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Sample records for health care development

  1. Developing primary health care.

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, B; Cumberlege, J

    1987-01-01

    Primary health care is best provided by a primary health care team of general practitioners, community nurses, and other staff working together from good premises and looking after the population registered with the practice. It encourages personal and continuing care of patients and good communication among the members of the team. Efforts should be made to foster this model of primary care where possible and also to evaluate its effectiveness. Community services that are not provided by primary care teams should be organised on a defined geographical basis, and the boundaries of these services should coincide as much as possible. Such arrangements would facilitate effective community care and health promotion and can be organised to work well with primary care teams. The patient's right to freedom of choice of a doctor, however, should be retained, as it adds flexibility to the rigidity of fixed geographically based services. PMID:3119003

  2. Challenges for health care development in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Rajko; Bilas, Vlatka; Franc, Sanja

    2012-09-01

    The main aim of the research done in this paper was to establish key challenges and perspectives for health care development in the Republic of Croatia in the next two decades. Empirical research was conducted in the form of semi-structured interviews involving 49 subjects, representatives of health care professionals from both, public and private sectors, health insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, drug wholesalers, and non-governmental organisations (patient associations). The results have shown that key challenges and problems of Croatian health care can be divided into three groups: functioning of health care systems, health care personnel, and external factors. Research has shown that key challenges related to the functioning of health care are inefficiency, financial unviability, inadequate infrastructure, and the lack of system transparency. Poor governance is another limiting factor. With regard to health care personnel, they face the problems of low salaries, which then lead to migration challenges and a potential shortage of health care personnel. The following external factors are deemed to be among the most significant challenges: ageing population, bad living habits, and an increase in the number of chronic diseases. However, problems caused by the global financial crisis and consequential macroeconomic situation must not be neglected. Guidelines for responding to challenges identified in this research are the backbone for developing a strategy for health care development in the Republic of Croatia. Long-term vision, strategy, policies, and a regulatory framework are all necessary preconditions for an efficient health care system and more quality health services. PMID:23213924

  3. Future developments in health care performance management

    PubMed Central

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

  4. Future developments in health care performance management.

    PubMed

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

  5. Health Care System Reforms in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a critical but non-systematic review of recent health care system reforms in developing countries. The literature reports mixed results as to whether reforms improve the financial protection of the poor or not. We discuss the reasons for these differences by comparing three representative countries: Mexico, Vietnam, and China. First, the design of the health care system reform, as well as the summary of its evaluation, is briefly described for each country. Then, the discussion is developed along two lines: policy design and evaluation methodology. The review suggests that i) background differences, such as social development, poverty level, and population health should be considered when taking other countries as a model; ii) although demand-side reforms can be improved, more attention should be paid to supply-side reforms; and iii) the findings of empirical evaluation might be biased due to the evaluation design, the choice of outcome, data quality, and evaluation methodology, which should be borne in mind when designing health care system reforms. PMID:25170464

  6. Health care system reforms in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei

    2012-12-28

    This article proposes a critical but non-systematic review of recent health care system reforms in developing countries. The literature reports mixed results as to whether reforms improve the financial protection of the poor or not. We discuss the reasons for these differences by comparing three representative countries: Mexico, Vietnam, and China. First, the design of the health care system reform, as well as the summary of its evaluation, is briefly described for each country. Then, the discussion is developed along two lines: policy design and evaluation methodology. The review suggests that i) background differences, such as social development, poverty level, and population health should be considered when taking other countries as a model; ii) although demand-side reforms can be improved, more attention should be paid to supply-side reforms; and iii) the findings of empirical evaluation might be biased due to the evaluation design, the choice of outcome, data quality, and evaluation methodology, which should be borne in mind when designing health care system reforms. PMID:25170464

