Science.gov

Sample records for health care current

  1. The Current State of Health Care for People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Mary Lou; Yee, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    The National Council on Disabilities (NCD) undertook this study in 2007 to focus the nation's attention on the health care disparities experienced by people with disabilities, and to provide information and recommendations that can help to eliminate health care inequities for people with disabilities. Among the key findings were that: (1) People…

  2. Music therapy in cardiac health care: current issues in research.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Suzanne B

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a service that has become more prevalent as an adjunct to medical practice-as its evidence base expands and music therapists begin to join the cardiology team in every phase of care, from the most serious cases to those maintaining good heart health. Although applications of music medicine, primarily listening to short segments of music, are capable of stabilizing vital signs and managing symptoms in the short-term, music therapy interventions by a qualified practitioner are showing promise in establishing deeper and more lasting impact. On the basis of mind-body approaches, stress/coping models, the neuromatrix theory of pain, and entrainment, music therapy capitalizes on the ability of music to affect the autonomic nervous system. Although only a limited number of randomized controlled trials pinpoint the efficacy of specific music therapy interventions, qualitative research reveals some profound outcomes in certain individuals. A depth of understanding related to the experience of living with a cardiovascular disease can be gained through music therapy approaches such as nonverbal music psychotherapy and guided imagery and music. The multifaceted nature of musical responsiveness contributes to strong individual variability and must be taken into account in the development of research protocols for future music therapy and music medicine interventions. The extant research provides a foundation for exploring the many potential psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual outcomes of a music therapy service for cardiology patients. PMID:23535529

  3. [Current evidence on the motivational interview in the approach to health care problems in primary care].

    PubMed

    Bóveda Fontán, Julia; Pérula de Torres, Luis Ángel; Campiñez Navarro, Manuel; Bosch Fontcuberta, Josep M; Barragán Brun, Nieves; Prados Castillejo, Jose Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The motivational interview has been widely used as a clinical method to promote behavioural changes in patients, helping them to resolve their ambivalence to obtain their own motivations. In the present article, a review is made of the main meta-analyses and systematic and narrative reviews on the efficacy of the motivational interview in the primary health care environment. PMID:24042074

  4. Accessibility and use of essential medicines in health care: Current progress and challenges in India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Dipika; Purohit, Vilok K.

    2013-01-01

    Essential Medicine Concept, a major breakthrough in health care, started in 1977 when World Health Organization (WHO) published its first list. Appropriate use of essential medicines is one of the most cost-effective components of modern health care. The selection process has evolved from expert evaluation to evidence-based selection. The first Indian list was published in 1996 and the recent revision with 348 medicines was published in 2011 after 8 years. Health expenditure is less in India as compared to developed countries. India faces a major challenge in providing access to medicines for its 1.2 billion people by focusing on providing essential medicines. In the future, countries will face challenges in selecting high-cost medicines for oncology, orphan diseases and other conditions. There is a need to develop strategies to improve affordable access to essential medicines under the current health care reform. PMID:23662019

  5. Mobile Communications for Medical Care a study of current and future healthcare and health promotion applications, and

    E-print Network

    Heller, Katherine

    Mobile Communications for Medical Care a study of current and future healthcare and health Communications for Medical Care ­ Final Report 2 21 April 2011 #12;Mobile Communications for Medical Care a study of current and future healthcare and health promotion applications, and their use in China and elsewhere

  6. Health care informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng

    2003-03-01

    The health care industry is currently experiencing a fundamental change. Health care organizations are reorganizing their processes to reduce costs, be more competitive, and provide better and more personalized customer care. This new business strategy requires health care organizations to implement new technologies, such as Internet applications, enterprise systems, and mobile technologies in order to achieve their desired business changes. This article offers a conceptual model for implementing new information systems, integrating internal data, and linking suppliers and patients. PMID:12670013

  7. Educating Medical Laboratory Technologists: Revisiting Our Assumptions in the Current Economic and Health-Care Environment

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Health care occupies a distinct niche in an economy struggling to recover from recession. Professions related to the care of patients are thought to be relatively resistant to downturns, and thus become attractive to students typically drawn to more lucrative pursuits. Currently, a higher profile for clinical laboratory technology among college students and those considering career change results in larger and better prepared applicant pools. However, after decades of contraction marked by closing of programs, prospective students encounter an educational system without the capacity or vigor to meet their needs. Here discussed are some principles and proposals to allow universities, partnering with health-care providers, government agencies, and other stake-holders to develop new programs, or reenergize existing ones to serve our students and patients. Principles include academic rigor in biomedical and clinical science, multiple points of entry for students, flexibility in format, cost effectiveness, career ladders and robust partnerships. PMID:23653802

  8. The health care system for female workers and its current status in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nohara, M; Kagawa, J

    2000-11-01

    In this paper we describe female workers' health care, the women's and maternal protection system within the Japanese legal system, the current status of female workers in Japan, and problems regarding methods of advancing health care and the women's or maternal protection system. Motherhood is respected in the workplace in Japan, and in order to provide an environment in which women can work and still bear and rear children with a sense of security, laws concerning maternal protection of female workers, and revisions in terms of the system have been made, and a new system has been in effect since the fiscal year of 1998. Nevertheless, gender discrimination against women and the disparagement of women, rooted in gender role stereotypes concerning the division of labor, remain firmly planted in the social environment and in long-established custom. PMID:11100954

  9. Is chiropractic care primary health care?

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, ID

    1992-01-01

    The following paper sets out to examine three issues: primary health care, chiropractic care, and the challenges to both in the next decade. The current crisis of primary health within the health care system provides chiropractic with an opportunity to choose between functioning as primary care or primary contact care. Chiropractic has seldom met its potential, or its own rhetoric, with regard to holistic health care which would make the case for being primary health care much stronger. There have been numerous social and political factors that have influenced this but part of the problem is that chiropractic has failed to clearly articulate itself as primary health care, and in some instances, has denied that it was. New opportunities and challenges will force chiropractors to resolve the issue of whether chiropractic is a general model of health care, or a form of health specialty (the neuromusculoskeletal practitioner verses the primary health practitioner).

  10. Health Care Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NKF Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » Health Care Team Good health care is always a team effort - especially for people ... chronic kidney failure. Since each member of the health care staff contributes to your care, it is important ...

  11. Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  12. Impact of current health care reform proposals on people with chronic illnesses

    E-print Network

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Otto, B.; Salley, S.

    2009-11-07

    Outlines the most challenging issues facing people with special health care needs. There is a need for the Medicaid Infrastructure Grants and other grants to identify cost effective strategies for providing access to coverage for individuals...

  13. Child Care Health Connections, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

  14. Focus group reflections on the current and future state of cognitive assessment tools in geriatric health care

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Jocelyne C; Gambino, Sara A; Richter, Jeffrey D; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides insight into the thoughts and opinions of geriatric health-care professionals toward cognitive assessments and the use of emerging technologies, such as eye-tracking, to supplement current tools. Methods Two focus group sessions were conducted with nurses and physicians who routinely administer neurocognitive assessments to geriatric populations. Video recordings of the focus group sessions were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed. Results Participants reported the need for assessment and diagnostic tools that are accessible and efficient, and that are capable of accommodating the rapid growth in the aging population. The prevalence of more complex ailments experienced by older adults has had repercussions in the quality of care that the clients receive, and has contributed to lengthy wait times and resource shortages. Health-care professionals stated that they are hampered by the disjointed structure of the health-care system and that they would benefit from a more efficient allocation of responsibilities made possible through tools that did not require extensive training or certification. Eyetracking-based cognitive assessments were thought to strongly complement this system, yet it was thought that difficulty would be faced in gaining the support and increased uptake by health-care professionals due to the nonintuitive relationship between eyetracking and cognition. Conclusion The findings suggest that health-care professionals are receptive to the use of eyetracking technology to assess for cognitive health as it would conserve resources by allowing frontline staff to administer assessments with minimal training. PMID:26109860

  15. Health care technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  16. Home health care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  17. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  18. Quality and professionalism in health care: a review of current initiatives in the NHS.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D.

    1996-01-01

    Since the start of the 1990s the NHS and the clinical professions have made significant investments in quality management in health care, and a plethora of initiatives has been aimed at service improvement. From a patient's perspective the extent to which these exercises have been cost effective is uncertain, although they have certainly involved great effort and enterprise on the part of many clinicians and managers. An important opportunity now exists to integrate this work into the mainstream of clinical and general service management. If clinicians can accept quality management concepts as central to their professional ethos and regulatory structures this could help them to maintain their professional authority and protect them and their patients from imposed decisions based on inadequate understanding of health care costs and benefits. Images p626-a PMID:8595342

  19. The 'Global Outcomes Score': a quality measure, based on health outcomes, that compares current care to a target level of care.

    PubMed

    Eddy, David M; Adler, Joshua; Morris, Macdonald

    2012-11-01

    The quality of health care is measured today using performance measures that calculate the percentage of people whose health conditions are managed according to specified processes or who meet specified treatment goals. This approach has several limitations. For instance, each measure looks at a particular process, risk factor, or biomarker one by one, and each uses sharp thresholds for defining "success" versus "failure." We describe a new measure of quality called the Global Outcomes Score (GO Score), which represents the proportion of adverse outcomes expected to be prevented in a population under current levels of care compared to a target level of care, such as 100 percent performance on certain clinical guidelines. We illustrate the use of the GO Score to measure blood pressure and cholesterol care in a longitudinal study of people at risk of atherosclerotic diseases, or hardening of the arteries. In that population the baseline GO Score was 40 percent, which indicates that the care being delivered was 40 percent as effective in preventing myocardial infarctions and strokes as our target level of care. The GO Score can be used to assess the potential effectiveness of different interventions such as prevention activities, tests, and treatments. PMID:23129674

  20. National Health Care Reform, Medicaid, and Children in Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfon, Neal; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines access to health care for children in out-of-home care under current law, reviews how health care access for these children would be affected by President Clinton's health care reform initiative, and proposes additional measures that could be considered to improve access and service coordination for children in the child welfare system.…

  1. Improving regional health care in West Africa using current space systems and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemison, Mae C.; Thomas, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved with establishing an integrated satellite health network in West Africa based on currently available technology. The system proposed makes use of a central national facility capable of transmitting and receiving voice/data and video signals from the entire country. Regional, field and local facilities provides timely epidemiologic information, sharing of medical expertise through telemedical consultations, enhances optimized resource distribution and builds a framework for telecommunications for the entire country.

  2. Improving regional health care in West Africa using current space systems and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemison, Mae C.; Thomas, J. Segun

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues involved with establishing an integrated satellite health network in West Africa based on currently available technology. The system proposed makes use of a central national facility capable of transmitting and receiving voice/data and video signals from the entire country. Regional, field and local facilities provide timely epidemiologic information, sharing of medical expertise through telemedical consultations, enhance optimized resource distribution and build a framework for telecommunications for the entire country.

  3. Vacation health care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 - 6 ... If you are taking medicine, talk to your health care provider before leaving. Carry all medicines with you ...

  4. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  5. Current situation of health care in India and corporation in emerging economies--what is the way forward?

    PubMed

    Surendra, Kumar; Amit, Sengupta; Kumar, Agarwal Vishnu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examine the management and operational problems faced by different categories of health care delivery platforms such as corporate hospitals, medium level private hospitals and public hospitals in Mumbai. Some suggestions are made and we believe many of the short falls or limitations that exist in the current set up can be removed and a way forward can be made in alleviating the suffering of vast majority of humankind living in our mega cities. Three major issues emerged as far as a public health system is concerned--that is shifting of trained health manpower from the public system to private or corporate hospitals, severe strain on the public health system's infrastructure and support services compounded by lack of accountability as far as management and governance are concerned. PMID:23342758

  6. Creonization of health care.

    PubMed

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals. PMID:2394563

  7. Your Health Care Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Your Health Care Team You You are the most important member of your health care team. After all, you are the one who ... are the first to notice any problems. Your health care team depends on you to talk to them ...

  8. HEALTH CARE ASSOCIATION

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    HEALTH CARE COMPLIANCE ASSOCIATION 5780 Lincoln Drive · Suite 120 · Minneapolis, MN 55436 · 888 of the following document, "Evaluating and Improving a Compliance Program, A Resource for Health care Board Members, Health care Executives and Compliance Officers." This resource is now available to all HCCA members

  9. Fixing health care before it fixes us.

    PubMed

    Kotlikoff, Laurence J

    2009-02-01

    The current American health care system is beyond repair. The problems of the health care system are delineated in this discussion. The current health care system needs to be replaced in its entirety with a new system that provides every American with first-rate, first-tier medicine and that doesn't drive our nation broke. The author describes a 10-point Medical Security System, which he proposes will address the problems of the current health care system. PMID:19038633

  10. Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmey, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

  11. The epidemiology and experience of atopic eczema during childhood: a discussion paper on the implications of current knowledge for health care, public health policy and research.

    PubMed

    Fennessy, M; Coupland, S; Popay, J; Naysmith, K

    2000-08-01

    Atopic eczema is a chronic skin condition affecting between 5% and 20% of children aged up to 11 years at one time or other. Research suggests that prevalence is increasing and various environmental factors have been implicated in the aetiology. While often seen to be a minor problem, research suggests that it can cause considerable disruption to the lives of children and their carers and involves significant cost for the family and health care systems. The current consensus is that the majority of cases of atopic eczema are most appropriately managed within primary care. However, management of the condition is problematic because diagnosis is often difficult. Consultations tend to focus on the physical aspects of the problems neglecting the psychosocial, while treatment remains mainly palliative and can be as diverse as the condition itself. More appropriate and effective primary care management and support for children with atopic eczema and their carers will only be developed if health professionals become more aware of the social context of the disease and the impact on the lives of those affected. Public health responses focusing on primary prevention are also needed. This paper reviews a diverse literature on the epidemiology of the condition, the way in which it affects the lives of children and their carers and the factors that shape their help seeking decisions. The aim is to contribute to a more substantial knowledge base for public health and primary care developments and to point to areas for future research PMID:10890869

  12. Herbal extracts in oral health care - A review of the current scenario and its future needs

    PubMed Central

    Chandra Shekar, Byalakere Rudraiah; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Suma, Shankarappa; Thakur, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral diseases are among the major public health problems and the commonest of chronic diseases that affect mankind. The application of natural products for the control of oral diseases is considered as an interesting alternative to synthetic antimicrobials due to their lower negative impact, and for the effort to overcome primary or secondary resistance to the drug during therapy. Objective: To review the current evidence on the antimicrobial efficacy of 10 plant extracts on dental caries and plaque microorganisms. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive literature search was made by one of the authors for 2 months in PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, LILACS/BBO, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, SCIENCE DIRECT, and Google scholar databases. The results from the relevant published literatures are discussed. Summary and Conclusion: The extracts of Azadirachta Indica, Ocimum sanctum, Murraya koenigii L., Acacia nilotica, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Hibiscus sabdariffa, Mangifera indica, Psidium guajava, Rosa indica, and Aloe barbadensis Miller have all been found to inhibit certain dental caries and periodontal pathogens. The current evidence is on individual plant extracts against bacteria involved in either caries or periodontitis. “Herbal shotgun” or “synergistic multitarget effects” are the terms used for the strategy of combining different extracts. The research assessing the antimicrobial efficacy of a combination of these plant extracts against dental caries and periodontal pathogens is the need of the hour, and such research will aid in the development of a novel, innovative method that can simultaneously inhibit two of the most common dental diseases of mankind, besides slowing the development of drug resistance. PMID:26392704

  13. The strategic genius of Jonathan Letterman: the relevancy of the American Civil War to current health care policy makers.

    PubMed

    Place, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    With expanding health insurance coverage, innovative technologies, improved diagnostic acumen, and pharmaceutical additions combining to increase life expectancy, quality of life, and concomitant costs, the American health care system is under significant stress. However, it pales in comparison to the challenges faced by health care leaders during the American Civil War. As we approach the 150th anniversary of the conclusion of that war, it is appropriate to review key strategic health care decisions faced by military leaders during the Civil War and how their resultant outcomes may provide an appropriate perspective for today's leaders. PMID:25735014

  14. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to start search site map [a-z] Health Health Care Information A-Z Health Topic Finder My Health ... General QUICK LIST Apply for Benefits Apply for Health Care Prescriptions My Health e Vet eBenefits Life Insurance ...

  15. Guidelines for Health Care Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fales, Ann W.; Leppert, Alice M.

    The complex issue of health care delivery is of continuing concern among health care volunteers. Trends in health services that affect the volunteer include those resulting from government or funding policy; changes in the structure of the health professions; increasing consumer interest in health care; and the growing demand for health care

  16. Should we ration health care?

    PubMed

    Jecker, N S

    1989-01-01

    The paper begins by drawing a distinction between "allocation"--the distribution of resources between different categories, and "rationing"--the distribution of scarce resources within a single category. I argue that the current allocation of funds to health care makes some form of rationing unavoidable. The paper next considers proposals by Daniel Callahan and Norman Daniels supporting age rationing publicly-financed life-extending medical care. I provide reasons for doubting that either argument succeeds. The final section of the paper sets forth an alternative approach which holds that if people have any rights to health care, then they have a right to a decent minimum. PMID:10296994

  17. Types of health care providers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... describes health care providers involved in primary care, nursing care, and specialty care. This is just one way ... MD) or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). NURSING CARE Registered nurses (RNs) have graduated from a nursing ...

  18. Mercury and health care

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

  19. Health care in Armenia today.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, R G; Chobanian, A V

    1994-01-01

    Although one of the smallest of the new independent states of the former Soviet Union, the Republic of Armenia has an ancient tradition and a strong ethnic identification, greatly enhanced by the diaspora. In addition to the problems following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Armenia has had to contend with a draining war in Nagorno-Karabakh and the after-effects of a devastating earthquake in 1988. Humanitarian efforts have ranged from emergency supply deliveries to longer-term sustainable health care partnerships. The United States government, through the Agency for International Development, has organized such partnerships, partially as a result of a multinational mission in 1992 and a subsequent hospital-to-hospital program developed by the American International Health Alliance. We describe the current state of health care in Armenia and some of the problems that need to be addressed to improve health care services to its citizens. PMID:8023481

  20. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  1. Parkland Health Care Campus 

    E-print Network

    Jones, W., Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1894, Parkland has been Dedicated to the health and well-being of individuals and communities entrusted to our care Parkland Hospital Mission Statement By our actions, we will define the standards of excellence for public academic health... systems Parkland Hospital Vision Statement ESL-KT-11-11-19 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 What is Parkland? Dallas County Hospital District ? d/b/a Parkland Health & Hospital System: ??Safety net? provider. ?Primary...

  2. Current Practices for Training Staff to Accommodate Youth with Special Health Care Needs in the 4-H Camp Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Lauren; Bruce, Jacklyn

    2013-01-01

    The theory of inclusion is the foundation for the study reported here; inclusion is a focus not only of formal education, but also of nonformal educational settings such as 4-H. Ideally, 4-H camps are designed to serve youth of all backgrounds and abilities. By accommodating youth with special health care needs, 4-H camps are effectively meeting…

  3. Nondisclosure of Smoking Status to Health Care Providers among Current and Former Smokers in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Laurel Erin; Richardson, Amanda; Xiao, Haijun; Niaura, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    An unintended consequence of tobacco control's success in marginalizing smoking is that smokers may conceal their smoking from those who are best positioned to help them quit: health care providers (HCPs). The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of, and factors related to, nondisclosure of smoking to HCPs. Data were obtained from…

  4. Convenient care clinics: the future of accessible health care.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ryan, Sandra; Miller, Ken; Counts, Mona; Nash, David B

    2007-04-01

    The need for accessible, affordable, quality health care in the United States has never been greater. In response to this need, convenient care clinics (CCCs) are being launched across the country to help provide care to meet the basic health needs of the public. In CCCs, highly qualified health care providers diagnose and treat common health problems, triage patients to the appropriate level of care, advocate for a medical home for all patients, and reduce unnecessary visits to emergency rooms and Urgent Care Clinics. CCCs have been called a "disruptive innovation" because they are consumer driven. They serve as a response to many patients who are unhappy with the current conventional health care delivery system--a system that is challenged to provide access to basic health care services when people need it the most. CCCs are based in retail stores and pharmacies. They are primarily staffed by nurse practitioners (NPs). Some CCCs are staffed by physician assistants (PAs) and physicians. The authors acknowledge the important roles of both PAs and physicians in CCCs; however, this paper primarily provides education about the role of NPs in CCCs. CCCs have evolved at a time when our health care system is floundering, and the need for accessible, affordable health care is at its greatest. The CCC model provides an accessible, affordable entry point into the health care system for those who previously were restricted access. PMID:17444791

  5. [A Long Way Home: The Current State of Care Provided by Family Caregivers and Public Health Nurses to Persons With Mental Illness in the Community].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chu; Wang, Yu-Hui

    2015-08-01

    According to Taiwan's Health and Welfare Ministry statistics, Taiwan had a total of 122,538 people who were officially registered as mentally disabled at the end of December 2013. Worldwide, schizophrenia ranks as the sixth most burdensome disease in terms of total expenditures. The present paper uses the two actual care stories of the families of mental illness patients and compares and contrasts these with the community mental illness care models used in other countries. The hospital-based psychiatric and community-based mental illness care that is practiced in Taiwan presents dilemmas and has long focused on "disease-orientated care" rather than holistic care. The gap between institutional and community mental rehabilitation services in Taiwan are examined. We recommend that policy makers create an open space for mental illness family caregivers and public health nurses to engage in dialogue in order to effectively integrate the care resources available to community mental illness patients and to break down the care barriers that currently separate community mental illness patients, family caregivers, and public health nurses. PMID:26242433

  6. Orthopedic Health: Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past ... Exercise helps bone density, improves muscle strength and joint flexibility, and enhances your balance. Take part in ...

  7. Health care lessons from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S

    1993-01-01

    Thailand's health care system incorporates the private and public sectors. The government regulates health care through a system of capping, which protects its interests while providing a climate for competition. As a result, the private sector has developed and implemented some interesting concepts in health care as it turned to prevention, hospital care alternatives, neighbourhood-based ambulatory care and home care. The author suggests that Canada could benefit by examining some of Thailand's innovations. PMID:10130773

  8. Current Status of Infant Mental Health in Day-Care Centres in Japan: An Investigation of Okinawa and Aomori Prefectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takizawa, Tohru; Kondo, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Osamu; Wake, Norie; Naka, Kuoichi; Todoriki, Hidemi; Ishizu, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Grasping both the extent and the actual situation of psychosomatic disorders, neurotic habits and developmental disorders of infancy and childhood is vital for their prevention and for taking appropriate measures to deal with the current situation. The purpose of this study is to explore the current situation of infant mental health in Japanese…

  9. Health Care Basics: Choosing the

    E-print Network

    Li, Mo

    2012 Health Care Basics: Choosing the Best Option for Your Health "Creating A More Educated Georgia" #12;Health Care Basics 2 Medical Options for Plan Year 2012 The University System of Georgia's Plan of Regents will offer the following health care options: · Blue Choice HMO · Kaiser Permanente HMO · HSA Open

  10. Duke Health Enterprise Organized Health Care Arrangement

    E-print Network

    Duke Health Enterprise Organized Health Care Arrangement NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES WE o de le clínica. Gracias. The Duke Health Enterprise Organized Health Care Arrangement covers and the entities and medical staffs listed in this brochure (collectively, the "Duke Health Enterprise" or "DHE

  11. Spurious claims for health-care products: an experimental approach to evaluating current UK legislation and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Leslie B; Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-01-01

    The lay media, and especially the Internet, contain many misleading claims for health products which have previously been inadequately regulated by consumer law. This was an experimental interventional survey within a consumer health-care setting. Three health products were chosen on the basis of being widely available on the UK market and having no available evidence of effectiveness. Twelve volunteers submitted 39 complaints to Consumer Direct (UK portal for the regulator Trading Standards) regarding false health claims, and 36 complaints were followed up for a maximum of 4.8 months. The mean time from submission of complaints to Consumer Direct to acknowledgement by the relevant Trading Standards office was 13 days. There were no responses from Trading Standards for 22% of complaints. At the end of the study one supplier had amended their website following Trading Standards advice, but did not stop all health claims. Another stopped advertising their product on the Internet and the third continued the health claims unchanged. EU directive 2005/29/EC is largely ineffective in preventing misleading health claims for consumer products in the UK. PMID:22403120

  12. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ... about lower-cost facilities and medicines. Understanding your health care costs can help you save money when managing ...

  13. [Primary health care contributes to global health].

    PubMed

    Aabenhus, Mette Morre; Schriver, Michael; Kallestrup, Per

    2012-05-28

    Global health interventions often focus on specific diseases, thus forming vertical programmes. Studies show that vertical programmes perform poorly, which underlines the need for a horizontal basis: universal community-based primary health care, which improves health equity and outcomes. The diagonal approach supports an integrated patient-centered health-care system. The ''15% by 2015''-initiative suggests that vertical programmes invest 15% of their budgets in strengthening integrated primary health care. Strategies depend on local context. PMID:22668645

  14. Ownership and Health Care 

    E-print Network

    Nighohossian, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    Gan Committee Members, Timothy Gronberg Stephanie Houghton Joanna Lahey Thomas Saving Department Head, Timothy Gronberg May 2013 Major Subject: Economics Copyright 2013 Jeremy Nighohossian ABSTRACT The United States Health Care sector is a... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Of course, a project of this magnitude cannot be accomplished without the help and support of many people. First, I would like to acknowledge the contributions of my committee, Li Gan, Tim Gronberg, Stephanie Houghton, Joanna Lahey, and Tom...

  15. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This booklet contains draft national health care skill standards that were proposed during the National Health Care Skill Standards Project on the basis of input from more than 1,000 representatives of key constituencies of the health care field. The project objectives and structure are summarized in the introduction. Part 1 examines the need for…

  16. Commensurate Ratings of Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bectel, Gordon G.

    2001-01-01

    Proposes a new descriptive item statistic, the mean cumulative logit, for scoring ratings of health care at the population level. Demonstrates the advantages of the method using data from the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Study and shows that the perceived quality of health care is greater for fee-for-service plans than managed care plans in…

  17. Target Audience: Health care professionals

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Target Audience: Health care professionals Workshop Facilitator: Valerie Spironello, MSW, RSW Valerie has been a social worker for over 20 years working in a variety of settings including health care provided workshops and presentations to health care providers on a variety of topics such as compassion

  18. Leadership models in health care - a case for servant leadership.

    PubMed

    Trastek, Victor F; Hamilton, Neil W; Niles, Emily E

    2014-03-01

    Our current health care system is broken and unsustainable. Patients desire the highest quality care, and it needs to cost less. To regain public trust, the health care system must change and adapt to the current needs of patients. The diverse group of stakeholders in the health care system creates challenges for improving the value of care. Health care providers are in the best position to determine effective ways of improving the value of care. To create change, health care providers must learn how to effectively lead patients, those within health care organizations, and other stakeholders. This article presents servant leadership as the best model for health care organizations because it focuses on the strength of the team, developing trust and serving the needs of patients. As servant leaders, health care providers may be best equipped to make changes in the organization and in the provider-patient relationship to improve the value of care for patients. PMID:24486078

  19. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  20. Pediatric Provider's Perspectives on the Transition to Adult Health Care for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Strategies and Promising New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Karen A.; Warfield, Marji E.; Hurson, Jill; Delahaye, Jennifer; Crossman, Morgan K.

    2015-01-01

    Few youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) nationally report receiving services to help them transition from the pediatric health care system to the adult health care system. For example, only one-fifth (21.1%) of youth with ASD receive any transition planning services. To better understand why the transition from pediatric to adult health care

  1. Integrating Children's Mental Health into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Wissow, Lawrence S; van Ginneken, Nadja; Chandna, Jaya; Rahman, Atif

    2016-02-01

    Children's mental health problems are among global health advocates' highest priorities. Nearly three-quarters of adult disorders have their onset or origins during childhood, becoming progressively harder to treat over time. Integrating mental health with primary care and other more widely available health services has the potential to increase treatment access during childhood, but requires re-design of currently-available evidence-based practices to fit the context of primary care and place a greater emphasis on promoting positive mental health. While some of this re-design has yet to be accomplished, several components are currently well-defined and show promise of effectiveness and practicality. PMID:26613691

  2. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Managing Home Health Care KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Caring for a Seriously ... Types of Medical Equipment Support for Parents Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care ...

  3. The current situation in education and training of health-care professionals across Africa to optimise the delivery of palliative care for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, FM; Gwyther, L; Kiyange, F; Luyirika, E; Meiring, M; Downing, J

    2014-01-01

    The need for palliative care education remains vital to contribute to the quality of life of patients, both adults and children, with cancer in Africa. The number of patients with cancer continues to rise, and with them the burden of palliative care needs. Palliative care has been present in Africa for nearly four decades, and a number of services are developing in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. However, the needs of cancer patients remain a challenge. Education and training initiatives have developed throughout this time, using a combination of educational methods, including, more recently, e-learning initiatives. The role of international and national organisations in supporting education has been pivotal in developing models of education and training that are robust, sustainable, and affordable. Developing a material for education and professional development needs to continue in close collaboration with that already in production in order to optimise available resources. Seeking ways to evaluate programmes in terms of their impact on patient care remains an important part of programme delivery. This article reviews the current situation. PMID:25624873

  4. [Current Care Guideline: Eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Suokas, Jaana; Alenius, Heidi; Ebeling, Hanna; Haapasalo-Pesu, Kirsi-Maria; Järvi, Leea; Koskinen, Minna; Laukkanen, Eila; Meskanen, Katarina; Morin-Papunen, Laure; Ryöppönen, Anita; Salonen, Ulla; Tossavainen, Päivi; Vuorela, Piia

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis with intervention is linked to better outcome. In primary care patients in risk for eating disorder should be screened and actively asked about eating disorder symptoms. Treatment is mainly out-patient care and should first be focused on gaining a normal nutritional status. It is important to involve the patient's family in the treatment. A confidential relationship between health care professionals and the patient is important. The patient's own motivation and readiness for recuperation are essential. Different therapeutic and psychosocial approaches are central in the treatment, as the disorders are psychiatric. Medical treatment may bring additional help in treating binge-eating disorder or bulimia nervosa, but it is seldom of help in treating anorexia nervosa. PMID:26245050

  5. Advance Health Care Directives and “Public Guardian”: The Italian Supreme Court Requests the Status of Current and Not Future Inability

    PubMed Central

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Bello, Stefania; Gulino, Matteo; Zaami, Simona; Frati, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Advance health care decisions animate an intense debate in several European countries, which started more than 20 years ago in the USA and led to the adoption of different rules, based on the diverse legal, sociocultural and philosophical traditions of each society. In Italy, the controversial issue of advance directives and end of life's rights, in the absence of a clear and comprehensive legislation, has been over time a subject of interest of the Supreme Court. Since 2004 a law introduced the “Public Guardian,” aiming to provide an instrument of assistance to the person lacking in autonomy because of an illness or incapacity. Recently, this critical issue has once again been brought to the interest of the Supreme Court, which passed a judgment trying to clarify the legislative application of the appointment of the Guardian in the field of advance directives. PMID:24729977

  6. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Provider Program Quality Care Book Store ? ? ??? ??? ? ??? ? ? ? Advocate for Care Join our Advocacy efforts on Facebook and Twitter! Be Inspired: to Provide Quality Care A look at the quality of care provided ...

