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1

Community Dental Health Promotion for Children: Integrating Applied Behavior Analysis and Public Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article examines community dental health promotion for children in terms of factors impacting children's dental health (water fluoridation, dental health education, behavior change strategies, use of dental services, and dental phobias). Proposed is a large scale behavior change approach to public dental health which integrates applied…

Kramer, Kathryn D.; Geller, E. Scott

1987-01-01

2

Health Behavior Health Promotion -Prevention  

E-print Network

Health Behavior Health Promotion - Prevention Modification of Health Attitudes and Health Behavior #12;Health Promotion: An Overview Basic philosophy Good health = individual and collective goal interventions Public Health Strategies #12;Introduction to Health Behaviors: Role of Behavioral Factors

Meagher, Mary

3

Social Ecology of Asthma: Engaging Stakeholders in Integrating Health Behavior Theories and Practice-Based Evidence through Systems Mapping  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a process for integrating health behavior and social science theories with practice-based insights using participatory systems thinking and diagramming methods largely inspired by system dynamics methods. This integration can help close the gap between research and practice in health education and health behavior by offering…

Gillen, Emily M.; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Yeatts, Karin B.; Hernandez, Michelle L.; Smith, Timothy W.; Lewis, Megan A.

2014-01-01

4

Integrative Health Coaching and Motivational interviewing: Synergistic Approaches to Behavior Change in Healthcare  

PubMed Central

As rates of preventable chronic diseases and associated costs continue to rise, there has been increasing focus on strategies to support behavior change in healthcare. Health coaching and motivational interviewing are synergistic but distinct approaches that can be effectively employed to achieve this end. However, there is some confusion in the literature about the relationship between these two approaches. The purpose of this review is to describe a specific style of health coaching—integrative health coaching—and motivational interviewing, including their origins, the processes and strategies employed, and the ways in which they are similar and different. We also provide a case example of how integrative health coaching and motivational interviewing might be employed to demonstrate how these approaches are synergistic but distinct from each other in practice. This information may be useful for both researchers and clinicians interested in investigating or using behavior change interventions to improve health and cost outcomes in chronic disease. PMID:24416683

Wolever, Ruth Q.

2013-01-01

5

The behavioral intervention technology model: an integrated conceptual and technological framework for eHealth and mHealth interventions.  

PubMed

A growing number of investigators have commented on the lack of models to inform the design of behavioral intervention technologies (BITs). BITs, which include a subset of mHealth and eHealth interventions, employ a broad range of technologies, such as mobile phones, the Web, and sensors, to support users in changing behaviors and cognitions related to health, mental health, and wellness. We propose a model that conceptually defines BITs, from the clinical aim to the technological delivery framework. The BIT model defines both the conceptual and technological architecture of a BIT. Conceptually, a BIT model should answer the questions why, what, how (conceptual and technical), and when. While BITs generally have a larger treatment goal, such goals generally consist of smaller intervention aims (the "why") such as promotion or reduction of specific behaviors, and behavior change strategies (the conceptual "how"), such as education, goal setting, and monitoring. Behavior change strategies are instantiated with specific intervention components or "elements" (the "what"). The characteristics of intervention elements may be further defined or modified (the technical "how") to meet the needs, capabilities, and preferences of a user. Finally, many BITs require specification of a workflow that defines when an intervention component will be delivered. The BIT model includes a technological framework (BIT-Tech) that can integrate and implement the intervention elements, characteristics, and workflow to deliver the entire BIT to users over time. This implementation may be either predefined or include adaptive systems that can tailor the intervention based on data from the user and the user's environment. The BIT model provides a step towards formalizing the translation of developer aims into intervention components, larger treatments, and methods of delivery in a manner that supports research and communication between investigators on how to design, develop, and deploy BITs. PMID:24905070

Mohr, David C; Schueller, Stephen M; Montague, Enid; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Rashidi, Parisa

2014-01-01

6

The Behavioral Intervention Technology Model: An Integrated Conceptual and Technological Framework for eHealth and mHealth Interventions  

PubMed Central

A growing number of investigators have commented on the lack of models to inform the design of behavioral intervention technologies (BITs). BITs, which include a subset of mHealth and eHealth interventions, employ a broad range of technologies, such as mobile phones, the Web, and sensors, to support users in changing behaviors and cognitions related to health, mental health, and wellness. We propose a model that conceptually defines BITs, from the clinical aim to the technological delivery framework. The BIT model defines both the conceptual and technological architecture of a BIT. Conceptually, a BIT model should answer the questions why, what, how (conceptual and technical), and when. While BITs generally have a larger treatment goal, such goals generally consist of smaller intervention aims (the "why") such as promotion or reduction of specific behaviors, and behavior change strategies (the conceptual "how"), such as education, goal setting, and monitoring. Behavior change strategies are instantiated with specific intervention components or “elements” (the "what"). The characteristics of intervention elements may be further defined or modified (the technical "how") to meet the needs, capabilities, and preferences of a user. Finally, many BITs require specification of a workflow that defines when an intervention component will be delivered. The BIT model includes a technological framework (BIT-Tech) that can integrate and implement the intervention elements, characteristics, and workflow to deliver the entire BIT to users over time. This implementation may be either predefined or include adaptive systems that can tailor the intervention based on data from the user and the user’s environment. The BIT model provides a step towards formalizing the translation of developer aims into intervention components, larger treatments, and methods of delivery in a manner that supports research and communication between investigators on how to design, develop, and deploy BITs. PMID:24905070

Schueller, Stephen M; Montague, Enid; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Rashidi, Parisa

2014-01-01

7

The Starting Early Starting Smart Integrated Services Model: Improving Access to Behavioral Health Services in the Pediatric Health Care Setting for At-Risk Families with Young Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We evaluated the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) national initiative to integrate behavioral health services (parenting, mental health, and drug treatment) into the pediatric health care setting for families with young children. Data are presented from five pediatric care (PC) sites, drawing from families at risk due to demographic and…

Morrow, Connie E.; Mansoor, Elana; Hanson, K. Lori; Vogel, April L.; Rose-Jacobs, Ruth; Genatossio, Carolyn Seval; Windham, Amy; Bandstra, Emmalee S.

2010-01-01

8

Outlining the scope of behavioral health practice in integrated primary care: dispelling the myth of the one-trick mental health pony.  

PubMed

Patient presentation in primary care ranges from psychosocial considerations to physical and mental health concerns including serious mental illness. To best prepare for addressing all aspects of health, integrated primary care practices should be equipped with the expertise and resources to appropriately treat the range of presentations. We conducted a literature review of research articles to determine the span of service types provided by behavioral health providers in primary care settings. Among 675 articles retrieved, only 17 addressed health behaviors, 64 examined both health behaviors and mental health, and 160 included only mental health topics. Within these groups, depression was the dominant screening, assessment, and treatment target, and only 42% of all studies included Method and Results sections. Literature supports that integrating behavioral health providers and services into primary care settings benefits patients, primary care providers, and the practice at large, resulting in improved care experiences. However, primary care practices appear to not use the full range of services behavioral health providers can offer. Increased health policy efforts and payment reform are needed to enable a more expansive view of what behavioral health providers could do in a primary care context. PMID:25020071

Miller, Benjamin F; Brown Levey, Shandra M; Payne-Murphy, Jessica C; Kwan, Bethany M

2014-09-01

9

Integrating multiple health behavior theories into program planning: the PER worksheet.  

PubMed

The foundation of a logic model or any theory-based planning model is the identification of the behavioral antecedents and the relationship of these variables to the target behavior. Applying theoretical concepts to specific behaviors and populations is often challenging for practitioners and program planning students. The challenge comes from the abstract definition of theoretical constructs, the duplication of similar constructs in multiple theories, and the need to combine multiple theories. To simplify the planning process when utilizing logic models and health behavior theory, we recommend the use of the PER Worksheet. The PER Worksheet is a planning tool that provides layman-term prompts for identifying health behavior antecedents. It encompasses five common health behavior theories-health belief model, theory of planned behavior, social cognitive theory, an ecological perspective, and transtheoretical model. The PER Worksheet is organized into three columns: Predisposing, Enabling, and Reinforcing factors, terms of the PRECEDE/PROCEED model. PMID:18552278

Langlois, Marietta A; Hallam, Jeffrey S

2010-03-01

10

Organizational Factors Influencing Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Integrated Treatment in Behavioral Health Agencies  

PubMed Central

Objective. In recent years, New Mexico has prioritized integrated treatment for cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders within its public behavioral health system. This report describes factors likely to be important when implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in community agencies. Methods. Our mixed-method research design consisted of observations, semistructured interviews, and surveys undertaken with employees at 14 agencies at baseline and after 18 months. We developed four-agency typologies based on iterative coding and analysis of observations and interviews. We then examined survey data from employees at the four exemplar agencies to validate qualitative findings. Results. Financial resources and strong leadership impacted agency capacity to train providers and implement EBPs. Quantitative analysis of service provider survey responses from these agencies (N = 38) supported qualitative findings and demonstrated significant mean score differences in leadership, organizational climate, and attitudes toward EBPs in anticipated directions. Conclusion. The availability of strong leadership and financial resources were key components to initial implementation success in this study of community agencies in New Mexico. Reliance only on external funding poses risks for sustainment when demoralizing work climates precipitate employee turnover. Strong agency leadership does not always compensate for deficient financial resources in vulnerable communities. PMID:24772411

Bonham, Caroline A.; Sommerfeld, David; Willging, Cathleen; Aarons, Gregory A.

2014-01-01

11

Integrated primary care and behavioral health services for Latinos: a blueprint and research agenda.  

PubMed

Disparities in Latino utilization of mental health services have been documented for some years. Factors such as stigma, low rates of health insurance, paucity of culturally competent providers, and linguistic inaccessibility have contributed to this underutilization. The documented tendency of many Latinos to experience the mind and body as a unified whole, often referred to as "non-dualism"; provides a unique opportunity to address these disparities in utilization. This article advocates a specific model of engagement of Latinos into a continuum of needed behavioral health services via the primary care clinic, and suggests a variety of clinical and administrative outcome measures for evaluating the effectiveness of the model. The model centers on the inclusion of a behavioral health specialist who is "nested" within the primary care team. The preparation and perspectives of clinically trained social workers make them ideal for this role. PMID:19042495

Manoleas, Peter

2008-01-01

12

Health Behaviors and Wellness  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Optimizing the health and quality of life for people who have survived cancer requires a continuing focus on health promotion\\u000a and behavior change to reduce behavioral health risks. A focus on optimizing health behavior is critical for people surviving\\u000a cancer because they are at increased risk for the development of chronic health conditions. Some of these conditions may develop\\u000a from

Robyn Osborn; Tricia L. Psota; Jaesin Sa; Tracy Sbrocco

13

Monitoring Risk & Health Behaviors  

Cancer.gov

The Applied Research Program supports surveys designed to assess the prevalence of individual and societal risk factors and health behaviors that mediate cancer incidence, morbidity, mortality, and survival.

14

Utilizing a Positive Behavior Support Approach to Achieve Integrated Mental Health Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although experts in early childhood mental health services make clear the need to infuse mental health services into all program components, many have suggested that the mental health services in the majority of Head Start programs are narrowly focused and that mental health consultants are often used in limited ways (see D. J. Cohen, Solnit, & Wohlford, 1997; E. Cohen

Andy Frey; Scott Young; Allene Gold; Earl Trevor

2008-01-01

15

Utilizing a Positive Behavior Support Approach to Achieve Integrated Mental Health Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although experts in early childhood mental health services make clear the need to infuse mental health services into all program components, many have suggested that the mental health services in the majority of Head Start programs are narrowly focused and that mental health consultants are often used in limited ways (see D. J. Cohen, Solnit, &…

Frey, Andy; Young, Scott; Gold, Allene; Trevor, Earl

2008-01-01

16

Education, cognition, health knowledge, and health behavior.  

PubMed

Using data from NLSY97, we analyze the impact of education on health behavior. Controlling for health knowledge does not influence the impact of education on health behavior, supporting the productive efficiency hypothesis. Accounting for cognitive ability does not significantly alter the relationship between education and health behavior. Similarly, the impact of education on health behavior is the same between those with and without a learning disability, suggesting that cognition is not likely to be a significant factor in explaining the impact of education on health behavior. PMID:23546739

Mocan, Naci; Altindag, Duha T

2014-04-01

17

Health Behavior in Ecological Context  

PubMed Central

Health is best understood within an ecological context. Accordingly, health promotion involves processes that foster supportive environments and healthful behavior. Thus, effective health promotion programs are typically multilevel, focusing not only on the population at risk but also on the environmental conditions that contribute so importantly to health and health behavior. Health behavior is important at each societal level. Arguably, accomplishment of health promotion goals at each societal level requires changes in the behavior of those who control or influence the health outcomes of interest. Recognition of three distinct types of health behavior can guide multilevel health promotion program planning. Personal-health behavior affects the health of the person who engages in that behavior. Health-related behavior includes actions taken by proximal others that directly affect the health of others, although usually not purposefully. Health-protective behavior is undertaken purposefully to foster the health of others. Regardless of the outcome of interest or societal level, similar health promotion processes can be employed to alter health behavior. PMID:23136303

Simons-Morton, Bruce

2014-01-01

18

Changing Health Behavior in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author considers the need for changing health behavior in youth. The author begins by discussing how people learn health behavior which could help educators in understanding the reasons why it is often difficult to effect changes--and how educators may succeed. If the aim of health educators is to change behavior, the author…

Hochbaum, Godfrey M.

2010-01-01

19

Integrated structural health monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the authors opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

2001-01-01

20

Skin: Behavior and Health Connection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students become better aware of how their personal behavior and the environment can have a considerable impact on their health in general, particularly the health of their skin. In this exercise, students draw a model of a healthy and unhealthy person. This prompts a discussion on behavior and environmental behaviors that affect health. They also learn what good health is and the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. Finally, the students determine their skin types.

American Association for the Advancement of Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science;)

2006-09-07

21

Integrating behavior, mechanics and physiology  

E-print Network

· Animal behavior and orientation · Swimming mechanics · When combined with other sensors providesIntegrating behavior, mechanics and physiology: use of acceleration sensors to study shark behavior behind observed behaviors · Variety of sensors available, but not utilized · Some modification

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

22

Health Behavior in Ecological Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health is best understood within an ecological context. Accordingly, health promotion involves processes that foster supportive environments and healthful behavior. Thus, effective health promotion programs are typically multilevel, focusing not only on the population at risk but also on the environmental conditions that contribute so importantly…

Simons-Morton, Bruce

2013-01-01

23

Sensory Integration in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lorna Jean King is interviewed concerning the present status of sensory integration as a treatment modality in the area of mental health. Topics covered are: use of sensory integration techniques with adults and adolescents in both chronic and acute mental health settings; goals and expected outcomes of using sensory integration techniques; cost-effectiveness of these techniques; differences between occupational therapy and

Barbara W. Posthuma

1983-01-01

24

Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Behaviors  

PubMed Central

The inverse relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) and unhealthy behaviors such as tobacco use, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been well demonstrated empirically but encompass diverse underlying causal mechanisms. These mechanisms have special theoretical importance because disparities in health behaviors, unlike disparities in many other components of health, involve something more than the ability to use income to purchase good health. Based on a review of broad literatures in sociology, economics, and public health, we classify explanations of higher smoking, lower exercise, poorer diet, and excess weight among low-SES persons into nine broad groups that specify related but conceptually distinct mechanisms. The lack of clear support for any one explanation suggests that the literature on SES disparities in health and health behaviors can do more to design studies that better test for the importance of the varied mechanisms. PMID:21909182

Pampel, Fred C.; Krueger, Patrick M.; Denney, Justin T.

2011-01-01

25

Health behaviors and endothelial function.  

PubMed

An unhealthy lifestyle, including excess caloric intake, lack of exercise, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption, increases one's risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the exact mechanisms by which these behaviors influence the development and progression of CVD have yet to be determined. Endothelial function (EF) has been shown to be a potent predictor of CVD, yet the effects of health behaviors on EF are not clear. The literature assessing the role of four health behaviors, obesity (a proxy of excess caloric intake), smoking, physical inactivity, and alcohol consumption, on the development of endothelial dysfunction is reviewed. Potential mechanisms through which these behaviors may influence EF are discussed. Smoking, being overweight or obese, and physical inactivity are all associated with decreased EF. A direct causal relationship between these measures and EF is suggested by the fact that improvements in these behaviors leads to parallel improvements in EF. The influence of alcohol consumption is somewhat more contentious, with some studies indicating a dose-response relationship such that those with greater consumption have poor EF. However, other studies have shown that those who drink moderately have the best EF. Although there is a growing body of literature implicating poor health behaviors in the development of endothelial dysfunction, more work is needed to establish the exact mechanisms by which this occurs. To our knowledge, there are no studies that have assessed the impact of multiple health behaviors or the interaction of health behaviors on EF. PMID:17906923

Gordon, Jennifer L; Lavoie, Kim L; Arsenault, André; Ditto, Blaine; Bacon, Simon L

2008-02-01

26

Does Formal Integration Between Child Welfare And Behavioral Health Agencies Result in Improved Placement Stability For Adolescents Engaged With Both Systems?  

PubMed Central

National survey data were used to assess whether child welfare agency ties to behavioral health care providers improved placement stability for adolescents served by both systems. Adolescents initially at home who were later removed tended to have fewer moves when child welfare and behavioral health were in the same larger agency. Joint training of child welfare and behavioral health staff was negatively associated with numbers of moves as well as numbers of days out of home. PMID:22894016

Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline

2013-01-01

27

Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

28

Mental Health 1: Human Behavior  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, from Science NetLinks, provides students with a sound introduction and historical overview of the important figures and discoveries that have greatly advanced the study of human behavior since the early 1900s. This lesson is the first of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-29

29

Does Formal Integration between Child Welfare and Behavioral Health Agencies Result in Improved Placement Stability for Adolescents Engaged with Both Systems?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National survey data were used to assess whether child welfare agency ties to behavioral health care providers improved placement stability for adolescents served by both systems. Adolescents initially at home who were later removed tended to have fewer moves when child welfare and behavioral health were in the same larger agency. Joint training…

Wells, Rebecca; Chuang, Emmeline

2012-01-01

30

Modifying and developing health behavior.  

PubMed

The literatures on both behavior modification and behavioral development have engendered innovations in public health programs, addressing problems of patient adherance to preventive and therapeutic regimens, delay in seeking diagnosis of illness symptoms, risk-taking behavior, and other aspects of lifestyle associated with health. Because most of this literature derives from psychology, there has been a distinct bias in the construction of interventions, pointing them directly at individuals, usually in a counseling or small group mode of delivery. These developments served public health well enough during a decade or so when the preoccupation was with utilization of health services and medical management of chronic diseases. With the publication of the Lalonde Report in Canada in 1974, the passage of Public Law 94-317 in 1976 in the United States, and similar initiatives in other English-speaking and European countries, the recognition of the greater complexities of lifestyle development and modification in the absence of symptoms has taken hold. Policy makers and public health workers seek a more efficient and equitable set of strategies to meet the behavioral health challenges of modern society without placing the entire weight of responsibility for behavior on the individual or on therapeutic practitioners. Concurrently, on a more global scale and in the developing countries, a concern has emerged for strategies that give individuals, families, and communities a greater role in deciding their own health priorities. The convergence of these two trends--one seeking to distribute responsibility for lifestyle more equitably and the other seeking to distribute responsibility for planning health programs more equitably --calls for policies, strategies, and interventions that will place similar emphasis on health education and organizational, economic, and environmental supports for health behavior. The combination of these elements of support for behavior calls, in turn, for research and more inventive applications of theory from sociology, political science, economics, and anthropology. Public health workers will need to become more conversant and facile in these social sciences, as they have in psychology and its applications in the recent past. PMID:6372810

Green, L W

1984-01-01

31

Institute for Behavioral Health SCHNEIDER INSTITUTES FOR HEALTH POLICY  

E-print Network

, families, and veterans Panel Sponsored by the Institute for Behavioral Health Mary Jo Larson, Ph for Behavioral Health SCHNEIDER INSTITUTES FOR HEALTH POLICY Veterans are Becoming More Diverse #12;Institute for Behavioral Health SCHNEIDER INSTITUTES FOR HEALTH POLICY Veterans are Becoming More Diverse #12;Institute

Snider, Barry B.

32

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Rick Gibbons is a professor at Iowa State University who conducts research on the social psychology of health behavior, including adolescent health risk behaviors, such as drinking and drug use, and health promotion, such as exercise and UV protection.

33

Health Literacy and Women's Health-Related Behaviors in Taiwan  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food…

Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N.

2012-01-01

34

Health Instruction Packages: Behavioral Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These four learning modules present text and exercises designed to help allied health students understand various elements of positive interaction with people. The first module, "Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs" by Dianne Mackey, defines human needs, presents Maslow's theories, and helps the learner identify behaviors that reflect the presence of…

Mackey, Dianne Dee; And Others

35

eHealth communication and behavior change: promise and performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional health communication interventions have often failed to show significant changes in people's behaviors. Guidance from social semiotic frameworks suggests that health communication interventions can be improved by incorporating greater participation by the intended audiences of users, paying greater attention to social contexts, and increasing broad use of integrated multimedia dissemination strategies. The use of eHealth communication has great promise

Linda Neuhauser; Gary L. Kreps

2010-01-01

36

Intersection of mHealth and Behavioral Health  

E-print Network

, mental health, medication-taking, health promotion/wellness). · They may include applicationsIntersection of mHealth and Behavioral Health Co-Chairs: Lisa A. Marsch, PhD, Director, Dartmouth Center for Technology and Behavioral Health Andrew Campbell, PhD, Professor of Computer Science

37

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Control and Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Home Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, and Research Home Constructs Barriers Dispositional Optimism Environments Illness Representations Implementation Intentions Intention,

38

Health Risk Behaviors and Academic Achievement  

MedlinePLUS

... and Academic Achievement What is the relationship between health-risk behaviors and academic achievement? Data presented below from ... Percentage of high school students who engaged in health-risk behaviors, by type of grades earned (mostly A’s, ...

39

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Ralf Schwarzer is a professor of psychology at the Freie Universitat of Berlin, Germany, who works on the role of perceived self-efficacy in the adoption and maintenance of health behaviors (see Schwarzer et al., in press, Annals of Behavioral Medicine). He is in particular involved in theory building, conducting studies to examine the causal mechanisms that link health cognitions to health behaviors.

40

Using an integrated approach to understand vaccination behavior among young men who have sex with men: stages of change, the health belief model, and self-efficacy.  

PubMed

Studies continue to show that the majority of men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States remain unvaccinated against hepatitis A (HAV); such limited vaccination coverage is a missed opportunity for preventing disease. This study sought to identify beliefs and attitudes associated with motivational readiness for vaccination against HAV among MSM, using a theoretically-integrated framework. Questionnaire data were collected from 358 MSM through bar outreach. MSM with increased readiness to complete the two-dose series perceived lower practical barriers and reported greater healthcare provider communication about their sexual orientation and risk behavior. They also perceived higher benefits to vaccination and higher severity of infection, and had higher self-efficacy to complete the vaccine series. Relationships between stages of change and theory-based constructs from the health belief model and the social learning theory follow predicted patterns suggesting that these theories may provide useful frameworks for understanding vaccination readiness and intervention strategy development among MSM. PMID:14535600

Rhodes, Scott D; Hergenrather, Kenneth C

2003-10-01

41

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Intelligent Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system (Management: storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation). Presentation discusses: (1) ISHM Capability Development. (1a) ISHM Knowledge Model. (1b) Standards for ISHM Implementation. (1c) ISHM Domain Models (ISHM-DM's). (1d) Intelligent Sensors and Components. (2) ISHM in Systems Design, Engineering, and Integration. (3) Intelligent Control for ISHM-Enabled Systems

Figueroa, Fernando

2012-01-01

42

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Ajzen, I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision processes, 50, 179-211. ), the TRA illustrates many of the issues surrounding the conceptualization and measurement of intentions and other proximal antecedents to health behavior.

43

Integration of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior and Transactional Model of Stress and Coping as a Tool for Understanding Retention in HIV Care Across the Lifespan.  

PubMed

Retaining people living with HIV (PLWH) in care over the lifespan is critical to quality and longevity of life. Individual health behavior decisions that affect care retention are complicated and multifactorial. Current health behavior theories are inadequate in isolation to guide retention in care research. Two existing models, Cox's Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior, and Lazarus and Folkman's Transactional Model of Stress and Coping have both guided research with PLWH, although not related to retention in care. Integration of these models may more comprehensively inform care retention research and practice across the lifespan as it incorporates not only intra- and inter-personal characteristics and relationships but also the stress and coping experiences inevitable when living with a chronic illness such as HIV. PMID:25665883

Graham, Lucy J

2015-01-01

44

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

This Web site provides definitions of major theoretical constructs employed in health behavior research, and information about the best measures of these constructs. This resource is designed for health behavior researchers in public health, health communications, nursing, psychology, and related fields.

45

Health Behaviors Research Branch Fact Sheet  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Instit?te U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Instit?tes of Health Health Behaviors Research Branch The Health Behaviors Research Branch (HBRB) provides scientific leadership and supports research in effective ps?chosocial,

46

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Department of Behavioral and Community Health  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Department of Behavioral and Community Health Undergraduate Internship activities carried out in a community/public health organization. The internship (HLTH 491) is a 12 credit

Hill, Wendell T.

47

Research and Practice Opportunities at the Intersection of Health Education, Health Behavior, and Genomics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers and practitioners in health behavior and health education (HBHE) can play a pivotal leadership role in the integration of genomic advances to improve the public's health. The purpose of this article is to outline research and practice opportunities at the intersection of genomics and HBHE. We begin this article by briefly summarizing…

Wang, Catharine; Bowen, Deborah J.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.

2005-01-01

48

Valuing ecosystem integrity and health  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread concern for valuing ecosystem integrity and health, in Congressional legislation, in policy for ecosystem management, sustainable development, and environmental quality. Both integrity and health are combined fact-value words that significantly mix science and advocacy. Science orients policy, though policy also orients science. Recent ecological science raises questions about the mix of stability and historical change in ecosystems, about how structure and process combine to form biotic communities, about order and disorder in natural systems, and the scales on which these occur. Concern for sustainable development mixes the concern for a sustainable biosphere. Ecosystem integrity and health require much restoration of degraded environments, but restoration goals also mix science and values. A traditional attitude toward nature as resources to be for several centuries, is being challenged by an attitude toward nature as resources to be managed by sound scientific management, increasingly successful for several centuries, is being challenged by an attitude of responsibility for harmonizing culture with nature. This will require an unprecendented mix of science, ethics, and policy in the century ahead. It would be a tragic failure of human culture, especially of modern scientifically advanced culture, if it were further to degrade the integrity, health, and biodiversity achieved over many millennia, leaving a still more depauperate Earth. Homo sapiens, improverishing people and the planet, would not be the {open_quotes}wise{close_quotes} species at all.

Rolston, H. III

1995-12-31

49

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived susceptibility is a major component of threat perception in the Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1966 xClose Rosenstock, I.M. (1966). Why people use health services. Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly , 44, 94-127. ; Becker, 1974 xClose Becker, M.H. (ed). (1974) The health belief model and personal health behavior. Health Education Monographs , 2, 324-508.

50

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

There is little question that social influence is an important determinant of health-related behaviors, including not only cigarette smoking and alcohol use but a range of other behaviors as well. Thus the basic question for new research on health behavior is not necessarily whether social influence should be studied, but what aspect should be measured.

51

Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and…

Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

2012-01-01

52

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Meg Gerrard is a professor at Iowa State University who has published widely on health cognitions associated with adolescent risk behaviors such as unprotected sex, tanning, smoking, drinking and substance use. Her research has been designed to increase our understanding of the way people make decisions associated with health risk and health maintenance behaviors. Dr.

53

The Measurement of Health Behavior Change: The Health Behavior Risk Factor Prevalence Instrument.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper addresses some issues concerning the use of written instruments for measuring health behavior change. A description is given of the Health Behavior Risk Factor Prevalence Survey which was developed to identify group members' risk-taking behaviors. This instrument was used to measure the health behaviors of a group of employees in the…

Sutherland, Mary; And Others

54

04. Experiential Integrative Approaches to Heart Health  

PubMed Central

Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Experiential Workshop This session will highlight two of the most important, yet frequently overlooked, determinants of heart health: mind-body interactions and nutrition. These areas will be explored through didactic and experiential learning. The session will begin with a short presentation by Dr Adi Haramati on the physiology of stress and the scientific basis for mind-body approaches to de-stress, followed by an experiential autogenic exercise that will allow participants to track their own vascular response to a relaxation exercise (using skin thermistors). Dr David Eisenberg will then provide a short presentation on national and global trends in the areas of nutrition, obesity, and diabetes and will discuss the relationship between health professionals’ personal self-care behaviors and the frequency with which they advise their patients about these same behaviors. A cooking demonstration will showcase simple techniques that healthcare professionals can use and share with their patients to convey the fact that healthy foods can also be easy to make, convenient, affordable, and “craveably” delicious. Dr Stephen Devries will complete the presentation with a review of recent clinical studies highlighting the efficacy of nutrition and mind-body interventions on heart health. Practical recommendations for incorporating integrative strategies into heart care will be emphasized.

Haramati, Adi; Eisenberg, David

2013-01-01

55

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Most prominent health behavior theories include self-efficacy (or similar constructs). Self-efficacy is a proximal and direct predictor of intention and of behavior. According to Social Cognitive Theory (SCT; Bandura, 1997 xClose Bandura, A. (1997).

56

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The general definition of social influence is that health-related behavior is influenced by a person's social context. The behavioral social context can be represented by the behaviors of individual peers or family members (e.g., smoking) with whom the person interacts regularly, or by behaviors observed in a larger social environment such as the neighborhood in which a person lives.

57

Health Status, Personal Definition of Health, and Health Behavior Choice in the Elderly.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among health status, personal definition of health, and health behavior choice in the elderly. Self-assessed health status was measured using a modified Cantril Ladder, personal definition of health was measured using the Laffrey Health Conception Scale (LHCS), and health behavior

Wood, Norma J.

58

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Worry per se, whether assessed as a trait or as a temporary feeling, has been ignored by all health behavior theories. Of course, affect in the form of feelings (as opposed to "affective judgments") does not appear in most health behavior theories.

59

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The construct of perceived benefits is defined as beliefs about the positive outcomes associated with a behavior in response to a real or perceived threat. The perceived benefit construct is most often applied to health behaviors and is specific to an individual's perception of the benefits that will accrue by engaging in a specific health action.

60

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The concept of perceived barriers is both important and central to a variety of prominent health behavior theories. There are a number of validated barrier measures available for use that target screening for cancer and other diseases, and especially for preventive health behaviors.

61

Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

62

Improving Maladaptive Behaviors Using Sensory Integration Techniques.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the use of sensory integration techniques to reduce the maladaptive behaviors that interfered with the learning of nine high school students with mental impairments attending a special school. Maladaptive behaviors identified included rocking, toe walking, echolalia, resistance to change, compulsive behaviors, aggression,…

Shuman, Theresa

63

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Meg Gerrard Meg Gerrard is a professor at Iowa State University who has published widely on health cognitions associated with adolescent risk behaviors such as unprotected sex, tanning, smoking, drinking and substance use. Her research has been designed to increase our understanding of the way people think about the risks associated with these behaviors, and the reciprocal relation between perceptions and behavior. Dr.

64

Health Behaviors Among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers  

PubMed Central

Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among “Baby Boomer” caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state’s non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and 12,941 non-caregivers. Logistic regression models were estimated separately for four individual health-risk behaviors—smoking, sedentary behavior, and regular soda and fast-food consumption—as well as a global health-risk measure. Results: Controlling for psychological distress and personal characteristics and social resources such as age, gender, income and education, work and marital status, and neighborhood safety, caregivers had greater odds than non-caregivers of overall negative health behavior and of smoking and regular soda and fast-food consumption. We did not observe significant differences in odds of negative behavior related to stress for spousal caregivers and caregivers in the role for longer periods of time or those providing more hours of weekly care compared with other caregivers. Implications: Our study found evidence that Baby Boomer caregivers engage in poor health behaviors that are associated with exposure to caregiving. Baby Boomer caregivers may be at risk for certain behavioral factors that are associated with disability and chronic illness. PMID:22391873

Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

2012-01-01

65

Public Housing, Health, and Health Behaviors: Is There a Connection?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the relationship between public housing, health outcomes, and health behaviors among low-income housing residents. While public housing can be a dangerous and unhealthy environment in which to live, the subsidized rent may free up resources for nutritious food and health care. In addition, public housing may be of higher…

Fertig, Angela R.; Reingold, David A.

2007-01-01

66

Behavioral Health and Performance, Risk to Mitigation Strategy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This poster reviews the working of the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) group, which supports the research element which manages an integrated program for future space flight. The BHP operations group supports astronauts and their families in all phases of the International Space Station Mission, and post mission effects.

Leveton, Lauren; Whitemire, Alexandra

2009-01-01

67

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Description & Theoretical Background 2 Use in Health Behavior Theories 3 Measures and Measurement 4 Similar Constructs 5 References 6 Measures Appendix 7 Published Examples Download Full Text (PDF) Other Constructs Barriers Dispositional

68

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Measures of Perceived Control, Mastery, and Empowerment Mastery. Pearlin and Schooler (1978) xClose Pearlin, L.I., and Schooler, C., (1978). The structure of coping. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 19, 2-21.

69

Performance Dynamics In Military Behavioral Health Clinics  

E-print Network

The prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other related behavioral health conditions among active duty service members and their families has grown over 100% in the past six years and are estimated to ...

Lyan, Dmitriy Eduard

70

Performance dynamics in military behavioral health clinics  

E-print Network

The prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other related behavioral health conditions among active duty service members and their families has grown over 100% in the past six years and are now estimated ...

Lyan, Dmitriy Eduard

2013-01-01

71

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Control and Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Home Michael A. Diefenbach Michael A. Diefenbach, Ph.D., is a health/social psychologist and Assistant Professor of Urology and Oncological Sciences at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. His

72

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Theories 2 Measures and Measurements 3 Similar Constructs 4 References 5 Measures Appendix 6 Published Examples Download Full Text (PDF) Other Constructs Barriers Dispositional Optimism Environments Illness

73

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 General Description & Theoretical Background 2 Definitions of Perceived Vulnerability in Health Behavior Theories 3 Measurement and Methodological Issues 4 Similar Constructs 5 References 6 Published Examples Download Full Text

74

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Although BI does have very good predictive validity, it is still the case that it doesn't explain 70% to 80% of the variance in health behavior, which raises the methodological question (with theoretical implications) of why?

75

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 General Definition 2 Use of the Construct in Health Behavior Theories 3 Measures and Measurements 4 Similar Constructs 5 Measurement and Methodological Issues 6 References 7 Measures Appendix 8 Published Examples Download Full Text

76

Prioritizing integrated mHealth strategies for universal health coverage.  

PubMed

As countries strive toward universal health coverage, mobile wireless technologies-mHealth tools-in support of enumeration, registration, unique identification, and maintenance of health records will facilitate improved health system performance. Electronic forms and registry systems will enable routine monitoring of the coverage of essential interventions for individuals within relevant target populations. A cascading model is presented for prioritizing and operationalizing the role of integrated mHealth strategies. PMID:25214614

Mehl, Garrett; Labrique, Alain

2014-09-12

77

Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics  

E-print Network

in adolescence " Drinking to excess " Smoking " Illicit drug use " Unsafe sex " Risk-taking behaviors " Tanning to major causes of death " Behaviors develop gradually rather than being acquired "all at once" " Substance of vulnerability #12;Substance abuse: Links " Conflict with parents and family problems " Impulsivity " Stress

Meagher, Mary

78

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The concept of perceived barriers has been used in behavioral medicine for a long time in one form or another. The earliest widespread use of the barriers concept was associated with the Health Belief Model, as described in the following section. Webster's dictionary defines a barrier as "something that impedes or separates". Interestingly, the concept of barriers to accomplishment of a goal or a specified health behavior is assumed to be so straightforward that it is often left undefined.

79

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Two important factors when deciding which measures to use in health research would be the type of behavior being examined and the age of the population being assessed. For health-promoting behaviors, such as those related to diet and nutrition, medical regimen, sun protection, exercise, etc., standard BI measures should work well, especially if accompanied by implementation intentions—where and when to exercise, which diet to follow, or which sunscreen to use.

80

How does health information influence African American men's health behavior?  

