Science.gov

Sample records for health care current

  1. The Cuban health care system and factors currently undermining it.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, K

    1995-08-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of health and health care in Cuba during a period of severe crisis by placing it within its economic, social, and political context using a comparative historical approach. It outlines Cuban achievements in health care as a consequence of the socialist transformations since 1959, noting the full commitment by the Cuban state, the planned economy, mass participation, and a self-critical, working class perspective as crucial factors. The roles of two external factors, the U.S. economic embargo and the Council of Mutual Economic Cooperation (CMEA), are explored in shaping the Cuban society and economy, including its health care system. It is argued that the former has hindered health efforts in Cuba. The role of the latter is more complex. While the CMEA was an important source for economic growth, Cuban relations with the Soviet bloc had a damaging effect on the development of socialism in Cuba. The adoption of the Soviet model of economic development fostered bureaucracy and demoralization of Cuban workers. As such, it contributed to two internal factors that have undermined further social progress including in health care: low productivity of labor and the growth of bureaucracy. While the health care system is still consistently supported by public policy and its structure is sound, economic crisis undermines its material and moral foundations and threatens its achievements. The future of the current Cuban health care system is intertwined with the potentials for its socialist development. PMID:7593738

  2. The Current State of Health Care for People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Mary Lou; Yee, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    The National Council on Disabilities (NCD) undertook this study in 2007 to focus the nation's attention on the health care disparities experienced by people with disabilities, and to provide information and recommendations that can help to eliminate health care inequities for people with disabilities. Among the key findings were that: (1) People…

  3. Health care in Canada: current trends and issues.

    PubMed

    Deber, R B; Hastings, J E; Thompson, G G

    1991-01-01

    Canada's universal health care system is perceived as threatened by rising costs, an aging population, and technological growth. This popular and successful program has largely kept costs under control while maintaining quality and ensuring equity. However, its success demonstrates the limits of medical care; remaining health problems are less amenable to improvement by merely improving access to traditional services. A widening view of health implies a larger health role in other policy arenas, and a larger group of legitimate participants; coordinating an evolving and expanding system becomes increasingly difficult. Policy options include some combination of laissez faire, business as usual, managed care, manpower regulation, and system change. Change implies controversy and conflict. Hard decisions are clearly ahead. PMID:2056111

  4. Music therapy in cardiac health care: current issues in research.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Suzanne B

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a service that has become more prevalent as an adjunct to medical practice-as its evidence base expands and music therapists begin to join the cardiology team in every phase of care, from the most serious cases to those maintaining good heart health. Although applications of music medicine, primarily listening to short segments of music, are capable of stabilizing vital signs and managing symptoms in the short-term, music therapy interventions by a qualified practitioner are showing promise in establishing deeper and more lasting impact. On the basis of mind-body approaches, stress/coping models, the neuromatrix theory of pain, and entrainment, music therapy capitalizes on the ability of music to affect the autonomic nervous system. Although only a limited number of randomized controlled trials pinpoint the efficacy of specific music therapy interventions, qualitative research reveals some profound outcomes in certain individuals. A depth of understanding related to the experience of living with a cardiovascular disease can be gained through music therapy approaches such as nonverbal music psychotherapy and guided imagery and music. The multifaceted nature of musical responsiveness contributes to strong individual variability and must be taken into account in the development of research protocols for future music therapy and music medicine interventions. The extant research provides a foundation for exploring the many potential psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual outcomes of a music therapy service for cardiology patients. PMID:23535529

  5. Current pulse: can a production system reduce medical errors in health care?

    PubMed

    Printezis, Antonios; Gopalakrishnan, Mohan

    2007-01-01

    One of the reasons for rising health care costs is medical errors, a majority of which result from faulty systems and processes. Health care in the past has used process-based initiatives such as Total Quality Management, Continuous Quality Improvement, and Six Sigma to reduce errors. These initiatives to redesign health care, reduce errors, and improve overall efficiency and customer satisfaction have had moderate success. Current trend is to apply the successful Toyota Production System (TPS) to health care since its organizing principles have led to tremendous improvement in productivity and quality for Toyota and other businesses that have adapted them. This article presents insights on the effectiveness of TPS principles in health care and the challenges that lie ahead in successfully integrating this approach with other quality initiatives. PMID:17627218

  6. Effects of current and future information technologies on the health care workforce.

    PubMed

    Masys, Daniel R

    2002-01-01

    Information technologies have the potential to affect the types and distribution of jobs in the health care workforce. Against a background of an explosively growing body of knowledge in the health sciences, current models of clinical decision making by autonomous practitioners, relying upon their memory and personal experience, will be inadequate for effective twenty-first-century health care delivery. The growth of consumerism and the proliferation of Internet-accessible sources of health-related information will modify the traditional roles of provider and patient and will provide opportunities for new kinds of employment in health-related professions. PMID:12224907

  7. [Current evidence on the motivational interview in the approach to health care problems in primary care].

    PubMed

    Bóveda Fontán, Julia; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Campińez Navarro, Manuel; Bosch Fontcuberta, Josep M; Barragán Brun, Nieves; Prados Castillejo, Jose Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The motivational interview has been widely used as a clinical method to promote behavioural changes in patients, helping them to resolve their ambivalence to obtain their own motivations. In the present article, a review is made of the main meta-analyses and systematic and narrative reviews on the efficacy of the motivational interview in the primary health care environment. PMID:24042074

  8. The current state of health care in the former Soviet Union: implications for health care policy and reform.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, D A; Field, M G

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Given the many profound health care problems facing Russia and the other former Soviet republics, there are a number of fundamental policy questions that deserve close attention as part of the reform process. METHODS. Summary data regarding Soviet health care issues were drawn from government agency reports, scholarly books and journals, recent press reports, and the authors' personal research. RESULTS. Smoking, alcohol, accidents, poor sanitation, inadequate nutrition, and extensive environmental pollution contribute to illness and premature mortality in Russia and the other newly independent states. Hospitals and clinics are poorly maintained and equipped; most physicians are poorly trained and inadequately paid; and there is essentially no system of quality management. While efforts at reform, which emphasize shifting to a system of "insurance medicine," have been largely unsuccessful, they have raised several important policy issues that warrant extensive research and discussion. CONCLUSIONS. Without considering the implications and consequences of alternative policy directions, Russia and the other states face the very real possibility of developing health care systems that improve the overall level of care but also incorporate limited access and escalating costs. Russian health care reform leaders can learn from the health care successes in the West and avoid repeating our mistakes. PMID:8604753

  9. Integrated primary health care in Greece, a missing issue in the current health policy agenda: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lionis, Christos; Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Markaki, Adelais; Vardavas, Constantine; Papadakaki, Maria; Daniilidou, Natasa; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Kyriopoulos, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the past years, Greece has undergone several endeavors aimed at modernizing and improving national health care services with a focus on PHC. However, the extent to which integrated primary health care has been achieved is still questioned. Purpose This paper explores the extent to which integrated primary health care (PHC) is an issue in the current agenda of policy makers in Greece, reporting constraints and opportunities and highlighting the need for a policy perspective in developing integrated PHC in this Southern European country. Methods A systematic review in PubMed/Medline and SCOPUS, along with a hand search in selected Greek biomedical journals was undertaken to identify key papers, reports, editorials or opinion letters relevant to integrated health care. Results Our systematic review identified 198 papers and 161 out of them were derived from electronic search. Fifty-three papers in total served the scope of this review and are shortly reported. A key finding is that the long-standing dominance of medical perspectives in Greek health policy has been paving the way towards vertical integration, pushing aside any discussions about horizontal or comprehensive integration of care. Conclusion Establishment of integrated PHC in Greece is still at its infancy, requiring major restructuring of the current national health system, as well as organizational culture changes. Moving towards a new policy-based model would bring this missing issue on the discussion table, facilitating further development. PMID:19777112

  10. Educating Medical Laboratory Technologists: Revisiting Our Assumptions in the Current Economic and Health-Care Environment

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Health care occupies a distinct niche in an economy struggling to recover from recession. Professions related to the care of patients are thought to be relatively resistant to downturns, and thus become attractive to students typically drawn to more lucrative pursuits. Currently, a higher profile for clinical laboratory technology among college students and those considering career change results in larger and better prepared applicant pools. However, after decades of contraction marked by closing of programs, prospective students encounter an educational system without the capacity or vigor to meet their needs. Here discussed are some principles and proposals to allow universities, partnering with health-care providers, government agencies, and other stake-holders to develop new programs, or reenergize existing ones to serve our students and patients. Principles include academic rigor in biomedical and clinical science, multiple points of entry for students, flexibility in format, cost effectiveness, career ladders and robust partnerships. PMID:23653802

  11. Health policies and intervention strategies: a description of current issues and approaches to care of the public health and health care system in the United Arab emirates.

    PubMed

    Mosaad, Aliye T; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2014-01-01

    The demographic factors of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have changed drastically within one generation. This is evident in how quickly it has moved from a developing nation, where fishing was once the main source of income, to a country that is quite developed, competing on a global level. From one perspective, socio-economic progress has brought many benefits to the population. These include improved education, better access to health care, and safe drinking water. However, on the other hand, economic development has been the cause for changes in lifestyles, eating habits, and traditional societal and family structures. Over time, these changes have added up, creating an unprecedented impact on the population's health. This impact has crept up onto the society until suddenly a notable epidemic has become recognized in the country. According to the UAE Ministry of Health, 19.5 percent of the UAE population has diabetes, making it the second highest rate in the world. The structure and responsibilities of the current UAE health care systems along with other cultural factors were investigated in order to determine their impact on the growing epidemic. PMID:25223161

  12. Health care justice and its implications for current policy of a mandatory waiting period for elective tubal sterilization.

    PubMed

    Moaddab, Amirhossein; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A; Fox, Karin A; Aagaard, Kjersti Marie; Salmanian, Bahram; Raine, Susan P; Shamshirsaz, Alireza A

    2015-06-01

    Tubal sterilization during the immediate postpartum period is 1 of the most common forms of contraception in the United States. This time of the procedure has the advantage of 1-time hospitalization, which results in ease and convenience for the woman. The US Collaborative Review of Sterilization Study indicates the high efficacy and effectiveness of postpartum tubal sterilization. Oral and written informed consent is the ethical and legal standard for the performance of elective tubal sterilization for permanent contraception for all patients, regardless of source of payment. Current health care policy and practice regarding elective tubal sterilization for Medicaid beneficiaries places a unique requirement on these patients and their obstetricians: a mandatory waiting period. This requirement originates in decades-old legislation, which we briefly describe. We then introduce the concept of health care justice in professional obstetric ethics and explain how it originates in the ethical concepts of medicine as a profession and of being a patient and its deontologic and consequentialist dimensions. We next identify the implications of health care justice for the current policy of a mandatory 30-day waiting period. We conclude that Medicaid policy allocates access to elective tubal sterilization differently, based on source of payment and gender, which violates health care justice in both its deontologic and consequentialist dimensions. Obstetricians should invoke health care justice in women's health care as the basis for advocacy for needed change in law and health policy, to eliminate health care injustice in women's access to elective tubal sterilization. PMID:25935572

  13. Mental Health Services for Children Placed in Foster Care: An Overview of Current Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pecora, Peter J.; Jensen, Peter S.; Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Jackson, Lovie J.; Ortiz, Abel

    2011-01-01

    Given the evidence from studies indicating that children in care have significant developmental, behavioral, and emotional problems, services for these children are an essential societal investment. Youth in foster care and adults who formerly were placed in care (foster care alumni) have disproportionately high rates of emotional and behavioral disorders. Among the areas of concern has been the lack of comprehensive mental health screening of all children entering out-of-home care, the need for more thorough identification of youth with emotional and behavioral disorders, and insufficient youth access to high-quality mental health services. In 2001, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) and the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) formed a foster care mental health values subcommittee to establish guidelines on improving policy and practices in the various systems that serve foster care children (AACAP and CWLA, 2002). Because of the excellent quality and comprehensiveness of these statements, the Casey Clinical Foster Care Research and Development Project undertook consensus development work to enhance and build upon these statements. This article presents an overview of mental health functioning of youth and alumni of foster care, and outlines a project that developed consensus guidelines. PMID:19653451

  14. Primary oral health care in black Americans: an assessment of current status and future needs.

    PubMed Central

    Cherry-Peppers, G.; Sinkford, J. C.; Newman, E. S.; Sanders, C. F.; Knight, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    To improve health for all in the United States by the year 2000, dental health needs must be considered a component of total health and primary care. The failure to address dental needs has reached a crisis level, particularly in the black and underserved communities throughout the nation. Data from several nationwide studies have shown that oral disease is greater in black Americans than their white counterparts. More severe periodontal disease patterns, untreated dental decay, and earlier tooth loss were observed. Key minority subgroups received less preventive care. PMID:7897686

  15. Adolescent Health Care in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Tomas Jose

    1984-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the health-care needs of Brazilian adolescents. The issues highlighted are adolescent morbidity and mortality, current delivery of adolescent health care, and future directions of adolescent programs in Brazil. (JAC)

  16. Achieving universal health care coverage: Current debates in Ghana on covering those outside the formal sector

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, extending financial protection and equitable access to health services to those outside the formal sector employment is a major challenge for achieving universal coverage. While some favour contributory schemes, others have embraced tax-funded health service cover for those outside the formal sector. This paper critically examines the issue of how to cover those outside the formal sector through the lens of stakeholder views on the proposed one-time premium payment (OTPP) policy in Ghana. Discussion Ghana in 2004 implemented a National Health Insurance Scheme, based on a contributory model where service benefits are restricted to those who contribute (with some groups exempted from contributing), as the policy direction for moving towards universal coverage. In 2008, the OTPP system was proposed as an alternative way of ensuring coverage for those outside formal sector employment. There are divergent stakeholder views with regard to the meaning of the one-time premium and how it will be financed and sustained. Our stakeholder interviews indicate that the underlying issue being debated is whether the current contributory NHIS model for those outside the formal employment sector should be maintained or whether services for this group should be tax funded. However, the advantages and disadvantages of these alternatives are not being explored in an explicit or systematic way and are obscured by the considerable confusion about the likely design of the OTPP policy. We attempt to contribute to the broader debate about how best to fund coverage for those outside the formal sector by unpacking some of these issues and pointing to the empirical evidence needed to shed even further light on appropriate funding mechanisms for universal health systems. Summary The Ghanaian debate on OTPP is related to one of the most important challenges facing low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve a universal health care system. It is critical that there is more extensive debate on the advantages and disadvantages of alternative funding mechanisms, supported by a solid evidence base, and with the policy objective of universal coverage providing the guiding light. PMID:23102454

  17. Focus group reflections on the current and future state of cognitive assessment tools in geriatric health care

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Jocelyne C; Gambino, Sara A; Richter, Jeffrey D; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides insight into the thoughts and opinions of geriatric health-care professionals toward cognitive assessments and the use of emerging technologies, such as eye-tracking, to supplement current tools. Methods Two focus group sessions were conducted with nurses and physicians who routinely administer neurocognitive assessments to geriatric populations. Video recordings of the focus group sessions were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed. Results Participants reported the need for assessment and diagnostic tools that are accessible and efficient, and that are capable of accommodating the rapid growth in the aging population. The prevalence of more complex ailments experienced by older adults has had repercussions in the quality of care that the clients receive, and has contributed to lengthy wait times and resource shortages. Health-care professionals stated that they are hampered by the disjointed structure of the health-care system and that they would benefit from a more efficient allocation of responsibilities made possible through tools that did not require extensive training or certification. Eyetracking-based cognitive assessments were thought to strongly complement this system, yet it was thought that difficulty would be faced in gaining the support and increased uptake by health-care professionals due to the nonintuitive relationship between eyetracking and cognition. Conclusion The findings suggest that health-care professionals are receptive to the use of eyetracking technology to assess for cognitive health as it would conserve resources by allowing frontline staff to administer assessments with minimal training. PMID:26109860

  18. Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  19. Child Care Health Connections, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

  20. Improving regional health care in West Africa using current space systems and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemison, Mae C.; Thomas, J. Segun

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved with establishing an integrated satellite health network in West Africa based on currently available technology. The system proposed makes use of a central national facility capable of transmitting and receiving voice/data and video signals from the entire country. Regional, field and local facilities provide timely epidemiologic information, sharing of medical expertise through telemedical consultations, enhance optimized resource distribution and build a framework for telecommunications for the entire country.

  1. Improving regional health care in West Africa using current space systems and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemison, Mae C.; Thomas, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved with establishing an integrated satellite health network in West Africa based on currently available technology. The system proposed makes use of a central national facility capable of transmitting and receiving voice/data and video signals from the entire country. Regional, field and local facilities provides timely epidemiologic information, sharing of medical expertise through telemedical consultations, enhances optimized resource distribution and builds a framework for telecommunications for the entire country.

  2. Improving regional health care in West Africa using current space systems and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemison, Mae C.; Thomas, J. Segun

    This paper discusses the issues involved with establishing an integrated satellite health network in West Africa based on currently available technology. The system proposed makes use of a central national facility capable of transmitting and receiving voice/data and video signals from the entire country. Regional, field and local facilities provide timely epidemiologic information, sharing of medical expertise through telemedical consultations, enhance optimized resource distribution and build a framework for telecommunications for the entire country.

  3. Health care technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  4. Home health care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  5. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  6. Universal health care.

    PubMed

    Meades, Karen; Roberts, Robert

    2007-01-01

    To inaugurate its fifth year of publication, The American Heart Hospital Journal (AHHJ) focused its Winter 2007 issue on health care systems from around the world, with 8 articles contributed by national leaders in their respective countries. Due to the interest and wide range of expertise in the international cardiac community, we continued to publish Special Reports throughout 2007 on this topic. In this issue we present the final two international perspectives, for a total of 12 individual international perspectives plus a final report from Robert Roberts, MD, that surveys the health care systems of an additional 4 countries, including his own, Canada. Our goal in publishing the series: to highlight the variety of systems currently employed worldwide, in the hope that such an international exchange of commentaries would result in debate and reforms where needed. We welcome your comments on the series, as well as your aspirations and ideas for the future of our national system of health care. PMID:17982309

  7. Current situation of health care in India and corporation in emerging economies--what is the way forward?

    PubMed

    Surendra, Kumar; Amit, Sengupta; Kumar, Agarwal Vishnu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine the management and operational problems faced by different categories of health care delivery platforms such as corporate hospitals, medium level private hospitals and public hospitals in Mumbai. Some suggestions are made and we believe many of the short falls or limitations that exist in the current set up can be removed and a way forward can be made in alleviating the suffering of vast majority of humankind living in our mega cities. Three major issues emerged as far as a public health system is concerned--that is shifting of trained health manpower from the public system to private or corporate hospitals, severe strain on the public health system's infrastructure and support services compounded by lack of accountability as far as management and governance are concerned. PMID:23342758

  8. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Educational Webinars Quality Improvement ahcancalED Gero Nurse Prep Leadership Excellence Nurse Assistant Training Quality Award Program Quality ... Degree in Nursing, Health Care Administration, Health Care Leadership, Health Policy or related field of study. • 6- ...

  9. The 'Global Outcomes Score': a quality measure, based on health outcomes, that compares current care to a target level of care.

    PubMed

    Eddy, David M; Adler, Joshua; Morris, Macdonald

    2012-11-01

    The quality of health care is measured today using performance measures that calculate the percentage of people whose health conditions are managed according to specified processes or who meet specified treatment goals. This approach has several limitations. For instance, each measure looks at a particular process, risk factor, or biomarker one by one, and each uses sharp thresholds for defining "success" versus "failure." We describe a new measure of quality called the Global Outcomes Score (GO Score), which represents the proportion of adverse outcomes expected to be prevented in a population under current levels of care compared to a target level of care, such as 100 percent performance on certain clinical guidelines. We illustrate the use of the GO Score to measure blood pressure and cholesterol care in a longitudinal study of people at risk of atherosclerotic diseases, or hardening of the arteries. In that population the baseline GO Score was 40 percent, which indicates that the care being delivered was 40 percent as effective in preventing myocardial infarctions and strokes as our target level of care. The GO Score can be used to assess the potential effectiveness of different interventions such as prevention activities, tests, and treatments. PMID:23129674

  10. Health Care Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NKF Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » Health Care Team Good health care is always a team effort - especially for people ... chronic kidney failure. Since each member of the health care staff contributes to your care, it is important ...

  11. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with congenital heart disease: current issues and health care situation].

    PubMed

    Kaemmerer, H; Gorenflo, M; Hoeper, M; Huscher, D; Ewert, P; Pittrow, D

    2013-06-01

    Defects of the heart and associated large vessels (CHD) are among the most frequent congenital anomalies. Owing to improved interdisciplinary management, about 90% of CHD patients reach adulthood. Up to 10% maintain or newly develop pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) over time, which impairs exercise tolerance and prognosis. Data on the health care situation of patients with PAH-CHD are limited. The ongoing Prospective Registry of Newly Initiated Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension (COMPERA, ClinTrials.gov Identifier NCT01347216) prospectively documents adult patients with all forms of pulmonary hypertension, if treated with PAH drugs (mean follow-up 40 months). As of 16 November 2012, 8% of the 3642 patients in the database had PAH-CHD. Of the latter, 104 were documented in great detail in specific CHD report forms. These patients were on average 39 years old, men in 39%, had a mean 6-minute walk distance of 370 ± 102 meters, and were in NYHA functional class I/II in 39%, III in 59%, und IV in 3%. Mean quality of life on the 100-point visual analogue scale (EQ-5 D) was 51. PAH-CHD patients received monotherapy in 80%, combination therapy in 9%, and no PAH drugs in 11%. Only 20% were on oral anticoagulation (OAC). Mean 4-year survival in incident patients (PAH-CHD diagnosis after start of the registry in 2007) was 79%, compared with 72% in patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH). According to these registry data, patients with PAH-CHD have impaired exercise capacity, and substantially reduced quality of life. They receive combination therapy or OAC, respectively, less frequently than IPAH patients, however, their survival rate is higher. PMID:23720182

  12. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  13. Vacation health care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 - 6 ... If you are taking medicine, talk to your health care provider before leaving. Carry all medicines with you ...

  14. Herbal extracts in oral health care - A review of the current scenario and its future needs

    PubMed Central

    Chandra Shekar, Byalakere Rudraiah; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Suma, Shankarappa; Thakur, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral diseases are among the major public health problems and the commonest of chronic diseases that affect mankind. The application of natural products for the control of oral diseases is considered as an interesting alternative to synthetic antimicrobials due to their lower negative impact, and for the effort to overcome primary or secondary resistance to the drug during therapy. Objective: To review the current evidence on the antimicrobial efficacy of 10 plant extracts on dental caries and plaque microorganisms. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive literature search was made by one of the authors for 2 months in PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, LILACS/BBO, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, SCIENCE DIRECT, and Google scholar databases. The results from the relevant published literatures are discussed. Summary and Conclusion: The extracts of Azadirachta Indica, Ocimum sanctum, Murraya koenigii L., Acacia nilotica, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Hibiscus sabdariffa, Mangifera indica, Psidium guajava, Rosa indica, and Aloe barbadensis Miller have all been found to inhibit certain dental caries and periodontal pathogens. The current evidence is on individual plant extracts against bacteria involved in either caries or periodontitis. “Herbal shotgun” or “synergistic multitarget effects” are the terms used for the strategy of combining different extracts. The research assessing the antimicrobial efficacy of a combination of these plant extracts against dental caries and periodontal pathogens is the need of the hour, and such research will aid in the development of a novel, innovative method that can simultaneously inhibit two of the most common dental diseases of mankind, besides slowing the development of drug resistance. PMID:26392704

  15. National Health Care Reform, Medicaid, and Children in Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfon, Neal; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines access to health care for children in out-of-home care under current law, reviews how health care access for these children would be affected by President Clinton's health care reform initiative, and proposes additional measures that could be considered to improve access and service coordination for children in the child welfare system.…

  16. Report on Health Care Education in Nevada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada Univ. and Community Coll. System, Reno. Office of the Chancellor.

    This document attempts to determine whether the University and Community College System of Nevada (UCCSN) is preparing a health care workforce that is appropriate for the current and future health care needs of the state of Nevada. To assess this issue, the system collected and analyzed current data in terms of the state of health and health care

  17. The strategic genius of Jonathan Letterman: the relevancy of the American Civil War to current health care policy makers.

    PubMed

    Place, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    With expanding health insurance coverage, innovative technologies, improved diagnostic acumen, and pharmaceutical additions combining to increase life expectancy, quality of life, and concomitant costs, the American health care system is under significant stress. However, it pales in comparison to the challenges faced by health care leaders during the American Civil War. As we approach the 150th anniversary of the conclusion of that war, it is appropriate to review key strategic health care decisions faced by military leaders during the Civil War and how their resultant outcomes may provide an appropriate perspective for today's leaders. PMID:25735014

  18. Health care in China.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S; Burns, C E; Hellings, P J

    1984-05-01

    Maternal-child nurses are part of a growing number of Americans who have had the opportunity to visit China. An increased understanding of the history and of the health care practices of the Chinese people lends itself to an examination of American values and health practices. The insight developed may aid us as we seek to understand our own health care practices for women and children and to plan for the future in health care. PMID:6728348

  19. Fixing health care before it fixes us.

    PubMed

    Kotlikoff, Laurence J

    2009-02-01

    The current American health care system is beyond repair. The problems of the health care system are delineated in this discussion. The current health care system needs to be replaced in its entirety with a new system that provides every American with first-rate, first-tier medicine and that doesn't drive our nation broke. The author describes a 10-point Medical Security System, which he proposes will address the problems of the current health care system. PMID:19038633

  20. Health care in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, A

    1993-01-01

    Brazil has great geopolitical importance because of its size, environmental resources, and potential economic power. The organisation of its health care system reflects the schisms within Brazilian society. High technology private care is available to the rich and inadequate public care to the poor. Limited financial resources have been overconcentrated on health care in the hospital sector and health professionals are generally inappropriately trained to meet the needs of the community. However, recent changes in the organisation of health care are taking power away from federal government to state and local authorities. This should help the process of reform, but many vested interests remain to be overcome. A link programme between Britain and Brazil focusing on primary care has resulted in exchange of ideas and staff between the two countries. If primary care in Brazil can be improved it could help to narrow the health divide between rich and poor. Images p503-a p504-a p505-a PMID:8448465

  1. Health disparities and health care financing: restructuring the American health care system.

    PubMed

    Diggs, Schnequa N

    2012-01-01

    For more than seven decades there has been a systematic disregard for the health needs of certain groups of individuals. Discrepancies in treatment and privilege based on race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and socio-economic status have been significant players in any portrait of American health care and have helped frame considerations of those who deserve and those undeserving of quality health care. Continuous incidences of inequitable health care practices strongly suggest a need for drastic changes in our current health care system. Although growing interest in social inequalities in health preside, health policy makers struggle to find appropriate intervention strategies to alleviate health disparities. The purpose of this article is to depict a clearer portrait of the American health care system within the context of health disparities and recognize intervention strategies to reduce/eliminate health care disparities. This article concludes with suggestions on how to refinance the American health care system based on equality principles. PMID:22894023

  2. Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmey, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

  3. Health care for children in foster care.

    PubMed

    Bean, Andrea; Gamino, Laura; Pierce, Priscilla; Shropshire, Deborah; Wallace, Kristina

    2004-09-01

    Every month 6,600 children in Oklahoma live under the custody of the state, most as result of being abused or neglected by their own families. The state provides medical care to these children via the Medicaid program. The American Academy of Pediatrics(AAP) has set forth a guideline for optimal care of these children. We discuss the current Oklahoma health care system for foster children and suggest changes that may move Oklahoma in the direction of the AAP recommendations. A more uniform, organized medical system may not only meet a foster child's medical needs but may also provide a degree of continuity to an otherwise discontinuous process. PMID:15540570

  4. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to start search site map [a-z] Health Health Care Information A-Z Health Topic Finder My Health ... General QUICK LIST Apply for Benefits Apply for Health Care Prescriptions My Health e Vet eBenefits Life Insurance ...

  5. Health care marketing management.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P D

    1979-01-01

    Health Care Marketing Management is the process of understanding the needs and the wats of a target market. Its purpose is to provide a viewpoint from which to integrate the analysis, planning, implementation (or organization) and control of the health care delivery system. PMID:10243818

  6. Health-Care Hub

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  7. Health care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S

    1984-07-01

    This is the third and last article reporting professional exchange tours between American nurses and nurses of other countries. In this article, the health care system of Kenya is discussed and comparisons made between this system and our own. Out of this comparison come several insights into our own way of doing things and possibilities for improving them. "Health Care in the Soviet Union" appeared in the April 1984 issue of The Nurse Practitioner. "Health Care in China" appeared in the May 1984 issue of the journal. PMID:6462542

  8. Should we ration health care?

    PubMed

    Jecker, N S

    1989-01-01

    The paper begins by drawing a distinction between "allocation"--the distribution of resources between different categories, and "rationing"--the distribution of scarce resources within a single category. I argue that the current allocation of funds to health care makes some form of rationing unavoidable. The paper next considers proposals by Daniel Callahan and Norman Daniels supporting age rationing publicly-financed life-extending medical care. I provide reasons for doubting that either argument succeeds. The final section of the paper sets forth an alternative approach which holds that if people have any rights to health care, then they have a right to a decent minimum. PMID:10296994

  9. Current Practices for Training Staff to Accommodate Youth with Special Health Care Needs in the 4-H Camp Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Lauren; Bruce, Jacklyn

    2013-01-01

    The theory of inclusion is the foundation for the study reported here; inclusion is a focus not only of formal education, but also of nonformal educational settings such as 4-H. Ideally, 4-H camps are designed to serve youth of all backgrounds and abilities. By accommodating youth with special health care needs, 4-H camps are effectively meeting…

  10. Nondisclosure of Smoking Status to Health Care Providers among Current and Former Smokers in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Laurel Erin; Richardson, Amanda; Xiao, Haijun; Niaura, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    An unintended consequence of tobacco control's success in marginalizing smoking is that smokers may conceal their smoking from those who are best positioned to help them quit: health care providers (HCPs). The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of, and factors related to, nondisclosure of smoking to HCPs. Data were obtained from…

  11. Nondisclosure of Smoking Status to Health Care Providers among Current and Former Smokers in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Laurel Erin; Richardson, Amanda; Xiao, Haijun; Niaura, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    An unintended consequence of tobacco control's success in marginalizing smoking is that smokers may conceal their smoking from those who are best positioned to help them quit: health care providers (HCPs). The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of, and factors related to, nondisclosure of smoking to HCPs. Data were obtained from…

  12. Current Practices for Training Staff to Accommodate Youth with Special Health Care Needs in the 4-H Camp Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Lauren; Bruce, Jacklyn

    2013-01-01

    The theory of inclusion is the foundation for the study reported here; inclusion is a focus not only of formal education, but also of nonformal educational settings such as 4-H. Ideally, 4-H camps are designed to serve youth of all backgrounds and abilities. By accommodating youth with special health care needs, 4-H camps are effectively meeting…

  13. Identifying health care quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Ramsaran-Fowdar, Roshnee R

    2005-01-01

    Evaluating health care quality is important for consumers, health care providers, and society. Developing a measure of health care service quality is an important precursor to systems and organizations that value health care quality. SERVQUAL has been proposed as a broad-based measure of service quality that may be applicable to health care settings. Results from a study described in this paper verify SERVQUAL dimensions, but demonstrate additional dimensions that are specific to health care settings. PMID:16318013

  14. Lesbian health care needs.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, N.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define the special health care needs of Canadian lesbians. DESIGN: A questionnaire containing 61 yes-or-no and multiple-choice questions sought information on six areas: demographics; health care use; habits, diet, and exercise; preventive care; mental health; and physical health. SETTING: The organizational meeting of a lesbian softball league in Toronto. PARTICIPANTS: Of 360 women eligible for the meeting, 205 attended and 195 completed the survey. Questionnaires used for analysis were those of the 186 women who answered yes to the question, "Are you a lesbian?" MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: How lesbian health care needs differ from those of women in general. Results of the survey were compared with results of the 1991 Canadian General Health Survey and the 1986 Health Promotion Survey (for comparable sex and age groups). RESULTS: The lesbians were young, white, and middle class. They visited the same health care professionals as other Canadian women but for different reasons. They smoked, drank alcohol, used caffeine, and exercised somewhat more than other women, but they were not very knowledgeable about healthy diets. The lesbians got Pap smears less often than other Canadian women, even if they were at high risk. They examined their breasts less frequently, but got their blood pressure checked with comparable frequency. Lesbians had a high incidence of mental health problems and often had nontraditional support systems. Lesbians were less prone to gynecologic complaints, especially infectious diseases, but had about the same incidence of common chronic illnesses. CONCLUSIONS: Although lesbians are not afflicted uniquely by any illness, they do have special health care needs. Canadian family physicians should be aware that lesbians are part of family practice and that, like other identifiable group, they have common health concerns that differ from those of the general population. PMID:8688691

  15. Mercury and health care.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-08-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries' health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

  16. Mercury and health care

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

  17. Current Status of Infant Mental Health in Day-Care Centres in Japan: An Investigation of Okinawa and Aomori Prefectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takizawa, Tohru; Kondo, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Osamu; Wake, Norie; Naka, Kuoichi; Todoriki, Hidemi; Ishizu, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Grasping both the extent and the actual situation of psychosomatic disorders, neurotic habits and developmental disorders of infancy and childhood is vital for their prevention and for taking appropriate measures to deal with the current situation. The purpose of this study is to explore the current situation of infant mental health in Japanese…

  18. Current Status of Infant Mental Health in Day-Care Centres in Japan: An Investigation of Okinawa and Aomori Prefectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takizawa, Tohru; Kondo, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Osamu; Wake, Norie; Naka, Kuoichi; Todoriki, Hidemi; Ishizu, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Grasping both the extent and the actual situation of psychosomatic disorders, neurotic habits and developmental disorders of infancy and childhood is vital for their prevention and for taking appropriate measures to deal with the current situation. The purpose of this study is to explore the current situation of infant mental health in Japanese…

  19. Current concepts in burn care.

    PubMed

    Wisnicki, J L; Sato, R M; Baxter, C R

    1986-03-01

    The understanding of and care for burn trauma have become increasingly sophisticated. A review of important clinical and laboratory conditions over the past five years highlights current thought and future trends in burn management. PMID:3078611

  20. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  1. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  2. Ethics, Politics, and Religion in Public Health Care: A Manifesto for Health Care Chaplains in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lasair, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Health care chaplaincy positions in Canada are significantly threatened due to widespread health care cutbacks. Yet the current time also presents a significant opportunity for spiritual care providers. This article argues that religion and spirituality in Canada are undergoing significant changes. The question for Canadian health care chaplains is, then: how well equipped are they to understand these changes in health care settings and to engage them? This article attempts to go part way toward an answer. PMID:26956752

  3. Spurious claims for health-care products: an experimental approach to evaluating current UK legislation and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Leslie B; Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-01-01

    The lay media, and especially the Internet, contain many misleading claims for health products which have previously been inadequately regulated by consumer law. This was an experimental interventional survey within a consumer health-care setting. Three health products were chosen on the basis of being widely available on the UK market and having no available evidence of effectiveness. Twelve volunteers submitted 39 complaints to Consumer Direct (UK portal for the regulator Trading Standards) regarding false health claims, and 36 complaints were followed up for a maximum of 4.8 months. The mean time from submission of complaints to Consumer Direct to acknowledgement by the relevant Trading Standards office was 13 days. There were no responses from Trading Standards for 22% of complaints. At the end of the study one supplier had amended their website following Trading Standards advice, but did not stop all health claims. Another stopped advertising their product on the Internet and the third continued the health claims unchanged. EU directive 2005/29/EC is largely ineffective in preventing misleading health claims for consumer products in the UK. PMID:22403120

  4. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Managing Home Health Care KidsHealth > For Parents > Managing Home Health Care Print ... espańol La atención médica en el hogar Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care ...