  7. The promise of Lean in health care.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, John S; Berry, Leonard L

    2013-01-01

    An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations. PMID:23274021

  8. Transitioning Care Across Various Health Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Marcia A; Mills, Vanessa

    2015-12-01

    Health care is continuously undergoing evolutionary changes. These changes have been very dramatic for the end users. Instead of simple physician office visits and lengthy hospital stays, we are now faced with short hospital stays, office visits to different specialty providers, and an array of choices around them. With the present highway of choices between illness and wellness, it is important for transitions between these two to be affordable, advantageous to patients, and uncomplicated. This article discusses the choices patients and health care providers must make as the number of care options increase along with the risks and benefits. PMID:26596653

  9. Modeling Health Care Policy Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Jeanne S; Eibner, Christine; Girosi, Federico; Cordova, Amado; McGlynn, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    Background Computer models played an important role in the health care reform debate, and they will continue to be used during implementation. However, current models are limited by inputs, including available data. Aim We review microsimulation and cell-based models. For each type of model, we discuss data requirements and other factors that may affect its scope. We also discuss how to improve models by changing data collection and data access procedures. Materials and Methods We review the modeling literature, documentation on existing models, and data resources available to modelers. Results Even with limitations, models can be a useful resource. However, limitations must be clearly communicated. Modeling approaches could be improved by enhancing existing longitudinal data, improving access to linked data, and developing data focused on health care providers. Discussion Longitudinal datasets could be improved by standardizing questions across surveys or by fielding supplemental panels. Funding could be provided to identify causal parameters and to clarify ranges of effects reported in the literature. Finally, a forum for routine communication between modelers and policy makers could be established. Conclusion Modeling can provide useful information for health care policy makers. Thus, investing in tools to improve modeling capabilities should be a high priority. PMID:21054371

  10. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education, Okemos, MI.

    This document presents the National Health Care Skill Standards, which were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology and West Ed Regional Research Laboratory, in partnership with educators and health care employers. The document begins with an overview of the purpose and benefits of skill standards. Presented next are…

  11. Health Care Workers and Tuberculosis

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Health Care Workers and Tuberculosis How can I protect myself from tuberculosis infection? It's important to know which ... care worker, you should have a tuberculosis skin test once or twice a year. The test determines ...

  12. Information Technology Outside Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-health-care uses of information technology (IT) provide important lessons for health care informatics that are often overlooked because of the focus on the ways in which health care is different from other domains. Eight examples of IT use outside health care provide a context in which to examine the content and potential relevance of these lessons. Drawn from personal experience, five books, and two interviews, the examples deal with the role of leadership, academia, the private sector, the government, and individuals working in large organizations. The interviews focus on the need to manage technologic change. The lessons shed light on how to manage complexity, create and deploy standards, empower individuals, and overcome the occasional “wrongness” of conventional wisdom. One conclusion is that any health care informatics self-examination should be outward-looking and focus on the role of health care IT in the larger context of the evolving uses of IT in all domains. PMID:10495095

  13. Health Care–Associated Native Valve Endocarditis in Patients with no History of Injection Drug Use: Current Importance of Non-Nosocomial Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Natividad; Miró, José M.; de Lazzari, Elisa; Cabell, Christopher H; del Río, Ana; Altclas, Javier; Commerford, Patrick; Delahaye, Francois; Dragulescu, Stefan; Giamarellou, Helen; Habib, Gilbert; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kumar, A. Sampath; Nacinovich, Francisco M.; Suter, Fredy; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Venugopal, K; Moreno, Asuncion; Fowler, Vance G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical profile and outcome of nosocomial and non-nosocomial health care–associated native valve endocarditis are not well defined. Objective To describe the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of nosocomial and non-nosocomial health care–associated native valve endocarditis. Design Prospective observational study. Setting 61 hospitals in 28 countries. Patients Patients with definite native valve endocarditis and no history of injection drug use who were enrolled in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study from June 2000 to August 2005. Measurements Characteristics of nosocomial and non-nosocomial health care–associated native valve endocarditis cases were described and compared with those cases acquired in the community. Results Health care–associated native valve endocarditis was present in 557 (34%) of 1622 patients with native valve endocarditis and no history of injection drug use (nosocomial native valve endocarditis 303 patients [54%]; non-nosocomial health care–associated native valve endocarditis 254 patients [46%]). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common cause of health care-associated native valve endocarditis (nosocomial native valve endocarditis, 47%; non-nosocomial health care–associated native valve endocarditis, 42%; p=0.3), with a notable proportion of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (nosocomial native valve endocarditis, 57%; non-nosocomial health care–associated native valve endocarditis, 41%; p=0.014). Patients with health care–associated native valve endocarditis had lower rates of cardiac surgery (41% health care–associated native valve endocarditis vs 51% community-acquired native valve endocarditis, p<0.001) and higher in-hospital mortality rates than patients with community-acquired native valve endocarditis (25% health care–associated native valve endocarditis vs. 13% community-acquired native valve endocarditis vs., p<0.001). Multivariable analysis confirmed a higher mortality associated with health care–associated native valve endocarditis (incidence risk ratio=1.20 (CI 95%, 1.03–1.61). Limitations This study involves tertiary hospitals with cardiac surgery programs. The results may not be generalized to patient populations receiving care in other types of facility. Conclusions More than one-third of all cases of native valve endocarditis in non-drug users involve contact with health care. S. aureus is the leading cause of health care–associated native valve endocarditis. Non-nosocomial health care–associated native valve endocarditis is common, especially in the US. Patients with health care-associated and community-acquired native valve endocarditis differ in their presentation, microbiology, and outcome. By contrast, patients with nosocomial and non-nosocomial healthcare-associated endocarditis are similar. PMID:19414837

  14. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  15. Developing private health care in Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Goldman, R L

    1996-01-01

    The Republic of Macedonia is the sole former Yugoslavian republic that has had a peaceful transition to independence. The current socialist health care system is bankrupt with an over-emphasis on specialty care and too many doctors. While clinical standards equal those in Western Europe, customer service is at a low level. Private initiatives are being encouraged by most members of the health care community. However, the current state system should be retained with a sound financial base. Private initiatives have a high potential for success. PMID:10163028

  16. Unlearning in health care

    PubMed Central

    Rushmer, R; Davies, H

    2004-01-01

    Learning in health care is essential if healthcare organisations are to tackle a challenging quality of care agenda. Yet while we know a reasonable amount about the nature of learning, how learning occurs, the forms it can take, and the routines that encourage it to happen within organisations, we know very little about the nature and processes of unlearning. We review the literature addressing issues pivotal to unlearning (what it is, why it is important, and why it is often neglected), and go further to explore the conditions under which unlearning is likely to be encouraged. There is a difference between routine unlearning (and subsequent re-learning) and deep unlearning—unlearning that requires a substantive break with previous modes of understanding, doing, and being. We argue that routine unlearning merely requires the establishment of new habits, whereas deep unlearning is a sudden, potentially painful, confrontation of the inadequacy in our substantive view of the world and our capacity to cope with that world competently. PMID:15576685

  17. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  18. Integrating Biopsychosocial Intervention Research in a Changing Health Care Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ell, Kathleen; Oh, Hyunsung; Wu, Shinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Safety net care systems are experiencing unprecedented change from the "Affordable Care Act," Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) uptake, health information technology application, and growing of mental health care integration within primary care. This article provides a review of previous and current efforts in which social…

  19. Congress enacts health care reform.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    Health care reform at last: After nearly a century of effort by Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt on down, the Congress finally agreed on and President Barack Obama signed into law a system that covers most Americans, regulates sharp insurance practices, and embraces a paradigm shift from acute institutionally focused care to chronic disease management based on home and community-based care. PMID:20465039

  20. Foster Care and Child Health.

    PubMed

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care. PMID:26318955

  1. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  2. Contagious Ideas from Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Financial problems plague both higher education and health care, two sectors that struggle to meet public expectations for quality services at affordable rates. Both higher education and health care also have a complex bottom line, heavy reliance on relatively autonomous professionals, and clients who share personal responsibility for achieving…

  3. 76 FR 37307 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... services under the rural health care program. Grandfathered providers do not currently qualify as ``rural,'' but play a key role in delivering health care services to surrounding regions that do qualify...

  4. Teens, technology, and health care.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health. PMID:25124206

  5. [Moral and operational challenges for the inclusion of palliative care in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Floriani, Ciro Augusto; Schramm, Fermin Roland

    2007-09-01

    Palliative care, a model in end-of-life care, is currently undergoing expansion in Brazil. This article emphasizes the need to implement palliative care in primary health care, with an important role in end-of-life care, especially in areas without specialized palliative-care teams. The article discusses key aspects in the organization of this treatment modality and analyzes how palliative care could and should be implemented within primary health care in Brazil. The article describes several challenges for health teams to provide such care, related to the primary caregiver, inherent ethical conflicts, and human resource allocation. PMID:17700942

  6. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  7. Appropriateness in health care delivery: definitions, measurement and policy implications.

    PubMed Central

    Lavis, J N; Anderson, G M

    1996-01-01

    A major focus of the current health care debate is the notion that a substantial proportion of the health care delivered in Canada is inappropriate. There are two types of appropriateness: appropriateness of a service and appropriateness of the setting in which care is provided (i.e., inpatient v. outpatient or home care). Measuring both types objectively requires the comparison of observed patterns of care with explicit criteria for appropriate care. The few studies of appropriateness conducted in Canada have shown that inappropriate services are provided and inappropriate settings are used. Reducing inappropriate health care delivery could involve active strategies for the implementation of guidelines and better cooperation and coordination within the health care system. However, lower rates of health care delivery or even inappropriate health care will not necessarily translate into higher quality care or lower costs overall. PMID:8564901

  8. The current status of the Korean student health examination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent trends place an emphasis on school health care, the ultimate goal of which is to protect, maintain, and promote students' health. School health care is a program that integrates health care services, health education, health counseling, and local social health services. The student health examination (SHE) system is a part of school health care and schools and communities must be available to provide professional health services. Pediatricians also have important roles as experts in both school health care and the SHE system. In this article, the history of school health care, its legal basis, and the current status of the SHE system in Korea are reviewed. Furthermore, sample surveys from the past few years are reviewed. Through this holistic approach, future directions are proposed for the improvement of SHE and school health care. PMID:24019840

  9. Community mental health care in the Asia-Pacific region: using current best-practice models to inform future policy

    PubMed Central

    NG, CHEE; HERRMAN, HELEN; CHIU, EDMOND; SINGH, BRUCE

    2009-01-01

    The reporting of child sexual abuse (CSA) and physician-patient sexual relationships (PPSR) are currently the focus of professional, legal and media attention in several countries. This paper briefly reviews mental health policies on these issues and reports on a WPA survey of them. While the WPA Madrid Declaration permits breaching confidentiality for mandatory reporting of CSA and clearly prohibits PPSR, it is not known how or to what extent these policies are implemented in WPA Member Societies’ countries. It is also not known whether policies or laws exist on these topics nationally or to what extent psychiatrists and the public are aware of them. Representatives of WPA Member Societies were e-mailed a survey about issues pertaining to CSA and PPSR. Fifty-one percent of 109 countries replied. All reporting countries had laws or policies regarding the reporting of CSA, but this was often voluntary (63%) and without protection for reporting psychiatrists either by law (29%) or by Member Societies (27%). A substantial number of psychiatric leaders did not know the law (27%) or their Society’s policy (11%) on these matters. With respect to PPSR, some reporting countries lacked laws or policies about PPSR with current (17%) or past (56%) patients. Fewer than half of responding representatives believed that their Society’s members or the public were well informed about the laws and policies pertaining to CSA or PPSR. There is clearly a wide range of laws, policies and practices about CSA and PPSR in WPA Member Societies’ countries. There is a need in some countries for laws or supplemental policies to facilitate the protection of vulnerable child and adult patients through clear, mandatory reporting policies for CSA and PPSR. Mechanisms to protect and support reporting psychiatrists should also be developed where they do not already exist. There is also a need in some countries to develop strategies to improve the education of psychiatrists, trainees, and the public on these issues. PMID:19293961

  10. Health care's service fanatics.

    PubMed

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life. PMID:23898737

  11. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khatib, Issam A. Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-15

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  12. New developments in a consolidating health care industry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D; Kleiner, B H

    1998-01-01

    The current health care industry has recently seen a great deal of consolidation in the form of mergers and acquisitions. These mergers and acquisitions invariably result in a loss of jobs. This paper focuses on two strategies that health care companies use to reduce workforce under these circumstances. Specifically, the paper will focus on the mergers between SmithKline Beckman and Beecham plc in the late 1980s, FHP Health Care and TakeCare Health Plans, and PacifiCare's recent acquisition of FHP Health-care. It will compare and contrast theory, strategy and practices of these six companies as they endeavoured to merge or acquire each other. PMID:10346310

  13. 78 FR 26036 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Application From the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for Continued CMS-Approval of...the Accreditation Commission for Health Care (ACHC) for continued recognition...The Accreditation Commission for Health Care's (ACHC's) current term...

  14. Hope for health and health care.

    PubMed

    Stempsey, William E

    2015-02-01

    Virtually all activities of health care are motivated at some level by hope. Patients hope for a cure; for relief from pain; for a return home. Physicians hope to prevent illness in their patients; to make the correct diagnosis when illness presents itself; that their prescribed treatments will be effective. Researchers hope to learn more about the causes of illness; to discover new and more effective treatments; to understand how treatments work. Ultimately, all who work in health care hope to offer their patients hope. In this paper, I offer a brief analysis of hope, considering the definitions of Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Thomas Aquinas. I then differentiate shallow and deep hope and show how hope in health care can remain shallow. Next, I explore what a philosophy of deep hope in health care might look like, drawing important points from Ernst Bloch and Gabriel Marcel. Finally, I suggest some implications of this philosophy of hope for patients, physicians, and researchers. PMID:24846726

  15. Fachprfungsordnung des Masterstudiengangs Health Care Management

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Fachprüfungsordnung des Masterstudiengangs Health Care Management an der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifs- wald die folgende Prüfungsordnung für den Masterstudiengang (M. Sc.) ,,Health Care Management Prüfungsverfahren im Studiengang ,,Health Care Management". Ergänzend gilt die Gemeinsame Prüfungsord- nung für

  16. East Carolina University Health Care Components

    E-print Network

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    East Carolina University Health Care Components Notice to Patients About Our Privacy Practices 1 University's Health Care Components Notice of Privacy Practices;Page 1 of 5 NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY HEALTH CARE COMPONENTS ECU PHYSICIANS

  17. Intramural health care budgeting.

    PubMed

    Groot, L M

    1984-01-01

    In the last years endeavours have been made in several health systems to get a firm grip on the explosive cost development in hospitals which amounts to nearly half of all health care expenditures. The fee-for-service system for doctors coupled with the professional autonomy leads to expansion of quality and quantity of services provided. In many systems hospitals are financed on basis of output items as patient days, examinations and therapies. As hospital costs are in the short run preponderantly constant prices fixed at average costs are higher than marginal costs. This situation favours expansion of services as in that case marginal revenue exceeds marginal cost. Inversely the decrease of services provided generates losses for the hospital. In systems, where financing takes place in the way of budgets like the U.K., Denmark and Italy, the authorities have more influence on the cost development in the system. In systems where the hospitals are financed by social security on basis of output, arrangements are now made to bring budgetary elements in the financing of these institutions. In France the "Budget Global" will be applied to services financed by the Sécurité sociale. In Belgium arrangements have been made to contain the amount of patient days allowed for reimbursement and in the Netherlands in 1983 budget-financing has been introduced for all general and teaching hospitals. In 1984 this system also applies to all other intramural institutions. If a way has been found to focus the financing mechanism of these institutions on budgeted costs, the way is open for budgeting these institutions. A very important problem in this context is the budget formula, which will be used to determine the budgets. In this respect a distinction can be made between internal and external budgeting. Internal budgeting is understood here as a process whereby the hospital itself puts a limit to the use of resources or adapts its resources to budget constraints coming from the outside. External budgeting can be defined as the budgetary constraint given from the outside by third parties to the hospitals. Of course, both internal and external budgeting are narrowly interrelated. The distinction between these two ways of budgeting should be sought in the character of the budget formula. External budgeting should be based on global indications whilst internal budgeting should be more differentiated than the external budget formula.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:10317555

  18. About Health Care Administration & Policy Students in the undergraduate Health Care Administration

    E-print Network

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    About Health Care Administration & Policy Students in the undergraduate Health Care Administration program gain a broad view of the health care delivery system and health care management practices positions in the organization, financing, and delivery of health care services. Health Care Administration

  19. Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. Methods A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Results Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Conclusion Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices. Multi-national research may provide guidance about how to scale up eye health interventions that are integrated into primary health systems. PMID:23506686

  20. Rural health care: redefining access.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The population and demographics of rural America are shifting once again. As our nation's unprecedented health care reform unfolds, it is becoming clear that rural communities have unique strengths, and capitalizing on these strengths can position them well for this health care transformation. Equally important are the distinct challenges that--with careful planning, attention, and resources--can be transformed into opportunities to thrive in the new health care environment. The North Carolina Institute of Medicine's Task Force on Rural Health recently published a report that highlights the strengths and challenges of rural communities [1]. In order to fully leverage these opportunities, we must continue to acknowledge the fundamental importance of access to basic health care, while also broadening our discussion to collectively tackle the additional components necessary to create healthy, thriving rural communities. As we reexamine the needs of rural communities, we should broaden our discussions to include an expansion of the types of access that are necessary for strengthening rural health. Collaboration, successful recruitment and retention, availability of specialty services, quality care, and cost effectiveness are some of the issues that must come into discussions about access to services. With this in mind, this issue of the NCMJ explores opportunities to strengthen the health of North Carolina's rural communities. PMID:25621473

  1. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  2. Delivering Health Care and Mental Health Care Services to Children in Family Foster Care after Welfare and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Mark D.; Freundlich, Madelyn; Battistelli, Ellen S.; Kaufman, Neal D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the essential features of a health care system that can meet the special needs of children in out-of-home care. Discusses some of the major recent changes brought about by welfare and health care reform. Notes that it remains to be seen whether the quality of services will improve as a result of these reforms. (Author)

  3. Infant Care and Infant Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Infant Care and Infant Health: Overview Skip sharing on social media links ... Page Content Since the NICHD's founding in 1962, infant death rates in the United States have dropped ...

  4. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  5. Model Child Care Health Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan; Smith, Herberta

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, the model health policies presented in this report are intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the report presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following…

  6. [Corruption and health care system].

    PubMed

    Marasovi? Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions. PMID:26016214

  7. Day care health risks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... after going to the bathroom or changing a diaper, and then preparing food. In addition to good ... washing, important policies include: Preparing food and changing diapers in different areas Making sure day care staff ...

  8. Taiwan's 1995 health care reform.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T L

    1997-03-01

    Under considerable domestic political pressure, the Taiwan government inaugurated a compulsory universal health insurance scheme on 1 March 1995. This new scheme is financed mainly by payroll tax and provides comprehensive health care benefits with a moderate cost sharing. In order to gain efficiency in delivering health services, the scheme enters contracts with health care providers and has been developing a prospective payment system. Meanwhile, the scheme uses a uniform fee schedule and makes all payments through a public single-payer system to control health care costs. By the end of the inaugural year, the scheme covered 92% of the population and the utilization pattern of the newly insured became close to that of the previously insured. However, there is the beginning of a financial crisis because the payments of the scheme are rapidly increasing and expect to exceed the premiums in the coming year. Besides, the scheme did not bring in the efficient use of health care resources and probably caused it to worsen. Taiwan's health care reform has an unfinished agenda. PMID:10165463

  9. Personal health--the future care paradigm.

    PubMed

    Norgall, Thomas; Blobel, Bernd; Pharow, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Demographic, economic and social conditions developed countries are faced with require a paradigm change for delivering high quality and efficient health services. In that context healthcare systems have to turn towards individualized of patient's care, also called personal care. Interoperability requirements for ubiquitous personalized health services reach beyond current concepts of health information integration among professional stakeholders and related Electronic Patient Records ("e-Health"): Future personal health platforms have particularly to maintain semantic interoperability among systems using different modalities and technologies, different knowledge representation and domain experts' languages as well as different coding schemes and terminologies to include home, personal and mobile systems. The paper introduces the evolving paradigm related to personal health information systems. PMID:17095828

  10. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  11. The right to health care

    PubMed Central

    Turka, Laurence A.; Caplan, Arthur L.

    2010-01-01

    While our eyes usually glaze over at the continued talk of health care reform, there are a few particulars that bear repeating. So many of the parties involved fail to consider the most basic and most important of all the issues: health insurance is not a luxury, it is a right.

  12. Sex Discrimination in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Bonnie; Bullough, Vern L.

    1975-01-01

    Sex discrimination in the health field results not only in inequities in roles and salaries for women, but inhibits healthy and fruitful relations between members of the health disciplines to the detriment of good patient care, affects decision making, and perpetuates misinformation about women's psychic and physiological processes. (Author)

  13. A national survey of health professionals and volunteers working in voluntary hospice services in the UK. I. Attitudes to current issues affecting hospices and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Addington-Hall, Julia M; Karlsen, Saffron

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports results from a national survey in 1999 of voluntary hospice services in the UK. It focuses on volunteer and staff views of the purposes of hospice care, and on current debates within palliative care. Twenty-five hospice services, stratified by region, services provided (inpatient care, day care and/or home care) and number of beds were randomly sampled from amongst 175 voluntary hospices in the UK. Nineteen participated. Seventy per cent of a random sample of professional and voluntary staff within these hospices returned a postal questionnaire. Both volunteers and professionals considered care of the whole person, pain and symptom control, quality of life and dying peacefully to be important aspects of hospice care. Most doctors chose care of the whole person as the most important aspect, and they were more likely to choose this option than other staff. Hospice volunteers were less positive than hospice staff (particularly doctors and nurses) in their attitudes to extending hospice care to noncancer patients (where many volunteers held no strong view), to restricting care to patients with specialist palliative care needs, and less negative about euthanasia. These findings illustrate the importance of including hospice volunteers and the general public, as well as hospice staff, in debates about the future of hospice and palliative care in the UK. Further research is needed into lay and professional views of the role of hospices and palliative care services. PMID:15690867

  14. Integrated primary mental health care.

    PubMed

    La Grenade, J

    1998-12-01

    Mental health is increasingly being recognized as contributing significantly to the burden of disease, particularly now that the indicators have shifted from measures of mortality to measures of morbidity. Psychiatric morbidity in the community, based on community surveys, is estimated at 20 to 30% of the population. Increasingly, patients needing mental health services prefer to be in a general health care setting than in specialized centres. Internationally and regionally, the general policy has been to move toward the development of comprehensive mental health programmes integrated within primary health care. This integration may be structural (use of shared facilities), administrative (shared administrative resources) or functional (complete integration of clinical services, with staff jointly responsible for patient welfare). This paper examines how this integration can be achieved, and the potential role of the Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, University of the West Indies in advancing this integrative process through research and training. PMID:10368622

  15. Retiree Health Care: A Ticking Bomb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Craig E.; Daniels, Janet D.

    1992-01-01

    With health insurance costs soaring for both current employees and retirees, governing boards of institutions of higher education must contain costs. Possible strategies include shifting some expenses from employer to employee, establishing flexible-benefit or cafeteria plans, using managed care to reduce unnecessary medical procedures,…

  16. Counseling and Mental Health Care in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawahin, Lamise; Ciftci, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of counseling and mental health care in Palestine, including their history and a summary of their current status. Finally, a discussion is presented of future trends in the development of the profession with regard to recent changes in the region.

  17. Informal care and caregiver's health.

    PubMed

    Do, Young Kyung; Norton, Edward C; Stearns, Sally C; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to measure the causal effect of informal caregiving on the health and health care use of women who are caregivers, using instrumental variables. We use data from South Korea, where daughters and daughters-in-law are the prevalent source of caregivers for frail elderly parents and parents-in-law. A key insight of our instrumental variable approach is that having a parent-in-law with functional limitations increases the probability of providing informal care to that parent-in-law, but a parent-in-law's functional limitation does not directly affect the daughter-in-law's health. We compare results for the daughter-in-law and daughter samples to check the assumption of the excludability of the instruments for the daughter sample. Our results show that providing informal care has significant adverse effects along multiple dimensions of health for daughter-in-law and daughter caregivers in South Korea. PMID:24753386

  18. Relationships between discrimination in health care and health care outcomes among four race/ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Benjamins, Maureen R; Whitman, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Discrimination has been found to be detrimental to health, but less is known about the influence of discrimination in health care. To address this, the current study (1) compared levels of racial/ethnic discrimination in health care among four race/ethnic groups; (2) determined associations between this type of discrimination and health care outcomes; and (3) assessed potential mediators and moderators as suggested by previous studies. Multivariate logistic regression models were used within a population-based sample of 1,699 White, African American, Mexican, and Puerto Rican respondents. Overall, 23% of the sample reported discrimination in health care, with levels varying substantially by race/ethnicity. In adjusted models, this type of discrimination was associated with an increased likelihood of having unmet health care needs (OR = 2.48, CI = 1.57-3.90) and lower odds of perceiving excellent quality of care (OR = 0.43, CI = 0.28-0.66), but not with the use of a physician when not sick or use of alternative medicine. The mediating role of mental health factors was inconsistently observed and the relationships were not moderated by race/ethnicity. These findings expand the literature and provide preliminary evidence that can eventually inform the development of interventions and the training of health care providers. PMID:23456249

  19. NTID Health Care Initiatives October 1, 2011

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    NTID Health Care Initiatives October 1, 2011 (Based on Interim Report, Task Force on Health Care Careers for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Community, June, 2011) "Building Pathways to Health Care Careers for the Deaf and Hard-of- Hearing Community: Interim Report" submitted by the Task Force on Health Care Careers

  20. Health care reform, behavioral health, and the criminal justice population.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Alison Evans; Cheema, Jehanzeb

    2014-10-01

    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has a number of important features for individuals who are involved with the criminal justice system. Among the most important changes is the expansion of Medicaid to more adults. The current study estimates that 10% of the total Medicaid expansion could include individuals who have experienced recent incarceration. The ACA also emphasizes the importance of mental health and substance abuse benefits, potentially changing the landscape of behavioral health treatment providers willing to serve criminal justice populations. Finally, it seeks to promote coordinated care delivery. New care delivery and appropriate funding models are needed to address the behavioral health and other chronic conditions experienced by those in criminal justice and to coordinate care within the complex structure of the justice system itself. PMID:24807645

  1. School Readiness Goal Begins with Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    Currently 59 bills are awaiting Congressional action. Meanwhile, a national coalition of economists and medical specialists (the National Leadership Coalition for Health Care Reform) are circulating a sensible consensus health reform plan proposing national practice guidelines; universal health care access; and efficient cost control, delivery,…

  2. Marketing home health care.

    PubMed

    Kolatch, A

    1991-11-01

    This case study focuses on the physician as an important customer for home care services. The author describes how Visiting Nurse Service of New York developed and implemented a direct sales strategy to increase the number of referrals from physicians. Five of the direct sales consultants were registered nurses. The tactics used to increase the percentage of cases referred directly by physicians are discussed. PMID:1941173

  3. Fitch ratings. Health care special report.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Fitch Ratings continues to believe that the current and projected personnel shortages, especially among registered nurses (RNs). present one of the greatest operating challenges for health care providers nationwide. As noted in Fitch Research on "Health Care Staffing Shortage," dated June 21, 2001 (available on Fitch's web site at www.fitchratings. com), staffing is an area that is creating enormous expense inflation for health care providers and presenting one of the biggest areas of uncertainty in assessing an organization's credit quality. Shortages are becoming increasingly widespread, affecting health care providers in urban and rural areas regardless of size. Since health care is a labor intensive business, salary and benefit costs are key determinants of profitability. Fitch believes the attention given to the nursing shortage and potential looming crisis has created a sense of urgency, with many hospitals developing innovative strategies for work force development. In addition, federal, state, and local governments are creating programs and/or providing financial support to help alleviate shortages. Yet, the benefits of many of these initiatives may not be realized for many years, and Fitch expects health care providers to continue experiencing inflating salary and benefit expenses with growing temporary staffing usage and competitive pressure to increase overall compensation. Fitch believes managing labor costs is critical to achieving profitability, especially as the ability to increase revenue diminishes. Fitch believes the nursing shortage will continue to represent an area of extreme expense pressure for health care providers for years to come. Imbalanced supply and demand, which is expected to worsen as retiring nurses outstrip replacements, should create financial strain for many providers in an industry that is gearing up to meet the aging population's anticipated demand for more services. Fitch plans to closely monitor management strategies for dealing with vacancy and turnover rates, as well as trends in agency spending, to determine financial implications among its rated portfolio. PMID:14528733

  4. Health Care Reform: A Values Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popko, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the crisis in health care, considering costs, lack of access, and system ineffectiveness. Reviews "Setting Relationships Right," the Catholic Health Association's proposal for health care reform. Advocates educators' awareness of children's health needs and health care reform issues and support for the Every Fifth Child Act of 1992. (DMM)

  5. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    Hanson, Stephen José

    SHRP MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT ONLINE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT QUESTIONS What is the Master's in Health Care Management (MSHM) program? This graduate program emphasizes health services management and is similar to many master in health administration (MHA) programs

  6. Transforming Health Care Delivery Through Consumer Engagement, Health Data Transparency, and Patient-Generated Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Wald, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Address current topics in consumer health informatics. Methods Literature review. Results Current health care delivery systems need to be more effective in the management of chronic conditions as the population turns older and experiences escalating chronic illness that threatens to consume more health care resources than countries can afford. Most health care systems are positioned poorly to accommodate this. Meanwhile, the availability of ever more powerful and cheaper information and communication technology, both for professionals and consumers, has raised the capacity to gather and process information, communicate more effectively, and monitor the quality of care processes. Conclusions Adapting health care systems to serve current and future needs requires new streams of data to enable better self-management, improve shared decision making, and provide more virtual care. Changes in reimbursement for health care services, increased adoption of relevant technologies, patient engagement, and calls for data transparency raise the importance of patient-generated health information, remote monitoring, non-visit based care, and other innovative care approaches that foster more frequent contact with patients and better management of chronic conditions. PMID:25123739

  7. 4 20152016 Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence

    E-print Network

    4 2015­2016 Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence Health Care Criteria for Performance aspects of your organization in your responses to the Health Care Criteria requirements in categories 1 (1) HEALTH CARE SERVICE Offerings What are your main HEALTH CARE SERVICE offerings (see the note

  8. Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... Patients About ACOG Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care Home For Patients Search FAQs Good Health Before ...