PubMed

Few researchers have examined where African American men obtain, process, and use health information. A thematic analysis of data from eighteen exploratory focus groups conducted with 154 urban African American men aged 32 years and older revealed that men received health information from a variety of sources, including health professionals, media, and members of their social networks. At times, information raised their awareness of health issues, but trust in the source of the information influenced how this information was perceived. Medical professionals were the most common source of health information, but family members were the most trusted source of health information. Health problems and social support increased men's motivation to use health information in order to improve their health and healthy behaviors. These findings illustrate that it is critical to identify factors that influence what information men choose to believe and follow or decide to ignore. PMID:22178902

Griffith, Derek M; Ellis, Katrina R; Ober Allen, Julie

2012-03-01

81

Oral Health Status and Oral Health Behaviors in Chinese Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of the study were to describe the oral health status and treatment needs of the 5- to 6-year-old and 12-year-old children in Southern China; to describe the patterns of oral health behaviors, knowledge, and attitudes among the 12-year-olds; and to assess the effects of socio-behavioral factors on the 12-year-old children's dental caries experiences. The study sample was comprised

M. C. M. Wong; E. C. M. Lo; E. Schwarz; H. G. Zhang

2001-01-01

82

Can health care organizations improve health behavior and treatment adherence?  

PubMed

Many Americans are failing to engage in both the behaviors that prevent and those that effectively manage chronic health conditions, including pulmonary disorders, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and cancer. Expectations that health care providers are responsible for changing patients' health behaviors often do not stand up against the realities of clinical care that include large patient loads, limited time, increasing co-pays, and restricted access. Organizations and systems that might share a stake in changing health behavior include employers, insurance payers, health care delivery systems, and public sector programs. However, although the costs of unhealthy behaviors are evident, financial resources to address the problem are not readily available. For most health care organizations, the return on investment for developing behavior change programs appears highest when addressing treatment adherence and disease self-management, and lowest when promoting healthy lifestyles. Organizational strategies to improve adherence are identified in 4 categories: patient access, provider training and support, incentives, and information technology. Strategies in all 4 categories are currently under investigation in ongoing studies and have the potential to improve self-management of many chronic health conditions. PMID:24152056

Bender, Bruce G

2014-04-01

83

Motivational Interviewing and Pediatric Health Behavior Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivational interviewing (MI) is an empirically supported intervention with a large evidentiary base in the adult behavioral medicine and addictions literature. In the last decade, a growing body of research has shown promise for the use of MI in health behavior change settings with pediatric populations. This article provides a description of MI and its differences from other pediatric counseling

Mariann Suarez; Sharon Mullins

2008-01-01

84

Hypertension Education: Impact on Parent Health Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study sought to determine the effects of a high blood pressure education program for sixth graders on the preventive hypertension health attitudes and behaviors of their parents. Attention was focused on the role of students ("significant others") in affecting parental attitude and behavior changes relating to the three risk factors of…

Walker, Peter; Portnoy, Barry

85

Health Educators: Role Modeling and Smoking Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined cigarette smoking among health educators, their views about the effects of this behavior upon their audiences and beliefs about smoking in light of their professional role. Smokers and nonsmokers were significantly less included than former smokers to feel the role of health education is to convince people not to smoke. (Author/ABL)

Brennan, Andrew J. J.; Galli, Nicholas

1985-01-01

86

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Barriers are a central part of many theories of health behavior. The health belief model (HBM) was one of the earliest to prominently feature perceived barriers (Becker et al., 1979 xClose Becker, M. H., Maiman, L. A., Kirscht, J. P., Haefner, D. P., Drachman, R.

87

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Using normative beliefs in the context of the theory of reasoned action Historically, there has been a strong tendency for health researchers to use normative beliefs in the context of the theory of reasoned action to predict and influence health behaviors. One strategy has been as follows.

88

DCCPS: BRP: Health Behaviors Research Branch  

Cancer.gov

The Food Attitudes and Behaviors (FAB) Survey was developed by staff at NCI with the goal of evaluating a variety of factors that may be related to fruit and vegetable intake among adults. The FAB Survey contains 65 questions in 8 sections. FAB measures attitudes and beliefs, general health, shopping, fruit and vegetable consumption, eating behaviors, physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and food preferences. Conventional constructs include self-efficacy, barriers, social support, and knowledge of recommendations related to fruit and vegetable intake.

89

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Weinstein, N.D. (1982). Unrealistic optimism about susceptibility to health problems. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 5, 441-460. ) is the belief that one is less vulnerable to health problems in general, or to a specific health problem, than peers. People consistently show this tendency, especially when they perceive that the problem is controllable or rare and when they lack experience with the problem.

90

Integrating reproductive health: myth and ideology.  

PubMed Central

Since 1994, integrating human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted disease (HIV/STD) services with primary health care, as part of reproductive health, has been advocated to address two major public health problems: to control the spread of HIV; and to improve women's reproductive health. However, integration is unlikely to succeed because primary health care and the political context within which this approach is taking place are unsuited to the task. In this paper, a historical comparison is made between the health systems of Ghana, Kenya and Zambia and that of South Africa, to examine progress on integration of HIV/STD services since 1994. Our findings indicate that primary health care in Ghana, Kenya and Zambia has been used mainly by women and children and that integration has meant adding new activities to these services. For the vertical programmes which support these services, integration implies enhanced collaboration rather than merged responsibility. This compromise between comprehensive rhetoric and selective reality has resulted in little change to existing structures and processes; problems with integration have been exacerbated by the activities of external donors. By comparison, in South Africa integration has been achieved through political commitment to primary health care rather than expanding vertical programmes (top-down management systems). The rhetoric of integration has been widely used in reproductive health despite lack of evidence for its feasibility, as a result of the convergence of four agendas: improving family planning quality; the need to improve women's health; the rapid spread of HIV; and conceptual shifts in primary health care. International reproductive health actors, however, have taken little account of political, financial and managerial constraints to implementation in low-income countries. PMID:10534902

Lush, L.; Cleland, J.; Walt, G.; Mayhew, S.

1999-01-01

91

Behavioral health leadership: new directions in occupational mental health.  

PubMed

The impact of stress on mental health in high-risk occupations may be mitigated by organizational factors such as leadership. Studies have documented the impact of general leadership skills on employee performance and mental health. Other researchers have begun examining specific leadership domains that address relevant organizational outcomes, such as safety climate leadership. One emerging approach focuses on domain-specific leadership behaviors that may moderate the impact of combat deployment on mental health. In a recent study, US soldiers deployed to Afghanistan rated leaders on behaviors promoting management of combat operational stress. When soldiers rated their leaders high on these behaviors, soldiers also reported better mental health and feeling more comfortable with the idea of seeking mental health treatment. These associations held even after controlling for overall leadership ratings. Operational stress leader behaviors also moderated the relationship between combat exposure and soldier health. Domain-specific leadership offers an important step in identifying measures to moderate the impact of high-risk occupations on employee health. PMID:25160794

Adler, Amy B; Saboe, Kristin N; Anderson, James; Sipos, Maurice L; Thomas, Jeffrey L

2014-10-01

92

Health-Compromising Behaviors characteristics  

E-print Network

a window of vulnerability in adolescence ! Drinking to excess ! Smoking ! Illicit drug use ! Unsafe sex (- reinforcement) ! Linked to major causes of death ! Behaviors develop gradually rather than being acquired "all to be matched to stage of vulnerability #12;Substance abuse: Links ! Conflict with parents and family problems

Meagher, Mary

93

Lifestyle Assessment: Helping Patients Change Health Behaviors  

PubMed Central

This article is the second in a series of six on lifestyle assessment and behavior change. The first article presented an assessment tool called FANTASTIC, which has been tested for reliability and is currently in wide use. After assessment, family physicians must help patients decide to change—and give them guidance on how to change—unhealthy behaviors. This article explains how the family physician can use educational, behavioral and relaxation strategies to increase patients' motivation, maintain their commitment and teach them the skills needed to effect changes in health behavior.

Ciliska, Donna; Wilson, Douglas M. C.

1984-01-01

94

Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

2013-01-01

95

Applying the Health Belief Model to college students' health behavior  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this research was to investigate how university students' nutrition beliefs influence their health behavioral intention. This study used an online survey engine (Qulatrics.com) to collect data from college students. Out of 253 questionnaires collected, 251 questionnaires (99.2%) were used for the statistical analysis. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) revealed that six dimensions, "Nutrition Confidence," "Susceptibility," "Severity," "Barrier," "Benefit," "Behavioral Intention to Eat Healthy Food," and "Behavioral Intention to do Physical Activity," had construct validity; Cronbach's alpha coefficient and composite reliabilities were tested for item reliability. The results validate that objective nutrition knowledge was a good predictor of college students' nutrition confidence. The results also clearly showed that two direct measures were significant predictors of behavioral intentions as hypothesized. Perceived benefit of eating healthy food and perceived barrier for eat healthy food to had significant effects on Behavioral Intentions and was a valid measurement to use to determine Behavioral Intentions. These findings can enhance the extant literature on the universal applicability of the model and serve as useful references for further investigations of the validity of the model within other health care or foodservice settings and for other health behavioral categories. PMID:23346306

Kim, Hak-Seon; Ahn, Joo

2012-01-01

96

Competition and integration in Swedish health care.  

PubMed

Despite of an insignificant track record of quasi-market models in Sweden, new models of this kind have recently been introduced in health care; commonly referred to as "choice of care". This time citizens act as purchasers; choosing the primary care centre or family physician they want to be treated by, which, in turn, generates a capitation payment to the chosen unit. Policy makers believe that such systems will be self-remedial, that is, as a result of competition the strong providers survive while unprofitable ones will be eliminated. Because of negative consequences of the fragmented health care delivery, policy makers at the same time also promote different forms of integrated health care arrangements. One example is "local health care", which could be described as an upgraded community-oriented primary care, supported by adaptable hospital services, fitting the needs of a local population. This article reviews if it is possible to combine this kind of integrated care system with a competition driven model of governance, or if they are incompatible. The findings indicate that some choice of care schemes could hamper the development of integration in local health care. However, geographical monopolies like local health care, enclosed in a non-competitive context, lack the stimulus of competition that possibly improves performance. Thus, it could be argued that if choice of care and local health care should be combined, patients ought to choose between integrated health care arrangements and not among individual health professionals. PMID:20153910

Ahgren, Bengt

2010-07-01

97

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Because personal control is a central concept in many theories of human behavior and has generated extensive research, a considerable number of different control constructs and types of control have been studied. This can be helpful to a health behavior researcher who has a clear idea of what type of control is most relevant to a particular study, but can cause confusion for those who are less familiar with the area.

98

INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Interconnections between Human Health and Ecological Integrity emanates from a June 2000 Pellston Workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA. Jointly sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society of Toxicology (SOT), the workshop was motivated by...

99

Incarceration, maternal hardship, and perinatal health behaviors.  

PubMed

Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had .86 the odds (95 % CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the US simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development. PMID:24615355

Dumont, Dora M; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela; Clarke, Jennifer G

2014-11-01

100

Health impact assessment, integration and critical appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little existing debate about what constitutes either a good quality health impact assessment (IA) or a good quality integration of health with environmental and social assessment (EIA, SIA). A critical appraisal process is required to assure the quality of each. The appraisal considers procedural and methodological components. It includes a comparison of the completed report with the terms

Martin Birley

2003-01-01

101

Enhanced Composites Integrity Through Structural Health Monitoring  

E-print Network

Enhanced Composites Integrity Through Structural Health Monitoring Victor Giurgiutiu & Constantinos Abstract This paper discusses the topic of how the integrity of safety-critical structural composites can of how the certification of flight-critical composite structures can be achieved within the framework

Giurgiutiu, Victor

102

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Given the limited scope of this review, I have focused on 1) barriers to cancer screening, 2) barriers to health behaviors related to cancer prevention and management-such as cigarette smoking cessation, exercise, and following a healthy eating pattern, and 3) a scale that uses response options not covered above.

103

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

This section refers to articles that may be helpful. Some articles are classic publications describing the constructs in their theoretical contexts. Others are examples of research that has used the constructs to study health-related behaviors such as mammography, smoking, and nutrition.

104

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Description and Theoretical Background 2 Use in Health Behavior Theories 3 Measures and Measurement 4 Most Common Barriers 5 Measurement and Methodological Issues 6 Summary 7 References 8 Appendix 1 9 Appendix 2 10 Appendix 3 11 Appendix

105

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Rawl, S., Champion, V., Menon, U., Loehrer, P., Vance, G., Hunter, C., et al. (2001). Differences on health beliefs by stage of readiness to screen for colorectal cancer among first-degree relatives of affected individuals. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 23(Supplement), S202.

106

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Stage theories assume that behavior change involves movement through a sequence of discrete stages, that different variables influence different stage transitions, and that effective interventions need to be matched to stage (Sutton, 2005 xClose Sutton, S. (2005). Stage theories of health behaviour. In M.

107

Health Enhancing Behavior Maintaining a Healthy Diet  

E-print Network

Health Enhancing Behavior Maintaining a Healthy Diet Weight Control #12;Maintaining a Healthy Diet at risk for Coronary artery disease, hypertension Diabetes Cancer #12;Why Maintain a Healthy Diet? Dietary cholesterol level, sudden death, salt and HTN Estimates of degree to which diet contributes to cancer exceed

Meagher, Mary

108

An Integrated Approach for Gear Health Prognostics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, an integrated approach for gear health prognostics using particle filters is presented. The presented method effectively addresses the issues in applying particle filters to gear health prognostics by integrating several new components into a particle filter: (1) data mining based techniques to effectively define the degradation state transition and measurement functions using a one-dimensional health index obtained by whitening transform; (2) an unbiased l-step ahead RUL estimator updated with measurement errors. The feasibility of the presented prognostics method is validated using data from a spiral bevel gear case study.

He, David; Bechhoefer, Eric; Dempsey, Paula; Ma, Jinghua

2012-01-01

109

Integrating homoeopathy in health systems.  

PubMed Central

Homoeopathy is a therapy which involves many components and three main agents: the patient, with his or her condition and personal characteristics; the medication used, with its composition and manufacturing procedure; and the physician, with his or her approach to treatment and concepts of health. The development of research and evaluation structures, combined with a critical education in the discipline, would help to improve practices and define homoeopathy's potential role in relation to the other therapies, both conventional and unconventional, used in Western health systems. PMID:10083716

Poitevin, B.

1999-01-01

110

The Effects of Widowhood on Physical and Mental Health, Health Behaviors, and Health Outcomes: The Women's Health Initiative  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether widowhood was associated with physical and mental health, health behaviors, and health outcomes using a cross-sectional (N = 72,247) and prospective (N = 55,724) design in women aged 50–79 years participating in the Women's Health Initiative observational study (85.4% White). At baseline, married women reported better physical and mental health and generally better health behaviors than

Sara Wilcox; Kelly R. Evenson; Aaron Aragaki; Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller; Charles P. Mouton; Barbara Lee Loevinger

2003-01-01

111

Performance Improvement in Behavioral Health Care: Collateral Effects of Planned Treatment Integrity Observations as an Applied Example of Schedule-Induced Responding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With rising interest in the role of treatment integrity on student outcomes, research has primarily focused on isolating the techniques and procedures necessary to improve staff's acquisition and maintenance of adequate levels of integrity. Despite increasing numbers of publications on this topic, there has been little discussion of the variables…

Reed, Derek D.; Fienup, Daniel M.; Luiselli, James K.; Pace, Gary M.

2010-01-01

112

Integrated Systems Health Management for Space Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is a system engineering discipline that addresses the design, development, operation, and lifecycle management of components, subsystems, vehicles, and other operational systems with the purpose of maintaining nominal system behavior and function and assuring mission safety and effectiveness under off-nominal conditions. NASA missions are often conducted in extreme, unfamiliar environments of space, using unique experimental spacecraft. In these environments, off-nominal conditions can develop with the potential to rapidly escalate into mission- or life-threatening situations. Further, the high visibility of NASA missions means they are always characterized by extraordinary attention to safety. ISHM is a critical element of risk mitigation, mission safety, and mission assurance for exploration. ISHM enables: In-space maintenance and repair; a) Autonomous (and automated) launch abort and crew escape capability; b) Efficient testing and checkout of ground and flight systems; c) Monitoring and trending of ground and flight system operations and performance; d) Enhanced situational awareness and control for ground personnel and crew; e) Vehicle autonomy (self-sufficiency) in responding to off-nominal conditions during long-duration and distant exploration missions; f) In-space maintenance and repair; and g) Efficient ground processing of reusable systems. ISHM concepts and technologies may be applied to any complex engineered system such as transportation systems, orbital or planetary habitats, observatories, command and control systems, life support systems, safety-critical software, and even the health of flight crews. As an overarching design and operational principle implemented at the system-of-systems level, ISHM holds substantial promise in terms of affordability, safety, reliability, and effectiveness of space exploration missions.

Uckun, Serdar

2005-01-01

113

Posttraumatic stress disorder and health: a preliminary study of group differences in health and health behaviors  

PubMed Central

Background Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to undertake harmful health behaviors like substance use. Less is known about the association of PTSD with healthful behaviors such as healthy diet and exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine differences across physical health indicators and health behaviors in individuals with and without PTSD. Methods A cross-sectional, case–control study of health indicators and self-reported health behaviors in a community and military veteran sample was used. Results Based on a structured psychiatric interview, 25 participants had PTSD, and the remaining 55 without PTSD served as the comparison group. Participants were 40 years old on average and 45% were female. Multivariate analysis of variance analyses revealed that participants with PTSD had significantly higher body mass index (p = 0.004), had more alcohol use (p = 0.007), and reported fewer minutes of vigorous exercise (p = 0.020) than those without PTSD. Chi-square analysis of diet content and eating behavior constructs found that individuals with PTSD ate fewer fruits (p = 0.035) and had more guilt after overeating (p = 0.006). Conclusions These findings replicate prior research on the link between PTSD and negative health outcomes and engagement in harmful health behaviors and highlight the need for further examination of the association between PTSD and other health behaviors like diet content, eating behaviors, and exercise. PMID:24070007

2013-01-01

114

Community Health Workers in Brazil's Unified Health System: A Framework of their Praxis and Contributions to Patient Health Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Community Health Workers (CHWs) play a pivotal role in primary care, serving as liaisons between community members and medical providers. However, the growing reliance of health care systems worldwide on CHWs has outpaced research explaining their praxis – how they combine indigenous and technical knowledge, overcome challenges and impact patient outcomes. This paper thus articulates the CHW Praxis and Patient Health Behavior Framework. Such a framework is needed to advance research on CHW impact on patient outcomes and to advance CHW training. The project that originated this framework followed Community-Based Participatory Research principles. A team of U.S.-Brazil research partners, including CHWs, worked together from conceptualization of the study to dissemination of its findings. The framework is built on an integrated conceptual foundation including learning/teaching and individual behavior theories. The empirical base of the framework comprises in-depth interviews with 30 CHWs in Brazil's Unified Health System, Mesquita, Rio de Janeiro. Data collection for the project which originated this report occurred in 2008–10. Semi-structured questions examined how CHWs used their knowledge/skills; addressed personal and environmental challenges; and how they promoted patient health behaviors. This study advances an explanation of how CHWs use self-identified strategies – i.e., empathic communication and perseverance – to help patients engage in health behaviors. Grounded in our proposed framework, survey measures can be developed and used in predictive models testing the effects of CHW praxis on health behaviors. Training for CHWs can explicitly integrate indigenous and technical knowledge in order for CHWs to overcome contextual challenges and enhance service delivery. PMID:22305469

Pinto, Rogério M.; da Silva, Sueli Bulhões; Soriano, Rafaela

2012-01-01

115

A Qualitative Study Exploring Facilitators for Improved Health Behaviors and Health Behavior Programs: Mental Health Service Users' Perspectives  

PubMed Central

Objective. Mental health service users experience high rates of cardiometabolic disorders and have a 20–25% shorter life expectancy than the general population from such disorders. Clinician-led health behavior programs have shown moderate improvements, for mental health service users, in managing aspects of cardiometabolic disorders. This study sought to potentially enhance health initiatives by exploring (1) facilitators that help mental health service users engage in better health behaviors and (2) the types of health programs mental health service users want to develop. Methods. A qualitative study utilizing focus groups was conducted with 37 mental health service users attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center, in Northern British Columbia, Canada. Results. Four major facilitator themes were identified: (1) factors of empowerment, self-value, and personal growth; (2) the need for social support; (3) pragmatic aspects of motivation and planning; and (4) access. Participants believed that engaging with programs of physical activity, nutrition, creativity, and illness support would motivate them to live more healthily. Conclusions and Implications for Practice. Being able to contribute to health behavior programs, feeling valued and able to experience personal growth are vital factors to engage mental health service users in health programs. Clinicians and health care policy makers need to account for these considerations to improve success of health improvement initiatives for this population. PMID:24895667

Graham, Candida; de Leeuw, Sarah; Griffiths, Brenda

2014-01-01

116

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Selected 2011 National Health Risk Behaviors and Health Outcomes by Sex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

117

Integration of basic sciences in health's courses.  

PubMed

Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and compares failure rate, global final grade, approved student final grade, grade distribution and students' satisfaction with teacher conduction between integrated curriculum and traditional learning in health courses from Anhembi Morumbi University-a private institution from Brazil. Comparison between integrated and traditional curriculum was based on students' records obtained from first-year health sciences students. A total of 1,697 records from 2005 to 2007 (nonintegrated curriculum) and 785 records from 2008 (integrated curriculum) were selected for this study and they were necessary to get information about students' grades. Moreover, a questionnaire was applied in order to cover student's satisfaction with teacher conduction. The data presented in this study indicated that the integrated curriculum based on PBL was related to an improvement in student's grades and satisfaction compared with traditional teaching. We believe that the effectiveness in health education will be a combination of "classical" presentation of contents associated to actively involved students in the educational process and methodology based on problems in order to create the stimulus for the undergraduates continue to integrate basic and clinical investigation. PMID:22615229

Azzalis, L A; Giavarotti, L; Sato, S N; Barros, N M T; Junqueira, V B C; Fonseca, F L A

2012-01-01

118

Workforce competencies in behavioral health: an overview.  

PubMed

Competency-based training approaches are being used more in healthcare to guide curriculum content and ensure accountability and outcomes in the educational process. This article provides an overview of the state of competency development in the field of behavioral health. Specifically, it identifies the groups and organizations that have conducted and supported this work, summarizes their progress in defining and assessing competencies, and discusses both the obstacles and future directions for such initiatives. A major purpose of this article is to provide a compendium of current competency efforts so that these might inform and enhance ongoing competency development in the varied behavioral health disciplines and specialties. These varied resources may also be useful in identifying the core competencies that are common to the multiple disciplines and specialties. PMID:16082798

Hoge, Michael A; Paris, Manuel; Adger, Hoover; Collins, Frank L; Finn, Cherry V; Fricks, Larry; Gill, Kenneth J; Haber, Judith; Hansen, Marsali; Ida, D J; Kaplan, Linda; Northey, William F; O'Connell, Maria J; Rosen, Anita L; Taintor, Zebulon; Tondora, Janis; Young, Alexander S

2005-01-01

119

The Effect of Individual Factors on Health Behaviors Among College Students: The Mediating Effects of eHealth Literacy  

PubMed Central

Background College students’ health behavior is a topic that deserves attention. Individual factors and eHealth literacy may affect an individual’s health behaviors. The integrative model of eHealth use (IMeHU) provides a parsimonious account of the connections among the digital divide, health care disparities, and the unequal distribution and use of communication technologies. However, few studies have explored the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors, and IMeHU has not been empirically investigated. Objective This study examines the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors using IMeHU. Methods The Health Behavior Scale is a 12-item instrument developed to measure college students’ eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. The eHealth Literacy Scale is a 12-item instrument designed to measure college students’ functional, interactive, and critical eHealth literacy. A nationally representative sample of 525 valid college students in Taiwan was surveyed. A questionnaire was administered to collect background information about participants’ health status, degree of health concern, major, and the frequency with which they engaged in health-related discussions. This study used Amos 6.0 to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to identify the best measurement models for the eHealth Literacy Scale and the Health Behavior Scale. We then conducted a multiple regression analysis to examine the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors. Additionally, causal steps approach was used to explore indirect (mediating) effects and Sobel tests were used to test the significance of the mediating effects. Results The study found that perceptions of better health status (t520=2.14-6.12, P<.001-.03) and greater concern for health (t520=2.58-6.95, P<.001-.003) influenced college students’ development of 3 dimensions of eHealth literacy and adoption of healthy eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. Moreover, eHealth literacy played an intermediary role in the association between individual factors and health behaviors (Sobel test=2.09-2.72, P<.001-.03). Specifically, higher levels of critical eHealth literacy promoted students’ health status and their practice of multiple positive health behaviors, including eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. Conclusions Because this study showed that eHealth literacy mediates the association between individual factors and health behaviors, schools should aim to enhance students’ eHealth literacy and promote their health behaviors to help them achieve high levels of critical eHealth literacy. Although some of the study’s hypotheses were not supported in this study, the factors that influence health behaviors are complex and interdependent. Therefore, a follow-up study should be conducted to further explore how these factors influence one another. PMID:25499086

Chiang, ChiaHsun

2014-01-01

120

SOURCE REDUCTION BEHAVIOR AS AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE IMPACT OF A PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION CAMPAIGN IN AN INTEGRATED VECTOR MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR THE ASIAN TIGER MOSQUITO  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3)...

121

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Social Pressure Theory. A development in social learning theory gave more emphasis to the role of peers, and posited that adoption of a health risk behavior (e.g., trying cigarettes) was influenced by explicit social pressure from peers in group contexts. Here it was suggested that peers might provide offers of cigarettes and then apply social pressure, through taunts or criticism, to teens who did not immediately go along with the offers (Evans, 1984 xClose Evans, R. I. (1984).

122

Integrated women’s health program  

PubMed Central

Abstract Problem addressed Residents in family medicine residency programs require comprehensive training in women’s health best practices and resources. Objective of program To provide a framework for the development and implementation of an integrated women’s health curriculum for family medicine residency programs. Program description Objectives for each element of the program were the basis for planning the curriculum. Residents experienced primary care obstetrics clinic and on-call shifts, 24-hour off-service on-call shifts, women’s health horizontals, and a women’s health workshop, all of which were integrated into a 6-month family medicine block time. Residents worked with family physicians, obstetricians and gynecologists, and multidisciplinary health care team members in clinical settings. Teaching objectives were aligned with CanMEDS–Family Medicine core competencies. Creation of this program and its implementation were accomplished by dedicated teachers, administrators, and faculty members involved in curriculum planning. Conclusion The program design and implementation resulted in an improved comprehensive women’s health training experience for residents, which was integrated into a family medicine context. Ongoing evaluation and innovation will serve to continually improve this program. PMID:25642486

Koppula, Sudha

2014-01-01

123

Health-risk behaviors in early adolescence.  

PubMed

The major morbidities and mortalities of adolescents are related to preventable risky behaviors, but how, when, and in whom these behaviors develop in early adolescence is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine which set of risk factors and protective resources of school-age children were best predictors of health-risk behaviors in early adolescence. A longitudinal, cohort sequential design was used with a diverse sample of 1,934 children in grades 4 through 8. Parents provided demographic and neighborhood data for children through a mailed survey. Children completed valid scales annually at schools, using audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing (A-CASI) technology. Significant gender and racial/ethnic differences were found in carrying a weapon and using alcohol. Higher perceived levels of stress increased the risk for alcohol use as did riding in a car with a driver who was drinking. Health behaviors exhibited while in 4th through 6th grades protected early adolescents from alcohol use and riding in a car with a driver who was drinking. A parent's education and perceived safety in neighborhood protected against carrying a weapon and smoking. Many findings are similar to those of national samples, but others show positive differences in this localized sample, over 50% of whom were Latino. Protective resources suggest numerous nursing interventions to promote healthy adolescent development. PMID:21568625

Rew, Lynn; Horner, Sharon D; Brown, Adama

2011-01-01

124

Health maintenance behaviors in advanced Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Co-morbidity in the older adult Parkinson's disease patient decreases functional status and quality of life, and increases the risk of permanent disability. Although many chronic conditions in the adult population can be prevented, or at least influenced by early detection and treatment many progressive neurologic disorders such as Parkinson's disease cannot. This pilot study describes the health maintenance and disease prevention behaviors of a group of patients with Parkinson's disease. Findings demonstrate that parkinsonians attend in a way similar to their peers without Parkinson's disease to most parameters of general health maintenance as established by the United States Preventive Task Force. In fact, in 11 out of 12 selective parameters, parkinsonians exhibit increased frequency of participation in the recommended behaviors. However, achievement of our national goals for health promotion and disease prevention will require additional efforts in this population. Emphasis should include the participation in Pap smears, mammograms, exercise, seat belt usage and adult immunizations, especially the pneumococcal vaccination. Neuroscience nurses can play an important role in reaching health promotion and disease prevention goals in persons with Parkinson's disease through patient education, advocacy, case management, anticipatory guidance and referrals to primary care providers. PMID:7499928

Vernon, G M; Jenkins, M

1995-08-01

125

Older Women: Social Cognitive Theory Correlates of Health Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most research about health promoting behaviors has focused on pre-old adults and men, despite clear evidence that the leading cause of death among postmenopausal women is related to health behaviors. This study applied social cognitive theory constructs to exercise, dietary, and stress management health behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of self-efficacy expectation and outcome

Vicki S. Conn

1998-01-01

126

Diagnosis and Treatment of Behavioral Health Disorders in Pediatric Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. There has been a strong push toward the recognition and treatment of children with behavioral health problems by primary care pediatri- cians. This study was designed to assess the extent to which a sample of primary care pediatricians diagnose and treat behavioral health problems and to identify factors that may contribute to their behavioral health practice. Methods. A standard

Jane Williams; Kurt Klinepeter; Guy Palmes; Anita Pulley; Jane Meschan Foy

2010-01-01

127

Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach  

PubMed Central

Background The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. Methods A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Results Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Conclusion Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices. Multi-national research may provide guidance about how to scale up eye health interventions that are integrated into primary health systems. PMID:23506686

2013-01-01

128

Integrated Environment, Safety, & Health Management Plan  

E-print Network

Management System Description Revision 8 i July 2013 Integrated Safety* Management provides important Management System. A high level of attention to environmental protection, safety, health, and performance is discussed, the following applies: DOE Policy 450.4 Safety Management System Policy "...the term safety

Knowles, David William

129

Instrumentation in Health Education and the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey (AHRBS) Instrument  

E-print Network

This journal article format dissertation examined aspects of survey research methodology in health education. In the first study, the author examined articles published in Health Education and Behavior, Health Education Journal, Health Education...

Smith, Matthew L.

2010-01-14

130

Brief Integrative Multiple Behavior Intervention Effects and Mediators for Adolescents  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the efficacy of a brief integrative multiple behavior intervention and assessed risk factors as mediators of behavioral outcomes among older adolescents. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with participants randomly assigned to either a brief intervention or standard care control with 3-month follow-up. A total of 479 students attending two public high schools participated. Participants receiving the intervention showed a significant reduction in quantity x frequency of alcohol use, and increases in fruit and vegetable consumption and frequency of relaxation activities, compared to those receiving the control, p’s =.01. No effects were found on cigarette and marijuana use, exercise and sleep. Effect sizes were small with alcohol use cessation effects reaching medium size. Intervention effects were mediated by changes in peer influenceability for alcohol use, and self-efficacy and self-image for health promoting behaviors. Findings suggest that the brief intervention resulted in health risk and promoting behavior improvements for adolescents, with outcomes mediated by several risk factors. PMID:20661637

(Chad) Werch, Chudley E.; Bian, Hui; Carlson, Joan; Moore, Michele J.; DiClemente, Carlo C.; Huang, I-Chan; Ames, Steven C.; Thombs, Dennis; Weiler, Robert M.; Pokorny, Steven B.

2015-01-01

131

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. It is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this paper, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an intelligent systems ]relevant ISHM capability. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system. Both ground-based (remote) and on-board ISHM capabilities are compared and contrasted. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

132

The Implications of Death for Health: A Terror Management Health Model for Behavioral Health Promotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces a terror management health model (TMHM). The model integrates disparate health and social psychology literatures to elucidate how the conscious and nonconscious awareness of death can influence the motivational orientation that is most operative in the context of health decisions. Three formal propositions are presented.…

Goldenberg, Jamie L.; Arndt, Jamie

2008-01-01

133

Investigation of Integrated Vehicle Health Management Approaches  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report is to present the work that was performed during the summer in the Advance Computing Application office. The NFFP (NASA Faculty Fellow Program) had ten summer faculty members working on IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) technologies. The objective of this project was two-fold: 1) to become familiar with IVHM concepts and key demonstrated IVHM technologies; and 2) to integrate the research that has been performed by IVHM faculty members into the MASTLAB (Marshall Avionic Software Test Lab). IVHM is a NASA-wide effort to coordinate, integrate and apply advanced software, sensors and design technologies to increase the level of intelligence, autonomy, and health state of future vehicles. IVHM is an important concept because it is consistent with the current plan for NASA to go to the moon, mars, and beyond. In order for NASA to become more involved in deep exploration, avionic systems will need to be highly adaptable and autonomous.

Paris, Deidre

2005-01-01

134

Effect of Integrated Personalized Health Care System on Middle-Aged and Elderly Women's Health  

PubMed Central

Objectives Body weight, body mass index (BMI), body fat, and blood pressure are important indicators of a person's health. In this experimental study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an integrated personalized health care system, Health Improvement and Management System (HIMS)-everyday, which instantly provides subjects with biofeedback on their measured body weight, BMI, body fat and blood pressure using a database that stores subjects-customized information. Methods The subjects of this study used the system once or twice a week for 8 weeks. We analyzed the changes in their body weight, BMI, body fat, and blood pressure according to their respective usage of the system, and analyzed the changes in their perceived health status and health promoting behavior accordingly. Results Subjects' body weight, BMI, and blood pressure decreased significantly with respect to their individual usage of the system. Subjects who used the system more frequently showed significant improvement in their body weight, BMI, and body fat. However, subjects' perceived health status and health promoting behavior did not improve significantly. Conclusions The study showed that the biofeedback-based personalized health care system was effective in controlling middle-aged and elderly women' body weight, BMI, body fat, and blood pressure. PMID:23115743

Lee, Hiye-Ja; Park, Seung-Hun; Ju, Se-Jin; Jin, Mi-Hwa; Park, Boc-Nam

2012-01-01

135

Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Work-Rest Cycles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BHP Program Element Goal: Identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration and return to terrestrial life. BHP Requirements: a) Characterize and assess risks (e.g., likelihood and consequences). b) Develop tools and technologies to prevent, monitor, and treat adverse outcomes. c) Inform standards. d) Develop technologies to: 1) reduce risks and human systems resource requirements (e.g., crew time, mass, volume, power) and 2) ensure effective human-system integration across exploration mission.

Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra

2011-01-01

136

Health-Seeking Behaviors among Latinas: Practices and Reported Difficulties in Obtaining Health Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Latinos experience disproportionate negative health status and health care access. Expanding understanding of factors impacting Latino immigrant health is imperative. Purpose: This study identified health-seeking behaviors among Latinas in a large Midwestern city with rapid immigrant population growth. Health-seeking behaviors like…

Rojas-Guyler, Liliana; King, Keith A.; Montieth, Brigid A.

2008-01-01

137

Changing Health Behavior in Youth: Plus 40 Years  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For those in health education, the year 1969 marked the debut of "School Health Review," the forerunner to the current "American Journal of Health Education." The inaugural issue of "School Health Review," in September of 1969 included the article, "Changing Health behavior in Youth," by Dr. Godfrey M. Hochbaum. This article reviews the 1969…

Valois, Robert F.; Zullig, Keith J.; Young, Michael; Kammermann, Sandra K.

2010-01-01

138

Outcome mapping for health system integration.  

PubMed

Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care. PMID:23526058

Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

2013-01-01

139

Multiple Health Behavior Change Research: An Introduction and Overview  

PubMed Central

In 2002, the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s special interest group on Multiple Health Behavior Change was formed. The group focuses on the interrelationships among health behaviors and interventions designed to promote change in more than one health behavior at a time. Growing evidence suggests the potential for multiple-behavior interventions to have a greater impact on public health than single-behavior interventions. However, there exists surprisingly little understanding of some very basic principles concerning multiple health behavior change (MHBC) research. This paper presents the rationale and need for MHBC research and interventions, briefly reviews the research base, and identifies core conceptual and methodological issues unique to this growing area. The prospects of MHBC for the health of individuals and populations are considerable. PMID:18319098

Prochaska, Judith J.; Spring, Bonnie; Nigg, Claudio R.