  5. Health care lessons from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S

    1993-01-01

    Thailand's health care system incorporates the private and public sectors. The government regulates health care through a system of capping, which protects its interests while providing a climate for competition. As a result, the private sector has developed and implemented some interesting concepts in health care as it turned to prevention, hospital care alternatives, neighbourhood-based ambulatory care and home care. The author suggests that Canada could benefit by examining some of Thailand's innovations. PMID:10130773

  6. Pediatric Provider's Perspectives on the Transition to Adult Health Care for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Strategies and Promising New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Karen A.; Warfield, Marji E.; Hurson, Jill; Delahaye, Jennifer; Crossman, Morgan K.

    2015-01-01

    Few youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) nationally report receiving services to help them transition from the pediatric health care system to the adult health care system. For example, only one-fifth (21.1%) of youth with ASD receive any transition planning services. To better understand why the transition from pediatric to adult health care

  7. Pediatric provider's perspectives on the transition to adult health care for youth with autism spectrum disorder: current strategies and promising new directions.

    PubMed

    Kuhlthau, Karen A; Warfield, Marji E; Hurson, Jill; Delahaye, Jennifer; Crossman, Morgan K

    2015-04-01

    Few youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) nationally report receiving services to help them transition from the pediatric health care system to the adult health care system. For example, only one-fifth (21.1%) of youth with ASD receive any transition planning services. To better understand why the transition from pediatric to adult health care is so difficult, we interviewed pediatric health care providers with extensive experience serving youth with ASD. We gathered information about the strategies and interventions they use to transition their patients with ASD to an adult provider. Five interventions or strategies are currently being used. These include providing families with written medical summaries to give to adult providers, compiling lists of available adult providers or community resources, coordinating care and communication between individual pediatric and adult providers, making transition-specific appointments, and using checklists to track transition progress. Other interventions or strategies were identified as needed but not currently in practice, and these focused on education and training. For example, informational workshops were suggested to train families and youth about transition. Training adult providers and medical students was also seen as important. Several respondents additionally identified the need for a transition center where all services could be coordinated in one place. With large numbers of youth with ASD becoming young adults, it seems that pediatric practices might want to consider some of the activities described here. Some of these activities, such as family educational seminars and written medical summaries, are likely relatively easy for a practice to implement. PMID:24497626

  8. Refugee health: a new model for delivering primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kay, Margaret; Jackson, Claire; Nicholson, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Providing health care to newly arrived refugees within the primary health care system has proved challenging. The primary health care sector needs enhanced capacity to provide quality health care for this population. The Primary Care Amplification Model has demonstrated its capacity to deliver effective health care to patients with chronic disease such as diabetes. This paper describes the adaption ofthe model to enhance the delivery ofhealth care to the refugee community. A 'beacon' practice with an expanded clinical capacity to deliver health care for refugees has been established. Partnerships link this practice with existing local general practices and community services. Governance involves collaboration between clinical leadership and relevant government and non-government organisations including local refugee communities. Integration with tertiary and community health sectors is facilitated and continuing education of health care providers is an important focus. Early incorporation of research in this model ensures effective feedback to inform providers of current health needs. Although implementation is currently in its formative phase, the Primary Care Amplification Model offers a flexible, yet robust framework to facilitate the delivery of quality health care to refugee patients. PMID:21133306

  9. The current situation in education and training of health-care professionals across Africa to optimise the delivery of palliative care for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, FM; Gwyther, L; Kiyange, F; Luyirika, E; Meiring, M; Downing, J

    2014-01-01

    The need for palliative care education remains vital to contribute to the quality of life of patients, both adults and children, with cancer in Africa. The number of patients with cancer continues to rise, and with them the burden of palliative care needs. Palliative care has been present in Africa for nearly four decades, and a number of services are developing in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. However, the needs of cancer patients remain a challenge. Education and training initiatives have developed throughout this time, using a combination of educational methods, including, more recently, e-learning initiatives. The role of international and national organisations in supporting education has been pivotal in developing models of education and training that are robust, sustainable, and affordable. Developing a material for education and professional development needs to continue in close collaboration with that already in production in order to optimise available resources. Seeking ways to evaluate programmes in terms of their impact on patient care remains an important part of programme delivery. This article reviews the current situation. PMID:25624873

  10. Health Care Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Jane L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The first of eight articles discusses the current state of the sensitive but unclassified information controversy. A series of six articles then explores the use of integrated information systems in the area of health services. Current trends in document management are provided in the last article. (CLB)

  11. [Reembursing health-care service provider networks].

    PubMed

    Binder, A; Braun, G E

    2015-03-01

    Health-care service provider networks are regarded as an important instrument to overcome the widely criticised fragmentation and sectoral partition of the German health-care system. The first part of this paper incorporates health-care service provider networks in the field of health-care research. The system theoretical model and basic functions of health-care research are used for this purpose. Furthermore already established areas of health-care research with strong relations to health-care service provider networks are listed. The second part of this paper introduces some innovative options for reimbursing health-care service provider networks which can be regarded as some results of network-oriented health-care research. The origins are virtual budgets currently used in part to reimburse integrated care according to §§ 140a ff. SGB V. Describing and evaluating this model leads to real budgets (capitation) - a reimbursement scheme repeatedly demanded by SVR-Gesundheit (German governmental health-care advisory board), for example, however barely implemented. As a final step a direct reimbursement of networks by the German sickness fund is discussed. Advantages and challenges are shown. The development of the different reimbursement schemes is partially based on models from the USA. PMID:25625796

  12. Equity in health care utilization in Chile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    One of the most extensive Chilean health care reforms occurred in July 2005, when the Regime of Explicit Health Guarantees (AUGE) became effective. This reform guarantees coverage for a specific set of health conditions. Thus, the purpose of this study is to provide timely evidence for policy makers to understand the current distribution and equity of health care utilization in Chile. The authors analyzed secondary data from the National Socioeconomic Survey (CASEN) for the years 1992–2009 and the 2006 Satisfaction and Out-of-Pocket Payment Survey to assess equity in health care utilization using two different approaches. First, we used a two-part model to estimate factors associated with the utilization of health care. Second, we decomposed income-related inequalities in medical care use into contributions of need and non-need factors and estimated a horizontal inequity index. Findings of this empirical study include evidence of inequities in the Chilean health care system that are beneficial to the better-off. We also identified some key factors, including education and health care payment, which affect the utilization of health care services. Results of this study could help researchers and policy makers identify targets for improving equity in health care utilization and strengthening availability of health care services accordingly. PMID:23937894

  13. Equity in health care utilization in Chile.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Alicia; Chi, Chunhuei

    2013-01-01

    One of the most extensive Chilean health care reforms occurred in July 2005, when the Regime of Explicit Health Guarantees (AUGE) became effective. This reform guarantees coverage for a specific set of health conditions. Thus, the purpose of this study is to provide timely evidence for policy makers to understand the current distribution and equity of health care utilization in Chile.The authors analyzed secondary data from the National Socioeconomic Survey (CASEN) for the years 1992-2009 and the 2006 Satisfaction and Out-of-Pocket Payment Survey to assess equity in health care utilization using two different approaches. First, we used a two-part model to estimate factors associated with the utilization of health care. Second, we decomposed income-related inequalities in medical care use into contributions of need and non-need factors and estimated a horizontal inequity index.Findings of this empirical study include evidence of inequities in the Chilean health care system that are beneficial to the better-off. We also identified some key factors, including education and health care payment, which affect the utilization of health care services. Results of this study could help researchers and policy makers identify targets for improving equity in health care utilization and strengthening availability of health care services accordingly. PMID:23937894

  14. Care for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Sharon Brown; Kanze, David Mitchell

    2016-03-01

    Pretravel care for the health care provider begins with an inventory, including the destination, length of stay, logistical arrangements, type of lodging, food and water supply, team members, personal medical needs, and the needs of the community to be treated. This inventory should be created and processed well in advance of the planned medical excursion. The key thing to remember in one's planning is to be a health care provider during one's global health care travel and not to become a patient oneself. This article will help demonstrate the medical requirements and recommendations for such planning. PMID:26900113

  15. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ... about lower-cost facilities and medicines. Understanding your health care costs can help you save money when managing ...

  16. Health Care Workers and Tuberculosis

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Health Care Workers and Tuberculosis How can I protect myself from tuberculosis infection? It's important to know which patients ... know if I have contracted tuberculosis? As a health care worker, you should have a tuberculosis skin test ...

  17. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but indicated that it should be incorporated in the HNC cancer care pathway to ensure all survivors would benefit. Conclusions Health care professionals experienced several barriers in directing patients to supportive care. They were positive toward the development and implementation of an eHealth application and expected it could support survivors in obtaining supportive care tailored to their needs. The cognitive walkthroughs revealed several points for optimizing the application prototype and developing an efficient implementation strategy. Including health care professionals in an early phase of a participatory design approach is valuable in developing an eHealth application and an implementation strategy meeting stakeholders’ needs. PMID:26489918

  18. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  19. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  20. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This booklet contains draft national health care skill standards that were proposed during the National Health Care Skill Standards Project on the basis of input from more than 1,000 representatives of key constituencies of the health care field. The project objectives and structure are summarized in the introduction. Part 1 examines the need for…

  1. Public health care provisions: access and equity.

    PubMed

    Bin Juni, M H

    1996-09-01

    Within the current exercise of reforming the health care system, underlying all issues, is the reassessment of the role of government. It is a government's responsibility and concern that the health sector be accessible and equitable to the population, and more important that the health sector be more efficient and affordable. Many governments in the world attempt to provide universal health care services to their population through public health care provisions. This paper reviews and analyses the experience of the Malaysian health system, focusing on the performance of the system in relation to access and equity. The performance of the Malaysian health system has been impressive. At minimum cost it has achieved virtually accessible and equitable health care to the entire population. This is evident by analysing almost all the commonly used indicators. These clearly show that when matched to comparable countries, health outcome is even better than predicted value. PMID:8870140

  2. Pediatric Provider's Perspectives on the Transition to Adult Health Care for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Strategies and Promising New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Karen A.; Warfield, Marji E.; Hurson, Jill; Delahaye, Jennifer; Crossman, Morgan K.

    2015-01-01

    Few youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) nationally report receiving services to help them transition from the pediatric health care system to the adult health care system. For example, only one-fifth (21.1%) of youth with ASD receive any transition planning services. To better understand why the transition from pediatric to adult health care…

  3. Leadership models in health care - a case for servant leadership.

    PubMed

    Trastek, Victor F; Hamilton, Neil W; Niles, Emily E

    2014-03-01

    Our current health care system is broken and unsustainable. Patients desire the highest quality care, and it needs to cost less. To regain public trust, the health care system must change and adapt to the current needs of patients. The diverse group of stakeholders in the health care system creates challenges for improving the value of care. Health care providers are in the best position to determine effective ways of improving the value of care. To create change, health care providers must learn how to effectively lead patients, those within health care organizations, and other stakeholders. This article presents servant leadership as the best model for health care organizations because it focuses on the strength of the team, developing trust and serving the needs of patients. As servant leaders, health care providers may be best equipped to make changes in the organization and in the provider-patient relationship to improve the value of care for patients. PMID:24486078

  4. A Medicare current beneficiary survey-based investigation of alternative primary care models in nursing homes: functional ability and health status outcomes.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Lisa M; Van Etten, Deborah; Lee, A James; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Remington, Ruth; Gautam, Ramraj; Gore, Rebecca J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed how the health status and functioning of Medicare beneficiaries residing in nursing homes varies systematically with nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) providing primary care services. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 2006, 2007, and 2008 Medicare Current Beneficiary Surveys. The study sample included 433 participant-year observations within one of three cohorts: (a) medical doctor (MD)-only, those who received primary care services exclusively from a physician; (b) MD-dominant, those who received some primary care services from an NP or PA, but those visits accounted for less than one half of total primary care visits; and (c) NP/PA-dominant, those who received more than one half of their primary care visits from an NP or PA. Participants in the MD-only cohort had significantly less orientation and independence in activities of daily living compared to participants in the NP/PA-dominant cohort. Other study variables did not vary significantly by practice model. Although the study provides some evidence that NP/PA involvement is associated with improved functioning, it is premature to draw strong inferences. PMID:25643375

  5. Operations management in health care.

    PubMed

    Henderson, M D

    1995-01-01

    Health care operations encompass the totality of those health care functions that allow those who practice health care delivery to do so. As the health care industry undergoes dramatic reform, so will the jobs of those who manage health care delivery systems. Although health care operations managers play one of the most vital and substantial roles in the new delivery system, the criteria for their success (or failure) are being defined now. Yet, the new and vital role of the operations manager has been stunted in its development, which is primarily because of old and outdated antipathy between hospital administrators and physicians. This article defines the skills and characteristics of today's health care operations managers. PMID:7600237

  6. Integrating Children's Mental Health into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Wissow, Lawrence S; van Ginneken, Nadja; Chandna, Jaya; Rahman, Atif

    2016-02-01

    Children's mental health problems are among global health advocates' highest priorities. Nearly three-quarters of adult disorders have their onset or origins during childhood, becoming progressively harder to treat over time. Integrating mental health with primary care and other more widely available health services has the potential to increase treatment access during childhood, but requires re-design of currently-available evidence-based practices to fit the context of primary care and place a greater emphasis on promoting positive mental health. While some of this re-design has yet to be accomplished, several components are currently well-defined and show promise of effectiveness and practicality. PMID:26613691

  7. Oral health and dental care during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Barbara J; Hilton, Irene V; Iida, Hiroko; Iada, Hiroko; Samelson, Renee

    2013-04-01

    Current research shows that women tend to receive less dental care than usual when they are pregnant. In 2012, the first national consensus statement on oral health care during pregnancy was issued, emphasizing both the importance and safety of routine dental care for pregnant women. This article reviews the current recommendations for perinatal oral health care and common oral manifestations during pregnancy. Periodontal disease and its association with preterm birth and low birth weight are also discussed, as is the role played by dental intervention in these adverse outcomes. PMID:23570802

  8. Access to health care

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Maltais, Danielle; Hudon, Catherine; Lapointe, Lise; Ntetu, Antoine Lutumba

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access. DESIGN Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions. METHODS For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held. MAIN FINDINGS The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access. CONCLUSION Systematic callbacks, family physicians’ personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:16926944

  9. Transitioning Care Across Various Health Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Marcia A; Mills, Vanessa

    2015-12-01

    Health care is continuously undergoing evolutionary changes. These changes have been very dramatic for the end users. Instead of simple physician office visits and lengthy hospital stays, we are now faced with short hospital stays, office visits to different specialty providers, and an array of choices around them. With the present highway of choices between illness and wellness, it is important for transitions between these two to be affordable, advantageous to patients, and uncomplicated. This article discusses the choices patients and health care providers must make as the number of care options increase along with the risks and benefits. PMID:26596653

  10. Modeling Health Care Policy Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Jeanne S; Eibner, Christine; Girosi, Federico; Cordova, Amado; McGlynn, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    Background Computer models played an important role in the health care reform debate, and they will continue to be used during implementation. However, current models are limited by inputs, including available data. Aim We review microsimulation and cell-based models. For each type of model, we discuss data requirements and other factors that may affect its scope. We also discuss how to improve models by changing data collection and data access procedures. Materials and Methods We review the modeling literature, documentation on existing models, and data resources available to modelers. Results Even with limitations, models can be a useful resource. However, limitations must be clearly communicated. Modeling approaches could be improved by enhancing existing longitudinal data, improving access to linked data, and developing data focused on health care providers. Discussion Longitudinal datasets could be improved by standardizing questions across surveys or by fielding supplemental panels. Funding could be provided to identify causal parameters and to clarify ranges of effects reported in the literature. Finally, a forum for routine communication between modelers and policy makers could be established. Conclusion Modeling can provide useful information for health care policy makers. Thus, investing in tools to improve modeling capabilities should be a high priority. PMID:21054371

  11. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education, Okemos, MI.

    This document presents the National Health Care Skill Standards, which were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology and West Ed Regional Research Laboratory, in partnership with educators and health care employers. The document begins with an overview of the purpose and benefits of skill standards. Presented next are…

  12. Information Technology Outside Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-health-care uses of information technology (IT) provide important lessons for health care informatics that are often overlooked because of the focus on the ways in which health care is different from other domains. Eight examples of IT use outside health care provide a context in which to examine the content and potential relevance of these lessons. Drawn from personal experience, five books, and two interviews, the examples deal with the role of leadership, academia, the private sector, the government, and individuals working in large organizations. The interviews focus on the need to manage technologic change. The lessons shed light on how to manage complexity, create and deploy standards, empower individuals, and overcome the occasional “wrongness” of conventional wisdom. One conclusion is that any health care informatics self-examination should be outward-looking and focus on the role of health care IT in the larger context of the evolving uses of IT in all domains. PMID:10495095

  13. The promise of Lean in health care.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, John S; Berry, Leonard L

    2013-01-01

    An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations. PMID:23274021

  14. Gypsies and health care.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, A

    1992-01-01

    Gypsies in the United States are not a healthy group. They have a high incidence of heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. When they seek medical care, Gypsies often come into conflict with medical personnel who find their behavior confusing, demanding, and chaotic. For their part, Gypsies are often suspicious of non-Gypsy people and institutions, viewing them as a source of disease and uncleanliness. Gypsy ideas about health and illness are closely related to notions of good and bad fortune, purity and impurity, and inclusion and exclusion from the group. These basic concepts affect everyday life, including the way Gypsies deal with eating and washing, physicians and hospitals, the diagnosis of illness, shopping around for cures, and coping with birth and death. PMID:1413769

  15. [External and internal financing in health care].

    PubMed

    Henke, Klaus-Dirk

    2007-05-15

    The objective of this contribution is to characterize the functional and institutional features of the German health-care system. This takes place after a short introduction and examination of the ongoing debate on health care in Germany. External funding describes the form of revenue generation. Regarding external funding of the German health care system, one of the favored alternatives in the current debate is the possibility of introducing per capita payments. After a short introduction to the capitation option, focus is on the so-called health fund that is currently debated on and being made ready for implementation in Germany, actually a mixed system of capitation and contributions based on income. On the other hand, internal funding is the method of how different health-care services are purchased or reimbursed. This becomes a rather hot topic in light of new trends for integrated and networked care to patients and different types of budgeting. Another dominating question in the German health-care system is the liberalization of the contractual law, with its "joint and uniform" regulations that have to be loosened for competition gains. After a discussion of the consequences of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) in Germany, the article is concluded by a note on the political rationality of the current health-care reform for increased competition within the Statutory Health Insurance and its players as exemplified by the health fund. To sum up, it has to be said that the complexity and specific features of how the German system is financed seem to require ongoing reform considerations even after realization of the currently debated health-care reform law which, unfortunately, is dominated by political rationalities rather than objective thoughts. PMID:17497087

  16. [Health care insurance for Africa].

    PubMed

    Schellekens, O P; Lindner, M E; van Esch, J P L; van Vugt, M; Rinke de Wit, T F

    2007-12-01

    Long-term substantial development aid has not prevented many African countries from being caught in a vicious circle in health care: the demand for care is high, but the overburdened public supply of low quality care is not aligned with this demand. The majority of Africans therefore pay for health care in cash, an expensive and least solidarity-based option. This article describes an innovative approach whereby supply and demand of health care can be better aligned, health care can be seen as a value chain and health insurance serves as the overarching mechanism. Providing premium subsidies for patients who seek health care through private, collective African health insurance schemes stimulates the demand side. The supply of care improves by investing in medical knowledge, administrative systems and health care infrastructure. This initiative comes from the Health Insurance Fund, a unique collaboration of public and private sectors. In 2006 the Fund received Euro 100 million from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to implement insurance programmes in Africa. PharmAccess Foundation is the Fund's implementing partner and presents its first experiences in Africa. PMID:18179087

  17. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  18. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  19. Managed care and reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S S; Williams, D R

    1998-01-01

    Managed care poses special challenges to midwives providing reproductive health care. This is owing to the sensitive nature of issues surrounding reproductive health and aspects of managed care that may impede a woman's ability to obtain continuous, confidential, and comprehensive care from the provider of her choice. Variations across payers (ie, Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial insurers) regarding covered benefits and reimbursement of midwifery services also may create obstacles. Furthermore, some physicians and managed care organizations are embracing policies that threaten the ability of midwives to function as primary health care providers for women. Despite these hurdles, midwives have the potential to remain competitive in the new marketplace. This article underscores the importance of being knowledgeable about legislation and policy issues surrounding the financing of midwifery services, quality performance measurement for HMOs as they pertain to reproductive health, and discussions regarding which clinicians should be defined as primary care providers. PMID:9674347

  20. Lesbian and bisexual health care.

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, C. M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore lesbian and bisexual women's experiences with their family physicians to learn about barriers to care and about how physicians can provide supportive care. DESIGN: Qualitative study that was part of a larger study of lesbian and bisexual women's health care. SETTING: The province of Nova Scotia, both urban and rural counties. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-eight self-identified lesbian or bisexual women who volunteered through snowball sampling. Women were interviewed by lesbian, bisexual, or heterosexual female interviewers. METHOD: Semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews, exploring questions about demographic information, sexual orientation, general health care patterns, preferences for health care providers, disclosure issues, health care information, access issues, and important health care services. Transcription of audiotapes of interviews was followed by content, thematic, and discourse analyses. Thematic analysis is reported in this paper. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: Three themes important for family physicians emerged: the importance of being gay positive, barriers to care, and strategies for providing appropriate care. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians are in a pivotal position to ensure supportive care for lesbian and bisexual women. Physicians need to recognize barriers to care and to use gay-positive strategies, paying attention to self-education, health history, and clinic environment. PMID:9721419

  1. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  2. Assessment of changes in health care needs.

    PubMed

    Nanjid, Khuderchuluun; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Nyamjav, Sumberzul; Mendsaikhan, Purevjav

    2014-01-01

    By 2020, the population of Ulaanbaatar will reach 1,522,400 inhabitants. In addition, estimates show that relative to 2010, there will be 13.1% more outpatient registrations and 11.6% more inpatients by 2020. This study, conducted by descriptive design based on demographic and morbidity data, analyzes whether current health care facilities meet the demands and needs of the Ulaanbaatar population. It also assesses health care needs and accessibilty in Ulaanbaatar by 2020. Both data analysis and qualitative interviews with different sub-groups of the population reveal the neccesity to both reorganize primary level health care facilities and adjust resources in accordance with changing morbidity patterns. PMID:24938031

  3. Educating students for a changing health care environment: an examination of health care practice course content.

    PubMed

    Kadushin, G; Egan, M

    1997-08-01

    Social work educators are confronting new challenges in preparing students for health care practice. Given the changing environment in which health care social workers practice and the changing nature of practice itself, it is surprising that there have been no surveys of health care curricula since the 1980s. This study, which is based on an analysis of the outlines for graduate-level health care practice courses from 53 accredited schools, attempts to determine what students are taught to prepare them for this altered practice environment. Content reflective of current practice issues was infrequently included in course outlines. Implications for social work education and practice are discussed. PMID:9260085

  4. Congress enacts health care reform.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    Health care reform at last: After nearly a century of effort by Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt on down, the Congress finally agreed on and President Barack Obama signed into law a system that covers most Americans, regulates sharp insurance practices, and embraces a paradigm shift from acute institutionally focused care to chronic disease management based on home and community-based care. PMID:20465039

  5. Telemedicine in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kastania, Anastasia

    2008-01-01

    Here, the possibilities to build integrated primary health care telemedicine services are presented accompanied with available epistemic criteria for quality evaluation purposes. Given that the cost of sanitary care is increasing continuously the telemedicine approach is a challenge for providing quality care and at low cost to the rural citizens. PMID:18305330

  6. Foster Care and Child Health.

    PubMed

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care. PMID:26318955

  7. Contagious Ideas from Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Financial problems plague both higher education and health care, two sectors that struggle to meet public expectations for quality services at affordable rates. Both higher education and health care also have a complex bottom line, heavy reliance on relatively autonomous professionals, and clients who share personal responsibility for achieving…

  8. Contagious Ideas from Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Financial problems plague both higher education and health care, two sectors that struggle to meet public expectations for quality services at affordable rates. Both higher education and health care also have a complex bottom line, heavy reliance on relatively autonomous professionals, and clients who share personal responsibility for achieving…

  9. Pharmacists' Role in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maronde, Robert F.

    1977-01-01

    Pharmacists' contribution to the health care of the future in the future in the U.S. may have to be in the context of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of health-care delivery. It is from the area of drug therapy, now poorly administered, that the pharmacist will have to justify his role in a cost-effective manner. (Author/LBH)

  10. The Politics of Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John B.

    Before the mid-1960's the Federal role in health care was extremely limited, but technological breakthroughs, the new importance of hospitals, and the recognition that the poor and elderly have been underserved prompted Congress to pass the Medicare and Medicaid package in 1966. Since then the Federal share of the health care dollar has risen by…

  11. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  12. Health care's service fanatics.

    PubMed

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life. PMID:23898737

  13. Cohort effects on the need for health care and implications for health care planning in Canada.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, William; Birch, Stephen; MacKenzie, Adrian; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    2016-01-01

    The sustainability of publicly funded health care systems is an issue for governments around the world. The economic climate limits governments' fiscal capacity to continue to devote an increasing share of public funds to health care. Meanwhile the demands for health care within populations continue to increase. Planning the future requirements for health care is typically based on applying current levels of health service use by age to demographic projections of the population. But changes in age-specific levels of health over time would undermine this 'constant use by age' assumption. We use representative Canadian survey data (Canadian Community Health Survey) covering the period 2001-2012, to identify the separate trends in demography (population ageing) and epidemiology (population health) on self-reported health. We propose an approach to estimating future health care requirements that incorporates cohort trends in health. Overall health care requirements for the population increase as the size and mean age of the population increase, but these effects are mitigated by cohort trends in health-we find the estimated need for health care is lower when models account for cohort effects in addition to age effects. PMID:26586614

  14. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  15. Transition Care for Children With Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alaina M.; Brown, Rebekah F.; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Epstein, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 750?000 children in the United States with special health care needs will transition from pediatric to adult care annually. Fewer than half receive adequate transition care. METHODS: We had conversations with key informants representing clinicians who provide transition care, pediatric and adult providers of services for individuals with special health care needs, policy experts, and researchers; searched online sources for information about currently available programs and resources; and conducted a literature search to identify research on the effectiveness of transition programs. RESULTS: We identified 25 studies evaluating transition care programs. Most (n = 8) were conducted in populations with diabetes, with a smaller literature (n = 5) on transplant patients. We identified an additional 12 studies on a range of conditions, with no more than 2 studies on the same condition. Common components of care included use of a transition coordinator, a special clinic for young adults in transition, and provision of educational materials. CONCLUSIONS: The issue of how to provide transition care for children with special health care needs warrants further attention. Research needs are wide ranging, including both substantive and methodologic concerns. Although there is widespread agreement on the need for adequate transition programs, there is no accepted way to measure transition success. It will be essential to establish consistent goals to build an adequate body of literature to affect practice. PMID:25287460

  16. Health care in the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Lippi, D

    1992-01-01

    Health care undergoes a deep transformation between XIVth and XVIth century; in the states of Central and Northern Italy very advanced health is practiced and magistratures are established, to face recurring pandemics of Black Death. At the same time, charitable institutions of medioeval tradition lose the role of generic assistance, to assume treatment of infirmi, with an ever-growing specialization. The author examines particularly the situation in Tuscany and in Florence, considering the evolution of health care in the Renaissance. PMID:11640127

  17. [Health care systems in Nepal].

    PubMed

    Eisler, O; Lajtai, L

    2000-06-11

    This article is the result of some preliminary journey of two Hungarian psychiatrist (one also epileptologist, other also anthropologist) to Nepal. The main aim of the research was to elaborate a community based epilepsy health care pilot project. It is shown a brief look at the modern and traditional health care systems and the severely difficult condition of the general and health infrastructure in Nepal. Some recommendations of possible help and intervention are offered for foreign (Hungarian) doctors. PMID:10936940

  18. Integrating Biopsychosocial Intervention Research in a Changing Health Care Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ell, Kathleen; Oh, Hyunsung; Wu, Shinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Safety net care systems are experiencing unprecedented change from the "Affordable Care Act," Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) uptake, health information technology application, and growing of mental health care integration within primary care. This article provides a review of previous and current efforts in which social…

  19. Integrating Biopsychosocial Intervention Research in a Changing Health Care Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ell, Kathleen; Oh, Hyunsung; Wu, Shinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Safety net care systems are experiencing unprecedented change from the "Affordable Care Act," Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) uptake, health information technology application, and growing of mental health care integration within primary care. This article provides a review of previous and current efforts in which social…

  20. Market incentives and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James Stacey

    2008-10-01

    It is generally agreed that the current methods of providing health care in the West need to be reformed. Such reforms must operate within the practical limitations to which any future system of health care will be subject. These limitations include an increase in the demand for costly end-of-life health care coupled with a reduction in the proportion of the population who are working taxpayers (and hence a reduction in the proportionate amount of health care funding that can be secured through taxation) and the fact that the imposition of bureaucratic regulations on health care systems is costly. Recognizing these limitations should naturally lead one to consider market-based reforms. Yet despite the practical impetus for such reforms, there is still widespread concern that market-based health care is unethical. The purpose of this paper is to address this concern and, in so doing, to pave the way for the market-based reform of health care to proceed. PMID:18840854

  1. The health care information directive

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Background Developments in information technology promise to revolutionise the delivery of health care by providing access to data in a timely and efficient way. Information technology also raises several important concerns about the confidentiality and privacy of health data. New and existing legislation in Europe and North America may make access to patient level data difficult with consequent impact on research and health surveillance. Although research is being conducted on technical solutions to protect the privacy of personal health information, there is very little research on ways to improve individuals power over their health information. This paper proposes a health care information directive, analogous to an advance directive, to facilitate choices regarding health information disclosure. Results and Discussion A health care information directive is described which creates a decision matrix that combines the ethical appropriateness of the use of personal health information with the sensitivity of the data. It creates a range of possibilities with in which individuals can choose to contribute health information with or without consent, or not to contribute information at all. Conclusion The health care information directive may increase individuals understanding of the uses of health information and increase their willingness to contribute certain kinds of health information. Further refinement and evaluation of the directive is required. PMID:11331535

  2. Current Health Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, John; And Others

    The basic premise of this text is that, in addition to the presentation of basic cognitive and affective information, health education should go one step further by assisting student in developing decision-making skills. The text begins by offering the student a basic foundation of what is meant by health and how this meaning applies to the world,…

  3. 76 FR 37307 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... services under the rural health care program. Grandfathered providers do not currently qualify as ``rural,'' but play a key role in delivering health care services to surrounding regions that do qualify...

  4. [Moral and operational challenges for the inclusion of palliative care in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Floriani, Ciro Augusto; Schramm, Fermin Roland

    2007-09-01

    Palliative care, a model in end-of-life care, is currently undergoing expansion in Brazil. This article emphasizes the need to implement palliative care in primary health care, with an important role in end-of-life care, especially in areas without specialized palliative-care teams. The article discusses key aspects in the organization of this treatment modality and analyzes how palliative care could and should be implemented within primary health care in Brazil. The article describes several challenges for health teams to provide such care, related to the primary caregiver, inherent ethical conflicts, and human resource allocation. PMID:17700942

  5. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khatib, Issam A. Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-15

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  6. Asian American health care attitudes.

    PubMed

    Perttula, W; Lowe, D; Quon, N S

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a survey of health care attitudes of a sample of respondents primarily of Asian American background. The importance of bilingualism, Asian background, age, and other attributes of a physician are discussed with relation to subgroups in the sample. The relative importance of the influence of doctors, family, and friends on the choice of physician and health care facility are also presented. The findings may help with the development of effective market segmentation and improved health care service to the Asian American community. PMID:10538733

  7. The United States health care system under managed care. How the commodification of health care distorts ethics and threatens equity.

    PubMed

    Churchill, L R

    1999-01-01

    Describing the U.S. health care system means describing managed care under commercial forces. Managed care creates new moral tension for practitioners, but more importantly, in its current form it intensifies the commercialization of health expectations and interactions. The largely unregulated marketing of health services under managed care has been a major factor in the increasing number of uninsured citizens, while claims for cost reduction through managed care are equivocal. Risk-rating practices integral to the current medical marketplace thwart concerns for justice in allocation and create vulnerabilities for almost everyone. The political-moral concern of the early 1990s for a right to health care is nowhere in sight. PMID:10787800

  8. Appropriateness in health care delivery: definitions, measurement and policy implications.

    PubMed Central

    Lavis, J N; Anderson, G M

    1996-01-01

    A major focus of the current health care debate is the notion that a substantial proportion of the health care delivered in Canada is inappropriate. There are two types of appropriateness: appropriateness of a service and appropriateness of the setting in which care is provided (i.e., inpatient v. outpatient or home care). Measuring both types objectively requires the comparison of observed patterns of care with explicit criteria for appropriate care. The few studies of appropriateness conducted in Canada have shown that inappropriate services are provided and inappropriate settings are used. Reducing inappropriate health care delivery could involve active strategies for the implementation of guidelines and better cooperation and coordination within the health care system. However, lower rates of health care delivery or even inappropriate health care will not necessarily translate into higher quality care or lower costs overall. PMID:8564901

  9. The Role of Private Health Insurance in Children's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheils, John F.; Wolfe, Patrice R.

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes the private health insurance market, focusing on recent trends. Efforts should be made to preserve the current private health insurance system through comprehensive reforms that reduce cost and shift from public programs; control costs by competition, managed care, and global spending limits; and guarantee coverage for all groups. (SLD)

  10. Providers Caring for Adolescents with Perinatally-Acquired HIV: Current Practices and Barriers to Communication About Sexual and Reproductive Health

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Cynthia D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The population of adolescents and young adults (AYA) with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) present challenges to HIV healthcare providers (HHCPs). Originally not expected to survive childhood, they are now living well into young adulthood. Little is known about the type of sexual and reproductive (SRH) information/services offered to AYA with PHIV by HHCPs. HHCPs (n=67) were recruited using snowball sampling, and completed an online survey. Providers' most frequently endorsed SRH topics discussed with both male and female patients included condom use (77.3%), STD prevention (73.1%), and screening (62.1%). Providers' reports indicated that females received significantly more education about SRH topics overall. The most frequently noted barriers to SRH communication included more pressing health concerns (53.0%), parent/guardian not receptive (43.9%), and lack of time during appointment (43.9%). Provider-reported SRH conversations with HHCPs were highly focused on horizontal transmission and pregnancy prevention. Salient social aspects of SRH promotion for AYAs with PHIV (e.g., managing disclosure and romantic relationships) were less commonly discussed, though such conversations may serve to reduce secondary transmission and enhance the overall well-being of AYA with PHIV. Findings indicated that further work must be done to identify strategies to address unmet SRH needs of the aging population of AYA with PHIV. PMID:25290765

  11. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care. PMID:21804069

  12. Five Steps to Safer Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Safer Health Care Five Steps to Safer Health Care: Patient Fact Sheet This information is for reference ... safety is one of the Nation's most pressing health care challenges. A 1999 report by the Institute of ...