  9. Training Health Care Paraprofessionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, Corinne B.

    1977-01-01

    This review of the allied health occupations training programs offered by Brevard Community College (Cocoa, Florida) covers organization of the division, objectives, selection and admission process, instructional delivery system, clinical facilities, advisory committees, high school relations, continuing education programs, and program success.…

  10. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  11. Health Care Procedure Considerations and Individualized Health Care Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Teachers need to maintain a safe, healthy environment for all their students in order to promote learning. However, there are additional considerations when students require health care procedures, such as tube feeding or clean intermittent catheterization. Teachers must effectively monitor their students and understand their roles and…

  12. Total quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Brannan, K M

    1998-05-01

    Quality is at the top of American consumers' demand list, and consequently American manufacturing companies have been forced to assign priority to the development of high-quality products. To improve the quality of what they offer, many manufacturers use the management philosophy known as total quality management (TQM), and now the service sector is following in their footsteps. The health care industry is a good example of a service industry that can benefit greatly from TQM, and it is the purpose of this article to show how a health care provider can implement TQM and evaluate its effects. PMID:10178544

  13. Universal health care in India: Panacea for whom?

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Imrana

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the current notion of universal health care (UHC) in key legal and policy documents and argues that the recommendations for UHC in these entail further abdication of the State's responsibility in health care with the emphasis shifting from public provisioning of services to merely ensuring universal access to services. Acts of commission (recommendations for public private partnership [PPPs], definition and provision of an essential health package to vulnerable populations to ensure universal access to care) and omission (silence maintained on tertiary care) will eventually strengthen the private and corporate sector at the cost of the public health care services and access to care for the marginalized. Thus, the current UHC strategy uses equity as a tool for promoting the private sector in medical care rather than health for all. PMID:24351383

  14. Contextualizing an Expanded Definition of Health Literacy among Adolescents in the Health Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Philip M.; Prelip, Michael; Calimlim, Brian M.; Quiter, Elaine S.; Glik, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    The current emphasis on preventive health care and wellness services suggests that measures of skills and competencies needed to effectively navigate the health care system need to be better defined. We take an expanded perspective of health literacy and define it as a set of skills used to organize and apply health knowledge, attitudes and…

  15. Children with Special Health Care Needs

    MedlinePLUS

    Children With Special Health Care Needs Parents whose children have special health care needs already have a lot to cope with. Care of children ... new " Emergency Information Form for Children With Special Health Care Needs. " The form contains important medical information, such ...

  16. Integrating Health Information Technology to Achieve Seamless Care Transitions.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Leah; Kirtane, Janhavi; Lynn, Joanne; McKethan, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Improving care transitions, or "handoffs" as patients migrate from one care setting to another, is a priority across stakeholder groups and health-care settings and additionally is included in national health-care goals set forth in the National Quality Strategy. Although many demonstrations of improved care transitions have succeeded, particularly for hospital discharges, ensuring consistent, high-quality, and safe transitions of care remains challenging. This paper highlights the potential for health information technology to become an increasing part of effective transitional care interventions, with the potential to reduce the resource burden currently associated with effective care transitions, the ability to spread improved practices to larger numbers of patients and providers efficiently and at scale, and, as health technology interoperability increases, the potential to facilitate critical information flow and feedback loops to clinicians, patients, and caregivers across disparate information systems and care settings. PMID:24522208

  17. Advancing SCI health care to avert rehospitalization.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Gerben; Groah, Suzanne L

    2015-11-01

    This commentary reflects on the high rate of health care utilization among individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in the first year of injury as reported by Skelton et al. in the current issue of this journal. Commentary argues that the variation in risk-adjusted rehospitalization rates suggests that there is considerable opportunity for improvement. Authors note that we need better strategies to prevent the onset of the 3 conditions that drive most of the rehospitalization, namely, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and pressure ulcers. Commentary also urges providers to rethink and reinvent the process of care in acute, rehabilitation, and post-discharge phases of care. It recommends that SCI centers take greater advantage data resources already available such as the National Spinal Cord Injury Database to openly share and compare center-to-center differences in practice and outcomes. It also urges SCI centers to reinvent their systems of care in ways being made possible under health care reform, especially systems that make all providers in a given episode of care-from acute to rehabilitation to post-discharge care, mutually and financially accountable for both outcomes and costs including emergency room use and rehospitalization. PMID:26507469

  18. PRIOR to Fall 2012 Health Care Track

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    PRIOR to Fall 2012 Health Care Track FRESHMAN YEAR 1st SEMESTER 2nd SEMESTER PHYS 107 Physics Disorders 3 PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology 3 HS (HCA) 102 Health Care Delivery in the United States 3 Microcomputers for Health Care Professionals 3 COMSDIS 380 Bases of Hearing Science 3 HS (HCA) 250 Allied Health

  19. Health Care Plan Name/Administrator

    E-print Network

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Health Care Plan Name/Administrator Toll-Free Number TDD/TYY Number Website Address Health Alliance) 868 - 9520 (866) 876 - 2194 www.bcbsil.com/stateofillinois Coventry Health Care HMO (800) 431 -1211 (217) 366 -5551 www.chcillinois.com Coventry Health Care OAP (800) 431 -1211 (217) 366 -5551 www

  20. Agent-based health care management An Agent-based Approach to Health Care Management

    E-print Network

    Mascardi, Viviana

    Agent-based health care management 1 An Agent-based Approach to Health Care Management Jun Huang1, London WC2A 3PX, UK. Abbreviated title: Agent-based health care management Complete Mailing Address. London E1 4NS UK #12;Agent-based health care management 2 Abstract The provision of medical care

  1. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  2. Health and Social Care Is Health and Social Care right for me?

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Health and Social Care Is Health and Social Care right for me? Are you are interested in caring for a specialised degree in medicine, nursing or social work? If yes, then Health and Social Care could the best out of this degree. The skills you can gain from a degree in Health and Social Care are wide

  3. Health Care User Perspectives on Constructing, Contextualizing, and Co-Producing "Quality of Care".

    PubMed

    Baim-Lance, Abigail; Tietz, Daniel; Schlefer, Madeleine; Agins, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Most of the research on health care user "quality of care" perspectives seeks discrete and measurable indicators to advance quality improvement (QI) goals. This lacks sufficiently grounded query about the meaning of "quality of care" for health users, and how context influences their ideas and experiences. We studied this between 2010 and 2011, repeatedly interviewing and shadowing 45 individuals in three of New York's hospital-based outpatient HIV care settings during routine visits. We found participants using common terminology, but across the cohort meaning varied and employed personal narratives. Participants conveyed the impact of historic and current experiences of stigma and discrimination on limiting access to care, and showed its destabilizing effects on quality constructs. Participants also felt they contributed to their health care settings' delivery of quality care. From our findings, we discuss the applicability and implications of "co-production" to conceptualize health care as jointly delivered by typical "givers" and "receivers" of care. PMID:25670664

  4. AN ANONYMOUS HEALTH CARE MELISSA CHASE AND KRISTIN LAUTER

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    AN ANONYMOUS HEALTH CARE SYSTEM MELISSA CHASE AND KRISTIN LAUTER MICROSOFT RESEARCH As medical. The electronic format makes misuse of many patients' data much easier, so we must be ex- tremely careful with who and pharmacies, that are not actively in- volved in patient care. Currently patients who are in- sured

  5. Synthetic real estate: bringing corporate finance to health care.

    PubMed

    Varwig, D; Smith, J

    1998-01-01

    The changing landscape of health care has caused hospitals, health care systems, and other health care organizations to look for ways to finance expansions and acquisitions without "tainting" their balance sheets. This search has led health care executives to a financing technique that has been already embraced by Fortune 500 companies for most of this decade and more recently adopted by high-tech companies: synthetic real estate. Select case studies provide examples of the more creative financial structures currently being employed to meet rapidly growing and increasingly complex funding needs. PMID:9612732

  6. Implementing a teenage health service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Green, Elizabeth; Larcombe, J; Horbury, I

    The health of teenagers is currently a priority of the NHS, with many schemes and projects being developed. There are documented difficulties for teenagers in accessing health care, especially within general practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of a tailor-made clinic in the primary care setting. PMID:16209395

  7. Cellular Radio Telecommunication for Health Care: Benefits and Risks

    PubMed Central

    Sneiderman, Charles A.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Cellular radio telecommunication has increased exponentially with many applications to health care reported. The authors attempt to summarize published applications with demonstrated effect on health care, review briefly the rapid evolution of hardware and software standards, explain current limitations and future potential of data quality and security, and discuss issues of safety. PMID:15298996

  8. Introducing a fresh approach to health care.

    E-print Network

    and FDIC-insured bank holds the health saving account dollars. #12;1 The concept is simple-- take office visits and maternity care to inpatient and outpatient hospital care. Preventive care Your employer

  9. Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

    MedlinePLUS

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ056 PREGNANCY Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care • What is a preconception care checkup? • Who should have a preconception care checkup? • Why is a healthy diet ...

  10. The development of primary health care in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    McCaw-Binns, A; Moody, C O

    2001-09-01

    The development of primary health care in Jamaica is explored, tracing its early roots to the abolition of the slave trade, the collapse of estate-based services after emancipation and the subsequent establishment of the Island Medical Services in 1875. Most development in the health sector occurred after World War I in response to the high infectious disease mortality rates. The Rockefeller Foundation was asked to assist with the control of hookworm, tuberculosis, malaria and yaws. Its recommendations led to the growth of public health programmes (e.g. environmental health, public health nursing, community midwifery) alongside community-based curative services run by hospitals. The most significant period of development occurred in the 1970s when the various vertical programmes were integrated into the current primary care system. Jamaica was integral in the development of the World Health Organization's Alma Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care, tabling the "Jamaican Perspective on Primary Health Care" which set out its goal that all citizens should be within 10 miles walking distance of a primary health care facility. At the close of the twentieth century, the health reform process led to the development of regional health authorities aimed at integrating the management of primary and secondary care under four Regional Boards of Health. This has led to a change in the role of the central Ministry of Health to one of policy-making, health promotion, setting standards, monitoring and evaluation of the quality of health care. PMID:11824020

  11. Health care expenditure in Sweden--an international comparison.

    PubMed

    Gerdtham, U G; Jönsson, B

    1991-01-01

    This paper analyses health care expenditure in Sweden and compares this with the corresponding expenditure in OECD countries. The definition and measurement problems of health care expenditure are discussed, new figures for the development of health care expenditure are presented and different measures of health care expenditure are provided. We found that health care expenditure has increased by about 20% in constant prices for Sweden between 1980 and 1988, but that health care expenditure as a share of the GDP has dropped during the same period in current prices. Health care expenditure disaggregated on different age groups show for Sweden that in the age group 15-64 years, health care expenditure has not increased in constant prices between 1976 and 1985, but in the oldest age group, health care expenditure has increased considerable during this period. Health care expenditure in Sweden is as high as would be expected, taking into account the degree of economic development and the growth of expenditure during the 80s, and has followed that in comparable OECD countries. However, the relative price is lower, which means that the input of real resources are greater than in other countries. PMID:10115993

  12. On reducing information asymmetry in U.S. health care.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Oswald A J; Kesavan, Ram; Bernacchi, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Information asymmetry is a significant issue facing the U.S. health care system. In this article, we investigate some methods of reducing this asymmetry. We trace the information asymmetry using the "wicked problem" of the health care distribution system. An information asymmetry reduction method requiring joint responsibilities among health care stakeholders is developed. It is argued that information asymmetry is a contributor to enormous health care inflation. Hence, any reduction in such asymmetry will reduce health care costs. Concepts from both signaling and corrective justice theories are integrated in this article to help reduce the information asymmetry that exists in the U.S. health care system. Getting health care costs in line with other "advanced" nations, is the long-term solution to the wicked problem that currently exists in the U.S. health care system. There is an immediate need for a centralized health care database with adequate provisions for individual privacy. Both processes as well as an outcome-based control system are essential for reducing information asymmetries in the U.S. health care system. PMID:24308415

  13. Women as health care decision-makers: implications for health care coverage in the United States.

    PubMed

    Matoff-Stepp, Sabrina; Applebaum, Bethany; Pooler, Jennifer; Kavanagh, Erin

    2014-11-01

    Women in the United States make approximately 80% of the health care decisions for their families, yet often go without health care coverage themselves. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act provides an historical opportunity for women to gain health care coverage for themselves and their families. The focus of this commentary is on women's leadership roles in the context of health care decision- making and Affordable Care Act education and outreach, and implications for reaching broader health and social goals. PMID:25418222

  14. National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fugitives, Career Connection, Reporting Health Care Fraud & More. Contact Us 1220 L Street, NW, Suite 600 Washington, ... Health Care Fraud Site Map Home Resources Education Contact Us Exhibit & Sponsor About Us Accreditation Members News ...

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  16. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Stop Spread of Antibiotic Resistance Language: English ... connecting patient safety efforts happening across the state. Health care facility CEOs/administrators can: Implement systems to alert ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vulvodynia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vulvodynia? Skip sharing on social media ... been ruled out. To diagnose vulvodynia, 1 a health care provider may recommend that a woman have blood ...

  20. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  1. Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Press Release Archives learn more » For Patients Your health care choices matter. Whether you're anticipating a surgical ... certificate of accreditation is a sign that a health care organization meets or exceeds nationally-recognized Standards. Learn ...

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 62 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Making Health Care Safer Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now ... to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities. Health Care Providers can Know if patients in your facility ...

  3. Consumer Attitudes toward Health and Health Care: A Differential Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaires returned by 343 out of 350 subjects measured health attitudes and health status. Results suggest that some consumers take a more scientific approach to health care and prevention. Demographic factors, health status, and health consciousness are partial predictors of consumer attitudes and approach to health care. (SK)

  4. Telematics for rural health care practitioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Robert H.; Kardaun, Jan W. P. F.

    1990-06-01

    The " crisis" in rural health care i. e. the decreasing number of practitioners is partially caused by the increasing use of technology in health care. Health care practitioners in rural Canada are progressively finding their practice more difficult because of their isolation from the population centers housing many of the services and supplies needed in the modern practice of medicine. The centralization of these supplies and services results from the increasing use of technology in medicine. It is uneconomical to place expensive equipment highly trained technicians and consultants and well-stocked and current information sources in rural locations where they are underutilized. Thus over the years the increasing use of technology makes rural practice more difficult and less attractive in comparison to an urban practice that can easily and cheaply employ the benefits of technology and expert consultation. The Saskatchewan situation is examined using data collected by the authors and compared to other rural areas reported in the literature. The ways that computer communications can help alleviate this situation are explained and illustrated through a review of North American telematics activities. Telematic services for physicians are developing in North America. This is in synergy with the increasing ownership of computers by physicians. We contrast the Canadian scene with the American. Telematics is a technological approach that can be employed to reduce the isolation of rural health care practitioners. It can provide

  5. Teaching tomorrow's health care leaders.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, W

    1993-01-01

    Business school curricula have traditionally emphasized functional skills for people who will work in functional departments and general management skills for people who will organize interdepartmental work. Recently, some business schools have begun to develop programs that teach cross-functional work and team skills to functional specialists. Students educated in such programs will be well prepared to meet the new challenges that health care organizations will face. PMID:10130527

  6. Studienordnung des Masterstudiengangs ,,Health Care Management"

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    1 Studienordnung des Masterstudiengangs ,,Health Care Management" an der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald die folgende Studienordnung für den Masterstudiengang ,,Health Care Management" als Satzung Master- studiengang (M.Sc.) ,,Health Care Management" an der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald

  7. Studienordnung des Masterstudiengangs ,,Health Care Management"

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Studienordnung des Masterstudiengangs ,,Health Care Management" an der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald die fol- gende Studienordnung für den Masterstudiengang ,,Health Care Manage- ment" als Satzung Masterstudiengang (M.Sc.) ,,Health Care Management" an der Ernst-Moritz- Arndt-Universität Greifswald vom 15. März

  8. An Integrated Systems Overview Health Care Behavior

    E-print Network

    Sherriff, Mark S.

    An Integrated Systems Overview Of Health Care Behavior Robert M. Bennett MD, MESE Donald E. Brown PhD Steven P. Tropello BS For health care, never has the classical expression "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times" appeared more appropriate. Never has health care been blessed

  9. Optimizing Health Care Coalitions: Conceptual Frameworks and a Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Hupert, Nathaniel; Biala, Karen; Holland, Tara; Baehr, Avi; Hasan, Aisha; Harvey, Melissa

    2015-12-01

    The US health care system has maintained an objective of preparedness for natural or manmade catastrophic events as part of its larger charge to deliver health services for the American population. In 2002, support for hospital-based preparedness activities was bolstered by the creation of the National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program, now called the Hospital Preparedness Program, in the US Department of Health and Human Services. Since 2012, this program has promoted linking health care facilities into health care coalitions that build key preparedness and emergency response capabilities. Recognizing that well-functioning health care coalitions can have a positive impact on the health outcomes of the populations they serve, this article informs efforts to optimize health care coalition activity. We first review the landscape of health care coalitions in the United States. Then, using principles from supply chain management and high-reliability organization theory, we present 2 frameworks extending beyond the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response's current guidance in a way that may help health care coalition leaders gain conceptual insight into how different enterprises achieve similar ends relevant to emergency response. We conclude with a proposed research agenda to advance understanding of how coalitions can contribute to the day-to-day functioning of health care systems and disaster preparedness. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2015;9:717-723). PMID:26545194

  10. Barriers to constraining health care cost growth.

    PubMed

    Chernew, Michael E; Jacobson, Peter D; Hofer, Timothy P; Aaronson, Keith D; Fendrick, A Mark

    2004-01-01

    Managing health care cost growth is a fundamental challenge facing our health care system. Through analysis of semistructured interviews, we conclude that barriers to health plan-level cost containment activities and strong forces outside the control of individual health plans will prevent many health system reforms (such as more competition among plans or modest increases in patient copayments) from stemming health care cost inflation. Policy debates and budgetary discussions must recognize that health care cost growth in excess of gross domestic product (GDP) growth is likely inevitable in the foreseeable future. The policy focus should be directed toward encouraging value. PMID:15537589

  11. Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers Roles of Child Health-Care

    E-print Network

    Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers in Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Roles of Child Health-Care Providers 1. Use and disseminate information from 7 #12;Chater 4 Roles of Child Health-Care Providers In addition to routine screening and follow

  12. Contribution of Primary Care to Health Systems and Health

    PubMed Central

    Starfield, Barbara; Shi, Leiyu; Macinko, James

    2005-01-01

    Evidence of the health-promoting influence of primary care has been accumulating ever since researchers have been able to distinguish primary care from other aspects of the health services delivery system. This evidence shows that primary care helps prevent illness and death, regardless of whether the care is characterized by supply of primary care physicians, a relationship with a source of primary care, or the receipt of important features of primary care. The evidence also shows that primary care (in contrast to specialty care) is associated with a more equitable distribution of health in populations, a finding that holds in both cross-national and within-national studies. The means by which primary care improves health have been identified, thus suggesting ways to improve overall health and reduce differences in health across major population subgroups. PMID:16202000

  13. Community financing of health care.

    PubMed

    Carrin, G

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses ways to lesson the restrictions on health development in sub-Saharan Africa caused by limited public health budgets. Health improvements can be funded by the implementation of health insurance, the use of foreign aid, the raising of taxes, the reallocation of public money, and direct contributions by users or households either in the form of charges for services received or prepayments for future services. Community financing, i.e. the direct financing of health care by households in villages or distinct urban communities, is seen as preferable to a national or regional plan. When community financing is chosen, a choice must then be made between direct payment, fee-for-service, and prepayment (insurance) systems. The 3 systems, using the example of an essential drugs program, are described. Theoretically, with direct payment the government receives full cost recovery, and the patients receive the drugs they need, thereby improving their health. Of course the poor may not be able to purchase the drugs, therefore a subsidy system must be worked out at the community level. Fee-for-service means charging for a consultation or course of treatment, including drugs. A sliding scale of fees or discounts for certain types of consultations (e.g. pre-and post natal) can be used. In fee-for-service the risk is shared; because the cost of drugs is financed by the fees, those who receive costly treatments are subsidized by those whose treatments are relatively inexpensive. With prepayment or health insurance the risk of illness is shifted from the patient to the insurance firm or state. 2 issues make insurance plans hard to implement. When patients are covered by insurance, they may demand "too much" medical care (moral hazard) and thus premiums may be too small to cover treatment costs. On the other hand, people in low-risk groups may be unwilling to pay a higher premium, thus leading to adverse selection. Eventually, premiums may rise to the point where even high-risk individuals no longer find it worthwhile. 2 forms of insurance which may be more successful in sub-Saharan Africa are extended family insurance and compulsory collective insurance organized by an enterprise, cooperative, community, or government. It is necessary to involve the population and to gather in-depth information about a community's socioeconomic status, preferences, and administrative know-how before advice is formulated on policy concerning the financing of drugs and health care. PMID:3252870

  14. Physical Health Problems and Barriers to Optimal Health Care Among Children in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephanie Anne; Fortin, Kristine

    2015-10-01

    Children and adolescents in foster care placement represent a unique population with special health care needs, often resulting from pre-placement early adversity and neglected, unaddressed health care needs. High rates of all health problems, including acute and/or chronic physical, mental, and developmental issues prevail. Disparities in health status and access to health care are observed. This article summarizes the physical health problems of children in foster care, who are predisposed to poor health outcomes when complex care needs are unaddressed. Despite recognition of the significant burden of health care need among this unique population, barriers to effective and optimal health care delivery remain. Legislative solutions to overcome obstacles to health care delivery for children in foster care are discussed. PMID:26364980

  15. Establishment of primary health care in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Birt, C A

    1990-08-01

    Basic demographic and epidemiological data relevant to health problems in Vietnam are described in this paper. Existing health service arrangements are referred to, with particular emphasis on the strategy for development of primary health care. The establishment of the paediatric centre in Ho Chi Minh City is reported, and examples of its valuable work in primary health care development are described. PMID:2121182

  16. The Obama health care plan: what it means for mental health care of older adults.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2009-01-01

    Health care was an important issue for both the Obama and McCain election campaigns. Now that Barack Obama is poised to serve as the 44th President of the United States, many health care providers are focused on what Obama's administration will mean for new health care initiatives. This article focuses specifically on aspects of the Obama and Biden health care plan that affects mental health care for older adults. PMID:19227106

  17. Skin Diseases: Questions for Your Health Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Questions for Your Health Care Provider Past ... dermatitis worse? What are the most common irritants? Skin cancer What type of skin cancer do I ...

  18. [Current infectious disease care in Spain].

    PubMed

    Almirante, Benito; Colmenero, Juan Dios; Fortún, Jesús; Oteo, José Antonio; Santamaría, Juan Mari; Sola, Julio

    2008-12-01

    Despite the specialist activity of Infectious Diseases not being officially recognised, the majority of the hospitals in the autonomous communities of Spain are equipped with structures, with significant heterogeneity among them, to be able to offer high quality care in these diseases. The main characteristics of and Infectious Diseases Department is its important healthcare activity, more than in other officially recognised medical specialities, and also its important interrelationship with other services in the hospital which is clearly horizontal healthcare. Furthermore, the aforementioned infectious disease care units have developed important activities in the arena of community and public health and, in collaboration with health authorities, contribute to the rational use of antimicrobials and the relationship with Primary Care. The future of specialists in infectious diseases, when they are officially recognised, will be the creation of clinical management units in every health institution with the objective of coordinating all the specialised health care, both in the hospital environment and in its health area of influence. PMID:19195465

  19. Certification of Health Care Provider for a Serious Health Condition

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    this time, will the patient need care? No Yes hour(s) per day; days per week from _________________ throughCertification of Health Care Provider for a Serious Health Condition Family and Medical Leave Act care: If family member is your child, please provide date of birth: If providing care for your Spouse

  20. America's health care safety net: revisiting the 2000 IOM report.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Marion E; Baxter, Raymond J

    2007-01-01

    The committee that wrote the 2000 Institute of Medicine report on the health care safety net reconvened in 2006 to reflect on the safety net from the perspective of rising numbers of uninsured and underinsured people, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, high immigration levels, and new fiscal and policy pressures on care for vulnerable populations. Safety-net providers now participate in Medicaid managed care but find it difficult to meet growing needs for specialty services, particularly mental health care and affordable prescription drugs. How current state reforms and coverage expansions will affect care for the poor and uninsured is a critical issue. PMID:17848461

  1. Controversies in faith and health care.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; Duff, Jean; Fitzgibbon, Atallah; Karam, Azza; Mills, Edward J; Munnings, Keith; Smith, Sally; Seshadri, Shreelata Rao; Steinberg, Avraham; Vitillo, Robert; Yugi, Philemon

    2015-10-31

    Differences in religious faith-based viewpoints (controversies) on the sanctity of human life, acceptable behaviour, health-care technologies and health-care services contribute to the widespread variations in health care worldwide. Faith-linked controversies include family planning, child protection (especially child marriage, female genital mutilation, and immunisation), stigma and harm reduction, violence against women, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, gender, end-of-life issues, and faith activities including prayer. Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and traditional beliefs have similarities and differences in their viewpoints. Improved understanding by health-care providers of the heterogeneity of viewpoints, both within and between faiths, and their effect on health care is important for clinical medicine, public-health programmes, and health-care policy. Increased appreciation in faith leaders of the effect of their teachings on health care is also crucial. This Series paper outlines some faith-related controversies, describes how they influence health-care provision and uptake, and identifies opportunities for research and increased interaction between faith leaders and health-care providers to improve health care. PMID:26159392

  2. Health Care Reform and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... onset Alzheimer's Quality of care Medical research Consumer health insurance website The Department of Health and Human Services ... www.cuidadodesalud.gov/ ) — to help individuals find what health insurance options are available in their communities. About Healthcare. ...

  3. Health Care Reform: Opportunities for Improving Adolescent Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Charles E., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    Health care reform represents a major step toward achieving the goal of improved preventive and primary care services for all Americans, including children and adolescents. Adolescence is a unique developmental age district from both childhood and adulthood with special vulnerabilities, health concerns, and barriers to accessing health care. It is…

  4. Variation in health care worker removal of personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Caroline; Van Hoof, Sarah; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-07-01

    In the current era of emerging pathogens such as Ebola virus, removal of personal protective equipment (PPE) is crucial to reduce contamination of health care workers. However, current removal practices are not well described. We undertook a systematic evaluation of health care worker removal of PPE for contact isolation to examine variation in removal procedures. Findings indicate that under usual conditions, only about half of health care workers correctly remove their PPE, and very few remove their PPE in the correct order and dispose of it in the proper location. PMID:26138659

  5. Paid Sick Days and Health Care Use

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Won Kim

    2011-01-01

    Background In identifying factors of health care use, past research has focused on individual-level characteristics or on the health care system itself. This study investigates whether access to paid sick days, an amenable environmental factor outside the health care system, is associated with primary and emergency care use. Methods A nationally representative sample of 14,302 U.S. working adults extracted from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey data was used. Multiple logistic regressions were performed, controlling for demographic variables, health conditions and status, and access to health care. Results Workers with lower socioeconomic status, poorer health status, or without health insurance or regular places for care were more likely to lack paid sick leave than higher-status workers. For all U.S. working adults, access to paid sick days benefits was significantly associated with increased use of outpatient care but not with reduced use of ER. For U.S. working adults with health insurance coverage, access to paid sick days benefits was significantly associated with increased use of outpatient care and reduced use of emergency care. Conclusions A public policy mandating paid sick days may help facilitate timely access to primary care, reduce avoidable emergency care use, and reduce health disparities among workers. PMID:21761429

  6. An Overview of Oral Health Status, Resources, and Care Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, B. Alex

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the current oral health status of Americans looks at the epidemiology of oral/dental diseases, rates of use of dental services, and expenditures for dental health care. Substantial progress in improving oral health is seen as are particular challenges resulting from the aging and ethnic diversification of the population. (MSE)

  7. Reduction of catastrophic health care expenditures by a community-based health insurance scheme in Gujarat, India: current experiences and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Michael Kent

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the Self Employed Women's Association's Medical Insurance Fund in Gujarat in terms of insurance coverage according to income groups, protection of claimants from costs of hospitalization, time between discharge and reimbursement, and frequency of use. METHODS: One thousand nine hundred and thirty claims submitted over six years were analysed. FINDINGS: Two hundred and fifteen (11%) of 1927 claims were rejected. The mean household income of claimants was significantly lower than that of the general population. The percentage of households below the poverty line was similar for claimants and the general population. One thousand seven hundred and twelve (1712) claims were reimbursed: 805 (47%) fully and 907 (53%) at a mean reimbursement rate of 55.6%. Reimbursement more than halved the percentage of catastrophic hospitalizations (>10% of annual household income) and hospitalizations resulting in impoverishment. The average time between discharge and reimbursement was four months. The frequency of submission of claims was low (18.0/1000 members per year: 22-37% of the estimated frequency of hospitalization). CONCLUSIONS: The findings have implications for community-based health insurance schemes in India and elsewhere. Such schemes can protect poor households against the uncertain risk of medical expenses. They can be implemented in areas where institutional capacity is too weak to organize nationwide risk-pooling. Such schemes can cover poor people, including people and households below the poverty line. A trade off exists between maintaining the scheme's financial viability and protecting members against catastrophic expenditures. To facilitate reimbursement, administration, particularly processing of claims, should happen near claimants. Fine-tuning the design of a scheme is an ongoing process - a system of monitoring and evaluation is vital. PMID:12219151

  8. The state of transgender health care: policy, law, and medical frameworks.

    PubMed

    Stroumsa, Daphna

    2014-03-01

    I review the current status of transgender people's access to health care in the United States and analyze federal policies regarding health care services for transgender people and the limitations thereof. I suggest a preliminary outline to enhance health care services and recommend the formulation of explicit federal policies regarding the provision of health care services to transgender people in accordance with recently issued medical care guidelines, allocation of research funding, education of health care workers, and implementation of existing nondiscrimination policies. Current policies denying medical coverage for sex reassignment surgery contradict standards of medical care and must be amended. PMID:24432926

  9. Home Health Care: Services and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Geraldine; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Findings from a study of home care services in one New York district document the value and relatively modest costs of home health care for the chronically ill and dependent elderly. Professional nurses coordinated the care, but most of the direct services were provided by home health aides and housekeepers. (MF)

  10. Literacy and learning in health care.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael S; Wilson, Elizabeth A H; Rapp, David N; Waite, Katherine R; Bocchini, Mary V; Davis, Terry C; Rudd, Rima E

    2009-11-01

    The relationship between literacy and health outcomes are well documented in adult medicine, yet specific causal pathways are not entirely clear. Despite an incomplete understanding of the problem, numerous interventions have already been implemented with variable success. Many of those who proposed earlier strategies assumed the problem to originate from reading difficulties only. Given the timely need for more effective interventions, it is of increasing importance to reconsider the meaning of health literacy to advance our conceptual understanding of the problem and how best to respond. One potentially effective approach might involve recognizing the known associations between a larger set of cognitive and psychosocial abilities with functional literacy skills. Here we review the current health literacy definition and literature and draw on relevant research from the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology. In this framework, a research agenda is proposed that considers an individual's "health-learning capacity," which refers to the broad constellation of cognitive and psychosocial skills from which patients or family members must draw to effectively promote, protect, and manage their own or a child's health. This new, related concept will lead, ideally, to more effective ways of thinking about health literacy interventions, including the design of health-education materials, instructional strategies, and the delivery of health care services to support patients and families across the life span. PMID:19861481

  11. Spinal pain: current understanding, trends, and the future of care

    PubMed Central

    Parkin-Smith, Gregory F; Amorin-Woods, Lyndon G; Davies, Stephanie J; Losco, Barrett E; Adams, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This commissioned review paper offers a summary of our current understanding of nonmalignant spinal pain, particularly persistent pain. Spinal pain can be a complex problem, requiring management that addresses both the physical and psychosocial components of the pain experience. We propose a model of care that includes the necessary components of care services that would address the multidimensional nature of spinal pain. Emerging care services that tailor care to the individual person with pain seems to achieve better outcomes and greater consumer satisfaction with care, while most likely containing costs. However, we recommend that any model of care and care framework should be developed on the basis of a multidisciplinary approach to care, with the scaffold being the principles of evidence-based practice. Importantly, we propose that any care services recommended in new models or frameworks be matched with available resources and services – this matching we promote as the fourth principle of evidence-based practice. Ongoing research will be necessary to offer insight into clinical outcomes of complex interventions, while practice-based research would uncover consumer needs and workforce capacity. This kind of research data is essential to inform health care policy and practice. PMID:26604815

  12. Primary Health Care and Narrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John W

    2015-01-01

    Primary health care has received a lot of attention since the Alma Ata Conference, convened by the World Health Organization in 1978. Key to the strategy to improve health care outlined at the Alma Ata conference is citizen participation in every phase of service delivery. Although the goals of primary health care have not been achieved, the addition of narrative medicine may facilitate these ends. But a new epistemology is necessary, one that is compatible with narrative medicine, so that local knowledge is elevated in importance and incorporated into the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. In this way, relevant, sustainable, and affordable care can be provided. The aim of this article is to discuss how primary health care might be improved through the introduction of narrative medicine into planning primary health care delivery. PMID:26222094

  13. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  14. Health Savings Accounts and Health Care Spending

    PubMed Central

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Shah, Mona; Frogner, Bianca K

    2010-01-01

    Objective The impact of consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs) has primarily been studied in a small number of large, self-insured employers, but this work may not generalize to the wide array of firms that make up the overall economy. The goal of our research is to examine effects of health savings accounts (HSAs) on total, medical, and pharmacy spending for a large number of small and midsized firms. Data Sources Health plan administrative data from a national insurer were used to measure spending for 76,310 enrollees over 3 years in 709 employers. All employers began offering a HSA-eligible plan either on a full-replacement basis or alongside traditional plans in 2006 and 2007 after previously offering only traditional plans in 2005. Study Design We employ difference-in-differences generalized linear regression models to examine the impact of switching to HSAs. Data Extraction Methods Claims data were aggregated to enrollee-years. Principal Findings For total spending, HSA enrollees spent roughly 5–7 percent less than non-HSA enrollees. For pharmacy spending, HSA enrollees spent 6–9 percent less than traditional plan enrollees. More of the spending decrease was observed in the first year of enrollment. Conclusions Our findings are consistent with the notion that CDHP benefit designs affect decisions that are at the discretion of the consumer, such as whether to fill or refill a prescription, but have less effect on care decisions that are more at the discretion of the provider. PMID:20528988

  15. The Impact of Grid on Health Care Digital Repositories

    E-print Network

    Donno, Flavia; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2008-01-01

    Grid computing has attracted worldwide attention in a variety of applications like Health Care. In this paper we identified the Grid services that could facilitate the integration and interoperation of Health Care data and frameworks world-wide. While many of the current Health Care Grid projects address issues such as data location and description on the Grid and the security aspects, the problems connected to data storage, integrity, preservation and distribution have been neglected. We describe the currently available Grid storage services and protocols that can come in handy when dealing with those problems. We further describe a Grid infrastructure to build a cooperative Health Care environment based on currently available Grid services and a service able to validate it.