2008-01-01

140

System Justification, Mental Health, and Behavior Among Disadvantaged Mothers and Their Children  

PubMed Central

Integrating social psychological research with work in child development, this study explored relationships between system justification (Jost & Banaji, 1994), maternal mental health and child externalizing behavior among low-income immigrants and racial/ethnic minorities. Dominican, Mexican and African-American families (N = 239) were assessed when children were 14-, 24- and 36-months old. SEM was used to explore longitudinal relationships between maternal system justification and mental health and associations with child behavior. Earlier mental health was negatively related to later system justification and system justification was negatively related to children’s externalizing behavior. Implications for system justification theory, child development and immigration are discussed. PMID:25035527

Godfrey, Erin B.

2014-01-01

141

Chronic Illness, Pain and Health Behaviors of Community Behavioral Health Clients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Persons with comorbid medical disorders, along with substance use disorders and mental illness, present complex treatment needs that are seldom addressed. Chronic physical illness negatively affects treatment participation and retention, decreasing effectiveness. Studies documenting higher medical morbidity and mortality in such persons have long been available. Less is known about their health behaviors. Respondents (n = 418) at a community

Sandra M. Gallagher; Audrey J. Brooks; Patricia E. Penn

2006-01-01

142

Time series clustering analysis of health-promoting behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Health promotion must be emphasized to achieve the World Health Organization goal of health for all. Since the global population is aging rapidly, ComCare elder health-promoting service was developed by the Taiwan Institute for Information Industry in 2011. Based on the Pender health promotion model, ComCare service offers five categories of health-promoting functions to address the everyday needs of seniors: nutrition management, social support, exercise management, health responsibility, stress management. To assess the overall ComCare service and to improve understanding of the health-promoting behavior of elders, this study analyzed health-promoting behavioral data automatically collected by the ComCare monitoring system. In the 30638 session records collected for 249 elders from January, 2012 to March, 2013, behavior patterns were identified by fuzzy c-mean time series clustering algorithm combined with autocorrelation-based representation schemes. The analysis showed that time series data for elder health-promoting behavior can be classified into four different clusters. Each type reveals different health-promoting needs, frequencies, function numbers and behaviors. The data analysis result can assist policymakers, health-care providers, and experts in medicine, public health, nursing and psychology and has been provided to Taiwan National Health Insurance Administration to assess the elder health-promoting behavior.

Yang, Chi-Ta; Hung, Yu-Shiang; Deng, Guang-Feng

2013-10-01

143

The IBM Health Integration Framework: Accelerating solutions for smarter healthcare  

E-print Network

The IBM Health Integration Framework: Accelerating solutions for smarter healthcare Healthcare provider edition IBM Healthcare Solutions To support your organization's objectives Healthcare #12;2 The IBM Health Integration Framework: Accelerating solutions for smarter healthcare Customers can quickly

144

Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

2007-01-01

145

Department of Health and Behavior Studies Teachers College  

E-print Network

HBS Department of Health and Behavior Studies Teachers College Columbia University Annual End of Health and Behavior Studies (HBS) was established as a result of a college- wide reorganization unit whose collective philosophical position has been that health and learning are inextricably linked

Qian, Ning

146

SPIRITUALITY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN: CORRELATIONS TO HEALTH PROMOTING BEHAVIORS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Public health data show that African-Americans have not adopted health-promoting behaviors of diet and exercise. In an effort to find other motivating or moderating variables, this study was designed to determine how spirituality relates to health promoting behaviors in African-American women. Bur...

147

Health Promotion and Risk Behaviors among Adolescents in Turkey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adolescents experience the onset and development of several health-related behaviors. The purpose of this study is to determine health risk and promotion behaviors of adolescents between the ages of 11 and 19 who were attending and to test the reliability and validity analysis of the Turkish version of Adolescent Health Promotion Scale (AHPS). The…

Ortabag, Tulay; Ozdemir, Serpil; Bakir, Bilal; Tosun, Nuran

2011-01-01

148

Behavior systems and reinforcement: an integrative approach.  

PubMed Central

Most traditional conceptions of reinforcement are based on a simple causal model in which responding is strengthened by the presentation of a reinforcer. I argue that reinforcement is better viewed as the outcome of constraint of a functioning causal system comprised of multiple interrelated causal sequences, complex linkages between causes and effects, and a set of initial conditions. Using a simplified system conception of the reinforcement situation, I review the similarities and drawbacks of traditional reinforcement models and analyze the recent contributions of cognitive, regulatory, and ecological approaches. Finally, I show how the concept of behavior systems can begin to incorporate both traditional and recent conceptions of reinforcement in an integrative approach. PMID:8354963

Timberlake, W

1993-01-01

149

Self-rated health in rural Appalachia: health perceptions are incongruent with health status and health behaviors  

PubMed Central

Background Appalachia is characterized by poor health behaviors, poor health status, and health disparities. Recent interventions have not demonstrated much success in improving health status or reducing health disparities in the Appalachian region. Since one's perception of personal health precedes his or her health behaviors, the purpose of this project was to evaluate the self-rated health of Appalachian adults in relation to objective health status and current health behaviors. Methods Appalachian adults (n = 1,576) were surveyed regarding health behaviors - soda consumer (drink ? 355 ml/d), or non-consumer (drink < 355 ml/d), fast food consumer (eating fast food ? 3 times/wk) or healthy food consumer (eating fast food < 3 times/wk), smoking (smoker or non-smoker), exercise (exerciser > 30 min > 1 d/wk) and sedentary (exercise < 30 min 1 d/wk), blood pressure medication (yes, no), and self-rated health. Blood pressure was measured through auscultation and serum cholesterol measured via needle prick. Weight status was based on BMI: normal weight (NW ? 18.5 and < 25.0), overweight (OW ? 25.0 and < 30.0), and obese (OB ? 30.0). Jaccard Binary Similarity coefficients, odds ratios, chi-square, and prevalence ratios were calculated to evaluate the relationships among self-rated health, objective health status, and health behaviors. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Respondents reported being healthy, while being sedentary (65%), hypertensive (76%), overweight (73%), or hyperlipidemic (79%). Between 57% and 66% of the respondents who considered themselves healthy had at least two disease conditions or poor health behaviors. Jaccard Binary Similarity coefficients and odds ratios showed the probability of reporting being healthy when having a disease condition or poor health behavior was high. Conclusions The association between self-rated health and poor health indicators in Appalachian adults is distorted. The public health challenge is to formulate messages and programs about health and health needs which take into account the current distortion about health in Appalachia and the cultural context in which this distortion was shaped. PMID:21489282

2011-01-01

150

Challenges of Systematic Reviewing Integrative Health Care  

PubMed Central

This article is based on an extensive review of integrative medicine (IM) and integrative health care (IHC). Since there is no general agreement of what constitutes IM/IHC, several major problems were identified that make the review of work in this field problematic. In applying the systematic review methodology, we found that many of those captured articles that used the term integrative medicine were in actuality referring to adjunctive, complementary, or supplemental medicine. The objective of this study was to apply a sensitivity analysis to demonstrate how the results of a systematic review of IM and IHC will differ according to what inclusion criteria is used based on the definition of IM/IHC. By analyzing 4 different scenarios, the authors show that, due to unclear usage of these terms, results vary dramatically, exposing an inconsistent literature base for this field. PMID:23843689

Coulter, Ian D.; Khorsan, Raheleh; Crawford, Cindy; Hsiao, An-Fu

2013-01-01

151

Integrated care: meeting mental health needs after the Gulf oil spill.  

PubMed

This column describes an integrated behavioral health initiative in primary care clinics in Louisiana parishes affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Louisiana Mental and Behavioral Health Capacity Project is an integral part of the Gulf Region Health Outreach Program and is funded from the Deepwater Horizon Medical Benefits Class Action Settlement. Using a public health approach, the Department of Psychiatry of the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center developed an interprofessional collaboration model of care to provide culturally tailored and time-sensitive on-site and telemedicine services to adults and children affected by the disaster. Results indicate a high level of acceptance of the services and reductions in both mental health symptoms and general medical symptoms. Primary care clinic staff also report increased confidence and resilience to meet future disasters. The approach could be used by communities at risk of disasters and by rural communities with limited mental health resources. PMID:24584523

Osofsky, Howard J; Osofsky, Joy D; Wells, John H; Weems, Carl

2014-03-01

152

Competency and Training Issues Related to the Integration of Career Counseling and Mental Health Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The symbiotic relationship between work and mental health requires counselor competence in both career and mental health counseling. Professional associations have developed competency statements and training standards that integrate psychopathology, career development theory, assessment techniques, and cognitive-behavioral therapy, among other…

Niles, Spencer G.; Pate, Robert H., Jr.

1989-01-01

153

Accuracy of Parents' Perceptions of Their College Student Children's Health and Health Risk Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors compared parents' perceptions of their college student children's health and health risk behaviors with the college students' own reports. One hundred sixty-four parent-college student child dyads completed questionnaires regarding the students' health, illness status, and health risk behaviors. Parents tended to be overoptimistic…

Bylund, Carma L.; Imes, Rebecca S.; Baxter, Leslie A.

2005-01-01

154

The Importance of Context in Understanding Behavior and Promoting Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavior, the roles of behavior in health, health promotion, health, quality of life, and death are all context-dependent.\\u000a This paper begins with a review of behavioral and ecological models, emphasizing their shared emphasis on context. It then\\u000a turns to genetics and the importance of contexts in understanding genetic influences. Jumping from genes to geography, it\\u000a examines how spatial analysis provides

Edwin B. Fisher

2008-01-01

155

Social disparities, health risk behaviors, and cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Overall cancer incidence rates decreased in the most recent time period in both men and women, largely due to improvements in surgical therapeutic approaches (tertiary prevention) and screening programs (secondary prevention), but differences in cancer incidence and survival according to socioeconomic status are documented worldwide. Health risk behaviors, defined as habits or practices that increase an individual’s likelihood of harmful health outcomes, are thought to mediate such inequalities. Discussion Obesity has been related with increased cancer incidence and mortality due to imbalance of leptin and adiponectin which are connected to activation of PI3K, MAPK, and STAT3 pathways and decreasing insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and mTOR signaling via activation of 5 AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), respectively. Physical activity has been associated to prevent cancer by the aforementioned obesity-related mechanisms, but also increasing level of circulating vitamin D, which has been related to lower risk of several cancers, and increasing prostaglandin F2a and reducing prostaglandin E2, which are both related with cancer prevention and promotion, respectively. A large number of different substances may induce themselves a direct cytotoxicity and mutagenic action on cells by smoking, whereas alcohol promote immune suppression, the delay of DNA repair, inhibition of the detoxification of carcinogens, the production of acetaldehyde, and the contribution to abnormal DNA methylation. The combined smoking and alcohol drinking habits have been shown to increase cancer risk by smoke action of increasing the acetaldehyde burden following alcohol consumption and alcohol action of enhancing the activation of various procarcinogens contained in tobacco smoke. Conclusions Interventions at the social level may be done to increase awareness about cancer risks and promote changing in unhealthy behaviors. PMID:24267900

2013-01-01

156

BBC Middle School Bitesize Activities: Organisms, Behaviors, and Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A website from the BBC containing activities, tests, and review materials on life processes, cells, reproduction, health, disease, classification, food chains, and behavior for middle school students.

BBC Science and Nature (British Broadcasting Corporation Broadcasting House)

2009-01-01

157

Linking family economic pressure and supportive parenting to adolescent health behaviors: two developmental pathways leading to health promoting and health risk behaviors.  

PubMed

Adolescent health behaviors, especially health risk behaviors, have previously been linked to distal (i.e., family economic pressure) and proximal (i.e., parental support) contributors. However, few studies have examined both types of contributors along with considering health promoting and health risk behaviors separately. The present study investigated the influences of family economic hardship, supportive parenting as conceptualized by self-determination theory, and individual psychosocial and behavioral characteristics (i.e., mastery and delinquency, respectively) on adolescents' health promoting and health risk behaviors. We used structural equation modeling to analyze longitudinal data from a sample of Caucasian adolescent children and their mothers and fathers (N = 407, 54 % female) to examine direct and indirect effects, as well as gender symmetry and asymmetry. Findings suggest that family economic pressure contributed to adolescent mastery and delinquency through supportive parenting. Further, supportive parenting indirectly affected adolescent health risk behaviors only through delinquency, whereas supportive parenting indirectly influenced health promoting behaviors only through mastery, suggesting different developmental pathways for adolescent health risk and health promoting behaviors. Testing for gender symmetry of the full model showed that maternal and paternal parenting contributed to females' health risk behaviors directly, while maternal and paternal parenting contributed to males' health risk behaviors through delinquency. Gender symmetry was largely unsupported. The study highlights key direct and indirect pathways to adolescent health risk and health promoting behaviors within a family stress model and self-determination theory framework, and also highlights important gender differences in these developmental pathways. PMID:24254978

Kwon, Josephine A; Wickrama, K A S

2014-07-01

158

DCCPS: Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior: Faculty  

Cancer.gov

Dr. Jeffrey Fisher is a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Connecticut and the founding Director of its Center for Health, Intervention, and Prevention. He has published extensively on factors associated with HIV risk behavior and has done conceptual and empirical work in the area of increasing HIV preventive behavior, as well as health behavior change in other domains. He has designed, implemented, and evaluated several effective HIV risk behavior change interventions in multiple populations.

159

Integrated Systems Health Management for Intelligent Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation of an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability is fundamentally linked to the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system. Management implies storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation. ISHM is akin to having a team of experts who are all individually and collectively observing and analyzing a complex system, and communicating effectively with each other in order to arrive at an accurate and reliable assessment of its health. In this chapter, concepts, procedures, and approaches are presented as a foundation for implementing an ISHM capability relevant to intelligent systems. The capability stresses integration of DIaK from all elements of a system, emphasizing an advance toward an on-board, autonomous capability. Both ground-based and on-board ISHM capabilities are addressed. The information presented is the result of many years of research, development, and maturation of technologies, and of prototype implementations in operational systems.

Figueroa, Fernando; Melcher, Kevin

2011-01-01

160

Religion and health-promoting behaviors among emerging adults.  

PubMed

Studies suggest we capitalize upon religion's health benefits to prevent obesity. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to determine how emerging adults used religion to manage their health. Two focus groups were conducted among White and African American participants. Content analysis of the data revealed categories about their attitudes regarding parental and religious influences, religion's influence on behavior, negative health effects of religion, barriers, obesity prevention, and health promotion programs. Society sends out "easy" solutions for unhealthy behaviors, but we should focus on healthy behavior benefits, remove barriers, and consider religion's part in health promotion (obesity prevention). PMID:24030810

Horton, Shalonda E B

2015-02-01

161

Determinants of health literacy and health behavior regarding infectious respiratory diseases: a pathway model  

PubMed Central

Background Health literacy has been defined as the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand the basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Currently, few studies have validated the causal pathways of determinants of health literacy through the use of statistical modeling. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate a health literacy model at an individual level that could best explain the determinants of health literacy and the associations between health literacy and health behaviors even health status. Methods Skill-based health literacy test and a self-administrated questionnaire survey were conducted among 3222 Chinese adult residents. Path analysis was applied to validate the model. Results The model explained 38.6% of variance for health literacy, 11.7% for health behavior and 2.3% for health status: (GFI?=?0.9990; RMR?=?0.0521; ?2?=?10.2151, P?=?0.1159). Education has positive and direct effect on prior knowledge (??=?0.324) and health literacy (??=?0.346). Health literacy is also affected by prior knowledge (??=?0.245) and age (??=?-0.361). Health literacy is a direct influencing factor of health behavior (??=?0.101). The most important factor of health status is age (??=?0.107). Health behavior and health status have a positive interaction effect. Conclusion This model explains the determinants of health literacy and the associations between health literacy and health behaviors well. It could be applied to develop intervention strategies to increase individual health literacy, and then to promote health behavior and health status. PMID:23521806

2013-01-01

162

Associations between diet and health behavior: Results from the 1992 Rhode Island Behavioral Risk Factor Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1992 Rhode Island Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was used to assess self-reported health behaviors of consumers of finfish and raw shellfish. We hypothesized that consumers of finfish, foods considered to be healthy, were more likely than nonconsumers of finfish to partake in health-promoting behaviors. Similarly, we postulated that consumers of raw molluscan shellfish, foods linked to an elevated

Sean F. Altekruse; Babagaleh B. Timbo; Marcia L. Headrick; Karl C. Klontz

1995-01-01

163

Integration of a Mobile-Integrated Therapy with Electronic Health Records: Lessons Learned  

PubMed Central

Background: Responses to the chronic disease epidemic have predominantly been standardized in their approach to date. Barriers to better health outcomes remain, and effective management requires patient-specific data and disease state knowledge be presented in methods that foster clinical decision-making and patient self-management. Mobile technology provides a new platform for data collection and patient–provider communication. The mobile device represents a personalized platform that is available to the patient on a 24/7 basis. Mobile-integrated therapy (MIT) is the convergence of mobile technology, clinical and behavioral science, and scientifically validated clinical outcomes. In this article, we highlight the lessons learned from functional integration of a Food and Drug Administration-cleared type 2 diabetes MIT into the electronic health record (EHR) of a multiphysician practice within a large, urban, academic medical center. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with integration stakeholder groups: mobile and EHR software and information technology teams, clinical end users, project managers, and business analysts. Interviews were summarized and categorized into lessons learned using the Architecture for Integrated Mobility® framework. Results: Findings from the diverse stakeholder group of a MIT–EHR integration project indicate that user workflow, software system persistence, environment configuration, device connectivity and security, organizational processes, and data exchange heuristics are key issues that must be addressed. Conclusions: Mobile-integrated therapy that integrates patient self-management data with medical record data provides the opportunity to understand the potential benefits of bidirectional data sharing and reporting that are most valuable in advancing better health and better care in a cost-effective way that is scalable for all chronic diseases. PMID:23759392

Peeples, Malinda M.; Iyer, Anand K.; Cohen, Joshua L.

2013-01-01

164

Importance of All Movement Behaviors in a 24 Hour Period for Overall Health  

PubMed Central

Physical inactivity and childhood obesity are well-recognized public health concerns that are associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. Historically, the benefits of physical activity (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity—MVPA) to overall health have dominated discussions and emerging evidence indicates that a broader, more integrated approach is needed to better understand and address current public health crises. Existing guidelines for children and youth around the world only focus on MVPA, and recently sedentary behavior, despite an accumulating body of evidence showing that light-intensity physical activity (LPA) such as walking can provide important health benefits. Furthermore, there is accumulating support for the importance of adequate sleep and that these behaviors moderate the health impact of each other. Ignoring the other components of the movement continuum (i.e., sleep, sedentary time, LPA) while focusing efforts exclusively on MVPA (accounting for <5% of the time in a 24 h period) limits the potential to optimize the health benefits of movement behaviors. In order to address this limitation, experts in Canada are currently developing the world’s first Integrated 24 Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth to help advance an integrated healthy active living agenda that has the potential to significantly improve the overall health and well-being of children and youth. PMID:25485978

Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Carson, Valerie; Gray, Casey E.; Tremblay, Mark S.

2014-01-01

165

Importance of all movement behaviors in a 24 hour period for overall health.  

PubMed

Physical inactivity and childhood obesity are well-recognized public health concerns that are associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. Historically, the benefits of physical activity (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity-MVPA) to overall health have dominated discussions and emerging evidence indicates that a broader, more integrated approach is needed to better understand and address current public health crises. Existing guidelines for children and youth around the world only focus on MVPA, and recently sedentary behavior, despite an accumulating body of evidence showing that light-intensity physical activity (LPA) such as walking can provide important health benefits. Furthermore, there is accumulating support for the importance of adequate sleep and that these behaviors moderate the health impact of each other. Ignoring the other components of the movement continuum (i.e., sleep, sedentary time, LPA) while focusing efforts exclusively on MVPA (accounting for <5% of the time in a 24 h period) limits the potential to optimize the health benefits of movement behaviors. In order to address this limitation, experts in Canada are currently developing the world's first Integrated 24 Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth to help advance an integrated healthy active living agenda that has the potential to significantly improve the overall health and well-being of children and youth. PMID:25485978

Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Carson, Valerie; Gray, Casey E; Tremblay, Mark S

2014-01-01

166

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Description & Theoretical Background 2 Measurement and Methodological Issues 3 Type of Behavior as a Moderator of the Intention - Behavior Relation 4 Other Proximal Antecedents: Implementation Intentions, Behavioral Expectation, and

167

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived behavioral control. Recognizing that perceived ability to perform a particular behavior, or achieve a certain goal may influence whether the behavior actually occurs, Ajzen (1991) xClose Ajzen, I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision processes, 50, 179-211. developed the TPB, which adds a self-efficacy component to the TRA, called perceived behavioral control (see Measures). When perceived and actual control are high, BI should relate directly to outcome.

168

Adolescent Health Problems: Behavioral Perspectives. Advances in Pediatric Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the relationship between adolescent risk-taking behaviors and health. The health-related problems of adolescents frequently are manifestations of social, economic, or behavioral factors. Following an overview (Siegal), the chapters in the first section of the book explore general and conceptual issues: (1) "Epidemiology of…

Wallander, Jan L., Ed.; Siegel, Lawrence J., Ed.

169

Informed-Consent Issues with Adolescent Health Behavior Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To identify the informed-consent issues when conducting adolescent health behavior research. Methods: A literature review was conducted across diverse academic fields about the informed-consent issues that were relevant to adolescent health behavior research. Results: Issues included defining consent, assent and permission, minimal…

Olds, R. Scott

2003-01-01

170

Examining the Health Information–Seeking Behaviors of Korean Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many Korean Americans suffer from high levels of cancer incidence and have low cancer screening rates. A significant number of Korean Americans lack adequate information about cancer screening tests. However, little is known about their health behaviors. This article examines exposure to mass media and health information–seeking behaviors for Korean Americans, and their associations with demographic characteristics influencing variations in

Kyeung Mi Oh; Gary L. Kreps; Jungmi Jun; Elizabeth Chong; Lolita Ramsey

2012-01-01

171

Rural Adolescent Health Risk Behaviors: Age, Gender, and Ethnic Differences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of health risk behaviors was administered to a representative sample of 7,776 Idaho students in grades 8-12. Respondents were 86% White, 6% Hispanic, 4% American Indian, 3% Asian, and 2% Black. These rural adolescents reported that they had engaged in some health risk behaviors at rates comparable to those of other U.S. adolescents: 57%…

Salzman, Stephanie A.; Girvan, James T.

172

Integration: the firm and the health care sector.  

PubMed

Integration in health care is a key goal of health reform in United States and England. Yet past efforts in the 1990s to better integrate the delivery system were of limited success. Building on work by Bevan and Janus on delivery integration, this article explores integration through the lens of economic theories of integration. Firms generally integrate to increase efficiency through economies of scale, to improve their market power, and resolve the transaction costs involved with multiple external suppliers. Using the United States and England as laboratories, we apply concepts of economic integration to understand why integration does or does not occur in health care, and whether expectations of integrating different kinds of providers (hospital, primary care) and health and social services are realistic. Current enthusiasm for a more integrated health care system expands the scope of integration to include social services in England, but retains the focus on health care in the United States. We find mixed applicability of economic theories of integration. Economies of scale have not played a significant role in stimulating integration in both countries. Managerial incentives for monopoly or oligopoly may be more compelling in the United States, since hospitals seek higher prices and more leverage over payers. In both countries the concept of transaction costs could explain the success of new payment and budgeting methods, since health care integration ultimately requires resolving transaction costs across different delivery organizations. PMID:24759287

Laugesen, Miriam J; France, George

2014-07-01

173

Trends in Behavioral Health Care Service Provision by Community Health Centers, 1998–2007  

PubMed Central

Objective The federal government boosted support for community health centers in medically underserved areas in 2002–2007. This investigation compared trends in behavioral health services provided by community health centers nationwide during the first several years of that initiative with immediately prior trends. Methods Data were extracted from the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Uniform Data System on community health centers for 1998–2007 (2007, N=1,067). Regression analyses revealed trends in individual community health centers’ likelihood of providing on-site specialty mental health care, crisis services, and substance abuse treatment. Aggregate data were used to show national trends in numbers of behavioral health encounters, patients, and encounters per patient. Results The number of federally funded community health centers increased 43% between 2001 and 2007, from 748 to 1,067, over twice the annual growth rate between 1998 and 2001. However, trends in individual community health centers’ likelihood of providing different types of behavioral health care were generally consistent across the two time periods. In 2007, 77% of community health centers offered specialty mental health services, 20% offered 24-hour crisis intervention services, and 51% offered substance abuse treatment. The mean number of mental health encounters per mental health patient at community health centers in 2007 was 2.9. Conclusions The behavioral health care safety net has widened through rapid recent growth in the number of community health centers as well as a continuing increase in the proportion offering specialty mental health services. PMID:20675833

Wells, Rebecca; Morrissey, Joseph P.; Lee, I-Heng; Radford, Andrea

2012-01-01

174

The ABCs of incentive-based treatment in health care: a behavior analytic framework to inform research and practice  

PubMed Central

Behavior plays an important role in health promotion. Exercise, smoking cessation, medication adherence, and other healthy behavior can help prevent, or even treat, some diseases. Consequently, interventions that promote healthy behavior have become increasingly common in health care settings. Many of these interventions award incentives contingent upon preventive health-related behavior. Incentive-based interventions vary considerably along several dimensions, including who is targeted in the intervention, which behavior is targeted, and what type of incentive is used. More research on the quantitative and qualitative features of many of these variables is still needed to inform treatment. However, extensive literature on basic and applied behavior analytic research is currently available to help guide the study and practice of incentive-based treatment in health care. In this integrated review, we discuss how behavior analytic research and theory can help treatment providers design and implement incentive-based interventions that promote healthy behavior. PMID:24672264

Meredith, Steven E; Jarvis, Brantley P; Raiff, Bethany R; Rojewski, Alana M; Kurti, Allison; Cassidy, Rachel N; Erb, Philip; Sy, Jolene R; Dallery, Jesse

2014-01-01

175

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Research to understand the impact of neighborhoods on health has grown significantly over the past decade as public health has more fully embraced a social ecological perspective. Neighborhood effects have been documented for a broad range of health and social outcomes, including birth weight, injury, mental health, and physical activity, among others (Diez-Roux, 2001 xClose Diez-Roux, A. (2001). Investigating neighborhood and area effects on health.

176

“White Box” Epidemiology and the Social Neuroscience of Health Behaviors: The Environmental Affordances Model  

PubMed Central

Crucial advances have been made in our knowledge of the social determinants of health and health behaviors. Existing research on health disparities, however, generally fails to address a known paradox in the literature: While blacks have higher risk of medical morbidity relative to non-Hispanic whites, blacks have lower rates of common stress-related forms of psychopathology such as major depression and anxiety disorders. In this article we propose a new theoretical approach, the Environmental Affordances Model, as an integrative framework for the origins of both physical and mental health disparities. We highlight early empirical support and a growing body of experimental animal and human research on self-regulatory health behaviors and stress coping that is consistent with the proposed framework. We conclude that transdisciplinary approaches, such as the Environmental Affordances Model, are needed to understand the origins of group-based disparities to implement effective solutions to racial and ethnic group inequalities in physical and mental health. PMID:24224131

Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Hudson, Darrell; Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Rafferty, Jane A.; Lee, Hedwig; Jackson, James S.

2013-01-01

177

Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors of California Community College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore the sexual and reproductive health behaviors of students from 13 community college campuses in California. Participants: Heterosexual college students, ages 18 to 24, who have had sexual intercourse (N = 4,487). Methods: The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) survey was…

Trieu, Sang Leng; Bratton, Sally; Marshak, Helen Hopp

2011-01-01

178

Ethical Theories for Promoting Health through Behavioral Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Arguments based on the philosophies of natural law, utilitarianism, paternalism, and distributive justice are examined for their pertinence to health behavior change strategies. Health educators should prepare individuals to make health-generating decisions but may need to limit the conditions under which they intervene. (Author/PP)

O'Connell, Janelle K.; Price, James H.

1983-01-01

179

Mental Health Issues and Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with emotional and behavioral challenges are significantly impacted by mental health issues. Teachers and other school staff need mental health knowledge to work more effectively with these students. Collaboration with mental health professionals and sharing of information is essential. [For complete volume, see ED539318.

DeLoach, Kendra P.; Dvorsky, Melissa; Miller, Elaine; Paget, Michael

2012-01-01

180

Development of a Medicaid Behavioral Health Case-Mix Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many Medicaid programs have either fully or partially carved out mental health services. The evaluation of carve-out plans requires a case-mix model that accounts for differing health status across Medicaid managed care plans. This article develops a diagnosis-based case-mix adjustment system specific to Medicaid behavioral health care. Several…

Robst, John

2009-01-01

181

Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, and Clinical Behaviors: Implications for Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the impact of practitioners' attitudes and knowledge of sexual health on clinical behaviors. Sexual health topics are often areas of concern for clients of any age in counseling. Thus, counselors must be trained and equipped to address sexual health across the life span. This study explored whether child and adolescent…

Russell, Elizabeth B.

2012-01-01

182

Behavioral Systems Analysis in Health and Human Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a behavioral systems approach to improve operational performance in health and human service organizations. This article provides six performance truths that are relevant to any organization and a case study from a community mental health network of agencies. A comprehensive analysis, as described here, will help health and…

McGee, Heather M.; Diener, Lori H.

2010-01-01

183

Longitudinal Effects of Health-Harming and Health-Protective Behaviors within Adolescent Romantic Dyads  

PubMed Central

Most models exploring adolescent health behavior have focused on individual influences to understand behavior change. The goal of the current study was to assess the role of adolescent romantic partners on the expression of health behavior. Our sample utilized two waves of data from the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1994, 1996), which included 80 romantic dyads (160 individuals). A longitudinal multilevel analysis was conducted. We assessed individual and romantic partner health-harming behaviors (i.e., delinquency, alcohol use, smoking, and marijuana use), health-protective behaviors (i.e., physical activity, physical inactivity, sleep patterns, seatbelt use, and contraception motivations), as well as the role of gender and age. Participants average age was 16 years at baseline. We found evidence for partner similarity and partner influence with the majority of health-harming behaviors. Specifically, partner influence was evident for smoking and alcohol use with partner influence approaching significance for marijuana use. We found limited evidence for partner similarity and partner influence for health-protective behaviors. The importance of assessing romantic dyads was evident in these data. Interventions focusing on health-harming behavior for adolescent populations are important public health goals. It is recommended that future intervention efforts with adolescent health-harming behaviors should target not only peers, but also consider the role of romantic partners. PMID:22424832

Aalsma, Matthew C.; Carpentier, Melissa; Azzouz, Faouzi; Fortenberry, Dennis

2012-01-01

184

Family perspectives on integrated child health information systems.  

PubMed

The perspectives of families, and especially parents of children with special health care needs, need to be better understood by the government agencies, health care providers, associations, and information systems vendors that are integrating child health information systems. To date, research on children with special health care needs has not included the perspectives of parents on integrated child health information systems. Interviews were conducted with a limited number of parents of children with special health care needs and a young adult with special health care needs about their perspectives on integrated health information systems needs. The interviews revealed common themes: (1) parents have experienced the benefits of information technology for health care purposes, (2) parents believe integrated health information systems could help to coordinate their children's health care, (3) parents believe information technology can help improve accuracy and timeliness of information, (4) parents of children with special health care needs believe their children's health information should be available to those who need it, but safeguards must be in place, (5) parents believe health information systems can improve health care, but it is not the highest priority health care issue for them, and (6) parents believe that their involvement in issues related to children with special health care needs, including information technology, is critical. Parents of children with special health care needs hold strong opinions about their children's health care, including health information systems. Parents need to be central to discussions about development of integrated child health information systems if we are to develop information systems that serve the needs of children with special health care needs and their families. PMID:15643354

Hastings, Terry Marie

2004-11-01

185

Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization  

PubMed Central

Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

2012-01-01

186

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Numerous behavioral theories and models include "environment" as a construct. For example, social cognitive theory posits that behavior is influenced by individual factors in combination with the social and physical environment (Bandura, 1986 xClose Bandura, A. (1986).

187

The relationship between functional health literacy and health promoting behaviors among older adults  

PubMed Central

Background: Health literacy is a measure of individual's ability to read, comprehend, and act on medical instructions. Older adults are one of the most important at risk groups affected by the impact of inadequate health literacy. Health promoting behaviors in older adults have potential impact on their health and quality of life and reduce the costs incurred to health care. Given the paucity of information health literacy and health promoting behavior, the purpose of this study was to examine health literacy level in older adults and the relationship between health literacy and health promoting behaviors. Materials and Method: A cross-sectional survey of 354 older adults was conducted in Isfahan. The method of sampling was clustering. Health literacy was measured using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA). Data were collected via home interviewing. Health promoting behaviors were measured based on self-reported smoking status, exercise, and consumption of fruit and vegetables. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA and ?2 tests under SPSS 18 software. Results: The sample group averaged 67 ± 6.97 years in age. Approximately 79.6% of adults were found to have inadequate health literacy. They tended to be older, have fewer years of schooling, lower household income, and being female Individuals with inadequate health literacy were more likely to report limitations in activity and lower consumption of fruit and vegetables (P < 0.001). No significant association was found between health literacy and smoking status. Conclusion: Considering high prevalence of inadequate health literacy among older adults, and its inverse relationship with some health promoting behaviors. Simple educational materials and effective interventions for low health literacy people can improve health promotion in society and mitigate the adverse health effects of low health literacy.

Reisi, Mahnoush; Javadzade, Seyed Homamodin; Heydarabadi, Akbar Babaei; Mostafavi, Firouzeh; Tavassoli, Elahe; Sharifirad, Gholamreza

2014-01-01

188

Covariations of Adolescent Weight-Control, Health-Risk and Health-Promoting Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed the prevalence of dieting, investigating clusters of risk behaviors among adolescents. Data from the 1999 South Carolina Youth Risk Behavior Survey indicated that weight control behaviors related to several other important health behaviors. Differences existed between adolescents who used extreme weight loss measures and moderate dieters…

Rafiroiu, Anca Codruta; Sargent, Roger G.; Parra-Medina, Deborah; Drane, Wanzer J.; Valois, Robert F.

2003-01-01

189

AN ENERGY SYSTEMS PERPECTIVE OF ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY AND ECOSYSTEM HEALTH  

EPA Science Inventory

The integrity and health of society's life-supporting ecosystems establishes a fundamental constraint on economic growth and development. Energy Systems Theory provides a theoretical basis for defining, measuring and interpreting the concepts of ecological integrity and ecosystem...

190

Self-Compassion, Affect, and Health-Promoting Behaviors.  

PubMed

Objective: Emerging theory and research suggest that self-compassion promotes the practice of health behaviors, and implicates self-regulation as an explanatory factor. However, previous investigations focused only on behavior intentions or health risk behaviors, and did not investigate the role of emotions. This study expands on this research using a small-scale meta-analysis approach with our own data sets to examine the associations of self-compassion with a set of health-promoting behaviors, and test the roles of high positive affect and low negative affect as potential explanatory mechanisms. Method: Fifteen independent samples (N = 3,252) with correlations of self-compassion with the frequency of self-reported health-promoting behaviors (eating habits, exercise, sleep behaviors, and stress management) were meta-analyzed. Eight of these samples completed measures of positive and negative affect. Results: Self-compassion was positively associated with the practice of health-promoting behaviors across all 15 samples. The meta-analysis revealed a small effect size (average r = .25; p < .001) of self-compassion and health behaviors, with low variability. Tests of the indirect effects of self-compassion on health behaviors through positive and negative affect with multiple mediator analyses revealed small effects for each. Separate meta-analyses of the indirect effects (IE) were significant for positive (average IE = .08; p < .001) and negative affect (average IE = .06; p < .001), and their combined indirect effects (average IE = .15; p < .0001). Conclusion: Self-compassion may be an important quality to cultivate for promoting positive health behaviors, due in part to its association with adaptive emotions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25243717

Sirois, Fuschia M; Kitner, Ryan; Hirsch, Jameson K

2014-09-22

191

Health Risk Behavior and Sexual Assault Among Ethnically Diverse Women  

PubMed Central

Sexual assault is associated with a number of health risk behaviors in women. It has been hypothesized that these risk behaviors, such as hazardous drinking, may represent women's attempts to cope with psychological distress, such as symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, extant research has failed to evaluate these relationships among ethnic minority samples or identify the mechanisms responsible for this association. The current study examined sexual assault history and two health risk behaviors (hazardous drinking and engaging in sexual behavior to regulate negative affect) in a diverse sample of 1,620 college women. Depression and anxiety were examined as mediators of the relationship between sexual assault and health risk behaviors. There was evidence of moderated mediation, such that for European American women, but not for ethnic minority women, both forms of psychological distress were significant mediators of the sexual assault/hazardous drinking relationship. In contrast, among all ethnic groups, the relationship between sexual assault and both forms of psychological distress was mediated by the use of sexual behavior as an affect regulation strategy. Results support a need to evaluate the assault experiences of ethnically diverse women, as well as the impact of the assault on their postassault experiences including health risk behaviors and psychological adjustment. Additionally, results suggest that practitioners should carefully assess health risk behaviors among victims of sexual assault and be aware that there may be differences in the risk factors and motives for these behaviors among women of various ethnic backgrounds. PMID:24223467

Littleton, Heather L.; Grills-Taquechel, Amie E.; Buck, Katherine S.; Rosman, Lindsey; Dodd, Julia C.

