Abhiroop Mukhopadhyay; Tridip Ray

2009-01-01

260

Integrating Mental Health in Welfare Evaluation: An Empirical Application  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents simple measures of individual and family mental health indices based on axiomatic foundations and integrates mental health into a neoclassical model that allows for proper substitution possibilities in the family preferences and quantifies its significance in family utility. We find that mental health effects are far more important than the effect of consumption or children’s schooling in

Sanghamitra Das; Abhiroop Mukhopadhyay; Tridip Ray

2007-01-01

261

Integrated Crew Health Care System for Space Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Davis' presentation includes a brief overview of space flight and the lessons learned for health care in microgravity. He will describe the development of policy for health care for international crews. He will conclude his remarks with a discussion of an integrated health care system.

Davis, Jeffrey R.

2007-01-01

262

HEALTH SERVICES 431: HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND MANAGEMENT SKILLS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organizations are held accountable to multiple stakeholders. New systems to manage the changing face of organizational processes are continually being created necessitating constant change in the way we work together in the healthcare workplace. Today's health care manager requires a clear understanding of the complexity in which health care organizations function and a commensurate stable of knowledge, skills and abilities

Diana W. Hilberman

263

Transtheoretical model of health behavior change applied to voice therapy.  

PubMed

Studies of patient adherence to health behavior programs, such as physical exercise, smoking cessation, and diet, have resulted in the formulation and validation of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change. Although widely accepted as a guide for the development of health behavior interventions, this model has not been applied to vocal rehabilitation. Because resolution of vocal difficulties frequently depends on a patient's ability to make changes in vocal and health behaviors, the TTM may be a useful way to conceptualize voice behavior change processes, including the patient's readiness for change. The purpose of this paper is to apply the TTM to the voice therapy process to: (1) provide an organizing framework for understanding of behavior change in voice therapy, (2) explain how treatment adherence problems can arise, and (3) provide broad strategies to improve treatment adherence. Given the significant role of treatment adherence in treatment outcome, considering readiness for behavior change should be taken into account when planning treatment. Principles of health behavior change can aid speech pathologists in such understanding and estimating readiness for voice therapy. PMID:18082367

van Leer, Eva; Hapner, Edie R; Connor, Nadine P

2008-11-01

264

Transtheoretical Model of Health Behavior Change Applied to Voice Therapy  

PubMed Central

Summary Studies of patient adherence to health behavior programs, such as physical exercise, smoking cessation, and diet, have resulted in the formulation and validation of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change. Although widely accepted as a guide for the development of health behavior interventions, this model has not been applied to vocal rehabilitation. Because resolution of vocal difficulties frequently depends on a patient’s ability to make changes in vocal and health behaviors, the TTM may be a useful way to conceptualize voice behavior change processes, including the patient’s readiness for change. The purpose of this paper is to apply the TTM to the voice therapy process to: (1) provide an organizing framework for understanding of behavior change in voice therapy, (2) explain how treatment adherence problems can arise, and (3) provide broad strategies to improve treatment adherence. Given the significant role of treatment adherence in treatment outcome, considering readiness for behavior change should be taken into account when planning treatment. Principles of health behavior change can aid speech pathologists in such understanding and estimating readiness for voice therapy. PMID:18082367

van Leer, Eva; Hapner, Edie R.; Connor, Nadine P.

2010-01-01

265

Health Risk Behaviors and Aliteracy: Are They Related?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aliteracy is defined as the quality or state of being able to read but the lack of interest in doing so; aliterates can read, but they never read for the love of reading. Aliteracy is said to be prevalent among college students. Also prevalent among college students are risk behaviors that contribute to poor health. Problem behavior theory links a…

Burak, Lydia J.

2003-01-01

266

Health Risk Behavior and Sexual Assault among Ethnically Diverse Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sexual assault is associated with a number of health risk behaviors in women. It has been hypothesized that these risk behaviors, such as hazardous drinking, may represent women's attempts to cope with psychological distress, such as symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, extant research has failed to evaluate these relationships among…

Littleton, Heather L.; Grills-Taquechel, Amie E.; Buck, Katherine S.; Rosman, Lindsey; Dodd, Julia C.

2013-01-01

267

Immigrant Acculturation, Gender and Health Behavior: A Research Note  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research shows that the health behavior of immigrants is favorable to that of native-born adults in the United States. We utilize pooled data from the 1998-2001 National Health Interview Surveys and multinomial logistic regression techniques to build on this literature and examine the association between acculturation and immigrant…

Lopez-Gonzalez, Lorena; Aravena, Veronica C.; Hummer, Robert A.

2005-01-01

268

Supervision in Public Sector Behavioral Health: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supervision plays a key role in the provision of health and human services. An extensive literature exists on supervision as an element of professional development in behavioral health care. However, much less attention has been given to the practice of supervision in publicly funded systems of care for persons with mental and substance use conditions. This article provides a comprehensive

Michael A. Hoge; Scott Migdole; Melanie S. Farkas; Allison N. Ponce; Christie Hunnicutt

2011-01-01

269

Behavior of Man in Health and Illness, Nursing 103A.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description is provided of a course, "Behavior of Man in Health and Illness," designed to introduce first-year undergraduate nursing students to the theories and concepts related to the health-illness continuum, the stress of illness, and coping theory. The description begins with an overview of course content, followed by information on the…

Bakke, Sandra I.

270

Preventive, Lifestyle, and Personal Health Behaviors among Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examines personal health behaviors and wellness, health-related lifestyles, and prevention screening practices among licensed physicians. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 1,875 physicians practicing in California. Data from 763 returned questionnaires (41%) were analyzed. Results: Our data…

Bazargan, Mohsen; Makar, Marian; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Ani, Chizobam; Wolf, Kenneth E.

2009-01-01

271

The Health of University Athletes: Attitudes, Behaviors, and Stressors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined several aspects of the health of university athletes. Five areas of concern were targeted for investigation: general health background, use of drugs and alcohol, weight and eating behaviors, stress, and use of helping resources. The authors developed a questionnaire and used it to survey 27 varsity athletic teams at a major private university. The incidence of injuries

Rosemary Selby; Harvey M. Weinstein; Tracy Stewart Bird

1990-01-01

272

Motivation for Healthy Behavior: A Review of Health Promotion Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Authors reviewed the theoretical history of the "motivation" construct, and its utilization within past/current health behavior research. Textbooks and review articles functioned as sources for the theoretical history review. Research published within a 10-year period (1993-2002) in four health promotion journals (all with impact factors greater…

Dunsmore, Sarah; Goodson, Patricia

2006-01-01

273

The Shifting Sands of Health Care Delivery: Curriculum Revision and Integration of Community Health Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Brigham Young University's nursing curriculum was revised to reflect the community-driven nature of primary health care. Curricular threads of inquiry, practice, stewardship, spirituality, and service are the framework for integrating community health nursing practice. (SK)

Conger, Cynthia O'Neill; Baldwin, Joan H.; Abegglen, JoAnn; Callister, Lynn C.

1999-01-01

274

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Individual differences in optimism versus pessimism can be measured by several devices. The measures have somewhat different focuses, but in large part they share the same underlying conception, deriving from the expectancy-value model of behavior.

275

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Kevin McCaul is Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics and professor of psychology at North Dakota State University. His research over the last decade has addressed relationships between cognitions, feelings, and self-protective behaviors.

276

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

In an effort to reduce the "literal inconsistency" problem (the inconsistency between what people say and what they do) and therefore increase the observed relation between proximal antecedents and behavior, researchers have explored other types of proximal measures.

277

Mental Health in the Oregon Health Plan: Fragmentation or Integration?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oregon Health Plan was implemented in 1994 with a 50% expansion of Medicaid enrollment to include some of the working poor. Over 75% of Oregon Medicaid clients are now enrolled in health maintenance organizations (HMOs). Outpatient chemical dependency services have been capitated since May 1995. Capitated mental health services have been provided for the 25% of eligibles who live

David L. Cutler; Bentson H. McFarland; Kevin Winthrop

1998-01-01

278

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Optimism and related constructs have been studied a great deal over the past two decades, in a large number of behavioral contexts. They have proven to be very useful in predicting behavior, emotional responses, coping tendencies, and adequacy of adjustment to difficult life circumstances. They are often referred to as resource or resilience variables, because they represent the presence of motivational properties that permit people to sustain and even thrive under adversity.

279

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

David Trafimow is a professor in the psychology department at New Mexico State University who has published widely on the determinants of behaviors such as attitudes, subjective norms, affect, cognition, beliefs, evaluations of beliefs, and others. His goal is to understand the causes of human behaviors. He has also published widely in the areas of attribution and self-concepts. Finally, he also has an interest in statistics.

280

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Champion, V., Skinner, C. S., Hui, S., Monahan, P., Juliar, B., Daggy, J. et al. (2007). The effect of telephone versus print tailoring for mammography adherence. Patient Education and Counseling, 65, 416-423.). For lifestyle behaviors such as healthy eating, exercising regularly, and smoking cessation, key barriers appear to be social-environmental-peer pressure, negative emotions or mood, stress, and habitual patterns associated with undesired behaviors (Glasgow et al., 2001 xClose Glasgow, R.

281

Integrating community health workers in schools  

E-print Network

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) has set the tone for a radically revised health landscape in America that focuses on community-based care. Our health care system, however, has neither the infrastructure ...

Williams, Roy Jerome, III

2013-01-01

282

Behavioral systems analysis in health and human services.  

PubMed

This article provides a behavioral systems approach to improve operational performance in health and human service organizations. This article provides six performance truths that are relevant to any organization and a case study from a community mental health network of agencies. A comprehensive analysis, as described here, will help health and human service leaders identify the critical areas in which to focus improvement efforts to better achieve their organizational mission. PMID:20935242

McGee, Heather M; Diener, Lori H

2010-09-01

283

Covariance among Multiple Health Risk Behaviors in Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Purpose In a diverse group of early adolescents, this study explores the co-occurrence of a broad range of health risk behaviors: alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use; physical inactivity; sedentary computing/gaming; and the consumption of low-nutrient energy-dense food. We tested differences in the associations of unhealthy behaviors over time, and by gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Methods Participants were 8360 students from 16 middle schools in California (50% female; 52% Hispanic, 17% Asian, 16% White, and 15% Black/multiethnic/other). Behaviors were measured with surveys in Spring 2010 and Spring 2011. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess if an underlying factor accounted for the covariance of multiple behaviors, and composite reliability methods were used to determine the degree to which behaviors were related. Results The measured behaviors were explained by two moderately correlated factors: a ‘substance use risk factor’ and an ‘unhealthy eating and sedentary factor’. Physical inactivity did not reflect the latent factors as expected. There were few differences in the associations among these behaviors over time or by demographic characteristics. Conclusions Two distinct, yet related groups of health compromising behaviors were identified that could be jointly targeted in multiple health behavior change interventions among early adolescents of diverse backgrounds. PMID:24858838

de la Haye, Kayla; D'Amico, Elizabeth J.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Ewing, Brett; Tucker, Joan S.

2014-01-01

284

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Risk. Worry about a health event is likely to be related to one's appraisal of risk concerning that event. Indeed, Slovic (1987) xClose Slovic, P. (1987). The perception of risk. Science, 236, 280-285.

285

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Illness representations are one class of illness cognitions which in a general sense might also include other cognitive constructs related to health threats, including perceived vulnerability, optimism and self-efficacy beliefs, as well as perceptions of social norms.

286

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 General Description and Theoretical Background 2 Role of Perceived Severity in Health Behaviour Theories 3 Protection Motivation Theory and Extended Parallel Process Model. 4 Measurement Issues 5 Similar Constructs 6 References 7 Appendices:

287

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

1 General Description and Theoretical Background 2 Role of Perceived Severity in Health Behaviour Theories 3 Protection Motivation Theory and Extended Parallel Process Model. 4 Measurement Issues 5 Similar Constructs 6 References 7 Appendices: Severity

288

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Fear and worry about illness. These emotions are closely linked to the concept of severity and have been included in some measures of severity, but usually only in the context of the Health Belief Model (e.g. Champion, 1984 xClose Champion, V. L. (1984). Instrument development for health belief model constructs. ANS Adv. Nurs. Sci. 6, 73-85.; Maiman et al., 1977 xClose Maiman, L. A., Becker, M. H., Kirscht, J. P., Haefner, D. P.

289

Social Learning Theory and Behavioral Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health costs in the US have risen at astronomic rates, rising from 4.6% of the GNP in 1950 to 8.3% in 1975. Yet, despite the compounding costs of medical care, the health of the population has not improved significantly since 1950, when viewed from the standpoint of increased longevity or decrease in the incidence of the major causes of death

Kenton L. Burns

1979-01-01

290

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Thomas Wills is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. His background is in social psychology and health psychology. He has published in areas including social support, social comparison, and stress and coping in adolescence. His research program has tested theoretical models of adolescent substance use which involve multiple levels of influence on adolescents, from broader environmental factors to family and peer influences.

291

Systematic literature review of Internet interventions across health behaviors  

PubMed Central

Purpose: This review examines Internet interventions aiming to change health behaviors in the general population. Methods: Internet health interventions in the USA published between January 2005 and December 2013 were identified through Medline and CINAHL. Keywords used were (Internet or e-health or social media or web) paired with (intervention or program*). A total of 38 articles met all criteria and were reviewed. Results: Studies were analyzed by targeted health behavior interventions: tobacco (5), alcohol (4), weight loss (7), physical activity (PA) (7), nutrition (2), PA and nutrition combined (5), HIV or sexual health (4), and chronic diseases (4). Interventions ranged from one session to 24? weeks (average 6–12 weeks). Common strategies used, including web-based information, tailored feedback, weekly e-mails, goal setting, and self-assessment. Social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical models were the most commonly used frameworks. Recruitment strategies were typically media based varied by settings and populations. Except for the tobacco interventions, the majority studies yielded significant outcomes. Conclusion: This review provides updates and synthesized knowledge on the design and consistent effectiveness of Internet interventions across health behaviors. Results have implications for public health and healthcare professionals, as they play a key role in developing and delivering health promotion interventions as well as in assisting the communities and clients serviced obtaining evidence-based health information. PMID:25750795

Hou, Su-I; Charlery, Su-Anne Robyn; Roberson, Kiersten

2014-01-01

292

Behavioral Health Providers and Electronic Health Records: An Exploratory Beliefs Elicitation and Segmentation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is a public policy strategy to improve healthcare quality and reduce accelerating health care costs. Much research has focused on medical providers' perceptions of EHRs, but little is known about those of behavioral health providers. This research was informed by the theory of reasoned…

Shank, Nancy

2011-01-01

293

Longitudinal Evaluation of Peer Health Education on a College Campus: Impact on Health Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors investigated the longitudinal impact of peer health education on the health behaviors of undergraduate students pertaining to alcohol and drug use, eating and nutrition, and sexual health. Participants: From fall 2003 to spring 2006, the authors annually administered a Web-based survey to a cohort of 2,000 randomly selected…

White, Sabina; Park, Yong S.; Israel, Tania; Cordero, Elizabeth D.