  7. Sustainable development and quality health care.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    On the occasion of Development Week in Canada, Dr. Remi Sogunro spoke in February, 1994, about the many achievements of quality primary health care and PLAN's strategy to achieve sustainability. In one generation, under-5 mortality has been cut by a third. Deaths from measles has been reduced from 2.5 million to 1 million a year. Skeletal deformities from polio also have been reduced from 1/2 million to less than 140,000. Despite all this, there is much more to be attained. 35,000 children under 5 die from preventable diseases every day in developing countries. The health community is working hard to address these silent emergencies. PLAN International's primary health care program targets the poor and undeserved populations where diseases are prevalent. The main focus of PLAN's programs are mothers and children who are most vulnerable to disease. Key interventions that PLAN gives priority to are childhood and maternal immunization programs, including pre- and post-natal care for mothers. Other interventions under PLAN's comprehensive primary health care program include: control of diarrheal diseases and acute respiratory infections, growth monitoring, nutrition and control of STDs and HIV/AIDS infection, water and sanitation, family planning information and educational services, and rehabilitation of the handicapped. "Go in search of people, begin with what they know, build on what they have," goes a Chinese proverb. This also summarizes PLAN's guiding principle for achieving sustainable development: the importance of investing in people. PLAN's programs in the field build partnerships and empower communities. PLAN's emphasis on institution-building and capacity-building with local institutions is an important part of organizational strategy to ensure sustained development. PMID:12179549

  8. Health Update: Development of New National Child Care Health Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the absence of national standards which are uniformly applicable to health, safety, sanitation, and nutrition aspects of child care programs. Explains the responsive collaborative project of the American Academy of Pediatrics and American Public Health Association to develop national reference standards for out-of-home child care…

  9. CHILDREN'S ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Materials for building capacity in the health sector of developing countries on children's environmental health. includes a trainer's guide and harmonized guidance materials on assessing environmental exposure & risk as well as prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Determinants of integrated health care development: chains of care in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ahgren, Bengt; Axelsson, Runo

    2007-01-01

    Local health care in Sweden is an emerging form of integrated care, linked together by chains of care. Experiences show, however, that the development of chains of care is making slow progress. In order to study the factors behind this development, an embedded multiple-case study design was chosen. The study compared six health authorities in Sweden, three with successful and three with unsuccessful chain of care development. Three major determinants of integrated health care development were identified: professional dedication, legitimacy and confidence. In more detail, space for prime movers and trust between participants were crucial success factors, while top-down approaches targeting at the same time a change of management systems were negative for the development of chains of care. Resistance from the body of physicians was a serious obstacle to such a development. Local health care depends on developed chains of care, but it seems that health care managers do not have the management systems necessary to run these clinical networks, mainly due to a lack of acceptance from the medical profession. This is an impossible situation in the long run, since the number of chains of care is likely to increase as a result of the emerging local health care. PMID:17623356

  11. Designing primary health care teams for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Reisman, A; Duran, L

    1983-01-01

    A time-honored industrial engineering technique, job evaluation, which was developed to set rates for manual labor, was used in the design of new teams for delivering primary health care in Latin America. The technique was used both in writing job descriptions for new allied health personnel and in designing the curriculums needed to train the personnel. PMID:6856744

  12. Developing Healthy Adolescents--A Progressive Health Care Partnership Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griesemer, Bernard A.; Hough, David L.

    1993-01-01

    A 1991 partnership coupling Southwest Missouri State University with Saint John's Regional Health Center spawned the Midwest Sports Medicine Center, originally designed to treat orthopedic injuries. Soon the center developed major educational initiatives, including SportsPACE, a program integrating health care programs into the secondary core…

  13. The history of China's maternal and child health care development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Bai, Jing; Na, Heya

    2015-10-01

    The history of maternal and child health (MCH) development in China can be divided into six stages: before 1949 when the People's Republic of China was founded, traditional Chinese medicine shielded women's and children's health while modern medicine began to bud; 1949-1966, the MCH system was established and gradually improved; 1966-1976, the decade of the Cultural Revolution, the road to improve MCH twisted and turned along with the political instability; 1976-1990, especially after the "Reform" and "Opening Up", China's MCH care had been booming and the MCH status continued to improve with the rapid social and economic development; 1990-2008, with the booming economy, MCH care gained increasingly national and international attention. Through improving legislation and investment, China made great strides in the improvement of MCH. After 2009, the comprehensive health care reform laid an institutional basis for the development of MCH and promotion of health equity. PMID:26271835

  14. Recent developments in health care law: partners in innovation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Roberta M; Bliss, Lisa; Caley, Sylvia; Lombardo, Paul A; Rooker, Jerri Nims; Todres, Jonathan; Wolf, Leslie E