  16. Health Services and Health Care Providers

    MedlinePLUS

    College Health: Health Services and Common Health Problems Posted under Health Guides . Updated 12 March 2015. +Related Content What are student health services? The student health services (sometimes called ...

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall ensure that newly admitted inmates to Connecticut Department FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: E 1.01 Page 1 of 2 INFORMATION ON HEALTH

  18. Health care in Costa Rica: boom and crisis.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Lago, C

    1985-01-01

    In 1960-1980 Costa Rica experienced a health boom, achieving significant improvements which moved that country into the number two position in Latin America for indicators such as population coverage, infant mortality, life expectancy and health services. In addition, there was a gradual process of integration of health services. But in the same period, the cost of health care as a percentage of GNP increased almost 5-fold and in 1980 was the fourth highest in the region. The economic crisis of the 1980s aggravated the financial difficulties; to cope with them, the government introduced an austere program to reduce costs and plans to transform the current model of health care into a more efficient one capable of maintaining Costa Rica's high health standards in the future. The paper is divided into five sections: summary of the historical development of health care, and description of its current organization and of its gradual process of integration; estimation of population coverage and its trends, evaluation of inequalities in coverage, and identification of the non-covered group; analysis of health-care financing and its sources, as well of the recent financial desequilibrium, its causes and measures to restore the equilibrium; description of health care benefits and their differences among groups and regions, analysis of the country's advances in health-care facilities and standards, and measurement of the impact of the health care system in income distribution; and description of the rising cost of health care and the current crisis, analysis of the causes of both phenomena, and review of the measures that have been and should be implemented to solve these problems. PMID:3929390

  19. Paying for Health Care: The Unequal Burdens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Beverlee A.

    1977-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of national health care. Neither Medicare nor Medicaid equitably meet the health needs of the entire population. The author suggests criteria which must be met by a national health program if it is to eliminate inequalities in costs, access to services and quality of care. (GC)

  20. Special Issue: The Family and Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J., Ed.; McCubbin, Hamilton I., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses research and interventions related to family health care. Topics include health promotion; risk behaviors; vulnerability and illness onset; choosing health care systems; stress; caregiving and coping; family counseling; and family responses to Alzheimer's Disease, pediatric cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and obesity. (JAC)

  1. School Health Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dian L.; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Anderson, Lori S.; Knauer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are at risk for school failure when their health needs are not met. Current studies have identified a strong connection between school success and health. This study attempted to determine (a) how schools meet the direct service health needs of children and (b) who provides those services. The study…

  2. Health care: economic impact of caring for geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Rich, Preston B; Adams, Sasha D

    2015-02-01

    National health care expenditures constitute a continuously expanding component of the US economy. Health care resources are distributed unequally among the population, and geriatric patients are disproportionately represented. Characterizing this group of individuals that accounts for the largest percentage of US health spending may facilitate the introduction of targeted interventions in key high-impact areas. Changing demographics, an increasing incidence of chronic disease and progressive disability, rapid technological advances, and systemic market failures in the health care sector combine to drive cost. A multidisciplinary approach will become increasingly necessary to balance the delicate relationship between our constrained supply and increasing demand. PMID:25459539

  3. Health care and equity in India.

    PubMed

    Balarajan, Y; Selvaraj, S; Subramanian, S V

    2011-02-01

    In India, despite improvements in access to health care, inequalities are related to socioeconomic status, geography, and gender, and are compounded by high out-of-pocket expenditures, with more than three-quarters of the increasing financial burden of health care being met by households. Health-care expenditures exacerbate poverty, with about 39 million additional people falling into poverty every year as a result of such expenditures. We identify key challenges for the achievement of equity in service provision, and equity in financing and financial risk protection in India. These challenges include an imbalance in resource allocation, inadequate physical access to high-quality health services and human resources for health, high out-of-pocket health expenditures, inflation in health spending, and behavioural factors that affect the demand for appropriate health care. Use of equity metrics in monitoring, assessment, and strategic planning; investment in development of a rigorous knowledge base of health-systems research; development of a refined equity-focused process of deliberative decision making in health reform; and redefinition of the specific responsibilities and accountabilities of key actors are needed to try to achieve equity in health care in India. The implementation of these principles with strengthened public health and primary-care services will help to ensure a more equitable health care for India's population. PMID:21227492

  4. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health. PMID:26405210

  5. EDI developments in Dutch health care.

    PubMed Central

    Koens, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    In the past two years EDI developments in Dutch Health Care have gained some momentum. These developments are focussed on the communication between hospitals on the one hand, and General Practitioners, Health Care insurers and suppliers of health care products on the other hand. Experiences show that although the results are promising there is a great need for broadly accepted standard EDI messages based on a thorough analysis of the existing information exchange between organisations. PMID:1807655

  6. Physician leadership: a health-care system's investment in the future of quality care.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Rocco; Haytaian, Marcia

    2012-08-01

    The current state of health care and its reform will require physician leaders to take on greater management responsibilities, which will require a set of organizational and leadership competencies that traditional medical education does not provide. Physician leaders can form a bridge between the clinical and administrative sides of a health-care organization, serving to further the organization's strategy for growth and success. Recognizing that the health-care industry is rapidly changing and physician leaders will play a key role in that transformation, Hartford HealthCare has established a Physician Leadership Development Institute that provides advanced leadership skills and management education to select physicians practicing within the health-care system. PMID:23248866

  7. Psychology and health: contributions of psychology to the improvement of health and health care

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, W. H.; Evans, R. I.; Kennedy, S.; Iscoe, I.

    1987-01-01

    Psychology as both a science and a profession has been closely identified with other disciplines in the broad field of health since the turn of the present century. Recent advances in health care have reinforced the growing belief that the promotion of health and the prevention and treatment of illness can be greatly enhanced by incorporating the scientific findings and modern techniques of psychology into everyday practices. This review outlines the contributions of psychology to health care throughout the world; only some of the most timely and relevant issues are mentioned, together with examples of current work in the field. After an introductory overview, special attention is given to each of the major areas within the broad field of health care where psychological applications have been particularly useful. PMID:3325189

  8. Attending unintended transformations of health care infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Wentzer, Helle; Bygholm, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Western health care is under pressure from growing demands on quality and efficiency. The development and implementation of information technology, IT is a key mean of health care authorities to improve on health care infrastructure. Theory and methods Against a background of theories on human-computer interaction and IT-mediated communication, different empirical studies of IT implementation in health care are analyzed. The outcome is an analytical discernment between different relations of communication and levels of interaction with IT in health care infrastructure. These relations and levels are synthesized into a framework for identifying tensions and potential problems in the mediation of health care with the IT system. These problems are also known as unexpected adverse consequences, UACs, from IT implementation into clinical health care practices. Results This paper develops a conceptual framework for addressing transformations of communication and workflow in health care as a result of implementing IT. Conclusion and discussion The purpose of the conceptual framework is to support the attention to and continuous screening for errors and unintended consequences of IT implementation into health care practices and outcomes. PMID:18043725

  9. Health care 2020: reengineering health care delivery to combat chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J

    2015-04-01

    Chronic disease has become the great epidemic of our times, responsible for 75% of total health care costs and the majority of deaths in the US. Our current delivery model is poorly constructed to manage chronic disease, as evidenced by low adherence to quality indicators and poor control of treatable conditions. New technologies have emerged that can engage patients and offer additional modalities in the treatment of chronic disease. Modifying our delivery model to include team-based care in concert with patient-centered technologies offers great promise in managing the chronic disease epidemic. PMID:25460529

  10. Ode to Healing Music in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Powell, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Music therapy has been around since the 1940s when physicians notice a positive effect that music had on the soldiers with "shell shock" (now more commonly known as posttraumatic stress disorder). For decades, veterans were the primary patients worked with by music therapists. In the 1970s, the hospice movement started to enter the health care continuum, largely due to Dr Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, who advocated for home care and patient choice for the terminally ill. Two decades later, it became apparent that hospice patients could benefit from music. And currently, there are not enough people certified to work with music in hospice patients, veterans, or patients with dementia/Alzheimer's disease. No, music does not prolong life, but it does add life to the time left. PMID:26618264

  11. Emotional intelligence: a core competency for health care administrators.

    PubMed

    Freshman, Brenda; Rubino, Louis

    2002-06-01

    The contemporary concept of emotional intelligence (EI) as a critical set of management skills is traced through time to its current application for health care administration. EI is defined as proficiencies in intrapersonal and interpersonal skills in the areas of self-awareness, self-regulation, self-motivation, social awareness, and social skills. The contributions of EI to effective management are supported by empirical research in the field. The importance of developing these skills in health care organizations is further clarified with examples familiar to health care administrators. Training suggestions and assessment resources are provided. PMID:12083173

  12. Consumer-driven health care marketing.

    PubMed

    Upton, R L

    1997-01-01

    In this article, a health care marketing executive takes an opposing view: That the consumer will not only continue to exercise choice but also, at annual renewal time, veto power. In part, that is because the consumers are feeling the rising cost of health care much more directly than in the past, through ever-higher premiums, deductibles and copayments. As they assumed more of the burden of medical care delivery, consumers are becoming more knowledgeable about and discriminating toward the health care system and provider plans they are offered. They understand--as does their employer--that no longer are all health care plans alike or at parity with each other. The consumer is also demanding greater access to freedom of provider choice, quality of health care coverage. PMID:10164646

  13. Managing the quality of health care.

    PubMed

    Larson, James S; Muller, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews quality of health care initiatives beginning with the quality assessment/quality assurance movement of the 1970s. Conceptually, modern quality of care management is rooted in the intellectual work of Avedis Donabedian who defined quality of care as a combination of structure, process, and outcome. Donabedian's model is presented and some limitations are pointed out. In the late 1980s and 1990s. the health care industry adopted total quality management (TQM). More recently, the pursuit of health care quality has led to substantial performance measurement initiatives such as ORYX by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and MEDIS by the National Commission of Quality Assurance. The importance of CONQUEST, a freely available performance measurement database developed at the Harvard School of Public Health, is noted and discussed. The article concludes with a list of challenges facing public and private parties interests in health care quality improvement. PMID:15188996

  14. Pivoting: leveraging opportunities in a turbulent health care environment*

    PubMed Central

    Bandy, Margaret Moylan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this lecture is to challenge librarians in clinical settings to leverage the opportunities presented by the current health care environment and to develop collaborative relationships with health care practitioners to provide relevant services. Discussion: Health care organizations are under financial and regulatory pressures, and many hospital librarians have been downsized or have had their positions eliminated. The lecture briefly reviews hospital librarians' roles in the past but focuses primarily on our current challenges. This environment requires librarians to be opportunity focused and pivot to a new vision that directs their actions. Many librarians are already doing this, and colleagues are encouraging us to embrace these opportunities. Evidence from publications, websites, discussion lists, personal communications, and the author's experience is explored. Conclusion: Developing interdisciplinary and collaborative relationships in our institutions and providing relevant services will mark our progress as vital, contributing members of our health care organizations. PMID:25552938

  15. Bereavement and Bereavement Care in Health and Social Care: Provision and Practice in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephen, Audrey I.; Wimpenny, Peter; Unwin, Rachel; Work, Fiona; Dempster, Paul; MacDuff, Colin; Wilcock, Sylvia E.; Brown, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The interview study described here aimed to explore current views of and practice in bereavement care and identify priorities for service development in Scotland. Fifty-nine participants who worked with the bereaved in some way, or whose interest was in bereavement or bereavement care, were interviewed. They represented National Health Service…

  16. Health care librarians and information literacy: an investigation.

    PubMed

    Kelham, Charlotte

    2014-09-01

    Until relatively recently, the concept of information literacy, and teaching the skills to enable it, was mainly a concern of academic libraries. Now, it is also seen to be of high importance within the context of health care libraries. Health care libraries and librarians can provide crucial support towards the implementation of evidence-based practice in patient care through both information literacy skills training and by conducting mediated searches on behalf of health care practitioners. This article reports the findings from an investigation conducted by Charlotte Kelham as part of her MA in Librarianship from the University of Sheffield. Her dissertation investigated how health care librarians understand the concept of information literacy, the implications of this for their role and their perceptions around how their role is valued. Charlotte graduated from Sheffield in 2013 and is currently job hunting. AM. PMID:25155981

  17. Advancing family involvement in collaborative health care: Next steps.

    PubMed

    Rolland, John S

    2015-06-01

    Comments on the article "Don Bloch's vision for Collaborative Family Health Care: Progress and next steps" by C. J. Peek (see record 2015-25290-002). C. J. Peek has provided us with a masterful integration of Don Bloch's vision of collaborative family health care and the evolution over the past 20 years of the field. The current author was very fortunate to be part of the initial meeting at Wingspread in 1994. As a family systems-oriented community and public health-trained psychiatrist, my primary focus over 30 years has been on families facing chronic illness and disability and collaborative care efforts in specialty, primary, rehabilitation, and palliative care medicine. In my view, the ability of the health care consumer (patient and his or her family members) and professional worlds to collaborate in a more egalitarian and less hierarchical and wary manner remains a significant constraint to progress. PMID:26053574

  18. Health Care Costing: Data, Methods, Future Directions

    Cancer.gov

    Health Services and Economics Branch staff have collaborated with colleagues at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and Emory University to develop a supplement to the journal Medical Care. The supplement, published in July 2009, examines a broad array of methodologic issues related to health care cost estimation. The supplement's papers are led by experts in health economics, epidemiology, health services research, and biostatistics.

  19. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    PubMed

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability. PMID:25217142

  20. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  1. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section 162...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity...

  2. Planning For Health Care and Health Care Costs: A Learning Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughston, George A.; And Others

    This manual is designed to assist those helping professionals responsible for developing consumer education programs for older adults on the topic of health care and health care costs. Using a modular presentation format, the materials focus on the following areas of concern: (1) self-evaluation and planning for health care needs; (2) methods for…

  3. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors Among Rural Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural adolescents. METHODS Semistructured individual interviews with 100 rural, minority, low socioeconomic status adolescents revealed their current perceptions of oral health and dental care access. Respondents age ranged from 12 to 18 years. The sample was 80% black and 52% male. RESULTS Perceived threat from dental disease was low. Adolescents perceived regular brushing and flossing as superseding the need for preventive care. Esthetic reasons were most often cited as reasons to seek dental care. Difficulties accessing dental care include finances, transportation, fear, issues with Medicaid coverage and parental responsibility. In general, adolescents and their parents are in need of information regarding the importance of preventive dental care. CONCLUSIONS Findings illuminate barriers to dental care faced by low-income rural adolescents and counter public perceptions of government-sponsored dental care programs as being “free” or without cost. The importance of improved oral health knowledge, better access to care, and school-based dental care is discussed. PMID:25388597

  4. High and rising health care costs.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    The U.S. is spending a growing share of the GDP on health care, outpacing other industrialized countries. This synthesis examines why costs are higher in the U.S. and what is driving their growth. Key findings include: health care inefficiency, medical technology and health status (particularly obesity) are the primary drivers of rising U.S. health care costs. Health payer systems that reward inefficiencies and preempt competition have impeded productivity gains in the health care sector. The best evidence indicates medical technology accounts for one-half to two-thirds of spending growth. While medical malpractice insurance and defensive medicine contribute to health costs, they are not large enough factors to significantly contribute to a rise in spending. Research is consistent that demographics will not be a significant factor in driving spending despite the aging baby boomers. PMID:22052035

  5. The Potential Impact of Health Care Reform on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reace, Diana

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 522 colleges and universities investigated the impact of health care reform proposals. Results provide an overview of typical current medical plan design, including coverage for part- and full-time employees, and give insight into attitudes toward the idea of regional health alliances, a potentially useful reform approach. (MSE)

  6. Disseminating best-evidence health-care to Indigenous health-care settings and programs in Australia: identifying the gaps.

    PubMed

    Clifford, A; Jackson Pulver, L; Richmond, R; Shakeshaft, A; Ivers, R

    2009-12-01

    Indigenous Australians experience a disproportionately greater burden of harm from smoking, poor nutrition, alcohol misuse and physical inactivity (SNAP risk factors) than the general Australian population. A critical step in further improving efforts to reduce this harm is to review existing efforts aimed at increasing the uptake of evidence-based interventions in Indigenous-specific health-care settings and programs. This study systematically identifies and reviews published Indigenous-specific dissemination studies targeting SNAP interventions. An electronic search of eight databases and a manual search of reference lists of previous literature reviews were undertaken. Eleven dissemination studies were identified for review: six for nutrition and physical activity as a component of diabetes care, three for alcohol and two for smoking. The majority of studies employed continuing medical education (n = 9 studies), suggesting that improving health-care providers' knowledge and skills is a focus of current efforts to disseminate best-evidence SNAP interventions in Indigenous health-care settings. Only two studies evaluated reminder systems, despite their widespread use in Indigenous-specific health-care services, and only one study employed academic detailing, despite its cost-effectiveness at modifying health-care provider behavior. There is a clear need for more Indigenous-specific dissemination research targeting the uptake of secondary prevention and to establish reliable and valid measures of Indigenous-specific health-care delivery, in order to determine which dissemination strategies are most likely to be effective in Indigenous health-care settings and programs. PMID:19887577

  7. Teaching Primary Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezzina, Paul; Keogh, Johann J.; Keogh, Mariana

    1998-01-01

    Nursing and radiology students (n=15) at the University of Malta who completed an interdisciplinary module on primary health care reported they found the theoretical material applicable to practice; the module enabled them to learn about their potential role in primary health care. (SK)

  8. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  9. A Guide to Adolescent Health Care EPSDT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Care Financing Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This document provides guidelines for individuals giving health care to adolescents through the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) Program. Chapter One briefly indicates needs of adolescents and outlines legal aspects of health care for adolescents such as age of majority, informed consent, confidentiality, disclosure of…

  10. Priorities in the Israeli health care system.

    PubMed

    Simonstein, Frida

    2013-08-01

    The Israeli health care system is looked upon by some people as one of the most advanced health care systems in the world in terms of access, quality, costs and coverage. The Israel health care system has four key components: (1) universal coverage; (2) 'cradle to grave' coverage; (3) coverage of both basic services and catastrophic care; and (4) coverage of medications. Patients pay a (relatively) small copayment to see specialists and to purchase medication; and, primary care is free. However, during 2011 the Israeli Medical Association (IMA) spent 5 months on a strike, justifying it as trying to 'save' the Israeli public health. This paper describes some aspects of the Israeli Health Care System, the criteria for setting priorities for the expenditures on health care and values underlying these criteria. The paper observes that the new agreement between the IMA and the government has given timely priority to problematic areas of specialization (in which there is an acute shortage of physicians) and to hospitals in the periphery of the country. Yet weak points in the health system in Israel remain. Particularly, the extent to which national health care expenditures are being financed privately--which is rising--and the parallel decline in the role of government financing. PMID:22722948

  11. take care of What Matters Health Family

    E-print Network

    Lee, Dongwon

    a competitive dental plan designed to promote a brighter smile and complete oral wellness. Annual coveragetake care of What Matters Health · Family · Finances · Future Medical Coverage Penn State offers plans allow you freedom of choice of health care providers both in and out of network. PPO Blue plan

  12. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  13. CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE CENTRAL OFFICE

    E-print Network

    CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE CENTRAL OFFICE October 2015 Executive Director Robert Trestman Services Johnny Wu Director of Mental Health and Psychiatric Services Robert Berger Research Associate 2 Director of Nursing and Patient Care Services Constance Weiskopf Pharmacy Manager Robin Wahl Dental

  14. Behavioral health consultation and primary care: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Patricia J; Strosahl, Kirk D

    2009-03-01

    This article provides an overview of 20 years of professional experiences with developing and implementing a model for integrating behavioral health services into primary care. The Primary Care Behavioral Health (PCBH) model is designed to provide immediate access to behavioral care for a large number of primary care patients by positioning a behavioral health consultant in the exam room area to function as a core member of the primary care team. In an initial era of discovery, the authors were directly involved in developing and testing a variety of new approaches to providing behavioral health services in general medicine. In a second era focused on feasibility, the authors worked with Kaiser Permanente, the United States Air Force and Navy, the Veteran's Administration, and the Bureau of Primary Care to system test this innovative model of integrated care. Now in an era devoted to dissemination, the authors review the various roles formal research, system level quality improvement initiatives and stakeholder analysis play in promoting integrated care. The authors also describe current efforts to (1) create a tool that helps systems develop integration targets and (2) use the PCBH model as a platform for teaching medical residents and behavioral health providers to work together in a redesigned primary care team model. PMID:19184376

  15. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are here: Plan of care Share What’s home health care & what should I expect? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  16. Oregon's experiment in health care delivery and payment reform: coordinated care organizations replacing managed care.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven W; Bernell, Stephanie L; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff; Ranit, Claire M

    2015-02-01

    To control Medicaid costs, improve quality, and drive community engagement, the Oregon Health Authority introduced a new system of coordinated care organizations (CCOs). While CCOs resemble traditional Medicaid managed care, they have differences that have been deliberately designed to improve care coordination, increase accountability, and incorporate greater community governance. Reforms include global budgets integrating medical, behavioral, and oral health care and public health functions; risk-adjusted payments rewarding outcomes and evidence-based practice; increased transparency; and greater community engagement. The CCO model faces several implementation challenges. If successful, it will provide improved health care delivery, better health outcomes, and overall savings. PMID:25480844

  17. Patient Data Confidentiality Issues of the Dutch Electronic Health Care Record

    E-print Network

    Groot, Perry

    Patient Data Confidentiality Issues of the Dutch Electronic Health Care Record Perry Groot Ferry.O.Box 9010, 6500GL Nijmegen Abstract Health care is currently in a phase of transition. One of the recent developments that seems to be in- escapable is the introduction of an Electronic Health care Record

  18. Psychological Science and Innovative Strategies for Informing Health Care Redesign: A Policy Brief.

    PubMed

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Stancin, Terry; Lochman, John E; Hughes, Jennifer L; Miranda, Jeanne M; Wysocki, Tim; Portwood, Sharon G; Piacentini, John; Tynan, Douglas; Atkins, Marc; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Recent health care legislation and shifting health care financing strategies are transforming health and behavioral health (a broad term referring to mental health, substance use, and health behavior) care in the United States. Advances in knowledge regarding effective treatment and services coupled with incentives for innovation in health and behavioral health care delivery systems make this a unique time for mobilizing our science to enhance the success of health and behavioral health care redesign. To optimize the potential of our current health care environment, a team was formed composed of leaders from the Societies of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, Pediatric Psychology, and Child and Family Policy and Practice (Divisions 53, 54, and 37 of the American Psychological Association). This team was charged with reviewing the scientific and policy literature with a focus on five major issues: (a) improving access to care and reducing health disparities, (b) integrating behavioral health care within primary care, (c) preventive services, (d) enhancing quality and outcomes of care, and (e) training and workforce development. The products of that work are summarized here, including recommendations for future research, clinical, training, and policy directions. We conclude that the current emphasis on accountable care and evaluation of the outcomes of care offer numerous opportunities for psychologists to integrate science and practice for the benefit of our children, families, and nation. The dramatic changes that are occurring in psychological and behavioral health care services and payment systems also require evolution in our practice and training models. PMID:26430948

  19. Redistributive effects in public health care financing.

    PubMed

    Honekamp, Ivonne; Possenriede, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    This article focuses on the redistributive effects of different measures to finance public health insurance. We analyse the implications of different financing options for public health insurance on the redistribution of income from good to bad health risks and from high-income to low-income individuals. The financing options considered are either income-related (namely income taxes, payroll taxes, and indirect taxes), health-related (co-insurance, deductibles, and no-claim), or neither (flat fee). We show that governments who treat access to health care as a basic right for everyone should consider redistributive effects when reforming health care financing. PMID:18347823

  20. Protecting the health of employees caring for family members with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

    2011-07-01

    Over half of American workers are holding a paid job while also providing unpaid assistance and support to a family member. Research shows that family members who provide care to children or adults with special health care needs are themselves at risk of physical and mental health problems. Yet, little research has explored how the work environment mediates the effects of caregiving on caregivers' mental and physical health. With a sample of 2455 currently employed U.S. adults from the Work, Family, Community Nexus (WFCN) survey, a random-digit dial, nationally representative survey of Americans aged 18-69, we examine whether paid leave and flexibility policies mediate the relationship between caregiving and health. In Ordinary Least Squares regression models, we find that paid leave to address family members' health was associated with better mental health status as measured by the 5-item Mental Health Inventory and paid sick leave with better physical health status as measured by self-rated overall health status. A supportive supervisor was also associated with improvements in mental and physical health. For both men and women, paid leave and a supervisor's support offset some or all of the negative effects of caregiving, but for women, the buffering effects of working conditions are slightly larger. Enhancing the unpaid leave guaranteed in the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act so that it is paid and passing national paid sick days legislation will help ensure that employed caregivers can retain their jobs, receive needed income, and meet their own mental and physical health needs. PMID:21669484

  1. The doctor's role in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C E

    1976-01-01

    A new pattern of health care in developing countries promises to meet the needs of rural people and still provide reasonable gratification for health workers. The service must have mutually strengthening linkages between all levels of the health care system. Reallocating roles in the health team requires turning routine medical care over to auxiliaries so that professionals can concentrate on more complex problems, such as community diagnosis and therapy. Young doctors are reasonable and willing to undertake a rural rotation early in their medical careers. This will help to identify those few who will provide leadership in improving rural services. PMID:939619

  2. Investigation of health care waste management in Binzhou District, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoyan, Gai; Xu Lingzhong; Li Huijuan; Zhou Chengchao; He Jiangjiang; Yoshihisa, Shirayama; Tang Wei; Chushi, Kuroiwa

    2010-02-15

    In China, national regulations and standards for health care waste management were implemented in 2003. To investigate the current status of health care waste management at different levels of health care facilities (HCF) after the implementation of these regulations, one tertiary hospital, one secondary hospital, and four primary health care centers from Binzhou District were visited and 145 medical staff members and 24 cleaning personnel were interviewed. Generated medical waste totaled 1.22, 0.77, and 1.17 kg/bed/day in tertiary, secondary, and primary HCF, respectively. The amount of medical waste generated in primary health care centers was much higher than that in secondary hospitals, which may be attributed to general waste being mixed with medical waste. This study found that the level of the HCF, responsibility for medical waste management in departments and wards, educational background and training experience can be factors that determine medical staff members' knowledge of health care waste management policy. Regular training programs and sufficient provision of protective measures are urgently needed to improve occupational safety for cleaning personnel. Financing and administrative monitoring by local authorities is needed to improve handling practices and the implementation of off-site centralized disposal in primary health care centers.