2009-01-01

294

Health-Related Quality of Life and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Black Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the health-related quality of life and health-promoting behaviors in a convenience sample of low-income black men. Almost three-fourths reported their overall health as good or better. However, the mean number of recent (that is, past 30 days) mentally unhealthy days was 13.12, and more than half reported frequent (greater than…

Calvert, Wilma J.; Isaac,, E. Paulette; Johnson, Sharon

2012-01-01

295

Health for the Hopeful: A Study of Attachment Behavior in Home Health Care Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Home health nursing is a growth industry in Western industrialized countries and is a stressful occupation. The current study builds on a line of research that examined the positive effects of attachment behavior at work on health for executives, managers, military officer candidates, and basic military trainees. The present study of 175 home health nurses from the U.S. Southwest included

Bret L. Simmons; Debra L. Nelson; James Campbell Quick

2003-01-01

296

Clustering of health-related behaviors, health outcomes and demographics in Dutch adolescents: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Recent studies show several health-related behaviors to cluster in adolescents. This has important implications for public health. Interrelated behaviors have been shown to be most effectively targeted by multimodal interventions addressing wider-ranging improvements in lifestyle instead of via separate interventions targeting individual behaviors. However, few previous studies have taken into account a broad, multi-disciplinary range of health-related behaviors and connected these behavioral patterns to health-related outcomes. This paper presents an analysis of the clustering of a broad range of health-related behaviors with relevant demographic factors and several health-related outcomes in adolescents. Methods Self-report questionnaire data were collected from a sample of 2,690 Dutch high school adolescents. Behavioral patterns were deducted via Principal Components Analysis. Subsequently a Two-Step Cluster Analysis was used to identify groups of adolescents with similar behavioral patterns and health-related outcomes. Results Four distinct behavioral patterns describe the analyzed individual behaviors: 1- risk-prone behavior, 2- bully behavior, 3- problematic screen time use, and 4- sedentary behavior. Subsequent cluster analysis identified four clusters of adolescents. Multi-problem behavior was associated with problematic physical and psychosocial health outcomes, as opposed to those exerting relatively few unhealthy behaviors. These associations were relatively independent of demographics such as ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status. Conclusions The results show that health-related behaviors tend to cluster, indicating that specific behavioral patterns underlie individual health behaviors. In addition, specific patterns of health-related behaviors were associated with specific health outcomes and demographic factors. In general, unhealthy behavior on account of multiple health-related behaviors was associated with both poor psychosocial and physical health. These findings have significant meaning for future public health programs, which should be more tailored with use of such knowledge on behavioral clustering via e.g. Transfer Learning. PMID:24305509

2013-01-01

297

Integrating individual and public health perspectives for treatment of tobacco dependence under managed health care: A combined stepped-care and matching model  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increasing momentum to integrate prevention into mainstream health care. Three decades of research on tobacco\\u000a dependence can provide insights into the conceptual, clinical, economic, and service delivery challenges to such an integration.\\u000a Biological sciences, cognitive-behavioral, clinical treatment outcome, and public health arenas are selectively reviewed.\\u000a The key conceptual issues are explored relevant to the optimal delivery of

David B. Abrams; C. Tracy Orleans; Raymond S. Niaura; Michael G. Goldstein; James O. Prochaska; Wayne Velicer

1996-01-01

298

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Selected 2011 National Health Risk Behaviors and Health Outcomes by Race/Ethnicity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

299

Health literacy and public health: A systematic review and integration of definitions and models  

PubMed Central

Background Health literacy concerns the knowledge and competences of persons to meet the complex demands of health in modern society. Although its importance is increasingly recognised, there is no consensus about the definition of health literacy or about its conceptual dimensions, which limits the possibilities for measurement and comparison. The aim of the study is to review definitions and models on health literacy to develop an integrated definition and conceptual model capturing the most comprehensive evidence-based dimensions of health literacy. Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify definitions and conceptual frameworks of health literacy. A content analysis of the definitions and conceptual frameworks was carried out to identify the central dimensions of health literacy and develop an integrated model. Results The review resulted in 17 definitions of health literacy and 12 conceptual models. Based on the content analysis, an integrative conceptual model was developed containing 12 dimensions referring to the knowledge, motivation and competencies of accessing, understanding, appraising and applying health-related information within the healthcare, disease prevention and health promotion setting, respectively. Conclusions Based upon this review, a model is proposed integrating medical and public health views of health literacy. The model can serve as a basis for developing health literacy enhancing interventions and provide a conceptual basis for the development and validation of measurement tools, capturing the different dimensions of health literacy within the healthcare, disease prevention and health promotion settings. PMID:22276600

2012-01-01

300

Behavioral & Community Health MPH Program Plan Last Name, First Name_______________________ UID# __________________  

E-print Network

Behavioral & Community Health MPH Program Plan Last Name, First Name_______________________ UID) ______________________________ _______ ____________ HLTH 774 Community Health Program Planning (3 credits) _____________________________ _______ ____________ HLTH 776 Community Health Program Evaluation (3 credits

Hill, Wendell T.

301

How Does Service Workers’ Behavior Affect Their Health? Service Climate as a Moderator in the Service Behavior–Health Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address the question of whether providing high-quality service deteriorates or benefits workers’ health, a contingency model was tested that focused on service climate as a moderator. This interacts with service behavior to affect workers’ perceptions of emotional exhaustion, hence their physical and mental health. Findings of this study with 328 nurses from 66 nursing units indicated that congruent conditions

Anat Drach-Zahavy

2010-01-01

302

Sensor Technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Management of Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is focusing considerable efforts on technology development for Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems. The research in this area is targeted toward increasing aerospace vehicle safety and reliability, while reducing vehicle operating and maintenance costs. Onboard, real-time sensing technologies that can provide detailed information on structural integrity are central to such a health management system. This paper describes a number of sensor technologies currently under development for integrated vehicle health management. The capabilities, current limitations, and future research needs of these technologies are addressed.

Prosser, W. H.; Brown, T. L.; Woodard, S. E.; Fleming, G. A.; Cooper, E. G.

2002-01-01

303

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

A variety of barrier assessment procedures have been developed for a spectrum of diverse cancer screening behaviors, other conditions including diabetes, HIV, pain, and panic attacks, and specific behaviors including medication adherence, healthy eating, physical activity, smoking cessation, and weight management. A PubMed search for "barriers to adherence" produced 1,002 articles and a search for "barriers to cancer screening" produced 1,346. Various procedures have been used to assess barriers including qualitative interviews, open-ended questionnaires, and structured surveys.

304

Is vertical integration adding value to health systems?  

PubMed

Vertical integration is a concept used by health systems when attempting to achieve economies of scale, greater coordination of services, and improved market penetration. This article focuses on the actual outcomes of utilizing vertical integration in the health field and then compares these findings with those reported in other industries. This analysis concludes that this organizational model does not work particularly well in the health industry, as illustrated by health alliances' poor fiscal performance when they acquire physician practices or when they start their own HMO plans. PMID:11066284

Weil, T P

2000-04-01

305

The case for integrating oral health into primary health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe disparities in oral health and inequities in access to oral health care exist globally. In New Zealand, the cost of oral health services is high. Physician services and medicines are heavily subsidised by the government—however, in contrast, private financing, either as out-of-pocket payments or as private insurance, dominates dental care. Consequently, the use of services is often prompted by

Santosh Jatrana; Peter Crampton; Sara Filoche

2009-01-01

306

Integrating mental health and social development in theory and practice.  

PubMed

In many low and middle income countries, attention to mental illness remains compartmentalized and consigned as a matter for specialist policy. Despite great advances in global mental health, mental health policy and practice dovetail only to a limited degree with social development efforts. They often lag behind broader approaches to health and development. This gap ignores the small but growing evidence that social development unavoidably impacts the mental health of those affected, and that this influence can be both positive and negative. This article examines the theoretical and practical challenges that need to be overcome for a more effective integration of social development and mental health policy. From a theoretical perspective, this article demonstrates compatibility between social development and mental health paradigms. In particular, the capability approach is shown to provide a strong framework for integrating mental health and development. Yet, capability-oriented critiques on 'happiness' have recently been applied to mental health with potentially detrimental outcomes. With regard to policy and practice, horizontal and vertical integration strategies are suggested. Horizontal strategies require stronger devolution of mental health care to the primary care level, more unified messages regarding mental health care provision and the gradual expansion of mental health packages of care. Vertical integration refers to the alignment of mental health with related policy domains (particularly the social, economic and political domains). Evidence from mental health research reinforces aspects of social development theory in a way that can have tangible implications on practice. First, it encourages a focus on avoiding exclusion of those affected by or at risk of mental illness. Secondly, it underscores the importance of the process of implementation as an integral component of successful policies. Finally, by retaining a focus on the individual, it seeks to avoid uneven approaches to development. PMID:24452138

Plagerson, Sophie

2015-03-01

307

Primary Care: Mental and Behavioral Health and Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities  

PubMed Central

Introduction: There are multiple ways to address the mental and behavioral health needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Method: In this paper, we do not argue for a particular approach or set of approaches, but instead review the benefits of integrating mental and behavioral health supports with primary healthcare based primarily on our experience in and understanding of healthcare systems in the United States. It is estimated that between 35 and 40% of people with IDD also live with psychiatric disorders. NADD, an association for persons with developmental disabilities and mental health needs in the US holds that coexisting IDD and a psychiatric disorder interferes with a person’s education and job readiness, and disrupts family and peer relationships. Historically, the presence of such disorders among people with IDD was not well understood or was discounted altogether. Conclusion: Over the past 15?years, however, greater attention is being paid to these comorbidities and their treatment, including the need to integrate mental and behavioral health treatments into primary care. Healthcare must account for multiple domains of quality of life, going beyond yearly physicals, and acute care visits, for example, to assess individuals’ healthcare goals and support them in achieving those goals. While integrated healthcare delivery systems can be difficult to find and access for people with IDD, such approaches are more responsive to the comprehensive needs and desires of people with IDD. PMID:25072047

Ervin, David A.; Williams, Ashley; Merrick, Joav

2014-01-01

308

The health and health behaviors of a sample of African American pastors.  

PubMed

There is growing concern for the health status of clergy in light of recent studies showing high rates of chronic health conditions and obesity. This manuscript examined the health and health behaviors of South Carolinian African Methodist Episcopal (AME) pastors (n = 40). A majority of pastors were overweight or obese (93%) with hypertension (68%); half had two or more chronic health conditions, 35% had high cholesterol, 30% arthritis, and 20% diabetes. On average, pastors had a waist circumference that put them at an increased risk for disease. Yet, with the exception of fruit and vegetable consumption (mean = 3.4 ± 4.0 cups/day), pastors generally engaged in positive health behaviors. Understanding where the greatest needs lie is the first step in developing programs that can improve pastor health, which may ultimately improve the health of their congregations. PMID:24509023

Baruth, Meghan; Wilcox, Sara; Evans, Rebecca

2014-02-01

309

Brief integrative multiple behavior intervention effects and mediators for adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the efficacy of a brief integrative multiple behavior intervention and assessed risk factors as mediators\\u000a of behavioral outcomes among older adolescents. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with participants randomly assigned\\u000a to either a brief intervention or standard care control with 3-month follow-up. A total of 479 students attending two public\\u000a high schools participated. Participants receiving the

Chudley E. Werch; Hui Bian; Joan M. Carlson; Michele J. Moore; Carlo C. DiClemente; I-Chan Huang; Steven C. Ames; Dennis Thombs; Robert M. Weiler; Steven B. Pokorny

2011-01-01

310

How does service workers' behavior affect their health? Service climate as a moderator in the service behavior-health relationships.  

PubMed

To address the question of whether providing high-quality service deteriorates or benefits workers' health, a contingency model was tested that focused on service climate as a moderator. This interacts with service behavior to affect workers' perceptions of emotional exhaustion, hence their physical and mental health. Findings of this study with 328 nurses from 66 nursing units indicated that congruent conditions of service climate and behaviors benefited workers' health, whereas incongruent conditions affected it adversely. The findings are discussed in light of stress, and emotion-work perspectives. PMID:20364909

Drach-Zahavy, Anat

2010-04-01

311

Behavior, Environment, and Health in Developing  

E-print Network

behaviors respond to disease levels in an exposure-management dynamic. Furthermore, if impacts on others of this analysis "confirms that approximately one-quarter of the global disease burden, and more than one-third of the burden among children, is due to modifiable environmental factors" (Pru¨ss-U¨ stu¨n & Corvalan 2006, p. 6

Pfaff, Alex

312

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The constructs of optimism (assessed both directly as expectancies and indirectly as attributional tendencies) and hope have been examined in a great many studies. They have proven to be quite useful as predictors of behavior and emotional experiences in a wide variety of settings (Bandura, 1997 xClose Bandura, A. (1997).

313

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Bleiker, E.M., Menko, F.H., Taal, B.G., Kluijt, I., Wever, L.D., Gerritsma, M.A., et al. (2005). Screening behavior of individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer. Gastroenterology, 128(2), 280-287.

314

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Outcome expectancy is the expectation that a behavior will produce a set of outcomes, i.e., the belief that a given action will lead to a defined result, whether beneficial or not (Bandura, 1982,x Close Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37(2), 122-147. 1997x Close Bandura, A. (1997).

315

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The concepts of optimism and pessimism concern people's expectations for the future. These concepts have ties to centuries of folk wisdom and also to a class of psychological theories of motivation, called expectancy-value theories. Such theories suggest a logical basis for some of the ways in which optimism and pessimism influence people's behavior and emotions.

316

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Normative beliefs are individuals' beliefs about the extent to which other people who are important to them think they should or should not perform particular behaviors. In general, researchers who measure normative beliefs also measure motivations to comply-how much individuals wish to behave consistently with the prescriptions of important others.

317

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

It may happen that a behavior is more under attitudinal than normative control. In this case, if attitudes are amenable to intervention, this would be the most straightforward strategy. However, it may be that attitudes are not amenable to intervention whereas normative beliefs are. Is there a way to increase the importance of normative beliefs?

318

Health literacy and nutrition behaviors among low-income adults.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between health literacy and nutrition behaviors using a low-income sample. Face-to-face surveys at 11 social services offices generated a convenience sample of 154 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-eligible adults. We assessed health literacy, fruit and vegetable intake, food label use, consumption of healthy foods, and demographic characteristics. Thirty seven percent of the sample had adequate health literacy as measured by the Newest Vital Sign (NVS). Race and parenthood were significantly related to health literacy scores. Adequate health literacy, as measured by the NVS, was associated with frying chicken less often and eating the peels of fresh fruit more often. The findings suggest that health practitioners should ensure nutrition-related messages are accessible to all of their clients, especially those with the lowest health literacy levels. PMID:24212161

Speirs, Katherine E; Messina, Lauren A; Munger, Ashley L; Grutzmacher, Stephanie K

2012-08-01

319

78 FR 38345 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-06-26

320

78 FR 48877 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-08-12

321

78 FR 69853 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-11-21

322

77 FR 33220 - Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2012-06-05

323

Integrating sensorimotor systems in a robot model of cricket behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanisms by which animals manage sensorimotor integration and coordination of different behaviors can be investigated in robot models. In previous work the first author has build a robot that localizes sound based on close modeling of the auditory and neural system in the cricket. It is known that the cricket combines its response to sound with other sensorimotor activities such as an optomotor reflex and reactions to mechanical stimulation for the antennae and cerci. Behavioral evidence suggests some ways these behaviors may be integrated. We have tested the addition of an optomotor response, using an analog VLSI circuit developed by the second author, to the sound localizing behavior and have shown that it can, as in the cricket, improve the directness of the robot's path to sound. In particular it substantially improves behavior when the robot is subject to a motor disturbance. Our aim is to better understand how the insect brain functions in controlling complex combinations of behavior, with the hope that this will also suggest novel mechanisms for sensory integration on robots.

Webb, Barbara H.; Harrison, Reid R.

2000-10-01

324

Health-Risking Social Behaviors: Moving Forward  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have a long history of supporting investigator-initiated research and research training to enhance the scientific understanding of and effective interventions for a range of problems associated with youth violence. New technologies are emerging and basic…

Price, L. N.; Reider, E. E.; Robertson, E. B.

2006-01-01

325

Health-Enhancing Behaviors Chapter Four  

E-print Network

in cardiovascular fitness and endurance ! 30-minute/day decreases the risk of chronic disease ! Increased longevity that fit your lifestyle and schedule #12;Exercise: Benefits 1) Physical Health Benefits: ! ! Increases tolerance in diabetics, reduced weight, cardiovascular disease, colon cancer, stroke, low back pain

Meagher, Mary

326

Health Education & Behavior 2012 Society for Public  

E-print Network

in the groundwater of the Bengal Basin (Ahmed et al., 2006). Drinking water containing elevated lev- els of arsenic Health Orga- nization guideline for arsenic of 10 µg/L because of naturally occurring arsenic). Arsenic mitigation in Bangladesh, though significant, has impacted less than half of the affected

van Geen, Alexander

327

Health Enhancing Behavior Maintaining a Healthy Diet  

E-print Network

40% (colon, breast, stomach, pancreas) Switch from transfats and saturated fats to polyunsaturated and monosaturated fats Poor diets are problems in conjunction with other risk factors, such as stress which increases lipid reactivity Good News! Changing one's diet improves health, e.g.,high fiber reduces risk

Meagher, Mary

328

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived severity (also called perceived seriousness) refers to the negative consequences an individual associates with an event or outcome, such as a diagnosis of cancer. These consequences may relate to an anticipated event that may occur in the future, or to a current state such as a pre-existing health problem.

329

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Measures of severity tend to be associated with a particular theoretical framework. For example, there are measures of severity developed in the context of the Health Belief Model (Maiman et al., 1977 xClose Maiman, L. A., Becker, M. H., Kirscht, J. P., Haefner, D. P.

330

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Social Network. Measures of social network composition typically ask about the number of persons with whom one has regular social interaction. Having a larger social network is a significant protective factor for physical health problems, but the mechanisms for this are not well understood (Uchino, 2004 xClose Uchino, B. N. (2004).

331

Adequate sleep among adolescents is positively associated with health status and health-related behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Amount of sleep is an important indicator of health and well-being in children and adolescents. Adequate sleep (AS: adequate sleep is defined as 6–8 hours per night regularly) is a critical factor in adolescent health and health-related behaviors. The present study was based on a health promotion project previously conducted on adolescents in Tao-Yuan County, Taiwan. The aim was

Mei-Yen Chen; Edward K Wang; Yi-Jong Jeng

2006-01-01

332

Older Male Prisoners: Health Status, Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Health-Promoting Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fastest-growing prison subgroup is men age 50 years and older, of whom 85% have multiple chronic health conditions. This pilot study examined relationships between health status, self-efficacy beliefs, and behaviors through a convenience sample survey of 51 older male prisoners. Inmates with greater self-efficacy (i.e., confidence) in their health self-management abilities were significantly more likely to rate their health

Susan J. Loeb; Darrell Steffensmeier

2006-01-01

333

Shaping the Future of Health Education: From Behavior Change to Social Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The view that individual behavior change is the primary goal of health education presents several serious problems. Although individual behavior does contribute to health and disease, social organization is perhaps a more powerful influence. The use of behavior change as the primary tool for health education raises grave ethical issues. Health education which seeks to change individual behavior has also

Nicholas Freudenberg

1978-01-01

334

Health decision behaviors: Appropriateness of dietary choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dietary choice is a complex mechanism that is influenced by multiple internal and external factors that impact individuals across the life span. The study was designed to examine how individuals make snack food choices based on integration of food motives (cues), appropriateness (nutritional index) as functions of nutritional knowledge, food-related motives, and information processing styles. Community college students participated in

Daryle Hermelin Wane

2008-01-01

335

75 FR 38099 - Establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Office of the Secretary, Office of Public Health and Science. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health will be governed by...