    2010-06-01

    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance directives; the recent emergence of medical-legal partnerships and their benefits for patients; the obesity epidemic and its implications for the child's right to health under international conventions. PMID:20490620

  15. Recent developments in health care law: culture and controversy.

    PubMed

    Berry, Roberta M; Bliss, Lisa; Caley, Sylvia; Lombardo, Paul A; Wolf, Leslie E

    2013-03-01

    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on controversy at the intersection of health care law and culture. The article addresses: emerging issues in federal regulatory oversight of the rapidly developing market in direct-to-consumer genetic testing, including questions about the role of government oversight and professional mediation of consumer choice; continuing controversies surrounding stem cell research and therapies and the implications of these controversies for healthcare institutions; a controversy in India arising at the intersection of abortion law and the rights of the disabled but implicating a broader set of cross-cultural issues; and the education of U.S. health care providers and lawyers in the theory and practice of cultural competency. PMID:23180091

  16. Report on the International Conference on Emergency Health Care Development.

    PubMed Central

    Dines, G B

    1990-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) provide rescue, field stabilization, transportation to medical facilities, and definitive care for persons experiencing medical emergencies. In order to advance worldwide development and refinement of EMS systems, and their integration with emergency preparedness and response programs, the International Conference on Emergency Health Care Development was held in Crystal City, Arlington, VA, August 15-19, 1989. The conference was supported by the Department of Health and Human Services and its Health Resources and Services Administration; the Department of Transportation and its National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration; and the Pan American Health Organization. Objectives of the conference were to clarify linkages between various levels of emergency response, to present methods for developing or improving EMS systems within societies with different resources, to demonstrate processes by which EMS systems have been developed, and to propose international emergency health care development goals. Topics included development of services in developing nations, case studies of underdeveloped countries' responses to natural disasters, and a method for updating disaster response through use of available medical resources. PMID:1968669

  17. Developing Electronic Cooperation Tools: A Case From Norwegian Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Mydske, Per Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Background Many countries aim to create electronic cooperational tools in health care, but the progress is rather slow. Objective The study aimed to uncover how the authoritys’ financing policies influence the development of electronic cooperational tools within public health care. Methods An interpretative approach was used in this study. We performed 30 semistructured interviews with vendors, policy makers, and public authorities. Additionally, we conducted an extensive documentation study and participated in 18 workshops concerning information and communication technology (ICT) in Norwegian health care. Results We found that the interorganizational communication in sectors like health care, that have undergone an independent development of their internal information infrastructure would find it difficult to create electronic services that interconnect the organizations because such connections would affect all interconnected organizations within the heterogenic structure. The organizations would, to a large extent, depend on new functionality in existing information systems. Electronic patient records play a central role in all parts of the health care sector and therefore dependence is established to the information systems and theirs vendors. The Norwegian government authorities, which run more than 80% of the Norwegian health care, have not taken extraordinary steps to compensate for this dependency–the government's political philosophy is that each health care institution should pay for further electronic patient record development. However, cooperational tools are complex due to the number of players involved and the way they are intertwined with the overall workflow. The customers are not able to buy new functionalities on the drawing table, while the electronic patient record vendors are not willing to take the economic risk in developing cooperational tools. Thus, the market mechanisms in the domain are challenged. We also found that public projects

  18. Community Health Workers and Health Care Delivery: Evaluation of a Women's Reproductive Health Care Project in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Abdul; White, Franklin; Karim, Mehtab S.