2013-01-01

192

Innovations in integrative health care education.  

PubMed

Content on integrative healthcare and complementary and alternative medicine is now being taught in hundreds of educational programs across the country. Nursing, medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathic, and other programs all are finding creative and innovative ways to include these approaches into new models of education and practice. In this column we spotlight such innovations in integrative health care and CAM education. The goal is to present readers with specific educational interventions that they may wish to adapt into new or ongoing educational efforts at their institution or program. We invite you to submit brief descriptions of efforts in your institutions that reflect the creativity, diversity, and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Please submit to either Dr. Sierpina at or Dr. Kreitzer at . Submissions should be brief, 300-400 words, as we plan to synopsize several projects in each issue. We also wish to link the information in the summary to a larger body of information at a website or other resource, so please include that information as well as your e-mail contact. PMID:16781556

Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Sierpina, Victor S

2005-07-01

193

Innovations in integrative health care education.  

PubMed

Content on integrative healthcare and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is now being taught in hundreds of educational programs across the country. Nursing, medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathic, and other programs all are finding creative and innovative ways to include these approaches into new models of education and practice. In this column, we will spotlight such innovations in integrative health care and CAM education. The goal is to present readers with specific educational interventions that they may wish to adapt into new or ongoing educational efforts at their institution or program. We invite you to submit brief descriptions of efforts in your institutions that reflect the creativity, diversity, and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Please submit to either Dr. Sierpina at vssierpi@utmb.edu or Dr. Kreitzer at. Submissions should be brief, 300 to 400 words, because we plan to synopsize several projects in each issue. We also wish to link the information in the summary to a larger body of information at a Web site or other resource, so please include that information as well as your e-mail contact. PMID:16781517

Sierpina, Victor S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

2005-03-01

194

Crossing The Divide: Primary Care And Mental Health Integration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the views of primary care providers about treating depression among adult Medicaid patients and their experiences with managed behavioral health care. It also shows the outcomes of an intervention project that provides a care manager to facilitate connections among PCPs, patients, and behavioral health providers. Despite widespread initiatives to improve depression management in primary care and to

Carole C. Upshur

2005-01-01

195

A needs-based method for estimating the behavioral health staff needs of community health centers  

PubMed Central

Background Federally Qualified Health Centers are expanding to increase access for millions of more Americans with a goal of doubling capacity to serve 40 million people. Health centers provide a lot of behavioral health services but many have difficulty accessing mental health and substance use professionals for their patients. To meet the needs of the underserved and newly insured it is important to better estimate how many behavioral health professionals are needed. Methods Using health center staffing data and behavioral health service patterns from the 2010 Uniform Data System and the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, we estimated the number of patients likely to need behavioral health care by insurance type, the number of visits likely needed by health center patients annually, and the number of full time equivalent providers needed to serve them. Results More than 2.5 million patients, 12 or older, with mild or moderate mental illness, and more than 357,000 with substance abuse disorders, may have gone without needed behavioral health services in 2010. This level of need would have required more than 11,600 full time providers. This translates to approximately 0.9 licensed mental health provider FTE, 0.1 FTE psychiatrist, 0.4 FTE other mental health staff, and 0.3 FTE substance abuse provider per 2,500 patients. These estimates suggest that 90% of current centers could not access mental health services or provide substance abuse services to fully meet patients’ needs in 2010. If needs are similar after health center expansion, more than 27,000 full time behavioral health providers will be needed to serve 40 million medical patients, and grantees will need to increase behavioral health staff more than four-fold. Conclusions More behavioral health is seen in primary care than in any other setting, and health center clients have greater behavioral health needs than typical primary care patients. Most health centers needed additional behavioral health services in 2010, and this need will be magnified to serve 40 million patients. Further testing of these workforce models are needed, but the degree of current underservice suggests that we cannot wait to move on closing the gap. PMID:23816353

2013-01-01

196

77 FR 42313 - Recharter of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2012-07-18

197

SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans, and their families  

E-print Network

SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans, and their families Page 1 SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans Aligata, SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans

Mather, Patrick T.

198

Workplace mental health: developing an integrated intervention approach  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health problems are prevalent and costly in working populations. Workplace interventions to address common mental health problems have evolved relatively independently along three main threads or disciplinary traditions: medicine, public health, and psychology. In this Debate piece, we argue that these three threads need to be integrated to optimise the prevention of mental health problems in working populations. Discussion To realise the greatest population mental health benefits, workplace mental health intervention needs to comprehensively 1) protect mental health by reducing work–related risk factors for mental health problems; 2) promote mental health by developing the positive aspects of work as well as worker strengths and positive capacities; and 3) address mental health problems among working people regardless of cause. We outline the evidence supporting such an integrated intervention approach and consider the research agenda and policy developments needed to move towards this goal, and propose the notion of integrated workplace mental health literacy. Summary An integrated approach to workplace mental health combines the strengths of medicine, public health, and psychology, and has the potential to optimise both the prevention and management of mental health problems in the workplace. PMID:24884425

2014-01-01

199

77 FR 15372 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2012-03-15

200

76 FR 58007 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2011-09-19

201

76 FR 67731 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2011-11-02

202

76 FR 26300 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2011-05-06

203

78 FR 14798 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-03-07

204

Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Challenging Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables…

Devlin, Sarah; Healy, Olive; Leader, Geraldine; Hughes, Brian M.

2011-01-01

205

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior  

E-print Network

-mail: sulinvil@indiana.edu Editor: Susan U. Linville #12;2 Cocaine Addiction Relapse is a major issue when treating cocaine addiction, with compulsive drug- seeking behavior contributing to the problem. In order to better treat the cocaine addict, it is important to understand the neurobiological mechanisms behind

Menczer, Filippo

206

Behavioral Health Order Sets in a Hybrid Information Environment  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) is a 500 bed freestanding psychiatric hospital in Canada. We are in the process of preparing for an integrated commercial clinical information system, which will have computerized physician order entry (CPOE) functionality. Methods: As a preparation for CPOE, we developed inpatient order sets (OSs). Development teams from individual clinical programs created and sent their OSs to an OS Working Group for initial endorsement, and then to Pharmacy & Therapeutics and Medical Advisory committees subsequent approvals. Results: In twelve months we created and introduced 22 behavioral health OSs across eight clinical programs in our hybrid information system with an excellent adoption rate (>97%) by clinicians. Discussion: The development and implementation temporarily contributed to a multifactorial flow problem in the emergency department (ED), which was addressed by substantially simplifying the General Admission via the ED OS. Also, as the OSs were developed and sent for approval the project identified areas where local clinical practice can improve. Our electronic-paper hybrid set of clinical systems was a major factor impacting the effort. PMID:24039642

Strauss, John; Olbrycht, Peggy; Woo, Vincent

2013-01-01

207

Health and Oral Health Care Needs and Health Care-Seeking Behavior Among Homeless Injection Drug Users in San Francisco  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few existing studies have examined health and oral health needs and treatment-seeking behavior among the homeless and injection\\u000a drug users (IDUs). This paper describes the prevalence and correlates of health and oral health care needs and treatment-seeking\\u000a behaviors in homeless IDUs recruited in San Francisco, California, from 2003 to 2005 (N?=?340). We examined sociodemographic characteristics, drug use patterns, HIV status

Jonathan Leserman Robbins; Lynn Wenger; Jennifer Lorvick; Caroline Shiboski; Alex H. Kral

2010-01-01

208

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived vulnerability, also called perceived susceptibility, perceived likelihood, and perceived probability, reflects an individual's belief about the likelihood of a health threat's occurrence or the likelihood of developing a health problem. Perceptions of event likelihood are central to both expectancy-value theory in social psychology and to subjective-expected utility theory in economics. The earliest work using the construct of perceived susceptibility in the health domain sought to determine why people use health services and included research by Hochbaum (1958)x Close Hochbaum, G.M. (1958).

209

Global Tobacco Control: An integrated approach to global health policy  

PubMed Central

Following the development discussion in the last volume on the ‘politics of health’, Jennifer Prah Ruger argues that the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) represents a shift in global health policy that recognizes the importance of addressing health needs on multiple fronts and integrating public policies into a comprehensive set of health improvement strategies. She argues that the FCTC provides a model for multifaceted approaches to health improvement that require simultaneous progress on various dimensions.

RUGER, JENNIFER PRAH

2014-01-01

210

Behavioral health and disasters: looking to the future.  

PubMed

Along with other manmade and natural disasters, oil spills produce profound and long-term impacts on the behavioral health of their survivors. Although previous and ongoing research has focused on producing evidence of the breadth and depth of these impacts, future efforts must begin to translate this evidence into developing and implementing policies, programs, and practices that effectively contribute to their prevention and mitigation. Drawing upon a conceptual framework of the behavioral health impacts of oil spills developed from data collected in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, this paper examines potential interventions designed to prevent or mitigate biopsychosocial, interpersonal, and intrapersonal impacts on behavioral health. Future efforts to translate behavioral health research into effective practice will require the formation and maintenance of academic-community partnerships for the purpose of building resilience to these impacts and providing targeted services to those most vulnerable to their long-term consequences. PMID:24443145

Palinkas, Lawrence A

2015-01-01

211

DCCPS: Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior: Schedule  

Cancer.gov

General Information Course Overview Schedule Application Frequently Asked Questions 6th Annual Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior Theory July 14–July 21, 2012 Schedule Please note that 2012 general schedule is based on the Detailed Course

212

NASA Human Research Program: Behavioral Health and Performance Program Element  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the performance errors associated with sleep loss, fatigue and psychomotor factors during manned space flight. Short and long term behavioral health factors are also addressed

Leveton, Lauren B.

2009-01-01

213

DCCPS: Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior: Application  

Cancer.gov

General Information Course Overview Schedule Application Frequently Asked Questions 6th Annual Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior Theory July 14–July 21, 2012 Application The application for the 2012 ATI can now be accessed. Please follow

214

Social Factors in Creating an Integrated Capability for Health System Modeling and Simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The health system is a complex system of systems - changes in agriculture, transportation, economics, family life, medical practices, and many other things can have a profound influence on health and health costs. Yet today, policy-level investment decisions are frequently made by modeling individual systems in isolation. We describe two sets of issues that we face in trying to develop a platform, method, and service for integrating expert models from different domains to support health policy and investment decisions. The first set of questions concerns how to develop accurate social and behavioral health models and integrate them with engineering models of transportation, clinic operations, and so forth. The second set of questions concerns the design of an environment that will encourage and facilitate collaboration between the health modelers themselves, who come from a wide variety of disciplines.

Maglio, Paul P.; Cefkin, Melissa; Haas, Peter J.; Selinger, Pat

215

Comparison of behavioral intervention and sensory-integration therapy in the treatment of challenging behavior.  

PubMed

The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables maintaining challenging behavior. Results of these assessments were used to design function-based behavioral interventions for each participant. Recommendations for the sensory-integration treatment were designed by an Occupational Therapist, trained in the use of sensory-integration theory and techniques. The sensory-integration techniques were not dependent on the results of the functional assessments. The study was conducted within an alternating treatments design, with initial baseline and final best treatment phase. For each participant, results demonstrated that the behavioral intervention was more effective than the sensory integration therapy in the treatment of challenging behavior. In the best treatment phase, the behavioral intervention alone was implemented and further reduction was observed in the rate of challenging behavior. Analysis of saliva samples revealed relatively low levels of cortisol and very little stress-responsivity across the SIT condition and the behavioral intervention condition, which may be related to the participants' capacity to perceive stress in terms of its social significance. PMID:21161577

Devlin, Sarah; Healy, Olive; Leader, Geraldine; Hughes, Brian M

2011-10-01

216

A behavior-analytic view of psychological health  

PubMed Central

This paper argues that a behavioral analysis of psychological health is useful and appropriate. Such an analysis will allow us to better evaluate intervention outcomes without resorting only to the assessment of pathological behavior, thus providing an alternative to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual system of conceptualizing behavior. The goals of such an analysis are to distinguish between people and outcomes using each term of the three-term contingency as a dimension to consider. A brief review of other efforts to define psychological health is provided. Laboratory approaches to a behavioral analysis of healthy behavior are presented along with shortcomings in our science that impede our analysis. Finally, we present some of the functional characteristics of psychological health that we value. PMID:22478160

Follette, William C.; Bach, Patricia A.; Follette, Victoria M.

1993-01-01

217

Social ties and health: The benefits of social integration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the relationship between level of social integration and various aspects of health. A search of the literature published since the mid-1970s (under the MEDLINE key words, “social ties”, “social network”, “social isolation”, “social environment”) presented strong evidence that social integration leads to reduced mortality risks, and to a better state of mental health. The evidence on physical

Teresa E. Seeman

1996-01-01

218

College Selectivity and Young Adult Health Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Large literatures have shown important links between the quantity of completed education and health outcomes on one hand and the quality or selectivity of schooling on a host of adult outcomes, such as wages, on the other hand. However, little research attempts to produce evidence of the link between school quality and health. The paper presents…

Fletcher, Jason M.; Frisvold, David E.

2011-01-01

219

Multiple health risk behaviors in German first year university students.  

PubMed

Multiple health risk behaviors have been identified as a problem in young adults which includes university students. The goals of this study included assessing the prevalence of major health risk behaviors in a cohort of German first year university students, analyzing the clustering of these behaviors and assessing readiness to change across multiple behaviors. A total of 1262 students from the schools of law, teaching and medicine at a German university participated in a voluntary and anonymous survey in 2005. The study assessed indicators and readiness for change regarding fruit and vegetable consumption, exercise, smoking and binge drinking as well as sociodemographic variables. Confirming the hypotheses, prevalences for risk behaviors were high; over 95% ate less than five servings of fruits and vegetables, 60% did not exercise sufficiently, 31% were current smokers and 62% reported binge drinking. Only 2% had none, 10.5% had one, 34.5% had two, 34.8% had three, and 18.2% showed all four risk behaviors. Readiness for behavior change was very low across multiple risk behavior combinations, especially for reducing binge drinking and increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Medical students showed slightly more positive patterns than other students. The results indicate the need for addressing health behaviors in the student population of this university. If these findings can be replicated in other universities, programs that promote individual behavior change as well as changes in environmental conditions in the university environment are necessary to address this urgent problem. PMID:18242666

Keller, Stefan; Maddock, Jason E; Hannöver, Wolfgang; Thyrian, J René; Basler, Heinz-Dieter

2008-03-01

220

Integrating Traditional Services within Primary Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article critically reviews the current status of primary health care services in India. It was observed that medical services have primarily relied on Western medicine, and are incompatible with prevailing health beliefs and practices. The failure of Western medicine and, as a consequence, that of primary health care, calls for developing some culturally compatible health care models for India.

Ajit K. Dalal

2005-01-01

221

Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Challenging Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention\\u000a on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.\\u000a For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables maintaining challenging behavior.\\u000a Results of these assessments were used to design

Sarah Devlin; Olive Healy; Geraldine Leader; Brian M. Hughes

222

Adolescent Health-Compromising Behaviors: Motivating School Counselors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated middle and high school counselors' perceptions of adolescent health-compromising behaviors and motivations to intervene. Data from a survey based on protection motivation theory showed differences in counselors' perceptions of the severity of risk-taking behaviors. Perceptions were highly correlated with intentions to seek out…

Nagel, Liza; Scherer, David G.; Lee, William

2000-01-01

223

Health Risk Behavior and Sexual Assault among Ethnically Diverse Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sexual assault is associated with a number of health risk behaviors in women. It has been hypothesized that these risk behaviors, such as hazardous drinking, may represent women's attempts to cope with psychological distress, such as symptoms of depression and anxiety. However, extant research has failed to evaluate these relationships among…

Littleton, Heather L.; Grills-Taquechel, Amie E.; Buck, Katherine S.; Rosman, Lindsey; Dodd, Julia C.

2013-01-01

224

Social Problem Solving and Health Behaviors of Undergraduate Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relationship of social problem solving to health behaviors as reported by 126 undergraduate students. Findings revealed significant relationships between elements of social problem solving and wellness and accident prevention behaviors, and traffic and substance risk taking. However, correlations revealed differences between men and…

Elliott, Timothy R.; And Others

1997-01-01

225

Health Behavior Change Challenge: Understanding Stages of Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This semester-long activity requires students to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses in attempting to take on a personally meaningful health behavior change challenge. This assignment affords them the opportunity to take a deeper look at theory and health concepts learned throughout the semester and to see how it has informed their own…

Sullivan, Claire F.

2011-01-01

226

Supervision in Public Sector Behavioral Health: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supervision plays a key role in the provision of health and human services. An extensive literature exists on supervision as an element of professional development in behavioral health care. However, much less attention has been given to the practice of supervision in publicly funded systems of care for persons with mental and substance use conditions. This article provides a comprehensive

Michael A. Hoge; Scott Migdole; Melanie S. Farkas; Allison N. Ponce; Christie Hunnicutt

2011-01-01

227

Computer-Assisted Behavioral Health Counseling for High School Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compared computer-assisted behavioral health counseling intervention for high school students (N=45) with a health tip educational intervention (N=17) and an assessment only group (N=15). Found significant dietary improvement among computer-assisted counseling group and lesser improvement among two control groups. (Author/CM)

Burnett, Kent E.; And Others

1989-01-01

228

eHEALTH INTEGRATOR CLINICAL DATA INTEGRATION IN LOWER AUSTRIA*  

E-print Network

on the interoperability of biomedical information and patient's health records. Although the advantages of healthcare medical information systems is becoming a necessity in modern health care. Under strong security measures on unstructured information or even hand-written notation. Paper based patient health record has many advantages

229

Project Summary for: Integrating and Mapping Community Health Assessment Information  

E-print Network

Project Summary for: Integrating and Mapping Community Health Assessment Information Grant Duration: 7/1/2008 through 12/31/2011 Award Type: Impact Award Amount: $367,792 Community Partner(s): Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Division of Public Health MCW Academic Partner

230

Integrated Crew Health Care System for Space Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dr. Davis' presentation includes a brief overview of space flight and the lessons learned for health care in microgravity. He will describe the development of policy for health care for international crews. He will conclude his remarks with a discussion of an integrated health care system.

Davis, Jeffrey R.

2007-01-01

231

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

In an effort to reduce the "literal inconsistency" problem (the inconsistency between what people say and what they do) and therefore increase the observed relation between proximal antecedents and behavior, researchers have explored other types of proximal measures.

232

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Individual differences in optimism versus pessimism can be measured by several devices. The measures have somewhat different focuses, but in large part they share the same underlying conception, deriving from the expectancy-value model of behavior.

233

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Kevin McCaul is Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics and professor of psychology at North Dakota State University. His research over the last decade has addressed relationships between cognitions, feelings, and self-protective behaviors.

234

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Champion, V., Skinner, C. S., Hui, S., Monahan, P., Juliar, B., Daggy, J. et al. (2007). The effect of telephone versus print tailoring for mammography adherence. Patient Education and Counseling, 65, 416-423.). For lifestyle behaviors such as healthy eating, exercising regularly, and smoking cessation, key barriers appear to be social-environmental-peer pressure, negative emotions or mood, stress, and habitual patterns associated with undesired behaviors (Glasgow et al., 2001 xClose Glasgow, R.

235

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Optimism and related constructs have been studied a great deal over the past two decades, in a large number of behavioral contexts. They have proven to be very useful in predicting behavior, emotional responses, coping tendencies, and adequacy of adjustment to difficult life circumstances. They are often referred to as resource or resilience variables, because they represent the presence of motivational properties that permit people to sustain and even thrive under adversity.

236

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Charles Carver is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Miami. He is a personality psychologist with broad interests in the self-regulatory processes that underlie behavior. This interest has led him to the study of individual differences in psychological and behavioral responses to stressful circumstances. Much of that work has been with breast cancer patients who are adapting to the diagnosis and treatment for cancer. His research has been funded by the National Cancer Institute.

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Cancer.gov

David Trafimow is a professor in the psychology department at New Mexico State University who has published widely on the determinants of behaviors such as attitudes, subjective norms, affect, cognition, beliefs, evaluations of beliefs, and others. His goal is to understand the causes of human behaviors. He has also published widely in the areas of attribution and self-concepts. Finally, he also has an interest in statistics.

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Cancer.gov

1 General Description and Theoretical Background 2 Role of Perceived Severity in Health Behaviour Theories 3 Protection Motivation Theory and Extended Parallel Process Model. 4 Measurement Issues 5 Similar Constructs 6 References 7 Appendices: Severity

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Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 General Description and Theoretical Background 2 Role of Perceived Severity in Health Behaviour Theories 3 Protection Motivation Theory and Extended Parallel Process Model. 4 Measurement Issues 5 Similar Constructs 6 References 7 Appendices:

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DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Illness representations are one class of illness cognitions which in a general sense might also include other cognitive constructs related to health threats, including perceived vulnerability, optimism and self-efficacy beliefs, as well as perceptions of social norms.

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DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Risk. Worry about a health event is likely to be related to one's appraisal of risk concerning that event. Indeed, Slovic (1987) xClose Slovic, P. (1987). The perception of risk. Science, 236, 280-285.

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DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Fear and worry about illness. These emotions are closely linked to the concept of severity and have been included in some measures of severity, but usually only in the context of the Health Belief Model (e.g. Champion, 1984 xClose Champion, V. L. (1984). Instrument development for health belief model constructs. ANS Adv. Nurs. Sci. 6, 73-85.; Maiman et al., 1977 xClose Maiman, L. A., Becker, M. H., Kirscht, J. P., Haefner, D. P.

243

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Thomas Wills is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. His background is in social psychology and health psychology. He has published in areas including social support, social comparison, and stress and coping in adolescence. His research program has tested theoretical models of adolescent substance use which involve multiple levels of influence on adolescents, from broader environmental factors to family and peer influences.

244

Covariance among Multiple Health Risk Behaviors in Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Purpose In a diverse group of early adolescents, this study explores the co-occurrence of a broad range of health risk behaviors: alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use; physical inactivity; sedentary computing/gaming; and the consumption of low-nutrient energy-dense food. We tested differences in the associations of unhealthy behaviors over time, and by gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Methods Participants were 8360 students from 16 middle schools in California (50% female; 52% Hispanic, 17% Asian, 16% White, and 15% Black/multiethnic/other). Behaviors were measured with surveys in Spring 2010 and Spring 2011. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess if an underlying factor accounted for the covariance of multiple behaviors, and composite reliability methods were used to determine the degree to which behaviors were related. Results The measured behaviors were explained by two moderately correlated factors: a ‘substance use risk factor’ and an ‘unhealthy eating and sedentary factor’. Physical inactivity did not reflect the latent factors as expected. There were few differences in the associations among these behaviors over time or by demographic characteristics. Conclusions Two distinct, yet related groups of health compromising behaviors were identified that could be jointly targeted in multiple health behavior change interventions among early adolescents of diverse backgrounds. PMID:24858838

de la Haye, Kayla; D'Amico, Elizabeth J.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Ewing, Brett; Tucker, Joan S.

2014-01-01

245

Initiatives to improve access to behavioral health services in the Veterans Affairs Health System.  

PubMed

In response to veterans' needs in the context of recent deployments, the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system has increased the number of its facilities and caregivers and has pioneered changes in policy and programs. We review significant recent initiatives to improve access to behavioral health services in the VA health system. PMID:21678688

Kudler, Harold; Straits-Tröster, Kristy; Brancu, Mira

2011-01-01

246

Comparison of Health Status and Health Behaviors between Female Graduate and Undergraduate College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Graduate females represent a substantial and growing proportion of the college student population, yet health promotion research and programming has traditionally focused on undergraduates. This study compared health status and health behaviors of female graduate and undergraduate students at a public university in the northeastern U.S.…

Bulmer, Sandra Minor; Irfan, Syed; Barton, Barbara; Vancour, Michele; Breny, Jean

2010-01-01

247

Health-Related Quality of Life and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Black Men  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the health-related quality of life and health-promoting behaviors in a convenience sample of low-income black men. Almost three-fourths reported their overall health as good or better. However, the mean number of recent (that is, past 30 days) mentally unhealthy days was 13.12, and more than half reported frequent (greater than…

Calvert, Wilma J.; Isaac,, E. Paulette; Johnson, Sharon

2012-01-01

248

Longitudinal Evaluation of Peer Health Education on a College Campus: Impact on Health Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors investigated the longitudinal impact of peer health education on the health behaviors of undergraduate students pertaining to alcohol and drug use, eating and nutrition, and sexual health. Participants: From fall 2003 to spring 2006, the authors annually administered a Web-based survey to a cohort of 2,000 randomly selected…

White, Sabina; Park, Yong S.; Israel, Tania; Cordero, Elizabeth D.

2009-01-01

249

Behavioral Health Providers and Electronic Health Records: An Exploratory Beliefs Elicitation and Segmentation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is a public policy strategy to improve healthcare quality and reduce accelerating health care costs. Much research has focused on medical providers' perceptions of EHRs, but little is known about those of behavioral health providers. This research was informed by the theory of reasoned…

Shank, Nancy

2011-01-01

250

Clustering of health-related behaviors, health outcomes and demographics in Dutch adolescents: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Recent studies show several health-related behaviors to cluster in adolescents. This has important implications for public health. Interrelated behaviors have been shown to be most effectively targeted by multimodal interventions addressing wider-ranging improvements in lifestyle instead of via separate interventions targeting individual behaviors. However, few previous studies have taken into account a broad, multi-disciplinary range of health-related behaviors and connected these behavioral patterns to health-related outcomes. This paper presents an analysis of the clustering of a broad range of health-related behaviors with relevant demographic factors and several health-related outcomes in adolescents. Methods Self-report questionnaire data were collected from a sample of 2,690 Dutch high school adolescents. Behavioral patterns were deducted via Principal Components Analysis. Subsequently a Two-Step Cluster Analysis was used to identify groups of adolescents with similar behavioral patterns and health-related outcomes. Results Four distinct behavioral patterns describe the analyzed individual behaviors: 1- risk-prone behavior, 2- bully behavior, 3- problematic screen time use, and 4- sedentary behavior. Subsequent cluster analysis identified four clusters of adolescents. Multi-problem behavior was associated with problematic physical and psychosocial health outcomes, as opposed to those exerting relatively few unhealthy behaviors. These associations were relatively independent of demographics such as ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status. Conclusions The results show that health-related behaviors tend to cluster, indicating that specific behavioral patterns underlie individual health behaviors. In addition, specific patterns of health-related behaviors were associated with specific health outcomes and demographic factors. In general, unhealthy behavior on account of multiple health-related behaviors was associated with both poor psychosocial and physical health. These findings have significant meaning for future public health programs, which should be more tailored with use of such knowledge on behavioral clustering via e.g. Transfer Learning. PMID:24305509

2013-01-01

251

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Selected 2011 National Health Risk Behaviors and Health Outcomes by Race/Ethnicity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

252

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

A variety of barrier assessment procedures have been developed for a spectrum of diverse cancer screening behaviors, other conditions including diabetes, HIV, pain, and panic attacks, and specific behaviors including medication adherence, healthy eating, physical activity, smoking cessation, and weight management. A PubMed search for "barriers to adherence" produced 1,002 articles and a search for "barriers to cancer screening" produced 1,346. Various procedures have been used to assess barriers including qualitative interviews, open-ended questionnaires, and structured surveys.

253

Health risk behavior among thai youth: national survey 2013.  

PubMed

This study aims to establish the prevalence of risky health behaviors among Thai youth and to characterize the prevalence of these behaviors by gender, age group, educational status, and region. We analyzed data from a population-based, nationally representative, cross-sectional survey of 938 youth aged between 13 and 24 years, sampled from Bangkok and 4 regions of Thailand. The 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System questionnaire was used to measure youth risk behaviors. This study finds that 15.9% of respondents had engaged in physical fights, and 8.1% had been cyber bullied. The prevalence of current cigarette smoking, alcohol, and marijuana use were 22.3%, 27.9%, and 2.3%, respectively. The prevalence of risky behaviors among Thai youth were found to be high, including behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence, unsafe sexual behaviors, and cigarette and alcohol consumption. PMID:25183211

Sirirassamee, Tawima; Sirirassamee, Buppha

2015-01-01

254

Integrating individual and public health perspectives for treatment of tobacco dependence under managed health care: A combined stepped-care and matching model  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increasing momentum to integrate prevention into mainstream health care. Three decades of research on tobacco\\u000a dependence can provide insights into the conceptual, clinical, economic, and service delivery challenges to such an integration.\\u000a Biological sciences, cognitive-behavioral, clinical treatment outcome, and public health arenas are selectively reviewed.\\u000a The key conceptual issues are explored relevant to the optimal delivery of

David B. Abrams; C. Tracy Orleans; Raymond S. Niaura; Michael G. Goldstein; James O. Prochaska; Wayne Velicer

1996-01-01

255

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Normative beliefs are individuals' beliefs about the extent to which other people who are important to them think they should or should not perform particular behaviors. In general, researchers who measure normative beliefs also measure motivations to comply-how much individuals wish to behave consistently with the prescriptions of important others.

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DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Table of Contents 1 Introduction 2 Self-Report of Cancer Behaviors 3 Self-Reports of Family History 4 Self-Reported Psychosocial Risk Factors among Cancer Patients 5 Application of Self-Report Measures in Cancer 6 Suggestions for Use of Self-Report for

257

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Bleiker, E.M., Menko, F.H., Taal, B.G., Kluijt, I., Wever, L.D., Gerritsma, M.A., et al. (2005). Screening behavior of individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer. Gastroenterology, 128(2), 280-287.

258

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The concepts of optimism and pessimism concern people's expectations for the future. These concepts have ties to centuries of folk wisdom and also to a class of psychological theories of motivation, called expectancy-value theories. Such theories suggest a logical basis for some of the ways in which optimism and pessimism influence people's behavior and emotions.

259

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

It may happen that a behavior is more under attitudinal than normative control. In this case, if attitudes are amenable to intervention, this would be the most straightforward strategy. However, it may be that attitudes are not amenable to intervention whereas normative beliefs are. Is there a way to increase the importance of normative beliefs?

260

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Outcome expectancy is the expectation that a behavior will produce a set of outcomes, i.e., the belief that a given action will lead to a defined result, whether beneficial or not (Bandura, 1982,x Close Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37(2), 122-147. 1997x Close Bandura, A. (1997).

261

Chapter Five: Health-Compromising Behaviors  

E-print Network

so that environmental cues trigger intense desire #12;What Is Substance Dependence? Addiction of affective dynamics a-process b-process Grows with experience Application to addiction Heroin Addiction #12 increases. Addiction Examples thrill-seeking behaviors, runners high, drugs Drug addiction The drug

Meagher, Mary

262

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

The constructs of optimism (assessed both directly as expectancies and indirectly as attributional tendencies) and hope have been examined in a great many studies. They have proven to be quite useful as predictors of behavior and emotional experiences in a wide variety of settings (Bandura, 1997 xClose Bandura, A. (1997).

263

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Measures of severity tend to be associated with a particular theoretical framework. For example, there are measures of severity developed in the context of the Health Belief Model (Maiman et al., 1977 xClose Maiman, L. A., Becker, M. H., Kirscht, J. P., Haefner, D. P.

264

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived severity (also called perceived seriousness) refers to the negative consequences an individual associates with an event or outcome, such as a diagnosis of cancer. These consequences may relate to an anticipated event that may occur in the future, or to a current state such as a pre-existing health problem.

265

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Secondary and tertiary prevention research often assesses and intervenes on processes that affect the cancer experience. These include health-related quality of life and medical adherence and, because there are often no reliable biomedical markers for these factors, self-report is the primary assessment method.

266

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Social Network. Measures of social network composition typically ask about the number of persons with whom one has regular social interaction. Having a larger social network is a significant protective factor for physical health problems, but the mechanisms for this are not well understood (Uchino, 2004 xClose Uchino, B. N. (2004).

267

Sensor Technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Management of Aerospace Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is focusing considerable efforts on technology development for Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems. The research in this area is targeted toward increasing aerospace vehicle safety and reliability, while reducing vehicle operating and maintenance costs. Onboard, real-time sensing technologies that can provide detailed information on structural integrity are central to such a health management system. This paper describes a number of sensor technologies currently under development for integrated vehicle health management. The capabilities, current limitations, and future research needs of these technologies are addressed.

Prosser, W. H.; Brown, T. L.; Woodard, S. E.; Fleming, G. A.; Cooper, E. G.

2002-01-01

268

Implementation of a Reverse Colocation Model: Lessons from Two Community Behavioral Health Agencies in Rural Pennsylvania.  

PubMed

This qualitative study examined the implementation of a reverse colocation pilot program that sought to integrate medical care in two community behavioral health agencies. To accomplish this, each agency hired a registered nurse, provided training for its staff to function as wellness coaches, and implemented a web-based tool for tracking consumer outcomes. The findings from two rounds of stakeholder discussions and consumer focus groups suggested that agencies successfully trained their staffs in wellness coaching, integrated nurses into agency functions, developed integrated care planning processes, and increased awareness of wellness among staff and consumers. Similar to other complex interventions, the agencies experienced challenges including difficulty establishing new procedures and communication protocols, discomfort among staff in addressing physical health concerns, difficulty building collaborative relationships with primary care providers, and modest uptake of the web-based tool. The study offers insights into the practical aspects of integrating care and makes recommendations for future efforts. PMID:24981219

Gerolamo, Angela M; Kim, Jung Y; Brown, Jonathan D; Schuster, James; Kogan, Jane

2014-07-01

269

Primary Care: Mental and Behavioral Health and Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities  

PubMed Central

Introduction: There are multiple ways to address the mental and behavioral health needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Method: In this paper, we do not argue for a particular approach or set of approaches, but instead review the benefits of integrating mental and behavioral health supports with primary healthcare based primarily on our experience in and understanding of healthcare systems in the United States. It is estimated that between 35 and 40% of people with IDD also live with psychiatric disorders. NADD, an association for persons with developmental disabilities and mental health needs in the US holds that coexisting IDD and a psychiatric disorder interferes with a person’s education and job readiness, and disrupts family and peer relationships. Historically, the presence of such disorders among people with IDD was not well understood or was discounted altogether. Conclusion: Over the past 15?years, however, greater attention is being paid to these comorbidities and their treatment, including the need to integrate mental and behavioral health treatments into primary care. Healthcare must account for multiple domains of quality of life, going beyond yearly physicals, and acute care visits, for example, to assess individuals’ healthcare goals and support them in achieving those goals. While integrated healthcare delivery systems can be difficult to find and access for people with IDD, such approaches are more responsive to the comprehensive needs and desires of people with IDD. PMID:25072047

Ervin, David A.; Williams, Ashley; Merrick, Joav

2014-01-01

270

Integrating mental health and social development in theory and practice.  

PubMed

In many low and middle income countries, attention to mental illness remains compartmentalized and consigned as a matter for specialist policy. Despite great advances in global mental health, mental health policy and practice dovetail only to a limited degree with social development efforts. They often lag behind broader approaches to health and development. This gap ignores the small but growing evidence that social development unavoidably impacts the mental health of those affected, and that this influence can be both positive and negative. This article examines the theoretical and practical challenges that need to be overcome for a more effective integration of social development and mental health policy. From a theoretical perspective, this article demonstrates compatibility between social development and mental health paradigms. In particular, the capability approach is shown to provide a strong framework for integrating mental health and development. Yet, capability-oriented critiques on 'happiness' have recently been applied to mental health with potentially detrimental outcomes. With regard to policy and practice, horizontal and vertical integration strategies are suggested. Horizontal strategies require stronger devolution of mental health care to the primary care level, more unified messages regarding mental health care provision and the gradual expansion of mental health packages of care. Vertical integration refers to the alignment of mental health with related policy domains (particularly the social, economic and political domains). Evidence from mental health research reinforces aspects of social development theory in a way that can have tangible implications on practice. First, it encourages a focus on avoiding exclusion of those affected by or at risk of mental illness. Secondly, it underscores the importance of the process of implementation as an integral component of successful policies. Finally, by retaining a focus on the individual, it seeks to avoid uneven approaches to development. PMID:24452138

Plagerson, Sophie

2015-03-01

271

Distal and Proximal Factors of Health Behaviors and Their Associations with Health in Children and Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim of the present paper was to analyze factors affecting distal and proximal health behavior within a biopsychosocial model for examining their interactions and associations with respect to health. Methods: Path analysis was based on the nationwide, cross-sectional German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (2003 to 2006). The data was collected from 4,529 participants with an average age of 9.45 years (SD = 4.01). Socio-demographic data, psychosocial factors and health behavior were assessed via questionnaire. Participants also underwent physical fitness tests and a medical examination. Results: Over the five levels of the model analyzed with socioeconomic status, immigration background, and rural-urban differences on the first level; physical activity of relatives and peers, intrinsic motivation, and quality of life on the second level; eating patterns, sedentary behavior, and physical activity on the third level; physical fitness and objective health on the fourth level; and health complaints and subjective health on the fifth level; direct, moderation, and mediation effects could be shown. Conclusions: Several distal and proximal factors are needed to take account of the multivariate complexity of health: e.g., immigration background affected health behaviors only indirectly and the effect of physical activity on objective health was mediated by physical fitness. PMID:23863614

Lämmle, Lena; Woll, Alexander; Mensink, Gert B. M.; Bös, Klaus

2013-01-01

272

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Optimistic biases are thought to represent one example of an array of self-serving beliefs that may influence behavior including the illusion of control (Langer, 1975 xClose Langer, E. J. (1975). The illusion of control. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 32, 311-328. ), the better-than-average effect (e.g., Alicke et al., 1995 xClose Alicke, M. D., Klotz, M. L., Breitenbecher, D. L., Yurak, T.