2010-07-01

336

The Health Fair as a Health Promotion Strategy: Effects on Health Risk Behaviors and the Utility of Specific Health Fair Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health fairs, carnivals, and exhibitions are health promotion strategies that have been frequently discussed in recent health-related literature. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if students attending a university health fair experienced greater reductions in health risk behavior compared with those not attending the fair. A second purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of

Chudley E. Werch; David A. Schroeder; Linda L. Matthews

1986-01-01

337

Integrating local agriculture into nutrition programs can benefit children's health  

E-print Network

nutrition programs can benefit children’s health Childhoodchildhood obesity requires a multifaceted approach: a co- ordinated, comprehensive program that integrates messages regarding nutrition,Childhood Obesity Morris JL, Zidenberg-Cherr S. 2002. Garden-enhanced nutrition

Scherr, Rachel E; Cox, Rachel J; Feenstra, Gail; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

2013-01-01

338

FRAMEWORK FOR THE INTEGRATION OF HEALTH AND ECOLOIGCAL RISK ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The World Health Organization's International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have developed a collaborative partnership to foster integration; of assessment approa...

339

Distal and Proximal Factors of Health Behaviors and Their Associations with Health in Children and Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim of the present paper was to analyze factors affecting distal and proximal health behavior within a biopsychosocial model for examining their interactions and associations with respect to health. Methods: Path analysis was based on the nationwide, cross-sectional German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (2003 to 2006). The data was collected from 4,529 participants with an average age of 9.45 years (SD = 4.01). Socio-demographic data, psychosocial factors and health behavior were assessed via questionnaire. Participants also underwent physical fitness tests and a medical examination. Results: Over the five levels of the model analyzed with socioeconomic status, immigration background, and rural-urban differences on the first level; physical activity of relatives and peers, intrinsic motivation, and quality of life on the second level; eating patterns, sedentary behavior, and physical activity on the third level; physical fitness and objective health on the fourth level; and health complaints and subjective health on the fifth level; direct, moderation, and mediation effects could be shown. Conclusions: Several distal and proximal factors are needed to take account of the multivariate complexity of health: e.g., immigration background affected health behaviors only indirectly and the effect of physical activity on objective health was mediated by physical fitness. PMID:23863614

Lämmle, Lena; Woll, Alexander; Mensink, Gert B. M.; Bös, Klaus

2013-01-01

340

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Personal control is the perception that one has the ability, resources, or opportunities to get positive outcomes or avoid negative effects through one's own actions. The concept of control has been one of the most pervasive and enduring ideas in psychological research and theory. Numerous theories posit an important role in human behavior for control constructs such as self-efficacy (Bandura, 1977 xClose Bandura, A. (1977).

341

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Self-report data are essential to behavioral research and clinical practice. Self-report is one of the primary means of obtaining information about a person, placing it at the heart of the research history that underlies much of cancer diagnosis and care. There are numerous benefits of retrospective self-reports, such as the expeditious development and modification of measures that are easy to administer and complete.

342

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Optimistic biases are thought to represent one example of an array of self-serving beliefs that may influence behavior including the illusion of control (Langer, 1975 xClose Langer, E. J. (1975). The illusion of control. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 32, 311-328. ), the better-than-average effect (e.g., Alicke et al., 1995 xClose Alicke, M. D., Klotz, M. L., Breitenbecher, D. L., Yurak, T.

343

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Identifying response and critical cues. To form an implementation intention, the person must first identify a response that is instrumental for goal attainment and, second, anticipate a critical cue to initiate that response. For example, the person might specify the behavior "perform breast self-examination" and specify a situational cue "just before I leave the shower tomorrow morning" in order to enact the goal intention of detecting possible breast cancer.

344

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Self-reported cancer screening. Cancer screening is a commonly reported clinical assessment designed to facilitate early detection, and regular screening is important for reducing morbidity and mortality across an array of cancer types. Although more objective alternatives exist for determining screening practices in the population (e.g., health insurance or medical records), self-report of screening is nonetheless the measure of choice in the majority of studies.

345

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived severity also forms part of threat perception in both Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) and the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM). In PMT, severity and vulnerability promote health motivation along with efficacy beliefs, but this is offset by the intrinsic and extrinsic rewards associated with 'unhealthy' behaviour and the costs associated with performing the recommended behaviour. In EPPM, however, the focus is solely on the balance between threat and efficacy beliefs.

346

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Most research has investigated optimistic biases at the group level, which has been sufficient given the predominant focus on which types of events, comparative targets, and other factors elicit the most bias. However, in order to establish the utility of this construct in the domain of health, it is necessary to measure optimistic bias at the level of the individual. Given the difficulties of doing so, research taking this approach is in its infancy.

347

Integration of Basic Sciences in Health's Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and…

Azzalis, L. A.; Giavarotti, L.; Sato, S. N.; Barros, N. M. T.; Junqueira, V. B. C.; Fonseca, F. L. A.

2012-01-01

348

Social relationships and health related behaviors among older US adults  

PubMed Central

Background Health behaviors are a key determinant of health and well-being that are influenced by the nature of the social environment. This study examined associations between social relationships and health-related behaviors among a nationally representative sample of older people. Methods We analyzed data from three waves (1999–2004) of the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Participants were 4,014 older Americans aged 60 and over. Log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios (PR) for the associations between social relationships and each of the following health behaviors: alcohol use, smoking, physical activity and dental attendance. Results Health-compromising behaviors (smoking, heavy drinking and less frequent dental visits) were related to marital status, while physical activity, a health-promoting behavior, was associated with the size of friendship networks. Smoking was more common among divorced/separated (PR?=?2.1; 95% CI: 1.6, 2.7) and widowed (PR?=?1.7; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.3) respondents than among those married or cohabiting, after adjusting for socio-demographic background. Heavy drinking was 2.6 times more common among divorced/separated and 1.7 times more common among widowed men compared to married/cohabiting men, while there was no such association among women. For women, heavy drinking was associated with being single (PR?=?1.7; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.9). Being widowed was related to a lower prevalence of having visited a dentist compared to being married or living with a partner (PR?=?0.92; 95% CI 0.86, 0.99). Those with a larger circle of friends were more likely to be physically active (PR?=?1.17; 95% CI:1.06, 1.28 for 5–8 versus less than 5 friends). Conclusions Social relationships of older Americans were independently associated with different health-related behaviors, even after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic determinants. Availability of emotional support did not however mediate these associations. More research is needed to assess if strengthening social relationships would have a significant impact on older people’s health behaviors and ultimately improve their health. PMID:24885507

2014-01-01

349

Managed behavioral health care and supply-side economics. 1998 Carl Taube Lecture.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Within the past decade, the mental health care system in the United States has undergone a significant transformation in terms of delivery, financing and work force configuration. Contracting between managed care organizations (MCOs) and providers has become increasingly prevalent, paralleling the trend in health care in general. These managed care carve-outs in behavioral health depend on networks of providers who agree to capitated rates or discounted fees for service for those patients covered by the carve-out contracts. Moreover, the carve-outs use a broader array of mental health providers than is typically found in traditional indemnity plans, encourage time-limited versus long-term treatments and favor providers who are engaged in outpatient care. This phenomenal growth in managed behavioral health care over the past decade includes the rapid growth and quick consolidation of mental health MCOs. The period 1992-1998 shows steady and substantial annual increases in the number of enrollees in mental health MCOs, the figure more than doubling from 78.1 million people in 1992 to a projected 156.6 million in 1998, or 70% of insured lives. Moreover, these vast numbers of enrollees are becoming increasingly consolidated into a smaller number of firms. In 1997, 12 companies controlled nearly 85% of the managed behavioral health care market, with 60% of the market held by the three largest firms. STUDY AIMS: This article reviews empirical data and draws policy implications from the literature on managed behavioral health care in the United States. Starting with spending and spending trend estimates that show the average annual growth rate of mental health expenditures to be lower than that of health care expenditures in general over the past decade, the author examines utilization and price factors that may account for managed-care-induced cost reductions in behavioral health care, with special attention to hospital use patterns, fee discounting and the supply and earnings patterns of various types of mental health provider. In addition, data on staffing ratios and provider mixes of health maintenance organizations and mental health MCOs are reviewed as they reveal at least part of the dynamics of reconfiguration of the mental health work force in this era of managed care. CONCLUSIONS: As measured by changes in utilization and price, widespread application of "classic" managed care techniques such as preadmission review (gatekeeping), concurrent review, case management, standardized clinical guidelines and protocols, volume purchase of services and fee discounting appears to have led to significant cost reductions for providers of both impatient and outpatient mental health services. However, amidst a complex flux of market variables such as risk shifting, changing financial incentives and intensity of competition, not all of the reduction or slowdown in spending can be clearly and purely attributed to managed care. The data on the ongoing reconfiguration of the mental health work force are clearer in their implications: with an oversupply of all types of mental health providers, managed care has significant potential to increase the incidence of provider substitutions and spur the growth of integrated group practices. IMPLICATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: The current body of empirical and policy literature in mental health economics suggests several salient areas of follow-up. Is the proportionately greater impact of managed care on the annual growth rate of mental health care spending a temporary phenomenon or does it signal an enduring difference in the rates of increase between behavioral health care and health care in general? Beyond industry downsizing, what are the substitutions among mental health providers that are going on, and will go on, to produce cost-effective practices? What are the new financial or risk-sharing arrangements between providers and MCOs that will produce appropriate and high-quality mental health services? PMID:11967404

Scheffler, Richard M.

1999-03-01

350

Integrating Substance Use Treatment Into Adolescent Health Care  

PubMed Central

Substance use (SU) problems are common among adolescents, a serious health risk for them and a major public health problem, but are inadequately addressed in most pediatric health care settings. Primary care offers an excellent context for SU assessment and treatment for adolescents and their families, offering better access and a less stigmatized environment for receiving treatment than specialty programs. This paper examines the literature on the integration of substance use treatment with adolescent health care, focusing on 2 areas: Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in Emergency Departments and Primary Care, and School- and College-Based Health Centers. PMID:22872492

Sterling, Stacy; Valkanoff, Tina; Hinman, Agatha; Weisner, Constance

2013-01-01

351

Entrepreneurship management in health services: an integrative model.  

PubMed

This research develops an integrated systems model of entrepreneurship management as a method for achieving health care organizational survival and growth. Specifically, it analyzes current health care environment challenges, identifies roles of managers and discusses organizational theories that are relevant to the health care environment, outlines the role of entrepreneurship in health care, and describes the entrepreneurial manager in the entrepreneurial management process to produce desirable organizational outcomes. The study concludes that as current health care environment continues to show intense competition, entrepreneurial managers are responsible for creating innovations, managing change, investing in resources, and recognizing opportunities in the environment to increase organizational viability. PMID:16583849

Guo, Kristina L

2006-01-01

352

Oral Health Self-Care Behaviors of Rural Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives This analysis describes the dental self-care behaviors used by a multi-ethnic sample of older adults, and it delineates the associations of self-care behaviors with personal characteristics and oral health problems. Methods A cross-sectional comprehensive oral health survey conducted with a random, multi-ethnic (African American, American Indian, white) sample of 635 community-dwelling rural adults aged 60 years and older was completed in two rural southern counties. Results Rural older adults engage in a variety of self-care behaviors, including the use of Over-the-Counter (OTC) Medicine (12.1%), OTC Dental Products (84.3%), Salt (51.0%), Prayer (6.1%), and Complementary Therapies (18.2%). Some gender and ethnic class differences are apparent, with greater use by women of OTC Medicine and Salt, and greater use by African Americans and American Indians of OTC Medicine and OTC Dental Products. Use of dental self-care behaviors appears to be driven by need. Those reporting oral pain, bleeding gums, and dry mouth have a greater odds of engaging in most of the dental self-care behaviors, including use of complementary therapies. Conclusions The major factor leading to the use of self-care behaviors is need. Although oral pain does increase the use of self-care behaviors, so do bleeding gums and dry mouth. Research and practice should address self-care behaviors used for oral health problems in addition to pain. Investigators should expand analysis of dental self-care behavior and the relationship of self-care behavior to the use of professional services. Further research also should explore the use of complementary therapies in dental self-care. PMID:19486460

Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Chen, Haiying; Savoca, Margaret R.; Kohrman, Teresa; Quandt, Sara A.

2008-01-01

353

Linking Human Health and Livestock Health: A “One-Health” Platform for Integrated Analysis of Human Health, Livestock Health, and Economic Welfare in Livestock Dependent Communities  

PubMed Central

Background For most rural households in sub-Saharan Africa, healthy livestock play a key role in averting the burden associated with zoonotic diseases, and in meeting household nutritional and socio-economic needs. However, there is limited understanding of the complex nutritional, socio-economic, and zoonotic pathways that link livestock health to human health and welfare. Here we describe a platform for integrated human health, animal health and economic welfare analysis designed to address this challenge. We provide baseline epidemiological data on disease syndromes in humans and the animals they keep, and provide examples of relationships between human health, animal health and household socio-economic status. Method We designed a study to obtain syndromic disease data in animals along with economic and behavioral information for 1500 rural households in Western Kenya already participating in a human syndromic disease surveillance study. Data collection started in February 2013, and each household is visited bi-weekly and data on four human syndromes (fever, jaundice, diarrhea and respiratory illness) and nine animal syndromes (death, respiratory, reproductive, musculoskeletal, nervous, urogenital, digestive, udder disorders, and skin disorders in cattle, sheep, goats and chickens) are collected. Additionally, data from a comprehensive socio-economic survey is collected every 3 months in each of the study households. Findings Data from the first year of study showed 93% of the households owned at least one form of livestock (55%, 19%, 41% and 88% own cattle, sheep, goats and chickens respectively). Digestive disorders, mainly diarrhea episodes, were the most common syndromes observed in cattle, goats and sheep, accounting for 56% of all livestock syndromes, followed by respiratory illnesses (18%). In humans, respiratory illnesses accounted for 54% of all illnesses reported, followed by acute febrile illnesses (40%) and diarrhea illnesses (5%). While controlling for household size, the incidence of human illness increased 1.31-fold for every 10 cases of animal illness or death observed (95% CI 1.16–1.49). Access and utilization of animal source foods such as milk and eggs were positively associated with the number of cattle and chickens owned by the household. Additionally, health care seeking was correlated with household incomes and wealth, which were in turn correlated with livestock herd size. Conclusion This study platform provides a unique longitudinal dataset that allows for the determination and quantification of linkages between human and animal health, including the impact of healthy animals on human disease averted, malnutrition, household educational attainment, and income levels. PMID:25798951

Thumbi, S. M.; Njenga, M. Kariuki; Marsh, Thomas L.; Noh, Susan; Otiang, Elkanah; Munyua, Peninah; Ochieng, Linus; Ogola, Eric; Yoder, Jonathan; Audi, Allan; Montgomery, Joel M.; Bigogo, Godfrey; Breiman, Robert F.; Palmer, Guy H.; McElwain, Terry F.

2015-01-01

354

Integrating sensorimotor systems in a robot model of cricket behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanisms by which animals manage sensorimotor integration and coordination of different behaviors can be investigated in robot models. In previous work the first author has built a robot that localizes sound based on close modeling of the auditory and neural system in the cricket. It is known that the cricket combines its response to sound with other sensorimotor activities

Barbara H. Webb; Reid R. Harisson

2000-01-01

355

Integrating sensorimotor systems in a robot model of cricket behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanisms by which animals manage sensorimotor integration and coordination of different behaviors can be investigated in robot models. In previous work the first author has build a robot that localizes sound based on close modeling of the auditory and neural system in the cricket. It is known that the cricket combines its response to sound with other sensorimotor activities

Barbara H. Webb; Reid R. Harrison

2000-01-01

356

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Neural Integration of Information Specifying Human  

E-print Network

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Neural Integration of Information Specifying Human Structure from Form,posturetemplates)andcontainnoexplicitmeansfordisambiguatingthethree-dimensionalorientationofaperceivedhuman figure. Are there neural mechanisms in the visual system that represent a moving human figure mechanisms to disambiguate depth ambiguities in two-dimensional body representations. Introduction Humans

Blake, Randolph

357

Top management team behavioral integration, decision quality, and organizational decline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little research on top management teams (TMTs) has sought to understand how group processes may influence organizational outcomes. This study examined the role of TMT behavioral integration in explaining the quality of strategic decisions and how these constructs together influenced organizational decline. Findings from survey data of 116 TMTs and a follow up case study show that TMTs in which

Abraham Carmeli; John Schaubroeck

2006-01-01

358

Harnessing social media for health promotion and behavior change.  

PubMed

Rapid and innovative advances in participative Internet communications, referred to as "social media," offer opportunities for modifying health behavior. Social media let users choose to be either anonymous or identified. People of all demographics are adopting these technologies whether on their computers or through mobile devices, and they are increasingly using these social media for health-related issues. Although social media have considerable potential as tools for health promotion and education, these media, like traditional health promotion media, require careful application and may not always achieve their desired outcomes. This article summarizes current evidence and understanding of using social media for health promotion. More important, it discusses the need for evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of social media and incorporating outcomes research and theory in the design of health promotion programs for social media. PMID:21558472

Korda, Holly; Itani, Zena

2013-01-01

359

Lights, Camera, Action: Integrating Popular Film in the Health Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the benefits as well as the important considerations that should be taken into account in integrating popular films in health education classes. Use of popular films in the classroom, termed "cinema education," is becoming increasingly popular in teaching health education. As a matter of convenience, popular films are easy…

Diez, Keri S.; Pleban, Francis T.; Wood, Ralph J.