  13. Health in Day Care: A Guide for Day Care Providers in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro, Ed.; Messenger, Katherine P., Ed.

    This reference manual and resource guide describes high standards for health policies and day care procedures that reflect current research and recommendations of experts. Chapters 1 and 2, which concern day care's role in health, cover health education in day care and the basics relating to policies, providers, and records. Chapters 3-5 concern…

  14. Health in Day Care: A Guide for Day Care Providers in Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro, Ed.; Messenger, Katherine P., Ed.

    This reference manual and resource guide describes high standards for health policies and day care procedures that reflect current research and recommendations of experts. Chapters 1 and 2, which concern day care's role in health, cover health education in day care and the basics relating to policies, providers, and records. Chapters 3-5 concern…

  15. [Supply and demand in home health care].

    PubMed

    Braga, Patrícia Pinto; Sena, Roseni Rosângela de; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; Castro, Edna Aparecida Barbosa de; Andrade, Angélica Mônica; Silva, Yara Cardoso

    2016-03-01

    The changes in the demographic and epidemiologic profiles of the Brazilian population and the need to rethink the health care model have led many countries like Brazil to consider Home Care (HC) as a care strategy. However, there is a gap between the supply of HC services, the demand for care and the health needs manifested by the population. Thus, this article analyzes scientific output regarding the status of the relation between supply, demand and the needs related to home health care. This work is based on an integrative review of the literature in the following databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Latin America and the Caribbean Literature on Health and Science (Lilacs), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline) and Web of Science. Despite the fact that few articles refer to the issue in question, there is evidence indicating that health demands and needs are seldom taken into account either in a quantitative or qualitative approach when developing the organization of HC services. The analysis would indicate that there is a national and international deficit in the supply of HC services considering the demand for health care and needs currently prevailing. PMID:26960102

  16. Day care health risks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. It is spread by poor or no hand washing after going to the bathroom or changing a diaper, and then preparing food. In addition to good hand washing, day care ...

  17. Will Boeing Change Health Care?

    PubMed

    Stempniak, Marty

    2015-12-01

    Big employers like Boeing and Intel are directly contracting with hospitals in an effort to control health care prices. Some hospital CEOs see direct contracting as the future, while others wonder how they can participate. PMID:26837134

  18. New developments in a consolidating health care industry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D; Kleiner, B H

    1998-01-01

    The current health care industry has recently seen a great deal of consolidation in the form of mergers and acquisitions. These mergers and acquisitions invariably result in a loss of jobs. This paper focuses on two strategies that health care companies use to reduce workforce under these circumstances. Specifically, the paper will focus on the mergers between SmithKline Beckman and Beecham plc in the late 1980s, FHP Health Care and TakeCare Health Plans, and PacifiCare's recent acquisition of FHP Health-care. It will compare and contrast theory, strategy and practices of these six companies as they endeavoured to merge or acquire each other. PMID:10346310

  19. Czechoslovakia's changing health care system.

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, M W; Raffel, N K

    1992-01-01

    Before World War II, Czechoslovakia was among the most developed European countries with an excellent health care system. After the Communist coup d'etat in 1948, the country was forced to adapt its existing health care system to the Soviet model. It was planned and managed by the government, financed by general tax money, operated in a highly centralized, bureaucratic fashion, and provided service at no direct charge at the time of service. In recent years, the health care system had been deteriorating as the health of the people had also been declining. Life expectancy, infant mortality rates, and diseases of the circulatory system are higher than in Western European countries. In 1989, political changes occurred in Czechoslovakia that made health care reform possible. Now health services are being decentralized, and the ownership of hospitals is expected to be transferred to communities, municipalities, churches, charitable groups, or private entities. Almost all health leaders, including hospital directors and hospital department heads, have been replaced. Physicians will be paid according to the type and amount of work performed. Perhaps the most important reform is the establishment of an independent General Health Care Insurance Office financed directly by compulsory contributions from workers, employers, and government that will be able to negotiate with hospitals and physicians to determine payment for services. PMID:1454975

  20. Child Day Care Health Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fookson, Maxine; And Others

    Developed to meet Washington State Day Care Minimum Licensing Requirements, guidelines in this handbook concern 10 health topics. Discussion focuses on (1) preventing illness in day care settings; (2) illnesses, their treatment, ways to limit their spread, and what caregivers can do when they have a sick child at their center; (3) caregivers'…

  1. Model Child Care Health Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan; Smith, Herberta

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, the model health policies presented in this report are intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the report presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following…

  2. [Corruption and health care system].

    PubMed

    Marasovi? Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions. PMID:26016214

  3. Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. Methods A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Results Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Conclusion Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices. Multi-national research may provide guidance about how to scale up eye health interventions that are integrated into primary health systems. PMID:23506686

  4. Delivering Health Care and Mental Health Care Services to Children in Family Foster Care after Welfare and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Mark D.; Freundlich, Madelyn; Battistelli, Ellen S.; Kaufman, Neal D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the essential features of a health care system that can meet the special needs of children in out-of-home care. Discusses some of the major recent changes brought about by welfare and health care reform. Notes that it remains to be seen whether the quality of services will improve as a result of these reforms. (Author)

  5. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  6. Universal health care: the changing international discourse.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Ramila

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 34 years ago, in 1978 in the face of a looming crisis in the health of the world's populations and rising health inequality, 134 countries came together to sign the historic Alma Ata Declaration where the idea of primary health care as the chosen path to "Health for All" was formulated. However even before the declaration and more so since, countries have diverse interpretations of Universalism, each setting it in the context of its own health care model. These have ranged from the minimalist to the more comprehensive welfare state. Today, as health statistics reveal, the crisis has deepened, not only in the developing world but also in the developed world. It is important to debate the nature of the crisis and understand current policy initiatives and their ideological legitimations. The paper attempts to trace, clarify and account for the shifts in international discourse on universal health care (UHC). It argues that the idea of UHC is still with us, but there have occurred substantial shifts in discourse and meaning, shaped by changing international and national contexts and social forces impinging on health systems. The current concept of universal health coverage has only a notional allusion to universality of Alma Ata and disregards its fundamental principles. It concludes that the shifts are detrimental and its value in promoting health for all is likely to be severely limited. PMID:24351385

  7. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  8. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  9. Health care entrepreneurship: financing innovation.

    PubMed

    Grazier, Kyle L; Metzler, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is often described as the ability to create new ventures from new or existing concepts, ideas and visions. There has been significant entrepreneurial response to the changes in the scientific and social underpinnings of health care services delivery. However, a growing portion of the economic development driving health care industry expansion is threatened further by longstanding use of financing models that are suboptimal for health care ventures. The delayed pace of entrepreneurial activity in this industry is in part a response to the general economy and markets, but also due to the lack of capital for new health care ventures. The recent dearth of entrepreneurial activities in the health services sector may also due to failure to consider new approaches to partnerships and strategic ventures, despite their mutually beneficial organizational and financing potential. As capital becomes more scarce for innovators, it is imperative that those with new and creative ideas for health and health care improvement consider techniques for capital acquisition that have been successful in other industries and at similar stages of development. The capital and added expertise can allow entrepreneurs to leverage resources, dampen business fluctuations, and strengthen long term prospects. PMID:16583848

  10. Prevention in Poland: health care system reform.

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, M D

    1995-01-01

    Despite the political and economic reforms that have swept Eastern Europe in the past 5 years, there has been little change in Poland's health care system. The Ministry of Health and Social Welfare has targeted preventive care as a priority, yet the enactment of legislation to meet this goal has been slow. The process of reform has been hindered by political stagnation, economic crisis, and a lack of delineation of responsibility for implementing the reforms. Despite the delays in reform, recent developments indicate that a realistic, sustainable restructuring of the health care system is possible, with a focus on preventive services. Recent proposals for change have centered on applying national goals to limited geographic areas, with both local and international support. Regional pilot projects to restructure health care delivery at a community level, local health education and disease prevention initiatives, and a national training program for primary care and family physicians and nurses are being planned. Through regionalization, an increase in responsibility for both the physician and the patient, and redefinition of primary health care and the role of family physicians, isolated local movements and pilot projects have shown promise in achieving these goals, even under the current budgetary constraints. PMID:7610217

  11. Help Yourself to Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Sarah

    A booklet on health care for limited English speakers provides information on choosing the right doctor, buying medicine, paying the bill, and the individual's role in maintaining his or her health. Cartoons, questions and puzzles concerning the message in cartoons and narrative passages, checklists about an individual's personal habits related to…

  12. The right to health care

    PubMed Central

    Turka, Laurence A.; Caplan, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    While our eyes usually glaze over at the continued talk of health care reform, there are a few particulars that bear repeating. So many of the parties involved fail to consider the most basic and most important of all the issues: health insurance is not a luxury, it is a right.

  13. Health care's 100 most wired.

    PubMed

    Solovy, A; Serb, C

    1999-02-01

    They're wired all right, and America's 100 most techno-savvy hospitals and health systems share one more thing: a commitment to using technology to link with employees, patients, suppliers, and insurers. "We want to be a health care travel agency for our community," says one chief information officer. "And we see Internet technology as a key." PMID:10081454

  14. Health care in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Nath, L M

    1994-02-01

    In India, although the health care system infrastructure is extensive, the people often regard government facilities as family planning (FP) centers instead of primary health care centers. This problem has been compounded by the separation of health care and FP at all stages, even down to the storage of the same medication in two different locations depending upon whether it is to be used for "health" or for "FP." In rural areas where the government centers are particularly desolate, the community has chosen to erect its own health care system of private practitioners of all sorts and qualifications. Even in rural areas where a comprehensive health service is provided, with each household visited regularly by health workers, and where this service has resulted in a lowering of the crude death rate from 14.6 to 7 and the maternal mortality rate from 4.7 to 0.5/1000, people depend upon practitioners of various types. Upon analysis, it was discovered that the reason for using this multiplicity of practitioners had nothing to do with the level of satisfaction with the government service or with the accessibility of the services. Rather, when ill, the people make a diagnosis and then go to the proper place for treatment. If, for instance, they believe their malady was caused by the evil eye, they consult a magico-religious practitioner. These various types of practitioners flourish in areas with the best primary health care because they fulfill a need not met by the primary health care staff. If government agencies work with the local practitioners and afford them the proper respect, their skills can be upgraded in selected areas and the whole community will benefit. PMID:12288590

  15. Personal health--the future care paradigm.

    PubMed

    Norgall, Thomas; Blobel, Bernd; Pharow, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Demographic, economic and social conditions developed countries are faced with require a paradigm change for delivering high quality and efficient health services. In that context healthcare systems have to turn towards individualized of patient's care, also called personal care. Interoperability requirements for ubiquitous personalized health services reach beyond current concepts of health information integration among professional stakeholders and related Electronic Patient Records ("e-Health"): Future personal health platforms have particularly to maintain semantic interoperability among systems using different modalities and technologies, different knowledge representation and domain experts' languages as well as different coding schemes and terminologies to include home, personal and mobile systems. The paper introduces the evolving paradigm related to personal health information systems. PMID:17095828

  16. Health care agents

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health does not improve Access and release your medical records Request an autopsy and donate your organs, unless you've stated otherwise in your advance directive Before you ... you do not want these treatments Order sterilization or abortion

  17. The Health Care Home Model: Primary Health Care Meeting Public Health Goals

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    In November 2010, the American Public Health Association endorsed the health care home model as an important way that primary care may contribute to meeting the public health goals of increasing access to care, reducing health disparities, and better integrating health care with public health systems. Here we summarize the elements of the health care home (also called the medical home) model, evidence for its clinical and public health efficacy, and its place within the context of health care reform legislation. The model also has limitations, especially with regard to its degree of involvement with the communities in which care is delivered. Several actions could be undertaken to further develop, implement, and sustain the health care home. PMID:22515874

  18. Marketing home health care.

    PubMed

    Kolatch, A

    1991-11-01

    This case study focuses on the physician as an important customer for home care services. The author describes how Visiting Nurse Service of New York developed and implemented a direct sales strategy to increase the number of referrals from physicians. Five of the direct sales consultants were registered nurses. The tactics used to increase the percentage of cases referred directly by physicians are discussed. PMID:1941173

  19. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  20. Counseling and Mental Health Care in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawahin, Lamise; Ciftci, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of counseling and mental health care in Palestine, including their history and a summary of their current status. Finally, a discussion is presented of future trends in the development of the profession with regard to recent changes in the region.

  1. Your Health Care Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... patients have diabetes? Are you familiar with the foot problems diabetes can cause? Will you work with my primary ... for Men and Women - 2016-mar-womens-health-foot.html Living W/ Diabetes Diabetes is Different for Men and Women Learn ...

  2. Health care reform, behavioral health, and the criminal justice population.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Alison Evans; Cheema, Jehanzeb

    2014-10-01

    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has a number of important features for individuals who are involved with the criminal justice system. Among the most important changes is the expansion of Medicaid to more adults. The current study estimates that 10% of the total Medicaid expansion could include individuals who have experienced recent incarceration. The ACA also emphasizes the importance of mental health and substance abuse benefits, potentially changing the landscape of behavioral health treatment providers willing to serve criminal justice populations. Finally, it seeks to promote coordinated care delivery. New care delivery and appropriate funding models are needed to address the behavioral health and other chronic conditions experienced by those in criminal justice and to coordinate care within the complex structure of the justice system itself. PMID:24807645

  3. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Hospital Quality Data Medical Inspector Patient Safety ... page provides answers to questions about health care for women Veterans. What health care services are available to women Veterans? How can I ...

  4. Relationships between discrimination in health care and health care outcomes among four race/ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Benjamins, Maureen R; Whitman, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Discrimination has been found to be detrimental to health, but less is known about the influence of discrimination in health care. To address this, the current study (1) compared levels of racial/ethnic discrimination in health care among four race/ethnic groups; (2) determined associations between this type of discrimination and health care outcomes; and (3) assessed potential mediators and moderators as suggested by previous studies. Multivariate logistic regression models were used within a population-based sample of 1,699 White, African American, Mexican, and Puerto Rican respondents. Overall, 23% of the sample reported discrimination in health care, with levels varying substantially by race/ethnicity. In adjusted models, this type of discrimination was associated with an increased likelihood of having unmet health care needs (OR = 2.48, CI = 1.57-3.90) and lower odds of perceiving excellent quality of care (OR = 0.43, CI = 0.28-0.66), but not with the use of a physician when not sick or use of alternative medicine. The mediating role of mental health factors was inconsistently observed and the relationships were not moderated by race/ethnicity. These findings expand the literature and provide preliminary evidence that can eventually inform the development of interventions and the training of health care providers. PMID:23456249

  5. The Future of Mental Health Care Delivery: Ideals and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Michael C.; Cooper, Caren C.

    2000-01-01

    Gives a response to the reactants of the authors' article (this issue), "Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology." Anticipates trends in the managed care movement and predicts numerous models of health care delivery as the current system of managed care diminishes. (Author/GCP)

  6. Promoting environmentally responsible health care.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Jacqueline; Skiehar, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Dioxins, polyvinyl chloride and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate are the three main toxins interfering with the goal to maintain a healthy environment, according to the international organization Health Care Without Harm (2004). Exposure to these chemicals has been linked to cancer, as well as reproductive, cardiac, hepatic and developmental disorders (Tickner, Schettler, Guidotti, McCally, and Rossi, 2001). Health-care clients are potentially exposed to these toxins every day: polyvinyl chloride equipment, such as i.v. bags and tubing, is widely used in hospitals, and medical incineration practices emit dioxins into the air (Chlorine Chemistry Council, 2006). Nurses are uniquely positioned to play an active role in environmentally responsible health care through education, advocacy and the implementation of measures to reduce medical wastage and exposure to these chemical toxins (Canadian Nurses Association, 2005). PMID:17269580

  7. Brentwood Community Health Care Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Melody S.; Gonzalez, Maria; Gil, Sandra; Si, Xuemei; Pashoukos, Judith L.; Stafford, Jewel D.; Ford, Elsa; Pashoukos, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Community Alliance for Research Empowering Social Change (CARES) is an academic–community research partnership designed to train community members on research methods and develop the infrastructure for community-based participatory research (CBPR) to examine and address racial/ethnic health disparities. The Brentwood Community Health Assessment (BCHA) was developed through a CBPR pilot project grant from CARES. Objectives The purpose of the BCHA is to assess health care utilization and identify existing barriers to health care access among a multi-ethnic community in the Hamlet of Brentwood, New York. Methods Using CBPR approaches, the community–academic research partnership develop the study design and survey instrument. Trained Bilingual (English/Spanish) data collectors verbally administered surveys door-to-door to residents of Brentwood from October 2010 to May 2011. Inclusion criteria required participants to be at least 18 years of age and speak either English or Spanish. Results Overall, 232 residents completed the BCHA; 49% were male, 66% Hispanic, 13% non-Hispanic White, 13% non-Hispanic Black, 29% had less than a high school education, and 33% were born in United States. The assessment results revealed that most residents are able to access health care when needed and the most significant barriers to health care access are insurance and cost. Conclusions We describe the community–academic partnered process used to develop and implement the BCHA and report assessment findings; the community-partnered approach improved data collection and allowed access into one of Suffolk County’s most vulnerable communities. PMID:24859100

  8. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  9. Phytotherapy in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanele; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  10. Coping with health care reform.

    PubMed

    van Eyk, H; Baum, F; Houghton, G

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a case study of health service reform in southern Adelaide. A mail survey, interviews and focus groups were used to gain an understanding of health care providers' perceptions and experiences of reform. The paper discusses lessons learnt about health service reform and its impact on people working in the health system. It finds that continual change that is not based on a well-articulated vision is likely to lead to 'reform fatigue' and low morale. An action research approach can be used by researchers to help managers and staff understanding the context in which reform is happening, and thus give support to organisational learning. PMID:11496464

  11. Fitch ratings. Health care special report.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Fitch Ratings continues to believe that the current and projected personnel shortages, especially among registered nurses (RNs). present one of the greatest operating challenges for health care providers nationwide. As noted in Fitch Research on "Health Care Staffing Shortage," dated June 21, 2001 (available on Fitch's web site at www.fitchratings. com), staffing is an area that is creating enormous expense inflation for health care providers and presenting one of the biggest areas of uncertainty in assessing an organization's credit quality. Shortages are becoming increasingly widespread, affecting health care providers in urban and rural areas regardless of size. Since health care is a labor intensive business, salary and benefit costs are key determinants of profitability. Fitch believes the attention given to the nursing shortage and potential looming crisis has created a sense of urgency, with many hospitals developing innovative strategies for work force development. In addition, federal, state, and local governments are creating programs and/or providing financial support to help alleviate shortages. Yet, the benefits of many of these initiatives may not be realized for many years, and Fitch expects health care providers to continue experiencing inflating salary and benefit expenses with growing temporary staffing usage and competitive pressure to increase overall compensation. Fitch believes managing labor costs is critical to achieving profitability, especially as the ability to increase revenue diminishes. Fitch believes the nursing shortage will continue to represent an area of extreme expense pressure for health care providers for years to come. Imbalanced supply and demand, which is expected to worsen as retiring nurses outstrip replacements, should create financial strain for many providers in an industry that is gearing up to meet the aging population's anticipated demand for more services. Fitch plans to closely monitor management strategies for dealing with vacancy and turnover rates, as well as trends in agency spending, to determine financial implications among its rated portfolio. PMID:14528733

  12. Health Care Procedure Considerations and Individualized Health Care Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Teachers need to maintain a safe, healthy environment for all their students in order to promote learning. However, there are additional considerations when students require health care procedures, such as tube feeding or clean intermittent catheterization. Teachers must effectively monitor their students and understand their roles and…

  13. Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-02-01

    As reimbursement transitions from a volume-based to a value-based system, innovation in health care delivery will be needed. The process of innovation begins with framing the problem that needs to be solved along with the strategic vision that has to be achieved. Similar to scientific testing, a hypothesis is generated for a new solution to a problem. Innovation requires conducting a disciplined form of experimentation and then learning from the process. This manuscript will discuss the different types of innovation, and the key steps necessary for successful innovation in the health care field. PMID:26694623

  14. [Stress in health care workers].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Stiefel; Guex, Patrice

    2008-02-13

    A growing body of evidence indicates that health care professionals are in need of support. Beside heavy clinical patient volume or administrative duties, stress related to the significance of contextual factors is an important source of clinician's distress. Identification of and working through such stress can be a durable source of support. This article discusses key elements of these stressors, namely, the role of emotions of the clinician, awareness of limits, confusion about empathy, the influence of development and life trajectory on professional identity and the conflicting roles of the health care provider being in need of support. PMID:18320773

  15. A systems view of health care for the poor.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, N.

    1989-01-01

    A systems view is a synthesis of health policy, medical sociology, public health, and common clinical problems to describe the current crisis in health care for the poor. Medical sociology and public health are particularly relevant to understand the complexity of clinical issues. Although preventive medicine is in desuetude, it is crucial if we are to reduce the future liability of postponed medical care among the poor. Medicaid metamorphosed to Medicare, as half of its outlays are spent on care of the elderly in nursing homes. Health care for the poor will remain a moral challenge to the architects of health policy and the medical profession. PMID:2659807

  16. Measuring competition in health care markets.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, L C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Measuring competition is increasingly important for analysis of health care markets and policies. Measurement of competition in health care is made complex by the breadth of potential issues under study, by the lack of necessary data, and by rapid changes in health care financing and delivery. This study reviews key issues in the measurement of competition and is designed to familiarize researchers and policymakers interested in competition measurement, but not steeped in its practice, with key concepts, data sources, and ways of adapting measures to fit ongoing changes in health care markets. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Attention to several key issues will strengthen measurement. Important components of successful measurement are: careful identification of the products and market areas for study; selection of Herfindahl-Hirschman or other indices to fit the issues being considered; consideration of econometric problems, like endogeneity, with common measures; and attention to the ways that current marketplace changes, like growth in managed care, affect the performance of classic measures. Data needed for constructing measures are also frequently scarce, insufficient, or both. Measurement could be improved with access to better data. PMID:11327175

  17. Health Care Reform: A Values Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popko, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the crisis in health care, considering costs, lack of access, and system ineffectiveness. Reviews "Setting Relationships Right," the Catholic Health Association's proposal for health care reform. Advocates educators' awareness of children's health needs and health care reform issues and support for the Every Fifth Child Act of 1992. (DMM)

  18. Ethics, empathy, and gender in health care.

    PubMed

    Nadelson, C C

    1993-09-01

    The changes that have taken place in medicine over the past few decades have challenged our views about the responsibilities and obligations of those providing health care and about their relationships with their patients. The demands brought by technologic advances and economic concerns have tested our ability to practice humane, empathic, and ethical medicine. This paper addresses the connection between ethics and empathy in the context of our current health care system. The author reviews the concept of empathy and argues that ethical medicine is empathic medicine. Since gender differences in health care needs and disparities in treatment have been identified, gender serves to focus some of the issues and exemplify some concerns about empathic and ethical practice. PMID:8352341

  19. School Readiness Goal Begins with Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    Currently 59 bills are awaiting Congressional action. Meanwhile, a national coalition of economists and medical specialists (the National Leadership Coalition for Health Care Reform) are circulating a sensible consensus health reform plan proposing national practice guidelines; universal health care access; and efficient cost control, delivery,…

  20. Oral health care in residential aged care services: barriers to engaging health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Slack-Smith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The oral health of older people living in residential aged care facilities has been widely recognised as inadequate. The aim of this paper is to identify barriers to effective engagement of health-care providers in oral care in residential aged care facilities. A literature review was conducted using MEDline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and PsychInfo between 2000 and 2013, with a grey literature search of government and non-government organisation policy papers, conference proceedings and theses. Keywords included: dental/oral care, residential aged care, health-care providers, barriers, constraints, and limitations. A thematic framework was used to synthesise the literature according to a series of oral health-care provision barriers, health-care provider barriers, and cross-sector collaborative barriers. A range of system, service and practitioner level barriers were identified that could impede effective communication/collaboration between different health-care providers, residents and carers regarding oral care, and these were further impeded by internal barriers at each level. Findings indicated several areas for investigation and consideration regarding policy and practice improvements. While further research is required, some key areas should be addressed if oral health care in residential aged care services is to be improved. PMID:25155109

  1. Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... Patients About ACOG Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care Home For Patients Search FAQs Good Health Before ...

  2. Positive rights, negative rights and health care.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    In the current debate about healthcare reform in the USA, advocates for government-ensured universal coverage assume that health care is a right. Although this position is politically popular, it is sometimes challenged by a restricted view of rights popular with libertarians and individualists. The restricted view of rights only accepts 'negative' rights as legitimate rights. Negative rights, the argument goes, place no obligations on you to provide goods to other people and thus respect your right to keep the fruits of your labour. A classic enumeration of negative rights includes life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Positive rights, by contrast, obligate you either to provide goods to others, or pay taxes that are used for redistributive purposes. Health care falls into the category of positive rights since its provision by the government requires taxation and therefore redistribution. Therefore, the libertarian or individualist might argue that health care cannot be a true right. This paper rejects the distinction between positive and negative rights. In fact, the protection of both positive and negative rights can place obligations on others. Furthermore, because of its role in helping protect equality of opportunity, health care can be tied to the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. There is, therefore, good reason to believe that health care is a human right and that universal access should be guaranteed. The practical application, by governments and non-governmental organisations, of several of the arguments presented in this paper is also discussed. PMID:20935318

  3. Making continual improvements to health care.

    PubMed

    Morris, M; Gambone, J C

    1994-03-01

    Health care organizations are looking for new ways to optimize the way that they provide health services. The notion that high quality health care means high costs is no longer accepted without question. Business organizations that found themselves at very high levels of inefficiency, not unlike the levels being seen in hospitals and clinics today, were able to transform their businesses by applying the principles of continual improvement. The components of knowledge for improvement, i.e., knowledge of a system, knowledge of variation, knowledge of psychology, and the theory of knowledge may seem to some too obvious to be recognized and applied on a daily basis in the workplace. Businesses and organizations that are failing, however, often lack this knowledge. We cannot be certain that management by continual improvement can or should be applied or modified to work in all health care organizations. Although the delivery of health care services is a business unlike any other, it has much in common with other service industries. The idea that the quality of patient care can be improved by using the principles of continual improvement currently is being tested. PMID:8194204

  4. Transforming Health Care Delivery Through Consumer Engagement, Health Data Transparency, and Patient-Generated Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Wald, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Address current topics in consumer health informatics. Methods Literature review. Results Current health care delivery systems need to be more effective in the management of chronic conditions as the population turns older and experiences escalating chronic illness that threatens to consume more health care resources than countries can afford. Most health care systems are positioned poorly to accommodate this. Meanwhile, the availability of ever more powerful and cheaper information and communication technology, both for professionals and consumers, has raised the capacity to gather and process information, communicate more effectively, and monitor the quality of care processes. Conclusions Adapting health care systems to serve current and future needs requires new streams of data to enable better self-management, improve shared decision making, and provide more virtual care. Changes in reimbursement for health care services, increased adoption of relevant technologies, patient engagement, and calls for data transparency raise the importance of patient-generated health information, remote monitoring, non-visit based care, and other innovative care approaches that foster more frequent contact with patients and better management of chronic conditions. PMID:25123739

  5. Health Care in the United States [and] Health Care Issues: A Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John; Dempsey, Joanne R.

    1984-01-01

    An article on American health care which focuses on health care costs and benefits is combined with a lesson plan on health care issues to enable students to consider both issues of cost effectiveness and morality in decisions about the allocation of health care. The article covers the history of interest in health care, the reasons for the…

  6. Small area variations in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, J; Gittelsohn

    1973-12-14

    Health information about total populations is a prerequisite for sound decision-making and planning in the health care field. Experience with a population-based health data system in Vermont reveals that there are wide variations in resource input, utilization of services, and expenditures among neighboring communities. Results show prima facie inequalities in the input of resources that are associated with income transfer from areas of lower expenditure to areas of higher expenditure. Variations in utilization indicate that there is considerable uncertainty about the effectiveness of different levels of aggregate, as well as specific kinds of, health services. Informed choices in the public regulation of the health care sector require knowledge of the relation between medical care systems and the population groups being served, and they should take into account the effect of regulation on equality and effectiveness. When population-based data on small areas are available, decisions to expand hospitals, currently based on institutional pressures, can take into account a community's regional ranking in regard to bed input and utilization rates. Proposals by hospitals for unit price increases and the regulation of the actuarial rate of insurance programs can be evaluated in terms of per capita expenditures and income transfer between geographically defined populations. The PSRO's can evaluate the wide variations in level of services among residents of different communities. Coordinated exercise of the authority vested in these regulatory programs may lead to explicit strategies to deal directly with inequality and uncertainty concerning the effectiveness of health care delivery. Population-based health information systems, because they can provide information on the performance of health care systems and regulatory agencies, are an important step in the development of rational public policy for health. PMID:4750608

  7. Health care insolvency and bankruptcy.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, L; Speiser, M; Maltz, A; Kirpalani, S

    1998-08-01

    Bankruptcy is an event that is often considered a business' worst nightmare. Debt, lawyers, and the U.S. government can lead to the eventual destruction of a business. This article shows how declaring bankruptcy can be a helpful instrument in continuing a successful venture in the health care marketplace. PMID:10182242

  8. Universal health care in India: Panacea for whom?

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Imrana

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the current notion of universal health care (UHC) in key legal and policy documents and argues that the recommendations for UHC in these entail further abdication of the State's responsibility in health care with the emphasis shifting from public provisioning of services to merely ensuring universal access to services. Acts of commission (recommendations for public private partnership [PPPs], definition and provision of an essential health package to vulnerable populations to ensure universal access to care) and omission (silence maintained on tertiary care) will eventually strengthen the private and corporate sector at the cost of the public health care services and access to care for the marginalized. Thus, the current UHC strategy uses equity as a tool for promoting the private sector in medical care rather than health for all. PMID:24351383

  9. Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health.

    PubMed

    Ternullo, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal; Lane, Susan; Myint-U, Khinlei; Havasy, Robert; Carter, Michael; Kvedar, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    This article reviews the history, current status, and future plans of the Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health (the Center). Established in 1995 by Harvard Medical School teaching hospitals, the Center develops strategies to move healthcare from the hospital and doctor's office into the day-to-day lives of patients. It leverages information technology to help manage chronic conditions, maintain health and wellness, and improve adherence to prescribed regimen, patient engagement, and clinical outcomes. Since inception, it has served over 30,000 patients. The Center's core functions include videoconference-based real-time virtual visits, home vital sign monitoring, store-and-forward online consultations, social media, mobile technology, and other novel methods of providing care and enabling health and wellness remotely and independently of traditional time and geographic constraints. It offers a wide range of services, programs, and research activities. The Center comprises over 40 professionals with various technical and professional skills. Internally within Partners HealthCare, the role of the Center is to collaborate, guide, advise, and support the experimentation with and the deployment and growth of connected health technologies, programs, and services. Annually, the Center engages in a deliberative planning process to guide its annual research and operational agenda. The Center enjoys a diversified revenue stream. Funding sources include institutional operating budget/research funds from Partners HealthCare, public and private competitive grants and contracts, philanthropic contributions, ad hoc funding arrangements, and longer-term contractual arrangements with third parties. PMID:23330595

  10. Contextualizing an Expanded Definition of Health Literacy among Adolescents in the Health Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Philip M.; Prelip, Michael; Calimlim, Brian M.; Quiter, Elaine S.; Glik, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The current emphasis on preventive health care and wellness services suggests that measures of skills and competencies needed to effectively navigate the health care system need to be better defined. We take an expanded perspective of health literacy and define it as a set of skills used to organize and apply health knowledge, attitudes and…

  11. Contextualizing an Expanded Definition of Health Literacy among Adolescents in the Health Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Philip M.; Prelip, Michael; Calimlim, Brian M.; Quiter, Elaine S.; Glik, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The current emphasis on preventive health care and wellness services suggests that measures of skills and competencies needed to effectively navigate the health care system need to be better defined. We take an expanded perspective of health literacy and define it as a set of skills used to organize and apply health knowledge, attitudes and…

  12. Towards an alternative economics of health care.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Geoffrey M

    2009-01-01

    It is argued here that an economics centred on subjective utility-maximization is unsuitable for the analysis and policy grounding of health care provision. To some extent, the peculiarities of health care have been recognized by mainstream health economists, who sometimes abandon Paretian welfare considerations to focus on needs instead. This article examines important peculiarities of health care that are relatively neglected in the literature. Some of these concern health care needs: while health itself is a universal need, needs for health care provision are largely involuntary, varied, and idiosyncratic. These issues have important consequences for the planning of health care systems and the extent of transaction costs in any market-based system. These factors, combined with the inherent dynamism of modern health care needs and capabilities, create an opening for alternative approaches to health care economics. PMID:19099619

  13. Financing the health care Internet.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J C

    2000-01-01

    Internet-related health care firms have accelerated through the life cycle of capital finance and organizational destiny, including venture capital funding, public stock offerings, and consolidation, in the wake of heightened competition and earnings disappointments. Venture capital flooded into the e-health sector, rising from $3 million in the first quarter of 1998 to $335 million two years later. Twenty-six e-health firms went public in eighteen months, raising $1.53 billion at initial public offering (IPO) and with post-IPO share price appreciation greater than 100 percent for eighteen firms. The technology-sector crash hit the e-health sector especially hard, driving share prices down by more than 80 percent for twenty-one firms. The industry now faces an extended period of consolidation between e-health and conventional firms. PMID:11192423

  14. Integrating Health Information Technology to Achieve Seamless Care Transitions.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Leah; Kirtane, Janhavi; Lynn, Joanne; McKethan, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Improving care transitions, or "handoffs" as patients migrate from one care setting to another, is a priority across stakeholder groups and health-care settings and additionally is included in national health-care goals set forth in the National Quality Strategy. Although many demonstrations of improved care transitions have succeeded, particularly for hospital discharges, ensuring consistent, high-quality, and safe transitions of care remains challenging. This paper highlights the potential for health information technology to become an increasing part of effective transitional care interventions, with the potential to reduce the resource burden currently associated with effective care transitions, the ability to spread improved practices to larger numbers of patients and providers efficiently and at scale, and, as health technology interoperability increases, the potential to facilitate critical information flow and feedback loops to clinicians, patients, and caregivers across disparate information systems and care settings. PMID:24522208

  15. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  16. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  17. Reduction of catastrophic health care expenditures by a community-based health insurance scheme in Gujarat, India: current experiences and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Michael Kent

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the Self Employed Women's Association's Medical Insurance Fund in Gujarat in terms of insurance coverage according to income groups, protection of claimants from costs of hospitalization, time between discharge and reimbursement, and frequency of use. METHODS: One thousand nine hundred and thirty claims submitted over six years were analysed. FINDINGS: Two hundred and fifteen (11%) of 1927 claims were rejected. The mean household income of claimants was significantly lower than that of the general population. The percentage of households below the poverty line was similar for claimants and the general population. One thousand seven hundred and twelve (1712) claims were reimbursed: 805 (47%) fully and 907 (53%) at a mean reimbursement rate of 55.6%. Reimbursement more than halved the percentage of catastrophic hospitalizations (>10% of annual household income) and hospitalizations resulting in impoverishment. The average time between discharge and reimbursement was four months. The frequency of submission of claims was low (18.0/1000 members per year: 22-37% of the estimated frequency of hospitalization). CONCLUSIONS: The findings have implications for community-based health insurance schemes in India and elsewhere. Such schemes can protect poor households against the uncertain risk of medical expenses. They can be implemented in areas where institutional capacity is too weak to organize nationwide risk-pooling. Such schemes can cover poor people, including people and households below the poverty line. A trade off exists between maintaining the scheme's financial viability and protecting members against catastrophic expenditures. To facilitate reimbursement, administration, particularly processing of claims, should happen near claimants. Fine-tuning the design of a scheme is an ongoing process - a system of monitoring and evaluation is vital. PMID:12219151

  18. Health Care User Perspectives on Constructing, Contextualizing, and Co-Producing "Quality of Care".

    PubMed

    Baim-Lance, Abigail; Tietz, Daniel; Schlefer, Madeleine; Agins, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Most of the research on health care user "quality of care" perspectives seeks discrete and measurable indicators to advance quality improvement (QI) goals. This lacks sufficiently grounded query about the meaning of "quality of care" for health users, and how context influences their ideas and experiences. We studied this between 2010 and 2011, repeatedly interviewing and shadowing 45 individuals in three of New York's hospital-based outpatient HIV care settings during routine visits. We found participants using common terminology, but across the cohort meaning varied and employed personal narratives. Participants conveyed the impact of historic and current experiences of stigma and discrimination on limiting access to care, and showed its destabilizing effects on quality constructs. Participants also felt they contributed to their health care settings' delivery of quality care. From our findings, we discuss the applicability and implications of "co-production" to conceptualize health care as jointly delivered by typical "givers" and "receivers" of care. PMID:25670664

  19. Health Care Politics and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Marmor, Theodore Richard

    2013-01-01

    This article is a condensed and edited version of a speech delivered to The Business of Medicine: A Course for Physician Leaders symposium presented by Yale-New Haven Hospital and the Medical Directors Leadership Council at Yale University in November 2012 and drawn from Politics, Health, and Health Care: Selected Essays by Theodore R. Marmor and Rudolf Klein [1]. It faithfully reflects the major argument delivered, but it does not include the typical range of citations in a journal article. The material presented here reflects more than 40 years of teaching a course variously described as Political Analysis and Management, Policy and Political Analysis, and The Politics of Policy. The aim of all of these efforts is to inform audiences about the necessity of understanding political conflict in any arena, not least of which is the complex and costly world of medical care. PMID:24058315

  20. Health care organization drug testing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J P; Dempsey, J

    1992-09-01

    Health care managers are being required to respond to the growing concerns of the public about alcohol and drug use in the health care workplace. To this end, the following recommendations are offered. A drug testing policy should be developed with input from and support of employees and unions. "For cause" testing should be used because it results in more definitive results and better employee acceptance. Unless there are compelling reasons for random testing, "for cause" testing is the preferable method. All levels of employees and the medical staff should be subject to the drug-testing policy. Rehabilitation rather than punishment should be emphasized in dealing with employees with alcohol and drug problems. PMID:10120030

  1. Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

    MedlinePLUS

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ056 PREGNANCY Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care • What is a preconception care checkup? • Who should have a preconception care checkup? • Why is a healthy diet ...