273

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Personal control is the perception that one has the ability, resources, or opportunities to get positive outcomes or avoid negative effects through one's own actions. The concept of control has been one of the most pervasive and enduring ideas in psychological research and theory. Numerous theories posit an important role in human behavior for control constructs such as self-efficacy (Bandura, 1977 xClose Bandura, A. (1977).

274

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Identifying response and critical cues. To form an implementation intention, the person must first identify a response that is instrumental for goal attainment and, second, anticipate a critical cue to initiate that response. For example, the person might specify the behavior "perform breast self-examination" and specify a situational cue "just before I leave the shower tomorrow morning" in order to enact the goal intention of detecting possible breast cancer.

275

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Self-report data are essential to behavioral research and clinical practice. Self-report is one of the primary means of obtaining information about a person, placing it at the heart of the research history that underlies much of cancer diagnosis and care. There are numerous benefits of retrospective self-reports, such as the expeditious development and modification of measures that are easy to administer and complete.

276

78 FR 69853 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-11-21

277

77 FR 33220 - Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2012-06-05

278

78 FR 48877 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-08-12

279

78 FR 38345 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory...

2013-06-26

280

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Perceived severity also forms part of threat perception in both Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) and the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM). In PMT, severity and vulnerability promote health motivation along with efficacy beliefs, but this is offset by the intrinsic and extrinsic rewards associated with 'unhealthy' behaviour and the costs associated with performing the recommended behaviour. In EPPM, however, the focus is solely on the balance between threat and efficacy beliefs.

281

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Most research has investigated optimistic biases at the group level, which has been sufficient given the predominant focus on which types of events, comparative targets, and other factors elicit the most bias. However, in order to establish the utility of this construct in the domain of health, it is necessary to measure optimistic bias at the level of the individual. Given the difficulties of doing so, research taking this approach is in its infancy.

282

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Self-reported cancer screening. Cancer screening is a commonly reported clinical assessment designed to facilitate early detection, and regular screening is important for reducing morbidity and mortality across an array of cancer types. Although more objective alternatives exist for determining screening practices in the population (e.g., health insurance or medical records), self-report of screening is nonetheless the measure of choice in the majority of studies.

283

Social relationships and health related behaviors among older US adults  

PubMed Central

Background Health behaviors are a key determinant of health and well-being that are influenced by the nature of the social environment. This study examined associations between social relationships and health-related behaviors among a nationally representative sample of older people. Methods We analyzed data from three waves (1999–2004) of the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Participants were 4,014 older Americans aged 60 and over. Log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios (PR) for the associations between social relationships and each of the following health behaviors: alcohol use, smoking, physical activity and dental attendance. Results Health-compromising behaviors (smoking, heavy drinking and less frequent dental visits) were related to marital status, while physical activity, a health-promoting behavior, was associated with the size of friendship networks. Smoking was more common among divorced/separated (PR?=?2.1; 95% CI: 1.6, 2.7) and widowed (PR?=?1.7; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.3) respondents than among those married or cohabiting, after adjusting for socio-demographic background. Heavy drinking was 2.6 times more common among divorced/separated and 1.7 times more common among widowed men compared to married/cohabiting men, while there was no such association among women. For women, heavy drinking was associated with being single (PR?=?1.7; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.9). Being widowed was related to a lower prevalence of having visited a dentist compared to being married or living with a partner (PR?=?0.92; 95% CI 0.86, 0.99). Those with a larger circle of friends were more likely to be physically active (PR?=?1.17; 95% CI:1.06, 1.28 for 5–8 versus less than 5 friends). Conclusions Social relationships of older Americans were independently associated with different health-related behaviors, even after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic determinants. Availability of emotional support did not however mediate these associations. More research is needed to assess if strengthening social relationships would have a significant impact on older people’s health behaviors and ultimately improve their health. PMID:24885507

2014-01-01

284

75 FR 38099 - Establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health...Office of the Secretary, Office of Public Health and Science. ACTION: Notice...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health will be governed by...

2010-07-01

285

Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What's In a Name?  

MedlinePLUS

... used regularly in some hospitals to help with pain management. Integrative Medicine This array of non-mainstream health ... of these practices appear to hold promise in pain management, whereas other practices have had little research to ...

286

FRAMEWORK FOR THE INTEGRATION OF HEALTH AND ECOLOIGCAL RISK ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The World Health Organization's International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have developed a collaborative partnership to foster integration; of assessment approa...

287

Integrating sensorimotor systems in a robot model of cricket behavior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanisms by which animals manage sensorimotor integration and coordination of different behaviors can be investigated in robot models. In previous work the first author has build a robot that localizes sound based on close modeling of the auditory and neural system in the cricket. It is known that the cricket combines its response to sound with other sensorimotor activities such as an optomotor reflex and reactions to mechanical stimulation for the antennae and cerci. Behavioral evidence suggests some ways these behaviors may be integrated. We have tested the addition of an optomotor response, using an analog VLSI circuit developed by the second author, to the sound localizing behavior and have shown that it can, as in the cricket, improve the directness of the robot's path to sound. In particular it substantially improves behavior when the robot is subject to a motor disturbance. Our aim is to better understand how the insect brain functions in controlling complex combinations of behavior, with the hope that this will also suggest novel mechanisms for sensory integration on robots.

Webb, Barbara H.; Harrison, Reid R.

2000-10-01

288

EFFECTS OF VIDEO MODELING ON TREATMENT INTEGRITY OF BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS  

PubMed Central

We examined the effects of individualized video modeling on the accurate implementation of behavioral interventions using a multiple baseline design across 3 teachers. During video modeling, treatment integrity improved above baseline levels; however, teacher performance remained variable. The addition of verbal performance feedback increased treatment integrity to 100% for all participants, and performance was maintained 1 week later. Teachers found video modeling to be more socially acceptable with performance feedback than alone, but rated both positively. PMID:21119903

DiGennaro-Reed, Florence D; Codding, Robin; Catania, Cynthia N; Maguire, Helena

2010-01-01

289

DCCPS: Health Behavior Constructs: Theory, Measurement, & Research  

Cancer.gov

Specificity is critical to the assessment of perceived benefits. For example, development of a scale to measure perceived benefits of sun protection must take into account the specific action being considered (e.g., use of sunscreen vs. wearing a hat), and the specific benefits being considered (e.g., decreasing likelihood of skin cancer vs. delaying the appearance of age spots and wrinkles). Thus, developing appropriate operational definitions of benefits will continue to challenge researchers as the construct is used with new behaviors.

290

Value for the future and preventive health behavior.  

PubMed

Many everyday decisions require trade-offs between immediate and delayed benefits. Although much research has assessed discounting of delayed outcomes by using hypothetical scenarios, little research has examined whether these discounting measures correspond to real-world behavior. Three studies examined the relationship between scenario measures of time preference and preventive health behaviors that require an upfront cost to achieve a long-term benefit. Responses to time preference scenarios showed weak or no relationship to influenza vaccination, adherence to a medication regimen to control high blood pressure, and adherence to cholesterol-lowering medication. The finding that scenario measures of time preference have surprisingly little relationship to actual behaviors exemplifying intertemporal trade-offs places limits on the applications of time preference research to the promotion of preventive health behavior. PMID:11676102

Chapman, G B; Brewer, N T; Coups, E J; Brownlee, S; Leventhal, H; Leventhal, E A

2001-09-01

291

The Influence of Mothers’ Lifestyle and Health Behavior on Their Children: An Exploration for Oral Health  

PubMed Central

Background: Parents and teachers involvement reinforce health promotion programs for children's health. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate mothers’ lifestyle behavior and its association with children's oral health. Materials and Methods: The study was a cross sectional study on 383 children and their mothers who were selected from 6 primary schools in Tehran, Iran. Mothers and children who participated in this study were asked to complete a questionnaire containing demographic questions, knowledge of oral health, attitude towards the oral health behavior, and oral health behaviors. Furthermore, the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) and Community Periodontal Index (CPI) were assessed by two calibrated dentists. Data were analyzed with multilevel mixed model analyses. Results: The average age of the children and their mothers were 11.6 and 38.4 years, respectively. Mothers’ higher knowledge, higher educational status, positive attitude, higher frequent oral health behaviors, lower DMFT and lower CPI were all associated significantly with children’s higher oral health status. Conclusions: The results suggest that to improve children’s oral health, educational interventions should focus on both children and mothers to obtain a more promising outcome. PMID:24719751

Nourijelyani, Keramat; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Mohammad, Kazem; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Pakpour, Amir

2014-01-01

292

Integration of Basic Sciences in Health's Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concepts from disciplines such as Biochemistry, Genetics, Cellular and Molecular Biology are essential to the understanding and treatment of an elevated number of illnesses, but often they are studied separately, with no integration between them. This article proposes a model for basic sciences integration based on problem-based learning (PBL) and…

Azzalis, L. A.; Giavarotti, L.; Sato, S. N.; Barros, N. M. T.; Junqueira, V. B. C.; Fonseca, F. L. A.

2012-01-01

293

Safe Schools, Positive Behavior Supports, and Mental Health Supports  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article profiles selected Safe Schools\\/Healthy Students (SS\\/HS) interventions in three Oregon communities that have completed Safe Schools\\/Healthy Students projects, representing a substantial investment in building school and community collaborations, expanding positive behavior supports in schools, and establishing school-based mental health services. The University of Oregon Institute on Violence and Destructive Behavior served as the local evaluator for these projects.

Jeffrey Sprague; Vicki Nishioka; Stephen G. Smith

2007-01-01

294

Health-Related Behavior and Beliefs of Pregnant Smokers  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the association of smoking with other health-compromising behavior and beliefs during pregnancy, a cross-sectional survey of 1,203 women in the United Kingdom assessed smoking status, stage of change, fetal health locus of control, alcohol consumption, folic acid intake, and use of vitamin and iron supplements. Twenty percent were current smokers, and 33% were alcohol users. Pregnant smokers (especially

Cheryl Haslam; Wendy Lawrence

2004-01-01

295

Death Attitudes and Self-reported Health-relevant Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies are presented investigating the role of attitudes toward death in self-reported health-protective behavior. The Multidimensional Death Attitudes Scale (MDAS), based on three existing measures of death attitudes, was administered to a group of health professionals (N 5 348). A principal components analysis revealed five factors, labeled Acceptance, Fear, Death as Passage, Death as Relief and Avoidance. The five-factor

Chloé D. Martin; Peter Salovey

1996-01-01

296

Health risk appraisal modifies cigarette smoking behavior among college students  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess whether Health Risk Appraisal (HRA), a computer-scored lifestyle analysis questionnaire, can result in significant\\u000a changes in health behavior, a controlled clinical trial with one-year follow-up was conducted among entering freshmen at an\\u000a urban state university. Three hundred fifty entering freshmen were each assigned to one of four groups: HRA with feedback,\\u000a HRA without feedback, initial control, and final

Chun-Wai Chan; John M. Witherspoon

1988-01-01

297

Computer-Assisted Behavioral Health Counseling for High School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer-assisted behavioral health counseling for high school students (n = 45) was compared with an educational intervention in which health tip sheets were distributed (n = 17) and with an assessment-only condition (n = 15). In addition, overweight subjects in the computer-assisted counseling condition received computer-generated feedback designed to encourage weight reduction. At the conclusion of the 12-week study period,

Kent F. Burnett; Patricia E. Magel; Susan Harrington; C. Barr Taylor

1989-01-01

298

Lights, Camera, Action: Integrating Popular Film in the Health Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the benefits as well as the important considerations that should be taken into account in integrating popular films in health education classes. Use of popular films in the classroom, termed "cinema education," is becoming increasingly popular in teaching health education. As a matter of convenience, popular films are easy…

Diez, Keri S.; Pleban, Francis T.; Wood, Ralph J.

2005-01-01

299

Integrating Health Care: The Clear Advantage for Underserved Diverse Populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Integrating health care into primary and specialty physician practices and clinics has potential benefits for women; racial\\/ethnic minorities; and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered populations, thus making a major contribution to the health disparities in America. Mounting evidence suggests that physical illnesses are accompanied and exacerbated by emotional, social, and cultural factors. Many of the chronic diseases, cardiovascular disease, HIV-AIDS, diabetes,

Suni Petersen; Philinda Hutchings; Gregory Shrader; Kaile Brake

2011-01-01

300

Social Integration and the Mental Health of Black Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The influence of family, school, and religious social contexts on the mental health of Black adolescents has been understudied. This study used Durkheim's social integration theory to examine these associations in a nationally representative sample of 1,170 Black adolescents, ages 13-17. Mental health was represented by positive and negative…

Rose, Theda; Joe, Sean; Shields, Joseph; Caldwell, Cleopatra H.

2014-01-01

301

Counselors and Physicians Providing Mental Health Services: An Integrated Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors argue that there is a clear link between mental and physical health issues. A wellness-based approach to integrated health care, such as the one described in this article, may allow older clients to be empowered to make lifestyle changes that can improve the quality of their lives and reduce physical illness.

Enochs, Wendy K; Young, Mark; Choate, Robert O.

2006-01-01

302

Pinnacle Health / Zynx Health / Siemens Medical Solutions A Study of Integration of Evidence Based Nursing Content  

PubMed Central

In 2005, Pinnacle Health System, Zynx Health, and Siemens Medical Solutions developed a partnership to conduct a study to explore the opportunities and challenges associated with the integration of evidence-based knowledge within the EHR with the goal of creating repeatable methodologies for integrating nursing knowledge within the EHR. The two-phase study involved access to referential evidence-based content, as well as integration of customized evidence-based plans of care within the documentation applications of the EHR.

Matter, Sheri; Brown, Cindy; Button, Patricia S.; Kennedy, Rosemary

2006-01-01

303

Case-Mix Adjustment of Consumer Reports about Managed Behavioral Health Care and Health Plans  

PubMed Central

Objective To develop a model for adjusting patients' reports of behavioral health care experiences on the Experience of Care and Health Outcomes (ECHO™) survey to allow for fair comparisons across health plans. Data Source Survey responses from 4,068 individuals enrolled in 21 managed behavioral health plans who received behavioral health care within the previous year (response rate=48 percent). Study Design Potential case-mix adjustors were evaluated by combining information about their predictive power and the amount of within- and between-plan variability. Changes in plan scores and rankings due to case-mix adjustment were quantified. Principal Findings The final case-mix adjustment model included self-reported mental health status, self-reported general health status, alcohol/drug treatment, age, education, and race/ethnicity. The impact of adjustment on plan report scores was modest, but large enough to change some plan rankings. Conclusions Adjusting plan report scores on the ECHO survey for differences in patient characteristics had modest effects, but still may be important to maintain the credibility of patient reports as a quality metric. Differences between those with self-reported fair/poor health compared with those in excellent/very good health varied by plan, suggesting quality differences associated with health status and underscoring the importance of collecting quality information. PMID:18783456

Eselius, Laura L; Cleary, Paul D; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Huskamp, Haiden A; Busch, Susan H

2008-01-01

304

Health promoting Behaviors Among Adolescents: A Cross-sectional Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Health maintenance and promotion are the fundamental prerequisites to community development. The best time for establishing healthy lifestyle habits is during adolescence. Objectives: Due to importance of health promotion behaviors in adolescents, this study was conducted to investigate health-promoting behaviors and its associated factors among high school students in Rasht, Iran. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 424 students during the first semester of the year 2012. We employed the multistage sampling design to recruit from private and public high schools in Rasht, Iran. The data collection instrument was a self-report questionnaire consisting of two parts. The first part of instrument was consisted of demographic questionnaire and the second part was adolescent health promotion scale (AHPS) questionnaire. AHPS questionnaire was consisted of six dimensions (nutrition, social support, health responsibility, life appreciation, physical activity, and stress management) to measure health promoting lifestyles. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 16 software employing ANOVA (analysis of variance) test, t-test, Mann-Whitney, and the Kruskal-Wallis. Results: The score of total Adolescent Health Promotion Scale were 3.58 ± 0.52 (possible range was 1-5). The highest score was in life appreciation dimension (3.99 ± 0.068) and the lowest score was in health responsibility dimension. Moreover, Significant associations were found between the adolescent health promotion Scale with age (P < 0.001), gender (P < 0.003), school grade (P < 0.011), father’s educational level (P < 0.045), mother’s educational level (P < 0.021), and mother’s occupation (P < 0.008). Conclusions: Female and older students are at higher risk of developing unhealthy lifestyle. Consequently, healthcare providers, health instructors, schoolteachers, and families must pay more attention to these students. Moreover, as most of lifelong healthy and unhealthy lifestyle habits are established during adolescence, developing effective health promotion and disease prevention strategies for adolescents seems crucial. PMID:25414892

Musavian, Azra Sadat; Pasha, Afsaneh; Rahebi, Seyyedeh-Marzeyeh; Atrkar Roushan, Zahra; Ghanbari, Atefeh

2014-01-01

305

Health Insurance Coverage and Take-Up: Lessons from Behavioral Economics  

PubMed Central

Context Millions of uninsured Americans ostensibly have insurance available to them—many at very low cost—but do not take it up. Traditional economic analysis is based on the premise that these are rational decisions, but it is hard to reconcile observed enrollment patterns with this view. The policy prescriptions that the traditional model generates may thus fail to achieve their goals. Behavioral economics, which integrates insights from psychology into economic analysis, identifies important deviations from the traditional assumptions of rationality and can thus improve our understanding of what drives health insurance take-up and improved policy design. Methods Rather than a systematic review of the coverage literature, this article is a primer for considering issues in health insurance coverage from a behavioral economics perspective, supplementing the standard model. We present relevant evidence on decision making and insurance take-up and use it to develop a behavioral approach to both the policy problem posed by the lack of health insurance coverage and possible policy solutions to that problem. Findings We found that evidence from behavioral economics can shed light on both the sources of low take-up and the efficacy of different policy levers intended to expand coverage. We then applied these insights to policy design questions for public and private insurance coverage and to the implementation of the recently enacted health reform, focusing on the use of behavioral insights to maximize the value of spending on coverage. Conclusions We concluded that the success of health insurance coverage reform depends crucially on understanding the behavioral barriers to take-up. The take-up process is likely governed by psychology as much as economics, and public resources can likely be used much more effectively with behaviorally informed policy design. PMID:22428694

Baicker, Katherine; Congdon, William J; Mullainathan, Sendhil

2012-01-01

306

Integrated multi-behavior mobile robot navigation using decentralized control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The components for providing autonomous capabilities of a mobile robot are grouped into few basic modules, namely motion planner, motion executor, motion assistant, and behavior arbitrator. The primitive motion executors such as obstacle avoidance, goal following, wall following, docking, and path tracking for mobile robot navigation are developed in this paper. They are integrated with motion planner, motion assistants, and

Tse Min Chen; Ren C. Luo

1998-01-01

307

A Comparison of Treatment Integrity Assessment Methods for Behavioral Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the similarity of outcomes from three different treatment integrity (TI) methods, and to identify the method which best corresponded to the assessment of a child's behavior. Six raters were recruited through individual contact via snowball sampling. A modified intervention component list and 19 video clips…

Koh, Seong A.

2010-01-01

308

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Neural Integration of Information Specifying Human  

E-print Network

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Neural Integration of Information Specifying Human Structure from Form,posturetemplates)andcontainnoexplicitmeansfordisambiguatingthethree-dimensionalorientationofaperceivedhuman figure. Are there neural mechanisms in the visual system that represent a moving human figure mechanisms to disambiguate depth ambiguities in two-dimensional body representations. Introduction Humans

Blake, Randolph

309

An Integrated Calculation Method to Predict Arc Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

The precision of magnetic field calculation is crucial to predict the arc behavior using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. A integrated calculation method is proposed to couple the calculation of magnetic field and fluid dynamics based on the commercial software ANSYS and FLUENT, which especially benefits to take into account the existence of the ferromagnetic parts. An example concerning air arc is

Xingwen Li; Degui Chen

2008-01-01

310

Implementation of universal behavioral health screening in a university health setting.  

PubMed

Universal screening at university health centers can facilitate early identification and treatment of behavioral health problems common among college students. This article describes the (a) process of implementing behavioral health screening at a university health center and (b) results of universal screening for depression, suicidal ideation, alcohol misuse, tobacco use, and sleep problems. We discuss the decision points involved in screening, including what to screen for, whom to screen, how to implement the screening measure, and how to deal with patients who screen positive. During the Spring and Fall 2010 academic semesters, 4,126 screening questionnaires were completed by students (62% female) accessing a university health center. Each semester, 9-13% of students screened positive for depression, 2.5-3% for suicidal ideation, and 33-38% for alcohol misuse, while 10% wanted help with smoking cessation and 12-13% with sleep problems. The results suggest that behavioral health screening in a university health center can help identify students with behavioral health concerns to increase access to care. PMID:25037065

Shepardson, Robyn L; Funderburk, Jennifer S

2014-09-01

311

Intergenerational health disparities: socioeconomic status, women's health conditions, and child behavior problems.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: Relatively little is known about the intergenerational mechanisms that lead to social disparities in child health. We examined whether the association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and child behavior problems is mediated by maternal health conditions and behavior. METHODS: Prospective cohort data (1979-1998) on 2,677 children and their mothers were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. SES, the Child Behavior Problems Index (BPI), and maternal smoking, depressive symptoms, and alcohol use before, during, and after pregnancy were examined. RESULTS: Lower income and lower maternal education were associated with increased child BPI scores. Adjustment for maternal smoking, depressive symptoms, and alcohol use attenuated the associations between SES and child BPI by 26% to 49%. These maternal health conditions often occurred together, persisted over time, and were associated with the mother's own childhood SES and pre-pregnancy health. CONCLUSIONS: Social disparities in women's health conditions may help shape the likelihood of behavior problems in the subsequent generation. Improved public health programs and services for disadvantaged women across the lifecourse may not only address their own urgent health needs, but reduce social disparities in the health and well-being of their children. PMID:16025720

Kahn, Robert S.; Wilson, Kathryn; Wise, Paul H.

2005-01-01

312

76 FR 16776 - Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department...Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice...Prevention, Health Promotion and Public Health (the ``Council'')....

2011-03-25

313

Morbidity Patterns and Health Care Seeking Behavior among Older Widows in India  

PubMed Central

In the process of health transition, India is facing rapid pace of demographic aging. Rapid increase in older adult population posed serious concerns regarding health and health care utilization for them. However, very limited research documented resultant implications of demographic aging for health and health care use in the nexus of marital status and gender. With this perspective, the present study examined patterns in morbidity prevalence and health seeking behaviour among older widows in India. Multivariate logistic regression models were estimated to examine the effects of socio-demographic conditions on morbidity prevalence among older widows and their health care seeking behavior. Data from the latest 60th round of National Sample Survey (NSS), 2004 was used. Overall, morbidity prevalence was 13% greater among older widows compared to older widowers. Adjusted prevalence of communicable and non-communicable diseases was found 74 and 192 per 1000 older widows respectively. At the same time, likelihood of seeking health care services for reported morbidities was substantially lower among older widows. The findings of this study are important to support policy makers and health care providers in identifying individuals ‘at risk’ and could be integrated into the current programs of social, economic and health security for the older persons. PMID:24718291

Agrawal, Gopal; Keshri, Kunal

2014-01-01

314

New Integrated Modeling Capabilities: MIDAS' Recent Behavioral Enhancements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) is an integrated human performance modeling software tool that is based on mechanisms that underlie and cause human behavior. A PC-Windows version of MIDAS has been created that integrates the anthropometric character "Jack (TM)" with MIDAS' validated perceptual and attention mechanisms. MIDAS now models multiple simulated humans engaging in goal-related behaviors. New capabilities include the ability to predict situations in which errors and/or performance decrements are likely due to a variety of factors including concurrent workload and performance influencing factors (PIFs). This paper describes a new model that predicts the effects of microgravity on a mission specialist's performance, and its first application to simulating the task of conducting a Life Sciences experiment in space according to a sequential or parallel schedule of performance.

Gore, Brian F.; Jarvis, Peter A.

2005-01-01

315

Health Behaviors of Elementary School Children in Rural Southern Illinois.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of patterns of health behavior among rural and small-town children surveyed 1,950 K-6 students from seven southern Illinois elementary schools. Findings indicate that less than half of the students ate the recommended amounts of fruits, vegetables, and grain each day. Males and females smoked at about the same rates, but sixth-grade boys…

Sarvela, Paul D.; Monge, Eduardo A.

1999-01-01

316

Health and Risk Behaviors of Massachusetts Youth, 2007: The Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the results of two coordinated surveys of Massachusetts adolescents, the 2007 Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey (ESE) and the Massachusetts Youth Health Survey (DPH). These two surveys were supported by funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and administered in a random selection of 124 public…

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2008

2008-01-01

317

Physician “Costs” in Providing Behavioral Health in Primary Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine pediatricians time spent, and resulting reimbursement payments for, addressing behavioral health concerns in a rural primary care pediatric practice. Methods: Research assistants observed 228 patient visits in a rural pediatric primary care office. The length of the visit (in minutes), content of visit, number and type of codes billed, and related insurance reimbursement amounts were recorded. Interrater

Tawnya Meadows; Rachel Valleley; Mary Kelly Haack; Ryan Thorson; Joseph Evans

2011-01-01

318

Priority Health Behaviors among South African Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the priority health behaviors of South African youth by administering a questionnaire to 635 undergraduate students enrolled in a large metropolitan university in South Africa. Results indicate that 65.5% of the participants tried cigarettes at least once during their lifetime, over 15.2% had their first cigarette and 31.2% had…

Porter, Kandice; Johnson, Ping Hu; Petrillo, Jane

2009-01-01

319

Priority Health Behavior Practices among Chinese Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the priority health behaviors among Chinese youth by administering a questionnaire to 1,917 undergraduates enrolled in three universities in China. The response rate was 89.7%. This survey found that 75.2% of the participants tried cigarettes at least once during their lifetime, over half had their first cigarette and alcoholic…

Johnson, Ping H.

2004-01-01

320

Developing games for health behavior change: Getting started  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Many investigators are considering developing video games for health (video-G4Hs) but have questions about how to get started. This report provides guidance for investigators considering a G4H as a behavioral intervention procedure from a team of experienced G4H developers. Thirteen commonly asked q...

321

Mindfulness and Health Behaviors: Is Paying Attention Good for You?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The investigators examined relations between mindfulness and health behaviors in college students, as well as the role of stress in mediating these effects. Participants: Participants were 553 undergraduates (385 females; mean age = 18.8 years, SD = 2.1) recruited from a university in the northeastern United States. Methods:…

Roberts, Kimberly C.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon

2010-01-01

322

Contextual Stress and Health Risk Behaviors among African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the longitudinal association between contextual stress and health risk behaviors and the role of protective factors in a community epidemiologically-defined sample of urban African American adolescents (N = 500; 46.4% female). Structural equation modeling was used to create a latent variable measuring contextual stress…

Copeland-Linder, Nikeea; Lambert, Sharon F.; Chen, Yi-Fu; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

2011-01-01

323

Self-Presentation and Health-Damaging Behavior in Sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between self-presentational concerns and health-damaging behaviors in sport competition as related to the sport ethic outlined by Hughes and Coakley (1991). Male (n = 358) and female (n = 781) NCAA Division I collegiate athletes from multiple sports completed a series of online surveys which tested self-presentational concerns (SPSQ)

Amber Nicole Miller

2008-01-01

324

An integrated framework for health and ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

The worldHealth Organization's (WHO's) International Program for Chemical Safety has developed a framework for performing risk assessments that integrate the assessment of risks to human health and risks to nonhuman organisms and ecosystems. The WHO's framework recognizes that stakeholders and risk managers have their own processes that are parallel to the scientific process of risk assessment and may interact with the risk assessment at various points, depending on the context. Integration of health and ecology provides consistent expressions of assessment results, incorporates the interdependence of humans and the environment, uses sentinel organisms, and improves the efficiency and quality of assessments relative to independent human health and ecological risk assessments. The advantage of the framework to toxicologists lies in the opportunity to use understanding of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics to inform the integrated assessment of all exposed species.

Suter, Glenn W. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin L. King Drive, MC-A130, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)]. E-mail: suter.glenn@epa.gov; Vermeire, Theo [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (Netherlands); Munns, Wayne R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin L. King Drive, MC-A130, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Sekizawa, Jun [Tokushima University (Japan)

2005-09-01

325

Personalized Health Planning With Integrative Health Coaching to Reduce Obesity Risk Among Women Gaining Excess Weight During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women. PMID:24278848

Yang, Nancy Y.; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva

2013-01-01

326

Community integration of transition-age individuals: views of young with mental health disorders.  

PubMed

This qualitative study examines the perceptions of young adults with mental health disorders of community integration. Fifty-nine young men and women participated in 12 focus groups whose aim was to gain understanding of what community integration means to them. Focus group questions also explored barriers and supports for their community integration, as well as their goals for the future and advice to others facing similar challenges. Themes that emerged were reported within the multiple domains that participants used to describe their experiences of community integration (or the lack thereof). This study highlights the desires of these young people to achieve goals in education and employment and to have friendships. Participants identified a pervasive lack of understanding of mental health and prevalent stigmatizing attitudes as resulting in challenges to their community integration. Implications of the study discuss roles for behavioral health services in encouraging empowerment, choices, and connections so that young people with mental health disorders may achieve their preferred levels of community integration. PMID:17464569

Jivanjee, Pauline; Kruzich, Jean; Gordon, Lynwood J

2008-10-01

327

Examining the health information-seeking behaviors of Korean Americans.  

PubMed

Many Korean Americans suffer from high levels of cancer incidence and have low cancer screening rates. A significant number of Korean Americans lack adequate information about cancer screening tests. However, little is known about their health behaviors. This article examines exposure to mass media and health information-seeking behaviors for Korean Americans, and their associations with demographic characteristics influencing variations in exposure to the different health information and trust in health information sources. The authors gathered data for this study using a cross-sectional, community-based survey conducted in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area during 2006 and 2007. It was administered to 254 Korean Americans who were 40 years of age or older. This study is part of the first health-related program of research to study exposure to mass media, health and cancer information sources, and seeking preferences and experiences of Korean Americans. Results indicated that Korean ethnic media sources and Internet are important sources used regularly. Age, years of education completed, and English proficiency levels for Korean Americans significantly predicted the likelihood of their Internet use. Low-income Korean Americans with less education were more likely to seek health information in Korean ethnic magazines and newspapers, whereas Korean Americans with higher education and English proficiency were more likely to seek information online. The most trusted source of health information among respondents was from a doctor or other health care professional. Future research should be conducted to determine whether physicians are actually used as a primary source for health information. PMID:22642692

Oh, Kyeung Mi; Kreps, Gary L; Jun, Jungmi; Chong, Elizabeth; Ramsey, Lolita

2012-08-01

328

Gateway Health Behaviors in College Students: Investigating Transfer and Compensation Effects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: There is a dearth of studies on the mechanisms of multiple risk behaviors, even though these behaviors are significant public health issues. The authors investigated whether health behavior interventions have transfer or compensatory effects on other health behaviors. Participants and Methods: The authors looked at transfer and…

Nigg, Claudio Renato; Lee, Hye-ryeon; Hubbard, Amy E.; Min-Sun, Kim

2009-01-01

329

Behavioral Health and Performance Element: Tools and Technologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the research into the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) of the Human Research Program. The program element goal is to identify, characterize and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration, and return to terrestrial life. To accomplish this goal the program focuses on applied research that is designed to yield deliverables that reduce risk. There are several different elements that are of particular interest: Behavioral Medicine, Sleep, and team composition, and team work. In order to assure success for NASA missions the Human Research Program develops and validate the standards for each of the areas of interest. There is discussion of the impact on BHP while astronauts are on Long Duration Missions. The effort in this research is to create tools to meet the BHP concerns, these prospective tools are reviewed.

Leveton, Lauren B.

2009-01-01

330

Integrating Human Health into Environmental Impact Assessment: An Unrealized Opportunity for Environmental Health and Justice  

PubMed Central

Objectives The National Environmental Policy Act and related state laws require many public agencies to analyze and disclose potentially significant environmental effects of agency actions, including effects on human health. In this paper we review the purpose and procedures of environmental impact assessment (EIA), existing regulatory requirements for health effects analysis, and potential barriers to and opportunities for improving integration of human health concerns within the EIA process. Data sources We use statutes, regulations, guidelines, court opinions, and empirical research on EIA along with recent case examples of integrated health impact assessment (HIA)/EIA at both the state and federal level. Data synthesis We extract lessons and recommendations for integrated HIA/EIA practice from both existing practices as well as case studies. Conclusions The case studies demonstrate the adequacy, scope, and power of existing statutory requirements for health analysis within EIA. The following support the success of integrated HIA/EIA: a proponent recognizing EIA as an available regulatory strategy for public health; the openness of the agency conducting the EIA; involvement of public health institutions; and complementary objectives among community stakeholders and health practitioners. We recommend greater collaboration among institutions responsible for EIA, public health institutions, and affected stakeholders along with guidance, resources, and training for integrated HIA/EIA practice. PMID:18709140

Bhatia, Rajiv; Wernham, Aaron

2008-01-01

331

Development of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI) was developed for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart behaviors") that should occur daily to help promote health and overcome illnesses/diseases: eating a healthy breakfast, eating…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Nolan, Sarah E. M.; Grandoit, Delphia J.; Gonzales, Lucia; Smith, Mary B.; Desmond, Frederic F.

2011-01-01

332

Sexual and Drug Use Behavior in Perinatally HIV? Infected Youth: Mental Health and Family Influences  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveAs perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)? infected (PHIV+) youths enter adolescence, they are at high risk for poor behavioral and health outcomes. This study examines relations between youth mental health problems and sexual and substance use risk behavior, the impact of caregiver mental health and family functioning on youth mental health and risk behavior outcomes, and the role of youth

Claude A. Mellins; Katherine S. Elkington; Jose A. Bauermeister; Elizabeth Brackis-Cott; Curtis Dolezal; Mary McKay; Andrew Wiznia; Mahrukh Bamji; Elaine J. Abrams

2009-01-01

333

Integrated Worker Health Protection and Promotion Programs: Overview and Perspectives on Health and Economic Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for integration of OSH and WHP programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. Methods A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes. Results Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes are considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Conclusions Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types. PMID:24284747

Pronk, Nicolaas P.

2014-01-01

334

Denver Health: a model for the integration of a public hospital and community health centers.  

PubMed

Two major pillars of the United States' safety net system are urban public hospitals and community health centers. Their common mission is to care for the uninsured and other vulnerable populations. However, in most communities these important components of the safety net remain organizationally and functionally separate, which inhibits the continuum of care and creates substantial inefficiencies. Denver Health is a long-standing vertically and horizontally integrated system for vulnerable populations. The integration benefits the patient and the system and serves as a model for the U.S. safety net. This paper outlines the benefits of integration to the patient, provider, and health system, using data from the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems, the Bureau of Primary Health Care, and Denver Health. PMID:12529097

Gabow, Patricia; Eisert, Sheri; Wright, Richard

2003-01-21

335

A pilot binational study of health behaviors and immigration.  