2005-01-01

360

Integrating Occupational Health and Safety into TAFE Courses: Curriculum Topics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to help technical and further education (TAFE) curriculum writers in Australia integrate safety education into vocational education courses. It provides a general overview of occupational health and safety from the perspective of TAFE trade training and a brief summary of the major health and safety issues that might be…

Hall, Bob; Mageean, Pauline

361

From social integration to health: Durkheim in the new millennium  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is widely recognized that social relationships and affiliation have powerful effects on physical and mental health. When investigators write about the impact of social relationships on health, many terms are used loosely and interchangeably including social networks, social ties and social integration. The aim of this paper is to clarify these terms using a single framework. We discuss: (1)

Lisa F. Berkman; Thomas Glass; Ian Brissette; Teresa E. Seeman

2000-01-01

362

Social Integration and the Mental Health of Black Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The influence of family, school, and religious social contexts on the mental health of Black adolescents has been understudied. This study used Durkheim's social integration theory to examine these associations in a nationally representative sample of 1,170 Black adolescents, ages 13-17. Mental health was represented by positive and negative…

Rose, Theda; Joe, Sean; Shields, Joseph; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

2014-01-01

363

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Specificity is critical to the assessment of perceived benefits. For example, development of a scale to measure perceived benefits of sun protection must take into account the specific action being considered (e.g., use of sunscreen vs. wearing a hat), and the specific benefits being considered (e.g., decreasing likelihood of skin cancer vs. delaying the appearance of age spots and wrinkles). Thus, developing appropriate operational definitions of benefits will continue to challenge researchers as the construct is used with new behaviors.

364

Developing integrated multistate environmental public health surveillance.  

PubMed

Environmental exposures cause substantial morbidity and mortality in the United States. A major goal of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Environmental Public Health Tracking program is the development of a national network of health and environmental data with analytic tools for rapid evaluation of specific national or regional environmental health concerns. A six-state collaborative project in the northeast United States was established to assess the feasibility of such a system, assessing the possible association between ambient air quality and adverse birth outcomes. For this regional surveillance project, issues were discussed surrounding the design of a mutually acceptable protocol, obtaining human subjects' protection approvals, obtaining and organizing both the exposure and outcome data, analyzing the data both locally and regionally, and planning subsequent interventions to address identified public health concerns. PMID:18849775

Wartenberg, Daniel; Thompson, W Douglas; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Gross, Hillary J; Condon, Suzanne K; Kim, Nancy; Goun, Barbara D; Opiekun, Richard E

2008-01-01

365

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health  

MedlinePLUS

... products and practices. News FDA Public Hearing on Homeopathic Product Regulation (04/20/15) NIH Pain Consortium ... 15) Over-the-Counter Asthma Products Labeled as Homeopathic: FDA Statement - Consumer Warning About Potential Health Risks ( ...

366

Integrating Occupational Safety and Health into TAFE Courses: Policy Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to help administrators, curriculum developers, and teachers integrate occupational health and safety into Australian vocational courses on bricklaying, metal fabrication, and horticulture, this document suggests specific policies and provides further amplification concerning three general policies for that integration. The three general…

Hill, Graham L.; Mageean, Pauline

367

An Integrated Approach for Supervising Mental Health Counseling Interns.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proposes an approach for supervising mental health counseling interns that integrates the developmental model of Littrell, Lee-Borden, and Lorenz, and Bernard's discrimination model. This approach integrates supervisor role, intern skills, and stages of the supervision process. It provides a practical tool for conceptualizing and implementing the…

Nelson, Mark D.; Johnson, Patrick; Thorngren, Jill M.

2000-01-01

368

Integrated approaches to health informatics research and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at a number of approaches to health informatics that support decision-making relevant to the integrated development and management of information systems with clinical and managerial practices in healthcare. Its main aim is to explore three such approaches for integrated development, the soft information systems and technologies methodology, participative simulation modelling and stakeholder analysis. A description of the

Chris Atkinson; Tillal Eldabi; Ray J. Paul; Athanasia Pouloudi

2002-01-01

369

Associations of muscular fitness with psychological positive health, health complaints, and health risk behaviors in Spanish children and adolescents.  

PubMed

We examined the association of muscular fitness with psychological positive health, health complaints, and health risk behaviors in 690 (n = 322 girls) Spanish children and adolescents (6-17.9 years old). Lower body muscular strength was assessed with the standing long jump test, and upper-body muscular strength was assessed with the throw basketball test. A muscular fitness index was computed by means of standardized measures of both tests. Psychosocial positive health, health complaints, and health risk behaviors were self-reported using the items of the Health Behavior in School-aged Children questionnaire. Psychological positive health indicators included the following: perceived health status, life satisfaction, quality of family relationships, quality of peer relationships, and academic performance. We computed a health complaints index from 8 registered symptoms: headache, stomach ache, backache, feeling low, irritability or bad temper, feeling nervous, difficulties getting to sleep, and feeling dizzy. The health risk behavior indicators studied included tobacco use, alcohol use, and getting drunk. Children and adolescents with low muscular fitness (below the mean) had a higher odds ratio (OR) of reporting fair (vs. excellent) perceived health status, low life satisfaction (vs. very happy), low quality of family relationships (vs. very good), and low academic performance (vs. very good). Likewise, children and adolescents having low muscular fitness had a significantly higher OR of reporting smoking tobacco sometimes (vs. never), drinking alcohol sometimes (vs. never), and getting drunk sometimes (vs. never). The results of this study suggest a link between muscular fitness and psychological positive health and health risk behavior indicators in children and adolescents. PMID:22158258

Padilla-Moledo, Carmen; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Mora, Jesús; Castro-Piñero, José

2012-01-01

370

Behavioral Health Competence: An Exploration of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists  

PubMed Central

The behavioral health competence of Army Reserve Occupational Therapists (OT) was examined by electronic survey to determine current levels of competence and highlight pre-deployment training needs. Results indicated that while Army Reserve OTs report high levels of behavioral health competence, many questions regarding diagnosis, assessment, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, and progress arose throughout deployment. OT’s often relied on skills from Level II fieldwork education and entry-level didactic education for competency. Perceived competencies may be compromised by curriculum changes in entry-level education, available fieldwork settings, and a lack of adequate training currently available prior to deployment. PMID:25368437

Arthur, Paul B.; DeCleene, Kate

2014-01-01

371

Health Risk Behaviors in Adolescents With Chronic Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE.The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of risk behaviors and to measure the extent of co-occurrence of these behaviors in chronically ill and healthy adolescents. METHODS.Data were drawn from the 2002 Swiss Multicenter Adolescent Survey on Health database, a nationally representative survey of 7548 adolescents in postman- datory school aged 16 to 20 years. There were

Joan-Carles Suris; Christina Akre; Susan M. Sawyer

2010-01-01

372

The integrity of independent variables in behavior analysis.  

PubMed Central

Establishing a functional relationship between the independent and the dependent variable is the primary focus of applied behavior analysis. Accurate and reliable description and observation of both the independent and dependent variables are necessary to achieve this goal. Although considerable attention has been focused on ensuring the integrity of the dependent variable in the operant literature, similar effort has not been directed at ensuring the integrity of the independent variable. Inaccurate descriptions of the application of the independent variable may threaten the reliability and validity of operant research data. A survey of articles in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis demonstrated that the majority of articles published do not use any assessment of the actual occurrence of the independent variable and a sizable minority do not provide operational definitions of the independent variable. The feasibility and utility of ensuring the integrity of the independent variable is described. PMID:7153187

Peterson, L; Homer, A L; Wonderlich, S A

1982-01-01

373

Health Literacy and Nutrition Behaviors among Low-Income Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between health literacy and nutrition behaviors using a low-income sample. Face-to-face surveys at 11 social services offices generated a convenience sample of 154 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-eligible adults. We assessed health literacy, fruit and vegetable intake, food label use, consumption of healthy foods, and demographic characteristics. Thirty seven percent

Katherine E. Speirs; Lauren A. Messina; Ashley L. Munger; Stephanie K. Grutzmacher

2012-01-01

374

Altruistic social interest behaviors are associated with better mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated whether altruistic social interest behaviors such as engaging in helping others were associated with better physical and mental health in a stratified random sample of 2016 members of the Presbyterian Church throughout the United States.\\u000aMETHODS: Mailed questionnaires evaluated giving and receiving help, prayer activities, positive and negative religious coping, and self-reported physical and mental health.

Carolyn E. Schwartz; Janice Bell Meisenhelder; Yunsheng Ma; George W. Reed

2003-01-01

375

76 FR 16776 - Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Prevention, Health Promotion and Public Health (the ``Council'')....

2011-03-25

376

Toward culturally centered integrative care for addressing mental health disparities among ethnic minorities.  

PubMed

Despite decades of research, recognition and treatment of mental illness and its comorbidities still remain a significant public health problem in the United States. Ethnic minorities are identified as a population that is vulnerable to mental health disparities and face unique challenges pertaining to mental health care. Psychiatric illness is associated with great physical, emotional, functional, and societal burden. The primary health care setting may be a promising venue for screening, assessment, and treatment of mental illnesses for ethnic minority populations. We propose a comprehensive, innovative, culturally centered integrated care model to address the complexities within the health care system, from the individual level, which includes provider and patient factors, to the system level, which includes practice culture and system functionality issues. Our multidisciplinary investigative team acknowledges the importance of providing culturally tailored integrative health care to holistically concentrate on physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral problems among ethnic minorities in a primary care setting. It is our intention that the proposed model will be useful for health practitioners, contribute to the reduction of mental health disparities, and promote better mental health and well-being for ethnic minority individuals, families, and communities. PMID:25383991

Holden, Kisha; McGregor, Brian; Thandi, Poonam; Fresh, Edith; Sheats, Kameron; Belton, Allyson; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

2014-11-01

377

An integrated framework for health and ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The worldHealth Organization's (WHO's) International Program for Chemical Safety has developed a framework for performing risk assessments that integrate the assessment of risks to human health and risks to nonhuman organisms and ecosystems. The WHO's framework recognizes that stakeholders and risk managers have their own processes that are parallel to the scientific process of risk assessment and may interact with the risk assessment at various points, depending on the context. Integration of health and ecology provides consistent expressions of assessment results, incorporates the interdependence of humans and the environment, uses sentinel organisms, and improves the efficiency and quality of assessments relative to independent human health and ecological risk assessments. The advantage of the framework to toxicologists lies in the opportunity to use understanding of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics to inform the integrated assessment of all exposed species.

Suter, Glenn W. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin L. King Drive, MC-A130, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)]. E-mail: suter.glenn@epa.gov; Vermeire, Theo [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (Netherlands); Munns, Wayne R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin L. King Drive, MC-A130, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Sekizawa, Jun [Tokushima University (Japan)

2005-09-01

378

Morbidity Patterns and Health Care Seeking Behavior among Older Widows in India  

PubMed Central

In the process of health transition, India is facing rapid pace of demographic aging. Rapid increase in older adult population posed serious concerns regarding health and health care utilization for them. However, very limited research documented resultant implications of demographic aging for health and health care use in the nexus of marital status and gender. With this perspective, the present study examined patterns in morbidity prevalence and health seeking behaviour among older widows in India. Multivariate logistic regression models were estimated to examine the effects of socio-demographic conditions on morbidity prevalence among older widows and their health care seeking behavior. Data from the latest 60th round of National Sample Survey (NSS), 2004 was used. Overall, morbidity prevalence was 13% greater among older widows compared to older widowers. Adjusted prevalence of communicable and non-communicable diseases was found 74 and 192 per 1000 older widows respectively. At the same time, likelihood of seeking health care services for reported morbidities was substantially lower among older widows. The findings of this study are important to support policy makers and health care providers in identifying individuals ‘at risk’ and could be integrated into the current programs of social, economic and health security for the older persons. PMID:24718291

Agrawal, Gopal; Keshri, Kunal

2014-01-01

379

The relationship between instrumental and expressive traits, health behaviors, and perceived physical health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between instrumental and expressive traits, health behaviors, and self-reported physical health were examined among young adults. Individuals (169 men, 167 women) completed two measures of instrumental and expressive traits, the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Personal Attributes Questionnaire (PAQ). Ethnic background of the sample included 72% European Americans, 13% Latin Americans, 6% Asian Americans, 5% African Americans,

Kim Shifren; Robert L. Bauserman

1996-01-01

380

African American College Students' Health Behaviors and Perceptions of Related Health Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors identify specific health-related behaviors of African American college students and compare them with the students' perceptions of corresponding health issues. Among students surveyed, the rate of cigarette smoking (4%) was very low compared with smoking rates found in a national survey (14%); but alcohol consumption was relatively high (63010), although lower than the national average of 91%. More

Denyce S. Ford; Carolyn R. Goode

1994-01-01

381

Personalized Health Planning With Integrative Health Coaching to Reduce Obesity Risk Among Women Gaining Excess Weight During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women. PMID:24278848

Yang, Nancy Y.; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva

2013-01-01

382

Past-Year Acute Behavioral Health Care Utilization Among Individuals With Mental Health Disorders: Results From the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Prevalence and correlates of past-year acute behavioral health care use were examined. Methods: Data are from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (N = 10,069 adults with behavioral health disorders). Associations between past-year acute behavioral health care use and factors related to health care use were examined through bivariate and logistic regression analyses per Andersen's behavioral

Blake Barrett; M. Scott Young

2012-01-01

383

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

45080 Physiology of Exercise 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 General Elective (lower or upper Core Summary on page 2 Semester Three: [16 Credit Hours] ATTR/EXSC 25057 Human Anatomy and Physiology I/EXSC 25058 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3 See note 2 on page 2 BSCI or CHEM 4 See note 1 on page 2; may

Sheridan, Scott

384

Roadmap: Integrated Health Studies -Health Sciences Bachelor of Science  

E-print Network

45080 Physiology of Exercise 3 PHIL 40005 Health Care Ethics 3 General Elective (lower or upper Core Summary on page 2 Semester Three: [16 Credit Hours] ATTR/EXSC 25057 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and Physiology II 3 BSCI or CHEM 4 See note 1 on page 2; may fulfill Kent Core Basic Sciences Kent Core

Sheridan, Scott

385

Health and impact assessment: Are we seeing closer integration?  

SciTech Connect

Health has always had a place in wider impact assessment activities, from the earliest days of the National Environmental Policy Act in the United States. However, early thinking tended to focus on health protection and environmental health issues, especially in relation to the effects of pollution. The adoption of wider models of health was reflected in impact assessment circles from the early 1990s, with particular emphasis on an integrated approach to impact assessment, especially at the project level, which would see health impact assessment benefiting from working with other forms of impact assessment, such as social and ecological. Yet twenty years later, integration still seems a distant prospect in many countries. In this paper I examine the case for integrating health considerations within the wider IA process, discuss some of the problems that have historically restricted progress towards this end, and explore the degree to which impact assessment practitioners have been successful in seeking to improve the consideration of health in IA. In New Zealand, project-level impact assessment is based on an integrated model under the Resource Management Act. In addition, HIA was recognised in the early 1990s as a valuable addition to the toolkit for project assessment. Since then policy-level HIA has grown supported by extensive capacity building. If health is being integrated into wider impact assessment, it should be happening in New Zealand where so many enabling conditions are met. Three major project proposals from New Zealand are examined, to characterise the broad trends in HIA development in New Zealand in the last ten years and to assess the degree to which health concerns are being reflected in wider impact assessments. The findings are discussed in the context of the issues outlined in the early part of the paper.

Morgan, Richard K., E-mail: rkm@geography.otago.ac.n

2011-07-15

386

Integrating human health into environmental impact assessment: an unrealized opportunity for environmental health and justice.  

PubMed

The National Environmental Policy Act and related state laws require many public agencies to analyze and disclose potentially significant environmental effects of agency actions, including effects on human health. In this paper we review the purpose and procedures of environmental impact assessment (EIA), existing regulatory requirements for health effects analysis, and potential barriers to and opportunities for improving integration of human health concerns within the EIA process. We use statutes, regulations, guidelines, court opinions, and empirical research on EIA along with recent case examples of integrated health impact assessment (HIA)/EIA at both the state and federal level. We extract lessons and recommendations for integrated HIA/EIA practice from both existing practices as well as case studies. The case studies demonstrate the adequacy, scope, and power of existing statutory requirements for health analysis within EIA. The following support the success of integrated HIA/EIA: a proponent recognizing EIA as an available regulatory strategy for public health; the openness of the agency conducting the EIA; involvement of public health institutions; and complementary objectives among community stakeholders and health practitioners. We recommend greater collaboration among institutions responsible for EIA, public health institutions, and affected stakeholders along with guidance, resources, and training for integrated HIA/EIA practice. PMID:19721956

Bhatia, Rajiv; Wernham, Aaron

2009-01-01

387

Integrated Worker Health Protection and Promotion Programs: Overview and Perspectives on Health and Economic Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for integration of OSH and WHP programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. Methods A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes. Results Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes are considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Conclusions Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types. PMID:24284747

Pronk, Nicolaas P.

2014-01-01

388

Health charities, unethical research and organizational integrity.  