  2. ARTEMIS: a collaborative framework for health care.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R; Jagannathan, V; Srinivas, K; Karinthi, R; Reddy, S M; Gollapudy, C; Friedman, S

    1993-01-01

    Patient centered healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative process. This involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with diverse perspectives: primary care physicians, hospital administrators, labs, clinics, and insurance. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The use of multi-media collaboration technology can facilitate timely delivery of patient care and reduce cost at the same time. During the last five years, the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, recently renamed ARPA) developed a number of generic key subsystems of a comprehensive collaboration environment. These subsystems are intended to overcome the barriers that inhibit the collaborative process. Three subsystems developed under this program include: MONET (Meeting On the Net)--to provide consultation over a computer network, ISS (Information Sharing Server)--to provide access to multi-media information, and PCB (Project Coordination Board)--to better coordinate focussed activities. These systems have been integrated into an open environment to enable collaborative processes. This environment is being used to create a wide-area (geographically distributed) research testbed under DARPA sponsorship, ARTEMIS (Advance Research Testbed for Medical Informatics) to explore the collaborative health care processes. We believe this technology will play a key role in the current national thrust to reengineer the present health-care delivery system. PMID:8130536

  3. Health care-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh; Kollef, Marin H

    2010-06-01

    Traditionally, pneumonia developing in patients who receive health care services in the outpatient environment, such as nursing homes, long-term care facilities, and dialysis centers, has been classified and treated as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Recent studies, however, have shown that this type of infection, known as health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is distinct from CAP in terms of its epidemiology and etiology, and increases the risk for infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. A review of available clinical data about HCAP was conducted to determine effective empiric treatment strategies and improve clinical outcomes. Analysis of multi-institutional clinical data showed that mortality associated with HCAP is higher than with CAP, suggesting that patients with HCAP may have been treated as hospitalized patients with CAP and received inappropriate initial empiric antibiotic treatment. All patients presenting to the hospital with suspected HCAP or CAP should be evaluated for their underlying risk of infection with MDR pathogens. Because HCAP may be similar to hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) both clinically and etiologically, it should be treated as HAP until culture data become available. A greater recognition of HCAP as a new class of pneumonia with a distinct epidemiologic, microbiologic, and clinical profile should lead physicians to initiate appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy more often, thereby improving the likelihood for optimal clinical outcomes and patient care. PMID:20499775

  4. Savings account for health care costs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can set aside tax-exempt money for your health care expenses. This means you will pay no or ... offers reimbursement for those expenses when you use health care. HRAs can be set up for any type ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  8. Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Press Release Archives learn more » For Patients Your health care choices matter. Whether you're anticipating a surgical ... certificate of accreditation is a sign that a health care organization meets or exceeds nationally-recognized Standards. Learn ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vulvodynia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vulvodynia? Skip sharing on social media ... been ruled out. To diagnose vulvodynia, 1 a health care provider may recommend that a woman have blood ...

  10. Job satisfaction in health-care organizations

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Kavita; Srivastava, Kalpana

    2012-01-01

    Job satisfaction among health-care professionals acquires significance for the purpose of maximization of human resource potential. This article is aimed at emphasizing importance of studying various aspects of job satisfaction in health-care organizations. PMID:23766585

  11. The Cultural Geography of Health Care Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesler, Wilbert M.

    1987-01-01

    This article shows how health care delivery is related to cultural or human geography. This is accomplished by describing health care delivery in terms of 12 popular themes of cultural geography. (JDH)

  12. Consumer Attitudes toward Health and Health Care: A Differential Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaires returned by 343 out of 350 subjects measured health attitudes and health status. Results suggest that some consumers take a more scientific approach to health care and prevention. Demographic factors, health status, and health consciousness are partial predictors of consumer attitudes and approach to health care. (SK)

  13. Catholic health care: future blueprint.

    PubMed

    Connors, E J

    1986-11-01

    Every Catholic hospital is influenced by one of two models of behavior, the private-business model and the public-service model. Which model eventually dominates an organization's actions is determined by the behavior of its leaders--sponsors, trustees, executive managers, and physicians. Since these internal forces are more likely than are external forces to determine an organization's course, Catholic health care leaders must consciously decide which value they wish to embrace. They also must improve their ability to forecast and influence the future, beginning with the creation of an independent national commission formed to assess the status of Catholic health care. Religious institutes, seeking collaboration and dialogue among themselves, should play a key role in implementing such a commission's recommendations. The Catholic health care systems that emerge in the future as a result of long-range planning and a value-driven philosophy will be multicongregational rather than owned by a single religious institute, fewer in number and larger in scope, and influential on a regional level. They will be expected to participate in networking with local non-Catholic providers and to integrate finance and delivery. PMID:10279352

  14. Women as health care decision-makers: implications for health care coverage in the United States.

    PubMed

    Matoff-Stepp, Sabrina; Applebaum, Bethany; Pooler, Jennifer; Kavanagh, Erin

    2014-11-01

    Women in the United States make approximately 80% of the health care decisions for their families, yet often go without health care coverage themselves. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act provides an historical opportunity for women to gain health care coverage for themselves and their families. The focus of this commentary is on women's leadership roles in the context of health care decision- making and Affordable Care Act education and outreach, and implications for reaching broader health and social goals. PMID:25418222

  15. Telematics for rural health care practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Robert H.; Kardaun, Jan W. P. F.

    1990-06-01

    The " crisis" in rural health care i. e. the decreasing number of practitioners is partially caused by the increasing use of technology in health care. Health care practitioners in rural Canada are progressively finding their practice more difficult because of their isolation from the population centers housing many of the services and supplies needed in the modern practice of medicine. The centralization of these supplies and services results from the increasing use of technology in medicine. It is uneconomical to place expensive equipment highly trained technicians and consultants and well-stocked and current information sources in rural locations where they are underutilized. Thus over the years the increasing use of technology makes rural practice more difficult and less attractive in comparison to an urban practice that can easily and cheaply employ the benefits of technology and expert consultation. The Saskatchewan situation is examined using data collected by the authors and compared to other rural areas reported in the literature. The ways that computer communications can help alleviate this situation are explained and illustrated through a review of North American telematics activities. Telematic services for physicians are developing in North America. This is in synergy with the increasing ownership of computers by physicians. We contrast the Canadian scene with the American. Telematics is a technological approach that can be employed to reduce the isolation of rural health care practitioners. It can provide

  16. Synthetic real estate: bringing corporate finance to health care.

    PubMed

    Varwig, D; Smith, J

    1998-01-01

    The changing landscape of health care has caused hospitals, health care systems, and other health care organizations to look for ways to finance expansions and acquisitions without "tainting" their balance sheets. This search has led health care executives to a financing technique that has been already embraced by Fortune 500 companies for most of this decade and more recently adopted by high-tech companies: synthetic real estate. Select case studies provide examples of the more creative financial structures currently being employed to meet rapidly growing and increasingly complex funding needs. PMID:9612732

  17. Cellular Radio Telecommunication for Health Care: Benefits and Risks

    PubMed Central

    Sneiderman, Charles A.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Cellular radio telecommunication has increased exponentially with many applications to health care reported. The authors attempt to summarize published applications with demonstrated effect on health care, review briefly the rapid evolution of hardware and software standards, explain current limitations and future potential of data quality and security, and discuss issues of safety. PMID:15298996

  18. Implementing a teenage health service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Green, Elizabeth; Larcombe, J; Horbury, I

    The health of teenagers is currently a priority of the NHS, with many schemes and projects being developed. There are documented difficulties for teenagers in accessing health care, especially within general practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of a tailor-made clinic in the primary care setting. PMID:16209395

  19. Social networks--the future for health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Frances; Cave, Jonathan; Boardman, Felicity; Ren, Justin; Pawlikowska, Teresa; Ball, Robin; Clarke, Aileen; Cohen, Alan

    2012-12-01

    With the rapid growth of online social networking for health, health care systems are experiencing an inescapable increase in complexity. This is not necessarily a drawback; self-organising, adaptive networks could become central to future health care delivery. This paper considers whether social networks composed of patients and their social circles can compete with, or complement, professional networks in assembling health-related information of value for improving health and health care. Using the framework of analysis of a two-sided network--patients and providers--with multiple platforms for interaction, we argue that the structure and dynamics of such a network has implications for future health care. Patients are using social networking to access and contribute health information. Among those living with chronic illness and disability and engaging with social networks, there is considerable expertise in assessing, combining and exploiting information. Social networking is providing a new landscape for patients to assemble health information, relatively free from the constraints of traditional health care. However, health information from social networks currently complements traditional sources rather than substituting for them. Networking among health care provider organisations is enabling greater exploitation of health information for health care planning. The platforms of interaction are also changing. Patient-doctor encounters are now more permeable to influence from social networks and professional networks. Diffuse and temporary platforms of interaction enable discourse between patients and professionals, and include platforms controlled by patients. We argue that social networking has the potential to change patterns of health inequalities and access to health care, alter the stability of health care provision and lead to a reformulation of the role of health professionals. Further research is needed to understand how network structure combined with its dynamics will affect the flow of information and potentially the allocation of health care resources. PMID:22985490

  20. On reducing information asymmetry in U.S. health care.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Kesavan, Ram; Bernacchi, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Information asymmetry is a significant issue facing the U.S. health care system. In this article, we investigate some methods of reducing this asymmetry. We trace the information asymmetry using the "wicked problem" of the health care distribution system. An information asymmetry reduction method requiring joint responsibilities among health care stakeholders is developed. It is argued that information asymmetry is a contributor to enormous health care inflation. Hence, any reduction in such asymmetry will reduce health care costs. Concepts from both signaling and corrective justice theories are integrated in this article to help reduce the information asymmetry that exists in the U.S. health care system. Getting health care costs in line with other "advanced" nations, is the long-term solution to the wicked problem that currently exists in the U.S. health care system. There is an immediate need for a centralized health care database with adequate provisions for individual privacy. Both processes as well as an outcome-based control system are essential for reducing information asymmetries in the U.S. health care system. PMID:24308415

  1. The cost of quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Overton, D T; Delene, L M

    1992-08-01

    The potential fiscal impact of improved quality on health care providers and organizations is substantial. In this era of dwindling health care resources, proposals that may limit cost increases while improving quality represent true win-win situations. There is a need for a substantial amount of health care research in this fertile area of quality improvement. PMID:1628559

  2. Satisfaction with health care among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Abraído-Lanza, Ana F; Céspedes, Amarilis; Daya, Shaira; Flórez, Karen R; White, Kellee

    2011-05-01

    Despite growing interest in disparities in access to health care, relatively little is known about different facets of care among Latinas, their satisfaction with the care they receive, and the predictors of satisfaction. This study examined whether various health care access and context factors, the quality of the patient-physician interaction, and medical mistrust predict satisfaction with health care among Latina immigrants in New York City. Structured interviews were conducted with 220 Latinas predominantly from the Dominican Republic and aged 40 years or over. Of the access to health care variables examined, greater waiting time predicted dissatisfaction with health care. Greater quality of the patient-physician interaction predicted less dissatisfaction. The effect of the patient-physician interaction on dissatisfaction was mediated, in part, by waiting time. The results illustrate the important role of specific health care factors in satisfaction with care. PMID:21551929

  3. The risks of innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in health care creates risks that are unevenly distributed. An evolutionary analogy using species to represent business models helps categorize innovation experiments and their risks. This classification reveals two qualitative categories: early and late diversification experiments. Early diversification has prolific innovations with high risk because they encounter a "decimation" stage, during which most experiments disappear. Participants face high risk. The few decimation survivors can be sustaining or disruptive according to Christensen's criteria. Survivors enter late diversification, during which they again expand, but within a design range limited to variations of the previous surviving designs. Late diversifications carry lower risk. The exception is when disruptive survivors "diversify," which amplifies their disruption. Health care and radiology will experience both early and late diversifications, often simultaneously. Although oversimplifying Christensen's concepts, early diversifications are likely to deliver disruptive innovation, whereas late diversifications tend to produce sustaining innovations. Current health care consolidation is a manifestation of late diversification. Early diversifications will appear outside traditional care models and physical health care sites, as well as with new science such as molecular diagnostics. They warrant attention because decimation survivors will present both disruptive and sustaining opportunities to radiology. Radiology must participate in late diversification by incorporating sustaining innovations to its value chain. Given the likelihood of disruptive survivors, radiology should seriously consider disrupting itself rather than waiting for others to do so. Disruption entails significant modifications of its value chain, hence, its business model, for which lessons may become available from the pharmaceutical industry's current simultaneous experience with early and late diversifications. PMID:25686642

  4. Spinal pain: current understanding, trends, and the future of care.

    PubMed

    Parkin-Smith, Gregory F; Amorin-Woods, Lyndon G; Davies, Stephanie J; Losco, Barrett E; Adams, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This commissioned review paper offers a summary of our current understanding of nonmalignant spinal pain, particularly persistent pain. Spinal pain can be a complex problem, requiring management that addresses both the physical and psychosocial components of the pain experience. We propose a model of care that includes the necessary components of care services that would address the multidimensional nature of spinal pain. Emerging care services that tailor care to the individual person with pain seems to achieve better outcomes and greater consumer satisfaction with care, while most likely containing costs. However, we recommend that any model of care and care framework should be developed on the basis of a multidisciplinary approach to care, with the scaffold being the principles of evidence-based practice. Importantly, we propose that any care services recommended in new models or frameworks be matched with available resources and services - this matching we promote as the fourth principle of evidence-based practice. Ongoing research will be necessary to offer insight into clinical outcomes of complex interventions, while practice-based research would uncover consumer needs and workforce capacity. This kind of research data is essential to inform health care policy and practice. PMID:26604815

  5. Spinal pain: current understanding, trends, and the future of care

    PubMed Central

    Parkin-Smith, Gregory F; Amorin-Woods, Lyndon G; Davies, Stephanie J; Losco, Barrett E; Adams, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This commissioned review paper offers a summary of our current understanding of nonmalignant spinal pain, particularly persistent pain. Spinal pain can be a complex problem, requiring management that addresses both the physical and psychosocial components of the pain experience. We propose a model of care that includes the necessary components of care services that would address the multidimensional nature of spinal pain. Emerging care services that tailor care to the individual person with pain seems to achieve better outcomes and greater consumer satisfaction with care, while most likely containing costs. However, we recommend that any model of care and care framework should be developed on the basis of a multidisciplinary approach to care, with the scaffold being the principles of evidence-based practice. Importantly, we propose that any care services recommended in new models or frameworks be matched with available resources and services – this matching we promote as the fourth principle of evidence-based practice. Ongoing research will be necessary to offer insight into clinical outcomes of complex interventions, while practice-based research would uncover consumer needs and workforce capacity. This kind of research data is essential to inform health care policy and practice. PMID:26604815

  6. Competition and integration in Swedish health care.

    PubMed

    Ahgren, Bengt

    2010-07-01

    Despite of an insignificant track record of quasi-market models in Sweden, new models of this kind have recently been introduced in health care; commonly referred to as "choice of care". This time citizens act as purchasers; choosing the primary care centre or family physician they want to be treated by, which, in turn, generates a capitation payment to the chosen unit. Policy makers believe that such systems will be self-remedial, that is, as a result of competition the strong providers survive while unprofitable ones will be eliminated. Because of negative consequences of the fragmented health care delivery, policy makers at the same time also promote different forms of integrated health care arrangements. One example is "local health care", which could be described as an upgraded community-oriented primary care, supported by adaptable hospital services, fitting the needs of a local population. This article reviews if it is possible to combine this kind of integrated care system with a competition driven model of governance, or if they are incompatible. The findings indicate that some choice of care schemes could hamper the development of integration in local health care. However, geographical monopolies like local health care, enclosed in a non-competitive context, lack the stimulus of competition that possibly improves performance. Thus, it could be argued that if choice of care and local health care should be combined, patients ought to choose between integrated health care arrangements and not among individual health professionals. PMID:20153910

  7. Opportunities for Palliative Care in Public Health.

    PubMed

    De Lima, Liliana; Pastrana, Tania

    2016-03-18

    In May 2014, the World Health Assembly, of the World Health Organization (WHO), unanimously adopted a palliative care (PC) resolution, which outlines clear recommendations to the United Nations member states, such as including PC in national health policies and in the undergraduate curricula for health care professionals, and highlights the critical need for countries to ensure that there is an adequate supply of essential PC medicines, especially those needed to alleviate pain. This resolution also carries great challenges: Every year over 20 million patients (of which 6% are children) need PC at the end of life (EOL). However, in 2011, approximately three million patients received PC, and only one in ten people in need is currently receiving it. We describe this public health situation and systems failure, the history and evolution of PC, and the components of the WHO public health model. We propose a role for public health for PC integration in community settings to advance PC and relieve suffering in the world. PMID:26989831

  8. Health care reform: possibilities & opportunities for primary care.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Randy; Hefner, Jennifer; Welker, Mary Jo; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2014-06-01

    Amid the swirl of change in today's US health care system, there are opportunities for new care delivery models to slow rising costs and improve outcomes in family medicine. This review summarizes the possibilities. PMID:25061618

  9. Flipping primary health care: A personal story.

    PubMed

    Mate, Kedar S; Salinas, Gilbert

    2014-12-01

    There is considerable interest in ideas borrowed from education about "flipping the classroom" and how they might be applied to "flipping" aspects of health care to reach the Triple Aim of improved health outcomes, improved experience of care, and reduced costs. There are few real-life case studies of "flipping health care" in practice at the individual patient level. This article describes the experience of one of the authors as he experienced having to "flip" his primary health care. We describe seven inverted practices in his care, report outcomes of this experiment, describe the enabling factors, and derive lessons for patient-centered primary care redesign. PMID:26250637

  10. Health care under the Taliban.

    PubMed

    Faiz, A

    1997-04-26

    When the Taliban swept into Kabul, Afghanistan in September 1996, they began a reign of terror over the people of that city, especially the women. Adhering to a fundamentalist interpretation of Islamic law, the group has severely restricted women's freedom of movement and access to health care, education, and employment. Some female physicians and nurses have been able to continue working because the Taliban has decreed that male doctors can not treat women patients unless they are their relatives. Female physicians and nurses have been subjected to beatings by armed Taliban guards who enforce "morals." Male and female doctors are viewed with suspicion by the Taliban and are routinely ridiculed in public. Women are attacked when they venture into the streets to seek medical care for themselves or their children, and a pregnant woman recently delivered her baby in the street while her husband was being beaten for trying to take her to the hospital. This interference with the delivery of health care has occurred at a time when many people require treatment for injuries inflicted in connection with the war and when the public utility system has collapsed. Few physicians are willing to discuss the patients they treat for injuries inflicted by the torturous Taliban, especially since some physicians have collaborated with the Taliban in order to avoid reprisals. PMID:9130961

  11. US Health Care Reform and the Future of Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    THE PATIENT PROTECTION and Affordable Care Act has grand ambitions: to provide insurance coverage to more than 30 million currently uninsured Americans, to slow increases in health care costs, to reorganize the health care delivery system, and to improve the quality of care provided to all. Where does the oral health community fit in this initiative? Should dentists “scope up” to become a more active part of the primary care workforce? Or should dentists “scope down” and delegate parts of the traditional dental tool kit to midlevel practitioners? Our nation's public health largely depends on whether we can create a more integrated and public health–oriented delivery system. The oral health, physical health, and public health communities should address this challenge together. PMID:21852628

  12. Health care reform--where ADA stands.

    PubMed

    Finn, S C; Gallagher, A

    1993-09-01

    Few issues have galvanized the American public as dramatically as health care reform. Virtually everyone agrees that health care costs, quality, and accessibility require close examination and a prescription for change. Not everyone, however, agrees on the exact nature of this change. It is extremely important that we awaken the public and our policy makers to the vital role nutrition plays in the health care system. ADA is dedicated to this effort. Stay tuned as the health care reform plan unfolds. This effort is likely to be long term and will require your commitment, dedication, and energy to make nutrition services in health care reform a reality. PMID:8360412

  13. Health Care Marketing: Role Evolution of the Community Health Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syre, Thomas R.; Wilson, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses role delineation in the health education profession, defines and presents principles of health care marketing, describes marketing plan development, and examines major ethical issues associated with health care marketing when utilized by community health educators. A marketing plan format for community health education is…

  14. First-class health: amenity wards, health insurance, and normalizing health care inequalities in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ellison, James

    2014-06-01

    In 2008, a government hospital in southwest Tanzania added a "first-class ward," which, unlike existing inpatient wards defined by sex, age, and ailment, would treat patients according to their wealth. A generation ago, Tanzanians viewed health care as a right of citizenship. In the 1980s and 1990s, structural adjustment programs and user fees reduced people's access to biomedical attention. Tanzania currently promotes "amenity" wards and health insurance to increase health care availability, generate revenue from patients and potential patients, and better integrate for-profit care. In this article, I examine people's discussions of these changes, drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in the 2000s and 1990s. I argue that Tanzanians criticize unequal access to care and health insurance, although the systemic structuring of inequalities is becoming normalized. People transform the language of socialism to frame individualized market-based care as mutual interdependence and moral necessity, articulating a new biomedical citizenship. PMID:24753314

  15. Physical Health Problems and Barriers to Optimal Health Care Among Children in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephanie Anne; Fortin, Kristine

    2015-10-01

    Children and adolescents in foster care placement represent a unique population with special health care needs, often resulting from pre-placement early adversity and neglected, unaddressed health care needs. High rates of all health problems, including acute and/or chronic physical, mental, and developmental issues prevail. Disparities in health status and access to health care are observed. This article summarizes the physical health problems of children in foster care, who are predisposed to poor health outcomes when complex care needs are unaddressed. Despite recognition of the significant burden of health care need among this unique population, barriers to effective and optimal health care delivery remain. Legislative solutions to overcome obstacles to health care delivery for children in foster care are discussed. PMID:26364980

  16. Transformation of health care in China.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, W C

    1984-04-01

    The evolving Chinese cooperative medical system is examined in an effort to gain some valuable knowledge for both the 3rd world and developed countries. The changes occurring in the Chinese health system are the unintended consequences of economic reforms that have exerted direct and indirect effects on the organization, financing, and delivery of health care. As China does not publish complete or current information on its health care system, the discussion draws on limited published information. China, an agrarian nation, has a population of 1 billion with 80% of the people living in rural areas. A gross national product of US$300/person in 1981 places China in the bottom 1/3 of the developing countries. In 1981 China had 2 hospital beds/1000 people. There are 516,000 senior doctors trained in Western medicine and 290,000 senior doctors trained in traditional Chinese medicine, yielding a ratio of 0.8 senior doctors/1000 people. China also has 436,000 assistant doctors in Western medicine, but most of the primary health care is provided by "barefoot doctors." Hospital beds and health personnel are unevenly distributed between the urban and rural areas. Health personnel, health stations, and hospitals are organized on a 3-tier system. In 1980 China inaugurated major economic reforms in agricultural production and public financing. Alterations in the rural economic structure brought about major changes in the Chinese cooperative medical system. The most influential reform provided financial incentives to peasants, who now receive direct rewards for individual output. Because of economic reform, collective financing and public support for the cooperative medical system diminished. The proportion of the rural population protected by the system has been reduced by 50%. The rapid, continuing decline in the cooperative medical system has affected several important elements of health care: the number of barefoot doctors per capita has diminished; most barefoot doctors forego continuing education; there has been an increase in the financial burden borne by peasants; and hospitals are experiencing financial problems. With the collapse of cooperative health care financing, many barefoot doctors have created private practices, charging patients on a fee for service basis and selling drugs to them. In some brigades, the peasants have organized voluntary health insurance programs, but the peasants face problems in organizing voluntary insurance programs. 1 consequence of the rising income of peasants is their demand for higher quality medical care. The Chinese experience illustrates the effects of economic structure on the supply of health personnel, the demand for services, and the organization and financing of health care. Economic incentives affected the supply of health personnel. Another lesson to be learned is the need to establish a universal, compulsory financial system for health care. The Chinese experience also demonstrates that the pricing structure influences the demand and need for insurance. PMID:6700690

  17. Establishment of primary health care in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Birt, C A

    1990-08-01

    Basic demographic and epidemiological data relevant to health problems in Vietnam are described in this paper. Existing health service arrangements are referred to, with particular emphasis on the strategy for development of primary health care. The establishment of the paediatric centre in Ho Chi Minh City is reported, and examples of its valuable work in primary health care development are described. PMID:2121182

  18. Establishment of primary health care in Vietnam.

    PubMed Central

    Birt, C A

    1990-01-01

    Basic demographic and epidemiological data relevant to health problems in Vietnam are described in this paper. Existing health service arrangements are referred to, with particular emphasis on the strategy for development of primary health care. The establishment of the paediatric centre in Ho Chi Minh City is reported, and examples of its valuable work in primary health care development are described. PMID:2121182

  19. Basic Health Care. Instructor's Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    The curriculum for the training of the entry level health workers (referred to as nursing aid, assistant, or basic health care worker) is organized with a modular approach and designed within the framework of a humanistic learning growth model. Module 1, The Health Core, provides basic education for any health care worker. Module 2, The Patient…

  20. Health care reform. Gridlock and pork?

    PubMed

    Weil, T P

    1997-01-01

    Can Americans expect the same gridlock and pork between now and the 21st Century? What are the possible directions that the United States can move in regarding health care reform and the long-term financing of health entitlement programs? Here, the author offers a snapshot of current politics and some predictions for the next four years. And explores the question: Are Americans willing to make the necessary sacrifices for future generations to profit by the significant changes needed by entitlement and health reform, or will it be business as usual? America's centrist perspective was recently reinforced by the 1996 election, suggesting that no major innovations in entitlement or in the health system should be anticipated in the next four years. PMID:10164286

  1. Preventive Health Care for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Stults, Barry M.

    1984-01-01

    Demographic, economic and humanitarian considerations dictate that effective preventive health care be provided to the elderly. A disease-specific approach to geriatric preventive health care will not suffice; measures to enhance or maintain physical, mental and social function must also be emphasized. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many preventive care procedures has not been adequately investigated in the elderly. Research is urgently needed to determine the efficacy of and appropriate target population for various geriatric preventive health care measures. PMID:6395498

  2. The changing face of health care consumers.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Caring for a diverse pool of patients is an ongoing challenge for health care practitioners and marketers. Communication difficulties and cultural misunderstandings still stand in the way and keep members of some minority populations from getting the health care they need. To better serve these groups, it's crucial to learn more about patients' values, needs, and expectations. Fortunately, opportunities abound for health care marketers to learn about and effectively target these still largely underserved populations. PMID:11763652

  3. Creating a high-value delivery system for health care.

    PubMed

    Teisberg, Elizabeth O; Wallace, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Health care reform that focuses on improving value enhances both the well-being of patients and the professional satisfaction of physicians. Value in health care is the improvement in health outcomes achieved for patients relative to the money spent. Dramatic and ongoing improvement in the value of health care delivered will require fundamental restructuring of the system. Current efforts to improve safety and reduce waste are truly important but not sufficient. The following three structural changes will drive simultaneous improvement in outcomes and efficiency: (1) reorganizing care delivery into clinically integrated teams defined by patient needs over the full cycle of care; (2) measuring and reporting patient outcomes by clinical teams, across the cycle of care and for identified clusters of medical circumstances; and (3) enabling reimbursement tied to value rather than to quantity of services. Many of these changes require physician leadership. We discuss steps on the journey to value-based care delivery. PMID:19632561

  4. Controversies in faith and health care.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; Duff, Jean; Fitzgibbon, Atallah; Karam, Azza; Mills, Edward J; Munnings, Keith; Smith, Sally; Seshadri, Shreelata Rao; Steinberg, Avraham; Vitillo, Robert; Yugi, Philemon

    2015-10-31

    Differences in religious faith-based viewpoints (controversies) on the sanctity of human life, acceptable behaviour, health-care technologies and health-care services contribute to the widespread variations in health care worldwide. Faith-linked controversies include family planning, child protection (especially child marriage, female genital mutilation, and immunisation), stigma and harm reduction, violence against women, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, gender, end-of-life issues, and faith activities including prayer. Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and traditional beliefs have similarities and differences in their viewpoints. Improved understanding by health-care providers of the heterogeneity of viewpoints, both within and between faiths, and their effect on health care is important for clinical medicine, public-health programmes, and health-care policy. Increased appreciation in faith leaders of the effect of their teachings on health care is also crucial. This Series paper outlines some faith-related controversies, describes how they influence health-care provision and uptake, and identifies opportunities for research and increased interaction between faith leaders and health-care providers to improve health care. PMID:26159392

  5. Health Care Reform: Opportunities for Improving Adolescent Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Charles E., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    Health care reform represents a major step toward achieving the goal of improved preventive and primary care services for all Americans, including children and adolescents. Adolescence is a unique developmental age district from both childhood and adulthood with special vulnerabilities, health concerns, and barriers to accessing health care. It is…

  6. Optimizing Health Care Coalitions: Conceptual Frameworks and a Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Hupert, Nathaniel; Biala, Karen; Holland, Tara; Baehr, Avi; Hasan, Aisha; Harvey, Melissa

    2015-12-01

    The US health care system has maintained an objective of preparedness for natural or manmade catastrophic events as part of its larger charge to deliver health services for the American population. In 2002, support for hospital-based preparedness activities was bolstered by the creation of the National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program, now called the Hospital Preparedness Program, in the US Department of Health and Human Services. Since 2012, this program has promoted linking health care facilities into health care coalitions that build key preparedness and emergency response capabilities. Recognizing that well-functioning health care coalitions can have a positive impact on the health outcomes of the populations they serve, this article informs efforts to optimize health care coalition activity. We first review the landscape of health care coalitions in the United States. Then, using principles from supply chain management and high-reliability organization theory, we present 2 frameworks extending beyond the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response's current guidance in a way that may help health care coalition leaders gain conceptual insight into how different enterprises achieve similar ends relevant to emergency response. We conclude with a proposed research agenda to advance understanding of how coalitions can contribute to the day-to-day functioning of health care systems and disaster preparedness. PMID:26545194

  7. Health Care Reform and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... onset Alzheimer's Quality of care Medical research Consumer health insurance website The Department of Health and Human Services ... www.cuidadodesalud.gov/ ) — to help individuals find what health insurance options are available in their communities. About Healthcare. ...

  8. Advance Health Care Directives and “Public Guardian”: The Italian Supreme Court Requests the Status of Current and Not Future Inability

    PubMed Central

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Bello, Stefania; Gulino, Matteo; Zaami, Simona; Frati, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Advance health care decisions animate an intense debate in several European countries, which started more than 20 years ago in the USA and led to the adoption of different rules, based on the diverse legal, sociocultural and philosophical traditions of each society. In Italy, the controversial issue of advance directives and end of life's rights, in the absence of a clear and comprehensive legislation, has been over time a subject of interest of the Supreme Court. Since 2004 a law introduced the “Public Guardian,” aiming to provide an instrument of assistance to the person lacking in autonomy because of an illness or incapacity. Recently, this critical issue has once again been brought to the interest of the Supreme Court, which passed a judgment trying to clarify the legislative application of the appointment of the Guardian in the field of advance directives. PMID:24729977

  9. Paid Sick Days and Health Care Use

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Won Kim

    2011-01-01

    Background In identifying factors of health care use, past research has focused on individual-level characteristics or on the health care system itself. This study investigates whether access to paid sick days, an amenable environmental factor outside the health care system, is associated with primary and emergency care use. Methods A nationally representative sample of 14,302 U.S. working adults extracted from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey data was used. Multiple logistic regressions were performed, controlling for demographic variables, health conditions and status, and access to health care. Results Workers with lower socioeconomic status, poorer health status, or without health insurance or regular places for care were more likely to lack paid sick leave than higher-status workers. For all U.S. working adults, access to paid sick days benefits was significantly associated with increased use of outpatient care but not with reduced use of ER. For U.S. working adults with health insurance coverage, access to paid sick days benefits was significantly associated with increased use of outpatient care and reduced use of emergency care. Conclusions A public policy mandating paid sick days may help facilitate timely access to primary care, reduce avoidable emergency care use, and reduce health disparities among workers. PMID:21761429

  10. Health Savings Accounts and Health Care Spending

    PubMed Central

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Shah, Mona; Frogner, Bianca K

    2010-01-01

    Objective The impact of consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs) has primarily been studied in a small number of large, self-insured employers, but this work may not generalize to the wide array of firms that make up the overall economy. The goal of our research is to examine effects of health savings accounts (HSAs) on total, medical, and pharmacy spending for a large number of small and midsized firms. Data Sources Health plan administrative data from a national insurer were used to measure spending for 76,310 enrollees over 3 years in 709 employers. All employers began offering a HSA-eligible plan either on a full-replacement basis or alongside traditional plans in 2006 and 2007 after previously offering only traditional plans in 2005. Study Design We employ difference-in-differences generalized linear regression models to examine the impact of switching to HSAs. Data Extraction Methods Claims data were aggregated to enrollee-years. Principal Findings For total spending, HSA enrollees spent roughly 5–7 percent less than non-HSA enrollees. For pharmacy spending, HSA enrollees spent 6–9 percent less than traditional plan enrollees. More of the spending decrease was observed in the first year of enrollment. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the notion that CDHP benefit designs affect decisions that are at the discretion of the consumer, such as whether to fill or refill a prescription, but have less effect on care decisions that are more at the discretion of the provider. PMID:20528988

  11. [Information security in health care].