PubMed

In the US, Mexican immigrant women often have better health outcomes than non-Hispanic white women despite a greater health risk profile. This cross-sectional pilot study compared women living in Chavinda, Michoacán (n = 102) to women who had migrated from Mexico to Madera, California (n = 93). The interview gathered information on acculturation and risk behaviors including smoking, alcohol use and number of sexual partners. The results suggest that more acculturated women living in the US are more likely to consume alcohol. US residence and higher acculturation level was marginally associated with having more than one sexual partner. There were no differences between odds of smoking among Chavinda and Madera women. While results with acculturation are not consistently significant due to small sample sizes, the results are suggestive that acculturation among immigrant Hispanic women in the US may be associated with adverse health behaviors, and selective migration seems less likely to account for these differences. PMID:20811952

Hennessy-Burt, Tamara E; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Meneses-González, Fernando; Schenker, Marc B

2011-12-01

336

Health and impact assessment: Are we seeing closer integration?  

SciTech Connect

Health has always had a place in wider impact assessment activities, from the earliest days of the National Environmental Policy Act in the United States. However, early thinking tended to focus on health protection and environmental health issues, especially in relation to the effects of pollution. The adoption of wider models of health was reflected in impact assessment circles from the early 1990s, with particular emphasis on an integrated approach to impact assessment, especially at the project level, which would see health impact assessment benefiting from working with other forms of impact assessment, such as social and ecological. Yet twenty years later, integration still seems a distant prospect in many countries. In this paper I examine the case for integrating health considerations within the wider IA process, discuss some of the problems that have historically restricted progress towards this end, and explore the degree to which impact assessment practitioners have been successful in seeking to improve the consideration of health in IA. In New Zealand, project-level impact assessment is based on an integrated model under the Resource Management Act. In addition, HIA was recognised in the early 1990s as a valuable addition to the toolkit for project assessment. Since then policy-level HIA has grown supported by extensive capacity building. If health is being integrated into wider impact assessment, it should be happening in New Zealand where so many enabling conditions are met. Three major project proposals from New Zealand are examined, to characterise the broad trends in HIA development in New Zealand in the last ten years and to assess the degree to which health concerns are being reflected in wider impact assessments. The findings are discussed in the context of the issues outlined in the early part of the paper.

Morgan, Richard K., E-mail: rkm@geography.otago.ac.n

2011-07-15

337

The health change trajectory model: an integrated model of health change.  

PubMed

Health and illness fluctuate across a person's life span, and various theories have been developed to address the unique perceptions and situations that accompany these fluctuations. An innovative model of health change resulted from a synthesis of the major concepts from 2 such theories: Mishel's uncertainty in illness theory and the Corbin and Strauss chronic illness trajectory framework. The proposed integrated model, the Health Change Trajectory Model, provides original conceptual definitions that operationalize trajectory framework in the context of changes in health. The use of a health trajectory perspective extends applications of the model to a wide range of health changes that result in uncertainty and ambiguity. PMID:25635506

Christensen, Deborah

2015-01-01

338

Mental health, demographic, and risk behavior profiles of pregnant survivors of childhood and adult abuse  

PubMed Central

Our objective was to address the gap in knowledge about the extent to which perinatal mental health and risk behaviors are associated with childhood and adult experiences of abuse that arises because of barriers to screening and disclosure about past and current abuse. Survey data from an ongoing study of the effects of posttraumatic stress on childbearing were used to describe four groups of nulliparous women: those with no abuse history, adult abuse only, childhood abuse only, and abuse that occurred during both periods. The rates of abuse history disclosure were higher in the research context than in the clinical settings. Mental health morbidity and risk behaviors occurred in a dose-response pattern with cumulative abuse exposure. Rates of current posttraumatic stress disorder ranged from 4.1% among those never abused to 11.4% (adult only), 16.0% (childhood only), and 39.2% (both periods). Women abused during both periods also were more likely to be using tobacco (21.5%) and drugs (16.5%) during pregnancy. We conclude that mental health and behavioral risk sequelae affect a significant portion of both childhood and adult abuse survivors in prenatal care. The integration into the maternity setting of existing evidence-based interventions for the mental health and behavioral sequelae of abuse is needed. PMID:18984507

Seng, Julia S.; Sperlich, Mickey; Low, Lisa Kane

2015-01-01

339

Physician, heal thyself: health maintenance behaviors among physicians.  

PubMed

The goal of this article is to assess the need for health maintenance intervention programs directed at physicians and patients. We compared the health maintenance behavior compliance of physicians (as patients) to a control patient population. An online survey was sent to the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) medical school clinical and nonclinical basic science faculties and to the non-TTUHSC clinicians of the local county medical society. The survey included questions regarding basic demographics and recent participation in regular health maintenance strategies including annual checkup, influenza vaccination, colonoscopy, Pap smear, and mammogram. Logistic regressions were conducted to determine if being a physician had a significant association with the likelihood of participating in the health maintenance behavior outcomes listed above. This article shows that physicians are less likely than the general population to adhere to specific health maintenance guidelines: namely, annual checkups, colonoscopies, and mammograms. Pap smear rates did not differ between physicians and a control population, but physicians showed an increased likelihood of receiving an influenza vaccine. PMID:25504354

Berk, Justin; Mills, Brooke; Varma, Surendra

2014-01-01

340

Effects of Perceived Racial Discrimination on Health Status and Health Behavior: A Differential Mediation Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Objective Prospective data tested a “differential mediation” hypothesis: The relations (found in previous research) between perceived racial discrimination and physical health status versus health-impairing behavior (problematic substance use) are mediated by two different types of affective reactions, internalizing and externalizing. Methods The sample included 680 African American women from the Family and Community Health Study (M age = 37 at Time 1; 45 at Time 4). Four waves of data were analyzed. Perceived discrimination was assessed, along with anxiety and depression (internalizing) and hostility / anger (externalizing) as mediators, and physical health status and problematic substance use (drinking) as outcomes. Results Structural equation modeling indicated that discrimination predicted increases in both externalizing and internalizing reactions. These affective responses, in turn, predicted subsequent problematic substance use and physical health status, respectively, also controlling for earlier reports. In each case, the indirect effects from discrimination through the affective mediator to the specific health outcome were significant and consistent with the differential mediation hypothesis. Conclusion Perceived racial discrimination is associated with increases in internalizing and externalizing reactions among Black women, but these reactions are related to different health outcomes. Changes in internalizing are associated with self-reported changes in physical health status, whereas changes in externalizing are associated with changes in substance use problems. Discussion focuses on the processes whereby discrimination affects health behavior and physical health status. PMID:24417690

Gibbons, Frederick X.; Kingsbury, John H.; Weng, Chih-Yuan; Gerrard, Meg; Cutrona, Carolyn; Wills, Thomas A.; Stock, Michelle

2013-01-01

341

Preterm infants' orally directed behaviors and behavioral state responses to the integrated H-HOPE intervention.  

PubMed

Preterm infants are challenged by immature infant behavioral organization which may negatively influence their ability to oral feed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the integrated H-HOPE (Hospital to Home: Optimizing the Infant's Environment) intervention would improve infant behavioral organization by increasing the frequency of orally directed behaviors and the proportion of time spent in an alert behavioral state when offered prior to oral feeding. Mother-infant dyads (n=198) were randomly assigned to the H-HOPE intervention or the Attention Control groups. Infants were born at 29-34 weeks gestation and were clinically stable. Mothers had at least two social environmental risk factors such as minority status or less than high school education. H-HOPE is an integrated intervention that included (1) twice-daily infant directed stimulation using the ATVV intervention (auditory, tactile, visual, and vestibular stimuli) and (2) maternal participatory guidance sessions by a nurse-community advocate team. Orally directed behaviors and behavioral states were assessed weekly prior to feeding during hospitalization when infants were able to feed orally. There were no differences between the groups at baseline (Day 0, prior to the initiation of the integrated H-HOPE intervention). We observed a pattern of increased frequency of orally directed behaviors in the H-HOPE intervention group when compared to the Attention Control group, however, the proportion of time spent in an alert behavioral state remained stable in both groups over the course of the study. On Day 7, the H-HOPE intervention group exhibited a significantly higher mean frequency of orally directed behaviors than the Attention Control group (12.6 vs. 7.1 pre-intervention, 51.8 vs. 33.2 during intervention, 4.3 vs. 3.2 immediately after intervention, and 8.9 vs. 5.3 immediately prior to feeding). On Day 7, the H-HOPE intervention group exhibited a significantly higher proportion of time spent in an alert behavioral state only during intervention (0.26 vs. 0.11) and immediately after intervention (0.28 vs. 0.06). These findings are suggestive that the integrated H-HOPE intervention facilitated infant behavioral organization for clinically stable infants born between 29 and 34 weeks gestation. The orally directed behaviors appear to be an important indicator of the infant's preparation for feeding, and when used in conjunction with assessment of behavioral states, are especially valuable to the clinician. Use of this combined assessment approach in practice would strengthen clinician assessment for initiation of (beginning the first oral feeding) and daily preparation for oral feeding in preterm infants. PMID:25189523

White-Traut, Rosemary; Rankin, Kristin M; Pham, Thao; Li, Zhuoying; Liu, Li

2014-11-01

342

Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) Toolkit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A framework of software components has been implemented to facilitate the development of ISHM systems according to a methodology based on Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). This framework is collectively referred to as the Toolkit and was developed using General Atomics' Health MAP (TM) technology. The toolkit is intended to provide assistance to software developers of mission-critical system health monitoring applications in the specification, implementation, configuration, and deployment of such applications. In addition to software tools designed to facilitate these objectives, the toolkit also provides direction to software developers in accordance with an ISHM specification and development methodology. The development tools are based on an RCM approach for the development of ISHM systems. This approach focuses on defining, detecting, and predicting the likelihood of system functional failures and their undesirable consequences.

Venkatesh, Meera; Kapadia, Ravi; Walker, Mark; Wilkins, Kim

2013-01-01

343

Integrated mental health services in England: a policy paradox  

PubMed Central

Abstract Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of health care policy on the development of integrated mental health services in England. Data sources Drawing largely from a narrative review of the literature on adult mental health services published between January 1997 and February 2003 undertaken by the authors, we discuss three case studies of integrated care within primary care, secondary care and across the primary/secondary interface for people with serious mental illness. Conclusion We suggest that while the central thrust of a raft of recent Government policies in England has been towards integration of different parts of the health care system, policy waterfalls and implementation failures, the adoption of ideas before they have been thoroughly tried and tested, a lack of clarity over roles and responsibilities and poor communication have led to an integration rhetoric/reality gap in practice. This has particular implications for people with serious mental health problems. Discussion We conclude with suggestions for strategies that may facilitate more integrated working. PMID:16773165

England, Elizabeth; Lester, Helen

2005-01-01

344

Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.  

PubMed

The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles presented here are necessary as a complete recipe. Leaders of health systems moving toward integration are cautioned to apply the recipe in full. This article ends with two questions. First, if not an integrated model of health care, what's the alternative? Since it seems clear that many of the existing community-based models are excessively fragmented and inefficient, especially in a reforming U.S. health care marketplace, is there a new model that is superior to the integrated models and, if so, what is it and what are its functional principles? The second question: Is there more than one functional form of integration? This article argues for the most integrated form. Others would argue that clinical integration is sufficient,'s and full integration isn't required. The stability, durability and adaptability of the fully integrated models have, arguably, been tested. The lesser integrated models remain to be proven in an unstable health care marketplace seeking higher levels of economic efficiency. PMID:23888674

Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

2012-01-01

345

Integrating Cognitive Behavioral and Applied Behavior Techniques With Dysfunctional Family Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Families experiencing severe conflict are often unable to effectively implement applied behavioral procedures due to interfering emotional responses (anger, blaming, anxiety and depression) and behavioral responses (yelling, crying and physical fighting), which often reduce effective implementation of applied behavioral procedures. Specific…

Barrish, I. J.

346

Optimal Health (Spirit, Mind, and Body): A Feasibility Study Promoting Well-Being for Health Behavior Change.  

PubMed

Faith-based programs have shown beneficial effects for health and behaviors. Few have specifically intervened on the spiritual, mental (i.e., stress), and physical dimensions of well-being combined for health and healthy behaviors (i.e., exercise and diet). The purpose of this report is to describe the feasibility of executing a spirituality-based health behavior change, program founded upon the Spiritual Framework of Coping. This study was a quasi-experimental one group pretest-posttest design. Feasibility objectives were assessed, and limited efficacy of pretest and posttest measures was analyzed using paired t test (p < .05). Acceptance of the program was positive, and modest demand was shown with initial interest and an average attendance of 78.7 %. The program was successfully implemented as shown by meeting session objectives and 88 % homework completion. The program was practical for the intended participants and was successfully integrated within the existing environment. Limited efficacy measures showed no pre-post changes. This study provided preliminary support for the design and further testing of the theoretical components of the Spiritual Framework of Coping that informed the program. PMID:24985320

Walker, Jenelle; Ainsworth, Barbara; Hooker, Steven; Keller, Colleen; Fleury, Julie; Chisum, Jack; Swan, Pamela

2014-07-01

347

Open, networked, integrated, multimedia, client/server behavioral healthcare.  

PubMed

Drawing upon the results of research from over 4,500 businesses that are now re-inventing themselves through the application of current information technology, the author envisions the informational characteristics of the behavioral healthcare enterprise of the future. The new technology will be open for all stakeholders in the healthcare system to interoperate, integrated between providers and facilities nationwide, decentralized, immediately accessible and continuously updating clinically useful information. Although the new information system architecture may not be fully implemented for another 10 to 15 years, the transformation is already well underway. New computer technology makes such a reinvention of the behavioral healthcare enterprise both possible and inevitable. PMID:10142492

Harriman, M

1994-01-01

348

Early life adversity reduces stress reactivity and enhances impulsive behavior: Implications for health behaviors  

PubMed Central

Altered reactivity to stress, either in the direction of exaggerated reactivity or diminished reactivity, may signal a dysregulation of systems intended to maintain homeostasis and a state of good health. Evidence has accumulated that diminished reactivity to psychosocial stress may signal poor health outcomes. One source of diminished cortisol and autonomic reactivity is the experience of adverse rearing during childhood and adolescence. The Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project has examined a cohort of 426 healthy young adults with and without a family history of alcoholism. Regardless of family history, persons who had experienced high degrees of adversity prior to age 16 had a constellation of changes including reduced cortisol and heart rate reactivity, diminished cognitive capacity, and unstable regulation of affect, leading to behavioral impulsivity and antisocial tendencies. We present a model whereby this constellation of physiological, cognitive, and affective tendencies is consistent with altered central dopaminergic activity leading to changes in brain function that may foster impulsive and risky behaviors. These in turn may promote greater use of alcohol other drugs along with adopting poor health behaviors. This model provides a pathway from early life adversity to low stress reactivity that forms a basis for risky behaviors and poor health outcomes. PMID:23085387

Lovallo, William R.

2012-01-01

349

Health behaviors and weight status among urban and rural children  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pediatric overweight is currently reaching epidemic proportions but little information exists on differences in weight related behaviors between urban and rural children. Objective: To assess health behaviors and weight status among urban and rural school-age children. Methods Fifth-grade children at two urban and two rural schools were invited to participate in an assessment study of their health behaviors and weight status. A total of 138 children (mean age = 10 years; % female = 54.6) chose to participate. Results Children in rural and urban areas consumed equivalent calories per day and calories from fat, but rural children ate more junk food and urban children were more likely to skip breakfast. Urban children engaged in more metabolic equivalent tasks and had slightly higher total sedentary activity than rural children. The BMI percentile was equivalent across rural and urban children but rural children were more often overweight and urban children were more often at risk for overweight. Conclusions Although some variables were equivalent across urban and rural children, results indicate some key health behavior differences between groups. Results should be interpreted with caution as the sample size was small and there were demographic differences between urban and rural samples. PMID:18426334

Davis, AM; Boles, RE; James, RL; Sullivan, DK; Donnelly, JE; Swirczynski, DL; Goetz, J

2009-01-01

350

Automated Interventions for Multiple Health Behaviors Using Conversational Agents  

PubMed Central

Objective An automated health counselor agent was designed to promote both physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption through a series of simulated conversations with users on their home computers. Methods The agent was evaluated in a 4-arm randomized trial of a two-month daily contact intervention comparing: a) physical activity; b) fruit and vegetable consumption; c) both interventions; and d) a non-intervention control. Physical activity was assessed using daily pedometer steps. Daily servings of fruit and vegetables was assessed using the NIH/NCI self-report Fruit and Vegetable Scan. Results Participants in the physical activity intervention increased their walking on average compared to the control group, while those in the fruit and vegetable intervention and combined intervention decreased walking. Participants in the fruit and vegetable intervention group consumed significantly more servings per day compared to those in the control group, and those in the combined intervention reported consuming more compared to those in the control group. Conclusion Automated health intervention software designed for efficient re-use is effective at changing health behavior. Practice Implications Automated health behavior change interventions can be designed to facilitate translation and adaptation across multiple behaviors. PMID:23763983

Bickmore, Timothy W.; Schulman, Daniel; Sidner, Candace

2013-01-01

351

Adolescents' health behaviors and obesity: Does race affect this epidemic?  

PubMed Central

This study explores the influence of health behaviors and individual attributes on adolescent overweight and obesity using data from Wave II (Add Health). Structural equation model/path analysis using maximum likelihood estimation was utilized to analyze the relationships of health behaviors and attributes with obesity. Results of the model reveal that the causal paths (adolescents' attributes and health behaviors) for overweight and obesity were different for African American and Caucasian adolescents. Generally, African Americans were more susceptible to overweight and obesity than Caucasians. Although increasing levels of vigorous physical activities lowers the risk for obesity among African American and Caucasian adolescents alike, low family SES and being sedentary were associated with overweight and obesity among Caucasians. No significant associations were found among African Americans. Increased hours of sleep at night relate positively with obesity among African Americans. These findings suggest important elements in the consideration of race in developing effective intervention and prevention approaches for curbing the obesity epidemic among U.S. adolescents. PMID:21286412

Shelley, Mack C.; Hausafus, Cheryl O.

2010-01-01

352

Moving from Intersection to Integration: Public Health Law Research and Public Health Systems and Services Research  

PubMed Central

Context For three decades, experts have been stressing the importance of law to the effective operation of public health systems. Most recently, in a 2011 report, the Institute of Medicine recommended a review of state and local public health laws to ensure appropriate authority for public health agencies; adequate access to legal counsel for public health agencies; evaluations of the health effects and costs associated with legislation, regulations, and policies; and enhancement of research methods to assess the strength of evidence regarding the health effects of public policies. These recommendations, and the continued interest in law as a determinant of health system performance, speak to the need for integrating the emerging fields of Public Health Law Research (PHLR) and Public Health Systems and Services Research (PHSSR). Methods Expert commentary. Findings This article sets out a unified framework for the two fields and a shared research agenda built around three broad inquiries: (1) the structural role of law in shaping the organization, powers, prerogatives, duties, and limitations of public health agencies and thereby their functioning and ultimately their impact on public health (“infrastructure”); (2) the mechanisms through which public health system characteristics influence the implementation of interventional public health laws (“implementation”); and (3) the individual and system characteristics that influence the ability of public health systems and their community partners to develop and secure enactment of legal initiatives to advance public health (“innovation”). Research to date has laid a foundation of evidence, but progress requires better and more accessible data, a new generation of researchers comfortable in both law and health research, and more rigorous methods. Conclusions The routine integration of law as a salient factor in broader PHSSR studies of public health system functioning and health outcomes will enhance the usefulness of research in supporting practice and the long-term improvement of system performance. PMID:22709392

Burris, Scott; Mays, Glen P; Douglas Scutchfield, F; Ibrahim, Jennifer K

2012-01-01

353

Adolescent Health-Risk Behavior and Community Disorder  

PubMed Central

Background Various forms of community disorder are associated with health outcomes but little is known about how dynamic context where an adolescent spends time relates to her health-related behaviors. Objective Assess whether exposure to contexts associated with crime (as a marker of community disorder) correlates with self-reported health-related behaviors among adolescent girls. Methods Girls (N?=?52), aged 14–17, were recruited from a single geographic urban area and monitored for 1 week using a GPS-enabled cell phone. Adolescents completed an audio computer-assisted self-administered interview survey on substance use (cigarette, alcohol, or marijuana use) and sexual intercourse in the last 30 days. In addition to recorded home and school address, phones transmitted location data every 5 minutes (path points). Using ArcGIS, we defined community disorder as aggregated point-level Unified Crime Report data within a 200-meter Euclidian buffer from home, school and each path point. Using Stata, we analyzed how exposures to areas of higher crime prevalence differed among girls who reported each behavior or not. Results Participants lived and spent time in areas with variable crime prevalence within 200 meters of their home, school and path points. Significant differences in exposure occurred based on home location among girls who reported any substance use or not (p 0.04) and sexual intercourse or not (p 0.01). Differences in exposure by school and path points were only significant among girls reporting any substance use or not (p 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Exposure also varied by school/non-school day as well as time of day. Conclusions Adolescent travel patterns are not random. Furthermore, the crime context where an adolescent spends time relates to her health-related behavior. These data may guide policy relating to crime control and inform time- and space-specific interventions to improve adolescent health. PMID:24278107

Wiehe, Sarah E.; Kwan, Mei-Po; Wilson, Jeff; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

2013-01-01

354

Health Behaviors Among Cancer Survivors Receiving Screening Mammography  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cancer-related behavioral risk factors among female cancer survivors, relative to women without a previous diagnosis of cancer. Methods In a large cohort of 19,948 women presenting for screening mammography, questionnaires on health behaviors were administered. Results 18,510 had detailed history on health behaviors and previous cancer history. Overall 2,713 (14.7%) reported a previous cancer history. We found statistically significant results indicating cancer survivors were less likely than those with no cancer history to: report their overall health as “excellent” (13.6% vs. 21.5%), to engage in moderate or strenuous exercise (56.5% vs. 63.3%), and to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) (57.4% vs. 60.2%). Conversely, cancer survivors were more likely to be current smokers (6.3% vs. 5.5%) rate their overall health as “poor” (15.8% vs. 9.1%), and to report more weight gain over time. Among cancer survivors, differences also emerged by type of primary cancer. For example, cervical cancer survivors (n=370) were most likely to report being current smokers (15.7%) and regular alcohol users (71.7%) compared to other survivors. Ovarian (n=185) and uterine (n=262) cancer survivors most frequently reported being obese (41% and 34.4% respectively). Cervical cancer survivors reported the largest weight gain (4.9 lbs at 5 yrs and 13.4 lbs at 10 yrs). Conclusions These results suggest opportunities for tailored behavioral health risk factor interventions for specific populations of cancer survivors. PMID:21293247

Rausch, Sarah M.; Millay, Shannon; Scott, Chris; Pruthi, Sandhya; Clark, Matthew M.; Patten, Christi; Stan, Daniela; Sellers, Thomas; Vachon, Celine

2010-01-01

355

Chip-scale sensor system integration for portable health monitoring.  

PubMed

The revolution in integrated circuits over the past 50 yr has produced inexpensive computing and communications systems that are powerful and portable. The technologies for these integrated chip-scale sensing systems, which will be miniature, lightweight, and portable, are emerging with the integration of sensors with electronics, optical systems, micromachines, microfluidics, and the integration of chemical and biological materials (soft/wet material integration with traditional dry/hard semiconductor materials). Hence, we stand at a threshold for health monitoring technology that promises to provide wearable biochemical sensing systems that are comfortable, inauspicious, wireless, and battery-operated, yet that continuously monitor health status, and can transmit compressed data signals at regular intervals, or alarm conditions immediately. In this paper, we explore recent results in chip-scale sensor integration technology for health monitoring. The development of inexpensive chip-scale biochemical optical sensors, such as microresonators, that are customizable for high sensitivity coupled with rapid prototyping will be discussed. Ground-breaking work in the integration of chip-scale optical systems to support these optical sensors will be highlighted, and the development of inexpensive Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuitry (which makes up the vast majority of computational systems today) for signal processing and wireless communication with local receivers that lie directly on the chip-scale sensor head itself will be examined. PMID:18048897

Jokerst, Nan M; Brooke, Martin A; Cho, Sang-Yeon; Shang, Allan B

2007-12-01

356

Integration of Health Protection and Health Promotion: Rationale, Indicators, and Metrics  

PubMed Central

Objective To offer a definition of an “integrated” approach to worker health and operationalize this definition using indicators of the extent to which integrated efforts are implemented in an organization. Methods Guided by the question, “How will we know it when we see it?” we reviewed relevant literature to identify available definitions and metrics, and used a modified-Delphi process to review and refine indicators and measures of integrated approaches. Results A definition of integrated approaches to worker health is proposed and accompanied by indicators and measures that may be used by researchers, employers and workers. Conclusions A shared understanding of what is meant by integrated approaches to protect and promote worker health has the potential to improve dialogue among researchers and facilitate the research-to-practice process. PMID:24284762

Sorensen, Glorian; McLellan, Deborah; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Allen, Jennifer D.; Boden, Leslie I.; Okechukwu, Cassandra A.; Hashimoto, Dean; Stoddard, Anne; Wagner, Gregory R

2014-01-01

357

Sexual Health and Men Who Have Sex with Men in Vietnam: An Integrated Approach to Preventive Health Care  

PubMed Central

Background. While HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam has received increasing attention, most studies focus on HIV knowledge and established risk factors such as injection drug use. This paper proposes to address HIV risk among MSM from an integrated approach to preventive care that takes into account syndemic conditions such as substance use, mental health, and stigma, the latter of which prevents MSM from accessing health services. Method. Current studies related to MSM in Vietnam from 2000 onwards, gathered from peer-reviewed as well as non-peer-reviewed sources, were examined. Results. HIV and STI prevalence among MSM varied significantly by location, and yet HIV prevalence has increased significantly over the past few years. Most studies have focused on sexual risk behaviors, paying little attention to the broad spectrum of sexual health, including noninjecting drug use, heavy alcohol consumption, high rates of mental health distress and anxiety, and stigma. Conclusion. Future research and interventions targeting MSM in Vietnam should address their vulnerability to HIV from an integrated approach that pays attention to both sexual health and syndemic conditions. PMID:23119171

Giang, Le Minh; Viet, Vu Duc; Hao, Bui Thi Minh

2012-01-01

358

Religion, kinship and health behaviors of african american women.  

PubMed

A positive relationship exists between functional health and religion. We present an empirical definition of religion and describe the key elements of religious behavior, building a model that can be used to explore the presumed relationship between religion and health. Semi-structured interactive interviews were conducted with 22 participants over a 6-month period. Head Start programs and churches located in the inner city of a large metropolitan area. Twenty-two African American women were aged from 21 to 45. We focus on social relationships and propose that prophet-created religions mimic kinship relationships and encourage kinship-like cooperation between members. PMID:24141689

Coe, Kathryn; Keller, Colleen; Walker, Jenelle R

2015-02-01

359

Rural adolescents' coping responses: implications for behavioral health nurses.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to identify coping responses of rural adolescents. The sample included 193 students attending three high schools in southwestern Pennsylvania. Family and peer relationships were the most common stressful situations described by the adolescents. Coping responses were measured by the Coping Responses Inventory-Youth Form (CRI-Y). The results indicate that males most often report the coping response of logical analysis and females report the coping response of cognitive avoidance most often. Mental health programs, led by behavioral health nurses, may teach a variety of coping strategies to rural adolescents. PMID:18437610

Puskar, Kathryn R; Grabiak, Beth R

2008-05-01

360

Effective elements of school health promotion across behavioral domains: a systematic review of reviews  

PubMed Central

Background Most school health education programs focus on a single behavioral domain. Integrative programs that address multiple behaviors may be more efficient, but only if the elements of change are similar for these behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine which effective elements of school health education are similar across three particular behavioral domains. Methods A systematic review of reviews of the effectiveness of school-based health promotion programs was conducted for the domains of substance abuse, sexual behavior, and nutrition. The literature search spanned the time period between 1995 and October 2006 and included three databases, websites of review centers and backward search. Fifty-five reviews and meta-analyses met predetermined relevance and publication criteria and were included. Data was extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. A standardized data extraction form was used, with detailed attention to effective elements pertaining to program goals, development, content, methods, facilitator, components and intensity. Two assessors rated the quality of reviews as strong, moderate or weak. We included only strong and moderate reviews in two types of analysis: one based on interpretation of conflicting results, the other on a specific vote-counting rule. Results Thirty six reviews were rated strong, 6 moderate, and 13 weak. A multitude of effective elements was identified in the included reviews and many elements were similar for two or more domains. In both types of analysis, five elements with evidence from strong reviews were found to be similar for all three domains: use of theory; addressing social influences, especially social norms; addressing cognitive-behavioral skills; training of facilitators; and multiple components. Two additional elements had positive results in all domains with the rule-based method of analysis, but had inconclusive results in at least one domain with the interpretion-based method of analysis: parent involvement and a larger number of sessions. Conclusion Five effective elements of school health promotion were found to be similar across the three behavioral domains examined (substance abuse, sexual behavior, nutrition). An integrative program that addresses the three domains seems feasible. The five elements are primary candidates to include in programs targeting these behaviors. PMID:19523195

Peters, Louk WH; Kok, Gerjo; Ten Dam, Geert TM; Buijs, Goof J; Paulussen, Theo GWM

2009-01-01

361

Behavioral Outcome of Preschoolers Exposed Prenatally to Cocaine: Role of Maternal Behavioral Health  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the impact of prenatal cocaine exposure and maternal behavioral health (recent drug use and psychological functioning) on child behavior at age 5 years. Method In this longitudinal investigation, maternal report of child behavior was assessed using the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) in 140 cocaine-exposed and 181 noncocaine-exposed (61 alcohol, tobacco, and/or marijuana-exposed, and 120 nondrug-exposed) low-income, African American children. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate suspected causal relationships between indicators of maternal behavioral health at 5-year follow-up, according to self-report on a modified Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and CBCL scores. Results Prenatal cocaine exposure was not related to child behavior at age 5. Recent maternal drug use and psychological functioning had relationships with CBCL Internalizing and Externalizing scores. However, when considered within a combined model, only maternal psychological functioning remained significant. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of maternal functioning in the behavioral outcome of children exposed prenatally to cocaine. PMID:11909933

Accornero, Veronica H.; Morrow, Connie E.; Bandstra, Emmalee S.; Johnson, Arnise L.; Anthony, James C.

2009-01-01

362

An integrated framework for detecting suspicious behaviors in video surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we propose an integrated framework for detecting suspicious behaviors in video surveillance systems which are established in public places such as railway stations, airports, shopping malls and etc. Especially, people loitering in suspicion, unattended objects left behind and exchanging suspicious objects between persons are common security concerns in airports and other transit scenarios. These involve understanding scene/event, analyzing human movements, recognizing controllable objects, and observing the effect of the human movement on those objects. In the proposed framework, multiple background modeling technique, high level motion feature extraction method and embedded Markov chain models are integrated for detecting suspicious behaviors in real time video surveillance systems. Specifically, the proposed framework employs probability based multiple backgrounds modeling technique to detect moving objects. Then the velocity and distance measures are computed as the high level motion features of the interests. By using an integration of the computed features and the first passage time probabilities of the embedded Markov chain, the suspicious behaviors in video surveillance are analyzed for detecting loitering persons, objects left behind and human interactions such as fighting. The proposed framework has been tested by using standard public datasets and our own video surveillance scenarios.

Zin, Thi Thi; Tin, Pyke; Hama, Hiromitsu; Toriu, Takashi

2014-03-01

363

Neighborhoods and adolescent health-risk behavior: An ecological network approach.  

PubMed

This study integrates insights from social network analysis, activity space perspectives, and theories of urban and spatial processes to present an novel approach to neighborhood effects on health-risk behavior among youth. We suggest spatial patterns of neighborhood residents' non-home routines may be conceptualized as ecological, or "eco"-networks, which are two-mode networks that indirectly link residents through socio-spatial overlap in routine activities. We further argue structural configurations of eco-networks are consequential for youth's behavioral health. In this study we focus on a key structural feature of eco-networks - the neighborhood-level extent to which household dyads share two or more activity locations, or eco-network reinforcement - and its association with two dimensions of health-risk behavior, substance use and delinquency/sexual activity. Using geographic data on non-home routine activity locations among respondents from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A.FANS), we constructed neighborhood-specific eco-networks by connecting sampled households to "activity clusters," which are sets of spatially-proximate activity locations. We then measured eco-network reinforcement and examined its association with dimensions of adolescent health risk behavior employing a sample of 830 youth ages 12-17 nested in 65 census tracts. We also examined whether neighborhood-level social processes (collective efficacy and intergenerational closure) mediate the association between eco-network reinforcement and the outcomes considered. Results indicated eco-network reinforcement exhibits robust negative associations with both substance use and delinquency/sexual activity scales. Eco-network reinforcement effects were not explained by potential mediating variables. In addition to introducing a novel theoretical and empirical approach to neighborhood effects on youth, our findings highlight the importance of intersecting conventional routines for adolescent behavioral health. PMID:25011958

Browning, Christopher R; Soller, Brian; Jackson, Aubrey L

2015-01-01

364

Respondents, Operants, and Emergents: Toward an Integrated Perspective on Behavior  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A triarchic organization of behavior, building on Skinner's description of respondents and operants, is proposed by introducing a third class of behavior called 'emergents.' Emergents are new responses, never specifically reinforced, that require operations more complex than association. Some of these operations occur naturally only in animals above a minimum level of brain complexity, and are developed in an interaction between treatment and organismic variables. (Here complexity is defined in terms of relative levels of hierarchical integration made possible both by the amount of brain, afforded both by brain-body allometric relationships and by encephalization, and, also, the elaboration of dendritic and synaptic connections within the cortex and connections between various parts/regions of the brain.) Examples of emergents are discussed to advance this triarchic view, of behavior. The prime example is language. This triarchic view reflects both the common goals and the cumulative nature of psychological science.

Rumbaugh, Daune M.; Washburn, David A.; Hillix, William A.

1996-01-01

365

Predictors in Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy and behavioral stress management for severe health anxiety.  

PubMed

Severe health anxiety can be effectively treated with exposure-based Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT), but information about which factors that predict outcome is scarce. Using data from a recently conducted RCT comparing ICBT (n = 79) with Internet-delivered behavioral stress management (IBSM) (n = 79) the presented study investigated predictors of treatment outcome. Analyses were conducted using a two-step linear regression approach and the dependent variable was operationalized both as end state health anxiety at post-treatment and as baseline-to post-treatment improvement. A hypothesis driven approach was used where predictors expected to influence outcome were based on a previous predictor study by our research group. As hypothesized, the results showed that baseline health anxiety and treatment adherence predicted both end state health anxiety and improvement. In addition, anxiety sensitivity, treatment credibility, and working alliance were significant predictors of health anxiety improvement. Demographic variables, i.e. age, gender, marital status, computer skills, educational level, and having children, had no significant predictive value. We conclude that it is possible to predict a substantial proportion of the outcome variance in ICBT and IBSM for severe health anxiety. The findings of the present study can be of high clinical value as they provide information about factors of importance for outcome in the treatment of severe health anxiety. PMID:25540862

Hedman, Erik; Andersson, Erik; Lekander, Mats; Ljótsson, Brjánn

2015-01-01

366

Sensory integration therapies for children with developmental and behavioral disorders.  

PubMed

Sensory-based therapies are increasingly used by occupational therapists and sometimes by other types of therapists in treatment of children with developmental and behavioral disorders. Sensory-based therapies involve activities that are believed to organize the sensory system by providing vestibular, proprioceptive, auditory, and tactile inputs. Brushes, swings, balls, and other specially designed therapeutic or recreational equipment are used to provide these inputs. However, it is unclear whether children who present with sensory-based problems have an actual "disorder" of the sensory pathways of the brain or whether these deficits are characteristics associated with other developmental and behavioral disorders. Because there is no universally accepted framework for diagnosis, sensory processing disorder generally should not be diagnosed. Other developmental and behavioral disorders must always be considered, and a thorough evaluation should be completed. Difficulty tolerating or processing sensory information is a characteristic that may be seen in many developmental behavioral disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, developmental coordination disorders, and childhood anxiety disorders. Occupational therapy with the use of sensory-based therapies may be acceptable as one of the components of a comprehensive treatment plan. However, parents should be informed that the amount of research regarding the effectiveness of sensory integration therapy is limited and inconclusive. Important roles for pediatricians and other clinicians may include discussing these limitations with parents, talking with families about a trial period of sensory integration therapy, and teaching families how to evaluate the effectiveness of a therapy. PMID:22641765

Zimmer, Michelle; Desch, Larry

2012-06-01

367

Preventive health behaviors among lesbian and bisexually identified women.  