PubMed

Organizations, particularly Catholic hospitals, schools and social service agencies, should re-examine their relationships to health and medical charities promoting unethical research such as human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning. Part 6 of the Ethical and Religious Directives provides a helpful framework for ethical analysis and action. PMID:16604750

Brehany, John

2005-01-01

389

Home Health Integration for the Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Balanced Budget Act of 1997, coupled with the effects of the Prospective Payment System implemented in October 2000, has created a situation that seriously compromises the financial viability of existing home health agencies. To survive the maelstrom, agencies must act rapidly to stem the financial hemorrhage and prevent closure. Attention to patient volumes, allowable reimbursement, timely submission of requests

James F. Veronesi

2001-01-01

390

Health and Risk Behaviors of Massachusetts Youth, 2007: The Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the results of two coordinated surveys of Massachusetts adolescents, the 2007 Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey (ESE) and the Massachusetts Youth Health Survey (DPH). These two surveys were supported by funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and administered in a random selection of 124 public…

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2008

2008-01-01

391

Whatever It Takes: Health Compromising Behaviors in Female Athletes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The power and performance model of sport stresses a sport ethic of doing "whatever it takes" to win (Coakley, 2004). Uncritical acceptance of this model may lead to various health-compromising behaviors. Employing achievement goal theory, we examine why female athletes may adopt the power and performance approach. An ego motivational climate and a…

Waldron, Jennifer J.; Krane, Vikki

2005-01-01

392

Contextual Stress and Health Risk Behaviors among African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the longitudinal association between contextual stress and health risk behaviors and the role of protective factors in a community epidemiologically-defined sample of urban African American adolescents (N = 500; 46.4% female). Structural equation modeling was used to create a latent variable measuring contextual stress…

Copeland-Linder, Nikeea; Lambert, Sharon F.; Chen, Yi-Fu; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

2011-01-01

393

Priority Health Behavior Practices among Chinese Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the priority health behaviors among Chinese youth by administering a questionnaire to 1,917 undergraduates enrolled in three universities in China. The response rate was 89.7%. This survey found that 75.2% of the participants tried cigarettes at least once during their lifetime, over half had their first cigarette and alcoholic…

Johnson, Ping H.

2004-01-01

394

Priority Health Behaviors among South African Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the priority health behaviors of South African youth by administering a questionnaire to 635 undergraduate students enrolled in a large metropolitan university in South Africa. Results indicate that 65.5% of the participants tried cigarettes at least once during their lifetime, over 15.2% had their first cigarette and 31.2% had…

Porter, Kandice; Johnson, Ping Hu; Petrillo, Jane

2009-01-01

395

Professional Behavior 1 LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER (LSUHSC),  

E-print Network

School of Allied Health Professions DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIORS, POLICIES of Occupational Therapy, welcomes you to the professional portion of your academic education. As a professional to leave a message with the office staff of the Occupational Therapy Department for that faculty member

396

Multiple Health Behavior Research represents the future of preventive medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the disease and cost burdens, Multiple Health Behavior Research represents the future of preventive medicine. Growing evidence in this special issue and beyond indicates that simultaneous and sequential interventions can be effective. The challenge for the future is to make such interventions more effective, cost effective and less demanding. Co-variation represents one innovative approach in which effective change on

James O. Prochaska

2008-01-01

397

Developing games for health behavior change: Getting started  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Many investigators are considering developing video games for health (video-G4Hs) but have questions about how to get started. This report provides guidance for investigators considering a G4H as a behavioral intervention procedure from a team of experienced G4H developers. Thirteen commonly asked q...

398

Mindfulness and Health Behaviors: Is Paying Attention Good for You?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The investigators examined relations between mindfulness and health behaviors in college students, as well as the role of stress in mediating these effects. Participants: Participants were 553 undergraduates (385 females; mean age = 18.8 years, SD = 2.1) recruited from a university in the northeastern United States. Methods:…

Roberts, Kimberly C.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon

2010-01-01

399

Health Behaviors of Elementary School Children in Rural Southern Illinois.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of patterns of health behavior among rural and small-town children surveyed 1,950 K-6 students from seven southern Illinois elementary schools. Findings indicate that less than half of the students ate the recommended amounts of fruits, vegetables, and grain each day. Males and females smoked at about the same rates, but sixth-grade boys…

Sarvela, Paul D.; Monge, Eduardo A.

1999-01-01

400

Health Behaviors of Nursing Students: A Longitudinal Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 3-year study compared 52 undergraduate nursing students with 93 education majors and with the general population. No significant differences among students on 9 health behaviors appeared. Compared with the general population, nursing students had inadequate time for sleep, exercise, and eating breakfast. (Contains 77 references.) (SK)

Clement, Madeleine; Jankowski, Louis W.; Bouchard, Louise; Perreault, Michel; Lepage, Yves

2002-01-01

401

Preterm infants' orally directed behaviors and behavioral state responses to the integrated H-HOPE intervention.  

PubMed

Preterm infants are challenged by immature infant behavioral organization which may negatively influence their ability to oral feed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the integrated H-HOPE (Hospital to Home: Optimizing the Infant's Environment) intervention would improve infant behavioral organization by increasing the frequency of orally directed behaviors and the proportion of time spent in an alert behavioral state when offered prior to oral feeding. Mother-infant dyads (n=198) were randomly assigned to the H-HOPE intervention or the Attention Control groups. Infants were born at 29-34 weeks gestation and were clinically stable. Mothers had at least two social environmental risk factors such as minority status or less than high school education. H-HOPE is an integrated intervention that included (1) twice-daily infant directed stimulation using the ATVV intervention (auditory, tactile, visual, and vestibular stimuli) and (2) maternal participatory guidance sessions by a nurse-community advocate team. Orally directed behaviors and behavioral states were assessed weekly prior to feeding during hospitalization when infants were able to feed orally. There were no differences between the groups at baseline (Day 0, prior to the initiation of the integrated H-HOPE intervention). We observed a pattern of increased frequency of orally directed behaviors in the H-HOPE intervention group when compared to the Attention Control group, however, the proportion of time spent in an alert behavioral state remained stable in both groups over the course of the study. On Day 7, the H-HOPE intervention group exhibited a significantly higher mean frequency of orally directed behaviors than the Attention Control group (12.6 vs. 7.1 pre-intervention, 51.8 vs. 33.2 during intervention, 4.3 vs. 3.2 immediately after intervention, and 8.9 vs. 5.3 immediately prior to feeding). On Day 7, the H-HOPE intervention group exhibited a significantly higher proportion of time spent in an alert behavioral state only during intervention (0.26 vs. 0.11) and immediately after intervention (0.28 vs. 0.06). These findings are suggestive that the integrated H-HOPE intervention facilitated infant behavioral organization for clinically stable infants born between 29 and 34 weeks gestation. The orally directed behaviors appear to be an important indicator of the infant's preparation for feeding, and when used in conjunction with assessment of behavioral states, are especially valuable to the clinician. Use of this combined assessment approach in practice would strengthen clinician assessment for initiation of (beginning the first oral feeding) and daily preparation for oral feeding in preterm infants. PMID:25189523

White-Traut, Rosemary; Rankin, Kristin M; Pham, Thao; Li, Zhuoying; Liu, Li

2014-11-01

402

Examining the health information-seeking behaviors of Korean Americans.  

PubMed

Many Korean Americans suffer from high levels of cancer incidence and have low cancer screening rates. A significant number of Korean Americans lack adequate information about cancer screening tests. However, little is known about their health behaviors. This article examines exposure to mass media and health information-seeking behaviors for Korean Americans, and their associations with demographic characteristics influencing variations in exposure to the different health information and trust in health information sources. The authors gathered data for this study using a cross-sectional, community-based survey conducted in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area during 2006 and 2007. It was administered to 254 Korean Americans who were 40 years of age or older. This study is part of the first health-related program of research to study exposure to mass media, health and cancer information sources, and seeking preferences and experiences of Korean Americans. Results indicated that Korean ethnic media sources and Internet are important sources used regularly. Age, years of education completed, and English proficiency levels for Korean Americans significantly predicted the likelihood of their Internet use. Low-income Korean Americans with less education were more likely to seek health information in Korean ethnic magazines and newspapers, whereas Korean Americans with higher education and English proficiency were more likely to seek information online. The most trusted source of health information among respondents was from a doctor or other health care professional. Future research should be conducted to determine whether physicians are actually used as a primary source for health information. PMID:22642692

Oh, Kyeung Mi; Kreps, Gary L; Jun, Jungmi; Chong, Elizabeth; Ramsey, Lolita

2012-08-01

403

Health Psychology Exam 1 Learning Objectives 1) Define health psychology and behavioral medicine. What are the four areas of focus  

E-print Network

and behavioral medicine. What are the four areas of focus in Health Psychology? 2) Describe how philosophical, and physician practice. How could we redesign our current health care system to focus on primary prevention and effectiveness studies. 2) Define health behaviors, health habits and primary prevention. Discuss how do

Meagher, Mary

404

Employer-driven consumerism: integrating health into the business model.  

PubMed

Consumer-driven health care is a misnomer. Notwithstanding the enormous role the individual consumer has to play in reshaping the U.S. health care delivery system, this article will focus on the employer as the key driver of change and innovation in the consumerism revolution. American Standard provides a case study of how one major employer has evaluated health care in the context of its business and aggressively integrated consumerism and health into the core of its business. Other companies will appropriately execute consumerism strategies in a fashion consistent with their own needs, culture, resources and populations. However, the principles supporting those strategies will be very much consistent. PMID:16827541

Thompson, Michael; Checkley, Joseph

2006-01-01

405

Development of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI) was developed for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart behaviors") that should occur daily to help promote health and overcome illnesses/diseases: eating a healthy breakfast, eating…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Nolan, Sarah E. M.; Grandoit, Delphia J.; Gonzales, Lucia; Smith, Mary B.; Desmond, Frederic F.

2011-01-01

406

Behavioral Health and Performance Element: Tools and Technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the research into the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) of the Human Research Program. The program element goal is to identify, characterize and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration, and return to terrestrial life. To accomplish this goal the program focuses on applied research that is designed to yield deliverables that reduce risk. There are several different elements that are of particular interest: Behavioral Medicine, Sleep, and team composition, and team work. In order to assure success for NASA missions the Human Research Program develops and validate the standards for each of the areas of interest. There is discussion of the impact on BHP while astronauts are on Long Duration Missions. The effort in this research is to create tools to meet the BHP concerns, these prospective tools are reviewed.

Leveton, Lauren B.

2009-01-01

407

A pilot binational study of health behaviors and immigration.  

PubMed

In the US, Mexican immigrant women often have better health outcomes than non-Hispanic white women despite a greater health risk profile. This cross-sectional pilot study compared women living in Chavinda, Michoacán (n = 102) to women who had migrated from Mexico to Madera, California (n = 93). The interview gathered information on acculturation and risk behaviors including smoking, alcohol use and number of sexual partners. The results suggest that more acculturated women living in the US are more likely to consume alcohol. US residence and higher acculturation level was marginally associated with having more than one sexual partner. There were no differences between odds of smoking among Chavinda and Madera women. While results with acculturation are not consistently significant due to small sample sizes, the results are suggestive that acculturation among immigrant Hispanic women in the US may be associated with adverse health behaviors, and selective migration seems less likely to account for these differences. PMID:20811952

Hennessy-Burt, Tamara E; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Meneses-González, Fernando; Schenker, Marc B

2011-12-01

408

Mental health, demographic, and risk behavior profiles of pregnant survivors of childhood and adult abuse  

PubMed Central

Our objective was to address the gap in knowledge about the extent to which perinatal mental health and risk behaviors are associated with childhood and adult experiences of abuse that arises because of barriers to screening and disclosure about past and current abuse. Survey data from an ongoing study of the effects of posttraumatic stress on childbearing were used to describe four groups of nulliparous women: those with no abuse history, adult abuse only, childhood abuse only, and abuse that occurred during both periods. The rates of abuse history disclosure were higher in the research context than in the clinical settings. Mental health morbidity and risk behaviors occurred in a dose-response pattern with cumulative abuse exposure. Rates of current posttraumatic stress disorder ranged from 4.1% among those never abused to 11.4% (adult only), 16.0% (childhood only), and 39.2% (both periods). Women abused during both periods also were more likely to be using tobacco (21.5%) and drugs (16.5%) during pregnancy. We conclude that mental health and behavioral risk sequelae affect a significant portion of both childhood and adult abuse survivors in prenatal care. The integration into the maternity setting of existing evidence-based interventions for the mental health and behavioral sequelae of abuse is needed. PMID:18984507

Seng, Julia S.; Sperlich, Mickey; Low, Lisa Kane

2015-01-01

409

Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) Toolkit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A framework of software components has been implemented to facilitate the development of ISHM systems according to a methodology based on Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). This framework is collectively referred to as the Toolkit and was developed using General Atomics' Health MAP (TM) technology. The toolkit is intended to provide assistance to software developers of mission-critical system health monitoring applications in the specification, implementation, configuration, and deployment of such applications. In addition to software tools designed to facilitate these objectives, the toolkit also provides direction to software developers in accordance with an ISHM specification and development methodology. The development tools are based on an RCM approach for the development of ISHM systems. This approach focuses on defining, detecting, and predicting the likelihood of system functional failures and their undesirable consequences.

Venkatesh, Meera; Kapadia, Ravi; Walker, Mark; Wilkins, Kim

2013-01-01

410

Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.  

PubMed

The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles presented here are necessary as a complete recipe. Leaders of health systems moving toward integration are cautioned to apply the recipe in full. This article ends with two questions. First, if not an integrated model of health care, what's the alternative? Since it seems clear that many of the existing community-based models are excessively fragmented and inefficient, especially in a reforming U.S. health care marketplace, is there a new model that is superior to the integrated models and, if so, what is it and what are its functional principles? The second question: Is there more than one functional form of integration? This article argues for the most integrated form. Others would argue that clinical integration is sufficient,'s and full integration isn't required. The stability, durability and adaptability of the fully integrated models have, arguably, been tested. The lesser integrated models remain to be proven in an unstable health care marketplace seeking higher levels of economic efficiency. PMID:23888674

Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

2012-01-01

411

Identifying Teachable Moments for Health Behavior Counseling in Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Objective Situations with potential to motivate positive change in unhealthy behavior have been called ‘teachable moments.’ Little is known about how they occur in the primary care setting. Methods Cross-sectional observational design. Audio-recordings collected during 811 physician-patient interactions for 28 physicians and their adult patients were analyzed using Conversation Analysis. Results Teachable moments were observed in 9.8% of the cases, and share three features: (1) the presence of a concern that is salient to the patient that is either obviously relevant to an unhealthy behavior, or through conversation comes to be seen as relevant; (2) a link that is made between the patient’s salient concern and a health behavior that attempts to motivate the patient toward change; and (3) a patient response indicating a willingness to discuss and commit to behavior change. Additionally, we describe phenomena related to, but not teachable moments, including teachable moment attempts, missed opportunities, and health behavior advice. Conclusions Success of the teachable moment rests on the physician’s ability to identify and explore the salience of patient concerns and recognize opportunities to link them with unhealthy behaviors. PMID:21183305

Cohen, Deborah J.; Clark, Elizabeth C.; Lawson, Peter J.; Casucci, Brad; Flocke, Susan A.

2015-01-01

412

Integrating animal health and foodborne disease surveillance.  

PubMed

The control of foodborne diseases from an animal source has become an important part of public health policy. Since the agents that cause these diseases originate in animals, Veterinary Services, as well as Public Health Services, must be involved in their control. Control programmes should be established either through cooperation between the two Services or by the consolidation of all those involved into a single food control agency. Surveillance is an important part of these control programmes. The following questions must be addressed when planning an effective surveillance programme. What is the relative incidence, morbidity, mortality and economic cost of the foodborne disease in humans? Is the animal population the exclusive or a significant source of the human foodborne infection? What kind of surveillance is needed to identify the disease-causing agent in the animal population? Are we interested in identifying all cases of a disease in order to eradicate it or is our aim to reduce its incidence in the animal population? Do we have the ability to control the disease in the animal population? What disease detection tests are available? What are the sensitivity, specificity and cost of these diagnostic tests? Finally, does the country, region or agency involved have the legal, financial and educational resources to carry out this surveillance and follow it up with appropriate action? After these questions have been resolved,the veterinary and public health sectors must jointly decide if surveillance and control are feasible. If so, they can then begin to develop an appropriate programme. PMID:24547641

Berman, E M; Shimshony, A

2013-08-01

413

Gender, marital status and the social control of health behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mortality rates are lower for married individuals than they are for unmarried individuals, and marriage seems to be even more beneficial to men than women in this regard. A theoretical model of social integration and social control is developed to explain why this may occur. Drawing from this model, I hypothesize that marriage may be beneficial to health because many

Debra Umberson

1992-01-01

414

Sedentary Behavior and Health Outcomes: An Overview of Systematic Reviews  

PubMed Central

Objective 1) To synthesize the current observational evidence for the association between sedentary behavior and health outcomes using information from systematic reviews. 2) To assess the methodological quality of the systematic reviews found. Methodology/Principal Findings Medline; Excerpta Medica (Embase); PsycINFO; and Web of Science were searched for reviews published up to September 2013. Additional publications were provided by Sedentary Behaviour Research Network members. The methodological quality of the systematic reviews was evaluated using recommended standard criteria from AMSTAR. For each review, improper use of causal language in the description of their main results/conclusion was evaluated. Altogether, 1,044 review titles were identified, 144 were read in their entirety, and 27 were included. Based on the systematic reviews with the best methodological quality, we found in children and adolescents, strong evidence of a relationship between time spent in sedentary behavior and obesity. Moreover, moderate evidence was observed for blood pressure and total cholesterol, self-esteem, social behavior problems, physical fitness and academic achievement. In adults, we found strong evidence of a relationship between sedentary behavior and all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In addition, there is moderate evidence for incidence rates of ovarian, colon and endometrial cancers. Conclusions This overview based on the best available systematics reviews, shows that sedentary behavior may be an important determinant of health, independently of physical activity. However, the relationship is complex because it depends on the type of sedentary behavior and the age group studied. The relationship between sedentary behavior and many health outcomes remains uncertain; thus, further studies are warranted. PMID:25144686

de Rezende, Leandro Fornias Machado; Rodrigues Lopes, Maurício; Rey-López, Juan Pablo; Matsudo, Victor Keihan Rodrigues; Luiz, Olinda do Carmo

2014-01-01

415

Health behaviors among college students: the influence of future time perspective and basic psychological need satisfaction  

PubMed Central

Health behavior change may prevent many fatal diseases, and may be influenced by social and motivational constructs. We assessed the interaction effect of future time perspective and basic psychological need fulfillment on positive and negative health behaviors. Future time perspective was associated with more positive, and less negative, health behaviors. Need fulfillment was associated with only positive health behaviors. In moderation analyses, individuals reporting both high need fulfillment and future perspective reported greater positive health behaviors, and were especially unlikely to smoke. Enhancing future-mindedness and supporting need satisfaction in interventions targeting modifiable health behaviors is encouraged.