  3. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  4. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  5. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines “health care provider” as: (1) A doctor of medicine... providing health care services. (b) Others “capable of providing health care services” include only:...

  6. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  7. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  8. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  9. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  10. 45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health care clearinghouse must use the NPI of any health care provider (or subpart(s), if...

  11. Information technology in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lovell, N H; Celler, B G

    1999-07-01

    Appropriate application of information technology in primary health care will extend traditional diagnosis and patient management beyond the doctor's clinic into the everyday living environment. We describe a model of information management in primary health care, and place special emphasis on the emerging areas of clinical decision support, computerised clinical measurements, patient education and network connectivity. Briefly discussed is the design of innovative home monitoring techniques and a telemedicine based communications infrastructure that should improve access to high quality primary health care for all citizens, irrespective of their distance from major urban centres. A preliminary design for a telemedicine-assisted primary health care network is presented, based on this model of information management. The premise is that improvements in health care services and reductions in health care costs can be effected by establishing a continuum of patient care from the patient's home, to the doctor's surgery, to speciality services in hospitals and to other service providers in the health care sector. While, the proposal focuses on new opportunities arising from the imminent introduction of broad band interactive fibre optic networks throughout Australia, the technology and projected data transfers could easily be handled in the short-term using modem access to the standard telephone network. A simple connectivity scheme for system integration is also presented. PMID:10471237

  12. UK national Lesbians and Health Care Survey.

    PubMed

    Fish, Julie; Anthony, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Lesbians are less prevention oriented in their health care behavior than heterosexual women and avoid routine screening tests such as Pap smears and mammograms. The reasons for these differences have been partly attributed to beliefs about risk, (for example, lesbians are said to be at lower risk of cervical cancer) and partly attributed to lesbians' poor experiences of health care because of heterosexism. The Lesbians and Health Care Survey was conducted during the 12 month period of 1997-8. The sample consisted of 1066 lesbians living throughout the UK. The study examined whether risk perceptions, experiences of health care and health-seeking behavior were correlated. Data were analyzed using SPSS to determine which variables were associated with participation in screening. While lesbians were less likely than lesbians in a similar US study to report that their risk of cervical cancer was the same as that of heterosexual women, perceptions of risk were not correlated with participation in screening. We assumed that bad experiences of screening would act as a barrier to attendance; instead, good experiences were associated with the increased likelihood of attendance. These findings under-score the need for a pro-active agenda for lesbian health which addresses the need for culturally competent health care, the sharing of best practice amongst health care providers and the creation of systemic institutional change to improve the care lesbians receive. PMID:15970574

  13. Lean methodology in health care.

    PubMed

    Kimsey, Diane B

    2010-07-01

    Lean production is a process management philosophy that examines organizational processes from a customer perspective with the goal of limiting the use of resources to those processes that create value for the end customer. Lean manufacturing emphasizes increasing efficiency, decreasing waste, and using methods to decide what matters rather than accepting preexisting practices. A rapid improvement team at Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania, implemented a plan, do, check, act cycle to determine problems in the central sterile processing department, test solutions, and document improved processes. By using A3 thinking, a consensus building process that graphically depicts the current state, the target state, and the gaps between the two, the team worked to improve efficiency and safety, and to decrease costs. Use of this methodology has increased teamwork, created user-friendly work areas and processes, changed management styles and expectations, increased staff empowerment and involvement, and streamlined the supply chain within the perioperative area. PMID:20619772

  14. Can health care rationing ever be rational?

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, David A

    2012-01-01

    Americans' appetite for life-prolonging therapies has led to unsustainable growth in health care costs. It is tempting to target older people for health care rationing based on their disproportionate use of health care resources and lifespan already lived, but aged-based rationing is unacceptable to many. Systems reforms can improve the efficiency of health care and may lessen pressure to ration services, but difficult choices still must be made to limit expensive, marginally beneficial interventions. In the absence of agreement on principles to govern health care resource allocation, a fair, open priority-setting process should be created to allow for reasonable disagreement on principles while being seen as legitimate by all stakeholders. At the patient-care level, careful discussions about the benefits and burdens of medical intervention and support for slow medicine - a gentle, family-centered care approach for frail elders - can do much to avoid harming these patients with aggressive yet unwanted medical care while reducing wasteful spending. PMID:22458458

  15. Using electronic health records to help coordinate care.

    PubMed

    Burton, Lynda C; Anderson, Gerard F; Kues, Irvin W

    2004-01-01

    The use of electronic health records that can securely transmit patient data among physicians will help coordinate the care of 60 million Americans with multiple chronic conditions. This article summarizes the different organizations in the United States that are developing this technology. It discusses some of the problems encountered and the current initiatives to resolve them. The article concludes with three recommendations for enhancing care coordination: (1) a common health record, such as the Continuity of Care Record, to facilitate the exchange of clinical information among health providers; (2) regional governance structures to encourage the exchange of clinical data; and (3) payment by purchasers of care, both public and private, to physicians for using electronic health records. PMID:15330973

  16. Coordinated systems of community-based health care delivery: a vehicle for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J M

    1997-10-01

    The need for health care reform in this country continues to be high on the public agenda. Deficits in the access of United States citizens to needed health care services continues, despite recent efforts at health care reform. In addition, the health status of children in this country is of paramount concern. Significant threats to the health of this nation's children have spurred several proposals for reducing the cost of health care while improving the quality of outcomes. A sample of these proposals is analyzed. An example of a health care program which exemplifies one such proposal for health care reform is then discussed. Findings of a recent research project that is relative to the benefits of such a program are provided. PMID:9330504

  17. Health care and equity in India

    PubMed Central

    Balarajan, Yarlini; Selvaraj, S; Subramanian, S V

    2011-01-01

    India’s health system faces the ongoing challenge of responding to the needs of the most disadvantaged members of Indian society. Despite progress in improving access to health care, inequalities by socioeconomic status, geography and gender continue to persist. This is compounded by high out-of-pocket expenditures, with the rising financial burden of health care falling overwhelming on private households, which account for more than three-quarter of health spending in India. Health expenditures are responsible for more than half of Indian households falling into poverty; the impact of this has been increasing pushing around 39 million Indians into poverty each year. In this paper, we identify key challenges to equity in service delivery, and equity in financing and financial risk protection in India. These include imbalanced resource allocation, limited physical access to quality health services and inadequate human resources for health; high out-of-pocket health expenditures, health spending inflation, and behavioral factors that affect the demand for appropriate health care. Complementing other paper in this Series, we argue for the application of certain principles in the pursuit of equity in health care in India. These are the adoption of equity metrics in monitoring, evaluation and strategic planning, investment in developing a rigorous knowledge-base of health systems research; development of more equity-focused process of deliberative decision-making in health reform, and redefinition of the specific responsibilities and accountabilities of key actors. The implementation of these principles, together with strengthening of public health and primary care services, provide an approach for ensuring more equitable health care for India’s population. PMID:21227492

  18. States Can Transform Their Health Care Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Rockey, Paul H.; Rieselbach, Richard E.; Neuhausen, Katherine; Nasca, Thomas J.; Phillips, Robert L.; Sundwall, David N.; Philibert, Ingrid; Yaghmour, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    The United States faces the simultaneous challenges of improving health care access and balancing the specialty and geographic distribution of physicians. A 2014 Institute of Medicine report recommended significant changes in Medicare graduate medical education (GME) funding, to incentivize innovation and increase accountability for meeting national physician workforce needs. Annually, nearly $4 billion of Medicaid funds support GME, with limited accountability for outcomes. Directing these funds toward states' greatest health care workforce needs could address health care access and physician maldistribution issues and make the funding for resident education more accountable. Under the proposed approach, states would use Medicaid funds, in conjunction with Medicare GME funds, to expand existing GME programs and establish new primary care and specialty programs that focus on their population's unmet health care needs. PMID:26140143

  19. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...either of the following: (a) An inquiry from a health care provider to a health plan to determine the status of a health care claim. (b) A response from a health plan to a health care provider about the status of a health care claim....

  20. Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

  1. Health care in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Zirkzee, E J M; Steup-Beekman, G M; Schouffoer, A A; Henquet, S M; Caljouw, M A A; Huizinga, T W J; Vliet Vlieland, T P M

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide more patient-centered care for patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we studied their current satisfaction and preferences regarding future health care delivery. We sent questionnaires to all SLE patients visiting the rheumatology outpatient clinic in Leiden, the Netherlands. The questionnaire comprised three topics: (a) health care needs using a modified version of SLE Needs Questionnaire (range 0-38), (b) satisfaction with care per provider (visual analogue scale, range 0 (not at all)-100 (very satisfied)), and (c) preferences for future healthcare (four items). One hundred and two patients (63 % response) reported an average of 16 (±6) health care needs, with all patients reporting a need in the physical domain. More needs were significantly associated with worse physical functioning and a higher educational level. The average satisfaction score was 73 (±19) with a lower overall satisfaction score being associated with younger age and an educational level higher or lower than average. Regarding preferences for future health care delivery, 75 % of patients showed interest in a yearly standardized medical assessment, 57 % in regular, specialized nurse contacts using internet, 50 % in a yearly inventory on the need for self-management support, and 36 % in an education course. The association of age, education level and physical functioning with health care needs, and/or satisfaction suggest that the delivery of care should be better tailored to the needs of subgroups of patients. PMID:24744153

  2. The French prescription for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Segouin, C; Thayer, C

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, the French government introduced a wide-ranging health care reform which aimed to resolve the problems of rising health expenditure and a levelling off in health sector income. Changes in the regulation of the health care system sought to strengthen quality while improving professional practice. At the same time the changes were intended to encourage greater synergy both between professionals and between the different parts of the system, thus promoting greater cost-effectiveness. The tools designed to achieve these results included: the creation of new regional hospital agencies, the introduction of cash-limited budgets at national and regional level, the launching of a contracting procedure between health authorities and hospitals and the setting up of a new health care accreditation agency. With some signs of improvement in the overall health insurance budgetary situation, the Jospin government seems to be supporting the broad lines of the reform introduced by its predecessor. PMID:11184916

  3. Improving educational preparation for transcultural health care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M

    1998-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that the health care needs of people from black and ethnic minority groups in England are not being met. A growing number of initiatives are being undertaken to remedy the situation. Many of them are focused on health care delivery at local and national levels. However, unless the preparation of health care professionals in the area of multi-cultural health care is appropriate and effective, a great deal of corrective action will continue to have to be taken. Despite 1997 having been the European Year Against Racism, it is still necessary to consider what educational preparation should be like. The article draws on identified inadequacies in health care provision as well as examples of initiatives taken to improve care provision. The author identifies deficiencies in educational preparation and proposes a range of actions to be taken. The article is focused on nursing, midwifery and health visiting education in England, but is deemed to be relevant to all health care professionals not only in Europe but other continents, as they become increasingly international and multi-ethnic. PMID:9887751

  4. Promoting coordination in Norwegian health care1

    PubMed Central

    Romøren, Tor Inge; Torjesen, Dag Olaf; Landmark, Brynjar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Norwegian health care system is well organized within its two main sectors—primary health and long-term care on the one hand, and hospitals and specialist services on the other. However, the relation between them lacks mediating structures. Policy practice Enhancing coordination between primary and secondary health care has been central in Norwegian health care policy in the last decade. In 2003 a committee was appointed to identify coordination problems and proposed a lot of practical and organisational recommendations. It relied on an approach challenging primary and secondary health care in shared geographical regions to take action. However, these proposals were not implemented. In 2008 a new Minister of Health and Care worked out plans under the key term “Coordination Reform”. These reform plans superseded and expanded the previous policy initiatives concerning cooperation, but represented also a shift in focus to a regulative and centralised strategy, including new health legislation, structural reforms and use of economic incentives that are now about to be implemented. Discussion The article analyses the perspectives and proposals of the previous and the recent reform initiatives in Norway and discusses them in relation to integrated care measures implemented in Denmark and Sweden. PMID:22128282

  5. Orientation to Multicultural Health Care in Migrant Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Robert T., II

    This guide furnishes health care providers serving migrant and seasonal farmworkers with information to cope with the complexities of health care delivery in a multiethnic, multicultural environment. Section I provides an introduction to basic cultural concepts that influence the outcome of interactions between providers and their migrant…

  6. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  7. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  8. Reflections on curative health care in Nicaragua.

    PubMed Central

    Slater, R G

    1989-01-01

    Improved health care in Nicaragua is a major priority of the Sandinista revolution; it has been pursued by major reforms of the national health care system, something few developing countries have attempted. In addition to its internationally recognized advances in public health, considerable progress has been made in health care delivery by expanding curative medical services through training more personnel and building more facilities to fulfill a commitment to free universal health coverage. The very uneven quality of medical care is the leading problem facing curative medicine now. Underlying factors include the difficulty of adequately training the greatly increased number of new physicians. Misdiagnosis and mismanagement continue to be major problems. The curative medical system is not well coordinated with the preventive sector. Recent innovations include initiation of a "medicina integral" residency, similar to family practice. Despite its inadequacies and the handicaps of war and poverty, the Nicaraguan curative medical system has made important progress. PMID:2705603

  9. Ideology drives health care reforms in Chile.

    PubMed

    Reichard, S

    1996-01-01

    The health care system of Chile evolved from rather unique historical circumstances to become one of the most progressive in Latin America, offering universal access to all citizens. Since the advent of the Pinochet regime in 1973, Chile has implemented Thatcherite/Reaganite reforms resulting in the privatization of much of the health care system. In the process, state support for health care has been sharply curtailed with deleterious effects on health services. As Chile emerges from the shadow of the Pinochet dictatorship, it faces numerous challenges as it struggles to rebuild its health care system. Other developing nations considering free-market reforms may wish to consider the high costs of the Chilean experiment. PMID:8919962

  10. Health Care Reform: Recommendations and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewit, Eugene M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Health care reform needs to assure coverage to all children regardless of income level or illnesses; address benefits, financing, administration, and delivery systems; provide substantial subsidies to low-income families; be equitable for all people; provide better monitoring of child health; protect and strengthen health providers who assist…

  11. Young People's Experiences of Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anjalee; Medlow, Sharon; Kelk, Norm; Hickie, Ian; Whitwell, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore young people's experiences of mental health care in Australia with the aim of informing the headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation. The interviews revealed that significant numbers of respondents had been aware of their mental health problems for several years before seeking help and…

  12. Space technology in remote health care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belasco, N.

    1974-01-01

    A program for an earth-based remote health service system is discussed as a necessary step for the development and verification of a remote health services spacecraft capability. This demonstration program is described to provide data for developing health care for future manned space missions.

  13. Voice Care Jewels: Nurturing Singers' Vocal Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the importance of vocal health for students. Discusses learning about vocal health care and the techniques used to educate music students about it. Includes an annotated bibliography of resources on vocal health, a survey to administer to students, and "Jewels of Wisdom" useful to music teachers. (CMK)

  14. Primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the United States of America.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, P

    1995-01-01

    Recent reform in the National Health Service has moved general practice towards a more intense market and competition structure. Meanwhile in the United States of America there has been an attempt to modify the free enterprise approach to medical care towards a more socially responsive system. This discussion paper provides a family doctor's perspective of primary care and the maelstrom of health care reform in the USA. The cultural, economic and organizational issues underlying the need for reform are considered in turn, and the current situation with regard to health care provision, medical research, medical education and primary care are outlined. General practitioners in the United Kingdom would do well to pay attention to the effects of market reform occurring in general practice among their American counterparts. PMID:7576850

  15. 78 FR 54967 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ...12-150] Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...the universal service support program mechanism; must not use the data except for purposes...administer the Rural Health Care support mechanism (Health Care Connect Fund,...

  16. 77 FR 42185 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ...02-60; FCC 12-74] Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal...responsible basis for specific Rural Health Care Pilot Program participants that...connectivity and the resulting health care benefits that patients...

  17. 76 FR 37307 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ...02-60; FCC 11-101] Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal...discounted services under the rural health care program. Grandfathered providers...but play a key role in delivering health care services to surrounding...

  18. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY...community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV...response to ``RIN 2900-AN73, Health Care for Homeless Veterans...

  19. 76 FR 57637 - TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program Expansion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ...0720-AB30 TRICARE; Continued Health Care Benefit Program Expansion AGENCY...eligible to purchase Continued Health Care Benefit Program (CHCBP) coverage...program that provides continued health care coverage for eligible...

  20. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Healthcare Connect Fund. Health care providers in the Healthcare...for funding for the site. Health care providers must also notify the Administrator within 30 days of a change in the health care provider's name, site...

  1. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Healthcare Connect Fund. Health care providers in the Healthcare...for funding for the site. Health care providers must also notify the Administrator within 30 days of a change in the health care provider's name, site...

  2. Prfungsordnung fr den Masterstudiengang (M.Sc.) ,,Health Care Management "

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Prüfungsordnung für den Masterstudiengang (M.Sc.) ,,Health Care Management " an der Ernst ,,Health Care Management" (HCM) als Satzung: Inhaltsverzeichnis § 1 Regelungsgegenstand § 2.Sc.) führendes Programm mit der fachlichen Ausrichtung ,,Health Care Management", im folgenden Masterprogramm

  3. Disparities in Health Care Quality among Minority Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3-EF Go to Online Store Disparities in Health Care Quality Among Minority Women Selected Findings From the ... race and ethnicity are combined. Return to Contents Health Care Delivery and Systems Information about health care delivery ...

  4. 38 CFR 17.901 - Provision of health care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Provision of health care. 17.901 Section 17.901...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children...Birth Defects § 17.901 Provision of health care. (a) Spina bifida....

  5. 38 CFR 17.901 - Provision of health care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Provision of health care. 17.901 Section 17.901...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children...Birth Defects § 17.901 Provision of health care. (a) Spina bifida....

  6. 38 CFR 17.901 - Provision of health care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Provision of health care. 17.901 Section 17.901...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children...Birth Defects § 17.901 Provision of health care. (a) Spina bifida....

  7. 38 CFR 17.901 - Provision of health care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Provision of health care. 17.901 Section 17.901...DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children...Birth Defects § 17.901 Provision of health care. (a) Spina bifida....

  8. PREVENTING ABSENTEEISM AND PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN

    E-print Network

    PREVENTING ABSENTEEISM AND PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN BIOLOGICAL Preventing Absenteeism and Promoting Resilience among Health Care Workers in Biological Emergencies A and Promoting Resilience among Health Care Workers in Biological Emergencies A. Lesperance J. Miller1 1

  9. Ecology of health care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide a population-based, Canada-wide picture of health care needs and health care use, and present it in a highly accessible manner, allowing provincial comparisons and comparisons with other international jurisdictions. Design A comparison of the rates of health care use among jurisdictions, using Canadian-population survey data and health administrative data. Setting Provincial jurisdictions across Canada. Main outcome measures Canadian and provincial rates of ill health (presence of chronic conditions) and health care use (contacts with family physicians, contacts with other specialist physicians, contacts with nurses, and hospitalizations) as monthly rates per 1000 population standardized by age and sex. Results The monthly rate per 1000 population of having at least 1 chronic condition ranged from 524 in Quebec to 638 in Nova Scotia; contacts with family physicians ranged from 158 in Quebec to 295 in British Columbia; contacts with other physician specialists ranged from 53 in Saskatchewan to 79 in Ontario; and contacts with nurses ranged from 23 in British Columbia to 41 in Quebec. Hospital stays ranged from 8 to 11 per 1000 people, and rates were similar among the provinces. Conclusion Recognizing the differences among jurisdictions is critical to informing health care policy across the country. Differences persisted when rates were standardized for different age and sex compositions in the provinces. This article provides a straightforward methodology using publicly available data that can be employed in each province to examine, in the future, the evolution over time of health care use by provincial jurisdictions. PMID:25971762

  10. The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Patricia A; Mecklenburg, Robert S; Martin, Lindsay A

    2015-01-01

    To tame its soaring health care costs, intel tried many popular approaches: "consumer-driven health care" offerings such as high-deductible/low-premium plans, on-site clinics and employee wellness programs. But by 2009 intel realized that those programs alone would not enable the company to solve the problem, because they didn't affect its root cause: the steadily rising cost of the care employees and their families were receiving. Intel projected that its health care expenditures would hit a whopping $1 billion by 2012. So the company decided to try a novel approach. As a large purchaser of health services and with expertise in quality improvement and supplier management, intel was uniquely positioned to drive transformation in its local health care market. The company decided that it would manage the quality and cost of its health care suppliers with the same rigor it applied to its equipment suppliers by monitoring quality and cost. It spearheaded a collaborative effort in Portland, Oregon, that included two health systems, a plan administrator, and a major government employer. So far the Portland collaborative has reduced treatment costs for certain medical conditions by 24% to 49%, improved patient satisfaction, and eliminated over 10,000 hours worth of waste in the two health systems' business processes. PMID:26540959

  11. Evolution of Taiwan's health care system.

    PubMed

    Rachel Lu, Jui-Fen; Chiang, Tung-Liang

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to present an overview of the evolutionary policy process in reforming the health care system in Taiwan, through dissecting the forces of knowledge, social-cultural context, economic resources and political system. We further identify factors, which had a significant impact on health care reform policies in Taiwan through illustrative policy examples. One of the most illuminating examples highlighted is the design and implementation of a single-payer National Health Insurance (NHI) program in 1995, after nearly five years of planning efforts (1988-1993) and a two-year legislative marathon. The NHI is one of the most popular social programs ever undertaken in the history of Taiwan, which greatly enhances financial protection against unexpected medical expenses and assures access to health services. Nonetheless, health care reform still has an unfinished agenda. Despite high satisfaction ratings, Taiwan's health care system today is encountering mounting pressure for new reforms as a result of its rapidly aging population, economic stagnation, and imbalanced NHI checkbook. Although there may exist some heterogeneous system characteristics and challenges among different health care systems around the world, Taiwan's experiences in reforming its health care system for the past few decades may provide valuable lessons for countries going through rapid economic and political transition. PMID:20199715

  12. Health care evaluation, utilitarianism and distortionary taxes.

    PubMed

    Calcott, P

    2000-09-01

    Cost Utility Analysis (CUA) and Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) are methods to evaluate allocations of health care resources. Problems are raised for both methods when income taxes do not meet the first best optimum. This paper explores the implications of three ways that taxes may fall short of this ideal. First, taxes may be distortionary. Second, they may be designed and administered without reference to information that is used by providers of health care. Finally, the share of tax revenue that is devoted to health care may be suboptimal. The two methods are amended to account for these factors. PMID:11184801

  13. Value-based partnering in health care.

    PubMed

    Young, D W; Pinakiewicz, D C; McCarthy, S M; Barrett, D; Kenagy, J

    2001-01-01

    Many companies are beginning to focus on value in their health care purchasing decisions, and some are going beyond value-based purchasing to value-based partnering. Value-based partnering recognizes the interdependencies among stakeholder groups in the health care system and creates a strategic reason for them to exchange information and create long-term strategic alliances. This article discusses the principles of value-based partnering, impediments to practicing it and its future role in the health care system. PMID:11372470

  14. Future developments in health care performance management

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

  15. Health Care Robotics: A Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Ali, Khaled; Seraji, Homayoun

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the approach followed in the design of a service robot for health care applications. Under the auspices of the NASA Technology Transfer program, a partnership was established between JPL and RWI, a manufacturer of mobile robots, to design and evaluate a mobile robot for health care assistance to the elderly and the handicapped. The main emphasis of the first phase of the project is on the development on a multi-modal operator interface and its evaluation by health care professionals and users. This paper describes the architecture of the system, the evaluation method used, and some preliminary results of the user evaluation.

  16. A model for implementing integrative practice in health care agencies.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Chris; Arthur, Heather M

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been increased awareness and use of complementary/alternative therapies (CAM) in many countries without the health care infrastructure to support it. The National Centre for Complementary and Alternative Medicine referred to the combining of mainstream medical therapies and CAM as integrative medicine. The creation of integrative health care teams will definitely result in redefining roles, but more importantly in a change in how services are delivered. The purpose of this paper is to describe a model of the necessary health care agency resources to support an integrative practice model. A logic model is used to depict the findings of a review of current evidence. Logic models are designed to show relationships between the goals of a program or initiative, the resources to achieve desired outputs and the activities that lead to outcomes. The four major resource categories necessary for implementing integrative care are within the domains of a) professional and research development, b) health human resource planning, c) regulation and legislation and d) practice and management in clinical areas. It was concluded that the system outcomes from activities within these resource categories should lead to freedom of choice in health care; a culturally sensitive health care system and a broader spectrum of services for achieving public health goals. PMID:21614155

  17. Integration: the firm and the health care sector.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, Miriam J; France, George

    2014-07-01

    Integration in health care is a key goal of health reform in United States and England. Yet past efforts in the 1990s to better integrate the delivery system were of limited success. Building on work by Bevan and Janus on delivery integration, this article explores integration through the lens of economic theories of integration. Firms generally integrate to increase efficiency through economies of scale, to improve their market power, and resolve the transaction costs involved with multiple external suppliers. Using the United States and England as laboratories, we apply concepts of economic integration to understand why integration does or does not occur in health care, and whether expectations of integrating different kinds of providers (hospital, primary care) and health and social services are realistic. Current enthusiasm for a more integrated health care system expands the scope of integration to include social services in England, but retains the focus on health care in the United States. We find mixed applicability of economic theories of integration. Economies of scale have not played a significant role in stimulating integration in both countries. Managerial incentives for monopoly or oligopoly may be more compelling in the United States, since hospitals seek higher prices and more leverage over payers. In both countries the concept of transaction costs could explain the success of new payment and budgeting methods, since health care integration ultimately requires resolving transaction costs across different delivery organizations. PMID:24759287

  18. Aversion to health inequalities and priority setting in health care.

    PubMed

    Bleichrodt, Han; Crainich, David; Eeckhoudt, Louis

    2008-12-01

    Traditionally aversion to health inequality is modelled through a concave utility function over health outcomes. Bleichrodt et al. [Bleichrodt, H., Diecidue E., Quiggin J., 2004. Equity weights in the allocation of health care: the rank-dependent QALY model. Journal of Health Economics 23, 157-171] have suggested a "dual" approach based on the introduction of explicit equity weights. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how priorities in health care are determined in the framework of these two models. It turns out that policy implications are highly sensitive to the choice of the model that will represent aversion to health inequality. PMID:18849085

  19. Mercy health promoter: A paradigm for just health care

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter A.; Schadt, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The foreign-born population in the United States, according to the “Current Populations Report” published in 2010, is estimated to exceed 39.9 million, or “12.9 percent of the U.S. population.” The increase in foreign-born peoples and their need for health care is a complicated issue facing many cities, health systems and hospitals. Over the course of the past few years Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia has treated increasing numbers of foreign-born African patients. The majority have been presenting in the late stages of disease. The increase of foreign-born documented and undocumented African patients seen by Mercy Hospitals seems to reflect a foreign-born population “boom” in Philadelphia over the past decade. To meet the needs of this growing population, the Mercy Hospital Task Force on African Immigration and the Institute of Catholic Bioethics at Saint Joseph’s University designed a program that centers on the third world concept of “Health Promoters.” This program is intended to serve as one possible solution for hospitals to cost-effectively manage the care of this growing percentage of foreign-born individuals in the population. This notion of a “Health Promoter” program in Philadelphia is unique as one of those rare occasions when a third world concept is being utilized in a first world environment. It is also unique in that it can serve as a paradigm for other hospitals in the United States to meet the growing need of health care for the undocumented population. As of November 2012 the Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia clinic became operative for patients who were referred from the Health Promoter clinics. To date, a total of forty-two patients have actively participated in the screenings, sixteen of which have been referred to Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia clinic for further evaluation. More than 75% of patient referrals were a result of high blood pressure. According to the American Medical Association, readings of 140–159 mmHg and above are indicative of stage 1 hypertension. Among those who presented at the Health Promoter screenings the mean systolic pressure for males was 140 mmHg and for females was 140.48 mmHg. PMID:24084364

  20. Health care – an everlasting challenge in temporal and spatial domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxi

    2010-01-01

    Health care is an everlasting challenge that requires effort at all levels, from national and organizational to individual domains, over a long-term period. This article reviews the historical development of health care-related issues worldwide and accentuates the necessity of health care in the current era. Through investigating the historical background in both the occidental and the oriental worlds and the latest achievements from academic and industrial endeavors, many lessons can be learnt, and as a result, an integrative strategy is proposed to meet today’s pressing needs. A government-funded project, “Challenge to 100 years of age”, which involved more than 600 residents in west Aizu village, lasted over 15 years. After reviewing its outcomes, a metrology of health based upon the three-dimensional phase space, which integrates with social well-being, mental status, and physical condition for a lifelong span, is advocated as a measure of the holistic view of health state. PMID:21197368

  1. Understanding and Measuring Health Care Insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Tomsik, Philip E.; Smith, Samantha; Mason, Mary Jane; Zyzanski, Stephen J.; Stange, Kurt C.; Werner, James J.; Flocke, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To define the concept of “health care insecurity,” validate a new self-report measure, and examine the impact of beginning care at a free clinic on uninsured patients’ health care insecurity. Methods Consecutive new patients presenting at a free clinic completed 15 items assessing domains of health care insecurity (HCI) at their first visit and again four to eight weeks later. Psychometrics and change of the HCI measure were examined. Results The HCI measure was found to have high internal consistency (?=0.94). Evidence of concurrent validity was indicated by negative correlation with VR-12 health-related quality of life physical and mental health components and positive correlation with the Perceived Stress Scale. Predictive validity was shown among the 83% of participants completing follow-up: HCI decreased after beginning care at a free clinic (p<.001). Conclusion Reliably assessing patient experience of health care insecurity is feasible and has potential to inform efforts to improve quality and access to care among underserved populations. PMID:25418245

  2. The ORIGINS of Primary Health Care and SELECTIVE Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cueto, Marcos

    2004-01-01

    I present a historical study of the role played by the World Health Organization and UNICEF in the emergence and diffusion of the concept of primary health care during the late 1970s and early 1980s. I have analyzed these organizations’ political context, their leaders, the methodologies and technologies associated with the primary health care perspective, and the debates on the meaning of primary health care. These debates led to the development of an alternative, more restricted approach, known as selective primary health care. My study examined library and archival sources; I cite examples from Latin America. PMID:15514221

  3. Financing health care in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Taha, Nabila Fahed; Sharif, Amer Ahmad; Blair, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Newcomers to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) health care system often enquire about the way in which UAE health services are financed particularly when funding issues affect eligibility for treatment. The UAE ranks alongside many western counties on measures of life expectancy and child mortality but because of the unique population structure spends less of its national income on health. In the past as a wealthy country the UAE had no difficulty ensuring universal access to a comprehensive range of services but the health needs of the UAE population are becoming more complex and like many countries the UAE health system is facing the twin challenges of quality and cost. To meet these challenges new models of health care financing are being introduced. In this brief article we will describe the evolution of UAE health financing, its current state and likely future developments. PMID:24228347

  4. Validation of the Health Care Surrogate Preferences Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckey, Julia W.; Abell, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in health care technology have increased the number of health care decisions made by acute care patients and those who act on their behalf, known as health care surrogates. This study reports on the validation of a new measure, the Health Care Surrogate Preferences Scale. Designed to assess the willingness of adults to perform and…

  5. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... care services. (b) Others capable of providing health care services include only: (1)...