    PubMed

    Ködmön, József; Csajbók, Zoltán Ernő

    2015-07-01

    Doctors, nurses and other medical professionals are spending more and more time in front of the computer, using applications developed for general practitioners, specialized care, or perhaps an integrated hospital system. The data they handle during healing and patient care are mostly sensitive data and, therefore, their management is strictly regulated. Finding our way in the jungle of laws, regulations and policies is not simple. Notwithstanding, our lack of information does not waive our responsibility. This study summarizes the most important points of international recommendations, standards and legal regulations of the field, as well as giving practical advices for managing medical and patient data securely and in compliance with the current legal regulations. PMID:26122901

  12. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and productivity, or other measures. At minimum, clinicians will be required to demonstrate that their new systems of care and future clinical activity are in conformance with overall standards of “best practice” in health care. PMID:22640759

  13. Health Services and Health Care Providers

    MedlinePLUS

    College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems Posted under Health Guides . Updated 12 March 2015. +Related Content What are student health services? The student health services (sometimes called ...

  14. America's health care safety net: revisiting the 2000 IOM report.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Marion E; Baxter, Raymond J

    2007-01-01

    The committee that wrote the 2000 Institute of Medicine report on the health care safety net reconvened in 2006 to reflect on the safety net from the perspective of rising numbers of uninsured and underinsured people, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, high immigration levels, and new fiscal and policy pressures on care for vulnerable populations. Safety-net providers now participate in Medicaid managed care but find it difficult to meet growing needs for specialty services, particularly mental health care and affordable prescription drugs. How current state reforms and coverage expansions will affect care for the poor and uninsured is a critical issue. PMID:17848461

  15. Reforming health care in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Császi, L; Kullberg, P

    1985-01-01

    Over the past two decades Hungary has initiated a series of social and economic reforms which have emphasized decentralization of control and the reintroduction of market mechanisms into the socialized economy. These reforms both reflect and reinforce a changing social structure, in particular the growing influence of upper class special interest groups. Market reforms are an expression of concurrent ideological shifts in Hungarian society. We examined the political significance of three recent proposals to reform health services against the backdrop of broader social and economic changes taking place. The first proposes a bureaucratic reorganization, the second, patient co-payments, and the third, a voucher system. The problems each proposal identifies, as well as the constituency each represents, reveal a trend toward consolidation of class structure in Hungary. Only one of these proposals has any potential to democratize the control and management of the heath care system. Moreover, despite a governmental push toward decentralization, two of these proposals would actually increase centralized bureaucratic control. Two of the reforms incorporate market logic into their arguments, an indication that the philosophical premises of capitalism are re-emerging as an important component of the Hungarian world-view. In Hungary, as well as in other countries, social analysis of proposed health care reforms can effectively illuminate the social and political dynamics of the larger society. PMID:4071119

  16. Home Health Care: Services and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Geraldine; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Findings from a study of home care services in one New York district document the value and relatively modest costs of home health care for the chronically ill and dependent elderly. Professional nurses coordinated the care, but most of the direct services were provided by home health aides and housekeepers. (MF)

  17. Variation in health care worker removal of personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Caroline; Van Hoof, Sarah; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-07-01

    In the current era of emerging pathogens such as Ebola virus, removal of personal protective equipment (PPE) is crucial to reduce contamination of health care workers. However, current removal practices are not well described. We undertook a systematic evaluation of health care worker removal of PPE for contact isolation to examine variation in removal procedures. Findings indicate that under usual conditions, only about half of health care workers correctly remove their PPE, and very few remove their PPE in the correct order and dispose of it in the proper location. PMID:26138659

  18. Strengthening of primary health care: key to deliver inclusive health care.

    PubMed

    Yeravdekar, Rajiv; Yeravdekar, Vidya Rajiv; Tutakne, M A; Bhatia, Neeta P; Tambe, Murlidhar

    2013-01-01

    Inequity and poverty are the root causes of ill health. Access to quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis in many parts of the country remains an unfulfilled aspiration. Disparity in health care is interpreted as compromise in 'Right to Life.' It is imperative to define 'essential health care,' which should be made available to all citizens to facilitate inclusivity in health care. The suggested methods for this include optimal utilization of public resources and increasing public spending on health care. Capacity building through training, especially training of paramedical personnel, is proposed as an essential ingredient, to reduce cost, especially in tertiary care. Another aspect which is considered very important is improvement in delivery system of health care. Increasing the role of 'family physician' in health care delivery system will improve preventive care and reduce cost of tertiary care. These observations underlie the relevance and role of Primary health care as a key to deliver inclusive health care. The advantages of a primary health care model for health service delivery are greater access to needed services; better quality of care; a greater focus on prevention; early management of health problems; and cumulative improvements in health and lower morbidity as a result of primary health care delivery. PMID:23873190

  19. Priorities in health care: reply to Lewis and Charny.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, David

    1989-01-01

    This paper is a reply to proposals to base priority health-care decisions on public opinion surveys. Whilst it is recognised that current practice is less than satisfactory, it is argued here that basing health-care priorities on societal attitudes in this way is not a solution and does not provide a satisfactory basis for bringing democracy to the health service. PMID:11644371

  20. Health care or health trade? A historic moment of choice.

    PubMed

    Hart, Julian Tudor

    2004-01-01

    During the 20th century, medical care evolved from a notional economy of trying to a real economy of doing. Care systems can therefore usefully be measured and evaluated as production systems. Whether they will succumb to the pattern of competitive commodity production for profit in the market, or will succeed in developing their own new gift economy for human needs, will become a dominant political and economic issue in the 21st century. Health care is now becoming industrialized in essentially the same way as textile manufacture was industrialized in the 19th century, with corresponding loss of control by skilled workers over their work processes. The outcome of the struggle between skilled handloom weavers and their industrializing employers was determined by the huge rise in productivity associated with machines. The outcome of current struggles between public service and state-subsidized corporate care for profit will be decided likewise by superior productivity. Evidence suggests that in terms of health outcome, democratized public care with a much expanded and diversified workforce could be far more productive than industrialization. PMID:15242157

  1. Primary Health Care and Narrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John W

    2015-01-01

    Primary health care has received a lot of attention since the Alma Ata Conference, convened by the World Health Organization in 1978. Key to the strategy to improve health care outlined at the Alma Ata conference is citizen participation in every phase of service delivery. Although the goals of primary health care have not been achieved, the addition of narrative medicine may facilitate these ends. But a new epistemology is necessary, one that is compatible with narrative medicine, so that local knowledge is elevated in importance and incorporated into the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. In this way, relevant, sustainable, and affordable care can be provided. The aim of this article is to discuss how primary health care might be improved through the introduction of narrative medicine into planning primary health care delivery. PMID:26222094

  2. Using appreciative inquiry to transform health care.

    PubMed

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2013-08-01

    Amid tremendous changes in contemporary health care stimulated by shifts in social, economic and political environments, health care managers are challenged to provide new structures and processes to continually improve health service delivery. The general public and the media are becoming less tolerant of poor levels of health care, and health care professionals need to be involved and supported to bring about positive change in health care. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and method for promoting transformational change, shifting from a traditional problem-based orientation to a more strength-based approach to change, that focuses on affirmation, appreciation and positive dialog. This paper discusses how an innovative participatory approach such as AI may be used to promote workforce engagement and organizational learning, and facilitate positive organizational change in a health care context. PMID:24099230

  3. Current research funding methods dumb down health care and rehabilitation for disabled people and aging population: a call for a change.

    PubMed

    Negrini, S; Padua, L; Kiekens, C; Michail, X; Boldrini, P

    2014-12-01

    Health care systems in Western societies are faced with two major challenges: aging populations and the growing burden of chronic conditions. This translates into more persons with disabilities and the need for more Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) services. We raise the point of how these emerging needs are faced by the actual research funding. We briefly present the results of an analysis we made about research funding by the Italian National Health Service as an interesting case study, since it relates to Italy (the financer) and the United States, where National Institutes of Health (NIH) reviewers were identified according to their classification of research topics. The topics of potentially greatest interest for aging Western societies, like chronicity, disability and rehabilitation, were among those least often funded and considered in the traditional method of financing research projects. These results could be based on those PRM peculiarities that make the specialty different from all other classical biomedical specialties, namely the bio-psycho-social approach and its specific research methodologies. Moreover, PRM researchers are spread among the different topics as usually classified, and it is probable that PRM projects are judged by non-PRM reviewers. There are at least two possible ways in which research can be better placed to meet the emerging needs of Western societies (chronicity, disability and consequently also rehabilitation). One is to create specific keywords on these topics so as to improve the match between researchers and reviewers; the second is to allocate specific funds to research in these areas. In fact, the not coherence between emerging needs and research priorities have already been periodically addressed in the past with specific "political" and/or "social" initiatives, when researchers were forced to respond to new emergencies: some historical examples include cancer or HIV and viral diseases or the recent Ebola outbreak. PMID:25521703

  4. College and University Health Care Professionals: An Expanding Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Phillip M.

    1980-01-01

    An historical perspective of the American College Health Association emphasizes the importance of teamwork among health personnel. The current trend in litigation toward health care professionals and the regulatory role of government has resulted in an apparent increase in legal activity, and necessitates teamwork between doctors and lawyers. (JN)

  5. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  6. Dual Loyalty in Prison Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Heino; Wolff, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Despite the dissemination of principles of medical ethics in prisons, formulated and advocated by numerous international organizations, health care professionals in prisons all over the world continue to infringe these principles because of perceived or real dual loyalty to patients and prison authorities. Health care professionals and nonmedical prison staff need greater awareness of and training in medical ethics and prisoner human rights. All parties should accept integration of prison health services with public health services. Health care workers in prison should act exclusively as caregivers, and medical tasks required by the prosecution, court, or security system should be carried out by medical professionals not involved in the care of prisoners. PMID:22390510

  7. Innovations to improve oral health care access.

    PubMed

    Colangelo, Gary A

    2009-07-01

    Improving access to oral health care requires an understanding of the social, cultural, political, financial, and manpower factors that influence access. Armed with this knowledge, individuals and organizations desiring to improve access can innovate to change public policy, garner resources, create clinical programs, and expand public health interventions as demonstrated by the examples in this article. This article highlights past and contemporary innovations that have improved access, or have the potential to improve access to oral health care. These innovations are grouped into six categories: the dental profession, public health, community-based care delivery, oral health care funding, dental education, and evidence-based dentistry. PMID:19482132

  8. Virtual connections: Internet health care.

    PubMed

    Penson, Richard T; Benson, Renee C; Parles, Karen; Chabner, Bruce A; Lynch, Thomas J

    2002-01-01

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery that provides hope to the patient, support to caregivers, and encourages the healing process. The Center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. The 20th century success of the Internet is now translating into changes in 21st century medical practice. The changes brought about by the Internet have at once facilitated and complicated the practice of medicine. Physicians and patients are challenged to take advantage of the increased opportunities afforded by Internet access while being mindful of its drawbacks and the limitations to virtual communication. The case of Karen Parles, one of the authors, is presented. Karen developed locally advanced lung cancer and used the Internet to research her diagnosis. She found the information on lung cancer limited and confusing, and, in response, developed a website devoted to empowering lung cancer patients in their search for information and support (http://www.lungcanceronline.org). Here we discuss issues surrounding patients' use of the Internet for health information and communication with health care providers. The value of information-seeking as a coping mechanism is debated, and concerns are raised regarding confidentiality of electronic communications and the logistics of physicians adopting e-mail as a mechanism for communicating with patients. PMID:12490743

  9. Model of care transformation: a health care system CNE's journey.

    PubMed

    Swick, Maureen; Doulaveris, Phyllis; Christensen, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    In 2001, the Institute of Medicine released the report "Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century." The report criticizes our health care system and argues that we are failing to provide Americans with the high-quality and affordable health care they deserve and need. While incremental progress has been made, we continue to strive for improved care quality, and our rising costs are potentially catastrophic. Consistent with the Institute of Medicine report, and its reputation for innovation, Inova Health System identified care model transformation as a system priority. Given that the organization is replacing its electronic health record and introducing advanced analytic capabilities, the opportunity to transform the model of care in tandem with core clinical platform enhancement was a compelling reason to move forward. PMID:22955219

  10. Children with Special Health Care Needs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... United States) have special health care needs, including cerebral palsy, spina bifida, asthma, hemophilia, autism, diabetes, and various ... Allergies? Resources Home Safety Checklist ACEP Coloring Book Download the Coloring Book » Emergency Care For You American ...

  11. Special Issue: The Family and Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J., Ed.; McCubbin, Hamilton I., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses research and interventions related to family health care. Topics include health promotion; risk behaviors; vulnerability and illness onset; choosing health care systems; stress; caregiving and coping; family counseling; and family responses to Alzheimer's Disease, pediatric cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and obesity. (JAC)

  12. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  13. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  14. Rx for Rising Health Care Premiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Sandra Millers

    1990-01-01

    Strategies for containing the cost of providing health insurance for college employees include cost sharing with employees, cost reduction through options such and managed care, incentives for use of health maintenance organizations, offering health care alternatives, and entering into multiple-employer purchasing groups. (MSE)

  15. Health care law versus constitutional law.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Supreme Court's ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, is a landmark decision - both for constitutional law and for health care law and policy. Others will study its implications for constitutional limits on a range of federal powers beyond health care. This article considers to what extent the decision is also about health care law, properly conceived. Under one view, health care law is the subdiscipline that inquires how courts and government actors take account of the special features of medicine that make legal or policy issues especially problematic - rather than regarding health care delivery and finance more generically, like most any other economic or social enterprise. Viewed this way, the opinions from the Court's conservative justices are mainly about general constitutional law principles. In contrast, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dissenting opinion for the four more liberal justices is just as much about health care law as it is about constitutional law. Her opinion gives detailed attention to the unique features of health care finance and delivery in order to inform her analysis of constitutional precedents and principles. Thus, the Court's multiple opinions give a vivid depiction of the compelling contrasts between communal versus individualistic conceptions of caring for those in need, and between health care and health insurance as ordinary commodities versus ones that merit special economic, social, and legal status. PMID:23262771

  16. The US health care system: On a road to nowhere?

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    THIS ARTICLE REVIEWS THE CURRENT STATE AND FUTURE PROSPECTS of the health care system in the United States. The 1990s were a decade of reform and change in US medical care, with the debate over the Clinton plan for universal insurance and, after its defeat, the spread of managed care. In particular, managed care had a profound impact on the delivery of medical services, transforming traditional insurance arrangements. However, after all of the changes, the United States appears to be no closer to solving the problems that have characterized its health care system for the past 3 decades. Over 40 million Americans lack health insurance, universal coverage is nowhere in sight, and medical care costs are rising again after a period of moderation. It is doubtful that incremental health reforms will significantly ameliorate these problems. PMID:12160126

  17. Supporting positive dimensions of health, challenges in mental health care

    PubMed Central

    Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2011-01-01

    This paper will explore two contrasting paradigms in mental health care and their relationship to evidence-based practice. The biomedical perspective of pathogenesis and the health perspective of salotogenesis are two major diverse views in mental health care. Positive dimensions of health are traditionally viewed as software not suitable for statistical analysis, while absence of symptoms of disease are regarded as measurable and suitable for statistical analysis and appropriate as a foundation of evidence-based practice. If the main goal of mental health care is to enhance subjectively experienced health among patients, it will not be sufficient to evaluate absence of symptoms of disease as a measure of quality of care. The discussion focuses on the paradox of evidence-based absence of illness and disease versus subjectively experienced health and well-being as criterions of quality of care in mental health care. PMID:21637739

  18. Reported lifetime aberrant drug-taking behaviors are predictive of current substance use and mental health problems in primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Michael F.; Davis, James; Passik, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The aim of this report is to determine the frequency of aberrant drug behaviors and their relationship substance abuse disorders in a large primary sample of patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Methods: The data utilized for this report was obtained from 904 chronic pain patients receiving opioid therapy from their primary care physician. A questionnaire was developed based on 12 aberrant drug behaviors reported in the clinical literature. The diagnosis of a current substance use disorder was determined using DSM-IV criteria. Results: The average duration of chronic pain in the sample was 16 years, and for opioid therapy 6.4 years. 80.5% of the sample reported one or more lifetime aberrant drug behaviors. The most frequent behaviors reported included early refills (41.7%), increase dose without physician consent (35.7%) and felt intoxicated from opioids (32.2%). Only 1.1% of subjects with 1-3 aberrant behaviors (n=464, 51.2%) met DSM-IV criteria for current opioid dependence compared to 9.9% of patients with 4 or more behaviors (n=264, 29.3%). Persons with a positive urine toxicology tests for cocaine were 14 times more likely to report 4 or more behaviors than no behaviors (14.1% v.s.1.1%). A logistic model found that subjects who reported four or more aberrant behaviors were more likely to have a current substance use disorder (OR 10.14; 3.72, 27.64), a positive test for cocaine (OR 3.01; 1.74, 15.4), an ASI psychiatric composite score >0.5 (OR 2.38; 1.65, 3.44), male gender (OR 2.08: 1.48, 2.92) and older age (OR 0.69; 0.59, 0.81) compared to subjects with three or fewer behaviors. Pain levels, employment status and morphine equivalent dose do not enter the model. Conclusions: Patients who report 4 or more aberrant drug behaviors are associated with a current substance use disorder and illicit drug use, whereas subjects with up to 3 aberrant behaviors have a very low probability of a current substance abuse disorder. Four behaviors - over sedated oneself, felt intoxicated, early refills, increase dose on own – appear useful as a screening questions to predict patients at greatest risk for a current substance use disorders. PMID:18721174

  19. Health care: economic impact of caring for geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rich, Preston B; Adams, Sasha D

    2015-02-01

    National health care expenditures constitute a continuously expanding component of the US economy. Health care resources are distributed unequally among the population, and geriatric patients are disproportionately represented. Characterizing this group of individuals that accounts for the largest percentage of US health spending may facilitate the introduction of targeted interventions in key high-impact areas. Changing demographics, an increasing incidence of chronic disease and progressive disability, rapid technological advances, and systemic market failures in the health care sector combine to drive cost. A multidisciplinary approach will become increasingly necessary to balance the delicate relationship between our constrained supply and increasing demand. PMID:25459539

  20. The State of Transgender Health Care: Policy, Law, and Medical Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I review the current status of transgender people’s access to health care in the United States and analyze federal policies regarding health care services for transgender people and the limitations thereof. I suggest a preliminary outline to enhance health care services and recommend the formulation of explicit federal policies regarding the provision of health care services to transgender people in accordance with recently issued medical care guidelines, allocation of research funding, education of health care workers, and implementation of existing nondiscrimination policies. Current policies denying medical coverage for sex reassignment surgery contradict standards of medical care and must be amended. PMID:24432926

  1. [Physiotherapeutic care marketing research: current state-of-the art].

    PubMed

    Babaskin, D V

    2011-01-01

    Successful introduction of modern technologies into the national health care systems strongly depends on the current pharmaceutical market situation. The present article is focused on the peculiarities of marketing research with special reference to physiotherapeutic services and commodities. Analysis of the structure and sequence of marketing research processes is described along with the methods applied for the purpose including their support by the use of Internet resources and technologies. PMID:21574299

  2. Health care seeking among Mexican American men.

    PubMed

    Sobralske, Mary C

    2006-04-01

    This focused ethnography explored health care seeking beliefs and behaviors of Mexican American men living in south central Washington State. Data collection included interviews with 36 research participants living in the community, participant observation in the research setting, and examination of ethnographic documents and cultural artifacts. Four major themes were identified: the identity of manhood dictates health care seeking, health means being able to be a man by fulfilling cultural obligations, illness means not being able to be a man, and men seek health care when their manhood is threatened or impaired. Machismo, the cultural concept of manliness, persisted among men despite the level of acculturation and other factors. Women influenced men's health care seeking behaviors. To fulfill their obligations, men must stay healthy and seek care when needed. Knowing when and why men do not seek health care enables nurses to better understand and serve the Mexican American community. PMID:16595400

  3. Current FDA directives for promoting public health

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.H. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The current directions of the FDA are outlined. The underlying philosophy of the FDA under the Reagan Administration is that both the private sector and the government must address the responsibilities to which they are best suited for the health-care system to work more efficiently. To facilitate this, FDA is conducting comprehensive reviews of FDA regulations and the drug-evaluation process. There are many dimensions to promoting public health, and the FDA alone cannot assure an adequate supply of safe and effective drugs. Innovative science and technology are needed to develop new drugs, followed by maximum potentiation (maximum good and least harm) after FDA approval. Hospital pharmacists have a role in maximizing the potential benefits of drugs through pharmacy and therapeutics committees. The current status of the pilot program for patient package inserts is described. The response at a recent hearing on the program indicates that the responsibility to protect the public health is shared by the government, health professions, industry, and the public. The FDA's campaign on sodium is based on that shared responsibility. By improving communication and building upon their common objections, both pharmacy and the FDA can do their jobs successfully.

  4. Health care and equity in India.

    PubMed

    Balarajan, Y; Selvaraj, S; Subramanian, S V

    2011-02-01

    In India, despite improvements in access to health care, inequalities are related to socioeconomic status, geography, and gender, and are compounded by high out-of-pocket expenditures, with more than three-quarters of the increasing financial burden of health care being met by households. Health-care expenditures exacerbate poverty, with about 39 million additional people falling into poverty every year as a result of such expenditures. We identify key challenges for the achievement of equity in service provision, and equity in financing and financial risk protection in India. These challenges include an imbalance in resource allocation, inadequate physical access to high-quality health services and human resources for health, high out-of-pocket health expenditures, inflation in health spending, and behavioural factors that affect the demand for appropriate health care. Use of equity metrics in monitoring, assessment, and strategic planning; investment in development of a rigorous knowledge base of health-systems research; development of a refined equity-focused process of deliberative decision making in health reform; and redefinition of the specific responsibilities and accountabilities of key actors are needed to try to achieve equity in health care in India. The implementation of these principles with strengthened public health and primary-care services will help to ensure a more equitable health care for India's population. PMID:21227492

  5. Interactive Computerized Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    McRoy, Susan W.; Liu-Perez, Alfredo; Ali, Syed S.

    1998-01-01

    The Patient Education and Activation System (PEAS) project aims to prepare people to take a more active role in their health care decisions. In this paper, the authors describe their work on the Layman Education and Activation Form (LEAF). LEAF is designed to be an interactive, Internet-based system for collecting a patient's medical history. It is unique in that it gives patients access to educational information when it is most pertinent, while they are attempting to complete a form. It avoids overwhelming the patient, by providing information only when it is likely to be relevant. The system avoids asking irrelevant questions or providing irrelevant facts by tailoring the content of the form to the patient's responses. The system also uses the patient's answers to suggest questions that the patient might ask a doctor and provides online resources that the patient can browse. PMID:9670132

  6. EDI developments in Dutch health care.

    PubMed Central

    Koens, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    In the past two years EDI developments in Dutch Health Care have gained some momentum. These developments are focussed on the communication between hospitals on the one hand, and General Practitioners, Health Care insurers and suppliers of health care products on the other hand. Experiences show that although the results are promising there is a great need for broadly accepted standard EDI messages based on a thorough analysis of the existing information exchange between organisations. PMID:1807655

  7. Environmental scanning and the health care manager.

    PubMed

    Layman, Elizabeth J; Bamberg, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Health care managers and supervisors work in an environment of major changes and ongoing turbulence. Basic terms and strategic approaches are described to enable managers and supervisors to better understand the process of environmental scanning in the turbulent health care environment. Drawing from multiple disciplines, the information allows health care managers and supervisors to improve their skills as environmental scanners as they develop and implement strategic plans in this environment. PMID:16131929

  8. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health. PMID:26405210

  9. School Health Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Anderson, Lori S.; Knauer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are at risk for school failure when their health needs are not met. Current studies have identified a strong connection between school success and health. This study attempted to determine (a) how schools meet the direct service health needs of children and (b) who provides those services. The study…

  10. School Health Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Anderson, Lori S.; Knauer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are at risk for school failure when their health needs are not met. Current studies have identified a strong connection between school success and health. This study attempted to determine (a) how schools meet the direct service health needs of children and (b) who provides those services. The study…

  11. Attending unintended transformations of health care infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Wentzer, Helle; Bygholm, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Western health care is under pressure from growing demands on quality and efficiency. The development and implementation of information technology, IT is a key mean of health care authorities to improve on health care infrastructure. Theory and methods Against a background of theories on human-computer interaction and IT-mediated communication, different empirical studies of IT implementation in health care are analyzed. The outcome is an analytical discernment between different relations of communication and levels of interaction with IT in health care infrastructure. These relations and levels are synthesized into a framework for identifying tensions and potential problems in the mediation of health care with the IT system. These problems are also known as unexpected adverse consequences, UACs, from IT implementation into clinical health care practices. Results This paper develops a conceptual framework for addressing transformations of communication and workflow in health care as a result of implementing IT. Conclusion and discussion The purpose of the conceptual framework is to support the attention to and continuous screening for errors and unintended consequences of IT implementation into health care practices and outcomes. PMID:18043725

  12. Psychology and health: contributions of psychology to the improvement of health and health care

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, W. H.; Evans, R. I.; Kennedy, S.; Iscoe, I.

    1987-01-01

    Psychology as both a science and a profession has been closely identified with other disciplines in the broad field of health since the turn of the present century. Recent advances in health care have reinforced the growing belief that the promotion of health and the prevention and treatment of illness can be greatly enhanced by incorporating the scientific findings and modern techniques of psychology into everyday practices. This review outlines the contributions of psychology to health care throughout the world; only some of the most timely and relevant issues are mentioned, together with examples of current work in the field. After an introductory overview, special attention is given to each of the major areas within the broad field of health care where psychological applications have been particularly useful. PMID:3325189

  13. Public expenditures and health care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, O; Gallagher, M

    1992-03-01

    Unfavorable economic conditions in most of Africa (in this paper Africa refers to Sub-Saharan Africa only) have meant public austerity and a deceleration in government health spending. Given the dominant role of government in providing health services in Africa there is a need to investigate the links between public spending and the provision of health care. Analyzing information from five Sub-Saharan African countries, namely Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ethiopia and Senegal, we investigate the impacts of shifting expenditure patterns and levels on the process of providing health services as well as on delivery of health care. The country analyses indicate that in addition to the level of public spending, the expenditure mix (i.e. salaries, drugs, supplies etc.), the composition of the health infrastructure (hospitals, clinics, health posts etc.), community efforts, and the availability of private health care all influence health care delivery. Consequently, per capita public expenditure (the most important indicator in a number of related studies) alone as a measure of the availability of health care and especially for cross-country comparisons is inadequate. Reductions in government resources for health care often result in less efficient mixing of resources and hence less health care delivery, in quality and quantity terms. With the recent trends in health care spending in Africa there should be greater effort to increase the efficient use of these increasingly scarce resources, yet the trend in resource mix has been in the opposite direction. Given the input to public health care of local communities, as well as the provision of private health care, it would seem that government spending on health care should be counter-cyclical, i.e. government health spending should accelerate during periods of economic down turns. Such counter-cyclical spending would tend to offset the difficulties facing local communities and the declining ability of individuals to pay for private health care. Recommending counter-cyclical health spending may seem wishful, but it points up the necessity of understanding what is likely to happen to health care in African countries in the face of economic difficulties, and particularly in the face of fiscal austerity. PMID:1574729

  14. Ode to Healing Music in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Powell, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Music therapy has been around since the 1940s when physicians notice a positive effect that music had on the soldiers with "shell shock" (now more commonly known as posttraumatic stress disorder). For decades, veterans were the primary patients worked with by music therapists. In the 1970s, the hospice movement started to enter the health care continuum, largely due to Dr Elisabeth KĂĽbler-Ross, who advocated for home care and patient choice for the terminally ill. Two decades later, it became apparent that hospice patients could benefit from music. And currently, there are not enough people certified to work with music in hospice patients, veterans, or patients with dementia/Alzheimer's disease. No, music does not prolong life, but it does add life to the time left. PMID:26618264

  15. Consumer-driven health care marketing.

    PubMed

    Upton, R L

    1997-01-01

    In this article, a health care marketing executive takes an opposing view: That the consumer will not only continue to exercise choice but also, at annual renewal time, veto power. In part, that is because the consumers are feeling the rising cost of health care much more directly than in the past, through ever-higher premiums, deductibles and copayments. As they assumed more of the burden of medical care delivery, consumers are becoming more knowledgeable about and discriminating toward the health care system and provider plans they are offered. They understand--as does their employer--that no longer are all health care plans alike or at parity with each other. The consumer is also demanding greater access to freedom of provider choice, quality of health care coverage. PMID:10164646

  16. Improving global health care through diversity.

    PubMed

    Kulwicki, Anahid

    2006-10-01

    One of the major challenges facing the nursing profession is the globalization of nursing education, research, and practice. The word diversity is derived from the Latin word divertere meaning being different or having differences. Diversity in nursing practice means providing competent care to clients from different cultures, conducting research in multi-cultural settings, and implementing educational programs to diverse populations. Key principles and practices that provide a framework for diverse relationships in nursing practice, research, and education must be driven by a professional commitment in building a global community that is inclusive, respectful, and dedicated to global health care for all. Through international collaborations and individual and collective partnerships, nurses can build bridges between and among national health care systems, strengthen the international health care infrastructure, broaden health care delivery systems, and improve the quality of health care for all. PMID:16946123

  17. Health care 2020: reengineering health care delivery to combat chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J

    2015-04-01

    Chronic disease has become the great epidemic of our times, responsible for 75% of total health care costs and the majority of deaths in the US. Our current delivery model is poorly constructed to manage chronic disease, as evidenced by low adherence to quality indicators and poor control of treatable conditions. New technologies have emerged that can engage patients and offer additional modalities in the treatment of chronic disease. Modifying our delivery model to include team-based care in concert with patient-centered technologies offers great promise in managing the chronic disease epidemic. PMID:25460529

  18. Coming Together To Cut Health Care Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, W. David; Donatelli, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Describes how, through a shared plan, the Health Insurance Initiative of the Independent Colleges and Universities in Florida (ICUF) is saving participating institutions millions in costs associated with providing employee health care. (EV)

  19. The digital transformation of health care.

    PubMed

    Coile, R C

    2000-01-01

    The arrival of the Internet offers the opportunity to fundamentally reinvent medicine and health care delivery. The "e-health" era is nothing less than the digital transformation of the practice of medicine, as well as the business side of the health industry. Health care is only now arriving in the "Information Economy." The Internet is the next frontier of health care. Health care consumers are flooding into cyberspace, and an Internet-based industry of health information providers is springing up to serve them. Internet technology may rank with antibiotics, genetics, and computers as among the most important changes for medical care delivery. Utilizing e-health strategies will expand exponentially in the next five years, as America's health care executives shift to applying IS/IT (information systems/information technology) to the fundamental business and clinical processes of the health care enterprise. Internet-savvy physician executives will provide a bridge between medicine and management in the adoption of e-health technology. PMID:10788126

  20. Physician leadership: a health-care system's investment in the future of quality care.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Rocco; Haytaian, Marcia

    2012-08-01

    The current state of health care and its reform will require physician leaders to take on greater management responsibilities, which will require a set of organizational and leadership competencies that traditional medical education does not provide. Physician leaders can form a bridge between the clinical and administrative sides of a health-care organization, serving to further the organization's strategy for growth and success. Recognizing that the health-care industry is rapidly changing and physician leaders will play a key role in that transformation, Hartford HealthCare has established a Physician Leadership Development Institute that provides advanced leadership skills and management education to select physicians practicing within the health-care system. PMID:23248866

  1. Health Care Costing: Data, Methods, Future Directions

    Cancer.gov

    Health Services and Economics Branch staff have collaborated with colleagues at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and Emory University to develop a supplement to the journal Medical Care. The supplement, published in July 2009, examines a broad array of methodologic issues related to health care cost estimation. The supplement's papers are led by experts in health economics, epidemiology, health services research, and biostatistics.