Visser, Preston L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

2014-01-01

416

Health-Promoting and Health-Risk Behaviors: Theory-Driven Analyses of Multiple Health Behavior Change in Three International Samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Co-occurrence of different behaviors was investigated using the theoretical underpinnings of the Transtheoretical Model, the Theory of Triadic Influence and the concept of Transfer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Purpose  To investigate relationships between different health behaviors' stages of change, how behaviors group, and whether study\\u000a participants cluster in terms of their behaviors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Relationships across stages for different behaviors were assessed in three studies with N?=?3,519,

Sonia Lippke; Claudio R. Nigg; Jason E. Maddock

417

Effects of Perceived Racial Discrimination on Health Status and Health Behavior: A Differential Mediation Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Objective Prospective data tested a “differential mediation” hypothesis: The relations (found in previous research) between perceived racial discrimination and physical health status versus health-impairing behavior (problematic substance use) are mediated by two different types of affective reactions, internalizing and externalizing. Methods The sample included 680 African American women from the Family and Community Health Study (M age = 37 at Time 1; 45 at Time 4). Four waves of data were analyzed. Perceived discrimination was assessed, along with anxiety and depression (internalizing) and hostility / anger (externalizing) as mediators, and physical health status and problematic substance use (drinking) as outcomes. Results Structural equation modeling indicated that discrimination predicted increases in both externalizing and internalizing reactions. These affective responses, in turn, predicted subsequent problematic substance use and physical health status, respectively, also controlling for earlier reports. In each case, the indirect effects from discrimination through the affective mediator to the specific health outcome were significant and consistent with the differential mediation hypothesis. Conclusion Perceived racial discrimination is associated with increases in internalizing and externalizing reactions among Black women, but these reactions are related to different health outcomes. Changes in internalizing are associated with self-reported changes in physical health status, whereas changes in externalizing are associated with changes in substance use problems. Discussion focuses on the processes whereby discrimination affects health behavior and physical health status. PMID:24417690

Gibbons, Frederick X.; Kingsbury, John H.; Weng, Chih-Yuan; Gerrard, Meg; Cutrona, Carolyn; Wills, Thomas A.; Stock, Michelle

2013-01-01

418

AIDS-related health behavior: coping, protection motivation, and previous behavior.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine Rogers' protection motivation theory and aspects of Janis and Mann's conflict theory in the context of AIDS-related health behavior. Subjects were 84 heterosexual men and women and 147 homosexual men with multiple sexual partners; LISREL's path-analysis techniques were used to evaluate the goodness of fit of the structural equation models. Protection motivation theory did fit the data but had considerably more explanatory power for heterosexual than for homosexual subjects (49 vs. 22%, respectively). When coping styles were added, different patterns of findings were found among both groups. Adding variables such as social norms and previous behavior increased the explained variance to 73% for heterosexual subjects and to 44% for homosexual subjects. It was concluded that although protection motivation theory did fit the data fairly adequately, expanding the theory with other variables--especially those related to previous behavior--could improve our understanding of AIDS-related health behavior. PMID:1744908

Van der Velde, F W; Van der Pligt, J

1991-10-01

419

The Health and Health Behaviors of Young Men Who Have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

Purpose There is growing evidence that young men who have sex with men (YMSM) may be at increased risk for a wide range of health and mental health problems. Methods An audio-computer assisted survey was administered to a large, ethnically diverse sample of 526 YMSM (ages 18 to 24 years) recruited from bars, clubs, and other social venues using a venue-based probability sampling method. Results Subjects reported a range of health and mental health problems, and involvement in health-compromising behaviors, such as overweight/obesity, depression, suicidal thoughts/attempts, and many were found to have high rates of sexually transmitted infections. Moreover, many reported not having insurance coverage and/or limited access to care. Conclusions Many of the health concerns and risks reported by these young men are preventable and can be addressed by any number of sectors, including health care and social service providers, religious organizations, schools, and employers. PMID:17367727

Kipke, Michele D.; Kubicek, Katrina; Weiss, George; Wong, Carolyn; Lopez, Donna; Iverson, Ellen; Ford, Wesley

2010-01-01

420

Do poor health behaviors affect health-related quality of life and healthcare utilization among veterans? The Veterans Health Study.  

PubMed

The impact of health behaviors on Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and HealthCare Utilization (HCU) was examined in a sample of male veterans. We examined the relationship between health behaviors (cigarette smoking, alcohol use, exercise, seat belt use, cholesterol level, and body mass index [BMI]), and HRQoL and HCU, among Veterans Health Study participants providing complete baseline (t0) and 12-month follow-up (t12) data. (Respective sample sizes were 1242 and 1397.) HRQoL measures were derived from the SF-36, expressed as physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores. Prospective 12-month outpatient and inpatient utilization data were obtained from a VA administrative database. Exercise and BMI were significant PCS predictors at t0 and t12, adjusting for age, social supports, education, employment status, and comorbidities. Smoker status was negatively associated with PCS only at t0. Nonproblem (no abuse) alcohol users had significantly higher t0 PCS scores than nonusers. Only current problem alcohol use was associated with lower MCS at t0 and t12 in multivariate analyses. Regarding HCU, current smokers had fewer medical visits than never smokers; alcohol nonusers had more medical visits than current alcohol users, current problem users, and former problem users. No behaviors were associated with mental health visits or inpatient stays. HRQoL is negatively affected by poor health behaviors. HRQoL and physical health may be improved by practitioners targeting these behaviors for preventive interventions. This study did not support an association between poor health behaviors and higher HCU. Future research should consider the effect of moderating variables on this relationship. PMID:15923947

Borzecki, Ann M; Lee, Austin; Kalman, David; Kazis, Lewis E

2005-01-01

421

Moving from Intersection to Integration: Public Health Law Research and Public Health Systems and Services Research  

PubMed Central

Context For three decades, experts have been stressing the importance of law to the effective operation of public health systems. Most recently, in a 2011 report, the Institute of Medicine recommended a review of state and local public health laws to ensure appropriate authority for public health agencies; adequate access to legal counsel for public health agencies; evaluations of the health effects and costs associated with legislation, regulations, and policies; and enhancement of research methods to assess the strength of evidence regarding the health effects of public policies. These recommendations, and the continued interest in law as a determinant of health system performance, speak to the need for integrating the emerging fields of Public Health Law Research (PHLR) and Public Health Systems and Services Research (PHSSR). Methods Expert commentary. Findings This article sets out a unified framework for the two fields and a shared research agenda built around three broad inquiries: (1) the structural role of law in shaping the organization, powers, prerogatives, duties, and limitations of public health agencies and thereby their functioning and ultimately their impact on public health (“infrastructure”); (2) the mechanisms through which public health system characteristics influence the implementation of interventional public health laws (“implementation”); and (3) the individual and system characteristics that influence the ability of public health systems and their community partners to develop and secure enactment of legal initiatives to advance public health (“innovation”). Research to date has laid a foundation of evidence, but progress requires better and more accessible data, a new generation of researchers comfortable in both law and health research, and more rigorous methods. Conclusions The routine integration of law as a salient factor in broader PHSSR studies of public health system functioning and health outcomes will enhance the usefulness of research in supporting practice and the long-term improvement of system performance. PMID:22709392

Burris, Scott; Mays, Glen P; Douglas Scutchfield, F; Ibrahim, Jennifer K

2012-01-01

422

An integrated framework for detecting suspicious behaviors in video surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we propose an integrated framework for detecting suspicious behaviors in video surveillance systems which are established in public places such as railway stations, airports, shopping malls and etc. Especially, people loitering in suspicion, unattended objects left behind and exchanging suspicious objects between persons are common security concerns in airports and other transit scenarios. These involve understanding scene/event, analyzing human movements, recognizing controllable objects, and observing the effect of the human movement on those objects. In the proposed framework, multiple background modeling technique, high level motion feature extraction method and embedded Markov chain models are integrated for detecting suspicious behaviors in real time video surveillance systems. Specifically, the proposed framework employs probability based multiple backgrounds modeling technique to detect moving objects. Then the velocity and distance measures are computed as the high level motion features of the interests. By using an integration of the computed features and the first passage time probabilities of the embedded Markov chain, the suspicious behaviors in video surveillance are analyzed for detecting loitering persons, objects left behind and human interactions such as fighting. The proposed framework has been tested by using standard public datasets and our own video surveillance scenarios.

Zin, Thi Thi; Tin, Pyke; Hama, Hiromitsu; Toriu, Takashi

2014-03-01

423

Integrated health of the girl child.  

PubMed

This article discusses factors that affect the well-being and health of female children in India: sex ratio, literacy, food intake, morbidity, mortality, early marriage, maternal mortality, nutrition, prenatal care and delivery, family planning responsibilities, and access to health services. India has recognized within its Constitution and other government documents and programs equality for women, but practices lag behind principles. A National Action Plan was formulated for the period 1991-2000 for the girl child. Women themselves must change their attitudes about themselves and their female children. Several pilot programs have demonstrated the potential to empower girls to be outspoken, vocal, and enthusiastic. Girls in India are disadvantaged even before their birth. Patriarchal norms reinforce the view of girls as a bad investment. Women are blamed for not bearing a son, despite the evidence that males carry the deciding gender-specific chromosome. Tamil Nadu districts are known for their female infanticide. The declining sex ratio is attributed to the higher death rate among females younger than 35 years. Females until recently had a lower life expectancy than males. Sex ratios vary between states. The only state with a positive female sex ratio is Kerala. Males outnumber females by almost 10% in most of the northern and eastern states. Illiteracy among women is high in about 100 districts. Female school enrollment is 50% less than male enrollment. Females suffer from higher rates of malnutrition, morbidity, and death. Girls' adolescent growth spurt is delayed until 18 years. Maternal mortality accounts for the largest proportion of deaths among women of reproductive age. The most common reason for abortion is "too many children." Lower socioeconomic status is associated with lower nutrition. Women do not have control over their fertility. Women are limited in their access to reproductive health care. PMID:12158016

Ghosh, S

1995-01-01

424

Integrating Public Health Policy, Practice, Evaluation, Surveillance, and Research: The School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System  

PubMed Central

The Canadian Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute of Canada have charged their Centre for Behavioral Research and Program Evaluation with contributing to the development of the country’s systemic capacity to link research, policy, and practice related to population-level interventions. Local data collection and feedback systems are integral to this capacity. Canada’s School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System (SHAPES) allows data to be collected from all of a school’s students, and these data are used to produce computer-generated school “health profiles.” SHAPES is being used for intervention planning, evaluation, surveillance, and research across Canada. Strong demand and multipartner investment suggest that SHAPES is adding value in all of these domains. Such systems can contribute substantially to evidence-informed public health practice, public engagement, participatory action research, and relevant, timely population intervention research. PMID:17329662

Cameron, Roy; Manske, Stephen; Brown, K. Stephen; Jolin, Mari Alice; Murnaghan, Donna; Lovato, Chris

2007-01-01

425

Early life adversity reduces stress reactivity and enhances impulsive behavior: implications for health behaviors.  

PubMed

Altered reactivity to stress, either in the direction of exaggerated reactivity or diminished reactivity, may signal a dysregulation of systems intended to maintain homeostasis and a state of good health. Evidence has accumulated that diminished reactivity to psychosocial stress may signal poor health outcomes. One source of diminished cortisol and autonomic reactivity is the experience of adverse rearing during childhood and adolescence. The Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project has examined a cohort of 426 healthy young adults with and without a family history of alcoholism. Regardless of family history, persons who had experienced high degrees of adversity prior to age 16 had a constellation of changes including reduced cortisol and heart rate reactivity, diminished cognitive capacity, and unstable regulation of affect, leading to behavioral impulsivity and antisocial tendencies. We present a model whereby this constellation of physiological, cognitive, and affective tendencies is consistent with altered central dopaminergic activity leading to changes in brain function that may foster impulsive and risky behaviors. These in turn may promote greater use of alcohol other drugs along with adopting poor health behaviors. This model provides a pathway from early life adversity to low stress reactivity that forms a basis for risky behaviors and poor health outcomes. PMID:23085387

Lovallo, William R

2013-10-01

426

Early life adversity reduces stress reactivity and enhances impulsive behavior: Implications for health behaviors  

PubMed Central

Altered reactivity to stress, either in the direction of exaggerated reactivity or diminished reactivity, may signal a dysregulation of systems intended to maintain homeostasis and a state of good health. Evidence has accumulated that diminished reactivity to psychosocial stress may signal poor health outcomes. One source of diminished cortisol and autonomic reactivity is the experience of adverse rearing during childhood and adolescence. The Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project has examined a cohort of 426 healthy young adults with and without a family history of alcoholism. Regardless of family history, persons who had experienced high degrees of adversity prior to age 16 had a constellation of changes including reduced cortisol and heart rate reactivity, diminished cognitive capacity, and unstable regulation of affect, leading to behavioral impulsivity and antisocial tendencies. We present a model whereby this constellation of physiological, cognitive, and affective tendencies is consistent with altered central dopaminergic activity leading to changes in brain function that may foster impulsive and risky behaviors. These in turn may promote greater use of alcohol other drugs along with adopting poor health behaviors. This model provides a pathway from early life adversity to low stress reactivity that forms a basis for risky behaviors and poor health outcomes. PMID:23085387

Lovallo, William R.

2012-01-01

427

Respondents, Operants, and Emergents: Toward an Integrated Perspective on Behavior  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A triarchic organization of behavior, building on Skinner's description of respondents and operants, is proposed by introducing a third class of behavior called 'emergents.' Emergents are new responses, never specifically reinforced, that require operations more complex than association. Some of these operations occur naturally only in animals above a minimum level of brain complexity, and are developed in an interaction between treatment and organismic variables. (Here complexity is defined in terms of relative levels of hierarchical integration made possible both by the amount of brain, afforded both by brain-body allometric relationships and by encephalization, and, also, the elaboration of dendritic and synaptic connections within the cortex and connections between various parts/regions of the brain.) Examples of emergents are discussed to advance this triarchic view, of behavior. The prime example is language. This triarchic view reflects both the common goals and the cumulative nature of psychological science.

Rumbaugh, Daune M.; Washburn, David A.; Hillix, William A.

1996-01-01

428

Direct action of gonadotropin in brain integrates behavioral and reproductive functions  

E-print Network

integrative role in modulating both reproductive physiology and behavior. amphibian luteinizing hormone roles in reproductive physiology across vertebrates. These heterodimeric glycoprotein hormonesDirect action of gonadotropin in brain integrates behavioral and reproductive functions Eun

Kelley, Darcy B.

429

The Behavior Change Consortium: setting the stage for a new century of health behavior-change research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Behavior Change Consortium (BCC), a col- lective of 15 National Institutes of Health-funded behavior-change projects, was conceived with the goal of evaluating the efficacy and effectiveness of novel ways of intervening in diverse popula- tions to reduce tobacco dependence, and improve physical activity, nutrition and other health behaviors. The purpose of this article is to provide a general introduction

M. G. Ory; P. J. Jordan; T. Bazzarre

2002-01-01

430

The Role of Integration in Health-Based Information Infrastructures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we contribute with empirical insight into the complexity of establishing and sustaining integration between\\u000a different information infrastructures in health care. An overall concern is to elaborate on how, despite many obstacles, the\\u000a integration effort moves forward. We see this as a collective achievement, where users have an essential role in terms of\\u000a mobilizing and coordinating the other

Gunnar Ellingsen; Kristoffer Røed

2010-01-01

431

The household production of health: Integrating social science perspectives on micro-level health determinants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efforts to control disease and improve health in developing countries require increasing collaboration between social and medical scientists. This collaboration should extend from the early stages of technology development to the evaluation and improvement of population-wide interventions. This paper provides an integrating framework for social science research on health producing processes at the household level, drawing on recent work in

Peter Berman; Carl Kendall; Karabi Bhattacharyya

1994-01-01

432

Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health  

PubMed Central

Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

2014-01-01

433

Neighborhoods and adolescent health-risk behavior: an ecological network approach.  