  6. 29 CFR 825.125 - Definition of health care provider.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Definition of health care provider. 825.125 Section 825.125... Definition of health care provider. (a) The Act defines health care provider as: (1) A doctor of medicine or... care services. (b) Others capable of providing health care services include only: (1)...

  7. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    PubMed

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10105044

  8. THE NEOLIBERAL TURN IN AMERICAN HEALTH CARE.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Leaving millions both uninsured and underinsured, the Affordable Care Act does not create a system of universal health care in the United States. To understand its shortcomings, we have to understand it as part of a historic shift in the political economy of American health care. This "neoliberal turn" began as a reaction against the welfare state as it expanded during the New Deal and post-World War II period. What began as a movement associated with philosophers like Friedrich Hayek ultimately had a powerful impact via the attraction of powerful corporate sponsors and political supporters, and it was to historically transform American health care thought and organization. In health policy circles, for example, it can be seen in a rising emphasis on "moral hazard," overuse, and cost sharing above a concern with universalism and equity. It was likewise manifested by the corporatization of the health maintenance organization and the rise of the "consumer-driven" health care movement. By the time of the health care reform debate, the influence of corporate "stakeholders" was to prove predominant. These developments, however, must be construed as connected parts of a much larger political transformation, reflected in rising inequality and privatization, occurring both domestically and internationally. PMID:26460446

  9. Implementation of Advanced Health Care Technology into Existing Competency-Based Health Care Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemovage, Shirley

    A project was undertaken to develop new curriculum materials that could be incorporated into an existing health assistant program to cover recent advances in health care technology. Area physicians' offices were toured and meetings were held with administrators of local hospitals in order to discover what kinds of advances in health care

  10. Benefits and Systems of Care for Maternal and Child Health under Health Care Reform: Workshop Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Cynthia H., Ed.

    This report discusses the health care needs of and benefits for women, children, and adolescents in light of national health care reform proposals put forth in 1994, and is based on presentations and discussions at an invitational workshop on maternal and child health. The report asserts that since women and children are disproportionately…

  11. Blogging and the health care manager.

    PubMed

    Malvey, Donna; Alderman, Barbara; Todd, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    The use of blogs in the workplace has emerged as a communication tool that can rapidly and simultaneously connect managers with their employees, customers, their peers, and other key stakeholders. Nowhere is this connection more critical than in health care, especially because of the uncertainty surrounding health care reform and the need for managers to have access to timely and authentic information. However, most health care managers have been slow to join the blogging bandwagon. This article examines the phenomenon of blogging and offers a list of blogs that every health care manager should read and why. This article also presents a simplified step-by-step process to set up a blog. PMID:19433934

  12. Essays on health care delivery and financing

    E-print Network

    Chan, David C. (David Cchimin)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains essays on health care delivery and financing. Chapter 1 studies the effect of organizational structure on physician behavior. I investigate this by studying emergency department (ED) physicians who ...

  13. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  14. 47 CFR 54.633 - Health care provider contribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider contribution. 54.633... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Healthcare Connect Fund § 54.633 Health care provider contribution. (a) Health care provider contribution. All health...

  15. Improving Health Care for Assisted Living Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Mach, John R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how medical care is delivered to older people in assisted living (AL) settings and to suggest ways for improving it. Design and Methods: We present a review of the limited research available on health care for older AL residents and on building testable models of better ways to organize primary…

  16. Model Child Care Health Policies. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, this document compiles model health policies intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the document presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following areas: (1)…

  17. Organization theory. Analyzing health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Cors, W K

    1997-02-01

    Organization theory (OT) is a tool that can be applied to analyze and understand health care organizations. Transaction cost theory is used to explain, in a unifying fashion, the myriad changes being undertaken by different groups of constituencies in health care. Agency theory is applied to aligning economic incentives needed to ensure Integrated Delivery System (IDS) success. By using tools such as OT, a clearer understanding of organizational changes is possible. PMID:10164970

  18. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

    PubMed Central

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  19. Primary health care in rural Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Dressekie, D

    1988-12-01

    1977 marked the year that the Ministry of Health (MOH) adopted the policy to promote primary health care (PHC) in Jamaica. 1977 health data supported the need for PHC. For example, the birth rate was high (30%), diarrhea and enteric infections were the leading causes of child mortality, and the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases was high. Health committees were formed which provided links with organizations that promoted PHC. Community participation would be crucial to its success. Further, community members were recruited and trained to work as community health aides. The PHC policy included integrating all services--preventive, curative, and rehabilitative--that could be provided at the community level. Specialized preventive and curative medical services would be accessible and feed into the PHC system. Recognizing the need for health care for the entire population, MOH concentrated its efforts in areas where the undeserved and most vulnerable individuals lived, principally in rural areas. The rural population comprised 58% of the population. After a decade of PHC in Jamaica, however, health care has not been dispensed equitably. Constraints to achieving PHC for all include insufficient number of trained personnel, inadequate facilities, and shortage of funds. For example, a substantial expenditure was needed to establish the PHC infrastructure, to allocate manpower, and to provide management of information and technology. Yet the Government's actual expenditure on health care fell 2.9%. Further, traditional attitudes of health care, where users perceive physicians and treatment as the center of health care, continued and often prevailed. In 1987, the Government declared it would reform the national health service so as to provide PHC to all. PMID:3150456

  20. Applying business management models in health care.

    PubMed

    Trisolini, Michael G

    2002-01-01

    Most health care management training programmes and textbooks focus on only one or two models or conceptual frameworks, but the increasing complexity of health care organizations and their environments worldwide means that a broader perspective is needed. This paper reviews five management models developed for business organizations and analyses issues related to their application in health care. Three older, more 'traditional' models are first presented. These include the functional areas model, the tasks model and the roles model. Each is shown to provide a valuable perspective, but to have limitations if used in isolation. Two newer, more 'innovative' models are next discussed. These include total quality management (TQM) and reengineering. They have shown potential for enabling dramatic improvements in quality and cost, but have also been found to be more difficult to implement. A series of 'lessons learned' are presented to illustrate key success factors for applying them in health care organizations. In sum, each of the five models is shown to provide a useful perspective for health care management. Health care managers should gain experience and training with a broader set of business management models. PMID:12476639

  1. Big data in health care.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Pieter

    2013-02-01

    By identifying and applying advanced revenue cycle analytics, healthcare providers can: Free up cash. Find new revenues without harming core services. Improve productivity, profitability, and patient care. PMID:23413667

  2. The Impact of Disasters on Populations With Health and Health Care Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer R.; Wilson, Sacoby; Brock-Martin, Amy; Glover, Saundra; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2010-01-01

    Context A disaster is indiscriminate in whom it affects. Limited research has shown that the poor and medically underserved, especially in rural areas, bear an inequitable amount of the burden. Objective To review the literature on the combined effects of a disaster and living in an area with existing health or health care disparities on a community’s health, access to health resources, and quality of life. Methods We performed a systematic literature review using the following search terms: disaster, health disparities, health care disparities, medically underserved, and rural. Our inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed, US studies that discussed the delayed or persistent health effects of disasters in medically underserved areas. Results There has been extensive research published on disasters, health disparities, health care disparities, and medically underserved populations individually, but not collectively. Conclusions The current literature does not capture the strain of health and health care disparities before and after a disaster in medically underserved communities. Future disaster studies and policies should account for differences in health profiles and access to care before and after a disaster. PMID:20389193

  3. The Disabled: Their Health Care and Health Insurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Michele

    This paper examines issues concerning access to health care for persons with disabilities, specifically the health status of the disabled, utilization and cost of services, and a comparison of health insurance coverage of persons with and without disabilities. Three age groups (children, working-age adults, and the elderly) are considered. Data…

  4. Physician workforce planning in an era of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Grover, Atul; Niecko-Najjum, Lidia M

    2013-12-01

    Workforce planning in an era of health care reform is a challenge as both delivery systems and patient demographics change. Current workforce projections are based on a future health care system that is either an identified "ideal" or a modified version of the existing system. The desire to plan for such an "ideal system," however, may threaten access to necessary services if it does not come to fruition or is based on theoretical rather than empirical data.Historically, workforce planning that concentrated only on an "ideal system" has been centered on incorrect assumptions. Two examples of such failures presented in the 1980s when the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee recommended a decrease in the physician workforce on the basis of predetermined "necessary and appropriate" services and in the 1990s, when planners expected managed care and health maintenance organizations to completely overhaul the existing health care system. Neither accounted for human behavior, demographic changes, and actual demand for health care services, leaving the nation ill-prepared to care for an aging population with chronic disease.In this article, the authors argue that workforce planning should begin with the current system and make adjustments based on empirical data that accurately reflect current trends. Actual health care use patterns will become evident as systemic changes are realized-or not-over time. No single approach will solve the looming physician shortage, but the danger of planning only for an ideal system is being unprepared for the actual needs of the population. PMID:24128627

  5. The Health and Social Care Act 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although the National Health Service (NHS) is regarded as a national treasure, it is no longer immune from the colossal financial pressures brought about by global recession. Economic sustainability has largely driven the reform process leading to the Health and Social Care Act (HSCA) 2012, however; other considerations have also played a role in the journey to turn the health and social care service into an institution which is fit for the 21st-century needs. This article examines the impact of the HSCA 2012 on those made vulnerable through mental ill health. It then considers three issues: First, whether parity between mental and physical health can have life beyond political rhetoric; second, what impact driving up efficiency within the NHS will have upon mental health patients; and finally, the extent to which the personalisation agenda can be meaningfully applied within the mental health context. PMID:26273147

  6. Mental health stigma and primary health care decisions

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Patrick W.; Mittal, Dinesh; Reaves, Christina M.; Haynes, Tiffany F.; Han, Xiaotong; Morris, Scott; Sullivan, Greer

    2015-01-01

    People with serious mental illness have higher rates of mortality and morbidity due to physical illness. In part, this occurs because primary care and other health providers sometimes make decisions contrary to typical care standards. This might occur because providers endorse mental illness stigma, which seems inversely related to prior personal experience with mental illness and mental health care. In this study, 166 health care providers (42.2% primary care, 57.8% mental health practice) from the Veteran's Affairs (VA) medical system completed measures of stigma characteristics, expected adherence, and subsequent health decisions (referral to a specialist and refill pain prescription) about a male patient with schizophrenia who was seeking help for low back pain due to arthritis. Research participants reported comfort with previous mental health interventions. Path analyses showed participants who endorsed stigmatizing characteristics of the patient were more likely to believe he would not adhere to treatment and hence, less likely to refer to a specialist or refill his prescription. Endorsement of stigmatizing characteristics was inversely related to comfort with one's previous mental health care. Implications of these findings will inform a program meant to enhance VA provider attitudes about people with mental illness, as well as their health decisions. PMID:24774076

  7. [Ethical aspects of health care economy].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, P W

    2000-08-01

    One of the present-day problems which illustrates several ethical issues is the development of health care, generally referred to as health policy. For over 25 years there has been a debate relating to runaway costs in health care. This led to various retrenchment attempts which failed altogether and will probably continue to fail in the future unless there is a radical change in approaching the subject. Brief explanations regarding the economies of public health care will show that by means of this science statements concerning the consequences as regards costs and efficiency can be made, but the material organisation of a health care system remains somewhat vague. The same applies to ethics as a science. To be able to explain how a health care system can be organised, one has to take a stand based on the system of values relevant to the particular individual. Yet the question is not, whether a certain concept is right or good, but rather to what extent it is plausible. It can be illustrated that the case against restricting health services cannot be justified. Following this there will be a discussion as to who is actually authorized to enforce such restrictions in a society with competing value systems, and which criteria can be applied. Finally the author will try to conceptualize the situation, taking a stand based upon his own views and beliefs. PMID:11022569

  8. Public Health Implications of Substandard Correctional Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Restum, Zulficar Gregory

    2005-01-01

    US citizens face a growing threat of contracting communicable diseases owing to the high recidivism rate in state and federal prisons, poor screening and treatment of prisoners, and inferior follow-up health care upon their release. Insufficient education about communicable diseases—for prisoners and citizens alike—and other problems, such as prejudice against prisoners, escalating costs, and an unreliable correctional health care delivery system for inmates, all contribute to a public health problem that requires careful examination and correction for the protection of everyone involved. PMID:16186448

  9. Access to Health Care and Control of ABCs of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuanping; Bullard, Kai McKeever; Gregg, Edward W.; Beckles, Gloria L.; Williams, Desmond E.; Barker, Lawrence E.; Albright, Ann L.; Imperatore, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the relationship between access to health care and diabetes control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2008, we identified 1,221 U.S. adults (age 18–64 years) with self-reported diabetes. Access was measured by current health insurance coverage, number of times health care was received over the past year, and routine place to go for health care. Diabetes control measures included the proportion of people with A1C >9%, blood pressure ?140/90 mmHg, and non-HDL cholesterol ?130 mg/dL. RESULTS An estimated 16.0% of known diabetic adults were uninsured. Diabetes control profiles were worse among uninsured than among insured persons (A1C >9% [34.1 vs. 16.5%, P = 0.002], blood pressure ?140/90 mmHg [31.8 vs. 22.8%, P < 0.05], and non-HDL cholesterol ?130 mg/dL [67.1 vs. 65.4%, P = 0.7]). Compared with insured persons, uninsured persons were more likely to have A1C >9% (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio 2.4 [95% CI 1.2–4.7]). Compared with those who reported four or more health care visits in the past year, those who reported no health care visits were more likely to have A1C >9% (5.5 [1.2–26.3]) and blood pressure ?140/90 mmHg (1.9 [1.1–3.4]). CONCLUSIONS In people with diabetes, lack of health care coverage is associated with poor glycemic control. In addition, low use of health care service is associated with poor glucose and blood pressure control. PMID:22522664

  10. Rainbows: a primary health care initiative for primary schools.

    PubMed

    Munns, Ailsa; Forde, Karen A; Krouzecky, Miriam; Shields, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Within the current Australian health system is the understanding of a need to change from the predominate biomedical model to incorporate a comprehensive primary health care centred approach, embracing the social contexts of health and wellbeing. Recent research investigated the benefits of the primary health care philosophy and strategies in relation to the Rainbows programme which addresses grief and loss in primary school aged students in Western Australia. A multidisciplinary collaboration between the Western Australian Departments of Health and Education enabled community school health nurse coordinators to train teacher facilitators in the implementation of Rainbows, enabling support for students and their parents. The results of this qualitative study indicate that all participants regard Rainbows as effective, with many perceived benefits to students and their families. PMID:26281402

  11. Risk-sharing in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Jajoo, U N

    1992-01-01

    Kasturba Hospital in Sevagram, India, has helped to initiate an outreach health program for nearby villages. A health insurance scheme has evolved where the community contributes sorghum for a fund and participates in decision-making and the supervision of village health workers. Contributors are entitled to free primary care and subsidized referral care. Only villages where at least 75% of the poor community agreed to enroll in the health insurance scheme were adopted by the hospital. The hospital offers insured persons free inpatient treatment for unexpected illness and a 75% subsidy for care during normal pregnancy or with cataract and hernia operations. The mobile health team, comprising auxiliary nurse-midwife, social worker, and village health worker, provides maternal and child health services in the localities. The village health workers provide symptomatic drug treatment, exercise a preventive role with the help of visiting health team members, and refer patients to hospital. The auxiliary nurse-midwife and social workers organize visits for vaccination and provide maternal and child health care. The doctor in charge treats patients in the hospital and trains village health workers. More than 75% of the villages in the area have enrolled in the scheme over the last 10 years. No vaccine-preventable illness (measles, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus) was reported in children or mothers after mass immunization was instituted, no maternal deaths have occurred during the past 10 years, and perinatal mortality has fallen steeply. The village health teams are now regarded as counselors on health-related matters, among them drinking-water supplies, irrigation, and programs for income generation. It is necessary to regulate the private health sector, including professionals, the drug industry, and investors. If outpatient services are opened up to the private sector, a system of universal medical insurance, financed by local government, should operate. PMID:1418330

  12. Incorporation of the health care system in the west

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A reflection is made, from an interpretative perspective, on the historical evolution of health care in the West. It starts from the moment that this became a way to intervene the sick and an instrument for healing diseases, focusing on original documents and written sources which account for results of historical research, which range from XV century until today. To do this, it tries to understand the health care as an ideographic body of knowledge consisting of five pieces of a puzzle composed by: the state policy of hospitals accumulation implemented in Spain, the accumulation of medical practices in what is currently Germany, the hospital wards in England, the nosological rationality in France, and the US sanitizing machine; all these movements as producers of closely linked health care developments, that are nothing more than collective actions regulated by social norms around health. PMID:26600630

  13. Suicides in Users of Mental Health Care Services: Treatment Characteristics and Hindsight Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Annemiek; Kerkhof, Ad J. F. M.; Robben, Paul B. M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to describe the patient and treatment characteristics of a sample of 505 suicides by mental health care patients, and to determine how clinicians view the care provided and what they learned. The results indicate that the quality of mental health care for suicidal patients could be improved by focusing on communication among…

  14. Humanitarian and civic assistance health care training and cultural awareness promoting health care pluralism.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Rose E

    2013-05-01

    Integration between traditional and contemporary health care in a host nation can be beneficial to nation- and capacity-building and, subsequently, to the overall health of the society. "Traditional" health care in this sense refers to the indigenous health care system in the host nation, which includes characteristic religious or cultural practices, whereas "contemporary" health care is also known as "conventional" or "Westernized"; integration is a synchronization of these two health care forms. However, the choice of integration depends on the political and cultural situation of the nation in which the Department of Defense health care personnel are intervening. Thus, cultural awareness training is essential to ensure the success of missions related to global health and in promoting a health care system that is most beneficial to the society. The present study attempts to show the benefits of both cultural training and health care integration, and how adequately evaluating their efficacy has been problematic. The author proposes that determinants of this efficacy are better documentation collection, extensive predeployment cultural awareness and sensitivity training, and extensive after-action reports for future development. PMID:23756013

  15. The Italian health-care system.

    PubMed

    France, George; Taroni, Francesco; Donatini, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    Italy's national health service is statutorily required to guarantee the uniform provision of comprehensive care throughout the country. However, this is complicated by the fact that, constitutionally, responsibility for health care is shared between the central government and the 20 regions. There are large and growing differences in regional health service organisation and provision. Public health-care expenditure has absorbed a relatively low share of gross domestic product, although in the last 25 years it has consistently exceeded central government forecasts. Changes in payment systems, particularly for hospital care, have helped to encourage organisational appropriateness and may have contributed to containing expenditure. Tax sources used to finance the Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN) have become somewhat more regressive. The limited evidence on vertical equity suggests that the SSN ensures equal access to primary care but lower income groups face barriers to specialist care. The health status of Italians has improved and compares favourably with that in other countries, although regional disparities persist. PMID:16161196

  16. Major concepts of health care economics.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Victor R

    2015-03-01

    This article applies major economic concepts, such as supply, demand, monopoly, monopsony, adverse selection, and moral hazard, to central features of U.S. health care. These illustrations help explain some of the principal problems of health policy-high cost and the uninsured-and why solutions are difficult to obtain. PMID:25732280

  17. Health and Safety in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sells, Clifford J.; Paeth, Susan

    1987-01-01

    Basic health and day care policies and procedures should be implemented and closely monitored with the help of a health consultant, particularly in terms of respiratory tract, enteric, skin, invasive bacterial, and multiple system infections; Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; vaccine preventable diseases; and general safety procedures.…

  18. Nadon'sHealth-careInlorlladon

    E-print Network

    of information across the health- care enterprise. A ccording to the Centers for Medicare and Med- icaid Services National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC)and formulated financial incentives forthe;www.lhe.net).anlnitlatlve by healthcare professionals and Industry to Improve the way healthcare computer systems share Information

  19. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... (54 FR 8735). The criteria for psychiatric HPSAs were expanded to mental health HPSAs on January 22, 1992 (57 FR 2473). Currently funded PHS Act programs use only the primary medical care, mental health... designated HPSAs and supersedes the HPSA lists published in the Federal Register on February 20, 2002 (67...

  20. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  1. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  2. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  3. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  4. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National...

  5. Health care financing: recent experience in Africa.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, D W

    1983-01-01

    The economic realities of health sector development in Africa has been analyzed in this paper. Both the global and national macroeconomic context has been defined. Given the available data, it is clear that most African countries face increasingly serious economic realities, such as slow or even declining economic growth (per capita), a depressed food production situation, severe balance of payments crises, and increasing dependence on external financial assistance. Given the limited but increasingly available 1981 and 1982 data, the economic situation in many countries is more constrained than those indicated by the data contained in this paper. In this context, the potential competitive situation facing governmental health care systems was reviewed. In addition, the diversity in the sources of health expenditures between countries in Africa was highlighted. These data provide clear evidence that governments clearly do not finance the entire health care system and that individual payment for service in many countries represent an important source of revenue for many care providers in various health care systems operating in any given country. The potential for governments to finance either an expansion of or improvements to the government component of their health care systems is then reviewed. The highlights of this analysis include the following points. First, the tax structure in many African countries is highly dependent on export and import duties, which in turn creates dependency on sustained foreign demand for exports.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6422557

  6. Primary health care in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R B

    1981-08-01

    In scarcely more than 30 years, the People's Republic of China has progressed from limited health care available only to a privileged few to a countrywide system providing basic services to one fifth of the world's population. The author gives his impressions of the current situation, based on a recent visit. PMID:7255300

  7. INFORMAL CARE AND CAREGIVER’S HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    DO, YOUNG KYUNG; NORTON, EDWARD C.; STEARNS, SALLY C.; VAN HOUTVEN, COURTNEY HAROLD

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to measure the causal effect of informal caregiving on the health and health care use of women who are caregivers, using instrumental variables. We use data from South Korea, where daughters and daughters-in-law are the prevalent source of caregivers for frail elderly parents and parents-in-law. A key insight of our instrumental variable approach is that having a parent-in-law with functional limitations increases the probability of providing informal care to that parent-in-law, but a parent-in-law’s functional limitation does not directly affect the daughter-in-law’s health. We compare results for the daughter-in-law and daughter samples to check the assumption of the excludability of the instruments for the daughter sample. Our results show that providing informal care has significant adverse effects along multiple dimensions of health for daughter-in-law and daughter caregivers in South Korea. PMID:24753386

  8. The strategy, cost, and progress of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Boland, R G; Young, M E

    1982-01-01

    Since the 1978 Alma-Alta International Conference on Primary Health Care, investments in primary health care projects throughout the world have been increasing. However, with the exception of China, no national projects have demonstrated the ability to provide longterm comprehensive primary health care in conditions of chronic proverty with local resources. Programs in China, Cuba, and Tanzania have achieved primary health care coverage for 100% of their populations. These countries have in common strong governments that have been able to implement radical changes in the health system. Individual freedoms in these societies have been restricted in favor of improved health. Programs in Nigeria, India, and Afghanistan have been less successful, although some progress has been made in projects using external funds, inspite of a strong committment by the governments. Efforts to reorganize the health care system have lacked needed political strength. Currently, these systems have resulted in less than complete coverage, without the prospect of attaining acceptable levels of infant mortality, life expectancy and net population growth. Economic, political, and cultural costs may be high as for example, national security or traditional practices are traded to achieve primary health care with 100% coverage. WHO has devised a global strategy which, when translated into operational policies will need to address several unresolved issues. These include recognizing that the goal of comprehensive primary health care may not be justified given the lack of progress to date and that effective, selective primary health care focused on nutrition, immunization, control of endemic diseases, and health education may be a more realistic goal; and that a system of international social security may be an effective means of assuring that the poorest countries are able to provide care. In addition, questions concerning continued funding of programs that can never be locally funded, the role of traditional healers in a system of free care, the supply of basic medications, the need for audit systems, realistic expectations of costs, the role of international agencies and the distribution of resources between more developed and less developed countries will need to be addressed. PMID:7171889

  9. Inquiries into health care: learning or lynching?

    PubMed

    Paterson, Ron

    2008-11-28

    There is a spectrum of reasons for inquiries into health care: learning, catharsis, reassurance, and accountability. The tension is immediately obvious. Is the primary purpose learning or lynching? We need to learn from major health inquiries. New Zealand needs a culture of inquiry that encourages health professionals to discuss their concerns. We need mechanisms that enable health professionals to share, learn, and implement changes for improvement. We need processes that support more informed scrutiny of health service quality by the public and media. There will continue to be a place for inquiries by the HDC and Coroners where external scrutiny is necessary. PMID:19098953

  10. Health Care for the Homeless in a National Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuler, James B.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of free health care for the homeless in Britain showed that it lacks government directive, has biases and overlaps, is disproportionately delivered in emergency rooms, and relies on advocacy from the nonprofit sector. Systems of care in the U. S. must better address the needs of disenfranchised groups. (Author/VM)

  11. Rapid Business Transformations in Health Care: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulaiba, Refaat A.

    2011-01-01

    The top two priorities of health care business leaders are to constantly improve the quality of health care while striving to contain and reduce the high cost of health care. The Health Care industry, similar to all businesses, is motivated to deliver innovative solutions that accelerate business transformation and increase business capabilities. …

  12. The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform Yueyi I. Liu, MD, PhD, Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Improving health care quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of health care (such as radiation dose tracking) and quality initiatives. Key Words: Informatics; health care. ª

  13. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  14. Road-mapping Health Care Systems and Services

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wei

    Road-mapping Health Care Systems and Services Ravi Nemana Chief Strategist, 360Fresh, Inc. Special. Northwestern University February 17, 2010 #12;Agenda Trends in Health Care Health Care Services and Innovation Smarter Platforms for Health Care New Bases of Competition and InnovationNew Bases of Competition

  15. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  16. Appendix 14-O Health Care Services for Summer Camps

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    Appendix 14-O 1 Health Care Services for Summer Camps Health Care Coverage Staffing: The athletic coverage of their camp. A proposal for health care service will be develop and the camp director must sign of health care services for a summer camp is a complimentary service and the camp director may choose

  17. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  18. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  19. 47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility. (a) Eligible health care providers. (1) Only an...

  20. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  1. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  2. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  3. 45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401... RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The health care claim status transaction is the transmission of either of...

  4. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  5. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  6. 45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Implementation specifications: Health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered entity that is a covered health care provider must: (1) Obtain, by application if necessary,...

  7. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Residential Care Facilities Most residential care communities did not use electronic health records in 2010, and ... of resident health information. Residential care communities that did not track any of these types of information ...

  8. Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

  9. Talking with Your Health Care Professionals about Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... care providers Alternate Language URL ?Talking with Your Health Care Professionals Page Content The most important person on ... if you already have it. Tips for Your Health Care Visits Be prepared. The more you plan for ...

  10. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on ... karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health care provider will take a small blood or skin ...

  11. Choosing the right health care provider for pregnancy and childbirth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... will have to decide is what kind of health care provider you would like to care for you ... practice doctor Certified nurse-midwife Each of these health care providers is described below. Each one has different ...

  12. Staying alive: strategies for accountable health care.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Stuart G; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye M; Halverson, Amy L; Maker, Vijay; Demetriou, Achilles; Fischer, Josef E; Bentrem, David; Rudnicki, Marek; Hiatt, Jonathan R; Jones, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act signed into law in March 2010, has led to sweeping changes to the US health care system. The ensuing pace of change in health care regulation is unparalleled and difficult for physicians to keep up with. Because of the extraordinary challenges that have arisen, the public policy committee of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary tract conducted a symposium at their 52nd Annual Meeting in May 2011 to educate participants on the myriad of public policy changes occurring in order to best prepare them for their future. Expert speakers presented their views on policy changes affecting diverse areas including patient safety, patient experience, hospital and provider fiscal challenges, and the life of the practicing surgeon. In all areas, surgical leadership was felt to be critical to successfully navigate the new health care landscape as surgeons have a long history of providing safe, high quality, low cost care. The recognition of shared values among the diverse constituents affected by health care policy changes will best prepare surgeons to control their own destiny and successfully manage new challenges as they emerge. PMID:22399268

  13. Health Care for College Students

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size Email Print Share Common Health Problems at College Article Body With students living together in dorms ... 11 through 18 years of age and for college freshmen living in dorms. The vaccine is effective ...

  14. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking State Health Care Reforms as They Affect Children and Adolescents with Emotional Disorders and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Sheila A.; Stroul, Beth A.

    The Health Care Reform Tracking Project is a 5-year national project to track and analyze state health care reform initiatives as they affect children and adolescents with emotional/behavioral disorders and their families. The study's first phase was a baseline survey of all 50 states to describe current state reforms as of 1995. Among findings of…

  15. The Social Implications of Health Care Reform: Reducing Access Barriers to Health Care Services for Uninsured Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Mitchell A.; Inguanzo, Marian M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is currently facing one of its most significant social challenges in decades in terms of its ability to provide access to primary care services to the millions of Americans who have lost their health insurance coverage in the recent economic recession. National statistics compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau for 2009…

  16. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  17. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  18. 78 FR 26036 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Application From the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for Continued CMS-Approval of Its Hospice Accreditation... years or as determined by CMS. The Accreditation Commission for Health Care's (ACHC's) current term of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  19. 75 FR 39022 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Survey of Health Care Professionals' Awareness and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Survey of Health Care... proposed information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on April 22, 2010 (75 FR... currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Survey of Health Care...