  2. Challenges for the German Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Riemer-Hommel, P

    2012-06-01

    The German Health Care System (GHCS) faces many challenges among which an aging population and economic problems are just a few. The GHCS traditionally emphasised equity, universal coverage, ready access, free choice, high numbers of providers and technological equipment; however, real competition among health-care providers and insurance companies is lacking. Mainly in response to demographic changes and economic challenges, health-care reforms have focused on cost containment and to a lesser degree also quality issues. In contrast, generational accounting, priorisation and rationing issues have thus far been completely neglected. The paper discusses three important areas of health care in Germany, namely the funding process, hospital management and ambulatory care, with a focus on cost control mechanisms and quality improving measures as the variables of interest. Health Information Technology (HIT) has been identified as an important quality improvement tool. Health Indicators have been introduced as possible instruments for the priorisation debate. PMID:22660990

  3. The authoritarian reign in American health care.

    PubMed

    Ballou, Kathryn A; Landreneau, Kandace J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this article is to increase understanding of the mechanisms of the continuation of elite hegemonic control of a highly valued social system--American health care. White, male physicians and administrators achieved control of the health care industry and its workers, including nurses, at the start of the 20th century. Using critical theorists' work on authoritarianism and incorporating gender analysis, the authors describe the health care system from a critical social- psychological perspective. The authors discuss the meaning and presence of authoritarian hierarchy and gender effects in today's health system through a critical analysis of the profession of medicine, the profession of nursing, corporate and bureaucratic health care, and patients or consumers. It is concluded that the social-psychological behavior of the American health care system has profound implications that must be taken into account in any recommendations for change. PMID:20628179

  4. Health Care: Lessons from China and Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Younge, Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    Health has improved in Cuba and China during the past quarter of a century. Some of the improvements in health occurred as economic conditions improved in both countries, but there are other similarities of health care delivery in China and Cuba. Collective activity plays an important role in health care in both nations; both do health planning centrally, but local communities control the daily activities of the health services that they use. Techniques that have improved health in underdeveloped nations might be applied in underserved areas of the United States. PMID:7120476

  5. Can health care teams improve primary care practice?

    PubMed

    Grumbach, Kevin; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2004-03-10

    In health care settings, individuals from different disciplines come together to care for patients. Although these groups of health care personnel are generally called teams, they need to earn true team status by demonstrating teamwork. Developing health care teams requires attention to 2 central questions: who is on the team and how do team members work together? This article chiefly focuses on the second question. Cohesive health care teams have 5 key characteristics: clear goals with measurable outcomes, clinical and administrative systems, division of labor, training of all team members, and effective communication. Two organizations are described that demonstrate these components: a private primary care practice in Bangor, Me, and Kaiser Permanente's Georgia region primary care sites. Research on patient care teams suggests that teams with greater cohesiveness are associated with better clinical outcome measures and higher patient satisfaction. In addition, medical settings in which physicians and nonphysician professionals work together as teams can demonstrate improved patient outcomes. A number of barriers to team formation exist, chiefly related to the challenges of human relationships and personalities. Taking small steps toward team development may improve the work environment in primary care practices. PMID:15010447

  6. Female farmworkers' health during pregnancy: health care providers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Maureen A; Flocks, Joan D; Economos, Jeannie; McCauley, Linda A

    2013-07-01

    Pregnant farmworkers and their fetuses are at increased risk of negative health outcomes due to environmental and occupational factors at their workplaces. Health care providers who serve farm communities can positively affect workers' health through the informed care they deliver. Yet, interviews with rural health care providers reveal limited knowledge about agricultural work or occupational and environmental health risks during pregnancy. Professional associations, government organizations, academic institutions, and practice settings must renew their efforts to ensure that environmental and occupational health education, especially as it relates to women and their children, is incorporated into academic and practice environments. PMID:23799657

  7. Pivoting: leveraging opportunities in a turbulent health care environment*

    PubMed Central

    Bandy, Margaret Moylan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this lecture is to challenge librarians in clinical settings to leverage the opportunities presented by the current health care environment and to develop collaborative relationships with health care practitioners to provide relevant services. Discussion: Health care organizations are under financial and regulatory pressures, and many hospital librarians have been downsized or have had their positions eliminated. The lecture briefly reviews hospital librarians' roles in the past but focuses primarily on our current challenges. This environment requires librarians to be opportunity focused and pivot to a new vision that directs their actions. Many librarians are already doing this, and colleagues are encouraging us to embrace these opportunities. Evidence from publications, websites, discussion lists, personal communications, and the author's experience is explored. Conclusion: Developing interdisciplinary and collaborative relationships in our institutions and providing relevant services will mark our progress as vital, contributing members of our health care organizations. PMID:25552938

  8. Health care librarians and information literacy: an investigation.

    PubMed

    Kelham, Charlotte

    2014-09-01

    Until relatively recently, the concept of information literacy, and teaching the skills to enable it, was mainly a concern of academic libraries. Now, it is also seen to be of high importance within the context of health care libraries. Health care libraries and librarians can provide crucial support towards the implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care through both information literacy skills training and by conducting mediated searches on behalf of health care practitioners. This article reports the findings from an investigation conducted by Charlotte Kelham as part of her MA in Librarianship from the University of Sheffield. Her dissertation investigated how health care librarians understand the concept of information literacy, the implications of this for their role and their perceptions around how their role is valued. Charlotte graduated from Sheffield in 2013 and is currently job hunting. AM. PMID:25155981

  9. Advancing family involvement in collaborative health care: Next steps.

    PubMed

    Rolland, John S

    2015-06-01

    Comments on the article "Don Bloch's vision for Collaborative Family Health Care: Progress and next steps" by C. J. Peek (see record 2015-25290-002). C. J. Peek has provided us with a masterful integration of Don Bloch's vision of collaborative family health care and the evolution over the past 20 years of the field. The current author was very fortunate to be part of the initial meeting at Wingspread in 1994. As a family systems-oriented community and public health-trained psychiatrist, my primary focus over 30 years has been on families facing chronic illness and disability and collaborative care efforts in specialty, primary, rehabilitation, and palliative care medicine. In my view, the ability of the health care consumer (patient and his or her family members) and professional worlds to collaborate in a more egalitarian and less hierarchical and wary manner remains a significant constraint to progress. PMID:26053574

  10. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  11. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  12. A Conversation on Rural Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Wayne; Russell, Jack; Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Wayne Myers, director of the Office of Rural Health Policy, discusses Appalachian rural health and access to health care. The health manpower shortage in Central Appalachia still exists but is less severe than 10 years ago. The needs of underserved areas could be address by training local people in the community and through telemedicine and…

  13. A Conversation on Rural Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Wayne; Russell, Jack; Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Wayne Myers, director of the Office of Rural Health Policy, discusses Appalachian rural health and access to health care. The health manpower shortage in Central Appalachia still exists but is less severe than 10 years ago. The needs of underserved areas could be address by training local people in the community and through telemedicine and…

  14. High and rising health care costs.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    The U.S. is spending a growing share of the GDP on health care, outpacing other industrialized countries. This synthesis examines why costs are higher in the U.S. and what is driving their growth. Key findings include: health care inefficiency, medical technology and health status (particularly obesity) are the primary drivers of rising U.S. health care costs. Health payer systems that reward inefficiencies and preempt competition have impeded productivity gains in the health care sector. The best evidence indicates medical technology accounts for one-half to two-thirds of spending growth. While medical malpractice insurance and defensive medicine contribute to health costs, they are not large enough factors to significantly contribute to a rise in spending. Research is consistent that demographics will not be a significant factor in driving spending despite the aging baby boomers. PMID:22052035

  15. Learning Health Care Systems: Leading Through Research

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Katherine M.; Larson, Eric B.

    2012-01-01

    The Health Maintenance Organization Research Network (HMORN), a consortium of 19 health care delivery systems with integrated research centers, held their 18th annual conference in Seattle, Washington from April 29 to May 2, 2012. Group Health Research Institute hosted the conference, “Learning health care systems: Leading through research”. The 2012 theme was chosen to reflect the critical role of collaboration among researchers, clinicians and health systems to improve health care nationally. Over 500 researchers and health care professionals participated in this conference. Representatives from the NCI, NHLBI, NIMH, and PCORI met with researchers to advance the quality and breadth of public domain research in HMOs. In this article we summarize information about the HMORN and its 18th annual conference. PMID:22904375

  16. Bereavement and Bereavement Care in Health and Social Care: Provision and Practice in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Audrey I.; Wimpenny, Peter; Unwin, Rachel; Work, Fiona; Dempster, Paul; MacDuff, Colin; Wilcock, Sylvia E.; Brown, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The interview study described here aimed to explore current views of and practice in bereavement care and identify priorities for service development in Scotland. Fifty-nine participants who worked with the bereaved in some way, or whose interest was in bereavement or bereavement care, were interviewed. They represented National Health Service…

  17. Financial management in leading health care systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    To understand better the financial management practices and strategies of modern health care organizations, we conducted interviews with chief financial officers (CFOs) of several leading health care systems. In this introduction, we present an overview of the project and summary responses on corporate financial structures and strategic challenges facing CFOs. PMID:10845383

  18. Teaching Primary Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezzina, Paul; Keogh, Johann J.; Keogh, Mariana

    1998-01-01

    Nursing and radiology students (n=15) at the University of Malta who completed an interdisciplinary module on primary health care reported they found the theoretical material applicable to practice; the module enabled them to learn about their potential role in primary health care. (SK)

  19. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  20. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  1. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  2. A Guide to Adolescent Health Care EPSDT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Care Financing Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This document provides guidelines for individuals giving health care to adolescents through the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) Program. Chapter One briefly indicates needs of adolescents and outlines legal aspects of health care for adolescents such as age of majority, informed consent, confidentiality, disclosure of…

  3. Research Challenges in Future Health Care Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatunga, Harini

    Future health care systems will involve a network of heterogeneous resources providing different levels of service and will comprise of a physical and a virtual decision and control layer. The initial results presented here will lead to health care delivery with on-line decision making in order to meet QoS requirements and management targets.

  4. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  5. e-Literacy in health care.

    PubMed

    Klecun, Ela; Lichtner, Valentina; Cornford, Tony

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores notions of e-Literacy (otherwise IT literacy or digital literacy) in health care. It proposes a multi-dimensional definition of e-Literacy in health care and provides suggestions for policy makers and managers as to how e-Literacy might be accounted for in their decisions. PMID:25160306

  6. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    PubMed

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability. PMID:25217142

  7. How physicians can change the future of health care.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael E; Teisberg, Elizabeth Olmsted

    2007-03-14

    Today's preoccupation with cost shifting and cost reduction undermines physicians and patients. Instead, health care reform must focus on improving health and health care value for patients. We propose a strategy for reform that is market based but physician led. Physician leadership is essential. Improving the value of health care is something only medical teams can do. The right kind of competition--competition to improve results--will drive dramatic improvement. With such positive-sum competition, patients will receive better care, physicians will be rewarded for excellence, and costs will be contained. Physicians can lead this change and return the practice of medicine to its appropriate focus: enabling health and effective care. Three principles should guide this change: (1) the goal is value for patients, (2) medical practice should be organized around medical conditions and care cycles, and (3) results--risk-adjusted outcomes and costs--must be measured. Following these principles, professional satisfaction will increase and current pressures on physicians will decrease. If physicians fail to lead these changes, they will inevitably face ever-increasing administrative control of medicine. Improving health and health care value for patients is the only real solution. Value-based competition on results provides a path for reform that recognizes the role of health professionals at the heart of the system. PMID:17356031

  8. Preventing Hepatitis B in Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, S. C.; Fisher, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a potentially serious occupational hazard for health care workers. Data indicate an increased risk of HBV infection in health care workers. This risk appears to be related to the frequency of contact with patients' blood and exposure to high risk patient populations. Strategies available for preventing HBV infection in the health care setting include HBV vaccine, which is the most efficacious and practical strategy. In view of the potential consequences of HBV infection, health care employers have a responsibility to provide education, serological testing and vaccination. Health care workers have a responsibility to use these programs, and to assess their own risk of infection. PMID:21274208

  9. Redistributive effects in public health care financing.

    PubMed

    Honekamp, Ivonne; Possenriede, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    This article focuses on the redistributive effects of different measures to finance public health insurance. We analyse the implications of different financing options for public health insurance on the redistribution of income from good to bad health risks and from high-income to low-income individuals. The financing options considered are either income-related (namely income taxes, payroll taxes, and indirect taxes), health-related (co-insurance, deductibles, and no-claim), or neither (flat fee). We show that governments who treat access to health care as a basic right for everyone should consider redistributive effects when reforming health care financing. PMID:18347823

  10. Transforming Care Delivery through Health Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The slow but progressive adoption of health information technology (IT) nationwide promises to usher in a new era in health care. Electronic health record systems provide a complete patient record at the point of care and can help to alleviate some of the challenges of a fragmented delivery system, such as drug-drug interactions. Moreover, health IT promotes evidence-based practice by identifying gaps in recommended treatment and providing clinical decision-support tools. In addition, the data collected through digital records can be used to monitor patient outcomes and identify potential improvements in care protocols. Kaiser Permanente continues to advance its capability in each of these areas. PMID:23596377

  11. Technology in health care: forensic implications.

    PubMed

    Quail, M Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and improve making our everyday tasks appear sometimes routine and mundane. The health care industry has embraced technological advances to improve on its daily operations in an effort to run more efficiently. Health care providers must be aware that these technologies collect data, lots of data, which is discoverable and may be used to defend or refute your actions as a nurse. This article will take a closer look at health care technology, cell phones, medical equipment, social media, telematics, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements, so that you will become familiar with the information and electronic fingerprint left behind. PMID:25463007

  12. The doctor's role in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C E

    1976-01-01

    A new pattern of health care in developing countries promises to meet the needs of rural people and still provide reasonable gratification for health workers. The service must have mutually strengthening linkages between all levels of the health care system. Reallocating roles in the health team requires turning routine medical care over to auxiliaries so that professionals can concentrate on more complex problems, such as community diagnosis and therapy. Young doctors are reasonable and willing to undertake a rural rotation early in their medical careers. This will help to identify those few who will provide leadership in improving rural services. PMID:939619

  13. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors Among Rural Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural adolescents. METHODS Semistructured individual interviews with 100 rural, minority, low socioeconomic status adolescents revealed their current perceptions of oral health and dental care access. Respondents age ranged from 12 to 18 years. The sample was 80% black and 52% male. RESULTS Perceived threat from dental disease was low. Adolescents perceived regular brushing and flossing as superseding the need for preventive care. Esthetic reasons were most often cited as reasons to seek dental care. Difficulties accessing dental care include finances, transportation, fear, issues with Medicaid coverage and parental responsibility. In general, adolescents and their parents are in need of information regarding the importance of preventive dental care. CONCLUSIONS Findings illuminate barriers to dental care faced by low-income rural adolescents and counter public perceptions of government-sponsored dental care programs as being “free” or without cost. The importance of improved oral health knowledge, better access to care, and school-based dental care is discussed. PMID:25388597

  14. The Potential Impact of Health Care Reform on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reace, Diana

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 522 colleges and universities investigated the impact of health care reform proposals. Results provide an overview of typical current medical plan design, including coverage for part- and full-time employees, and give insight into attitudes toward the idea of regional health alliances, a potentially useful reform approach. (MSE)

  15. Strategic service quality management for health care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Quality management has become one of the most important and most debated topics within the service sector. This is especially true for health care, as the controversy rages on how the existing American system should be restructured. Health care reform aimed at reducing costs and ensuring access to all Americans cannot be allowed to jeopardize the quality of care. As such, total quality management (TQM) has become a vital ingredient to strategic planning within the health care domain. At the heart of any such quality improvement effort is the issue of measurement. TQM cannot be effectively utilized as a competitive weapon unless quality can be accurately defined, measured, evaluated, and monitored over time. Through such analysis a hospital can elect how to expend its limited resources toward those quality improvement projects which will impact customer perceptions of service quality the most. Thus, the purpose of this report is to establish a framework by which to approach the issue of quality measurement, delineate the various components of quality that exist in health care, and explore how these elements affect one another. We propose that the issue of quality measurement in health care be approached as an integration of service quality attributes common to other service organizations and technical quality attributes unique to health care. We hope that this research will serve as a first step toward the synthesis of the various quality attributes inherent in the health care domain and encourage other researchers to address the interactions of the various quality attributes. PMID:8763215

  16. Health systems organization for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Pedroto, Isabel; Amaro, Pedro; Romăozinho, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of acute and severe digestive diseases presenting to hospital emergency departments, mainly related with an ageing population, demands an appropriate answer from health systems organization, taking into account the escalating pressure on cost reduction. However, patients expect and deserve a response that is appropriate, effective, efficient and safe. The huge variety of variables which can influence the evolution of such cases warranting intensive monitoring, and the coordination and optimization of a range of human and technical resources involved in the care of these high-risk patients, requires their admission in hospital units with conveniently equipped facilities, as is done for heart attack and stroke patients. Little information of gastroenterology emergencies as a function of structure, processes and outcome is available at the organizational level. Surveys that have been conducted in different countries just assess local treatment outcome and question the organizational structure and existing resources but its impact on the outcome is not clear. Most studies address the problem of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the out-of-hours endoscopy services in the hospital setting. The demands placed on emergency (part of the overall continuum of care) are obvious, as are the needs for the efficient use of resources and processes to improve the quality of care, meaning data must cover the full care cycle. Gastrointestinal emergencies, namely gastrointestinal bleeding, must be incorporated into the overall emergency response as is done for heart attack and stroke. This chapter aims to provide a review of current literature/evidence on organizational health system models towards a better management of gastroenterology emergencies and proposes a research agenda. PMID:24160936

  17. Protecting the health of employees caring for family members with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

    2011-07-01

    Over half of American workers are holding a paid job while also providing unpaid assistance and support to a family member. Research shows that family members who provide care to children or adults with special health care needs are themselves at risk of physical and mental health problems. Yet, little research has explored how the work environment mediates the effects of caregiving on caregivers' mental and physical health. With a sample of 2455 currently employed U.S. adults from the Work, Family, Community Nexus (WFCN) survey, a random-digit dial, nationally representative survey of Americans aged 18-69, we examine whether paid leave and flexibility policies mediate the relationship between caregiving and health. In Ordinary Least Squares regression models, we find that paid leave to address family members' health was associated with better mental health status as measured by the 5-item Mental Health Inventory and paid sick leave with better physical health status as measured by self-rated overall health status. A supportive supervisor was also associated with improvements in mental and physical health. For both men and women, paid leave and a supervisor's support offset some or all of the negative effects of caregiving, but for women, the buffering effects of working conditions are slightly larger. Enhancing the unpaid leave guaranteed in the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act so that it is paid and passing national paid sick days legislation will help ensure that employed caregivers can retain their jobs, receive needed income, and meet their own mental and physical health needs. PMID:21669484

  18. Lean methodology in health care.

    PubMed

    Kimsey, Diane B

    2010-07-01

    Lean production is a process management philosophy that examines organizational processes from a customer perspective with the goal of limiting the use of resources to those processes that create value for the end customer. Lean manufacturing emphasizes increasing efficiency, decreasing waste, and using methods to decide what matters rather than accepting preexisting practices. A rapid improvement team at Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania, implemented a plan, do, check, act cycle to determine problems in the central sterile processing department, test solutions, and document improved processes. By using A3 thinking, a consensus building process that graphically depicts the current state, the target state, and the gaps between the two, the team worked to improve efficiency and safety, and to decrease costs. Use of this methodology has increased teamwork, created user-friendly work areas and processes, changed management styles and expectations, increased staff empowerment and involvement, and streamlined the supply chain within the perioperative area. PMID:20619772

  19. Correctional health care: implications for public health policy.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Diane L.; Leath, Brenda A.

    2002-01-01

    "Correctional Health Care: Implications for Public Health Policy" is the first in a series of articles that examines the special health care needs of persons who are incarcerated in America's correctional facilities. The intent of the series is to gain a better understanding about the unmet health needs of incarcerated persons, the importance of addressing the health service delivery system in correctional facilities, and the implications that may arise from neglecting to address these health issues on health outcomes for individual detainees and society at-large when detainees transition back into the community. This article provides a descriptive overview of the corrections population, their sociodemographics, health care needs, and health concerns that are in need of improvement. This article also offers recommendations for public policy consideration to improve the overall health of inmates and society at large. PMID:12069208

  20. An introduction to oral health care reform.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Kristen L

    2009-07-01

    Oral health care reform is made up of several components, but access to care is central. Health care reform will occur in some fashion at some point, and how it will impact the entire dental sector is unclear. In the short term, there is likely to be a dental component during the reauthorization of State Children's Health Insurance Program in early 2009, and several federal oral health bills are expected to be reintroduced as well. Additional public funding for new programs and program expansions remains questionable, as federal funding will be tight. Fiscal conservancy will be occurring in the states as well; however, various proposals to expand dental hygienists' duties are likely, as are proposals related to student grants for dental schools. Regardless of one's political stance, the profile of oral health care has been elevated, offering countless opportunities for improvement in the oral health of the nation. PMID:19482130

  1. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePLUS

    ... care + Share widget - Select to show What’s home health care & what should I expect? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  2. Primary health care in the mental health workplace: insights from the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Dean, Suzanne; Webster, Sue; Walter, Garry; Escott, Phil; Lopez, Violeta

    2014-06-01

    In Australia, Primary Health Care and the mental health sector have always shared a philosophy. In 1978, Primary Health Care was first put forward as a strategy to improve "health for all." Recently, the Australian Government included mental health as a national health priority, identifying six strategies consistent with a Primary Health Care approach to address the mental health of all Australians. Throughout this time, Primary Health Care has been highlighted in all models of care. However, in reality, it appears that in mental health services, mental health nurses, despite good intentions, are not delivering care in a planned or systematised way and that much needs to be done to further improve the situation for individuals accessing the health care system. Services currently focus on those identified as seriously mentally unwell; in order to really make an impact it is argued that services should be broader, offered to the population at large and, further, that the emphasis on case work at an individual level should be changed to an approach that considers prevention, maintenance, and follow-up as well as crisis intervention. This article reflects the Australian experience and offers some insights from that experience. PMID:24857527

  3. Health care in the circumpolar world: Greenland.

    PubMed

    Aaen-Larsen, Birger

    2004-01-01

    Greenland is part of the Kingdom of Denmark and it is the world's largest island. An ice cap covers 85% of its territory. The population is about 57,000 inhabitants, with 14,000 living in the capital Nuuk, and 10,000 in villages and other small settlements. There are pronounced regional variations in lifestyle and living conditions. The Greenland Home Rule Government assumed responsibility, for health care on 1 January 1992. Greenland's territory is divided into 16 health care districts. Queen Ingrid's Hospital in Nuuk is the national hospital and has 156 beds and numerous specialist physicians associated with it. Each health district has a health care centre with one or more physicians, nurses and other health care personnel appropriate for the number of people living in the district. Each district health centre is responsible for primary health care in towns, villages and other small settlements, and the health centres treat all common illnesses. The health centres handle uncomplicated births, minor surgery, common treatment in internal medicine and community mental health services. The centres have a number of inpatient beds proportional to the number of people in the health district. People with more complicated illnesses are referred to Queen Ingrid's Hospital in Nuuk or to specialised treatment in Denmark. PMID:15736622

  4. Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoyan, Gai; Xu Lingzhong; Li Huijuan; Zhou Chengchao; He Jiangjiang; Yoshihisa, Shirayama; Tang Wei; Chushi, Kuroiwa

    2010-02-15

    In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff members and 24 cleaning personnel were interviewed. Generated medical waste totaled 1.22, 0.77, and 1.17 kg/bed/day in tertiary, secondary, and primary HCF, respectively. The amount of medical waste generated in primary health care centers was much higher than that in secondary hospitals, which may be attributed to general waste being mixed with medical waste. This study found that the level of the HCF, responsibility for medical waste management in departments and wards, educational background and training experience can be factors that determine medical staff members' knowledge of health care waste management policy. Regular training programs and sufficient provision of protective measures are urgently needed to improve occupational safety for cleaning personnel. Financing and administrative monitoring by local authorities is needed to improve handling practices and the implementation of off-site centralized disposal in primary health care centers.

  5. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  6. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  7. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  8. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  9. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  10. Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

  11. Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

  12. Orientation to Multicultural Health Care in Migrant Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Robert T., II

    This guide furnishes health care providers serving migrant and seasonal farmworkers with information to cope with the complexities of health care delivery in a multiethnic, multicultural environment. Section I provides an introduction to basic cultural concepts that influence the outcome of interactions between providers and their migrant…

  13. Orientation to Multicultural Health Care in Migrant Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Robert T., II

    This guide furnishes health care providers serving migrant and seasonal farmworkers with information to cope with the complexities of health care delivery in a multiethnic, multicultural environment. Section I provides an introduction to basic cultural concepts that influence the outcome of interactions between providers and their migrant…

  14. Improving educational preparation for transcultural health care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M

    1998-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that the health care needs of people from black and ethnic minority groups in England are not being met. A growing number of initiatives are being undertaken to remedy the situation. Many of them are focused on health care delivery at local and national levels. However, unless the preparation of health care professionals in the area of multi-cultural health care is appropriate and effective, a great deal of corrective action will continue to have to be taken. Despite 1997 having been the European Year Against Racism, it is still necessary to consider what educational preparation should be like. The article draws on identified inadequacies in health care provision as well as examples of initiatives taken to improve care provision. The author identifies deficiencies in educational preparation and proposes a range of actions to be taken. The article is focused on nursing, midwifery and health visiting education in England, but is deemed to be relevant to all health care professionals not only in Europe but other continents, as they become increasingly international and multi-ethnic. PMID:9887751

  15. "Am I Supposed to Understand This Stuff?" Youth with Special Health Care Needs Readiness for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Tanis; Stiles, Nora; Burstein, Karen; Ergul, Cevriye; Chao, Pen-Chiang

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the transition experiences of youth with special health care needs (YSHCN). Fifty-five YSHCN completed a phone survey, which asked about their educational and vocational goals, current health care (e.g., access to adult care providers, health insurance, medications), life experiences (exercise, doing chores, cooking, types…

  16. Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum Asarnow, Joan; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Stancin, Terry; Lochman, John E; Hughes, Jennifer L; Miranda, Jeanne M; Wysocki, Tim; Portwood, Sharon G; Piacentini, John; Tynan, Douglas; Atkins, Marc; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models. PMID:26430948

  17. Building health promotion into health care reform in Russia.

    PubMed

    Tillinghast, S J; Tchernjavskii, V E

    1996-12-01

    The health care system of the former Soviet Union, despite serious flaws, did provide the basis for community health activities, and for mandatory immunization and periodic health examinations for which primary care physicians were responsible. Since 1991, a new system of mandatory health insurance has been put into place. Health care funding has decreased substantially, owing to economic conditions. However, there is not yet widespread acceptance either of the strong association between personal behaviour and health consequences, nor of the importance of individual responsibility for one's health. To summarize, efforts at health promotion and disease prevention in Russia face numerous barriers: severe financial constraints owing to the general economic situation; social upheaval with loss of previous constraints on behaviour; cultural characteristics that include fatalism and encouragement of heavy alcohol and tobacco consumption; lack of acceptance of individual responsibility for health; lack of role modelling by the medical community; lack of critical appraisal of benefit and cost-effectiveness for preventive interventions; low priority for health care, and for prevention specifically. Disease prevention and health education must be built into the reformed health care system, to promote health for the Russian population. PMID:9023808

  18. Collecting and applying data on social determinants of health in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Laura; Sandel, Megan; Adler, Nancy E

    2013-06-10

    Despite strong evidence linking patients' social circumstances to their health, little guidance exists for health care practitioners and institutions on addressing social needs in clinical settings. Current approaches to social determinants generally focus on population-level and policy interventions; these overlook individual and clinical innovations within health care that can address patients' social circumstances. This article proposes a framework for how social determinants interventions in the health care system can be construed across 3 tiers-patient, institution, and broader population-and describes ways to collect data and target interventions at these levels. PMID:23699778

  19. Reflections on curative health care in Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Slater, R G

    1989-01-01

    Improved health care in Nicaragua is a major priority of the Sandinista revolution; it has been pursued by major reforms of the national health care system, something few developing countries have attempted. In addition to its internationally recognized advances in public health, considerable progress has been made in health care delivery by expanding curative medical services through training more personnel and building more facilities to fulfill a commitment to free universal health coverage. The very uneven quality of medical care is the leading problem facing curative medicine now. Underlying factors include the difficulty of adequately training the greatly increased number of new physicians. Misdiagnosis and mismanagement continue to be major problems. The curative medical system is not well coordinated with the preventive sector. Recent innovations include initiation of a "medicina integral" residency, similar to family practice. Despite its inadequacies and the handicaps of war and poverty, the Nicaraguan curative medical system has made important progress. PMID:2705603

  20. Space technology in remote health care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belasco, N.

    1974-01-01

    A program for an earth-based remote health service system is discussed as a necessary step for the development and verification of a remote health services spacecraft capability. This demonstration program is described to provide data for developing health care for future manned space missions.

  1. Young People's Experiences of Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anjalee; Medlow, Sharon; Kelk, Norm; Hickie, Ian; Whitwell, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore young people's experiences of mental health care in Australia with the aim of informing the headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation. The interviews revealed that significant numbers of respondents had been aware of their mental health problems for several years before seeking help and…

  2. Health Care and Services for Consumers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Mabel

    This module, consisting of materials for use in conducting a consumer education mini-course, deals with health care and services for consumers. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: understanding what is and is not covered by Medicare, assessing the need for private health insurance, purchasing private health insurance,…

  3. Health Care Issues of Incarcerated Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaha, Glenda S.

    1987-01-01

    Presents health profile of the female offender. Discusses needs in areas of gynecology, breast assessment, and health education and services related to childbearing and parenting. Describes incarcerated health care delivery system and looks to communication and education, nursing personnel, and community resources for potential solutions to…

  4. Health Care Reform: Recommendations and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewit, Eugene M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Health care reform needs to assure coverage to all children regardless of income level or illnesses; address benefits, financing, administration, and delivery systems; provide substantial subsidies to low-income families; be equitable for all people; provide better monitoring of child health; protect and strengthen health providers who assist…

  5. Telecommunications, health care, and legal liability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Chris

    1990-06-01

    Regulation of health care telecommunications is fragmented in Canada. Further neither the legislative nor the administrative nor the judicial processes have managed to respond successfully to the impact of telecommunications technology. The result is a legal environment that is necessarily speculative for both telecommunications service providers and health care personnel and facilities. Critical issues include ensuring confidentiality for sensitive patient records and health information liability of telecommunications service providers for inaccurate transmission liability of health care providers for use or non-use of telecommunications services. Limitation of legal liability for both telecommunications and health care service providers is likely to be most effective when based on contract but the creation of the necessary contracts is potentially unduly cumbersome both legally and practically. 1. CONSTITUTIONAL ASPECTS Telecommunications systems that are empowered to operate or connect cross provincial or international boundaries are subject to federal regulation bu the scheme is incomplete in respect of a system set up as a provincial agency. Health care on the other hand is very much a matter of provincial rather than federal authority as a matter of strict law but the fiscal strength of the federal government enables it to provide money to the provinces for financing health care and to4 use this as a device for securing compliance with certain federal standards. Nevertheless the political willingness of the federal health authorities to impose standards on the provinces

  6. The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Patricia A; Mecklenburg, Robert S; Martin, Lindsay A

    2015-01-01

    To tame its soaring health care costs, intel tried many popular approaches: "consumer-driven health care" offerings such as high-deductible/low-premium plans, on-site clinics and employee wellness programs. But by 2009 intel realized that those programs alone would not enable the company to solve the problem, because they didn't affect its root cause: the steadily rising cost of the care employees and their families were receiving. Intel projected that its health care expenditures would hit a whopping $1 billion by 2012. So the company decided to try a novel approach. As a large purchaser of health services and with expertise in quality improvement and supplier management, intel was uniquely positioned to drive transformation in its local health care market. The company decided that it would manage the quality and cost of its health care suppliers with the same rigor it applied to its equipment suppliers by monitoring quality and cost. It spearheaded a collaborative effort in Portland, Oregon, that included two health systems, a plan administrator, and a major government employer. So far the Portland collaborative has reduced treatment costs for certain medical conditions by 24% to 49%, improved patient satisfaction, and eliminated over 10,000 hours worth of waste in the two health systems' business processes. PMID:26540959

  7. Sharing the Caring: Rethinking Current Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Don

    1992-01-01

    This article presents an argument for reforming Australian public policy in favor of social care, rather than family, residential, or community care, for the elderly, sick, and disabled. After noting policy assumptions that families are the focus of caring and women are the natural caregivers, the paper describes changes in Australian family…

  8. Using Electronic Health Records to Help Coordinate Care

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Lynda C; Anderson, Gerard F; Kues, Irvin W

    2004-01-01

    The use of electronic health records that can securely transmit patient data among physicians will help coordinate the care of 60 million Americans with multiple chronic conditions. This article summarizes the different organizations in the United States that are developing this technology. It discusses some of the problems encountered and the current initiatives to resolve them. The article concludes with three recommendations for enhancing care coordination: (1) a common health record, such as the Continuity of Care Record, to facilitate the exchange of clinical information among health providers; (2) regional governance structures to encourage the exchange of clinical data; and (3) payment by purchasers of care, both public and private, to physicians for using electronic health records. PMID:15330973

  9. Using electronic health records to help coordinate care.

    PubMed

    Burton, Lynda C; Anderson, Gerard F; Kues, Irvin W

    2004-01-01

    The use of electronic health records that can securely transmit patient data among physicians will help coordinate the care of 60 million Americans with multiple chronic conditions. This article summarizes the different organizations in the United States that are developing this technology. It discusses some of the problems encountered and the current initiatives to resolve them. The article concludes with three recommendations for enhancing care coordination: (1) a common health record, such as the Continuity of Care Record, to facilitate the exchange of clinical information among health providers; (2) regional governance structures to encourage the exchange of clinical data; and (3) payment by purchasers of care, both public and private, to physicians for using electronic health records. PMID:15330973

  10. Health Care Robotics: A Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Ali, Khaled; Seraji, Homayoun

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the approach followed in the design of a service robot for health care applications. Under the auspices of the NASA Technology Transfer program, a partnership was established between JPL and RWI, a manufacturer of mobile robots, to design and evaluate a mobile robot for health care assistance to the elderly and the handicapped. The main emphasis of the first phase of the project is on the development on a multi-modal operator interface and its evaluation by health care professionals and users. This paper describes the architecture of the system, the evaluation method used, and some preliminary results of the user evaluation.