PubMed

This study integrates insights from social network analysis, activity space perspectives, and theories of urban and spatial processes to present an novel approach to neighborhood effects on health-risk behavior among youth. We suggest spatial patterns of neighborhood residents' non-home routines may be conceptualized as ecological, or "eco"-networks, which are two-mode networks that indirectly link residents through socio-spatial overlap in routine activities. We further argue structural configurations of eco-networks are consequential for youth's behavioral health. In this study we focus on a key structural feature of eco-networks--the neighborhood-level extent to which household dyads share two or more activity locations, or eco-network reinforcement--and its association with two dimensions of health-risk behavior, substance use and delinquency/sexual activity. Using geographic data on non-home routine activity locations among respondents from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A.FANS), we constructed neighborhood-specific eco-networks by connecting sampled households to "activity clusters," which are sets of spatially-proximate activity locations. We then measured eco-network reinforcement and examined its association with dimensions of adolescent health risk behavior employing a sample of 830 youth ages 12-17 nested in 65 census tracts. We also examined whether neighborhood-level social processes (collective efficacy and intergenerational closure) mediate the association between eco-network reinforcement and the outcomes considered. Results indicated eco-network reinforcement exhibits robust negative associations with both substance use and delinquency/sexual activity scales. Eco-network reinforcement effects were not explained by potential mediating variables. In addition to introducing a novel theoretical and empirical approach to neighborhood effects on youth, our findings highlight the importance of intersecting conventional routines for adolescent behavioral health. PMID:25011958

Browning, Christopher R; Soller, Brian; Jackson, Aubrey L

2015-01-01

434

Context Passive gathering of information Experiments Integrated behavioral dvfs method Hydrasim Measuring and Characterizing HPC applications  

E-print Network

Context Passive gathering of information Experiments Integrated behavioral dvfs method Hydrasim behavioral dvfs method Hydrasim Plan 1 Context 2 Passive gathering of information 3 Experiments 4 Integrated of information Experiments Integrated behavioral dvfs method Hydrasim Context To optimize a computing center

Lefèvre, Laurent

435

SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans, and their families  

E-print Network

SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans, and their families Page 1 SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans systems serving Service Members, Veterans, and their Families; 2. Identify at least two best practices

Mather, Patrick T.

436

A comparative cost analysis of an integrated military telemental health-care service.  

PubMed

The National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, integrated telemental health care into its primary behavioral health-care outreach service in 1998. To date, there have been over 1,800 telemental health visits, and the service encounters approximately 100 visits per month at this time. The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the costs to the beneficiary, the medical system, and the military organization as a whole via one of the four methods currently employed to access mental health care from remotely located military medical clinics. The four methods include local access via the military's civilian health maintenance organization (HMO) network, patient travel to the military treatment facility, military mental health specialists' travel to the remote clinic (circuit riding) and TeleMental Healthcare (TMH). Interactive video conferencing, phone, electronic mail, and facsimile were used to provide telemental health care from a military treatment facility to a remote military medical clinic. The costs of health-care services, equipment, patient travel, lost work time, and communications were tabulated and evaluated. While the purpose of providing telemental healthcare services was to improve access to mental health care for our beneficiaries at remote military medical clinics, it became apparent that this could be done at comparable or reduced costs. PMID:12419023

Grady, Brian J

2002-01-01

437

Community Participation in New Mexico's Behavioral Health Care Reform  

PubMed Central

In 2005, New Mexico implemented a unique reform in managed behavioral health services that seeks to ensure delivery of consumer-driven, recovery-oriented care to low-income individuals. Distinguishing features of the reform are the Local Collaboratives (LCs), regionally based community organizations designed by state government to represent behavioral health concerns of New Mexico's diverse cultural populations. We examine community response to the LCs, focusing on two broad sets of themes derived from 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork. The first set—structure and function—encompasses several issues: predominance of provider versus consumer voice; insufficient resources to support internal operations; imposition of state administrative demands; and perceived lack of state response to LC efforts. The second set—participation and collaboration—reveals how problems of information flow and other logistical factors impact involvement in LCs and how the construction of “community” introduced under this initiative exacerbates tensions across localities with varied histories and populations. PMID:19764315

Kano, Miria; Willging, Cathleen E.; Rylko-Bauer, Barbara

2010-01-01

438

NASA Human Research Program Behavioral Health and Performance Element (BHP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of NASA BHP is to identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration, and return to terrestrial life. The NASA Behavioral Health and Performance Operations Group (BHP Ops) supports astronauts and their families before, during, and after a long-duration mission (LDM) on the ISS. BHP Ops provides ISS crews with services such as preflight training (e.g., psychological factors of LDM, psychological support, cross-cultural); preflight, in-flight, and postflight support services, including counseling for astronauts and their families; and psychological support such as regular care packages and a voice-over IP phone system between crew members and their families to facilitate real-time one-on-one communication.

Whitmire, Sandra; Faulk, Jeremy; Leveton, Lauren

2010-01-01

439

Embracing an Integrated Personal Health Record for Continuity of Care  

PubMed Central

There is a lack of information exchange for patients utilizing complementary and alternative therapies such as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) combined with conventional western medicine. Siloed health information can lead to potential problems for safe, quality care and optimal health. The Continuity of Care Document (CCD) is intended to be a subset of health data to exchange between providers and foundational for personal health records (PHR). It is unknown, however, about the relevance of CCD to represent TCM data for information exchange across different health systems. Four clinical data elements and related standards in CCD were evaluated for relevance to TCM providers and adequacy to represent TCM data. Project results indicate that even though standardized TCM-specific terminology and coding are lacking, the CCD data elements and standards are relevant to TCM providers. Recommendations are made for an integrated PHR containing both conventional western medicine and TCM following the CCD standard. PMID:24199068

Gao, Grace; Westra, Bonnie L.

2012-01-01

440

Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 2: Behavior of Nurses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as these activities relate to patient care, and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric nurses in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

441

Critical Behaviors in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing. Volume 3: Behavior of Attendants.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a three-volume document, this volume is concerned with providing source data about the activities of mental health nursing personnel as the activities relate to patient care and contains abstracts of more than 4,000 critical behaviors of psychiatric attendants in 50 psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals with psychiatric units, and…

Jacobs, Angeline Marchese; And Others

442

Multiple Health Risk Behaviors in Adolescents: An Examination of Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Chronic disease risk factors tend to cooccur. Purpose: This study examined the cooccurrence of 8 negative health behaviors in a representative sample of urban adolescents to inform educational interventions. Methods: The prevalence, cooccurrence, and clustering of suicide attempt, lifetime history of sexual activity, tobacco use, cell…

Coleman, Casey; Wileyto, E. Paul; Lenhart, Clare M.; Patterson, Freda

2014-01-01

443

Behavioral Health Services in Separate CHIP Programs on the Eve of Parity  

PubMed Central

The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) plays a vital role in financing behavioral health services for low-income children. This study examines behavioral health benefit design and management in separate CHIP programs on the eve of federal requirements for behavioral health parity. Even before parity implementation, many state CHIP programs did not impose service limits or cost sharing for behavioral health benefits. However, a substantial share of states imposed limits or cost sharing that might hinder access to care. The majority of states use managed care to administer behavioral health benefits. It is important to monitor how states adapt their programs to comply with parity. PMID:21461975

Beardslee, William R.; Greenfield, Shelly F.; Meara, Ellen

2011-01-01

444

Developing Games for Health Behavior Change: Getting Started  

PubMed Central

Abstract Many investigators are considering developing videogames for health (video-G4Hs) but have questions about how to get started. This report provides guidance for investigators considering a G4H as a behavioral intervention procedure from a team of experienced G4H developers. Thirteen commonly asked questions are answered, including defining a G4H, considerations in developing a team, considerations in G4H design, and anticipating unintended consequences. PMID:24443708

Buday, Richard; Thompson, Debbe; Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Lu, Amy Shirong; Baranowski, Janice

2013-01-01

445

Oral Health Care Behavior in a Group of Turkish Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate oral health attitude and behavior of a group of Turkish children aged between 6-12 years Methods: A sample of 139 children attending Marmara University Dentistry School (MUDS) Department of Pediatrics Dentistry between December 2002 to April 2003 was selected. Results: The mean age for girls was 8.82 yr (SD=2.06) and for

N Bekiroglu; I Tanboga; B Altinok; B Kargul

2009-01-01

446

Cellular mechanisms for integral feedback in visually guided behavior  

PubMed Central

Sensory feedback is a ubiquitous feature of guidance systems in both animals and engineered vehicles. For example, a common strategy for moving along a straight path is to turn such that the measured rate of rotation is zero. This task can be accomplished by using a feedback signal that is proportional to the instantaneous value of the measured sensory signal. In such a system, the addition of an integral term depending on past values of the sensory input is needed to eliminate steady-state error [proportional-integral (PI) control]. However, the means by which nervous systems implement such a computation are poorly understood. Here, we show that the optomotor responses of flying Drosophila follow a time course consistent with temporal integration of horizontal motion input. To investigate the cellular basis of this effect, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the set of identified visual interneurons [horizontal system (HS) cells] thought to control this reflex during tethered flight. At high stimulus speeds, HS cells exhibit steady-state responses during flight that are absent during quiescence, a state-dependent difference in physiology that is explained by changes in their presynaptic inputs. However, even during flight, the membrane potential of the large-field interneurons exhibits no evidence for integration that could explain the behavioral responses. However, using a genetically encoded indicator, we found that calcium accumulates in the terminals of the interneurons along a time course consistent with the behavior and propose that this accumulation provides a mechanism for temporal integration of sensory feedback consistent with PI control. PMID:24706794

Schnell, Bettina; Weir, Peter T.; Roth, Eatai; Fairhall, Adrienne L.

2014-01-01

447

Promote health or prevent disease? The effects of health-related advertising on eating behavior intention.  

PubMed

The health medical costs of colorectal cancer are increasingly higher in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance Administration (NHI) and The Health Promotion Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) in Taiwan encourage individuals to adopt an earnest approach to healthy behavior through advocacy advertising. However, the number of colorectal cancer patients continues to increase annually. Our study explored the effects of health-related advertisements (ads) on healthy behavior intentions as influenced by regulatory focus theory (RFT) and construal level theory (CLT). We conducted an experiment with different public health advocacy ads. A 2 (regulatory focus: promotion vs. prevention) × 2 (temporal distance: one month vs. one year) × 2 (graphics-text ratio: more pictures and less text vs. fewer pictures and more text) three-factor experiment was adopted. The multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) results revealed that ads with higher construal levels (i.e., more text) had greater effects with a promotion-oriented regulatory focus. However, no significant differences were found in either attitude toward the ads or behavior intention when the regulatory focus was prevention. In addition, according to the young testers and those who were psychologically distant from colorectal cancer, different temporal distances and different construal levels had no statistically significantly effects on attitudes toward advertising or on behavior intentions. The results revealed that viewers found the information easier to understand when the ads triggered the regulatory focuses of the viewers and applied an appropriate graphics-text ratio, which resulted in favorable health-related advertising effectiveness. Thus, we provide two suggestions regarding the use of health-related advertising for MOHW in the future. PMID:25826394

Lin, Chia-Yen

2015-01-01

448

Assessing Health-Related Quality of Life in Northern Plains American Indians: Prominence of Physical Activity as a Health Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations of behavioral health risks and healthy behaviors with self-reported health-related quality of life measures were investigated in a Northern Plains American Indian sample. Participants were surveyed in person using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. The results showed that regular physical activity was significantly…

Poltavski, Dmitri; Holm, Jeffrey; Vogeltanz-Holm, Nancy; McDonald, Leander

2010-01-01

449

Behavioral Health and Performance Operations During the Space Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to the Columbia STS 107 disaster in 2003, the Johnson Space Center s Behavioral Health and Performance Group (BHP) became involved in Space Shuttle Operations on an as needed basis, occasionally acting as a consultant and primarily addressing crew-crew personality conflicts. The BHP group also assisted with astronaut selection at every selection cycle beginning in 1991. Following STS 107, an event that spawned an increased need of behavioral health support to STS crew members and their dependents, BHP services to the Space Shuttle Program were enhanced beginning with the STS 114 Return to Flight mission in 2005. These services included the presence of BHP personnel at STS launches and landings for contingency support, a BHP briefing to the entire STS crew at L-11 months, a private preflight meeting with the STS Commander at L-9 months, and the presence of a BHP consultant at the L-1.5 month Family Support Office briefing to crew and family members. The later development of an annual behavioral health assessment of all active astronauts also augmented BHP s Space Shuttle Program specific services, allowing for private meetings with all STS crew members before and after each mission. The components of each facet of these BHP Space Shuttle Program support services will be presented, along with valuable lessons learned, and with recommendations for BHP involvement in future short duration space missions

Beven, G.; Holland, A.; Moomaw, R.; Sipes, W.; Vander Ark, S.

2011-01-01

450

Beyond expectancy theory: an integrative motivational model from health care.  

PubMed

Expectancy theory has been criticized for its omission of normative, habitual, and other motivational elements. This paper describes the sources and features of an integrative motivational model from the field of preventive health care that combines expectancy/valence factors with habitual, normative, and conative motivational elements. The model is viewed as having implications for work motivation as well. PMID:10255417

Walker, L R; Thomas, K W

1982-04-01

451

Integrating Health and Vocational Psychology: HIV and Employment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces the Major Contribution on integrating health and vocational psychology, using persons with HIV who have work-related concerns as an example. The authors describe the demographics associated with HIV disease and new treatments that have allowed people with HIV to remain healthy and continue working, or consider returning to…

Werth, James L., Jr.; Borges, Nicole J.; McNally, Christopher J.; Maguire, Colleen P.; Britton, Paula J.

2008-01-01

452

Integrating Children with Complex Health Care Needs: The Teacher's Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A naturalistic inquiry involving early childhood special education teachers' perceptions of integrating children with complex health care needs into the classroom found that teachers' initial reactions were fear and apprehension, but teachers later had positive feelings and adjusted to dealing with life-threatening situations and communicable…

Lowman, Dianne Koontz

1995-01-01

453

Integrated Care in College Health: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study describes 1 international student's treatment experience with an integrated health program on a college campus. This program uses a multidisciplinary, mind-body approach, which incorporates individual counseling, primary care, psychiatric consultation, a mindfulness-based cognitive therapy class, and a meditation group.

Tucker, Cary; Sloan, Sarah K.; Vance, Mary; Brownson, Chris

2008-01-01

454

Asymptotic behavior of Heun function and its integral formalism  

E-print Network

The Heun function generalizes all well-known special functions such as Spheroidal Wave, Lame, Mathieu, and hypergeometric functions. Heun functions are applicable to diverse areas such as theory of black holes, lattice systems in statistical mechanics, solution of the Schrodinger equation of quantum mechanics, and addition of three quantum spins. In this paper, applying three term recurrence formula, I consider asymptotic behaviors of Heun function and its integral formalism including all higher terms of A_n's. I will show how the power series expansion of Heun functions can be converted to closed-form integrals for all cases of infinite series and polynomial. One interesting observation resulting from the calculations is the fact that a Gauss hypergeometric function recurs in each of sub-integral forms: the first sub-integral form contains zero term of A_n's, the second one contains one term of A_n's, the third one contains two terms of A_n's, etc. In the appendix, I apply the power series expansion and my integral formalism of Heun function to "The 192 solutions of the Heun equation." Due to space restriction final equations for all 192 Heun functions is not included in the paper, but feel free to contact me for the final solutions. Section 5 contains two additional examples using integral forms of Huen function. This paper is 4th out of 10 in series "Special functions and three term recurrence formula (3TRF)". See section 5 for all the papers in the series. The previous paper in series deals with the power series expansion in closed forms of Heun function. The next paper in the series describes analytically the power series expansion of Mathieu function and its integral formalism.

Yoon Seok Choun

2014-11-04

455

Relationship of Interpersonal Behaviors and Health-Related Control Appraisals to Patient Satisfaction and Compliance in a University Health Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors' aim was to evaluate patient-provider relationships in a college health center. Participants: Eighty student patients and their health-care providers. Methods: Patients completed a measure of perceived health competence before a consultation and measures of provider participatory behavior and interpersonal behavior before…

Campbell, Thomas A.; Auerbach, Stephen M.; Kiesler, Donald J.

2007-01-01

456

High-risk health behaviors associated with various dietary patterns.  

PubMed

We have previously identified dietary patterns among 1,475 male and 780 female normal healthy control subjects in a case-control study of cancer at various sites. In this paper we examine the presence, among persons exhibiting these dietary patterns, of individual health behaviors that may contribute to risks for cancer. Specifically we examine trimming of separable fat from meats, fats used in cooking and as additions to foods, alcohol consumption, and smoking. Results indicate that men and women differ in possession of these high-risk behaviors. Women are more likely to trim fat from meat, consume less alcohol, and have lower exposures to smoking. Their dietary patterns are more independent of the fats used. Several eating patterns are positively associated with total fat intake but differ in their associations with high-risk behaviors. These data suggest that assessing risk associated with dietary patterns sheds more light on disease relationships than studies of single nutrients. PMID:1796009

Randall, E; Marshall, J R; Graham, S; Brasure, J

1991-01-01

457

Adolescent Health Behaviors among Public School Students in Washington, 1988-1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many adolescents' health problems arise from preventable behaviors, such as unprotected sexual intercourse and the use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs. The 1992 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors (WSSAHB) was created in order to collect information on a variety of health behaviors among students in the state of…

Einspruch, Eric L.; Pollard, James P.