  20. Catharine Whiteside, MD PhD Vice Provost, Relations with Health Care Institutions

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Catharine Whiteside, MD PhD Dean Vice Provost, Relations with Health Care Institutions Office with Health Care Institutions Re: Reappointment of Professor Brenda Andrews as Director, Donnelly Centre. Professor Andrews' research is currently funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR

  1. Urban Health Care in Transition: Challenges Facing Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Long, Sharon K.; Zuckerman, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The authors examine the Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Project currently underway in Los Angeles County. The waiver was designed as part of a response to a financial crisis the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LACDHS) faced in 1995. It provides financial relief to give the county time to restructure its system for serving the medically indigent population. Los Angeles County's goal is to reduce its traditional emphasis on emergency room and hospital care by building an integrated system of community-based primary, specialty, and public health care. This case study describes activities completed through the spring of 1997, approximately 1 year after the waiver was approved. PMID:10387424

  2. Health care organization and incentives under emerging models of elderly health care.

    PubMed

    Graber, D R; Kilpatrick, A O

    1997-01-01

    Health providers are rapidly establishing integrated delivery systems to prepare for managed care and capitation. However, acute and primary services for the elderly continue to be reimbursed through DRGs or fee-for-service (FFS) payments. Different incentives and care patterns are described for providers caring for elderly populations and younger, capitated groups. Pilot programs to provide Medicare services to the elderly may become models or foundations for a future, capitated health system for the elderly. Existing models of elderly health care that receive capitated payments are described in this article, including Social HMOs, TEFRA HMOs. and PACE programs. The potential significance of these programs for the synchrony of operational incentives, comprehensiveness of health care, volume of institutional services, and primary care orientation is analyzed. PMID:10175520

  3. Accountable Care Organizations and Population Health Organizations.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Erb, Natalie; Joshi, Maulik S; Shortell, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) and hospitals are investing in improving "population health," by which they nearly always mean the health of the "population" of patients "attributed" by Medicare, Medicaid, or private health insurers to their organizations. But population health can and should also mean "the health of the entire population in a geographic area." We present arguments for and against ACOs and hospitals investing in affecting the socioeconomic determinants of health to improve the health of the population in their geographic area, and we provide examples of ACOs and hospitals that are doing so in a limited way. These examples suggest that ACOs and hospitals can work with other organizations in their community to improve population health. We briefly present recent proposals for such coalitions and for how they could be financed to be sustainable. PMID:26124305

  4. Restructuring military health care: the winds of change blow stronger.

    PubMed

    Lanier, J O; Boone, C

    1993-01-01

    The Military Health Services System is an enormously complex enterprise, consisting of more than 400,000 personnel in the active, reserve, and civilian workforce, operating 148 hospitals and over 800 medical and dental clinics worldwide, and serving nearly 9 million beneficiaries. Expenditures on military health care activities will exceed $15 billion in 1993. Yet many people in leadership positions in government--both inside and outside the Department of Defense--question whether the current organization of the Military Health Services System is appropriate to accomplish the Department's medical missions. Some insiders have observed that having three military medical services is having two too many--that a single "purple" medical service, or at least a single management structure such as a Defense Health Agency, would better meet military mission requirements as the Defense Department undergoes post-Cold War downsizing. One of the most pressing challenges facing military health care managers is how to best organize resources to provide timely access to quality care and achieve economies at a time when civilian health care is itself in turmoil. This article provides a long-awaited update on the spirited debate over the need to reorganize the Military Health Services System--and the prescriptions ordered so far to cure the system's perceived organizational ills. PMID:10127290

  5. Out of Place: Mediating Health and Social Care in Ontario's Long-Term Care Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Tamara

    2007-01-01

    The paper discusses two reforms in Ontario's long-term care. The first is the commercialization of home care as a result of the implementation of a "managed competition" delivery model. The second is the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care's privileging of "health care" over "social care" through changes to which types of home care and home…

  6. Meanings of care in health promotion.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Gladys Carmela Santos; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Backes, Dirce Stein

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study is to understand the meaning built by students and professors on health promotion in the teaching and learning process of health care in Nursing. It is a qualitative study using ground theory as a methodological reference. Data was collected through interviews, with three samples groups, 13 students and four professors, by classroom observation, and through meetings with nursing professors. The central subject resulting from this analysis was: constructing teaching and learning in order, disorder and self organization for a new way of caring promoting health. The teaching/learning process directed at health promotion develops in a stage of crisis, going from a state of order to a state of disorder that is uncertain and contradictory regarding what society understands about health. PMID:18695816

  7. Space technology in remote health care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam L.

    1991-01-01

    Crews and passengers on future long-duration Earth orbital and interplanetary missions must be provided quality health services - to combat illnesses and accidental injuries, and for routine preventive care. People on Earth-orbital missions can be returned relatively easily to Earth, but those on interplanetary missions cannot. Accordingly, crews on long-duration missions will likely include at least one specially trained person, perhaps a physician's assistant, hospital corpsman, nurse, or physician who will be responsible for providing onboard health services. Specifically, we must determine the most effective way to administer health care to a remotely located population. NASA with the cooperation of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is pursuing a program for providing health services to remote locations on Earth as a necessary step to developing and verifying this capability on a spacecraft. The STARPAHC program is described.

  8. [Health care systems and impossibility theorems].

    PubMed

    Penchas, Shmuel

    2004-02-01

    Health care systems, amongst the most complicated systems that serve mankind, have been in turmoil for many years. They are characterized by widespread dissatisfaction, repeated reforms and a general perception of failure. Is it possible that this abominable situation derives from underlying causes, which are inherent to the most basic elements of these systems? Those elements compromise the use of words and definitions in the formulation of their principles and their way of action, in their logical structure as well as in the social order in which they exist. An in-depth investigation of these elements raises findings that may negate the basic feasibility of the success of such complex systems, as currently known in the western world. One of the main elements of the democratic regime is its system of decision/choice making, i.e. the majority vote. But, already in the nineteenth century, it was discovered that a majority was an intransitive ordering and did not produce a consistent definition of a preference. The Marquis of Condorcet in his famous 1785 "Essai sur l'application de l'analyse a la probabilite des decisions rendues a la plurite des voix", clearly demonstrated that majority decisions might lead to intransitivity and an indeterminancy in social choices. On the basis of his discoveries, it was later shown that legislative rules may lead to the choice of a proposal that is actually opposed by the majority, or to a deadlock and therefore, to socially undesirable implications. Subsequent to these theories of Condorcet, which became known as "The Paradox of Condorcet", many papers were published in the 19th and 20th centuries regarding the issue of problems dealing with individual preferences leading to social order--a complex procedure of, amongst others, aggregation in a defined axiomatic framework. During the twentieth century it became astoundingly manifest that certain issues, although correctly attacked logically, could not be resolved. Two such famous results are Kurt Godel's seminal paper in 1931: "Ueber formal unentscheidbare Saetze der Principia Mathematica and verwandter System I" and Arrow's Nobel Prize winning "Impossibility Theorem" (Social Choice and Individual Values, 1951). Godel showed, unequivocally, that there is an enormous gap between what is being perceived as truth and what in fact can be proven as such. Arrow showed that the translation of individual preferences into a social order is impossible--except in a dictatorship. The unsolved controversies concerning the desirable or ideal structure of health care systems are impinged upon by these findings generally, and, in the case of the impossibility theorem, also directly. There is the impossibility of aggregating preferences and, at a deeper level, the impossibility of defining certain fundamental values, coupled with the problematic use of certain words, the absence of the possibility of creating, on a logically defined base, a complex system, complete and comprehensive in its own right. This is added to the fact that according to the elaboration by Stephen Wolfram in "A New Kind of Science", it is not easy to reduce complicated systems to simple components and to predict the continuation of their development even from simple basic laws without complicated calculations. All of these factors impede the construction of satisfying health care systems and leave obvious problems which overshadow the structure and the operation of health care systems. PMID:15143703

  9. Advance Health Care Directive Form Instructions You have the right to give instructions about your own health care.

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    Advance Health Care Directive Form Instructions You have the right to give instructions about your own health care. You also have the right to name someone else to make health care decisions for you. The Advance Health Care Directive form lets you do one or both of these things. It also lets you write down

  10. [The Chilean Health Care System: the task ahead].

    PubMed

    Goic, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    The most important event in Chilean public health in the XXth Century was the creation of the National Health Service (NHS), in 1952. Systematic public policies for the promotion of health, disease prevention, medical care, and rehabilitation were implemented, while a number of more specific programs were introduced, such as those on infant malnutrition, complementary infant feeding, medical control of pregnant women and healthy infants, infant and adult vaccination, and essential sanitation services. In 1981, a parallel private health care system was introduced in the form of medical care financial institutions, which today cover 15% of the population, as contrasted with the public system, which covers about 80%. From 1952 to 2014, public health care policies made possible a remarkable improvement in Chile's health indexes: downward trends in infant mortality rate (from 117.8 to 7.2 x 1,000 live births), maternal mortality (from 276 to 18.5 x 100,000), undernourished children < 5 years old (from 63% to 0.5%); and upward trends in life expectancy at birth (from 50 to 79,8 years), professional hospital care of births (from 35% to 99.8%), access to drinking water (from 52% to 99%), and access to sanitary sewer (from 21% to 98.9%). This went hand in hand with an improvement in economic and social indexes: per capita income at purchasing power parity increased from US$ 3,827 to US$ 20,894 and poverty decreased from 60% to 14.4% of the population. Related indexes such as illiteracy, average schooling, and years of primary school education, were significantly improved as well. Nevertheless, compared with OECD countries, Chile has a relatively low public investment in health (45.7% of total national investment), a deficit in the number of physicians (1.7 x 1,000 inhabitants) and nurses (4.8 x 1,000), in the number of hospital beds (2.1 x 1,000), and in the availability of generic drugs in the market (30%). Chile and the USA are the two OECD countries with the lowest public investment in health. A generalized dissatisfaction with the current Chilean health care model and the need of the vast majority of the population for timely access to acceptable quality medical care are powerful arguments which point to the need for a universal public health care system. The significant increase in public expenditure on health care which such a system would demand requires a sustainable growth of the Chilean economy. PMID:26230561

  11. Congenital Heart Disease: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

    These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with congenital heart disease. The booklet begins with general information about congenital heart disease. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures.…

  12. Higher Education and Health Care at a Crossroads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirch, Darrell G.

    2011-01-01

    As major providers and consumers of health care, higher-education institutions have an important role to play in improving health and the nation's health-care system. Health care is a complex issue for colleges and universities. Not only do institutions of higher education provide health insurance to faculty members, staff members, and students,…

  13. Addressing substance abuse in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Miller, William R; Baca, Catherine; Compton, Wilson M; Ernst, Denise; Manuel, Jennifer K; Pringle, Beverly; Schermer, Carol R; Weiss, Roger D; Willenbring, Mark L; Zweben, Allen

    2006-02-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a roundtable discussion at the 2005 annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism in Santa Barbara, California. The chair was William R. Miller. The presentations were as follows: (1) Screening and Brief Intervention for Alcohol Problems, by Allen Zweben; (2) Three Intervention Models and Their Impact on Medical Records, by Denise Ernst; (3) Pharmacotherapies for Managing Alcohol Dependence in Health Care Settings, by Roger D. Weiss; (4) The Trauma Center as an Opportunity, by Carol R. Schermer; (5) Motivational Interviewing by Telephone and Telemedicine, by Catherine Baca; (6) Health Care as a Context for Treating Drug Abuse and Dependence, by Wilson M. Compton; and (7) Interventions for Heavy Drinking in Health Care settings: Barriers and Strategies, by Mark L. Willenbring. PMID:16441278

  14. Health care transformation and CEO accountability.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Craig; Lee, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Unless President-elect Barack Obama-America's CEO-and the CEOs who run large businesses work together, health care changes will not occur. The government and private sector must abandon business as usual to reduce costs, reward outcomes, and stimulate innovative ways to achieve those outcomes. President-elect Obama will find a willing partner in corporate America if he reaches out in ways that recognize that solutions must put the patient at the center of our health care system and also drive efficiencies to allow U.S. companies to compete globally. It is past time for the nation's elected and appointed CEOs to take action to transform U.S. health care. PMID:19151004

  15. Projections of health care spending to 1990

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Ross H.; McKusick, David R.; Sonnefeld, Sally T.; Cowell, Carol S.

    1986-01-01

    National health expenditures are projected to grow to $640 billion by 1990, 11.3 percent of the gross national product. Growth in health spending is expected to moderate to an 8.7 percent average annual rate from 1984 to 1990, compared with a 12.6 percent rate from 1978 to 1984. These projections assume lower estimates of overall economic price growth, lower use of hospital care, and increased use of less expensive types of care. A preliminary analysis of demographic factors reveals that the aging of the population has almost as great an impact as the growth in total population on projected expenditures for many types of health care services. PMID:10311492

  16. ERP implementation in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Kenneth J; Pumphrey, Lela D; Wiggins, Carla

    2002-01-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems provide organizations with the opportunity to integrate individual, functionally-oriented information systems. Although much of the focus in the popular press has been placed on ERP systems in large for-profit organizations, small hospitals and clinics are candidates for ERP systems. Focusing information systems on critical success factors (CSFs) allows the organization to address a limited number of areas associated with performance. This limited number of factors can provide management with an insight into dimensions of information that must be addressed by a system. Focuses on CSFs for small health-care organizations. In addition, also considers factors critical to the implementation of health-care information systems. Presents two cases. The results indicate support for the continuing use of CSFs to help focus on the benefits of ERPs. Focusing on groups of tangible and intangible benefits can also assist the rural health-care organization in the use of ERPs. PMID:12211339

  17. Redefining global health-care delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jim Yong; Farmer, Paul; Porter, Michael E

    2013-09-21

    Initiatives to address the unmet needs of those facing both poverty and serious illness have expanded significantly over the past decade. But many of them are designed in an ad-hoc manner to address one health problem among many; they are too rarely assessed; best practices spread slowly. When assessments of delivery do occur, they are often narrow studies of the cost-effectiveness of a single intervention rather than the complex set of them required to deliver value to patients and their families. We propose a framework for global health-care delivery and evaluation by considering efforts to introduce HIV/AIDS care to resource-poor settings. The framework introduces the notion of care delivery value chains that apply a systems-level analysis to the complex processes and interventions that must occur, across a health-care system and over time, to deliver high-value care for patients with HIV/AIDS and cooccurring conditions, from tuberculosis to malnutrition. To deliver value, vertical or stand-alone projects must be integrated into shared delivery infrastructure so that personnel and facilities are used wisely and economies of scale reaped. Two other integrative processes are necessary for delivering and assessing value in global health: one is the alignment of delivery with local context by incorporating knowledge of both barriers to good outcomes (from poor nutrition to a lack of water and sanitation) and broader social and economic determinants of health and wellbeing (jobs, housing, physical infrastructure). The second is the use of effective investments in care delivery to promote equitable economic development, especially for those struggling against poverty and high burdens of disease. We close by reporting our own shared experience of seeking to move towards a science of delivery by harnessing research and training to understand and improve care delivery. PMID:23697823

  18. Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies and Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Thomas H.; Katz, Emily R.; Duffy, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the two most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities. PMID:24093903

  19. 47 CFR 54.602 - Health care support mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care support mechanism. 54.602 Section 54.602 Telecommunication FEDERAL...Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.602 Health care support mechanism. (a) Telecommunications Program. Rural health...

  20. 47 CFR 54.602 - Health care support mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care support mechanism. 54.602 Section 54.602 Telecommunication FEDERAL...Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.602 Health care support mechanism. (a) Telecommunications Program. Rural health...

  1. Health Care Issues in Southern Rural Black America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Henrie M.

    1986-01-01

    High infant and maternal mortality, poverty, isolation, a shortage of health professionals, inadequate health care facilities, and difficult geographic access to care are some of the health-related problems that plague Black rural southerners. (GC)

  2. 77 FR 42185 - Rural Health Care Support Mechanism

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Rural Health Care Support Mechanism AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... support on a limited, interim, fiscally responsible basis for specific Rural Health Care Pilot Program... will preserve transitioning Pilot Program participants' connectivity and the resulting health...

  3. Weight-Loss Surgery May Trim Health Care Costs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_155520.html Weight-Loss Surgery May Trim Health Care Costs Study found people, especially diabetes patients, spent ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-loss surgery may save health care dollars down the road, a new study suggests. ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Birth Defects?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose birth defects? Skip sharing on social ... to begin before health problems occur. Prenatal Screening Health care providers recommend that certain pregnant women, including those ...

  5. Health workforce policy and Turkey's health care reform.

    PubMed

    Agartan, Tuba I

    2015-12-01

    The health care industry is labor intensive and depends on well-trained and appropriately deployed health professionals to deliver services. This article examines the health workforce challenges in the context of Turkey's recent health reform initiative, Health Transformation Program (HTP). Reformers identified shortages, imbalances in the skills-mix, and inequities in the geographical distribution of health professionals as among the major problems. A comprehensive set of policies was implemented within the HTP framework to address these problems. The article argues that these policies addressed some of the health workforce challenges, while on the other hand exacerbating others and hence may have resulted in increasing the burden on the workforce. So far HTP's governance reforms and health human resource policy have not encouraged meaningful participation of other key stakeholders in the governance of the health care system. Without effective participation of health professionals, the next stages of HTP implementation that focus on managerial reforms such as restructuring public hospitals, improving the primary care system and implementing new initiatives on quality improvement could be very difficult. PMID:26464082

  6. Enhancing Health-Care Services with Mixed Reality Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantchev, Vladimir

    This work presents a development approach for mixed reality systems in health care. Although health-care service costs account for 5-15% of GDP in developed countries the sector has been remarkably resistant to the introduction of technology-supported optimizations. Digitalization of data storing and processing in the form of electronic patient records (EPR) and hospital information systems (HIS) is a first necessary step. Contrary to typical business functions (e.g., accounting or CRM) a health-care service is characterized by a knowledge intensive decision process and usage of specialized devices ranging from stethoscopes to complex surgical systems. Mixed reality systems can help fill the gap between highly patient-specific health-care services that need a variety of technical resources on the one side and the streamlined process flow that typical process supporting information systems expect on the other side. To achieve this task, we present a development approach that includes an evaluation of existing tasks and processes within the health-care service and the information systems that currently support the service, as well as identification of decision paths and actions that can benefit from mixed reality systems. The result is a mixed reality system that allows a clinician to monitor the elements of the physical world and to blend them with virtual information provided by the systems. He or she can also plan and schedule treatments and operations in the digital world depending on status information from this mixed reality.

  7. Environmental Health Data in Europe: Current Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, A. W., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    These papers presented at a World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe (WHO/EURO) Consultation explore current approaches to environmental health data in Europe. Topics discussed include unified environmental health databases, the use of national hospital registers, health statistics in small areas, expert systems, chemical databases,…

  8. Health Care Costs Workshop Agenda

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  9. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    MedlinePLUS

    ... degree in social work (M.S.W.); Licensed Clinical Social Workers (L.C.S.W.) have additional supervised training and clinical work experience. Licensed Professional Counselor: Master’s degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: ...

  10. Mental health system historians: adults with schizophrenia describe changes in community mental health care over time.

    PubMed

    Stein, Catherine H; Leith, Jaclyn E; Osborn, Lawrence A; Greenberg, Sarah; Petrowski, Catherine E; Jesse, Samantha; Kraus, Shane W; May, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    This qualitative study examined changes in community mental health care as described by adults diagnosed with schizophrenia with long-term involvement in the mental health system to situate their experiences within the context of mental health reform movements in the United States. A sample of 14 adults with schizophrenia who had been consumers of mental health services from 12 to 40 years completed interviews about their hospital and outpatient experiences over time and factors that contributed most to their mental health. Overall, adults noted gradual changes in mental health care over time that included higher quality of care, more humane treatment, increased partnership with providers, shorter hospital stays, and better conditions in inpatient settings. Regardless of the mental health reform era in which they were hospitalized, participants described negative hospitalization experiences resulting in considerable personal distress, powerlessness, and trauma. Adults with less than 27 years involvement in the system reported relationships with friends and family as most important to their mental health, while adults with more than 27 years involvement reported mental health services and relationships with professionals as the most important factors in their mental health. The sample did not differ in self-reported use of services during their initial and most recent hospitalization experiences, but differences were found in participants' reported use of outpatient services over time. Findings underscore the importance of the lived experience of adults with schizophrenia in grounding current discourse on mental health care reform. PMID:25274147

  11. Ethical dilemmas in community mental health care.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, A; Van Audenhove, C

    2005-08-01

    Ethical dilemmas in community mental health care is the focus of this article. The dilemmas are derived from a discussion of the results of a qualitative research project that took place in five countries of the European Union. The different stakeholders are confronted with the following dilemmas: community care versus hospital care (clients); a life with care versus a life without care (informal carers); stimulation of the client toward greater responsibility versus protection against such responsibility (professionals); budgetary control versus financial incentives (policy makers), and respect for the client versus particular private needs (neighbourhood residents). These dilemmas are interpreted against the background of a value based ethical model. This model offers an integral approach to the dilemmas and can be used to determine policy. The dilemmas are discussed here as the result of conflicting values-namely autonomy and privacy, support and safety, justice and participation, and trust and solidarity. PMID:16076969

  12. [Mental health care for immigrants in Germany].

    PubMed

    Schouler-Ocak, M

    2015-11-01

    Immigrants represent a very heterogeneous population, with various stress factors for mental disorders. These individuals are confronted with numerous access barriers within the health care system, which are reflected in limited utilization of the mental health system and psychotherapy services. A particularly large gap in health service provision exists among refugees and asylum-seekers. There is an urgent need for action in terms of opening up of the mental health system, improving and simplifying routes of access, and facilitating treatment options. PMID:26385118

  13. TQM in health care: mistaken identity?

    PubMed

    Rose, E A

    1997-01-01

    Total Quality Management is a powerful tool in health care today. The definition of quality improvement in the medical literature focuses on improving patient outcomes. However, most quality initiatives in the health care field focus on improving productivity, cost-effectiveness, market share, employee morale, and efficiencies of processes. This disparity between the medical definition of quality and the actual application of quality improvement may have the effect of alienating many physicians, the very people who must be involved. The semantics are important to address in a TQM initiative. PMID:10184762

  14. Setting health care priorities: Oregon's next steps.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Charles J

    1991-01-01

    Since the proposal was first broached in 1987, a storm of controversy has engulfed Oregon's plan to prioritize the health care services offered to its Medicaid recipients. After two years of debate, community consultation, and public opinion polls, the Oregon Health Services Commission was mandated in 1989 to study prioritization as part of a package of bills enacted as the Oregon Basic Health Services Act. In March 1990 the commission released a draft list of ranked health care services for public comment... As part of the ongoing debate, the Hastings Center and the Wesley Foundation sponsored a two-day meeting in January 1991 in Wichita, Kansas, to provide opportunity for thoughtful, in-depth, informal analysis of the OBHSA model for health care reform...a majority felt that OBHSA, in the framework of progress toward larger reform goals, is an experiment worth trying. Some felt that even if OBHSA doesn't attain its larger goals it should be tried since it will extend access and may lead to better health outcomes among the poor. But the general view was that OBHSA is a valuable experiment only to the extent that it leads to a statewide system of universal health insurance in Oregon without creating special burdens for the state's poor.... PMID:11642897

  15. Where does the US experience of managed care currently stand?

    PubMed

    Simonet, D

    2005-01-01

    After an historical review of the advent of managed care in the USA, this article presents cost-control mechanisms, changes in the medical practice and consequences on patient health. The article also explains the development of the HMO using the transaction costs theory and the subsequent orientations of the US health care system. PMID:15991459

  16. Influencing health care in the legislative arena.

    PubMed

    Abood, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Nurses are well aware that today's health care system is in trouble and in need of change. The experiences of many nurses practicing in the real world of health care are motivating them to take on some form of an advocacy role in order to influence a change in policies, laws, or regulations that govern the larger health care system. This type of advocacy necessitates stepping beyond their own practice setting and into the less familiar world of policy and politics, a world in which many nurses do not feel prepared to operate effectively. Successful policy advocacy depends on having the power, the will, the time, and the energy, along with the political skills needed to 'play the game' in the legislative arena. This article describes the role of the nurse as health care policy advocate, identifies the power bases available to nurses as they assume that role, discusses the policy process in the legislative arena, and presents strategies for effective action. A list of selected online resources is included to help readers learn more about shaping and influencing future health policy. PMID:17330985

  17. Health Literacy in Primary Care Practice.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Lauren; Salzman, Brooke; Snyderman, Danielle

    2015-07-15

    Health literacy includes a set of skills needed to make appropriate health decisions and successfully navigate the health care system. These skills include reading, writing, numeracy, communication, and, increasingly, the use of electronic technology. National data indicate that more than one-third of U.S. adults have limited health literacy, which contributes to poor health outcomes and affects patient safety, and health care access and quality. Although there are a number of tools that screen for limited health literacy, they are primarily used for research. Routinely screening patients for health literacy has not been shown to improve outcomes and is not recommended. Instead, multiple professional organizations recommend using universal health literacy precautions to provide understandable and accessible information to all patients, regardless of their literacy or education levels. This includes avoiding medical jargon, breaking down information or instructions into small concrete steps, limiting the focus of a visit to three key points or tasks, and assessing for comprehension. Additionally, printed information should be written at or below a fifth- to sixth-grade reading level. Visual aids, graphs, or pictures can enhance patient understanding, as can more concrete presentation of numerical information. PMID:26176370

  18. Health care financing and the sustainability of health systems.

    PubMed

    Liaropoulos, Lycourgos; Goranitis, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    The economic crisis brought an unprecedented attention to the issue of health system sustainability in the developed world. The discussion, however, has been mainly limited to "traditional" issues of cost-effectiveness, quality of care, and, lately, patient involvement. Not enough attention has yet been paid to the issue of who pays and, more importantly, to the sustainability of financing. This fundamental concept in the economics of health policy needs to be reconsidered carefully. In a globalized economy, as the share of labor decreases relative to that of capital, wage income is increasingly insufficient to cover the rising cost of care. At the same time, as the cost of Social Health Insurance through employment contributions rises with medical costs, it imperils the competitiveness of the economy. These reasons explain why spreading health care cost to all factors of production through comprehensive National Health Insurance financed by progressive taxation of income from all sources, instead of employer-employee contributions, protects health system objectives, especially during economic recessions, and ensures health system sustainability. PMID:26369417

  19. Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics

    PubMed Central

    Pammett, Robert; Landry, Eric; Jorgenson, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Interprofessional student-run primary health care clinics have been a flagship model of health professional education in Canada for many years. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is support for implementing this educational model in the United Kingdom and to highlight the implications for pharmacy education in Scotland. Method: A cross-sectional postal survey of 3000 randomly selected citizens of Aberdeen city and shire, Scotland, aged 18 years and older. Results: Of the 824 questionnaires that were returned (response rate 27.5%), more than half of the respondents (62.4%; n = 514) would consider accessing health care from a student-led, walk-in service. The range of services they expect to see includes general health checks (60%; n = 494), help for sexually transmitted diseases (57.5%; n = 474), weight management (56.8%; n = 468), smoking cessation (54.4%; n = 448) and drug misuse services (47.2%; n = 387). Concerns raised pertained to student ability, suitability for children and accessibility. Many comments pertained to the improvement of the current system by offering after-hours care. Discussion: The positive response from the general public towards an interprofessional student-run primary health care clinic in Aberdeen suggests that this Canadian model of interdisciplinary health professional education would likely be a successful addition to the pharmacy curriculum in Scotland. PMID:26150889

  20. Successful Reentry: The Perspective of Private Correctional Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Greifinger, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to public health and safety concerns, discharge planning is increasingly prioritized by correctional systems when preparing prisoners for their reintegration into the community. Annually, private correctional health care vendors provide $3 billion of health care services to inmates in correctional facilities throughout the U.S., but rarely are contracted to provide transitional health care. A discussion with 12 people representing five private nationwide correctional health care providers highlighted the barriers they face when implementing transitional health care and what templates of services health care companies could provide to state and counties to enhance the reentry process. PMID:17131191

  1. Successful reentry: the perspective of private correctional health care providers.

    PubMed

    Mellow, Jeff; Greifinger, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    Due to public health and safety concerns, discharge planning is increasingly prioritized by correctional systems when preparing prisoners for their reintegration into the community. Annually, private correctional health care vendors provide $3 billion of health care services to inmates in correctional facilities throughout the U.S., but rarely are contracted to provide transitional health care. A discussion with 12 people representing five private nationwide correctional health care providers highlighted the barriers they face when implementing transitional health care and what templates of services health care companies could provide to state and counties to enhance the reentry process. PMID:17131191

  2. Developing targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Palliative Care is an approach that improves quality of life for patients and their families facing the problems associated with incurable life-threatening illness. In many countries, due to the rapidly ageing population, increasingly more people are suffering from serious chronic disease towards the end of life, making further development in palliative care a major public health challenge. The aim of this study was to develop the first targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care in Germany. Methods Based on the findings from pilot studies (qualitative interviews and surveys with different stakeholders in the health care system), we conducted a modified Delphi study with two rounds of questionnaires with experts in public health and palliative care. In the first round, the experts commented on the findings from the pilot studies. The answers were evaluated descriptively and with qualitative content analysis, resulting in the formulation of 25 targets. These were presented to the experts in the second Delphi round to assess each of them separately with regard to its importance and current implementation (7-point answer scales) and in relation to the other targets (defining the five most important of the 25 targets). Results Six most relevant targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care in Germany were worked out: Supporting palliative care as a basic attitude for the care of people in the last phase of life; coordinating healthcare for people in the last phase of life; establishing cooperation among health professions and disciplines; establishing education in palliative care for all professional groups with contact to people in the last phase of life; reviewing the evidence of palliative care measures; offering support to family members who are caring for someone in the last phase of life. Conclusions To systematically develop palliative care, it makes sense to define fields of action with individual targets. For Germany, it can be recommended to give priority to the targets that were highlighted as the most relevant in this study. The next step will be to develop, implement and evaluate tangible measures to achieve these targets. PMID:20429901

  3. Distraction: an assessment of smartphone usage in health care work settings

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Preetinder S; Kamath, Ashwini; Gill, Tejkaran S

    2012-01-01

    Smartphone use in health care work settings presents both opportunities and challenges. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and overuse are not kept in check. This practice-focused research paper examines the current panorama of health software applications. Findings from existing research are consolidated to elucidate the level and effects of distraction in health care work settings due to smartphone use. A conceptual framework for crafting guidelines to regulate the use of smartphones in health care work settings is then presented. Finally, specific guidelines are delineated to assist in creating policies for the use of smartphones in a health care workplace. PMID:22969308

  4. Distraction: an assessment of smartphone usage in health care work settings.

    PubMed

    Gill, Preetinder S; Kamath, Ashwini; Gill, Tejkaran S

    2012-01-01

    Smartphone use in health care work settings presents both opportunities and challenges. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and overuse are not kept in check. This practice-focused research paper examines the current panorama of health software applications. Findings from existing research are consolidated to elucidate the level and effects of distraction in health care work settings due to smartphone use. A conceptual framework for crafting guidelines to regulate the use of smartphones in health care work settings is then presented. Finally, specific guidelines are delineated to assist in creating policies for the use of smartphones in a health care workplace. PMID:22969308

  5. Health Care Reform: How Will It Impact You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukaszewski, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the impact of health care reform on child-care centers and child-care employees. Topics covered include requirements to provide health insurance for all employees; subsidies for businesses with fewer than 50 employees; subsidies for low income employees; family coverage; health are costs for 2 working parents; and costs to day-care

  6. Changes in Patterns of Health Care: Plus Forty Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofalvi, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an update of Herman's article ["Changes in Patterns of Health Care," "School Health Review," 1(9-14)1969] that focuses on the changes in patterns of health care. He discusses the poverty, insurance, and access to medical care as well as the quality of medical care for adults and minors. He stresses that…

  7. Reason for Visit: Is Migrant Health Care that Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, George F.; Graybill, Marie; George, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the reasons for which migrant agricultural workers in Pennsylvania seek health care. Methods: Participants were individuals 14 years of age and over, actively involved in agricultural labor and presenting for medical care at 6 migrant health care centers. Bilingual health care providers…

  8. PRESIDENT'S INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Panel on Transforming Health Care

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, Eric

    #12;PRESIDENT'S INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Panel on Transforming Health Care February 2001 Transforming Health Care Through Information Technology REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT #12;c transform health care and increase access to care for all citizens. The Federal government has a critical

  9. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Fumi?, Nera; Marinovi?, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and conditions, provide appropriate wound treatment, increase satisfaction, reduce pain, increase mobility, reduce and eliminate aggravating factors, and achieve a satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcome. Many scientific researches and knowledge about the pathophysiological processes of wound formation and healing are currently available. Modern achievements can accelerate independence, reduce pain and encourage faster wound healing, thus it is important to continuously develop awareness, knowledge and experience, along with the treatment to achieve, maintain and enhance the quality of health care and patient safety. PMID:25326985

  10. A telemedicine health care delivery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Jay H.

    1991-01-01

    The Interactive Telemedicine Systems (ITS) system was specifically developed to address the ever widening gap between our medical care expertise and our medical care delivery system. The frustrating reality is that as our knowledge of how to diagnose and treat medical conditions has continued to advance, the system to deliver that care has remained in an embryonic stage. This has resulted in millions of people being denied their most basic health care needs. Telemedicine utilizes an interactive video system integrated with biomedical telemetry that allows a physician at a base station specialty medical complex or teaching hospital to examine and treat a patient at multiple satellite locations, such as rural hospitals, ambulatory health centers, correctional institutions, facilities caring for the elderly, community hospital emergency departments, or international health facilities. Based on the interactive nature of the system design, the consulting physician at the base station can do a complete history and physical examination, as if the patient at the satellite site was sitting in the physician's office. This system is described.