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of the mid-term evaluation of a Women's Health Care Project, a study was conducted to compare the utilization of maternal and neonatal health (MNH) services in two areas with different levels of service in Punjab, Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted to interview Married Women of Reproductive Age (MWRA). Information was collected on MWRA knowledge regarding danger signs during pregnancy, delivery, postnatal periods, and MNH care seeking behavior. After comparing MNH service utilization, the two areas were compared using a logistic regression model, to identify the association of different factors with the intervention after controlling for socio-demographic, economic factors and distance of the MWRA residence to a health care facility. Results The demographic characteristics of women in the two areas were similar, although socioeconomic status as indicated by level of education and better household amenities, was higher in the intervention area. Consequently, on univariate analysis, utilization of MNH services: antenatal care, TT vaccination, institutional delivery and use of modern contraceptives were higher in the intervention than control area. Nonetheless, multivariable analysis controlling for confounders such as socioeconomic status revealed that utilization of antenatal care services at health centers and TT vaccination during pregnancy are significantly associated with the intervention. Conclusions Our findings suggest positive changes in health care seeking behavior of women and families with respect to MNH. Some aspects of care still require attention, such as knowledge about danger signs and neonatal care, especially umbilical cord care. Despite overall success achieved so far in response to the Millennium Development Goals, over the past two decades decreases in maternal mortality are far from the 2015 target. This report identifies some of the key factors to improving MNH and serves as an interim measure of a

  19. New developments in a consolidating health care industry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D; Kleiner, B H

    1998-01-01

    The current health care industry has recently seen a great deal of consolidation in the form of mergers and acquisitions. These mergers and acquisitions invariably result in a loss of jobs. This paper focuses on two strategies that health care companies use to reduce workforce under these circumstances. Specifically, the paper will focus on the mergers between SmithKline Beckman and Beecham plc in the late 1980s, FHP Health Care and TakeCare Health Plans, and PacifiCare's recent acquisition of FHP Health-care. It will compare and contrast theory, strategy and practices of these six companies as they endeavoured to merge or acquire each other. PMID:10346310

  20. Palau assessment for a continuing health care professional development program.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Ho; Dever, Gregory; Kuartei, Stevenson; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2007-03-01

    In 2003, the University of Hawai'i Department of Family Medicine and Community Health entered a 4-year cooperative agreement with the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration to establish the "Pacific Association for Clinical Training" (PACT). PACT's goal is to develop effective distance education methods to improve the education and skills of health care professionals in the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Island nations. To determine the situation existing in 2004, one of PACT's first projects was to perform site visits to each jurisdiction, conducting needs assessments through interviews with key health care professionals, hospital administrators and government officials. This article highlights findings of PACT's Palau assessment. Meant to establish a baseline for future reference, all data were collected in 2004-2005 and have not been updated. PMID:19772140

  1. [Primary health care and the millennium development goals].

    PubMed

    Faye, A; Bob, M; Fall, A; Fall, C

    2012-01-01

    Member countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) met in Alma Ata (8-12 September 1978) to define and advocate the implementation of primary health care (PHC) worldwide, above all, in developing countries, which had a real need to review their strategies for meeting the health needs of their populations. They did not suspect that 20 years later the vision they displayed would remain undeniably relevant. Here we examine the similarities and points of convergence of their declaration about PHC with the Millennium Development Goals that seek today to reduce poverty across the world. An exhaustive and analytic literature review was conducted to collect those similarities. Further analysis of the definitions, objectives, principles and recommendations of the Alma Ata Declaration and the Millennium Declaration reveals multiple dependencies and fundamental points of similarity between these two representations. Almost all states have pledged to achieve the eight MDG by 2015: to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, achieve universal primary education, promote gender equality and empower women, reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensure environmental sustainability, and develop a global partnership for development. The Alma Ata conference defined primary health care as essential health care, based on practical methods and techniques that are both scientifically sound and socially acceptable, universally accessible to all individuals and all families of the community, through their full participation and at a cost that the community and countries can afford at all stages of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination. It is an integral part of economic and social development. The following principles are involved in the achievement of both primary health care and the MDG: social equity, community participation, and intersectorality. Public health is an essential condition of poverty

  2. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care

    PubMed Central

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care. PMID:27493399

  3. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  4. Health Care Mentors: A Work-Based Approach to Developing the Health Care Workforce of Tomorrow. [Fourth Edition]. Career Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GMS Partners, Inc. Silver Spring, MD.