  11. Future developments in health care performance management

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

  12. Nongrowth strategies and options in health care.

    PubMed

    Breindel, C L

    1988-01-01

    Changing economic and market forces in health care delivery have stimulated much management thinking about innovative, entrepreneurial forms of strategic growth. Along with this thinking comes a new imperative to rethink strategies to include nongrowth options in either services or markets. The health care manager must go beyond describing the strategies and tactics as simple reversals of the organizational pattern of growth in explaining the available nongrowth options. Examples of nine nongrowth options demonstrate their practicality and relevance to health care organizations. PMID:10302290

  13. Mercy health promoter: A paradigm for just health care

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter A.; Schadt, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The foreign-born population in the United States, according to the “Current Populations Report” published in 2010, is estimated to exceed 39.9 million, or “12.9 percent of the U.S. population.” The increase in foreign-born peoples and their need for health care is a complicated issue facing many cities, health systems and hospitals. Over the course of the past few years Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia has treated increasing numbers of foreign-born African patients. The majority have been presenting in the late stages of disease. The increase of foreign-born documented and undocumented African patients seen by Mercy Hospitals seems to reflect a foreign-born population “boom” in Philadelphia over the past decade. To meet the needs of this growing population, the Mercy Hospital Task Force on African Immigration and the Institute of Catholic Bioethics at Saint Joseph’s University designed a program that centers on the third world concept of “Health Promoters.” This program is intended to serve as one possible solution for hospitals to cost-effectively manage the care of this growing percentage of foreign-born individuals in the population. This notion of a “Health Promoter” program in Philadelphia is unique as one of those rare occasions when a third world concept is being utilized in a first world environment. It is also unique in that it can serve as a paradigm for other hospitals in the United States to meet the growing need of health care for the undocumented population. As of November 2012 the Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia clinic became operative for patients who were referred from the Health Promoter clinics. To date, a total of forty-two patients have actively participated in the screenings, sixteen of which have been referred to Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia clinic for further evaluation. More than 75% of patient referrals were a result of high blood pressure. According to the American Medical Association, readings of 140–159 mmHg and above are indicative of stage 1 hypertension. Among those who presented at the Health Promoter screenings the mean systolic pressure for males was 140 mmHg and for females was 140.48 mmHg. PMID:24084364

  14. Managed care in four managed competition OECD health systems.

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Amir; Stam, Piet; Wasem, JĂĽrgen; Trottmann, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Managed care emerged in the American health system in the 1980s as a way to manage suppliers' induced demand and to contain insurers' costs. While in Israel the health insurers have always been managed care organizations, owning health care facilities, employing medical personnel or contracting selectively with independent providers, European insurers have been much more passive, submitting themselves to collective agreements between insurers' and providers' associations, accompanied by extensive government regulation of prices, quantities, and budgets. With the 1990s reforms, and the introduction of risk-adjusted "managed competition", a growing pressure to allow the European insurers to manage their own care - including selective contracting with providers - has emerged, with varying speed of the introduction of policy changes across the individual countries. This paper compares experiences with managed care in Israel, The Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland since the 1990s. After a brief description of the health insurance markets in the four countries, we focus comparatively on the emergence of managed care in the markets for ambulatory care and inpatient market care. We conclude with an evaluation of the current situation and a discussion of selected health policy issues. PMID:25776034

  15. Health and Safety Considerations: Caring for Young Children with Exceptional Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presler, Betty

    This manual on health and safety considerations in caring for young children with exceptional health care needs is a product of Project EXCEPTIONAL (EXceptional Children: Education in Preschool Techniques for Inclusion, Opportunity-building, Nurturing And Learning), which has the goal of increasing the quality and quantity of inclusive child care

  16. Geographical Information Systems and Health: Current State and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and how they can be used. It reviews the current state of GIS use in health care before identifying the barriers to more pervasive use of GIS in health. Finally, it makes recommendations for the direction of health GIS research over the next decade and concludes with a call to action to health informatics researchers to stop ignoring a tool and methodology that has such immense potential for improving the health of our communities. PMID:22844644

  17. Understanding and Measuring Health Care Insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Tomsik, Philip E.; Smith, Samantha; Mason, Mary Jane; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Stange, Kurt C.; Werner, James J.; Flocke, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To define the concept of “health care insecurity,” validate a new self-report measure, and examine the impact of beginning care at a free clinic on uninsured patients’ health care insecurity. Methods Consecutive new patients presenting at a free clinic completed 15 items assessing domains of health care insecurity (HCI) at their first visit and again four to eight weeks later. Psychometrics and change of the HCI measure were examined. Results The HCI measure was found to have high internal consistency (?=0.94). Evidence of concurrent validity was indicated by negative correlation with VR-12 health-related quality of life physical and mental health components and positive correlation with the Perceived Stress Scale. Predictive validity was shown among the 83% of participants completing follow-up: HCI decreased after beginning care at a free clinic (p<.001). Conclusion Reliably assessing patient experience of health care insecurity is feasible and has potential to inform efforts to improve quality and access to care among underserved populations. PMID:25418245

  18. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  19. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  20. Financial burden of health care expenditures: Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sulku, S Nur; Bernard, D Minbay

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine whether and to what extent the health insurance system in Turkey provided adequate protection against high out of pocket expenditures in the period prior to "The Health Transformation Programme". Furthermore, we examine the distribution of out of pocket expenditures by demographic characteristics, poverty status, health service type, access to health care and self-reported health status. We employ the 2002/03 National Household Health Expenditure Survey data to analyze financial burden of health care expenditure. Following the literature, we define high burdens as expenses above 10 and 20% of income. We find that 19% of the nonelderly population were living in families spending more than 10% of family income and that 14% of the nonelderly population were living in families spending more than 20% of family income on health care. Furthermore, the poor and those living in economically less developed regions had the greatest risk of high out of pocket burdens. The risk of high financial burdens varied by the type of insurance among the insured due to differences in benefits among the five separate public schemes that provided health insurance in the pre-reform period. Our results are robust to three alternative specifications of the burden measure and including elderly adults in the sample population. We see that prior to the reforms there were not adequate protection against high health expenditures. Our study provides a baseline against which policymakers can measure the success of the health care reform in terms of providing financial protection. PMID:23113149

  1. Petroleum and Health Care: Evaluating and Managing Health Care's Vulnerability to Petroleum Supply Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Petroleum is used widely in health care—primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies—and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services. PMID:21778473

  2. The Shifting Landscape of Health Care: Toward a Model of Health Care Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In a rapidly changing world of health care information access and patients’ rights, there is limited conceptual infrastructure available to understand how people approach and engage in treatment of medical conditions. The construct of health care empowerment is defined as the process and state of being engaged, informed, collaborative, committed, and tolerant of uncertainty regarding health care. I present a model in which health care empowerment is influenced by an interplay of cultural, social, and environmental factors; personal resources; and intrapersonal factors. The model offers a framework to understand patient and provider roles in facilitating health care empowerment and presents opportunities for investigation into the role of health care empowerment in multiple outcomes across populations and settings, including inquiries into the sources and consequences of health disparities. PMID:21164096

  3. Health Care Issues for Children and Adolescents in Foster Care and Kinship Care.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Children and adolescents who enter foster care often do so with complicated and serious medical, mental health, developmental, oral health, and psychosocial problems rooted in their history of childhood trauma. Ideally, health care for this population is provided in a pediatric medical home by physicians who are familiar with the sequelae of childhood trauma and adversity. As youth with special health care needs, children and adolescents in foster care require more frequent monitoring of their health status, and pediatricians have a critical role in ensuring the well-being of children in out-of-home care through the provision of high-quality pediatric health services, health care coordination, and advocacy on their behalves. PMID:26416941

  4. Information Technology for Children's Health and Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Richard N.; Spooner, S. Andrew; Kwiatkowski, Kelly; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2001-01-01

    In September 2000, the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research and the American Academy of Pediatrics Center for Child Health Research sponsored a meeting of experts and knowledgeable stakeholders to identify 1) the special information needs of pediatric care and 2) health service research questions related to the use of information technology in children's health care. Technologies that support the care of children must address issues related to growth and development, children's changing physiology, and the unique diseases of children and interventions of pediatric care. Connectivity and data integration are particular concerns for child health care workers. Consumer health information needs for this population extend beyond the needs of one individual to the needs of the family. Recommendations of the attendees include rapid implementation of features in electronic health information systems that support pediatric care and involvement of child health experts in policy making, standards setting, education, and advocacy. A proposed research agenda should address both effectiveness and costs of information technology, with special consideration for the needs of children, the development and evaluation of clinical decision support in pediatric settings, understanding of the epidemiology of iatrogenic injury in childhood, supplementation of vocabulary standards with pediatrics-specific terminology, and improvement in health care access for children, using telemedicine. PMID:11687562

  5. Improving oral health: current considerations.

    PubMed

    Ciancio, S

    2003-01-01

    The high incidence of periodontal disease among adults in the Western world indicates that in most cases, routine dental care could be considerably improved. The progressive effect of the disease suggests that improvements in oral cleanliness are mandatory if large numbers of adults are to retain their teeth into old age. Data show that periodontal disease can be minimized through effective plaque control, and that a combination of brushing, interdental cleaning, and chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. mouthwash) is beneficial to patients with plaque control problems. The vast majority of adults do not follow an adequate home-care routine. Average brushing times are low, and only a minority of patients regularly floss. In addition, in those patients who do regularly brush and floss, a deterioration of plaque control occurs over time, suggesting that compliance is a major issue. The principal challenge for dental professionals is to identify how best to elicit an improvement. PMID:12787194

  6. THE NEOLIBERAL TURN IN AMERICAN HEALTH CARE.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Leaving millions both uninsured and underinsured, the Affordable Care Act does not create a system of universal health care in the United States. To understand its shortcomings, we have to understand it as part of a historic shift in the political economy of American health care. This "neoliberal turn" began as a reaction against the welfare state as it expanded during the New Deal and post-World War II period. What began as a movement associated with philosophers like Friedrich Hayek ultimately had a powerful impact via the attraction of powerful corporate sponsors and political supporters, and it was to historically transform American health care thought and organization. In health policy circles, for example, it can be seen in a rising emphasis on "moral hazard," overuse, and cost sharing above a concern with universalism and equity. It was likewise manifested by the corporatization of the health maintenance organization and the rise of the "consumer-driven" health care movement. By the time of the health care reform debate, the influence of corporate "stakeholders" was to prove predominant. These developments, however, must be construed as connected parts of a much larger political transformation, reflected in rising inequality and privatization, occurring both domestically and internationally. PMID:26460446

  7. [Organizing health care: an ethical perspective].

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Health care at population level is a complex problem. Having this in mind, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the goods that are ethically relevant in the process of caring for health at this level. We briefly analyze some of the Chilean health statistics that, although they show important improvements along the years, demonstrate that certain conditions are to be deemed as inadequate by both healthcare providers and patients. Ethics is a central component to determine how to structure and organize health care systems and how they should operate. We emphasize human dignity as an ethical corner stone of the health care system, along with other important values such as justice and humanization, under the scope of the ends of medicine, and other components such as technical competence of providers and the financing of the whole process. We conclude that as far as a health care system is organized in a way that medical practice is well ordered, primarily and fundamentally according the ends of medicine and the good of persons, such a health care system is ethically adequate. PMID:24121582

  8. A pilot test of the addition of zinc to the current case management package of diarrhea in a primary health care setting.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Nita; Mazumder, Sarmila; Taneja, Sunita; Dube, Brinda; Black, Robert E; Fontaine, Olivier; Mahalanabis, Dilip; Bhan, Maharaj Kishan

    2005-11-01

    Zinc is recommended for the treatment of acute diarrhea in children but the effect of its introduction on drug and oral rehydration solution use is unclear. Government care providers, private practitioners and community workers were trained to distribute zinc and oral rehydration solution to children seeking care for diarrhea. Periodic surveys showed that village-based workers became a common source of diarrhea treatment and private practitioners were used less. Zinc was used in approximately half of the episodes; the prescription and use rates of oral rehydration solution packets increased from 7% at baseline to 44.9% 6 months later. Reduction in use of drugs during diarrhea ranged from 34% for tablets to 64% for injections 6 months later. The cost of treatment to families declined significantly. These findings need confirmation in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:16254536

  9. [Update on Current Care guidelines: ADHD (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, children and adolescents)].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The updated Current Care guideline for children and adolescents with ADHD covers both diagnosis and treatment. Psychosocial support is provided when hyperactivity problems arise, even before specific diagnosis. While psychosocial interventions are effective in the treatment of ADHD, the core symptoms are best treated with medication, such as methylphenidate, dexamphetamine, lisdexamphetamine or atomoxetine. Collaboration between families, primary health care services, specialist consultation services and day-care and school professionals is essential within the chain of care. PMID:22486070

  10. Integration: the firm and the health care sector.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, Miriam J; France, George

    2014-07-01

    Integration in health care is a key goal of health reform in United States and England. Yet past efforts in the 1990s to better integrate the delivery system were of limited success. Building on work by Bevan and Janus on delivery integration, this article explores integration through the lens of economic theories of integration. Firms generally integrate to increase efficiency through economies of scale, to improve their market power, and resolve the transaction costs involved with multiple external suppliers. Using the United States and England as laboratories, we apply concepts of economic integration to understand why integration does or does not occur in health care, and whether expectations of integrating different kinds of providers (hospital, primary care) and health and social services are realistic. Current enthusiasm for a more integrated health care system expands the scope of integration to include social services in England, but retains the focus on health care in the United States. We find mixed applicability of economic theories of integration. Economies of scale have not played a significant role in stimulating integration in both countries. Managerial incentives for monopoly or oligopoly may be more compelling in the United States, since hospitals seek higher prices and more leverage over payers. In both countries the concept of transaction costs could explain the success of new payment and budgeting methods, since health care integration ultimately requires resolving transaction costs across different delivery organizations. PMID:24759287

  11. A model for implementing integrative practice in health care agencies.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Chris; Arthur, Heather M

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been increased awareness and use of complementary/alternative therapies (CAM) in many countries without the health care infrastructure to support it. The National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine referred to the combining of mainstream medical therapies and CAM as integrative medicine. The creation of integrative health care teams will definitely result in redefining roles, but more importantly in a change in how services are delivered. The purpose of this paper is to describe a model of the necessary health care agency resources to support an integrative practice model. A logic model is used to depict the findings of a review of current evidence. Logic models are designed to show relationships between the goals of a program or initiative, the resources to achieve desired outputs and the activities that lead to outcomes. The four major resource categories necessary for implementing integrative care are within the domains of a) professional and research development, b) health human resource planning, c) regulation and legislation and d) practice and management in clinical areas. It was concluded that the system outcomes from activities within these resource categories should lead to freedom of choice in health care; a culturally sensitive health care system and a broader spectrum of services for achieving public health goals. PMID:21614155

  12. Big data in health care.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Pieter

    2013-02-01

    By identifying and applying advanced revenue cycle analytics, healthcare providers can: Free up cash. Find new revenues without harming core services. Improve productivity, profitability, and patient care. PMID:23413667

  13. National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AHFI AHFI FAQ AHFI Roster AHFI Approved For Vendors AHFI Approved Education Exhibit & Sponsor Anti-Fraud Expo ... Health Care Fraud & More. Contact Us 1220 L Street, NW, Suite 600 Washington, DC 20005 Phone: 202. ...

  14. National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... View Member Resources Newsroom View Newsroom Resources Latest News NHCAA comments on NAIC Subgroup work on Medical ... 8, 2016 AHFI® Prep Course Health Care Fraud News International Partners Fraud Reporting & Other Resources Platinum & Premier ...

  15. Product costing for health care firms.

    PubMed

    Cleverley, W O

    1987-01-01

    Product costing is an important management function for today's health care executive. A standard costing approach may be used based on two sets of standards: a standard cost profile and a standard treatment protocol. PMID:3121535

  16. Addressing health care disparities using public reporting.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Anne McGeary; Kunerth, Vicki; Carlson, Angeline M; McRae, James A; Vetta, Erika

    2012-01-01

    The literature highlights that disparities in health care performance exist. Publicly reporting data about disparities at an actionable level is needed. The Minnesota Health Care Disparities Report is designed to publicly report medical group health care performance rates for patients enrolled in state/federally funded programs. In addition, differences between patients enrolled in state-funded public programs and those in private or Medicare programs at statewide and medical group levels are presented. The endeavor is a cooperative one between Minnesota Community Measurement, an independent nonprofit community organization, and the Minnesota Department of Human Services, the state Medicaid agency. Public reporting makes transparent the gaps in the delivery of health care between patients enrolled in these programs at a medical group level and can facilitate quality improvement locally, where accountability lies and actions to address disparities can occur. PMID:22102162

  17. Health care – an everlasting challenge in temporal and spatial domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxi

    2010-01-01

    Health care is an everlasting challenge that requires effort at all levels, from national and organizational to individual domains, over a long-term period. This article reviews the historical development of health care-related issues worldwide and accentuates the necessity of health care in the current era. Through investigating the historical background in both the occidental and the oriental worlds and the latest achievements from academic and industrial endeavors, many lessons can be learnt, and as a result, an integrative strategy is proposed to meet today’s pressing needs. A government-funded project, “Challenge to 100 years of age”, which involved more than 600 residents in west Aizu village, lasted over 15 years. After reviewing its outcomes, a metrology of health based upon the three-dimensional phase space, which integrates with social well-being, mental status, and physical condition for a lifelong span, is advocated as a measure of the holistic view of health state. PMID:21197368

  18. Operationalizing knowledge management in health care.

    PubMed

    Zazzara, P

    2001-02-01

    Being able to leverage the collective clinical knowledge that a health system acquires on a daily basis and then apply that knowledge to elevate productivity and maintain clinical quality would be nirvana for health system executives. Although it is difficult to bring knowledge management to health care, it is not impossible. Architects of knowledge management solutions in health care will need to balance what an organization hopes to achieve in its market (business strategy); how they hope to achieve it (operating strategy); and where information technology is needed to enable what they hope to achieve and how they hope to achieve it (information strategy). PMID:11234728

  19. Current trends in palliative heart care.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rongyun

    2016-02-01

    Palliative care is an alternate therapeutic approach that involves specialised medical care of a patient diagnosed with serious life threatening illness like heart failure (HF). The prime aim of the palliative care is to provide patient with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical stress, and mental stress of the diagnosed disease. The palliative care helps in improving the quality of life for both the patient and the family. Advanced HF is a disease process that carries a high burden of symptoms, suffering, and death. Palliative care can complement traditional care to improve symptom amelioration, patient-caregiver communication, emotional support, and medical decision making. The present review summarized all the available on alternative palliative approaches provided to heart patient by a team of physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. PMID:25926080

  20. Implementation of Advanced Health Care Technology into Existing Competency-Based Health Care Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemovage, Shirley

    A project was undertaken to develop new curriculum materials that could be incorporated into an existing health assistant program to cover recent advances in health care technology. Area physicians' offices were toured and meetings were held with administrators of local hospitals in order to discover what kinds of advances in health care

  1. Benefits and Systems of Care for Maternal and Child Health under Health Care Reform: Workshop Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Cynthia H., Ed.

    This report discusses the health care needs of and benefits for women, children, and adolescents in light of national health care reform proposals put forth in 1994, and is based on presentations and discussions at an invitational workshop on maternal and child health. The report asserts that since women and children are disproportionately…

  2. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... care services. (b) Others capable of providing health care services include only: (1)...

  3. Health care utilisation and problems in accessing health care of female undocumented immigrants in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Loeffen, Maartje J.; van den Muijsenbergh, Maria E.; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To obtain information about the actual use of health care facilities by undocumented women and to identify obstacles they experience in accessing health care facilities. Methods A mixed methods study, with structured questionnaires and semi-structured interviews, was chosen to obtain a complete understanding. One-hundred undocumented women were recruited. Diversity was sought according to age, origin and reason for being undocumented. Results Undocumented female immigrants have unmet health care needs (56%) and low health care utilisation. Sixty-nine per cent of the women reported obstacles in accessing health care facilities. These included many personal obstacles such as shame, fear and/or lack of information. Poor language proficiency (OR 0.28;. CI 0.09–0.90) reduces utilisation of primary health care services. Conclusion Health care utilisation of undocumented women is low. Undocumented women refrain from seeking health care because of personal obstacles. These women need to be identified and informed about their rights, the health care system and the duty of professional confidentiality of doctors. Finally, institutional obstacles to access care should be removed since they strengthen reluctance to seek help. PMID:20502936

  4. Financing health care in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Taha, Nabila Fahed; Sharif, Amer Ahmad; Blair, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Newcomers to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) health care system often enquire about the way in which UAE health services are financed particularly when funding issues affect eligibility for treatment. The UAE ranks alongside many western counties on measures of life expectancy and child mortality but because of the unique population structure spends less of its national income on health. In the past as a wealthy country the UAE had no difficulty ensuring universal access to a comprehensive range of services but the health needs of the UAE population are becoming more complex and like many countries the UAE health system is facing the twin challenges of quality and cost. To meet these challenges new models of health care financing are being introduced. In this brief article we will describe the evolution of UAE health financing, its current state and likely future developments. PMID:24228347

  5. The Health Care Dilemma. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTaggart, Aubrey C.; McTaggart, Lorna, M.

    The purpose of this book is to provide useful information about the components of quality health care and to suggest ways for the consumer to find and avail himself of the best care possible. The following subjects are covered, including brief histories of sociological background and suggestions on how to judge competency: (1) physicians,…

  6. Child Health USA 2013: Prenatal Care Utilization

    MedlinePLUS

    ... site). 1 Office on Women’s Health . Pregnancy: Prenatal care and tests. Accessed: on 7/31/13 ↑ Back to top Graphs This image is described in the Data section. This image is described in the Data section. Data Timing of Prenatal Care Initiation, * by Maternal Education, 2011 Maternal Education Percent ...

  7. Model Child Care Health Policies. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, this document compiles model health policies intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the document presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following areas: (1)…

  8. Model Child Care Health Policies. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, this document compiles model health policies intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the document presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following areas: (1)…

  9. Emerging trends in health care finance.

    PubMed

    Sterns, J B

    1994-01-01

    Access to capital will become more difficult. Capital access is dependent on ability to repay debt, which, in turn, is dependent on internally generated cash flows. Under any health care reform proposal, revenue inflows will be slowed. The use of corporate finance techniques to limit financial risk and lower cost will be a permanent response to fundamental changes to the health care system. These changes will result in greater balance sheet management, centralized capital allocation, and alternative sources of capital. PMID:7614219

  10. Economists, policy entrepreneurs, and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, J P

    1995-01-01

    Economists would have formulated several aspects of the health care reform debate differently than policy entrepreneurs did. Economists would have questioned whether health care costs must be contained and whether either competition or global budgets were a "magic bullet" for doing so. They also would have emphasized the distortive costs of subsidies and taxes necessary to reach universal coverage, as well as the shakiness of the arguments about international competitiveness and excess insurance industry profits. PMID:7657203

  11. Organization theory. Analyzing health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Cors, W K

    1997-02-01

    Organization theory (OT) is a tool that can be applied to analyze and understand health care organizations. Transaction cost theory is used to explain, in a unifying fashion, the myriad changes being undertaken by different groups of constituencies in health care. Agency theory is applied to aligning economic incentives needed to ensure Integrated Delivery System (IDS) success. By using tools such as OT, a clearer understanding of organizational changes is possible. PMID:10164970

  12. Health care reform and long-term care pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Martin, R

    1994-11-01

    "Waiting and preparing" describes the health care reform activity of most of the larger long-term care pharmacy providers. The complexity of this service sector, in combination with the potentially enormous cost and actuarial uncertainty, seems to have averted major federal action at this time. The frenzy caused by the reform debate, however, has precipitated several changes at the state level that may not be as prudent. PMID:10138702

  13. The physician's perception of health care.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, R S

    1994-01-01

    A general malaise appears to have settled on the American medical scene; most Americans continue to trust their own physicians but do not trust the medical profession or the health system as a whole, while many physicians feel harassed by the regulatory, bureaucratic, or litigious intrusions upon the patient-doctor relationship. The strains on mutual trust among physicians, their patients, and the public are being played out against a background of contradictions. The advances of biomedicine are offset by the neglect of social and behavioural aspects of medical care. Preoccupation with specialized, hospital-based treatment is accompanied by isolation of public health and preventive interests from medical education and practice. Society remains uncertain whether health care is a right or a privilege while accepting public responsibility for financing the health care of certain groups such as the indigent sick (Medicaid), the elderly (Medicare), Native Americans, or members of the armed forces and veterans. Rising expectations about better outcomes through advances in technology are accompanied by rising anxieties about cost, appropriateness of care, access, and quality. Physicians must alter their perception of health care by adopting a population-based approach to need, a commitment to restoring equity in staffing patterns and compensation between primary care and specialty care, and adoption of a social contract that provides for full access by all Americans to basic cost-effective preventive and clinical services before spending on less cost-effective services. PMID:8064752

  14. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    PubMed

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10105044

  15. Latina Self-Reported Mental Health and Delay in Health Care in a New Latino Destination

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Emily Leckman; Rossy-Millán, José

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how depression and/or anxiety affect use of health care among Latinas in rapidly growing new Latino destinations, population where the growth rate of the Latino population exceeds the national average, may enhance community engagement efforts. Using community-based participatory research, a questionnaire assessing health care use was administered to 289 Latinas. Most (70%) reported delaying healthcare, and self-reported depression/anxiety was associated with a 3.1 fold (95% CI: 1.6 - 5.9) increase in delay, after adjusting for current health status, acculturation, age, education and place of birth. Mental health disparities exist among Latinas, which are related to delays in use of health care. A gap exists regarding health education interventions for Latinas. More research is needed to identify successful models, especially in new Latino destinations as they may be particularly vulnerable to delay care. PMID:20512742

  16. Economic analysis in health care antitrust.

    PubMed

    Vita, M G; Langenfeld, J; Pautler, P; Miller, L

    1991-01-01

    The Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission) has been very active in enforcing antitrust laws in the health care field for the past two decades. The staff has investigated a wide variety of cases covering a broad range of restrictions on competition. These cases can be divided into three basic types of cases in health care: (1) mergers and acquisitions, (2) horizontal restraints cases or agreements among competitors, and (3) input market monopolization cases, such as hospital privileges cases. The Commission relies on both legal and economic analysis in all of these cases. As Chairman Steiger of the Federal Trade Commission has stated, antitrust policy has been "increasingly reshaped by analysis based on economic theory." This article attempts to explain the economic analysis used in antitrust enforcement as applied to the first two of the three types of health care cases. Section I presents the basic economic framework that is used to assess the competitive implications of health care mergers and acquisitions. Section II describes the analysis applied to other agreements among competitors in the health care field and briefly explains how this analysis differs in other health care cases. PMID:10111250

  17. Health Care Reform, Care Coordination, and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Steaban, Robin Lea

    2016-01-01

    This article is meant to spur debate on the role of the professional nurse in care coordination as well as the role of nursing leaders for defining and leading to a future state. This work highlights the opportunity and benefits associated with transformation of professional nursing practice in response to the mandates of the Affordable Care Act of 2010. An understanding of core concepts and the work of care coordination are used to propose a model of care coordination based on the population health pyramid. This maximizes the roles of nurses across the continuum as transformational leaders in the patient/family and nursing relationship. The author explores the role of the nurse in a transactional versus transformational relationship with patients, leading to actualization of the nurse in care coordination. Focusing on the role of the nurse leader, the challenges and necessary actions for optimization of the professional nurse role are explored, using principles of transformational leadership. PMID:26938188

  18. The Disabled: Their Health Care and Health Insurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Michele

    This paper examines issues concerning access to health care for persons with disabilities, specifically the health status of the disabled, utilization and cost of services, and a comparison of health insurance coverage of persons with and without disabilities. Three age groups (children, working-age adults, and the elderly) are considered. Data…

  19. Expensive cancer drugs and just health care.

    PubMed

    Ehni, Hans-Jörg

    2014-04-01

    Extremely expensive drugs which cost more than 100.000 $ per year for the treatment of one patient are increasingly common. The benefit of these drugs may either be not accessible to many patients or the overall costs could lead to a heavy burden on the health care system and public resources. This article describes the overall background of this trend and addresses the problem of expensive drugs from a perspective of just health care and just health outcomes. Therefore, basic aspects of just health care are outlined such as goods and principles relevant from a perspective of justice. This framework is applied to the allocation of expensive drugs on three levels. These reflections will demonstrate that there is no simple solution to this problem, and that the decisions cannot be taken by experts, but should be the result of an open, transparent, and fair public dialogue on health priorities. PMID:24810193

  20. Latino Adults’ Access to Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos’ service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos’ access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

  1. The practice of health care: wisdom as a model.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Ricca; Pearce, Jane

    2007-09-01

    Reasoning and judgement in health care entail complex responses to problems whose demands typically derive from several areas of specialism at once. We argue that current evidence- or value-based models of health care reasoning, despite their virtues, are insufficient to account for responses to such problems exhaustively. At the same time, we offer reasons for contending that health professionals in fact engage in forms of reasoning of a kind described for millennia under the concept of wisdom. Wisdom traditions refer to forms of deliberation which combine knowledge, reflection and life experience with social, emotional and ethical capacities. Wisdom is key in dealing with problems which are vital to human affairs but lack prescribed solutions. Uncertainty and fluidity must be tolerated in seeking to resolve them. We illustrate the application of wisdom using cases in psychiatry, where non-technical aspects of problems are often prominent and require more systematic analysis than conventional approaches offer, but we argue that our thesis applies throughout the health care field. We argue for the relevance of a threefold model of reasoning to modern health care situations in which multifaceted teamwork and complex settings demand wise judgement. A model based on practical wisdom highlights a triadic process with features activating capacities of the self (professional), other (patient and/or carers and/or colleagues) and aspects of the problem itself. Such a framework could be used to develop current approaches to health care based on case review and experiential learning. PMID:17120113

  2. Providing Health Care to Latino Immigrants: Community-Based Efforts in the Rural Midwest

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Michelle M.; Blewett, Lynn A.; Call, Kathleen T.

    2004-01-01

    We examined case studies of 3 rural Midwestern communities to assess local health care systems’ response to rapidly growing Latino populations. Currently, clinics provide free or low-cost care, and schools, public health, social services, and religious organizations connect Latinos to the health care system. However, many unmet health care needs result from lack of health insurance, limited income, and linguistic and cultural barriers. Targeted safety net funding would help meet Latino health care needs in rural communities with limited resources. PMID:15451737

  3. The Health and Social Care Act 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although the National Health Service (NHS) is regarded as a national treasure, it is no longer immune from the colossal financial pressures brought about by global recession. Economic sustainability has largely driven the reform process leading to the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) 2012, however; other considerations have also played a role in the journey to turn the health and social care service into an institution which is fit for the 21st-century needs. This article examines the impact of the HSCA 2012 on those made vulnerable through mental ill health. It then considers three issues: First, whether parity between mental and physical health can have life beyond political rhetoric; second, what impact driving up efficiency within the NHS will have upon mental health patients; and finally, the extent to which the personalisation agenda can be meaningfully applied within the mental health context. PMID:26273147

  4. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  5. Association between Electronic Health Records and Health Care Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A.; Kern, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The federal government is investing approximately $20 billion in electronic health records (EHRs), in part to address escalating health care costs. However, empirical evidence that provider use of EHRs decreases health care costs is limited. Objective To determine any association between EHRs and health care utilization. Methods We conducted a cohort study (2008–2009) in the Hudson Valley, a multi-payer, multiprovider community in New York State. We included 328 primary care physicians in predominantly small practices (median practice size four primary care physicians), who were caring for 223,772 patients. Data from an independent practice association was used to determine adoption of EHRs. Claims data aggregated across five commercial health plans was used to characterize seven types of health care utilization: primary care visits, specialist visits, radiology tests, laboratory tests, emergency department visits, hospital admissions, and readmissions. We used negative binomial regression to determine associations between EHR adoption and each utilization outcome, adjusting for ten physician characteristics. Results Approximately half (48%) of the physicians were using paper records and half (52%) were using EHRs. For every 100 patients seen by physicians using EHRs, there were 14 fewer specialist visits (adjusted p < 0.01) and 9 fewer radiology tests (adjusted p = 0.01). There were no significant differences in rates of primary care visits, laboratory tests, emergency department visits, hospitalizations or readmissions. Conclusions Patients of primary care providers who used EHRs were less likely to have specialist visits and radiology tests than patients of primary care providers who did not use EHRs. PMID:25848412

  6. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  7. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

    PubMed Central

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  8. Risk-sharing in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Jajoo, U N

    1992-01-01

    Kasturba Hospital in Sevagram, India, has helped to initiate an outreach health program for nearby villages. A health insurance scheme has evolved where the community contributes sorghum for a fund and participates in decision-making and the supervision of village health workers. Contributors are entitled to free primary care and subsidized referral care. Only villages where at least 75% of the poor community agreed to enroll in the health insurance scheme were adopted by the hospital. The hospital offers insured persons free inpatient treatment for unexpected illness and a 75% subsidy for care during normal pregnancy or with cataract and hernia operations. The mobile health team, comprising auxiliary nurse-midwife, social worker, and village health worker, provides maternal and child health services in the localities. The village health workers provide symptomatic drug treatment, exercise a preventive role with the help of visiting health team members, and refer patients to hospital. The auxiliary nurse-midwife and social workers organize visits for vaccination and provide maternal and child health care. The doctor in charge treats patients in the hospital and trains village health workers. More than 75% of the villages in the area have enrolled in the scheme over the last 10 years. No vaccine-preventable illness (measles, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus) was reported in children or mothers after mass immunization was instituted, no maternal deaths have occurred during the past 10 years, and perinatal mortality has fallen steeply. The village health teams are now regarded as counselors on health-related matters, among them drinking-water supplies, irrigation, and programs for income generation. It is necessary to regulate the private health sector, including professionals, the drug industry, and investors. If outpatient services are opened up to the private sector, a system of universal medical insurance, financed by local government, should operate. PMID:1418330

  9. Current Issues in Day Care: Readings and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carol H., Ed.

    A collection of 19 articles addressing questions and concerns of child caregivers and parents, this resource book serves as a guide to the selection and evaluation of day care programs, discusses employer-sponsored day care trends, and studies health and environmental concerns. More specifically, section I provides an overview of day care, section…

  10. Evidence-based medicine in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gordon B

    2011-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 mandates a national comparative outcomes research project agenda. Comparative effectiveness research includes both clinical trials and observational studies and is facilitated by electronic health records. A national network of electronic health records will create a vast electronic data "warehouse" with exponential growth of observational data. High-quality associations will identify research topics for pragmatic clinical trials, and systematic reviews of clinical trials will provide optimal evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Thus, health care reform will provide a robust environment for comparative effectiveness research, systematic reviews, and evidence-based medicine, and implementation of evidence-based medicine should lead to improved quality of care. PMID:21860057

  11. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior. PMID:21045586

  12. Public health capacity in the provision of health care services.

    PubMed

    Valdmanis, Vivian; DeNicola, Arianna; Bernet, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we assess the capacity of Florida's public health departments. We achieve this by using bootstrapped data envelopment analysis (DEA) applied to Johansen's definition of capacity utilization. Our purpose in this paper is to measure if there is, theoretically, enough excess capacity available to handle a possible surge in the demand for primary care services especially after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act that includes provisions for expanded public health services. We measure subunit service availability using a comprehensive data source available for all 67 county health departments in the provision of diagnostic care and primary health care. In this research we aim to address two related research questions. First, we structure our analysis so as to fix budgets. This is based on the assumption that State spending on social and health services could be limited, but patient needs are not. Our second research question is that, given the dearth of primary care providers in Florida if budgets are allowed to vary is there enough medical labor to provide care to clients. Using a non-parametric approach, we also apply bootstrapping to the concept of plant capacity which adds to the productivity research. To preview our findings, we report that there exists excess plant capacity for patient treatment and care, but question whether resources may be better suited for more traditional types of public health services. PMID:24687803

  13. The Role of Strategy in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; Millhouse, Paul W; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Significant changes are occurring in the health care field, and spine surgeons must have an understanding of business strategy if they are going to adapt to the new health care environment. Spine surgeons will be required to demonstrate how their service provides a unique value to their patients or else the patients will obtain care from competitors. Classic methods for demonstrating value such as academic prestige and superior clinical outcomes may no longer be sufficient in the evolving health care field, and surgeons will need to demonstrate a comprehensive and cost-effective treatment algorithm for a diagnosis. This article will discuss the basics of business strategy for the spine surgeon, and ways in which the surgeon may demonstrate value to their patients. PMID:26466340

  14. The Impact of Disasters on Populations With Health and Health Care Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Wilson, Sacoby; Brock-Martin, Amy; Glover, Saundra; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2010-01-01

    Context A disaster is indiscriminate in whom it affects. Limited research has shown that the poor and medically underserved, especially in rural areas, bear an inequitable amount of the burden. Objective To review the literature on the combined effects of a disaster and living in an area with existing health or health care disparities on a community’s health, access to health resources, and quality of life. Methods We performed a systematic literature review using the following search terms: disaster, health disparities, health care disparities, medically underserved, and rural. Our inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed, US studies that discussed the delayed or persistent health effects of disasters in medically underserved areas. Results There has been extensive research published on disasters, health disparities, health care disparities, and medically underserved populations individually, but not collectively. Conclusions The current literature does not capture the strain of health and health care disparities before and after a disaster in medically underserved communities. Future disaster studies and policies should account for differences in health profiles and access to care before and after a disaster. PMID:20389193

  15. Twenty-first century health care.

    PubMed

    Pearson, M

    1999-04-01

    A dynamic, proactive health-care environment is beckoning. Fueled by consumer-led awareness, digital television, the Internet and a preoccupation with preventative health maintenance, it will define a new genre of products. In a series of provocative statements, this visionary article explores what the future may hold for diagnostics and medical devices. PMID:10387620

  16. Health and Safety in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sells, Clifford J.; Paeth, Susan

    1987-01-01

    Basic health and day care policies and procedures should be implemented and closely monitored with the help of a health consultant, particularly in terms of respiratory tract, enteric, skin, invasive bacterial, and multiple system infections; Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; vaccine preventable diseases; and general safety procedures.…

  17. Women and access to health care.

    PubMed

    Puentes-Markides, C

    1992-08-01

    This paper is concerned with access to health care for women in developing countries, with specific reference to Latin American and Caribbean countries. It reviews the available literature on the concept of access as it relates to other variables such as accountability, affordability and acceptability of health services, taking into consideration the effects of the generalized socio-economic crisis that has affected most countries during the last decade, as well as equity objectives. Various approaches to defining variables affecting access to health care appear in the literature reviewed. While some of them indicate that ability to pay for services act as a major determinant of access to health care, others point to behavioral issues related to motivation, health seeking behavior or perception of illness as a deterrent to women in the low socioeconomic strata, while others indicate that sociocultural issues, such as values, education, religion or demographic variables related to age, influence access to health care. The paper concludes with some comments on policies and strategies for securing access to health and healthcare, indicating the need to move away from traditional solutions including framing gender-based health differences in status and access adequately, promoting and strengthening social participation of women in policy making. PMID:1381522

  18. Optimizing cancer care through mobile health.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Bassel; Kayyali, Reem; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Philip, Nada