  11. Quarantine, Isolation, and Health Care Workers.

    PubMed

    Webb, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Although Ebola virus disease and other hemorrhagic fevers are not generally considered infectious diseases of the nervous system, neurologists may be asked to participate in the management of patients with these and other dangerous communicable illnesses, including possible bioterrorism agents. It is essential for all health professionals to understand the public health, legal, and ethical frameworks behind autonomy-limiting interventions such as quarantine and isolation. Health care professionals represent the front line of defense during public health emergencies. They are often disproportionately affected by the illnesses themselves as well as by the public health interventions intended to prevent spread. The global health crisis caused by the spread of Ebola virus disease has been instructional for examining these ethical issues. PMID:26633787

  12. The ethical self-fashioning of physicians and health care systems in culturally appropriate health care.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Diverse advocacy groups have pushed for the recognition of cultural differences in health care as a means to redress inequalities in the U.S., elaborating a form of biocitizenship that draws on evidence of racial and ethnic health disparities to make claims on both the state and health care providers. These efforts led to federal regulations developed by the U.S. Office of Minority Health requiring health care organizations to provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services. Based on ethnographic research at workshops and conferences, in-depth interviews with cultural competence trainers, and an analysis of postings to a moderated listserv with 2,000 members, we explore cultural competence trainings as a new type of social technology in which health care providers and institutions are urged to engage in ethical self-fashioning to eliminate prejudice and embody the values of cultural relativism. Health care providers are called on to re-orient their practice (such as habits of gaze, touch, and decision-making) and to act on their own subjectivities to develop an orientation toward Others that is "culturally competent." We explore the diverse methods that cultural competence trainings use to foster a health care provider's ability to be self-reflexive, including face-to-face workshops and classes and self-guided on-line modules. We argue that the hybrid formation of culturally appropriate health care is becoming detached from its social justice origins as it becomes rationalized by and more firmly embedded in the operations of the health care marketplace. PMID:21553151

  13. Emergency Care Skills for Occupational Health Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh. Occupational Information Center.

    Designed for use in community colleges, technical colleges, and technical institutes, this manual contains a course for teaching emergency care skills to both licensed practical and registered nurses employed in occupational health. The manual consists of three sections. In section 1 the need for the course, its content, objectives, length,…

  14. Telemedicine: Health Care for Isolated Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Communication Report, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The lead article discusses the results of a series of experiments in rural Alaska in which telemedicine was used to improve the delivery of health care to isolated populations. The author, Dennis Foote, also discusses the implications of these experiments for planning telemedicine systems in other areas. Satellite communication and a centralized…

  15. Memo to: Ambulatory Health Care Planners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    Planning for changing types of health professions and a changing clientele necessitates designing flexible facilities. Findings from a recently completed analysis of ambulatory care facilities are directed to planners in the form of 16 memos. Approaches to planning and design considerations are made that attempt to humanize these facilities.…

  16. Escalating health care costs: costs of litigation.

    PubMed

    Wehrmacher, W H

    1998-09-01

    Although controlling the risks and costs of litigation is difficult, that goal is worth pursuing. Trumped-up malpractice claims, direct litigation costs, and defensive medicine contribute to the accelerating costs of U.S. health care but are not their driving force. PMID:9784951

  17. Life Contentment and Mental Health Care Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Jonathan D.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: It is now well documented that satisfaction with mental health services is influenced by a variety of other factors (e.g., race, diagnosis, functioning level). Because of a generally brighter outlook, this study examined whether care satisfaction is also influenced by contentment in housing, social relations, or existence in general.…

  18. Comparability of Health Care Responsiveness in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirven, Nicolas; Santos-Eggimann, Brigitte; Spagnoli, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure and to correct for the potential incomparability of responses to the SHARE survey on health care responsiveness. A parametric approach based on the use of anchoring vignettes is applied to cross-sectional data (2006-2007) in eleven European countries. More than 7,000 respondents aged 50 years old and over were…

  19. Health Care Struggle between Young and Old.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Discusses establishing relative priorities between health care needs of the young and the old. Argues that it is fair to limit assistance to those already old when there are genuine social needs for children. The elderly should lead the way in recognizing the importance of the needs of children. (SLD)

  20. Courage, Context, and Contemporary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Berger, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    A commentary on "Must We Be Courageous?," by Ann Hamric, John Arras, and Margaret Mohrmann, and on "Patient-Satisfaction Surveys on a Scale of 0 to 10: Improving Health Care, or Leading It Astray?," by Alexandra Junewicz and Stuart J. Youngner , bothin the May-June 2015 issue. PMID:26556137

  1. Portrait of a Health Care Entrepreneur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    Describes career path of Franketta Guinn, who founded her own home health care business. Claims equally important to the financial reward is the opportunity to provide minority members with jobs. Guinn cites family values, a strong personal belief system, and ability to draw from diverse educational, job-related, and personal experiences as keys…

  2. Health Care Assistant. Instructor [Guide.] Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This instructor's guide contains 65 lessons designed to aid teachers in presenting a course in basic nursing procedures for students studying for careers as health care assistants. Lesson plans consist of a scope, objectives, suggested supplementary teaching and learning items; references, an introduction, a lesson outline, handouts, evaluation…

  3. Health care's most wired. A wired exchange.

    PubMed

    Solovy, Alden

    2004-08-01

    There was a time when innovation in health care information technology meant being at the cutting edge of managerial systems. Hospitals made significant investments in financially oriented technology. In the past five years, the investment in clinical IT appears to have outstripped the investment in managerial systems, including enterprise resource planning aimed at improving the supply chain. PMID:15453607

  4. Health Care Communication with Low Literate Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Christine A.

    Low literate patients face difficulties when they read health care information. The complex process of reading can be summarized in five steps: input, decoding, encoding, output, and feedback. Each occurs automatically for the fluent reader; the low literate reader might encounter stumbling blocks in one or more of the steps. Once the patient has…

  5. The virtue of uncertainty in health care.

    PubMed

    Buetow, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Uncertainty is unavoidable in health care, yet frequently tacit. When uncertainty is acknowledged, it tends to be defined in terms of the unpredictable nature of the care, and limits to human knowledge. It is cast as a problem that evidence-based health care can minimize. Challenging that simplistic perspective, this paper reconstructs uncertainty as a property whose meaning derives from how people are relationally disposed to perceive it in the social context in which they are embedded. Five conditions are suggested to define a need to protect and cultivate uncertainty as a virtue or positive disposition. These conditions are that uncertainty is natural, promotes creativity and a critical attitude, can signify wisdom, nurtures safety, sustains hope and protects against excess. In contrast, certainty is a delusion. Believing in certainty is unscientific and antiscientific because it can obscure and devalue critique in scientific practice. PMID:21848939

  6. Exposure of health workers in primary health care to glutaraldehyde

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to avoid proliferation of microorganisms, cleaning, disinfection and sterilisation in health centres is of utmost importance hence reducing exposure of workers to biological agents and of clients that attend these health centres to potential infections. One of the most commonly-used chemical is glutaraldehyde. The effects of its exposure are well known in the hospital setting; however there is very little information available with regards to the primary health care domain. Objective To determine and measure the exposure of health workers in Primary Health Care Centres. Environmental to glutaraldehyde and staff concentration will be measured and compared with regulated Occupational Exposure Limits. Methods/Design Observational, cross-sectional and multi-centre study. The study population will be composed of any health professionals in contact with the chemical substance that work in the Primary Health Care Centres in the areas of Barcelonès Nord, Maresme, and Barcelona city belonging to the Catalan Institute of Health. Data will be collected from 1) Glutaraldhyde consumption from the previous 4 years in the health centres under study. 2) Semi-structured interviews and key informants to gather information related to glutaraldehyde exposure. 3) Sampling of the substance in the processes considered to be high exposure. Discussion Although glutaraldehyde is extensively used in health centres, scientific literature only deals with certain occupational hazards in the hospital setting. This study attempts to take an in-depth look into the risk factors and environmental conditions that exist in the primary care workplace with exposure to glutaraldehyde. PMID:24180250

  7. Barriers to Health Care among the Elderly in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Chiyoe; Yamada, Tetsuji; Chen, Chia-Ching; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Hirai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Katsunori

    2010-01-01

    Japan is undergoing a set of health care reforms aimed at cutting rising health care costs and increasing the efficiency of health care delivery. This empirical study used a large-scale community survey on 15,302 elderly people 65 years and older (56.0% women) conducted in seven municipalities in 2006, to reveal clear-cut evidence of barriers to necessary care. The reasons for not getting health care is attributed to health care cost for the elderly with lower income, while higher income counterparts reported being busy or having a condition not serious enough to seek care. PMID:20617033

  8. Online Simulation of Health Care Reform: Helping Health Educators Learn and Participate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jecklin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Young and healthy undergraduates in health education were not predisposed to learn the complex sprawl of topics in a required course on U.S. Health Care. An online simulation of health care reform was used to encourage student learning about health care and participating in health care reform. Students applied their understanding of high costs,…

  9. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Responsibilities of health care facilities. 476.78... § 476.78 Responsibilities of health care facilities. (a) Every hospital seeking payment for services.... (b) Cooperation with QIOs. Health care providers that submit Medicare claims must cooperate in...

  10. Primary Care Health Service For office use only

    E-print Network

    Primary Care Health Service For office use only [ ] Mailed (date) ___/___/___/ Initial Health Information From: Barnard College Primary Care Health Service Specific Description of Information in writing and present my written revocation to the Manager of the Barnard College Primary Care Health

  11. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Responsibilities of health care facilities. 476.78... § 476.78 Responsibilities of health care facilities. (a) Every hospital seeking payment for services.... (b) Cooperation with QIOs. Health care providers that submit Medicare claims must cooperate in...

  12. The Health Care Application CSE2102 Course Project Background

    E-print Network

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    The Health Care Application CSE2102 ­ Course Project Background 1 Introduction to HCA Health of treatments, etc. Health care is at the forefront at a national level as its future is debated and discussed. As such, the concept of a nation-wide Health-Care Application was proposed. A critical component

  13. 47 CFR 54.602 - Health care support mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care support mechanism. 54.602 Section... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.602 Health care support mechanism. (a) Telecommunications Program. Rural health...

  14. 47 CFR 54.602 - Health care support mechanism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care support mechanism. 54.602 Section... (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.602 Health care support mechanism. (a) Telecommunications Program. Rural health...

  15. Private equity investment in health care services.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Catherine J; Rudsenske, Todd; Vaughan, James S

    2008-01-01

    Sophisticated private equity investors in health services provide venture capital for early-stage companies, growth capital for mid-stage companies, and equity capital for buyouts of mid-stage and mature companies. They pursue opportunities in provider sectors that are large and have a stable reimbursement environment, such as acute care services; sectors with room to execute consolidation strategies, such as labs; alternative-site sectors, such as "storefront" medicine; and clinical services, such as behavioral health, that are subject to profitably increasing quality and lowering costs. The innovations created through private equity investments could challenge established health services organizations. PMID:18780929

  16. Primary health care according to African requirements.

    PubMed

    Botha, H P

    1983-08-01

    African conditions and circumstances present specific challenges to health service providers. These conditions have implications for primary health care (PHC), including problems of communication (geographical, educational and cultural), maldistribution of health manpower, political unrest and wars. Local PHC services must compete with the prestige of and faith in the hospitals. Manpower training should be stressed at all levels of education of all medical and paramedical personnel. The status of PHC in the Republic of South Africa is now well recognized, and provision of the required services has a high priority. PMID:6885358

  17. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Behavioral Health Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM Service ... individuals should be involved in their own behavioral health care. These efforts to increase consumer awareness and involvement ...

  18. Engaging doctors in the health care revolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas H; Cosgrove, Toby

    2014-06-01

    A health care revolution is under way, and doctors must be part of it. But many are deeply anxious and angry about the transformation, fearing loss of autonomy, respect, and income. Given their resistance, how can health system Leaders engage them in redesigning care? In this article, Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Press Ganey's chief medical officer, and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, describe a framework they've developed for encouraging buy-in. Adapting Max Weber's "typology of motives," and applying behavioral economics and other motivational principles, they describe four tactics leadership must apply in concert: engaging doctors in a noble shared purpose; addressing their economic self-interest; leveraging their desire for respect; and appealing to their sense of tradition. Drawing from experiences at the Mayo Clinic, Geisinger Health System, Partners HealthCare, the Cleveland Clinic, Ascension Health, and others, the authors show how the four motivational levers work together to bring this critical group of stakeholders on board. PMID:25051859

  19. Physician payments under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe; Shapiro, Adam Hale

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the impact of major health insurance reform on payments made in the health care sector. We study the prices of services paid to physicians in the privately insured market during the Massachusetts health care reform. The reform increased the number of insured individuals as well as introduced an online marketplace where insurers compete. We estimate that, over the reform period, physician payments increased at least 11 percentage points relative to control areas. Payment increases began around the time legislation passed the House and Senate-the period in which their was a high probability of the bill eventually becoming law. This result is consistent with fixed-duration payment contracts being negotiated in anticipation of future demand and competition. PMID:25497755

  20. Justice, health care, and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Brock, Dan W

    1989-01-01

    Concern over rising health costs in the United States has led to an intensifying policy debate over health care for the elderly and a rethinking of questions on intergenerational justice and the claims of the aged on social resources. Major contributions to this debate have been made by Daniel Callahan in his Setting Limits (Simon & Schuster; 1987) and by Norman Daniels in his Am I My Parents' Keeper? (Oxford University Press; 1988). Brock reviews Callahan's and Daniels' work, identifying the central focus of both as the age-group problem of resource allocation. He sees Callahan as calling upon a communitarian political philosophy and Daniels as arguing from a tradition of political liberalism. While disagreeing in part with both authors, Brock identifies compatible elements in their arguments that contribute significantly to the public debate over health care and the aged. PMID:11651943

  1. Incentivising improvements in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Adam

    2015-07-01

    This Special Section of Health Economics, Policy and Law begins with an article on the different ways in which one might incentivise improved performance among health care providers. I asked five experts on performance management, Gwyn Bevan, Tim Doran, Peter Smith, Sandra Tanenbaum and Karsten Vrangbaek, to write brief reactions to the article and to the notion of performance management in health care in general. The commentators were given an open remit to be as critical as they wished to be, and their reactions can be found in the pages that follow. I would like to thank Albert Weale for reviewing all of the articles, and Katie Brennan for serving as the catalyst for this collection. PMID:25728467

  2. 76 FR 35950 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Living Will and Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activity (Living Will and Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care) Under... Health Care, VA Form 10-0137. OMB Control Number: 2900-0556. Type of Review: Extension of a currently... appoint a health care agent to make decision about his or her medical treat and to record...

  3. An Integrated Collection of Tools for Continuously Improving the Processes by Which Health Care is Delivered: A Tool Report

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    An Integrated Collection of Tools for Continuously Improving the Processes by Which Health Care of health care. The tools have been developed over the past several years and are currently being evaluated through their application to four health care processes, blood transfusion, chemotherapy, emergency

  4. National Institutes of Health Current National Institute

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    National Institutes of Health Current National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin of Mental Health National Eye Institute National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute National Human Genome------------------------c-----------------------]-----------r----- National Institute National Institute of Child Health and on Deafness and Human Development Other Communica

  5. Health Insurance, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes: A Model of Elderly Health Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Zhou; Gilleskie, Donna B.; Norton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Prescription drug coverage creates a change in medical care consumption, beyond standard moral hazard, arising both from the differential cost-sharing and the relative effectiveness of different types of care. We model the dynamic supplemental health insurance decisions of Medicare beneficiaries, their medical care demand, and subsequent health

  6. China's health care sector in transition: resources, demand and reforms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y

    1997-02-01

    Economic development and reforms have had profound impacts on China's health care sector. As a result, the health care sector in China is in transition. This report reviews the major changes, and the possible policy response to these changes in China's health care sector. It discusses resource availability in the Chinese health sector, and analyses the trend of household demand for health care goods and services. This study also examines the trade and investment situations in China's health sector and investigates the major forces that are driving the transition in health care and comments on the potential policy responses. PMID:10165043

  7. How not to cut health care costs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Haas, Derek A

    2014-11-01

    Health care providers in much of the world are trying to respond to the tremendous pressure to reduce costs--but evidence suggests that many of their attempts are counterproductive, raising costs and sometimes decreasing the quality of care. Kaplan and Haas reached this conclusion after conducting field research with more than 50 health care provider organizations. Administrators looking for cuts typically work from the line-item expense categories on their P&Ls, they found. This may appear to generate immediate results, but it usually does not reflect the optimal mix of resources needed to efficiently deliver excellent care. The authors describe five common mistakes: (1) Reducing support staff. This often lowers the productivity of clinicians, whose time is far more expensive. (2) Underinvesting in space and equipment. The costs of these are consistently an order of magnitude smaller than personnel costs, so cuts here are short-sighted if they lower people's productivity. (3) Focusing narrowly on procurement prices and neglecting to examine how individual clinicians actually consume supplies. (4) Maximizing patient throughput. Physicians achieve greater overall productivity by spending more time with fewer patients. (5) Failing to benchmark and standardize. Administrators, in collaboration with clinicians, should examine all the costs of treating patients' conditions. This will uncover multiple opportunities to improve processes in ways that lower total costs and deliver better care. PMID:25509507

  8. Equity and efficiency in Italian health care.

    PubMed

    Paci, P; Wagstaff, A

    1993-04-01

    Health care finance and provision in Italy is unusual by international standards: public financing relies heavily on both general taxation and social insurance, and although the vast majority of expenditure is publicly financed, the majority of care is provided by the private sector. The system suffers, however, from a chronic failure to control expenditures and its record on perinatal and infant mortality is poor. Hospitals in Italy have a low bed-occupancy rate by international standards and the per diem system of reimbursing private hospitals encourages unduly long stays. Costs per inpatient day are high by international standards, but costs per admission are close to the OECD average. Ambulatory care costs are extremely low, but this appears to be due to the fact that GPs see so many patients that their role is inevitably mainly administrative. Consumption of medicines is extremely high, but because the cost per item is low, expenditure per capita is not unduly high. Despite the emphasis on social insurance, the financing system appears to be progressive. There is evidence of inequalities in health in Italy, and some evidence that health care is not provided equally to those in the same degree of need. PMID:8269044

  9. Care pathways for dementia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Samsi, Kritika; Manthorpe, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty appears to typify the experience of living with dementia. With an uncertain illness trajectory and unpredictable levels of deterioration and stability in symptoms, people with a diagnosis of dementia may live with uncertainty and anxiety and find it hard to make plans or decisions for their future. People with memory problems and caregivers seeking a diagnosis of dementia may also potentially find themselves navigating a labyrinth-like maze of services, practitioners, assessments, and memory tests, with limited understanding of test scores and little information about what support is available. In this context of uncertainty, the apparent clarity and certainty of a “dementia care pathway” may be attractive. However, the term “dementia care pathway” has multiple and overlapping meanings, which can potentially give rise to further confusion if these are ill-defined or a false consensus is presumed. This review distinguishes four meanings: 1) a mechanism for the management and containment of uncertainty and confusion, useful for the professional as well as the person with dementia; 2) a manual for sequencing care activities; 3) a guide to consumers, indicating eligibility for care activities, or a guide to self-management for dementia dyads, indicating the appropriateness of care activities; and 4) a manual for “walking with” the person. Examples of these approaches are presented from UK dementia services with illustrations of existing care pathways and associated time points, specifically focusing on: 1) early symptom identification and first service encounters, 2) assessment process, 3) diagnostic disclosure, 4) postdiagnostic support, and 5) appropriate interventions. We review the evidence around these themes, as well as discuss service pathways and referral routes used by some services in England and internationally. We conclude that the attraction of the term “care pathway” is seductive, but caution is needed in taking shared understandings for granted. PMID:25506210

  10. Reforming the Health Care System for Children and the Elderly to Balance Cure and Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Issues in balancing health services and costs in a changing society, where groups have differential access to health care, are discussed, including need for a universal health care system, growing cost of health care for the elderly, prolongation of life among older adults, and the claims of children on services. (MSE)

  11. Certification of Health Care Provider for U.S. Department of Labor Employee's Serious Health Condition

    E-print Network

    He, Chuan

    of Health Care Provider for U.S. Department of Labor Employee's Serious Health Condition (Family and Medical health condition to submit a medical certification issued by the employee's health care provider. Please: __________________________________________________________________________________ First Middle Last SECTION III: For Completion by the HEALTH CARE PROVIDER INSTRUCTIONS to the HEALTH

  12. Residential and Health Care Transition Patterns among Older Medicare Beneficiaries over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Masayo; Shaffer, Thomas; Arbaje, Alicia I.; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe annual care transition patterns across residential and health care settings and assess consistency in care transition patterns across years. Design and Methods: This retrospective cohort study used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (2000-2005). The sample comprised beneficiaries aged 65 years and older (N = 57,684…

  13. mHealth: A Mechanism to Deliver More Accessible, More Effective Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Price, Matthew; Yuen, Erica K.; Goetter, Elizabeth M.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Acierno, Ron; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    The increased popularity and functionality of mobile devices has a number of implications for the delivery of mental health services. Effective use of mobile applications has the potential to (a) increase access to evidence-based care; (b) better inform consumers of care and more actively engage them in treatment; (c) increase the use of evidence-based practices; and (d) enhance care after formal treatment has concluded. The current paper presents an overview of the many potential uses of mobile applications as a means to facilitate ongoing care at various stages of treatment. Examples of current mobile applications in behavioural treatment and research are described, and the implications of such uses are discussed. Finally, we provide recommendations for methods to include mobile applications into current treatment and outline future directions for evaluation. PMID:23918764

  14. Teaching primary health care: a comprehensive approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Mehra, S; Devereaux, M O; Rich, J

    1988-01-01

    The MEDEX Primary Health Care Series, an integrated training system for everyone in primary care (PHC), was published in 1983. It is now used in over 70 countries and has demonstrated its value in the developing world. The Series lays considerable emphasis on the crucial link between the performance of health workers and the management support with which they are provided. It was the result of 10 years of development and field testing. The Series is so widely employed because its development involved health centers and health workers associated in PHC programs in Guyana, Lesotho, Micronesia, Pakistan, and Thailand. It also addresses everyday problems and provides pragmatic solutions which PHC programs can apply. Attention is given to the development of skills in health workers, using a competency-based methodology, in contrast to the concentration on knowledge acquition found in more conventional training programs. Training activities are detailed for as little as 15 minutes at a time in courses lasting 6-15 months. Dialogic methods are used for the more peripheral workers who may not be literate. Management is given systematic, practical treatment. The Series advocates disease prevention and health promotion and helps to train health workers to diagnose an treat the most common clinical problems. It can be used to strengthen existing programs or to start new ones. It has a consistent formant, facilitating local adaption. Any part of the Series can be copied or reproduced for noncommercial purposes without persmission from the publisher. The Series is based on the realistic and pragmatic organization of health care delivery systems found in most countries and places great importance on the use of health center presonnel to orientate and link resources at the center to needs at the periphery. Nurses, the health center person at the middle level of the PHC, often fulfills the role of trainer and supervisor of the community health worker. The diagnostic, curative and community health skills in the Series are consistent with the expanding role of nursing in PHC. The Series is published in English but also available in a mini-edition in Spanish with increasing interest in a French translation. Various sections have been translated into 21 other languages. A newsletter and a network of series users (MEDINET) has been established. PMID:3252832

  15. Budget-makers and health care systems.

    PubMed

    White, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Health programs are shaped by the decisions made in budget processes, so how budget-makers view health programs is an important part of making health policy. Budgeting in any country involves its own policy community, with key players including budgeting professionals and political authorities. This article reviews the typical pressures on and attitudes of these actors when they address health policy choices. The worldview of budget professionals includes attitudes that are congenial to particular policy perspectives, such as the desire to select packages of programs that maximize population health. The pressures on political authorities, however, are very different: most importantly, public demand for health care services is stronger than for virtually any other government activity. The norms and procedures of budgeting also tend to discourage adoption of some of the more enthusiastically promoted health policy reforms. Therefore talk about rationalizing systems is not matched by action; and action is better explained by the need to minimize blame. The budget-maker's perspective provides insight about key controversies in healthcare policy such as decentralization, competition, health service systems as opposed to health insurance systems, and dedicated vs. general revenue finance. It also explains the frequency of various "gaming" behaviors. PMID:23958590

  16. Health Care System Reforms in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a critical but non-systematic review of recent health care system reforms in developing countries. The literature reports mixed results as to whether reforms improve the financial protection of the poor or not. We discuss the reasons for these differences by comparing three representative countries: Mexico, Vietnam, and China. First, the design of the health care system reform, as well as the summary of its evaluation, is briefly described for each country. Then, the discussion is developed along two lines: policy design and evaluation methodology. The review suggests that i) background differences, such as social development, poverty level, and population health should be considered when taking other countries as a model; ii) although demand-side reforms can be improved, more attention should be paid to supply-side reforms; and iii) the findings of empirical evaluation might be biased due to the evaluation design, the choice of outcome, data quality, and evaluation methodology, which should be borne in mind when designing health care system reforms. PMID:25170464

  17. Problem-Oriented Approaches in the Context of Health Care Education: Perspectives and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Weiqun Courtney; Jordan, Elizabeth; Porath, Marion

    2009-01-01

    The current study aimed to explore and articulate some of the key issues in problem-oriented learning (POL), in the context of health care education. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with faculties representing four different health care disciplines around common issues identified in a prior survey study. Thematic analysis of the…

  18. Meeting the Personnel Needs of the Health Care Industry through Vocational Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudis, Paula M.; And Others

    A 2-year study of the health care industry in the San Francisco Bay Area identified avenues for reducing health care labor shortages. Focus was on classifications where demand was expected to grow and where current demand exceeds supply: nursing, medical imaging, medical therapy, and medical records management. A modified job analysis technique…

  19. 77 FR 58755 - Small Business Size Standards: Health Care and Social Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG30 Small Business Size Standards: Health Care and Social Assistance... Classification System (NAICS) Sector 62, Health Care and Social Assistance, and retaining the current standards... the Federal Register on July 18, 2008 (73 FR 41237). SBA recognizes that changes in industry...

  20. Ten Things Lesbians Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for high blood pressure, cholesterol problems, and diabetes. Health care providers can also offer tips on quitting smoking, ... lesbians experience violence in their intimate relationships. However, health care providers do not ask lesbians about intimate partner ...

  1. Health Care Reform: Out Greatest Opportunity...Ever!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keigher, Sharon M.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses inevitability of health care reform in United States, considers the reform process itself, and explains the plan of the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform. Also considers the prospects for Congressional response to reform proposals. (NB)

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Your health care provider may suspect PCOS if you have eight ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Cushing’s syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... easily recognized when it is fully developed, but health care providers try to diagnose and treat it well ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... Rett syndrome may not always be present, so health care providers also need to evaluate the child's symptoms ...

  6. Children in Foster Homes Need Better Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 154859.html Children in Foster Homes Need Better Health Care American Academy of Pediatrics says kids may be ... do a better job of providing consistent, quality health care to children living in foster homes, a new ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on ... and urine tests. 1 Cushing’s Syndrome If a health care provider suspects Cushing’s syndrome, he or she may ...

  8. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on ... BV requires a vaginal exam by a qualified health care provider and the laboratory testing of fluid collected ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menkes Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Menkes disease? Skip sharing on social ... 3 months old. To diagnose Menkes disease, a health care provider will order blood tests to measure the ...

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Expanding Horizons of Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Past Issues Special Section CAM Expanding Horizons of Health Care Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... and why it is important to tell your health care providers about your use of CAM. We hope ...

  11. Americans Spend More on Health Care, but Fare Worse: Report

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_155051.html Americans Spend More on Health Care, But Fare Worse: Report Comparison with 12 industrialized ... doesn't buy everything when it comes to health care in the United States. When compared to 12 ...

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pregnancy Loss or Miscarriage?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pregnancy loss or miscarriage? Skip sharing ... light spotting, or bleeding, she should contact her health care provider immediately. For diagnosis, the woman may need ...

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers can check for Down syndrome during pregnancy ...

  14. Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2014 Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services On This Page Key findings Married men ... other not-married men to have had a health care visit in the past 12 months. Figure 1. ...

  15. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities (IDDs)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose IDDs? Skip sharing on social media ... 1 This type of test will help the health care provider examine the ability of a person to ...

  17. Hill-Burton Free and Reduced Cost Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Google Bookmarks Hill-Burton Free and Reduced-Cost Health Care In 1946, Congress passed a law that gave ... stopped providing funds in 1997, but about 150 health care facilities nationwide are still obligated to provide free ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on ... AFP, as well as high levels of acetylcholinesterase; health care providers might conduct this test to confirm high ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Phenylketonuria (PKU)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose phenylketonuria (PKU)? Skip sharing on social ... disabilities. 2 How are newborns tested for PKU? Health care providers conduct a PKU screening test using a ...