    Designed as the final step in a carefully articulated work-readiness program, Mentors provides students interested in health care careers with an opportunity to develop superior employability skills, while striking a balance between work and school. The Mentors program links the school community, the student, and host organizations in a mutually…

  5. Developing the Cambridge palliative audit schedule (CAMPAS): a palliative care audit for primary health care teams.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M S; Barclay, S I; Todd, C J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problems with the provision of palliative care have been reported. Audit is one means of improving care. Earlier audits of primary care palliative care have been initiated by general practitioners (GPs) and are predominantly retrospective record reviews. Widely applicable methods for the audit of primary care palliative care do not exist. AIM: To develop relevant palliative care standards and to devise an audit schedule (the Cambridge palliative audit schedule, CAMPAS) suitable for monitoring palliative care in diverse primary care settings. METHOD: Primary health care team (PHCT) members collaborated at all stages. Reasonable outcomes and acceptable interventions for PHCTs were identified and standards developed. Each standard was constructed to ensure uniform interpretation, and CAMPAS was structured to collect data necessary for determining whether the standards were met. RESULTS: Over 50% of PHCTs (n = 20) in the health district were recruited and trained to use CAMPAS. A total of 876 contacts with 29 patients was recorded by PHCTs using CAMPAS. Considerable inter- and intra-PHCT variation was found in the achievement of the standards. CONCLUSIONS: The favourable participation rate suggests commitment to audit and improvement in patient care. Overall, the standards were reported to be suitable. Although 100% achievement of some standards may be unrealistic, the level of attainment for many suggests that it is possible. CAMPAS has been reported to be a useful structure for recording assessments and monitoring care, as well as a usable audit schedule. As an audit tool, it identified areas in need of improvement and facilitated feed-back to participants. Future audit is required to determine whether improvements in care have been effected. PMID:9692279

  6. Doctor of nursing practice program development: reengineering health care.

    PubMed

    Wall, Barbra M; Novak, Julie C; Wilkerson, Sharon A

    2005-09-01

    In this article, we describe the developmental process of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program that uses interdisciplinary resources to create unique DNP curriculum opportunities. Other schools may benefit from this experience in the development of their own DNP programs. The program delivers an innovative curriculum from post-baccalaureate to doctorate, emphasizing health care engineering and interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, hospitals, community leaders, and policymakers. This DNP program is uniquely situated to provide leadership in solving complex clinical problems through its partnership with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, the School of Pharmacy, the Homeland Security Institute, and the Center on Aging and the Life Course. Doctoral coursework, interdisciplinary collaboration, health care engineering/systems approaches, and new knowledge result in uniquely qualified providers. Post-baccalaureate students complete the university's Adult Nurse Practitioner program or its developing Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program during the first 2 years of the 4-year curriculum. A total of 83 post-baccalaureate credit hours include 1,526 hours of supervised clinical practice, a health policy residency, and cognate residencies in an area of specialization. The seven core competencies recommended by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing are incorporated into the curriculum. PMID:16220646

  7. Primary health care trading companies for sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Soeters, R; Nzala, S

    1994-01-01

    A programme of comprehensive primary health care in Zambia has been accompanied by the emergence of autonomous, non-profit trading and production companies that sell health-related goods to communities and health institutions and find markets for locally produced good. PMID:8141978

  8. Assessing & Developing Primary Care for Children: Reforms in Health Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grason, Holly Allen, Ed.; Guyer, Bernard, Ed.

    This publication is a compilation of papers presented at an April 1994 workshop sponsored by the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and the Bureau-funded Johns Hopkins Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center (CAHPC). The papers are as follows: (1) "Defining the Issues and Planning for Change: Health Care Systems, Primary…

  9. Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffer, Sandra, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains 13 articles and book/film reviews on various topics related to the diffusion of health care information in developing countries; beginning with two articles which define primary health care, and suggest principles related to the community, communication, and the health practitioner upon which primary health care should be…

  10. Experiences from development of home health care applications based on emerging Java technology.

    PubMed

    Lind, L; Sundvall, E; Ahlfeldt, H

    2001-01-01

    Home health care is an expanding area within the health care system. The idea of moving parts of the health care process from expensive specialised hospital care to primary health care and home health care might be attractive in a cost perspective. The introduction of home health care applications must be based on a rigorous analysis of necessary requirements to secure a safe and reliable health care. This article reports early experiences from the development of a home health care application based on emerging Java technologies such as the OSGi platform. A pilot application for follow-up of diabetes patients is presented and discussed in relation to a list of general requirements on home health care applications. PMID:11604851

  11. [Problems in the development of the emergency health care system].