PubMed

The current research aimed to better understand the preventive health behaviors of lesbian and bisexually identified women. We recruited lesbian and bisexual women at a large-scale Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual (GLB) event in New York City. An ethnically diverse sample of 102 lesbian and 23 bisexually identified women who had sex with women from the New York City metropolitan area completed a quantitative survey. Lesbians, compared to bisexual women, were significantly older and significantly more likely to report being in partnered relationships. Lesbians were also more likely than bisexual women to report having performed recent breast self-examinations. Because of previously inconsistent findings and methodologies, further research is needed to determine the specific effects of lesbian or bisexual identity on preventive health behaviors. PMID:17255056

Wells, Brooke E; Bimbi, David S; Tider, Diane; Van Ora, Jason; Parsons, Jeffrey T

2006-01-01

368

NASA Human Research Program Behavioral Health and Performance Element (BHP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of NASA BHP is to identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration, and return to terrestrial life. The NASA Behavioral Health and Performance Operations Group (BHP Ops) supports astronauts and their families before, during, and after a long-duration mission (LDM) on the ISS. BHP Ops provides ISS crews with services such as preflight training (e.g., psychological factors of LDM, psychological support, cross-cultural); preflight, in-flight, and postflight support services, including counseling for astronauts and their families; and psychological support such as regular care packages and a voice-over IP phone system between crew members and their families to facilitate real-time one-on-one communication.

Whitmire, Sandra; Faulk, Jeremy; Leveton, Lauren

2010-01-01

369

Community Participation in New Mexico's Behavioral Health Care Reform  

PubMed Central

In 2005, New Mexico implemented a unique reform in managed behavioral health services that seeks to ensure delivery of consumer-driven, recovery-oriented care to low-income individuals. Distinguishing features of the reform are the Local Collaboratives (LCs), regionally based community organizations designed by state government to represent behavioral health concerns of New Mexico's diverse cultural populations. We examine community response to the LCs, focusing on two broad sets of themes derived from 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork. The first set—structure and function—encompasses several issues: predominance of provider versus consumer voice; insufficient resources to support internal operations; imposition of state administrative demands; and perceived lack of state response to LC efforts. The second set—participation and collaboration—reveals how problems of information flow and other logistical factors impact involvement in LCs and how the construction of “community” introduced under this initiative exacerbates tensions across localities with varied histories and populations. PMID:19764315

Kano, Miria; Willging, Cathleen E.; Rylko-Bauer, Barbara

2010-01-01

370

Primary Care and Public Health Services Integration in Brazil’s Unified Health System  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We examined associations between transdisciplinary collaboration, evidence-based practice, and primary care and public health services integration in Brazil’s Family Health Strategy. We aimed to identify practices that facilitate service integration and evidence-based practice. Methods. We collected cross-sectional data from community health workers, nurses, and physicians (n?=?262). We used structural equation modeling to assess providers’ service integration and evidence-based practice engagement operationalized as latent factors. Predictors included endorsement of team meetings, access to and consultations with colleagues, familiarity with community, and previous research experience. Results. Providers’ familiarity with community and team meetings positively influenced evidence-based practice engagement and service integration. More experienced providers reported more integration and engagement. Physicians reported less integration than did community health workers. Black providers reported less evidence-based practice engagement than did Pardo (mixed races) providers. After accounting for all variables, evidence-based practice engagement and service integration were moderately correlated. Conclusions. Age and race of providers, transdisciplinary collaboration, and familiarity with the community are significant variables that should inform design and implementation of provider training. Promising practices that facilitate service integration in Brazil may be used in other countries. PMID:22994254

Wall, Melanie; Yu, Gary; Penido, Cláudia; Schmidt, Clecy

2012-01-01

371

Developing Games for Health Behavior Change: Getting Started  

PubMed Central

Abstract Many investigators are considering developing videogames for health (video-G4Hs) but have questions about how to get started. This report provides guidance for investigators considering a G4H as a behavioral intervention procedure from a team of experienced G4H developers. Thirteen commonly asked questions are answered, including defining a G4H, considerations in developing a team, considerations in G4H design, and anticipating unintended consequences. PMID:24443708

Buday, Richard; Thompson, Debbe; Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Lu, Amy Shirong; Baranowski, Janice

2013-01-01

372

Assessing Health-Related Quality of Life in Northern Plains American Indians: Prominence of Physical Activity as a Health Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Associations of behavioral health risks and healthy behaviors with self-reported health-related quality of life measures were investigated in a Northern Plains American Indian sample. Participants were surveyed in person using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. The results showed that regular physical activity was significantly…

Poltavski, Dmitri; Holm, Jeffrey; Vogeltanz-Holm, Nancy; McDonald, Leander

2010-01-01

373

Behavioral Health and Performance Operations During the Space Shuttle Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to the Columbia STS 107 disaster in 2003, the Johnson Space Center s Behavioral Health and Performance Group (BHP) became involved in Space Shuttle Operations on an as needed basis, occasionally acting as a consultant and primarily addressing crew-crew personality conflicts. The BHP group also assisted with astronaut selection at every selection cycle beginning in 1991. Following STS 107, an event that spawned an increased need of behavioral health support to STS crew members and their dependents, BHP services to the Space Shuttle Program were enhanced beginning with the STS 114 Return to Flight mission in 2005. These services included the presence of BHP personnel at STS launches and landings for contingency support, a BHP briefing to the entire STS crew at L-11 months, a private preflight meeting with the STS Commander at L-9 months, and the presence of a BHP consultant at the L-1.5 month Family Support Office briefing to crew and family members. The later development of an annual behavioral health assessment of all active astronauts also augmented BHP s Space Shuttle Program specific services, allowing for private meetings with all STS crew members before and after each mission. The components of each facet of these BHP Space Shuttle Program support services will be presented, along with valuable lessons learned, and with recommendations for BHP involvement in future short duration space missions

Beven, G.; Holland, A.; Moomaw, R.; Sipes, W.; Vander Ark, S.

2011-01-01

374

Relationship of Interpersonal Behaviors and Health-Related Control Appraisals to Patient Satisfaction and Compliance in a University Health Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors' aim was to evaluate patient-provider relationships in a college health center. Participants: Eighty student patients and their health-care providers. Methods: Patients completed a measure of perceived health competence before a consultation and measures of provider participatory behavior and interpersonal behavior before…

Campbell, Thomas A.; Auerbach, Stephen M.; Kiesler, Donald J.

2007-01-01

375

Widowhood, Age Heterogamy, and Health: The Role of Selection, Marital Quality, and Health Behaviors  

PubMed Central

Objective. Although the impact of widowhood on the surviving spouse’s health has been widely documented, there is little empirical research examining whether certain spousal choice decisions and marital sorting patterns predispose individuals to be more vulnerable to the adverse consequences of widowhood for health. Design and Method. We use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study and employ ordinary least squares models to (a) document variations in mental and physical health between married and widowed persons, (b) determine whether widowed persons in age heterogamous unions are especially vulnerable to the adverse consequences of widowhood, and (c) investigate to what extent differential selection, marital quality, and health practices account for health disparities by marital status and the spousal age gap. Results. Widowed persons, especially those in age heterogamous unions, have worse mental health than married persons, but they do not seem to be more disadvantaged in terms of physical health. Differential selection, marital quality, and health behaviors partly account for some of the health disparities by marital status and spousal age gap. Discussion. Our findings suggest that marrying a spouse who is very dissimilar in age may enhance one’s vulnerability to the adverse consequences of widowhood for health. PMID:24128991

2014-01-01

376

STRESS AND HEALTH: Psychological, Behavioral, and Biological Determinants  

PubMed Central

Stressors have a major influence upon mood, our sense of well-being, behavior, and health. Acute stress responses in young, healthy individuals may be adaptive and typically do not impose a health burden. However, if the threat is unremitting, particularly in older or unhealthy individuals, the long-term effects of stressors can damage health. The relationship between psychosocial stressors and disease is affected by the nature, number, and persistence of the stressors as well as by the individual’s biological vulnerability (i.e., genetics, constitutional factors), psychosocial resources, and learned patterns of coping. Psychosocial interventions have proven useful for treating stress-related disorders and may influence the course of chronic diseases. PMID:17716101

Schneiderman, Neil; Ironson, Gail; Siegel, Scott D.

2008-01-01

377

The Youth Form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To develop a youth form of the Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Smart Behaviors Inventory (MB-HSBI--Youth) for use in identifying self-reported motivators of and barriers to the following health-promoting behaviors (called "health-smart" behaviors): eating a healthy breakfast, eating healthy foods and snacks, drinking healthy…

Tucker, Carolyn M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Desmond, Frederic F.; Hou, Wei; Kaye, Lillian B.; Smith, Tasia M.

2012-01-01

378

Self-Regulation, Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Change in Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an overview of self-regulation models: theory of planned behavior, protection motivation theory, health belief model, action control theory, transtheoretical model of behavior change, health action process, and precaution adoption process. Applies models to health behavior change in older adults with cardiovascular disease or diabetes.…

Purdie, Nola; McCrindle, Andrea

2002-01-01

379

Prevalence of Health Behaviors among a University Staff: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assessed the prevalence of health behaviors among non-academic staff at a Midwestern U.S. university. A sample of 627 women and 237 men completed a web survey for the study. Most of the health behaviors showed no sex difference. Health behaviors of drinking, smoking, and irregular breakfast eating were significantly associated with…

Torabi, Mohammad; Thiagarajah, Krisha; Jeng, Ifeng

2010-01-01

380

Designing serious video games for health behavior change: Current status and future directions  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Serious video games for health are designed to entertain while changing a specific health behavior. This article identifies behavioral principles that can guide the development of serious video games focused on changing a variety of health behaviors, including those attempting to decrease risk of o...

381

Sexual Victimization and Health-Risk Behaviors: A Prospective Analysis of College Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study utilizes the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey to examine the relationship between health-risk behaviors and sexual victimization among a sample of college women. A prospective design is utilized to examine the relationship between health-risk behaviors as measured at baseline and sexual victimization during a 3-month…

Gidycz, Christine A.; Orchowski, Lindsay M.; King, Carrie R.; Rich, Cindy L.

2008-01-01

382

Open Rank Faculty Positions in Health Behaviors in the Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine  

E-print Network

Open Rank Faculty Positions in Health Behaviors in the Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University Faculty Positions (Rank Open). The Center for Behavior access barriers, reduce costs, and extend the reach of behavior change interventions into the broader

Chisholm, Rex L.

383

Available Supports and Coping Behaviors of Mental Health Social Workers Following Fatal and Nonfatal Client Suicidal Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research indicates that mental health social workers risk being confronted with fatal and nonfatal client suicidal behaviors during professional practice. Although reactions to client suicidal behavior have been documented, there is little empirical evidence about coping behaviors and available supports following client suicidal behavior. This…

Ting, Laura; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sanders, Sara

2008-01-01

384

The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior  

E-print Network

The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior: Presentations and discussions at the two-day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior for High employer. #12;2013 CERC-BEE Forum on Human Behavior and Integrated Design for High Performance Buildings

385

Web-Enabling an Integrated Health Information System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Potential users of Health Information Systems include General Practioners, Pharmacists, Hospital Staff, Community Nurses and patients. Ideally an infrastructure for such a system will support the integration of data and processing as well as a diverse range of user interface technologies and devices. We describe a prototype system that uses a range of current Java-based object-oriented technologies to achieve this,

A. Petrovski; John C. Grundy

2001-01-01

386

Beyond expectancy theory: an integrative motivational model from health care.  

PubMed

Expectancy theory has been criticized for its omission of normative, habitual, and other motivational elements. This paper describes the sources and features of an integrative motivational model from the field of preventive health care that combines expectancy/valence factors with habitual, normative, and conative motivational elements. The model is viewed as having implications for work motivation as well. PMID:10255417

Walker, L R; Thomas, K W

1982-04-01

387

[Solutions for the better integration of public health ethical considerations].  

PubMed

Public Health Ethics (PHE) has grown significantly during the past decade. Despite PHE’s relevance, its integration into public health practices, resources, activities and knowledge is lacking. In our view, this lack of integration can be understood as a problem of knowledge transfer (KT). In this article, we briefly describe existing knowledge integration methods and their limitations for PHE. We then explore the KT literature to underline how recent research in this area presents possible solutions to the problem before us. The proposed solutions stress the importance, first, of adapting knowledge and tools to the needs of users and the context of their practice, and, second, of recognizing the personal, continual nature of interactions between actors. We conclude that it would be beneficial to public health organizations to count on the presence and expertise of PHE knowledge brokers in order to build, in partnership with knowledge users, tools that will allow them to achieve PHE integration in public health practices, resources, activities and knowledge. PMID:24886851

Désy, Michel; Hughes, David; Filiatrault, France

2014-01-01

388

Integrating health impact assessment into the triple bottom line concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

This theoretical study explores the links between the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) concept and the principles of HIA and considers the potential role of HIA to provide a mechanism for integrating health concerns within a broader agenda of government and business. TBL is a framework linked to the broader sustainability agenda that underpins and reviews environmental, economic and social performance

Mary Mahoney; Jenny-Lynn Potter

2004-01-01

389

Preference for immediate reinforcement over delayed reinforcement: relation between delay discounting and health behavior.  

PubMed

Reinforcement from engaging in health behaviors is often delayed by several months or years, a circumstance partly responsible for some people's increased preference for engaging in unhealthy behaviors associated with immediate reinforcement. To examine whether individuals who discount the future engage in fewer health behaviors, 72 young adults completed questionnaires assessing health behaviors and impulsiveness and laboratory-behavioral measures of impulsive decision making. Regression analyses of impulsivity measures predicting health behavior were only significant for one measure, the Experiential Discounting Task, a task in which monetary consequences of choice were actually experienced by study participants. Participants who discounted most by delay (i.e., exhibited impulsive choice) engaged in fewer health behaviors than those who showed less impulsive responding. This task, in contrast to a hypothetical choice task or self-reported impulsiveness, measures the actual behavior of discounting by delay, and was the facet of impulsive decision making most closely associated with adopting a range of health behaviors. PMID:22311103

Melanko, Shane; Larkin, Kevin T

2013-02-01

390

Health Promoting Behaviors of Older Americans versus Young and Middle Aged Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health promoting behaviors have become increasingly important as Americans attempt to retain their youth and health. This study collected self-reported data from 559 participants in the Southwest United States using the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II to compare the health promoting behaviors of older adults (60-92 years), middle-aged adults…

Becker, Craig; Arnold, William

2004-01-01

391

Health Promoting Behaviors of Older Americans Versus Young and Middle Aged Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health promoting behaviors have become increasingly important as Americans attempt to retain their youth and health. This study collected self-reported data from 559 participants in the Southwest United States using the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile II to compare the health promoting behaviors of older adults (60-92 years), middle-aged adults…

Becker, Craig M.; Arnold, William

2004-01-01

392

Asymptotic behavior of Heun function and its integral formalism  

E-print Network

The Heun function generalizes all well-known special functions such as Spheroidal Wave, Lame, Mathieu, and hypergeometric functions. Heun functions are applicable to diverse areas such as theory of black holes, lattice systems in statistical mechanics, solution of the Schrodinger equation of quantum mechanics, and addition of three quantum spins. In this paper, applying three term recurrence formula, I consider asymptotic behaviors of Heun function and its integral formalism including all higher terms of A_n's. I will show how the power series expansion of Heun functions can be converted to closed-form integrals for all cases of infinite series and polynomial. One interesting observation resulting from the calculations is the fact that a Gauss hypergeometric function recurs in each of sub-integral forms: the first sub-integral form contains zero term of A_n's, the second one contains one term of A_n's, the third one contains two terms of A_n's, etc. In the appendix, I apply the power series expansion and my integral formalism of Heun function to "The 192 solutions of the Heun equation." Due to space restriction final equations for all 192 Heun functions is not included in the paper, but feel free to contact me for the final solutions. Section 5 contains two additional examples using integral forms of Huen function. This paper is 4th out of 10 in series "Special functions and three term recurrence formula (3TRF)". See section 5 for all the papers in the series. The previous paper in series deals with the power series expansion in closed forms of Heun function. The next paper in the series describes analytically the power series expansion of Mathieu function and its integral formalism.

Yoon Seok Choun

2014-11-04

393

Adolescence, sexual behavior and risk factors to health  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze the relationships between sexual behavior and risk factors to physical and mental health in adolescents. METHODS Study of 3,195 pupils aged 15 to 19 in secondary education, in public and private schools in 10 state capitals in Brazil between 2007 and 2008. Multi-stage (schools and pupils) cluster sampling was used in each city and public and private educational network. All of the students selected completed a questionnaire on the following items: socioeconomic and demographic data; sexual behavior; having sex with those of the same sex, the opposite sex, or both; alcohol and cannabis use; using condoms; traumatic sexual experiences as a child or adolescent; suicidal thoughts. The analysis included describing frequencies, Chi-square test, analysis of multiple and cluster correspondence. Responses to an open ended question in which the adolescent expressed general comments about themselves and their lives were qualitatively analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS Around 3.0% of adolescents reported homosexual or bisexual behavior, with no difference according to sex, age, skin color, social status family structure or educational network. Adolescents with homosexual/bisexual sexual behavior, compared to their heterosexual peers, reported: (p < 0.05): getting drunk (18.7% and 10.5%, respectively), frequent cannabis use (6.1% and 2.1%, respectively), suicidal thoughts (42.5% and 18.7%, respectively), and having been the victim of sexual violence (11.7% and 1.5%; respectively). Adolescents with homosexual/bisexual sexual behavior reported that they used condoms less frequently (74.2%) than their heterosexual peers (48.6%, p < 0.001). In the correspondence analysis, three groups were found, one composed of adolescents with homosexual/bisexual behavior and experiencing risk factors; suffering sexual violence, never using a condom, suicidal thoughts, frequent cannabis use; another composed of occasional cannabis and condom users, who got drunk frequently, and adolescents with heterosexual behavior and none of the risk factors investigated. More of the risk factors were found in adolescents with homosexual/bisexual behavior compared with those with heterosexual behavior. Adolescents with homosexual/bisexual sexual behavior were more likely to talk about their positive personal experiences and negative relationship experiences that their heterosexual peers, but spoke less about religion. CONCLUSIONS Not only should this issue be studied in more detail, but preventative actions aimed at adolescents with homosexual/bisexual behavior should be widened. PMID:24789636

de Assis, Simone Gonçalves; Gomes, Romeu; Pires, Thiago de Oliveira

2014-01-01

394

Health Psychology Exam 1 Learning Objectives 1) Define health psychology and behavioral medicine. What are the four areas of focus  

E-print Network

Health Psychology Exam 1 Learning Objectives 1. Chapter 1 1) Define health psychology and behavioral medicine. What are the four areas of focus in Health Psychology? 2) Describe how philosophical) Explain what factors contributed to the rise of health psychology. Include discussion of changing patterns

Meagher, Mary

395

Does More Schooling Improve Health Outcomes and Health Related Behaviors? Evidence from U.K. Twins  

PubMed Central

Several recent studies using instrumental variables based on changes in compulsory schoolleaving age laws have estimated the causal effect of schooling on health outcomes and health-related behaviors in the U.K. Despite using the same identification strategy and similar datasets, no consensus has been reached. We contribute to the literature by providing results for the U.K. using a different research design and a different dataset. Specifically, we estimate the effect of schooling on health outcomes (obesity and physical health) and health-related behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption and exercise) for women through within-MZ twins estimates using the TwinsUK database. For physical health, alcohol consumption and exercise, the within-MZ twins estimates are uninformative about whether there is a causal effect. However, we find (1) that the significant association between schooling and smoking status is due to unobserved endowments that are correlated with schooling and smoking (2) there is some indication that more schooling reduces the body mass index for women, even once these unobserved endowments have been controlled for. PMID:24415826

Amin, Vikesh; Behrman, Jere R.; Spector, Tim D.

2013-01-01

396

Influencing factors on health promoting behavior among the elderly living in the community  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Health promotion behavior is one of the main criteria for determining health that is recognized as the basic factor in catching numerous diseases. Observing such behaviors by the elderly prevents affliction to various diseases and has potential effect in promoting health and increasing the elderly quality of life. This research was done for the aim of determining effective factors on health promotion behaviors and health status in the elderly of the Dena province. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty elderly of over 65 years of age were selected randomly to do this descriptive-analytical study (cross-sectional type). The questionnaire regarding health promoting lifestyle profile 2 (HPLP2) was used for measuring the rate of health promotion behaviors. The data was collected by personal interviews and face to face method for completing the relevant questionnaire and was analyzed by SPSS software version 20 and also proper tests. Results: The average score of the elderly health promotion behaviors in the Dena province (143.8) indicated the acceptable level of performing health promoting behaviors in this group, such that 85% of the elderly had intermediate health promoting behaviors and 15% had proper behaviors. Also, the results showed that the average score of the physical activity and nutrition sub-measuring conditions was lower than the average score of other sub measures of prevention had the highest average. Moreover, comparison of the correlation of health promotion behaviors with the sub-measures showed that apart from the healthy nutrition sub-measure, all the other sub-measures have significant correlation with health promotion behaviors. Conclusion: From the findings of this study, the authors recommend health providers to promote elderly health promotion behaviors in all communities by identifying health promotion behaviors in other parts of the country, and also designing suitable intervention programs based on effective factors on health promotion behaviors of the elderly people. PMID:25013833

Harooni, Javad; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Mostafavi, Firoozeh

2014-01-01

397

Approaches to integrated monitoring for environmental health impact assessment  

PubMed Central

Although Integrated Environmental Health Monitoring (IEHM) is considered an essential tool to better understand complex environmental health issues, there is no consensus on how to develop such a programme. We reviewed four existing frameworks and eight monitoring programmes in the area of environmental health. We identified the DPSEEA (Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action) framework as most suitable for developing an IEHM programme for environmental health impact assessment. Our review showed that most of the existing monitoring programmes have been designed for specific purposes, resulting in narrow scope and limited number of parameters. This therefore limits their relevance for studying complex environmental health topics. Other challenges include limited spatial and temporal data availability, limited development of data sharing mechanisms, heterogeneous data quality, a lack of adequate methodologies to link disparate data sources, and low level of interdisciplinary cooperation. To overcome some of these challenges, we propose a DPSEEA-based conceptual framework for an IEHM programme that would enable monitoring and measuring the impact of environmental changes on human health. We define IEHM as ‘a systemic process to measure, analyse and interpret the state and changes of natural-eco-anthropogenic systems and its related health impact over time at the same location with causative explanations across the various compartments of the cause-effect chain’. We develop a structural work process to integrate information that is based on existing environmental health monitoring programmes. Such a framework allows the development of combined monitoring systems that exhibit a large degree of compatibility between countries and regions. PMID:23171406

2012-01-01

398

Conditional Economic Incentives for Reducing HIV Risk Behaviors: Integration of Psychology and Behavioral Economics  

PubMed Central

Objective This paper reviews psychology and behavioral economic approaches to HIV prevention, and examines the integration and application of these approaches in conditional economic incentive (CEI) programs for reducing HIV risk behavior. Methods We discuss the history of HIV prevention approaches, highlighting the important insights and limitations of psychological theories. We provide an overview of the theoretical tenets of behavioral economics that are relevant to HIV prevention, and utilize CEIs as an illustrative example of how traditional psychological theories end behavioral economics can be combined into new approaches for HIV prevention. Results Behavioral economic interventions can complement psychological frameworks for reducing HIV risk by introducing unique theoretical understandings about the conditions under which risky decisions are amenable to intervention. Findings from illustrative CEI programs show mixed but generally promising effects of economic interventions on HIV and STI prevalence, HIV testing, HIV medication adherence, and drug use. Conclusion CEI programs can complement psychological interventions for HIV prevention and behavioral risk reduction. To maximize program effectiveness, CEI programs must be designed according to contextual and population-specific factors that may determine intervention applicability and success. PMID:24001243

Operario, Don; Kuo, Caroline C.; Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G.; Gálarraga, Omar

2014-01-01

399

Organisational Culture Matters for System Integration in Health Care  

PubMed Central

This paper illustrates the importance of organisational culture for Clinical Information Systems (CIS) integration. The study is based on data collected in intensive care units in the UK and Denmark. Data were collected using qualitative methods, i.e., observations, interviews and shadowing of health care providers, together with a questionnaire at each site. The data are analysed to extract salient variables for CIS integration, and it is shown that these variables can be separated into two categories that describe the ‘Actual Usefulness’ of the system and the ‘Organisational Culture’. This model is then extended to show that CIS integration directly affects the work processes of the organisation, forming an iterative process of change as a CIS is introduced and integrated. PMID:14728220

Munir, Samina K.; Kay, Stephen

2003-01-01

400

Cost and quality impact of Intermountain's mental health integration program.  

PubMed

Most patients with mental health (MH) conditions, such as depression, receive care for their conditions from a primary care physician (PCP) in their health/medical home. Providing MH care, however, presents many challenges for the PCP, including (1) the difficulty of getting needed consultation from an MH specialist; (2) the time constraints of a busy PCP practice; (3) the complicated nature of recognizing depression, which may be described with only somatic complaints; (4) the barriers to reimbursement and compensation; and (5) associated medical and social comorbidities. Practice managers, emergency departments, and health plans are stretched to provide care for complex patients with unmet MH needs. At the same time, payment reform linked to accountable care organizations and/or episodic bundle payments, MH parity rules, and increasing MH costs to large employers and payers all highlight the critical need to identify high-quality, efficient, integrated MH care delivery practices. Over the past ten years, Intermountain Healthcare has developed a team-based approach-known as mental health integration (MHI)-for caring for these patients and their families. The team includes the PCPs and their staff, and they, in turn, are integrated with MH professionals, community resources, care management, and the patient and his or her family. The integration model goes far beyond co-location in its team-based approach; it is operationalized at the clinic, thereby improving both physician and staff satisfaction. Patients treated in MHI clinics also show improved satisfaction, lower costs, and better quality outcomes. The MHI program is financially sustainable in routinized clinics without subsidies. MHI is a successful approach to improving care for patients with MH conditions in primary care health homes. PMID:20402366

Reiss-Brennan, Brenda; Briot, Pascal C; Savitz, Lucy A; Cannon, Wayne; Staheli, Russ

2010-01-01

401

Health Systems Integration of Sexual and Reproductive Health and HIV Services in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Scoping Study  

PubMed Central

Objective: Both sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services and HIV programs in sub-Saharan Africa are typically delivered vertically, operating parallel to national health systems. The objective of this study was to map the evidence on national and international strategies for integration of SRH and HIV services in sub-Saharan Africa and to develop a research agenda for future health systems integration. Methods: We examined the literature on national and international strategies to integrate SRH and HIV services using a scoping study methodology. Current policy frameworks, national HIV strategies and research, and gray literature on integration were mapped. Five countries in sub-Saharan Africa with experience of integrating SRH and HIV services were purposively sampled for detailed thematic analysis, according to the health systems functions of governance, policy and planning, financing, health workforce organization, service organization, and monitoring and evaluation. Results: The major international health policies and donor guidance now support integration. Most integration research has focused on linkages of SRH and HIV front-line services. Yet, the common problems with implementation are related to delayed or incomplete integration of higher level health systems functions: lack of coordinated leadership and unified national integration policies; separate financing streams for SRH and HIV services and inadequate health worker training, supervision and retention. Conclusions: Rigorous health systems research on the integration of SRH and HIV services is urgently needed. Priority research areas include integration impact, performance, and economic evaluation to inform the planning, financing, and coordination of integrated service delivery. PMID:25436826

Kendall, Tamil; Langer, Ana; Bärnighausen, Till

2014-01-01

402

Teachable moments for health behavior change: a concept analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective “Teachable moments” have been proposed as events or circumstances which can lead individuals to positive behavior change. However, the essential elements of teachable moments have not been elucidated. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive review of the literature to uncover common definitions and key elements of this phenomenon. Methods Using databases spanning social science and medical disciplines, all records containing the search term “teachable moment*” were collected. Identified literature was then systematically reviewed and patterns were derived. Results Across disciplines, ‘teachable moment’ has been poorly developed both conceptually and operationally. Usage of the term falls into three categories: 1) “teachable moment” is synonymous with “opportunity” (81%); 2) a context that leads to a higher than expected behavior change is retrospectively labeled a ‘teachable moment’ (17%); 3) a phenomenon that involves a cueing event that prompts specific cognitive and emotional responses (2%). Conclusion The findings suggest that the teachable moment is not necessarily unpredictable or simply a convergence of situational factors that prompt behavior change but suggest the possible creation of a teachable moment through clinician-patient interaction. Practice Implications Clinician-patient interaction may be central to the creation of teachable moments for health behavior change. PMID:19110395

Lawson, Peter J.; Flocke, Susan A.

2009-01-01

403

Religion and selected health behaviors among Latinos in Texas.  

PubMed

Though research has shown that religion provides a protective influence with respect to a number of health-related outcomes, little work has examined its influence on patterns of alcohol (especially binge drinking) and tobacco consumption among Latinos in Texas. Thus, we used a probability sample of Texas adults to test this relationship via logistic regression. Our results revealed that clear distinctions emerge on the basis of both denomination and frequency of attendance. Specifically, Protestants who regularly attend religious services are significantly more likely to be abstainers and to have never smoked, while those with no religious affiliation exhibit relatively unfavorable risk profiles. These findings persist despite a range of socio-demographic controls. Our study supports the assertion that religion may serve as an important protective influence on risky health behaviors. PMID:22911394

Garcia, Ginny; Ellison, Christopher G; Sunil, Thankam S; Hill, Terrence D

2013-03-01

404

Comparing Two Service Delivery Models for Homeless Individuals With Complex Behavioral Health Needs: Preliminary Data From Two SAMHSA Treatment for Homeless Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) and the Comprehensive, Continuous, Integrated System of Care (CCISC) are two models for delivering services to homeless persons with complex behavioral health needs. This quasi-experimental study presents preliminary data comparing these two programs. The first program was based out of a community mental health center and utilized the ACT model of care with supported housing (ACT-SH),

M. Scott Young; Colleen Clark; Kathleen Moore; Blake Barrett

2009-01-01

405

Integrating timing and conditioning approaches to study behavior.  

PubMed

Skinner and Pavlov had innovative ways to measure both the times of their subject's responses, as well as the rate of their responses. Since then, different subfields within the study of animal behavior have prioritized either the rate or timing of responses, creating a divide in data and theory. Both timing and conditioning fields have proven fruitful, producing large bodies of empirical data and developing sophisticated models. Despite their individual successes, a unified view of simple behavior is still lacking. This may be caused, at least in part, by the differential emphasis on data collection and analysis techniques. The result is that these subfields produce models that fit their data well, but fail to translate to the other domain. This is startling given the fact that both subfields use nearly identical experimental procedures. To highlight similarities within the subfields, and provide empirical data in support of this integration, 18 Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on trace, delay, and backward conditioning procedures. Using these empirical data we discuss how traditional summary measures used by these subfields can be limiting, and suggest methods that may aid in the integration of these subfields toward common goals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25546101

Kalafut, Kathryn L; Freestone, David M; MacInnis, Mika L M; Church, Russell M

2014-10-01

406

Health-Seeking Behaviors of Elderly Chinese Americans: Shifts in Expectations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study reported a qualitative analysis of health-seeking behaviors of community-dwelling elderly Chinese Americans on the influences of family network, cultural values, and immigrant experience in their use of health resources. Barriers to health care, pathway of health care, and adaptation of health care by use of self-treatment and…

Pang, Elaine C.; Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice; Silverstein, Merril; Cody, Michael

2003-01-01

407

Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study investigates the comparative effects of sensory-integration therapy and behavioral interventions on rates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in a 9-year-old boy with diagnosis of autism. A functional analysis was conducted to identify the variables maintaining the self-injurious behavior. This analysis demonstrated that SIB was…

Devlin, Sarah; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive

2009-01-01

408

"Integrative Health and Complementary Medicine: The Evidence, The Experience, The Application"  

E-print Network

"Integrative Health and Complementary Medicine: The Evidence, The Experience, social workers, naturopaths, nutritionists, acupuncturists, life coaches, physical therapists, educators for this discount. Deadline: September 1st #12; "Integrative Health and Complementary Medicine

Provancher, William

409

Grant Title: TRANSLATING BASIC BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DISCOVERIES INTO INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE HEALTH-RELATED BEHAVIORS (R01)  

E-print Network

Grant Title: TRANSLATING BASIC BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE DISCOVERIES INTO INTERVENTIONS of Research: Support interdisciplinary teams of basic and applied biological, behavioral and/or social science discoveries in basic behavioral and/or social science research by developing and refining novel health

Farritor, Shane

410

Primary Sources of Health Information: Comparisons in the Domain of Health Attitudes, Health Cognitions, and Health Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent growth in consumer autonomy in health care accompanied by the surge in the use of new media for health information gathering has led to an increasing schol- arly interest in understanding the consumer health information search construct. This article explores consumer health information seeking in the realm of the primary sources of health information used by consumers. Based

Mohan J. Dutta-Bergman

2004-01-01

411

Going Digital: Building eHealth and mHealth Interventions Society of Behavioral Medicine Conference 2012  

E-print Network

Going Digital: Building eHealth and mHealth Interventions Society of Behavioral Medicine Conference acceptance: The role of user types and e-learning technology types. Computers in Human Behavior. 2011; 27 development: a brief history. IEEE Computer 2003;36:47­56. Borycki EM, Househ M, Kushniruk AW, Kuziemsky C

Chisholm, Rex L.

412

[Juvenile obesity with a focus on health promotion: integrative review].  

PubMed

This integrative review summarizes nursing researches that contribute to study juvenile obesity with a focus on health promotion. 20 articles were identified in a bibliographical survey that followed the criteria: date, language, and the descriptors: nursing, adolescent, obesity and health promotion. The Pediatric Nursing Journal published seven of these papers (35%). Indexed papers were published in the last ten years in Portuguese and English. Results showed the construction of scientific knowledge in nursing that developed health promotion strategies in cases of juvenile obesity, thus contributing to the development of the profession. Showing the cumulative risk that juvenile obesity presents of turning subjects into obese adults is a precious resource to plan nursing actions for this population, and for these actions to achieve effective results. PMID:21988003

Luna, Izaildo Tavares; Moreira, Rosa Aparecida Nogueira; da Silva, Kelanne Lima; Caetano, Joselany Afio; Pinheiro, Patrícia Neyva da Costa; Rebouças, Cristiana Brasil de Almeida

2011-06-01

413

An integrative behavioral model of information security policy compliance.  

PubMed

The authors found the behavioral factors that influence the organization members' compliance with the information security policy in organizations on the basis of neutralization theory, Theory of planned behavior, and protection motivation theory. Depending on the theory of planned behavior, members' attitudes towards compliance, as well as normative belief and self-efficacy, were believed to determine the intention to comply with the information security policy. Neutralization theory, a prominent theory in criminology, could be expected to provide the explanation for information system security policy violations. Based on the protection motivation theory, it was inferred that the expected efficacy could have an impact on intentions of compliance. By the above logical reasoning, the integrative behavioral model and eight hypotheses could be derived. Data were collected by conducting a survey; 194 out of 207 questionnaires were available. The test of the causal model was conducted by PLS. The reliability, validity, and model fit were found to be statistically significant. The results of the hypotheses tests showed that seven of the eight hypotheses were acceptable. The theoretical implications of this study are as follows: (1) the study is expected to play a role of the baseline for future research about organization members' compliance with the information security policy, (2) the study attempted an interdisciplinary approach by combining psychology and information system security research, and (3) the study suggested concrete operational definitions of influencing factors for information security policy compliance through a comprehensive theoretical review. Also, the study has some practical implications. First, it can provide the guideline to support the successful execution of the strategic establishment for the implement of information system security policies in organizations. Second, it proves that the need of education and training programs suppressing members' neutralization intention to violate information security policy should be emphasized. PMID:24971373

Kim, Sang Hoon; Yang, Kyung Hoon; Park, Sunyoung

2014-01-01

414

Gender, health behavior, and intimate relationships: lesbian, gay, and straight contexts.  

PubMed

Many studies focus on health behavior within the context of intimate ties. However, this literature is limited by reliance on gender socialization theory and a focus on straight (i.e., heterosexual) marriage. We extend this work with an analysis of relationship dynamics around health behavior in 20 long-term straight marriages as well as 15 gay and 15 lesbian long-term cohabiting partnerships in the United States (N = 100 individual in-depth interviews). We develop the concept of "health behavior work" to align activities done to promote health behavior with theories on unpaid work in the home. Respondents in all couple types describe specialized health behavior work, wherein one partner works to shape the other partner's health behavior. In straight couples, women perform the bulk of specialized health behavior work. Most gay and lesbian respondents-but few straight respondents--also describe cooperative health behavior work, wherein partners mutually influence one another's health behaviors. Findings suggest that the gendered relational context of an intimate partnership shapes the dynamics of and explanations for health behavior work. PMID:22227238

Reczek, Corinne; Umberson, Debra

2012-06-01

415

Development of a New Approach to the Measurement of Integrative Teacher Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of a new approach to the analysis of teacher behavior on the dominative-integrative dimension is proposed. The major characteristics of integrative behavior are flexibility of response and acceptance of individual differences, while dominative behavior is characterized by rigidity. The approach consists of a combination of direct…

Kennedy, Emily R.; Ely, Margot

416

An Integrated Model of Waste Management BehaviorA Test of Household Recycling and Composting Intentions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the antecedents of recycling and composting intentions in the context of an integrated waste management behavior model. This model incorporates a wide variety of important factors from previous research on environmental behavior. The theory of planned behavior provides a theoretical framework to integrate these factors. The model was tested using both recycling and composting data from a

Shirley Taylor; Peter Todd

1995-01-01

417

[Primary Health Care in the coordination of health care networks: an integrative review].  