458

Self-Regulation, Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Change in Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of self-regulation models: theory of planned behavior, protection motivation theory, health belief model, action control theory, transtheoretical model of behavior change, health action process, and precaution adoption process. Applies models to health behavior change in older adults with cardiovascular disease or diabetes.…

Purdie, Nola; McCrindle, Andrea

2002-01-01

459

The Youth Form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To develop a youth form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI--Youth) for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart" behaviors): eating a healthy breakfast, eating healthy foods and snacks, drinking healthy…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Desmond, Frederic F.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Smith, Tasia M.

2012-01-01

460

Prevalence of Health Behaviors among a University Staff: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the prevalence of health behaviors among non-academic staff at a Midwestern U.S. university. A sample of 627 women and 237 men completed a web survey for the study. Most of the health behaviors showed no sex difference. Health behaviors of drinking, smoking, and irregular breakfast eating were significantly associated with…

Torabi, Mohammad; Thiagarajah, Krisha; Jeng, Ifeng

2010-01-01

461

Designing serious video games for health behavior change: Current status and future directions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Serious video games for health are designed to entertain while changing a specific health behavior. This article identifies behavioral principles that can guide the development of serious video games focused on changing a variety of health behaviors, including those attempting to decrease risk of o...

462

System Integration and Network Planning in the Academic Health Center  

PubMed Central

The transfer of information within the academic health center is complicated by the complex nature of the institution's multi-dimensional role. The diverse functions of patient care, administration, education and research result in a complex web of information exchange which requires an integrated approach to system management. System integration involves a thorough assessment of “end user” needs in terms of hardware and software as well as specification of the communications network architecture. The network will consist of a series of end user nodes which capture, process, archive and display information. This paper will consider some requirements of these nodes, also called intelligent workstations, relating to their management and integration into a total health care network.

Testa, Marcia A.; Spackman, Thomas J.

1985-01-01

463

The shifting sands of health care delivery: curriculum revision and integration of community health nursing.  

PubMed

The health care delivery system in the United States is moving from an institutionally driven and controlled medical care model toward the Primary Health Care model described by the Alma-Alta Conference (World Health Organization [WHO], 1978) as community-driven comprehensive health care. However, nursing education still remains institutionally based, anchored in a medical model. Dynamic curricula must be developed that prepare nurses to practice in an ever-changing health care delivery system that is becoming more community based. The purpose of this article is twofold: to provide an overview of the revised curriculum of Brigham Young University's College of Nursing (BYU-CON) as one example of a faculty's attempt to develop a program that prepares graduates skilled in providing health care in the 21st century; and to examine closely the integration of community health nursing into the curriculum. PMID:10528738

Conger, C O; Baldwin, J H; Abegglen, J; Callister, L C

1999-10-01

464

Patterns of Health-Risk Behavior among Japanese High School Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed Japanese high school students' health risk behavior patterns, examining clustering and accumulation of health risk behaviors. Physical inactivity and alcohol use were the most common risk behaviors. Prevalence rates for most risk behaviors varied by demographic variables. Smoking, drinking, and sexual intercourse clustered among both…

Takakura, Minoru; Nagayama, Tomoko; Sakihara, Seizo; Willcox, Craig

2001-01-01

465

Behavioral measures of multisensory integration: bounds on bimodal detection probability.  

PubMed

One way to test and quantify multisensory integration in a behavioral paradigm is to compare bimodal detection probability with bounds defined by some combination of the unimodal detection probabilities. Here we (1) improve on an upper bound recently suggested by Stevenson et al. (Brain Topogr 27(6):707-730, 2014), (2) present a lower bound, (3) interpret the bounds in terms of stochastic dependency between the detection probabilities, (4) discuss some additional assumptions required for the validity of any such bound, (5) suggest some potential applications to neurophysiologic measures, and point out some parallels to the 'race model inequality' for reaction times. PMID:25526854

Colonius, Hans

2015-01-01

466

Lying behavior and postpartum health status in grazing dairy cows.  

PubMed

Many cows have difficulty making the transition from pregnancy to lactation, as evidenced by the high incidence of disease that occurs in the weeks after calving. Changes in lying behavior can be used as an indicator of illness, yet no work to date has evaluated this relationship in dairy cows on pasture. The objectives of this study were to describe the lying behavior of grazing dairy cows during the first 3 wk after calving and determine the relationships between transition diseases and lying behavior. Our convenience sample included 227 multiparous and 47 primiparous Holstein cows from 6 commercial farms. Cows were recruited as they calved during the spring calving period. Electronic data loggers (Hobo Pendant G Acceleration, Onset Computer Corp., Pocasset, MA) recorded lying behavior at 1-min intervals. Diseases were recorded up to 21 d in milk, and cows were subsequently categorized into 3 health categories: (1) healthy, not lame and had no other signs of clinical (retained placenta, milk fever, metritis, mastitis) or subclinical (ketosis, hypocalcemia) postpartum diseases; (2) lame, identified as being clinically or severely lame with no other signs of clinical or subclinical postpartum disease; and (3) sick, diagnosed as having one or more clinical postpartum diseases (with or without a subclinical disease) but not lame. This last group was further divided into 2 groups: those that were diagnosed with a single clinical health event and those diagnosed with more than one clinical event. Lying behavior differed between primiparous and multiparous cows; primiparous cows divided their lying time into more bouts than did multiparous cows (9.7 ± 0.54 vs. 8.4 ± 0.26 bouts/d) and spent less time lying down than multiparous cows (7.5 ± 0.38 h/d vs. 8.5 ± 0.19 h/d). Lying behavior was also affected by illness; primiparous cows that developed more than one clinical disease, excluding lameness, spent more time lying, and tended to have longer lying bouts in the days following calving compared with healthy cows; multiparous severely lame cows spent more time lying down (1.7 h longer per day) compared with multiparous cows that were nonlame. Clinically lame cows had fewer lying bouts per day and these bouts were of longer duration than healthy nonlame cows. In summary, changes in lying behavior after calving were associated with postpartum health status in grazing dairy cows. PMID:25151885

Sepúlveda-Varas, P; Weary, D M; von Keyserlingk, M A G

2014-10-01

467

Restoring Health to Health Reform: Integrating Medicine and Public Health to Advance the Population's Wellbeing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is a major achievement in improving access to health care services. However, evidence indicates that the nation could achieve greater improvements in health outcomes, at a lower cost, by shifting its focus to public health. By focusing nearly exclusively on health care, policy makers have chronically starved public health of adequate and stable

Lawrence O. Gostin; Peter D. Jacobson; Katherine L. Record; Lorian E. Hardcastle

2011-01-01

468

Adolescence, sexual behavior and risk factors to health  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze the relationships between sexual behavior and risk factors to physical and mental health in adolescents. METHODS Study of 3,195 pupils aged 15 to 19 in secondary education, in public and private schools in 10 state capitals in Brazil between 2007 and 2008. Multi-stage (schools and pupils) cluster sampling was used in each city and public and private educational network. All of the students selected completed a questionnaire on the following items: socioeconomic and demographic data; sexual behavior; having sex with those of the same sex, the opposite sex, or both; alcohol and cannabis use; using condoms; traumatic sexual experiences as a child or adolescent; suicidal thoughts. The analysis included describing frequencies, Chi-square test, analysis of multiple and cluster correspondence. Responses to an open ended question in which the adolescent expressed general comments about themselves and their lives were qualitatively analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS Around 3.0% of adolescents reported homosexual or bisexual behavior, with no difference according to sex, age, skin color, social status family structure or educational network. Adolescents with homosexual/bisexual sexual behavior, compared to their heterosexual peers, reported: (p < 0.05): getting drunk (18.7% and 10.5%, respectively), frequent cannabis use (6.1% and 2.1%, respectively), suicidal thoughts (42.5% and 18.7%, respectively), and having been the victim of sexual violence (11.7% and 1.5%; respectively). Adolescents with homosexual/bisexual sexual behavior reported that they used condoms less frequently (74.2%) than their heterosexual peers (48.6%, p < 0.001). In the correspondence analysis, three groups were found, one composed of adolescents with homosexual/bisexual behavior and experiencing risk factors; suffering sexual violence, never using a condom, suicidal thoughts, frequent cannabis use; another composed of occasional cannabis and condom users, who got drunk frequently, and adolescents with heterosexual behavior and none of the risk factors investigated. More of the risk factors were found in adolescents with homosexual/bisexual behavior compared with those with heterosexual behavior. Adolescents with homosexual/bisexual sexual behavior were more likely to talk about their positive personal experiences and negative relationship experiences that their heterosexual peers, but spoke less about religion. CONCLUSIONS Not only should this issue be studied in more detail, but preventative actions aimed at adolescents with homosexual/bisexual behavior should be widened. PMID:24789636

de Assis, Simone Gonçalves; Gomes, Romeu; Pires, Thiago de Oliveira

2014-01-01

469

Conditional Economic Incentives for Reducing HIV Risk Behaviors: Integration of Psychology and Behavioral Economics  

PubMed Central

Objective This paper reviews psychology and behavioral economic approaches to HIV prevention, and examines the integration and application of these approaches in conditional economic incentive (CEI) programs for reducing HIV risk behavior. Methods We discuss the history of HIV prevention approaches, highlighting the important insights and limitations of psychological theories. We provide an overview of the theoretical tenets of behavioral economics that are relevant to HIV prevention, and utilize CEIs as an illustrative example of how traditional psychological theories end behavioral economics can be combined into new approaches for HIV prevention. Results Behavioral economic interventions can complement psychological frameworks for reducing HIV risk by introducing unique theoretical understandings about the conditions under which risky decisions are amenable to intervention. Findings from illustrative CEI programs show mixed but generally promising effects of economic interventions on HIV and STI prevalence, HIV testing, HIV medication adherence, and drug use. Conclusion CEI programs can complement psychological interventions for HIV prevention and behavioral risk reduction. To maximize program effectiveness, CEI programs must be designed according to contextual and population-specific factors that may determine intervention applicability and success. PMID:24001243

Operario, Don; Kuo, Caroline C.; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G.; Gálarraga, Omar

2014-01-01

470

[General integral medicine: the strategic direction for complex health interventions].  

PubMed

Nowadays, the simple combination of Western medicine (WM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) cannot resolve all the health problems and various requirements. This article proposed the general integral medicine (GIM) theoretical model, which declares the disease causes analysis, clinical intervention and outcomes assessment should be recognized, managed and evaluated both from physiological, psychological, and spiritual status, and all the four dimensions: orthodox medicine (WM, Chinese medicine, etc.), individual inherent characteristics (emotion, attitude, psychology, etc.), cultural influences (doctors, caregivers, groups care, etc.), and natural environment and social systems (economic status, social security system, environmental pollution, etc). As for health outcomes assessment, a more comprehensive system including biological, doctors, patients, health intimate, social and environmental evaluations were required. The GIM model has individualized, dynamic, standardized, objective, systematic inherent characteristics, and opening and compatible external characteristics. It aims to provide the new theoretical guidance and strategic development direction for complex health interventions, and solve various medical related psychological and social problems. PMID:25046942

Hou, Zheng-kun; Liu, Feng-bin; Yang, Yun-ying; Chen, Xin-lin; Li, Li-juan; Li, Pei-wu; Liu, Yuan-peng

2014-06-01

471

Integrating Risk Adjustment and Enrollee Premiums in Health Plan Payment  

PubMed Central

In two important health policy contexts – private plans in Medicare and the new state-run “Exchanges” created as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) – plan payments come from two sources: risk-adjusted payments from a Regulator and premiums charged to individual enrollees. This paper derives principles for integrating risk-adjusted payments and premium policy in individual health insurance markets based on fitting total plan payments to health plan costs per person as closely as possible. A least squares regression including both health status and variables used in premiums reveals the weights a Regulator should put on risk adjusters when markets determine premiums. We apply the methods to an Exchange-eligible population drawn from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). PMID:24308878

McGuire, Thomas G.; Glazer, Jacob; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Shi, Julie; Sinaiko, Anna D.; Zuvekas, Samuel

2013-01-01

472

The Role of Family Communication in Individual Health Attitudes and Behaviors Concerning Diet and Physical Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored associations among family communication patterns (conversation and conformity orientations), health-specific communication variables, health attitudes, and health behaviors in a sample of 433 family dyads (N?=?866). As expected, results of multilevel models revealed that individuals' health attitudes were strongly associated with their self-reported health behaviors. Findings also suggested that perceived confirmation from a family member during health-specific conversations

Elizabeth A. Baiocchi-Wagner; Amelia E. Talley

2012-01-01

473

[Association between social capital and oral health conditions and behavior].  

PubMed

The theory of social capital seeks to explain social inequality in health through the interaction of social, economic and environmental factors and has been associated with many health problems, though there is still little research in the area of oral health. The scope of this study was to evaluate the association between social capital and socio-demographic and behavioral factors related to oral health among schoolchildren aged from 15 to 19. A random sample of 1,417 adolescents filled out a self-administered survey and the data were descriptively analyzed (simple frequencies, central tendency and variability measurement) and inferential statistics (Pearson's chi-square test). The results showed that the social capital which is more prevalent among adolescents was intermediate level, as well as between each of its dimensions, except for social action where the majority were classified as lower-leveled. Among the variables analyzed, social capital was statistically associated only with sex, with women being more likely to be classified under the 'low social capital' label. This area still needs considerable research to increase theoretical-conceptual and methodological maturity in order to better understand the social contexts that are essential for formulating effective public health policies. PMID:24897493

Bezerra, Isabella Azevedo; Goes, Paulo Sávio Angeiras de

2014-06-01

474

Innovative strategies for nurse recruitment and retention in behavioral health.  

PubMed

Successfully recruiting licensed nurses to work in behavioral health is challenging. This article describes and illustrates methods one hospital successfully used to attract, orient, and mentor new graduate nurses to work in mental health. The New Horizons program included a paid internship for new graduate vocational nurses, a mental health curriculum, preceptorship, a state board review course, and a new graduate program. Since 2003, the program has recruited 37 new graduates for the unfilled licensed staff vacancies in mental health who continued their professional education and pursued degrees as registered nurses. The evaluations indicated that more than 100% of graduates rated the program as excellent as well as recommended it to their friends, and retention has been more than 90%. New Horizons graduates have received promotions; one has assumed a new role as a clinical resource nurse who teaches nursing orientation. All stakeholders including nurse management, patients, other disciplines, and coworkers have high praise for the program graduates. The program increased the cultural diversity of the mental health staff because the graduates included high percentages of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans and less than 10% of White Americans. Adult learning technologies were used including teaching with films, role-playing, case studies, reflective thinking, evidence-based practice, and group performance improvement projects. Research-based fact sheets were used for the course and continued education. These 1-page fact sheets help nurses apply the evidence to improve nursing practice. PMID:17607135

Valente, Sharon M; Wright, Ileen

2007-01-01

475

Approaches to integrated monitoring for environmental health impact assessment  

PubMed Central

Although Integrated Environmental Health Monitoring (IEHM) is considered an essential tool to better understand complex environmental health issues, there is no consensus on how to develop such a programme. We reviewed four existing frameworks and eight monitoring programmes in the area of environmental health. We identified the DPSEEA (Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action) framework as most suitable for developing an IEHM programme for environmental health impact assessment. Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters. This therefore limits their relevance for studying complex environmental health topics. Other challenges include limited spatial and temporal data availability, limited development of data sharing mechanisms, heterogeneous data quality, a lack of adequate methodologies to link disparate data sources, and low level of interdisciplinary cooperation. To overcome some of these challenges, we propose a DPSEEA-based conceptual framework for an IEHM programme that would enable monitoring and measuring the impact of environmental changes on human health. We define IEHM as ‘a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain’. We develop a structural work process to integrate information that is based on existing environmental health monitoring programmes. Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions. PMID:23171406

2012-01-01

476

The impact of an integrated population health enhancement and disease management program on employee health risk, health conditions, and productivity.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the impact of an integrated population health enhancement program on employee health risks, health conditions, and productivity. Specifically, we analyzed changes in these measures among a cohort of 543 employees who completed a health risk assessment in both 2003 and 2005. We compared these findings with 2 different sets of employees who were not offered health enhancement programming. We found that the DIRECTV cohort showed a significant reduction in health risks after exposure to the program. Relative to a matched comparison group, the proportion of low-risk employees at DIRECTV in 2005 was 8.2 percentage points higher; the proportion of medium-risk employees was 7.1 percentage points lower; and the proportion of high-risk employees was 1.1 percentage points lower (p < 0.001). The most noticeable changes in health risk were a reduction in the proportion of employees with high cholesterol; an improvement in diet; a reduction of heavy drinking; management of high blood pressure; improved stress management; increased exercise; fewer smokers; and a drop in obesity rates. We also found that a majority of employees who improved their risk levels from 2003 to 2005 maintained their gains in 2006. Employees who improved their risks levels also demonstrated relative improvement in absenteeism. Overall, this study provides additional evidence that integrated population health enhancement positively impacts employees' health risk and productivity; it also reinforces the view that "good health is good business." PMID:19108644

Loeppke, Ron; Nicholson, Sean; Taitel, Michael; Sweeney, Mat