    PubMed

    Hasić, Z; Sisić, I

    2000-01-01

    Since February 1994, during and after 4-years supervision of American specialists, Emergency department of Zenica hospital has been trying to implement Anglo-American working system within the hospital framework (video). Principles of quality functioning of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) are based on: Population that depends on different demographic factors and prevention programme (education of population, quality functioning of health legislation). Pre-hospital treatment depends on good quality communication and transport. Hospital treatment based on good functioning of Emergency department and Intensive care unit as well as proper coordination with other specialties. Proper implementation of items stated above depends on top-class teaching and compulsory periodical screening of attained knowledge and skills, properly organized communication, transport and technical equipment. Emergency medicine is not only a sum of urgencies from the existing conditions but a special medical discipline and it has special and unique approach to diagnosis and therapy of acute health disorders. Therefore, a main weakness in the development of emergency medicine is: no recognition of emergency medicine as a unique specialty in the most European countries, non-existing departments of emergency medicine at medical faculties, no unification of BiH emergency medicine system, undeveloped monitoring and development evaluation of emergency medicine etc. The World Association of Emergency Medicine should have an important role for emergency medicine recognition, and in its future development through links with health legislation and educational associations (ACLS, ATLS, APLS). PMID:11117025

  12. Health Care in the Community: Developing Academic/Practice Partnerships for Care Coordination and Managing Transitions.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Mary E; Perron, Tracy; Fountain, Donna M; Hinic, Katherine; Vargas, Maryelena; Swan, Beth Ann; Heelan-Fancher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of health care is quickly changing from an acute care to a community-based setting. Faculty development and mastery in the use of new technologies, such as high-definition simulation and virtual communities are crucial for effective student learning outcomes. Students' benefits include opportunities for hands-on experience in various patient care scenarios, realtime faculty feedback regarding their critical reasoning and clinical performance, interdisciplinary collaboration, and access to a nonthreatening learning environment. The results of this study provide some evidence of the benefits of developing faculty and nursing curricula that addresses the shift from an ilness-based, acute hospital model, to a community and population health-based preventive model. PMID:26259341

  13. Organization of ambulatory care provision: a critical determinant of health system performance in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P.

    2000-01-01

    Success in the provision of ambulatory personal health services, i.e. providing individuals with treatment for acute illness and preventive health care on an ambulatory basis, is the most significant contributor to the health care system's performance in most developing countries. Ambulatory personal health care has the potential to contribute the largest immediate gains in health status in populations, especially for the poor. At present, such health care accounts for the largest share of the total health expenditure in most lower income countries. It frequently comprises the largest share of the financial burden on households associated with health care consumption, which is typically regressively distributed. The "organization" of ambulatory personal health services is a critical determinant of the health system's performance which, at present, is poorly understood and insufficiently considered in policies and programmes for reforming health care systems. This article begins with a brief analysis of the importance of ambulatory care in the overall health system performance and this is followed by a summary of the inadequate global data on ambulatory care organization. It then defines the concept of "macro organization of health care" at a system level. Outlined also is a framework for analysing the organization of health care services and the major pathways through which the organization of ambulatory personal health care services can affect system performance. Examples of recent policy interventions to influence primary care organization--both government and nongovernmental providers and market structure--are reviewed. It is argued that the characteristics of health care markets in developing countries and of most primary care goods result in relatively diverse and competitive environments for ambulatory care services, compared with other types of health care. Therefore, governments will be required to use a variety of approaches beyond direct public provision

  14. [THE PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF HEALTH CARE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION].

    PubMed

    Schepin, O P; Korotkikh, R V

    2015-01-01

    The article considers actual conditions and characteristics of reformation of health care of Russia. The comparison is applied to such sectoral aspects as decentralization, medical care accessibility, public sector of health care, health of healthy population, resources distribution, medical insurance, paid medical services, etc. The comprehensive approach is proposed to resolving problems of national health care and alternatives of main direction of sectoral development. PMID:27116828