    2015-07-01

    The survival rates for patients living with cancer are increasing, due to recent advances in detection, prevention and treatment. It has been estimated that there were 28 million cancer survivors around the world in 2012. In the UK, for patients diagnosed in 2007, it is predicted that more than half of them will survive their cancer for 5 years or more. A large majority of cancer survivors report unmet supportive care needs and distressing symptoms and adverse long-term consequences related to their cancer. Cancer management could be optimized to better meet patients demand through technology, including mobile health (m-Health). m-Health is defined as the use of mobile communications and network technologies for health care. m-Health can help both patients and health-care professionals and play an important part in managing and delivering cancer care including managing side effects, supporting drug adherence, providing cancer information, planning and follow up and detecting and diagnosing cancer. Health authorities have already published guidelines regulating m-Health to insure patient safety and improve the accountability of its applications. PMID:25649121

  19. Dermatology. Positioned for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Lober, C W

    1996-09-01

    Dermatologic services will of necessity be a fundamental part of any quality, cost-conscious health care system because (1) we treat medically necessary and economically significant diseases, (2) our area of expertise includes a distinct body of medical knowledge over which no other health professional has comparable expertise, and (3) our services are provided in a cost-effective manner. PMID:8795547

  20. Prevention Opportunities in Health Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Millstein, Susan G.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews changing patterns of health and illness that have led to increased interest in the role of patient and provider behaviors, discussing the advantages of using health care settings as prevention sites. Presents examples of successful behaviorally-based prevention programs, offering evidence supporting their cost-effectiveness. Describes…

  1. Physician workforce planning in an era of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Grover, Atul; Niecko-Najjum, Lidia M

    2013-12-01

    Workforce planning in an era of health care reform is a challenge as both delivery systems and patient demographics change. Current workforce projections are based on a future health care system that is either an identified "ideal" or a modified version of the existing system. The desire to plan for such an "ideal system," however, may threaten access to necessary services if it does not come to fruition or is based on theoretical rather than empirical data.Historically, workforce planning that concentrated only on an "ideal system" has been centered on incorrect assumptions. Two examples of such failures presented in the 1980s when the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee recommended a decrease in the physician workforce on the basis of predetermined "necessary and appropriate" services and in the 1990s, when planners expected managed care and health maintenance organizations to completely overhaul the existing health care system. Neither accounted for human behavior, demographic changes, and actual demand for health care services, leaving the nation ill-prepared to care for an aging population with chronic disease.In this article, the authors argue that workforce planning should begin with the current system and make adjustments based on empirical data that accurately reflect current trends. Actual health care use patterns will become evident as systemic changes are realized-or not-over time. No single approach will solve the looming physician shortage, but the danger of planning only for an ideal system is being unprepared for the actual needs of the population. PMID:24128627

  2. Who pays for health care in Ghana?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Financial protection against the cost of unforeseen ill health has become a global concern as expressed in the 2005 World Health Assembly resolution (WHA58.33), which urges its member states to "plan the transition to universal coverage of their citizens". An important element of financial risk protection is to distribute health care financing fairly in relation to ability to pay. The distribution of health care financing burden across socio-economic groups has been estimated for European countries, the USA and Asia. Until recently there was no such analysis in Africa and this paper seeks to contribute to filling this gap. It presents the first comprehensive analysis of the distribution of health care financing in relation to ability to pay in Ghana. Methods Secondary data from the Ghana Living Standard Survey (GLSS) 2005/2006 were used. This was triangulated with data from the Ministry of Finance and other relevant sources, and further complemented with primary household data collected in six districts. We implored standard methodologies (including Kakwani index and test for dominance) for assessing progressivity in health care financing in this paper. Results Ghana's health care financing system is generally progressive. The progressivity of health financing is driven largely by the overall progressivity of taxes, which account for close to 50% of health care funding. The national health insurance (NHI) levy (part of VAT) is mildly progressive and formal sector NHI payroll deductions are also progressive. However, informal sector NHI contributions were found to be regressive. Out-of-pocket payments, which account for 45% of funding, are regressive form of health payment to households. Conclusion For Ghana to attain adequate financial risk protection and ultimately achieve universal coverage, it needs to extend pre-payment cover to all in the informal sector, possibly through funding their contributions entirely from tax, and address other issues affecting the expansion of the National Health Insurance. Furthermore, the pre-payment funding pool for health care needs to grow so budgetary allocation to the health sector can be enhanced. PMID:21708026

  3. Role of Primary Health Care in Ensuring Access to Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Sambala, Evanson Z; Sapsed, Susan; Mkandawire, Mercy L

    2010-01-01

    To examine ways of ensuring access to health services within the framework of primary health care (PHC), since the goal of PHC to make universal health care available to all people has become increasingly neglected amid emerging themes of globalization, trade, and foreign policy. From a public health point of view, we argue that the premise of PHC can unlock barriers to health care services and contribute greatly to determining collective health through the promotion of universal basic health services. PHC has the most sophisticated and organized infrastructure, theories, and political principles, with which it can deal adequately with the issues of inequity, inequality, and social injustice which emerge from negative economic externalities and neo-liberal economic policies. Addressing these issues, especially the complex social and political influences that restrict access to medicines, may require the integration of different health initiatives into PHC. Based on current systems, PHC remains the only conventional health delivery service that can deal with resilient public health problems adequately. However, to strengthen its ability to do so, we propose the revitalization of PHC to incorporate scholarship that promotes human rights, partnerships, research and development, advocacy, and national drug policies. The concept of PHC can improve access; however, this will require the urgent interplay among theoretical, practical, political, and sociological influences arising from the economic, social, and political determinants of ill health in an era of globalization. PMID:20564760

  4. Health care reform: a short summary.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay

    2010-09-01

    The Health Care Reform legislation has many provisions of importance to the nuclear medicine community. This article is not a complete summary of the thousands of pages in the legislation, but emphasizes some relevant aspects of the bills. When the plan is fully implemented, about 32 million more Americans will have health insurance. Pre-existing medical conditions will no longer result in insurance denials. There are many initiatives to slow the growth of spending on health care in various ways, such as by setting up the new Medicare Advisory Board. There are also new fees, taxes, penalties, subsidies, and tax deduction changes. PMID:20706044

  5. Health Care Delivery in Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kenneth S.

    1982-01-01

    A structural framework is provided for a responsive athletic injury control program, the Health Supervision Loop in Sport. The use of certified athletic trainers is recommended to lessen the risk of sport-related injuries. (FG)

  6. Defining care products to finance health care in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Westerdijk, Machiel; Zuurbier, Joost; Ludwig, Martijn; Prins, Sarah

    2012-04-01

    A case-mix project started in the Netherlands with the primary goal to define a complete set of health care products for hospitals. The definition of the product structure was completed 4 years later. The results are currently being used for billing purposes. This paper focuses on the methodology and techniques that were developed and applied in order to define the casemix product structure. The central research question was how to develop a manageable product structure, i.e., a limited set of hospital products, with acceptable cost homogeneity. For this purpose, a data warehouse with approximately 1.5 million patient records from 27 hospitals was build up over a period of 3 years. The data associated with each patient consist of a large number of a priori independent parameters describing the resource utilization in different stages of the treatment process, e.g., activities in the operating theatre, the lab and the radiology department. Because of the complexity of the database, it was necessary to apply advanced data analysis techniques. The full analyses process that starts from the database and ends up with a product definition consists of four basic analyses steps. Each of these steps has revealed interesting insights. This paper describes each step in some detail and presents the major results of each step. The result consists of 687 product groups for 24 medical specialties used for billing purposes. PMID:21350859

  7. Barriers to health care for Vietnamese refugees.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzo, C E

    1992-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the dynamics of why Vietnamese refugees may not optimally use existing health services in the United States. A random sample of 75 refugees was interviewed by a bilingual translator. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to analyze the effects of time of arrival on whether the following are barriers to care: not having a translator available in health care facilities, feeling understood by health care providers, being able to understand the written and verbal instructions of providers, and not having a primary provider. The hypothesis, that time-of-arrival groups would differ significantly on these variables, was supported (F = 4.81; df = 8,136; P less than .001). Concern about not having a translator in health care facilities ranked first in distinguishing the groups (F = 17.09; df = 2.71; P less than .001), followed by primary provider (F = 5.68; df = 2.71; P less than .01), feeling understood by the provider (F = 5.15; df = 2.71; P less than .01), and being able to understand written and verbal instructions given by the provider (F = 4.25; df = 2.71; P less than .05). The time-of-arrival groups also differed significantly on supplemental analyses. Subjects expressed willingness to seek more frequent health care if translators were available in health care facilities (F = 18.22; df = 2.72; P less than .001) and to change health care sites to gain a translator (F = 13.74; df = 2.72; P less than .001). PMID:1506563

  8. Enabling patient-centered care through health information technology.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Knight, Amy; Marinopoulos, Spyridon; Gibbons, M Christopher; Berger, Zackary; Aboumatar, Hanan; Wilson, Renee F; Lau, Brandyn D; Sharma, Ritu; Bass, Eric B

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The main objective of the report is to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) that supports patient-centered care (PCC) on: health care processes; clinical outcomes; intermediate outcomes (patient or provider satisfaction, health knowledge and behavior, and cost); responsiveness to needs and preferences of patients; shared decisionmaking and patient-clinician communication; and access to information. Additional objectives were to identify barriers and facilitators for using health IT to deliver PCC, and to identify gaps in evidence and information needed by patients, providers, payers, and policymakers. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, INSPEC, and Compendex databases through July 31, 2010. METHODS Paired members of our team reviewed citations to identify randomized controlled trials of PCC-related health IT interventions and studies that addressed barriers and facilitators for health IT for delivery of PCC. Independent assessors rated studies for quality. Paired reviewers abstracted data. RESULTS The search identified 327 eligible articles, including 184 articles on the impact of health IT applications implemented to support PCC and 206 articles addressing barriers or facilitators for such health IT applications. Sixty-three articles addressed both questions. The study results suggested positive effects of PCC-related health IT interventions on health care process outcomes, disease-specific clinical outcomes (for diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cancer, and other health conditions), intermediate outcomes, responsiveness to the needs and preferences of patients, shared decisionmaking, patient-clinician communication, and access to medical information. Studies reported a number of barriers and facilitators for using health IT applications to enable PCC. Barriers included: lack of usability; problems with access to the health IT application due to older age, low income, education, cognitive impairment, and other factors; low computer literacy in patients and clinicians; insufficient basic formal training in health IT applications; physicians' concerns about more work; workflow issues; problems related to new system implementation, including concerns about confidentiality of patient information; depersonalization; incompatibility with current health care practices; lack of standardization; and problems with reimbursement. Facilitators for the utilization of health IT included ease of use, perceived usefulness, efficiency of use, availability of support, comfort in use, and site location. CONCLUSIONS Despite marked heterogeneity in study characteristics and quality, substantial evidence exists confirming that health IT applications with PCC-related components have a positive effect on health care outcomes. positive effect on health care outcomes. PMID:24422882

  9. Incorporation of the health care system in the west

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A reflection is made, from an interpretative perspective, on the historical evolution of health care in the West. It starts from the moment that this became a way to intervene the sick and an instrument for healing diseases, focusing on original documents and written sources which account for results of historical research, which range from XV century until today. To do this, it tries to understand the health care as an ideographic body of knowledge consisting of five pieces of a puzzle composed by: the state policy of hospitals accumulation implemented in Spain, the accumulation of medical practices in what is currently Germany, the hospital wards in England, the nosological rationality in France, and the US sanitizing machine; all these movements as producers of closely linked health care developments, that are nothing more than collective actions regulated by social norms around health. PMID:26600630

  10. The health care market: can hospitals survive?

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J C

    1980-01-01

    Does it sound familiar? Resources are scarce, competition is tough, and government regulations and a balanced budget are increasingly hard to meet at the same time. This is not the automobile or oil industry but the health care industry, and hospital managers are facing the same problems. And, maintains the author of this article, they must borrow some proven marketing techniques from business to survive in the new health care market. He first describes the features of the new market (the increasing economic power of physicians, new forms of health care delivery, prepaid health plans, and the changing regulatory environment) and then the possible marketing strategies for dealing with them (competing hard for physicians who control the patient flow and diversifying and promoting the mix of services). He also describes various planning solutions that make the most of a community's hospital facilities and affiliations. PMID:10247957

  11. INFORMAL CARE AND CAREGIVER’S HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    DO, YOUNG KYUNG; NORTON, EDWARD C.; STEARNS, SALLY C.; VAN HOUTVEN, COURTNEY HAROLD

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to measure the causal effect of informal caregiving on the health and health care use of women who are caregivers, using instrumental variables. We use data from South Korea, where daughters and daughters-in-law are the prevalent source of caregivers for frail elderly parents and parents-in-law. A key insight of our instrumental variable approach is that having a parent-in-law with functional limitations increases the probability of providing informal care to that parent-in-law, but a parent-in-law’s functional limitation does not directly affect the daughter-in-law’s health. We compare results for the daughter-in-law and daughter samples to check the assumption of the excludability of the instruments for the daughter sample. Our results show that providing informal care has significant adverse effects along multiple dimensions of health for daughter-in-law and daughter caregivers in South Korea. PMID:24753386

  12. Virtual health care center in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology – Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center". PMID:18673518

  13. Commentary: Health care reform and primary care: training physicians for tomorrow's challenges.

    PubMed

    Caudill, T Shawn; Lofgren, Richard; Jennings, C Darrell; Karpf, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Although Congress recently passed health insurance reform legislation, the real catalyst for change in the health care delivery system, the author's argue, will be changes to the reimbursement model. To rein in increasing costs, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid aims to move Medicare from the current fee-for-service model to a reimbursement approach that shifts the risk to providers and encourages greater accountability both for the cost and the quality of care. This level of increased accountability can only be achieved by clinical integration among health care providers. Central to this reorganized delivery model are primary care providers who coordinate and organize the care of their patients, using best practices and evidence-based medicine while respecting the patient's values, wishes, and dictates. Thus, the authors ask whether primary care physicians will be available in sufficient numbers and if they will be adequately and appropriately trained to take on this role. Most workforce researchers report inadequate numbers of primary care doctors today, a shortage that will only be exacerbated in the future. Even more ominously, the authors argue that primary care physicians being trained today will not have the requisite skills to fulfill their contemplated responsibilities because of a variety of factors that encourage fragmentation of care. If this training issue is not debated vigorously to determine new and appropriate training approaches, the future workforce may eventually have the appropriate number of physicians but inadequately trained individuals, a situation that would doom any effort at system reform. PMID:21270552

  14. Spina Bifida: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

    These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with spina bifida. The booklet begins with general information about spina bifida. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures. The child's health care…

  15. Clinical Preventive Services for Older Adults: The Interface Between Personal Health Care and Public Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Chesley L.; Shenson, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Healthy aging must become a priority objective for both population and personal health services, and will require innovative prevention programming to span those systems. Uptake of essential clinical preventive services is currently suboptimal among adults, owing to a number of system- and office-based care barriers. To achieve maximum health results, prevention must be integrated across community and clinical settings. Many preventive services are portable, deliverable in either clinical or community settings. Capitalizing on that flexibility can improve uptake and health outcomes. Significant reductions in health disparities, mortality, and morbidity, along with decreases in health spending, are achievable through improved collaboration and synergy between population health and personal health systems. PMID:22390505

  16. Health planning and health care for the poor: the internal ethic of public health.

    PubMed

    Erwin, P C

    1996-01-01

    Health planning involves assessing health care needs of a defined population, setting priorities, then developing, implementing,m and evaluating programs that address priority needs. The concepts of health planning are central to the 1988 report of the Institute of Medicine on the Future of Public Health, which defined the three core functions of public health as assessment, policy development, and assurance. Generally, when health planning is instituted, poor people are identified as having the poorest health status and the greatest need. An internal ethic is therefore created for public health to focus on the health care needs of those in poverty. This internal ethic of public health health can become the driving force for reforming the present U.S. health care system. A reformed health care system would be guided by the principle of care according to need, which not only has a basis in health planning, but in social justice as well. PMID:10158562

  17. [Complex chronic care situations and socio-health coordination].

    PubMed

    Morilla Herrera, Juan Carlos; Morales Asencio, José Miguel; Kaknani, Shakira; García Mayor, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Patient-centered healthcare is currently one of the most pursued goals in health services. It is necessary to ensure a sufficient level of cooperative and coordinated work between different providers and settings, including family and social and community resources. Clinical integration occurs when the care provided by health professionals and providers is integrated into a single coherent process through different professions using shared guidelines and protocols. Such coordination can be developed at three levels: macro, which involves the integration of one or more of the three basic elements that support health care (the health plan, primary care and specialty care), with the aim of reducing fragmentation of care; meso, where health and social services are coordinated to provide comprehensive care to elderly and chronic patients; and micro, aimed to improve coordination in individual patients and caregivers. The implementation of new roles, such as Advanced Practice Nursing, along with improvements in family physicians' problem-solving capacity in certain processes, or modifying the place of provision of certain services are key to ensure services adapted to the requirements of chronic patients. PMID:26363991

  18. Staying alive: strategies for accountable health care.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Stuart G; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye M; Halverson, Amy L; Maker, Vijay; Demetriou, Achilles; Fischer, Josef E; Bentrem, David; Rudnicki, Marek; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Jones, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act signed into law in March 2010, has led to sweeping changes to the US health care system. The ensuing pace of change in health care regulation is unparalleled and difficult for physicians to keep up with. Because of the extraordinary challenges that have arisen, the public policy committee of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary tract conducted a symposium at their 52nd Annual Meeting in May 2011 to educate participants on the myriad of public policy changes occurring in order to best prepare them for their future. Expert speakers presented their views on policy changes affecting diverse areas including patient safety, patient experience, hospital and provider fiscal challenges, and the life of the practicing surgeon. In all areas, surgical leadership was felt to be critical to successfully navigate the new health care landscape as surgeons have a long history of providing safe, high quality, low cost care. The recognition of shared values among the diverse constituents affected by health care policy changes will best prepare surgeons to control their own destiny and successfully manage new challenges as they emerge. PMID:22399268

  19. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... (54 FR 8735). The criteria for psychiatric HPSAs were expanded to mental health HPSAs on January 22, 1992 (57 FR 2473). Currently funded PHS Act programs use only the primary medical care, mental health... designated HPSAs and supersedes the HPSA lists published in the Federal Register on February 20, 2002 (67...

  20. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  1. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  2. Community health workers and primary health care in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Quillian, J P

    1993-01-01

    Community participation and utilization of community health workers (CHWs) are essential components of the primary health care model. The success of CHWs is dependent on their training and subsequent community support. Community-prepared nurses are ideal CHW educators. A training program for CHWs was implemented in Honduras emphasizing the principles of adult learning and problem-based learning. Following a 4-month program of training a primary health care clinic was opened and managed by CHWs for a population over 10,000. Approximately 80% of local health problems were managed by the CHWs proving that well-trained CHWs can have a significant impact on the delivery of health care. PMID:8240881

  3. Conditional shared confidentiality in mental health care.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Axel; Eneman, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Because of the development towards community care, care providers not only exchange information in a team, but increasingly also in networks. This is a challenge to confidentiality. The ethical question is how care providers can keep information about the care receiver confidential, whilst at the same time exchanging information about that care receiver in a team or network? Can shared confidentiality be extended from a team to a network? To clarify this question, the article refers to the advice of an expert ethics committee in mental health care. The advice regards exchange of information in a network as a further step in enhancing collaboration among care providers. Therefore, the good and evident practice of shared confidentiality in a team can be extended to a network if the same conditions are met. First, the care providers participate in a clearly defined and identifiable team or network. Secondly, they have a shared care responsibility. Thirdly, they have a duty of confidentiality. Fourth, they dialogue with the care receiver and obtain his or her consent. Finally, they apply the filter of relevance. Hence, conditional shared confidentiality is an ethical justification for the exchange of information in a team or network. PMID:25209901

  4. Collaborative Care for Depression in Primary Care: How Psychiatry Could “Troubleshoot” Current Treatments and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Barkil-Oteo, Andres

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of mental health services for people with depression are provided in primary care settings. Primary care providers prescribe 79 percent of antidepressant medications and see 60 percent of people being treated for depression in the United States, and they do that with little support from specialist services. Depression is not effectively managed in the primary care setting. Collaborative care based on a team approach, a population health perspective, and measurement-based care has been proven to treat depression more effectively than care as usual in a variety of settings and for different populations, and it increases people’s access to medications and behavioral therapies. Psychiatry has the responsibility of supporting the primary care sector in delivering mental health services by disseminating collaborative care approaches under recent initiatives and opportunities made possible by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). PMID:23766735

  5. Integrating primary health care and mental health services--a successful rural linkage.

    PubMed Central

    Prindaville, G M; Sidwell, L H; Milner, D E

    1983-01-01

    The local delivery of human services is currently receiving national emphasis. The expectation is that community-based services shall be provided with a minimum of duplication and with maximum efficiency, achieved partly by interdisciplinary and interorganizational cooperation. This emphasis was appropriately facilitated in the mid-1970s through the availability of the Mental Health Initiative grants. The grants, initiated by the Bureau of Community Health Services in conjunction with the National Institute of Mental Health, Public Health Service, promoted the increased availability of mental health services through formal linkages between community mental health centers and primary health care programs. One such successful linkage was between a small primary health care center and a nonfederally funded, multicounty, mental health center in northwest Illinois. Initiated in September 1980, the services of the linkage project included direct clinical mental health services delivered at the primary health care center site, consultation and education activities, and the coordination of interagency services. The project patients differed from the general clients of the mental health center in demographic characteristics, source of referral, and diagnoses. The key elements in successful linkages and the achievement of goals are analyzed. The experience of the linkage project is relevant to the 1980s. The project was prematurely ended after 14 months. Reduction in Federal funds severely cut support for the primary health care center, and the depressed local economy could not match the withdrawn Federal funds. PMID:6828640

  6. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E

    2003-01-01

    Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries). The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security) framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin PMID:12525262

  7. IOM committee calls for complete revamping of health care system to achieve better quality.

    PubMed

    2001-03-01

    The health care system can no longer deliver quality care the way it is currently organized, according to a new report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, released March 1 by the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Quality of Health Care in America. Instead, the committee says that it is time to reinvent the system. PMID:11268795

  8. Suicides in Users of Mental Health Care Services: Treatment Characteristics and Hindsight Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Annemiek; Kerkhof, Ad J. F. M.; Robben, Paul B. M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to describe the patient and treatment characteristics of a sample of 505 suicides by mental health care patients, and to determine how clinicians view the care provided and what they learned. The results indicate that the quality of mental health care for suicidal patients could be improved by focusing on communication among…

  9. Suicides in Users of Mental Health Care Services: Treatment Characteristics and Hindsight Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Annemiek; Kerkhof, Ad J. F. M.; Robben, Paul B. M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to describe the patient and treatment characteristics of a sample of 505 suicides by mental health care patients, and to determine how clinicians view the care provided and what they learned. The results indicate that the quality of mental health care for suicidal patients could be improved by focusing on communication among…

  10. Giving health care to minority patients.

    PubMed

    White, E H

    1977-03-01

    Health care is usually thought of as a basic right of each individual. This so-called basic right is denied to many mainly because of their economic situation and the color of their skin. There is a need for more blacks, Indians, Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Asians in the health care field. The numbers are low and the training process slow. Time is needed to prepare ethnic people of color. Since most of the deliveries of health care are white, these white workers must become sensitive to the traditions, values and attitudes of the ethnic groups of color. Schools of nursing are beginning to include cultural differences in nursing curriculums, but the majority of the nurses who practice are not aware of and are not sensitive to the needs of nonwhite patients. Nursing must help solve problems of the ethnic groups of color. Nurses must become personally involved in the injustices of health care. As Marie Branch states, there must be "personal reeducation." When this occurs, health care to the minority client will improve. PMID:585011

  11. A Survey of Autism Knowledge in a Health Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidgerken, Amanda, D.; Geffken, Gary; Modi, Avani; Frakey, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The current study extends research by Stone [Cross-disciplinary perspectives on autism? "Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 12", (1988) 615; A comparison of teacher and parent views of autism. "Journal of Autism and Development Disorders, 18", (1988) 403] exploring the knowledge and beliefs about autism across multiple health care professions. One…

  12. Building successful collaborations between Public Health and Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Specchia, Maria Lucia; de Belvis, Antonio Giulio; Capizzi, Silvio; Veneziano, Maria Assunta; Kheiraoui, Flavia; Morelli, Luca; Ferriero, Anna Maria; Cadeddu, Chiara; Ricciardi, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Public Health (PH) and Primary Health Care (PHC) need to be better integrated, at different levels of the healthcare system, in order to improve health and social outcomes. The aim of this study was to review international models and approaches supporting the integration of PH and PHC and to classify these according to their main focus. A literature search was performed using the main scientific databases, to identify national and international journal publications regarding models to support integration between PH and PHC. The final set of the documents provided a broad coverage of the topic. Four models of integration were identified: general integration, chronic disease prevention, targeted prevention or care delivery and infection control. Models differed in their levels of implementation, stages of development and focus. This review, by classifying the main characteristics and results of the experiences retrieved, indicates a relatively scarce use of integration models in the global health care landscape, with the exception of Canada. In fact, Canada has been a leader in developing models of integrated health systems that combine tailored approaches to influence personal health behaviour and community-oriented approaches to influence the health of the population. The review also revealed a general lack of experience in evaluating the sustainability of integration between PH and PHC, not only in terms of cost-effectiveness, but also in terms of better health and work conditions and self-perceived quality of care in the population. Collaboration between PH and PHC seems to be an important strategy for achieving principles of equity and access in health care and for ensuring a more equal distribution of health care services. PMID:24091844

  13. Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

  14. The strategy, cost, and progress of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Boland, R G; Young, M E

    1982-01-01

    Since the 1978 Alma-Alta International Conference on Primary Health Care, investments in primary health care projects throughout the world have been increasing. However, with the exception of China, no national projects have demonstrated the ability to provide longterm comprehensive primary health care in conditions of chronic proverty with local resources. Programs in China, Cuba, and Tanzania have achieved primary health care coverage for 100% of their populations. These countries have in common strong governments that have been able to implement radical changes in the health system. Individual freedoms in these societies have been restricted in favor of improved health. Programs in Nigeria, India, and Afghanistan have been less successful, although some progress has been made in projects using external funds, inspite of a strong committment by the governments. Efforts to reorganize the health care system have lacked needed political strength. Currently, these systems have resulted in less than complete coverage, without the prospect of attaining acceptable levels of infant mortality, life expectancy and net population growth. Economic, political, and cultural costs may be high as for example, national security or traditional practices are traded to achieve primary health care with 100% coverage. WHO has devised a global strategy which, when translated into operational policies will need to address several unresolved issues. These include recognizing that the goal of comprehensive primary health care may not be justified given the lack of progress to date and that effective, selective primary health care focused on nutrition, immunization, control of endemic diseases, and health education may be a more realistic goal; and that a system of international social security may be an effective means of assuring that the poorest countries are able to provide care. In addition, questions concerning continued funding of programs that can never be locally funded, the role of traditional healers in a system of free care, the supply of basic medications, the need for audit systems, realistic expectations of costs, the role of international agencies and the distribution of resources between more developed and less developed countries will need to be addressed. PMID:7171889

  15. Integrating mental health into primary health care in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Iraq is undertaking a systematic programme to integrate mental health into primary care in order to increase population access to mental health care. This paper reports the evaluation of the delivery of a ten day interactive training programme to 20% of primary care centres across Iraq. The multistage evaluation included a pre- and post-test questionnaire to assess knowledge, attitudes and practice in health workers drawn from 143 health centres, a course evaluation questionnaire and, in a random sample of 41 clinics, direct observation of health workers skills and exit interviews of patients, comparing health workers who had received the training programme with those from the same clinics who had not received the training. Three hundred andseventeen health workersparticipated in the training, which achieved an improvement in test scores from 42.3% to 59%. Trained health workers were observed by research psychiatrists to have a higher level of excellent skills than the untrained health workers, and patient exit interviews also reported better skills in the trained rather than untrained health workers. The two week course has thus been able to achieve significant change, not only in knowledge, but also in subsequent demonstration of trained practitioners practical skills in the workplace. Furthermore, it has been possible to implement the course and the evaluation despite a complex conflict situation. PMID:22479291

  16. Incarcerated adolescents. The need for the development of professional ethical standards for institutional health care providers.

    PubMed

    Jameson, E J

    1989-11-01

    Large numbers of children are incarcerated in juvenile correctional facilities each year in the United States. These children suffer from a wide range of physical and psychiatric illnesses and are in critical need of professional health care services. This article summarizes the health care needs of these children and documents the ethical problems faced by health care professionals who work in juvenile institutions. The adequacy of current ethical standards as a source of guidance and support for institutional health care professionals is reviewed and a series of recommendations for the development of comprehensive health care standards is set forth. PMID:2691467

  17. Hepatitis B and the infected health care worker: public safety at what cost?

    PubMed

    Bhat, Mamatha; Ghali, Peter; Deschenes, Marc; Wong, Philip

    2012-05-01

    Public safety and the right of the health care worker to practise without prejudice based on underlying illness may be at odds for those affected by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Nevertheless, HBV does not preclude entry into a health care profession, and the risk of transmission from health care worker to patient is not uniform across the spectrum of health care fields. In the present article, the authors present an overview of the literature regarding transmission of HBV from the health care worker to the patient, and the current recommendations that vary from province to province within Canada. The establishment of national guidelines to standardize monitoring of HBV infection among health care workers would improve health care workplace safety and patient care. PMID:22590698

  18. Creating "innovator's DNA" in health care education.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Elizabeth G; Barsion, Sylvia J

    2013-03-01

    Serious deficits in health care education have been identified recently, yet proposed solutions call for faculty skill sets not typically developed in health professional schools or in continuing professional development (CPD) programs. The authors propose that addressing the oft-cited problems in health care education (e.g., it is not learner-centered and does not take advantage of insights gained from the learning sciences) requires faculty to develop "innovator's skills" including the ability to facilitate organizational change. Given increased social responsibilities and decreased financial resources, it is imperative that more health care educators and health care delivery system leaders not only become innovators themselves but also develop systems that support the next generation of innovators. Dyer et al conducted a comprehensive study of successful innovators and found five behavioral and cognitive "discovery" skill sets that constitute the "innovator's DNA": associating, questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting. This article uses the prism of innovator's DNA to examine a CPD program for health care educators, the Harvard Macy Institute (HMI), whose overarching purpose is to develop innovation skills in participants so that they can build their own educational models customized for implementing changes in their home institutions. A retrospective review of HMI alumni from 1995 to 2010 suggests that innovator skills can be taught and applied. The conceptual framework of the innovator's DNA provides a useful model for other CPD program leaders seeking to enable health care educators to develop the capacity for successfully examining problems and then customizing and implementing organizational change to solve them. PMID:23348085

  19. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  20. Child Care Health Connections, 2001: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2001 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, and resources for child care providers.…

  1. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  2. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  3. Evidence-Based Health Care: A New Approach to Teaching the Practice of Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Evidence-based health care, in which practitioners use technology to access medical databases in solving clinical problems, is seen as a major step in improving clinical diagnosis and treatment. Role-modeling, practice, and teaching of evidence-based health care require new skills of clinical teachers in addition to traditional teaching skills.…

  4. Digital health care: cementing centralisation?

    PubMed

    Keen, Justin

    2014-09-01

    This article reviews large-scale digital developments in the National Health Service in England in recent years and argues that there is a mismatch between digital and organisational thinking and practice. The arguments are based on new institutional thinking, where the digital infrastructure is taken to be an institution, which has been shaped over a long period, and which in turn shapes the behaviour of health professionals, managers and others. Many digital services are still being designed in line with a bureaucratic data processing model. Yet health services are increasingly based on a network model, where health professionals and service managers require information systems that allow them to manage risks proactively and to coordinate multiple services on behalf of patients. This article further argues that the data processing model is being reinforced by Open Data policies and by related developments in the acquisition of genomic and telehealth data, suggesting that the mismatch will persist. There is, therefore, an ongoing tension between frontline and central objectives for digital services. It may be that the tension can only be resolved when--or if--there is trust between the interested parties. PMID:25183607

  5. Disaster preparedness in health care.

    PubMed

    Sarp, Nilgun

    2005-01-01

    Natural disasters frequently cause major problems which affect a population's health and hinder a nation's socioeconomic development by draining its scarce financial resources in an effort to repair damages. For example, the tsunami disaster in the Indian Ocean is one of the worst natural disasters in modern times. Well over 200,000 people died and more than 1.5 million people lost their homes and often their livelihoods. Losses are estimated to total more than US dollar 7 billion. Private assets, including housing and business equipment, account for the largest share of the losses. In the largest countries, the impact on GDP is likely to be minimal, but the damage in the affected areas is extreme. Poor people were disproportionately affected. A country's health systems and public health infrastructure must be organised and ready to act in disaster situations as well as under normal conditions and must be cognisant of the type of measures to be taken in event of a disaster. These will differ according to the severity of the disaster's impact on the national health system. PMID:15881821

  6. Health Care Costs Workshop Agenda

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  7. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    MedlinePLUS

    ... degree in social work (M.S.W.); Licensed Clinical Social Workers (L.C.S.W.) have additional supervised training and clinical work experience. Licensed Professional Counselor: Master’s degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: ...

  8. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  9. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  10. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  11. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  12. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  13. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  14. Rapid Business Transformations in Health Care: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulaiba, Refaat A.

    2011-01-01

    The top two priorities of health care business leaders are to constantly improve the quality of health care while striving to contain and reduce the high cost of health care. The Health Care industry, similar to all businesses, is motivated to deliver innovative solutions that accelerate business transformation and increase business capabilities. …

  15. Rapid Business Transformations in Health Care: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulaiba, Refaat A.

    2011-01-01

    The top two priorities of health care business leaders are to constantly improve the quality of health care while striving to contain and reduce the high cost of health care. The Health Care industry, similar to all businesses, is motivated to deliver innovative solutions that accelerate business transformation and increase business capabilities. …

  16. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  17. Palliative care and pain treatment in the global health agenda.

    PubMed

    De Lima, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    The Global Atlas of Palliative Care at the End of Life, published by the Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance (WPCA) jointly with the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that every year >20 million patients need palliative care (PC) at the end of life. Six percent of these are children. According to the Atlas, in 2011, approximately 3 million patients received PC and only 1 in 10 people in need is currently receiving it. Although most PC is provided in high-income countries (HIC), almost 80% of the global need is in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Only 20 countries have PC well integrated into their health-care systems. In regards to opioids, >5 billion people (83% of the world's population) live in countries with low to nonexistent access, 250 million (4%) have moderate access, and only 460 million (7%) have adequate access. In order for PC and pain treatment strategies to be effective, they must be incorporated by governments into all levels of their health care systems. In 1990, the WHO pioneered a public health strategy to integrate PC into existing health care systems which includes four components: (1) appropriate policies, (2) adequate availability of medications, (3) education of health care workers and the public, and (4) implementation of PC services at all levels throughout the society. This topical review describes the current status of the field, and presents several initiatives by United Nations (UN) organizations and the civil society to improve access to PC and to pain treatment for patients in need. PMID:25789428

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on ... karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health care provider will take a small blood or skin ...

  19. Talking with Your Health Care Professionals about Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... care providers Alternate Language URL ​Talking with Your Health Care Professionals Page Content The most important person on ... if you already have it. Tips for Your Health Care Visits Be prepared. The more you plan for ...

  20. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.