PubMed

Health systems organized in health care networks and coordinated by Primary Health Care can contribute to an improvement in clinical quality with a positive impact on health outcomes and user satisfaction (by improving access and resolubility) and a reduction in the costs of local health systems. Thus, the scope of this paper is to analyze the scientific output about the evidence, potential, challenges and prospects of Primary Health Care in the coordination of Health Care Networks. To achieve this, the integrative review method was selected covering the period between 2000 and 2011. The databases selected were Medline (Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System online), Lilacs (Latin American Literature in Health Sciences) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). Eighteen articles fulfilled the selection criteria. It was seen that the potential impacts of primary care services supersede the inherent weaknesses. However, the results revealed the need for research with a higher level of classification of the scientific evidence about the role of Primary Healh Care in the coordination of Health Care Networks. PMID:24863811

Rodrigues, Ludmila Barbosa Bandeira; Silva, Patricia Costa Dos Santos; Peruhype, Rarianne Carvalho; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

2014-02-01

418

Integrating mental health into public health: The community mental health development project in India  

PubMed Central

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and its public health institutes are collaborating with Asia Australia Mental Health on an innovative community mental health development project designed to enhance initiatives under the District Mental Health Program and increase accessibility of essential community mental health services. The project is an exciting opportunity to create positive change in meeting the challenges of community mental health care in India. It recognizes that no one single model of care can be applied to all the community in the country and that locally appropriate models working in close partnership with local communities is required. Targeted and skill-based training programs are useful to build local leadership capacity in implementing quality and culturally appropriate community mental health services. PMID:25316931

Ng, Chee; Chauhan, Ajay P.; Chavan, Bir Singh; Ramasubramanian, Chellamuthu; Singh, Amool R.; Sagar, Rajesh; Fraser, Julia; Ryan, Brigid; Prasad, Jagdish; Singh, Sujeet; Das, Jayanta; Isaac, Mohan

2014-01-01

419

Serious video games for health: How behavioral science guided the development of a serious video game  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Serious video games for health are designed to entertain players while attempting to modify some aspect of their health behavior. Behavior is a complex process influenced by multiple factors, often making it difficult to change. Behavioral science provides insight into factors that influence specifi...

420

The Dynamics of Health Behavior Sentiments on a Large Online Social Network  

E-print Network

The Dynamics of Health Behavior Sentiments on a Large Online Social Network Marcel Salathé* 1 behaviors affecting health outcomes are increasingly modulated by social networks, for example through on the dynamics of behavioral spread on social networks are strongly content-dependent. Keywords: Social media

Salathé, Marcel

421

High-Risk Health and Credit Behavior among 18- to 25-Year-Old College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of students accumulating credit card debt--and the amount of debt itself--on college campuses is increasing. If high-risk credit and health behavior are associated, health behavior interventions might apply to high-risk credit behavior. Objective: The authors' purpose was to examine these possible associations. Participants and Methods:…

Adams, Troy; Moore, Monique

2007-01-01

422

Preventive health behavior among black and white women in urban and rural areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship of race to preventive health behavior among women is examined using data from the 1985 National Health Interview Survey. We find that black women are less likely to engage in primary prevention behaviors such as exercising, non-smoking and maintaining a favorable weight. However, black women are more likely to engage in secondary prevention behaviors such as receiving a

Sonia I. Duelberg

1992-01-01

423

Technology Integration Performance Assessment Using Lean Principles in Health Care.  

PubMed

This study assesses the impact of an automated infusion system (AIS) integration at a positron emission tomography (PET) center based on "lean thinking" principles. The authors propose a systematic measurement system that evaluates improvement in terms of the "8 wastes." This adaptation to the health care context consisted of performance measurement before and after integration of AIS in terms of time, utilization of resources, amount of materials wasted/saved, system variability, distances traveled, and worker strain. The authors' observations indicate that AIS stands to be very effective in a busy PET department, such as the one in Moffitt Cancer Center, owing to its accuracy, pace, and reliability, especially after the necessary adjustments are made to reduce or eliminate the source of errors. This integration must be accompanied by a process reengineering exercise to realize the full potential of AIS in reducing waste and improving patient care and worker satisfaction. PMID:24878516

Rico, Florentino; Yalcin, Ali; Eikman, Edward A

2014-05-30

424

A Comprehensive Profile of Health Risk Behaviors Among Students at a Small Canadian University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite recent attention to health promotion and illness prevention, young people continue to engage in a variety of risk behaviors, which may negatively influence current and future health status. The purpose of this study was to create a comprehensive profile of health risk behaviors among undergraduate students at the University of Prince…

Taylor, Jennifer P.; McCarthy, Mary Jean; Herbert, Rosemary J.; Smith, Philip B.

2009-01-01

425

The Authoritative Parenting Index: Predicting Health Risk Behaviors Among Children and Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public health research demonstrates increasing interest in mobilizing parental influence to prevent health risk behaviors among children and adolescents. This research focuses on authoritative parenting, which previous studies suggest can prevent health risk behaviors among youth. To evaluate the reliability and validity of a new survey measure of authoritative parenting, data from studies of (1) substance use in a sample

Christine Jackson; Lisa Henriksen; Vangie A. Foshee

1998-01-01

426

A Systematic Review of Oral Health Behavior Research in American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite improvements in prevention, oral diseases are a problem among adolescents, linked to poor health outcomes and poor school performance. Little is known about adolescent oral health behavior. This systematic review describes factors that influence oral health behavior in adolescents. Inclusion criteria for the literature search were American…

Calderon, Susana J.; Mallory, Caroline

2014-01-01

427

Adolescent Health-Risk Sexual Behaviors: Effects of a Drug Abuse Intervention  

PubMed Central

Adolescents who abuse substances are more likely to engage in health-risking sexual behavior (HRSB) and are at particularly high risk for HIV/AIDS. Thus, substance abuse treatment presents a prime opportunity to target HIV-risk behaviors. The present study evaluated a one-session HIV-risk intervention embedded in a controlled clinical trial for drug-abusing adolescents. The trial was conducted in New Mexico and Oregon with Hispanic and Anglo adolescents. Youths were randomly assigned to individual cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or to an integrated behavioral and family therapy (IBFT) condition, involving individual and family sessions. The HIV-specific intervention was not associated with change. IBFT and CBT were both efficacious in reducing HIV-risk behaviors from intake to the 18-month follow-up for high-risk adolescents. For low-risk adolescents, CBT (versus IBFT) was more efficacious in suppressing HRSB. These data suggest that drug abuse treatments can have both preventative and intervention effects for adolescents, depending on their relative HIV-risk. PMID:21833690

Ozechowski, Timothy J.; Waldron, Holly B.; Davis, Betsy; Turner, Charles W.; Brody, Janet L.; Barrera, Manuel

2011-01-01

428

The Relationship between Radon Knowledge, Concern and Behavior, and Health Values, Health Locus of Control and Preventive Health Behaviors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey returned by 300 homeowners (50 percent) in a community at risk for high home radon concentrations found that, although 64 percent were concerned, only 7 percent tested their homes. Findings indicate the need for more education about radon and its health effects. (JOW)

Kennedy, Cassondra Jeanne

1991-01-01

429

Lifestyle Behaviors and Self-Rated Health: The Living for Health Program  

PubMed Central

Background. Lack of adherence to dietary and physical activity guidelines has been linked to an increase in chronic diseases in the United States (US). The aim of this study was to assess the association of lifestyle behaviors with self-rated health (SRH). Methods. This cross-sectional study used self-reported data from Living for Health Program (N = 1,701) which was conducted from 2008 to 2012 in 190 health fair events in South Florida, US. Results. Significantly higher percent of females as compared to males were classified as obese (35.4% versus 27.0%), reported poor/fair SRH (23.4% versus 15.0%), and were less physically active (33.9% versus 25.4%). Adjusted logistic regression models indicated that both females and males were more likely to report poor/fair SRH if they consumed ?2 servings of fruits and vegetables per day (OR = 2.14, 95% CI 1.30–3.54; OR = 2.86, 95% CI 1.12–7.35, resp.) and consumed mostly high fat foods (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.03–2.43; OR = 3.37, 95% CI 1.67–2.43, resp.). The association of SRH with less physical activity was only significant in females (OR = 1.66, 95% CI 1.17–2.35). Conclusion. Gender differences in health behaviors should be considered in designing and monitoring lifestyle interventions to prevent cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25530764

Zarini, Gustavo G.; Vaccaro, Joan A.; Canossa Terris, Maria A.; Exebio, Joel C.; Ajabshir, Sahar; Cheema, Amanpreet; Huffman, Fatma G.

2014-01-01

430

Integrating Social impacts on Health and Health-Care Systems in Systemic Seismic Vulnerability Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a new method for modeling health impacts caused by earthquake damage which allows for integrating key social impacts on individual health and health-care systems and for implementing these impacts in quantitative systemic seismic vulnerability analysis. In current earthquake casualty estimation models, demand on health-care systems is estimated by quantifying the number of fatalities and severity of injuries based on empirical data correlating building damage with casualties. The expected number of injured people (sorted by priorities of emergency treatment) is combined together with post-earthquake reduction of functionality of health-care facilities such as hospitals to estimate the impact on healthcare systems. The aim here is to extend these models by developing a combined engineering and social science approach. Although social vulnerability is recognized as a key component for the consequences of disasters, social vulnerability as such, is seldom linked to common formal and quantitative seismic loss estimates of injured people which provide direct impact on emergency health care services. Yet, there is a consensus that factors which affect vulnerability and post-earthquake health of at-risk populations include demographic characteristics such as age, education, occupation and employment and that these factors can aggravate health impacts further. Similarly, there are different social influences on the performance of health care systems after an earthquake both on an individual as well as on an institutional level. To link social impacts of health and health-care services to a systemic seismic vulnerability analysis, a conceptual model of social impacts of earthquakes on health and the health care systems has been developed. We identified and tested appropriate social indicators for individual health impacts and for health care impacts based on literature research, using available European statistical data. The results will be used to develop a socio-physical model of systemic seismic vulnerability that enhances the further understanding of societal seismic risk by taking into account social vulnerability impacts for health and health-care system, shelter, and transportation.

Kunz-Plapp, T.; Khazai, B.; Daniell, J. E.

2012-04-01

431

IVHM Framework for Intelligent Integration for Vehicle Health Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems for aerospace vehicles, is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, this framework integrates technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear that IIVM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission objectives. These systems include the following: Guidance and Navigation; Communications and Tracking; Vehicle Monitoring; Information Transport and Integration; Vehicle Diagnostics; Vehicle Prognostics; Vehicle Mission Planning, Automated Repair and Replacement; Vehicle Control; Human Computer Interface; and Onboard Verification and Validation. Furthermore, the presented framework provides complete vehicle management which not only allows for increased crew safety and mission success through new intelligence capabilities, but also yields a mechanism for more efficient vehicle operations.

Paris, Deidre; Trevino, Luis C.; Watson, Michael D.

2005-01-01

432

Decision Making for Animal Health and Welfare: Integrating Risk-Benefit Analysis with Prospect Theory  

PubMed Central

This study integrated risk-benefit analysis with prospect theory with the overall objective of identifying the type of management behavior represented by farmers’ choices of mastitis control options (MCOs). Two exploratory factor analyses, based on 163 and 175 Swedish farmers, respectively, highlighted attitudes to MCOs related to: (1) grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent spread of existing infection and (2) working in a precautionary way to prevent mastitis occurring. This was interpreted as being based on (1) reactive management behavior on detection of udder-health problems in individual cows and (2) proactive management behavior to prevent mastitis developing. Farmers’ assessments of these MCOs were found to be based on asymmetrical evaluations of risks and benefits, suggesting that farmers’ management behavior depends on their individual reference point. In particular, attitudes to MCOs related to grouping cows and applying milking order to prevent the spread of mastitis once infected cows were detected were stronger in the risk domain than in the benefit domain, in accordance with loss aversion. In contrast, attitudes to MCOs related to working in a precautionary way to prevent cows from becoming infected in the first place were stronger in the benefit domain than in the risk domain, in accordance with reverse loss aversion. These findings are of practical importance for farmers and agribusiness and in public health protection work to reduce the current extensive use of antibiotics in dairy herds. PMID:24372180

Hansson, Helena; Lagerkvist, Carl Johan

2013-01-01

433

The Impact of Health-Promoting Behaviors on Low-Income Children's Health: A Risk and Resilience Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study's objective was to examine whether five child health-promoting behaviors by caregivers would be associated with caregivers' assessments of their children's health as "excellent," controlling for an array of risk factors for adverse health outcomes. The study used the third and fourth waves of the Illinois Families Study-Child Well-being…

Yoo, Joan; Slack, Kristen S.; Holl, Jane L.

2010-01-01

434

78 FR 10618 - Re-Establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Assistant...Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (hereafter referred to as...Prevention, Health Promotion, and Public Health Council (hereafter referred...

2013-02-14

435

Psychological and Behavioral Health Issues of Long-Duration Space Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It will be the responsibility of the long-duration space flight crew to take the actions necessary to maintain their health and well-being and to cope with medical emergencies without direct assistance from support personnel, including maintaining mental health and managing physiological and psychological changes that may impair decision making and performance. The Behavior and Performance Integrated Product Team at Johnson Space Center, working, within the Space Medicine, Monitoring, and Countermeasures Program, has identified critical questions pertaining to long-duration space crew behavioral health, psychological adaptation, human factors and habitability, and sleep and circadian rhythms. Among the projects addressing these questions are: the development of tools to assess cognitive functions during space missions; the development of a model of psychological adaptation in isolated and confined environments; tools and methods for selecting individuals and teams well-suited for long-duration missions; identification of mission-critical tasks and performance evaluation; and measures of sleep quality and correlation to mission performance.

Eksuzian, Daniel J.

1998-01-01

436

Factors associated with health-seeking behaviors of Native Hawaiian men.  

PubMed

Native Hawaiian men have higher mortality rates and lower life expectancies than Caucasian men in the United States and in Hawai'i. As an initial step in developing targeted cancer awareness interventions for Native Hawaiian men, the Native Hawaiian Cancer Committee (NHCC) of the American Cancer Society Hawai'i Pacific, Inc. conducted focus groups of Native Hawaiian men living in four geographical areas in Hawai'i in 2002-2003. The purpose was to explore attitudes and practices related to health-seeking behaviors among Native Hawaiian men. In all, 54 urban- and rural-dwelling men participated. Many common issues related to access to care, perceptions, attitudes, as well as cultural values were identified. These findings provide opportunities to motivate Hawaiian men to navigate the current healthcare system and facilitate access to healthcare. Integrating cultural strengths and preferences into health-seeking approaches can readily affect behaviors, and with time, improve the health status of Native Hawaiian men. PMID:16281697

Hughes, Claire K

2004-09-01

437

A systematic review of oral health behavior research in american adolescents.  

PubMed

Despite improvements in prevention, oral diseases are a problem among adolescents, linked to poor health outcomes and poor school performance. Little is known about adolescent oral health behavior. This systematic review describes factors that influence oral health behavior in adolescents. Inclusion criteria for the literature search were American children aged 12-19 and research on oral health behavior. Articles (n = 353) were retrieved, eight met the inclusion criteria, and of these, six were descriptive and two were experimental studies. The matrix method, critical appraisal, and content analysis produced themes across the studies. Participants were primarily African Americans and Hispanics of both genders, of lower socioeconomic status, aged 12-19. Findings suggest that ethnicity, race, and gender may influence oral health behavior in adolescents and that interventions have an effect. Research is needed to explore what other factors may influence oral health behavior in adolescents, long-term health outcomes, and school performance. PMID:25063680

Calderon, Susana J; Mallory, Caroline

2014-12-01

438

Intelligent Integrated Health Management for a System of Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An intelligent integrated health management system (IIHMS) incorporates major improvements over prior such systems. The particular IIHMS is implemented for any system defined as a hierarchical distributed network of intelligent elements (HDNIE), comprising primarily: (1) an architecture (Figure 1), (2) intelligent elements, (3) a conceptual framework and taxonomy (Figure 2), and (4) and ontology that defines standards and protocols. Some definitions of terms are prerequisite to a further brief description of this innovation: A system-of-systems (SoS) is an engineering system that comprises multiple subsystems (e.g., a system of multiple possibly interacting flow subsystems that include pumps, valves, tanks, ducts, sensors, and the like); 'Intelligent' is used here in the sense of artificial intelligence. An intelligent element may be physical or virtual, it is network enabled, and it is able to manage data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) focused on determining its condition in the context of the entire SoS; As used here, 'health' signifies the functionality and/or structural integrity of an engineering system, subsystem, or process (leading to determination of the health of components); 'Process' can signify either a physical process in the usual sense of the word or an element into which functionally related sensors are grouped; 'Element' can signify a component (e.g., an actuator, a valve), a process, a controller, an actuator, a subsystem, or a system; The term Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is used to describe a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, prognosis of future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) not just data to control systems for safe and effective operation. A major novel aspect of the present development is the concept of intelligent integration. The purpose of intelligent integration, as defined and implemented in the present IIHMS, is to enable automated analysis of physical phenomena in imitation of human reasoning, including the use of qualitative methods. Intelligent integration is said to occur in a system in which all elements are intelligent and can acquire, maintain, and share knowledge and information. In the HDNIE of the present IIHMS, an SoS is represented as being operationally organized in a hierarchical-distributed format. The elements of the SoS are considered to be intelligent in that they determine their own conditions within an integrated scheme that involves consideration of data, information, knowledge bases, and methods that reside in all elements of the system. The conceptual framework of the HDNIE and the methodologies of implementing it enable the flow of information and knowledge among the elements so as to make possible the determination of the condition of each element. The necessary information and knowledge is made available to each affected element at the desired time, satisfying a need to prevent information overload while providing context-sensitive information at the proper level of detail. Provision of high-quality data is a central goal in designing this or any IIHMS. In pursuit of this goal, functionally related sensors are logically assigned to groups denoted processes. An aggregate of processes is considered to form a system. Alternatively or in addition to what has been said thus far, the HDNIE of this IIHMS can be regarded as consisting of a framework containing object models that encapsulate all elements of the system, their individual and relational knowledge bases, generic methods and procedures based on models of the applicable physics, and communication processes (Figure 2). The framework enables implementation of a paradigm inspired by how expert operators monitor the health of systems with the help of (1) DIaK from various sources, (2) software tools that assist in rapid visualization of the condition of the system, (3) analical software tools that assist in reasoning about the condition, (4) sharing of information via

Smith, Harvey; Schmalzel, John; Figueroa, Fernando

2008-01-01

439

Actively Caring for the EnvironmentAn Integration of Behaviorism and Humanism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Perspectives from behavior-based psychology (behaviorism) and person-based psychology (humanism) are integrated to summarize ways to protect the environment. Community-based interventions are needed to decrease environment-destructive behaviors and to increase environment-protective behaviors. Intervention agents are needed to implement these interventions on a large scale, and this requires people to \\

E. Scott Geller

1995-01-01

440

Methods for Translating Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions for Health-Disparity Communities  

PubMed Central

Populations composed of racial/ethnic minorities, disabled persons, and people with low socioeconomic status have worse health than their counterparts. Implementing evidence-based behavioral interventions (EBIs) to prevent and manage chronic disease and disability in community settings could help ameliorate disparities. Although numerous models of implementation processes are available, they are broad in scope, few offer specific methodological guidance, and few address the special issues in reaching vulnerable populations. Drawing from 2 existing models, we describe 7 methodological phases in the process of translating and implementing EBIs in communities to reach these vulnerable groups: establish infrastructure for translation partnership, identify multiple inputs (information gathering), review and distill information (synthesis), adapt and integrate program components (translation), build general and specific capacity (support system), implement intervention (delivery system), and develop appropriate designs and measures (evaluation). For each phase, we describe specific methodological steps and resources and provide examples from research on racial/ethnic minorities, disabled persons, and those with low socioeconomic status. Our methods focus on how to incorporate adaptations so that programs fit new community contexts, meet the needs of individuals in health-disparity populations, capitalize on scientific evidence, and use and build community assets and resources. A key tenet of our approach is to integrate EBIs with community best practices to the extent possible while building local capacity. We discuss tradeoffs between maintaining fidelity to the EBIs while maximizing fit to the new context. These methods could advance our ability to implement potentially effective interventions to reduce health disparities. PMID:24262025

Santoyo-Olsson, Jasmine; Stewart, Anita L.

2013-01-01

441

Adolescent Peer Crowd Affiliation: Linkages With Health-Risk Behaviors and Close Friendships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine adolescents' peer crowd affiliation and its linkages with health-risk behaviors, their friends' health-risk behaviors, the presence of close friends in the same peer crowd, and adolescents' social acceptance. Methods: We interviewed 250 high school students and identified six categories: popular, jocks, brains, burnouts, nonconformists, or average\\/other. Adolescents also reported on their health-risk behaviors (including use of cigarettes,

Annette M. La Greca; Mitchell J. Prinstein; Michael D. Fetter

2001-01-01

442

The role of private-for-profit managed behavioral health in the public sector.  

PubMed

Managed behavioral health, once largely confined to private sector employees, has been growing rapidly in the public sector. Throughout the country, behavioral health services, particularly for Medicaid enrollees, are coming under the management of private-for-profit firms. The authors discuss these developments, and the controversies that have come about as a result. Several public/private models of managed behavioral health services are identified. PMID:9239942

Feldman, S; Baler, S; Penner, S

1997-05-01

443

Brain-behavior relations in infancy: integrative approaches to examining infant looking behavior and event-related potentials.  

PubMed

This article describes three approaches to conducting integrated research on brain-behavior relations in infancy. These approaches include: conducting an integrative study that tests the same cognitive construct using behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures in separate experiments, measuring behavior and ERPs in different phases of the same experiment, and measuring behavior and ERPs simultaneously. We review studies that have utilized these approaches with a specific focus on research on infant visual attention and recognition memory, and discuss the application of cortical source localization with infant ERP data. Advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed and suggestions are made for future research. PMID:22545659

Reynolds, Greg D; Guy, Maggie W

2012-01-01

444

Behavioral Counseling Interventions to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity  

MedlinePLUS

... Force FINAL | 1 Understanding Task Force Recommendations Behavioral Counseling Interventions to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical ... activities 2 or more times a week Behavioral Counseling on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity to Prevent ...

445

Summary of SITH3, Panel 1: "Intersection of mHealth and Behavioral Health" Co-Chairs: Lisa Marsch and Andrew Campbell  

E-print Network

of mHealth and behavioral health. Dr. Marsch discussed the vast prevalence and impact of behavioral with a variety of functions including health care scheduling, appointment reminders, goal tracking, assessment development and research for behavioral health? Is it in assessment or #12;interventions?; 5) What role can

446

Supporting Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom: The Behavioral Health Assistant Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an effective model for employing paraprofessionals to provide behavioral support for students in a general education setting. Behavioral health assistants (BHAs) worked under the supervision of school psychologists and counselors and provided behavioral interventions for students with behavioral goals on their individualized…

Adolphson, S. Lillian; Hawken, Leanne S.; Stein Carroll, Mishele

2010-01-01

447

HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Health Insurance Coverage in Men Who Have Sex with Men  

PubMed Central

Research on the association between health insurance coverage and sexual risk behavior among men who have sex with men (MSM) is sparse. We hypothesized that MSM with health insurance would be less likely to engage in risky sexual behavior based on previous research showing that insured persons increase contact with providers which can improve health knowledge, decrease tendency to engage in unhealthy behaviors, and raise awareness about health risks. As part of a study testing an online HIV prevention intervention, we collected information on health insurance and sexual behavior from MSM (n=650). Overall, men with health insurance had a 28% reduced prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse male partners (UAIMP) in the 90 days prior to the survey. Potential explanations include access to healthcare providers and awareness of sexual health. Additional research is needed to identify the mechanism through which health insurance is protective. PMID:23180980

Brunsberg, Sarah A.; Rosser, B.R. Simon; Smolenski, Derek

2012-01-01

448

Gamification: what it is and why it matters to digital health behavior change developers.  

PubMed

This editorial provides a behavioral science view on gamification and health behavior change, describes its principles and mechanisms, and reviews some of the evidence for its efficacy. Furthermore, this editorial explores the relation between gamification and behavior change frameworks used in the health sciences and shows how gamification principles are closely related to principles that have been proven to work in health behavior change technology. Finally, this editorial provides criteria that can be used to assess when gamification provides a potentially promising framework for digital health interventions. PMID:25658754

Cugelman, Brian

2013-01-01

449

Gamification: What It Is and Why It Matters to Digital Health Behavior Change Developers  

PubMed Central

This editorial provides a behavioral science view on gamification and health behavior change, describes its principles and mechanisms, and reviews some of the evidence for its efficacy. Furthermore, this editorial explores the relation between gamification and behavior change frameworks used in the health sciences and shows how gamification principles are closely related to principles that have been proven to work in health behavior change technology. Finally, this editorial provides criteria that can be used to assess when gamification provides a potentially promising framework for digital health interventions.

2013-01-01

450

Prevalence of Health-Related Behaviors among Physicians and Medical Trainees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors studied the prevalence of health-promoting and health-risking behaviors among physicians and physicians-in-training. Given the significant potential for negative outcomes to physicians' own health as well as the health and safety of their patients, examination of the natural history of this acculturation process about…

Hull, Sharon K.; DiLalla, Lisabeth F.; Dorsey, J. Kevin

2008-01-01

451

Consumer Health Information Behavior in Public Libraries: A Mixed Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies indicated inadequate health literacy of American adults as one of the biggest challenges for consumer health information services provided in public libraries. Little attention, however, has been paid to public users' health literacy and health information behaviors. In order to bridge the research gap, the study aims to…

Yi, Yong Jeong

2012-01-01

452

School of Public Health, University of Memphis Doctoral Degree in Social and Behavioral Sciences  

E-print Network

School of Public Health, University of Memphis Doctoral Degree in Social and Behavioral Sciences PREFIX COURSE DESCRIPTION (15 hours) LEVEL HOURS TERM GRADE PUBH 8014 Public Health Comm/PUBH 8012 Public GRADE PUBH 8900 Advanced Readings in Public Health 3 PUBH 8901 Professional Development in Public Health

Dasgupta, Dipankar

453

Predictors of Caregiver Supportive Behaviors towards Reproductive Health Care for Women with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although many previous studies have begun to address the reproductive health needs of women with intellectual disabilities; however, the supportive behaviors of caregivers to assist their reproductive health is not well understood. Data from a cross-sectional survey of ""2009 National Survey on Reproductive Health Care Needs and Health Education…

Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chu, Cordia M.; Lin, Jin-Ding

2011-01-01

454

Integration of mental health into primary care in Sri Lanka  

PubMed Central

Introduction Sri Lanka has one of the highest suicide rates in the world, with recent protracted conflict and the tsunami aggravating mental health needs. This paper describes a project to establish a systematic “train the trainers” programme to integrate mental health into primary care in Sri Lanka's public health system and private sector. Methods A 40 hour training programme was delivered to curriculum and teaching materials were adapted for Sri Lanka, and delivered to 45 psychiatrists, 110 medical officers of mental health and 95 registered medical practitioners, through five courses, each in a different region (Colombo, Kandy, Jaffna, Galle and Batticola). Participants were selected by the senior psychiatrist of each region, on the basis of ability to conduct subsequent roll out of the training. The course was very interactive, with discussions, role plays and small group work, as well as brief theory sessions. Results Qualitative participant feedback was encouraging about the value of the course in improving patient assessments and treatments, and in providing a valuable package for roll out to others. Systematic improvement was achieved between pre- and post-test scores of participants at all training sites. The participants had not had prior experience in such interactive teaching methods, but were able to learn these new techniques relatively quickly. Conclusions The programme has been conducted in collaboration with the Sri Lankan National Institute of Mental Health and the Ministry of Health, and this partnership has helped to ensure that the training is tailored to Sri Lanka and has the chance of long term sustainability. PMID:23277794

2012-01-01

455

Opportunities for Launch Site Integrated System Health Engineering and Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The launch site processing flow involves operations such as functional verification, preflight servicing and launch. These operations often include hazards that must be controlled to protect human life and critical space hardware assets. Existing command and control capabilities are limited to simple limit checking durig automated monitoring. Contingency actions are highly dependent on human recognition, decision making, and execution. Many opportunities for Integrated System Health Engineering and Management (ISHEM) exist throughout the processing flow. This paper will present the current human-centered approach to health management as performed today for the shuttle and space station programs. In addition, it will address some of the more critical ISHEM needs, and provide recommendations for future implementation of ISHEM at the launch site.

Waterman, Robert D.; Langwost, Patricia E.; Waterman, Susan J.

2005-01-01

456

The effect of integrated health management model on the health of older adults with diabetes in a randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of integrated health management model on the health of older adults with diabetes. The 100 older adults with diabetes who gave informed consent were randomly allocated 1:1 into management and control groups. The integrated health management model was applied in the former while the latter was only given usual care. This model included the following components: health record establishment, health evaluation and health management (such as: diet advice, psychological aspects of health, education/skills training on health self-management, regular blood glucose monitoring, long-term diabetes drug monitoring, etc.). After 18 months, differences in three categories of variables (subjective grading items, objective measurement health indices and health service utilization) between the two groups before and after the intervention were assessed with t-test, ?(2)-test and mixed model analysis. The management group demonstrated improvement on the following variables: health knowledge score, self-evaluated psychological conditions, overall self-evaluated health conditions, diet score, physical activity duration per week, regular blood sugar monitoring, waist-to-hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure and fasting blood sugar, the days of hospital admissions in the preceding 6 months. Mixed model analysis showed that gender, age, self-evaluated health status, self-evaluated psychological status, education level and resident status were important factors affecting health indices. This study demonstrated that integrated health management model was effectiveness in improving the health of older adults with diabetes. PMID:25456892

Chao, Jianqian; Yang, Liang; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qing; Jiang, Lili; Zong, Mengmeng

2015-01-01

457

Integrated controls and health monitoring for chemical transfer propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA is reviewing various propulsion technologies for exploring space. The requirements are examined for one enabling propulsion technology: Integrated Controls and Health Monitoring (ICHM) for Chemical Transfer Propulsion (CTP). Functional requirements for a CTP-ICHM system are proposed from tentative mission scenarios, vehicle configurations, CTP specifications, and technical feasibility. These CTP-ICHM requirements go beyond traditional reliable operation and emergency shutoff control to include: (1) enhanced mission flexibility; (2) continuously variable throttling; (3) tank-head start control; (4) automated prestart and post-shutoff engine check; (5) monitoring of space exposure degradation; and (6) product evolution flexibility. Technology development plans are also discussed.

Millis, Marc G.; Binder, Michael P.

1990-01-01

458

The strategic role of health informatics in integrated delivery systems.  

PubMed

Having accurate measures and high-quality health information is critically important for all providers today. Integrated delivery systems are faced with increasing demands for numerous redundant, sometimes conflicting, performance measurement and reporting data from managed care customers, regulators, and accreditors. When implemented independently within each organizational subunit, these measurement systems are costly and difficult to manage. Centralization of all measurement services can maximize the productivity of the costly resources required to deliver them and can achieve efficiencies, cost savings, and a better balance between internal and external resources while collecting information that is of a higher quality for managerial and clinical decision making. PMID:10185721

Currie, G A

1998-01-01

459

A prospective health impact assessment of the Merseyside Integrated Transport Strategy (MerITS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Prospective health impact assessment is a new approach to predicting potential health impacts of policies, programmes or projects. It has been widely recognized that public policies have important impacts on health. In 1997, the Liverpool Public Health Observatory was commissioned to carry out a health impact assessment of the Merseyside Integrated Transport Strategy (MerITS). A secondary aim was to

N Gleeman; Alex Scott-Samuel

2000-01-01

460

Integrative medicine selects best practice from public health and biomedicine.  

PubMed

The meaning of terms Integrated and Integrative are described variously by an amalgam of latest scientific advances with ancient healing systems, of complementary medicine and biomedicine, and sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS. It means seamless good quality care between hospital and primary care. They provoke approval mostly from patients and disapproval mostly from advocates of science and evidence-based medicine. The Institute of Applied Dermatology in Kasaragod, Kerala, India has championed a mix of Biomedicine, Yoga and herbals from Ayurvedic medicine, partly based on publications from the Department of Dermatology of the University of Oxford. In Oxford dermatology, acceptance of value of integrative medicine (IM) is demonstrated, especially in wound healing and the skin's blood supply. This has long featured in the university's research program. A variety of approaches to the practice of medicine are illustrated with reference to Osler, Garrod, and Doll. IM is believed to underlie contemporarily best practice. Particular emphasis is given to the control of heat, pain, redness, and swelling, all manifestations of inflammation, and the importance of emotion as a stimulus or inhibitor carried by neural pathways. These may explain some unbelievable Asian practices and one of the many roles of Yoga. The concept of Integrative is expanded to include care of the earth and nutrition, the hazards of climate change, Gardens for Health, do (k) no (w) harm as a key to good practice. PMID:23716803

Ryan, Terence J

2013-03-01

461

Integrative Medicine Selects Best Practice from Public Health and Biomedicine  

PubMed Central

The meaning of terms Integrated and Integrative are described variously by an amalgam of latest scientific advances with ancient healing systems, of complementary medicine and biomedicine, and sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS. It means seamless good quality care between hospital and primary care. They provoke approval mostly from patients and disapproval mostly from advocates of science and evidence-based medicine. The Institute of Applied Dermatology in Kasaragod, Kerala, India has championed a mix of Biomedicine, Yoga and herbals from Ayurvedic medicine, partly based on publications from the Department of Dermatology of the University of Oxford. In Oxford dermatology, acceptance of value of integrative medicine (IM) is demonstrated, especially in wound healing and the skin's blood supply. This has long featured in the university's research program. A variety of approaches to the practice of medicine are illustrated with reference to Osler, Garrod, and Doll. IM is believed to underlie contemporarily best practice. Particular emphasis is given to the control of heat, pain, redness, and swelling, all manifestations of inflammation, and the importance of emotion as a stimulus or inhibitor carried by neural pathways. These may explain some unbelievable Asian practices and one of the many roles of Yoga. The concept of Integrative is expanded to include care of the earth and nutrition, the hazards of climate change, Gardens for Health, do (k) no (w) harm as a key to good practice. PMID:23716803

Ryan, Terence J

2013-01-01

462

Reconstruction of health-seeking behaviors: a comparative study of three Asian Pacific immigrant groups.  

PubMed

In this article, I explore how health-seeking behaviors of immigrants are reconstructed and shaped during the adaptation process by comparing the experiences of three Asian Pacific immigrant groups in Hawaii: Filipinos, Koreans, and Marshallese. A total of 91 participants (52 new immigrants, 22 ethnic community key informants, and 17 service providers) completed in-depth interviews. All three groups of immigrants experienced significant changes in their health-seeking behaviors, but in different ways. Koreans experienced a dramatic decrease in seeking both primary and preventive health care after immigration, whereas Filipinos and Marshallese increased their health-seeking behaviors. Coupled with the previous health care experiences in their home country and individual characteristics, the social context of the host country, to a great degree, influenced the formation of health-seeking behaviors after immigration. The study findings suggest that tailored interventions should take into account the source of behavioral change and difficulties that each immigrant group experiences. PMID:23427079

Choi, Jin Young

2013-04-01

463

Oral-Systemic Health During Pregnancy: Exploring Prenatal and Oral Health Providers' Information, Motivation and Behavioral Skills.  

PubMed

Pregnancy is identified as a sensitive period of increased risk for poor oral health among mothers and offspring. Subsequently, both medical and dental associations have re-endorsed consolidated, inter-professional guidelines promoting oral health during pregnancy. The objective was to explore prenatal and oral health providers' information, motivation and practice behaviors related to oral health during pregnancy. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with prenatal and oral health providers based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method in NVivo 10. Providers held variable knowledge with regards to identified oral-systemic connections and implications. Most providers were unaware o