  15. Health communication in primary health care -A case study of ICT development for health promotion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Developing Information and Communication Technology (ICT) supported health communication in PHC could contribute to increased health literacy and empowerment, which are foundations for enabling people to increase control over their health, as a way to reduce increasing lifestyle related ill health. However, to increase the likelihood of success of implementing ICT supported health communication, it is essential to conduct a detailed analysis of the setting and context prior to the intervention. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of health communication for health promotion in PHC with emphasis on the implications for a planned ICT supported interactive health channel. Methods A qualitative case study, with a multi-methods approach was applied. Field notes, document study and focus groups were used for data collection. Data was then analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Health communication is an integral part of health promotion practice in PHC in this case study. However, there was a lack of consensus among health professionals on what a health promotion approach was, causing discrepancy in approaches and practices of health communication. Two themes emerged from the data analysis: Communicating health and environment for health communication. The themes represented individual and organizational factors that affected health communication practice in PHC and thus need to be taken into consideration in the development of the planned health channel. Conclusions Health communication practiced in PHC is individual based, preventive and reactive in nature, as opposed to population based, promotive and proactive in line with a health promotion approach. The most significant challenge in developing an ICT supported health communication channel for health promotion identified in this study, is profiling a health promotion approach in PHC. Addressing health promotion values and principles in the design of ICT supported health

  16. Development of Health Equity Indicators in Primary Health Care Organizations Using a Modified Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sabrina T.; Browne, Annette J.; Varcoe, Colleen; Lavoie, Josée; Fridkin, Alycia; Smye, Victoria; Godwin, Olive; Tu, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a core set of indicators that could be used for measuring and monitoring the performance of primary health care organizations' capacity and strategies for enhancing equity-oriented care. Methods Indicators were constructed based on a review of the literature and a thematic analysis of interview data with patients and staff (n = 114) using procedures for qualitatively derived data. We used a modified Delphi process where the indicators were circulated to staff at the Health Centers who served as participants (n = 63) over two rounds. Indicators were considered part of a priority set of health equity indicators if they received an overall importance rating of>8.0, on a scale of 1–9, where a higher score meant more importance. Results Seventeen indicators make up the priority set. Items were eliminated because they were rated as low importance (<8.0) in both rounds and were either redundant or more than one participant commented that taking action on the indicator was highly unlikely. In order to achieve health care equity, performance at the organizational level is as important as assessing the performance of staff. Two of the highest rated “treatment” or processes of care indicators reflects the need for culturally safe and trauma and violence-informed care. There are four indicators that can be used to measure outcomes which can be directly attributable to equity responsive primary health care. Discussion These indicators and subsequent development of items can be used to measure equity in the domains of treatment and outcomes. These areas represent targets for higher performance in relation to equity for organizations (e.g., funding allocations to ongoing training in equity-oriented care provision) and providers (e.g., reflexive practice, skill in working with the health effects of trauma). PMID:25478914

  17. Nursing and health care reform: implications for curriculum development.

    PubMed

    Bowen, M; Lyons, K J; Young, B E

    2000-01-01

    The health care system is undergoing profound changes. Cost containment efforts and restructuring have resulted in cutbacks in registered nurse (RN) positions. These changes are often related to the increased market penetration by managed care companies. To determine how RN graduates perceive these changes and their impact on the delivery of patient care, Healthcare Environment Surveys were mailed to graduates of the classes of 1986 and 1991. Using the Survey's 5-point Likert Scale, we measured the graduates' satisfaction with their salary, quality of supervision they received, opportunities for advancement, recognition for their job, working conditions, the overall job and the changes in their careers over the previous five year period. Our study suggests that the changes in the health care system are having an impact on how health care is being delivered and the way nurses view their jobs. Respondents reported that insurance companies are exerting increased control over patient care and perceive that the quality of patient care is declining. Increased workloads and an increase in the amount of paperwork were reported. Participants perceived that there were fewer jobs available and that job security was decreasing. The percentage of nurses who see job satisfaction as remaining the same or increasing are a majority. However, the relatively high percent of nurses who see job satisfaction as declining should provide a note of warning. The major implications of this study are that the professional nursing curriculum must be modified to include content on communication, organization, legislative/policy skills, and leadership. The nation's health care system is undergoing profound changes. There are numerous forces at work that are effecting the delivery of care and, consequently, the work of health professionals. These forces include significant efforts at cost containment, restructuring and downsizing of hospitals, and the movement of health care delivery out of acute

  18. Training for health care in developing countries: the work of the Tropical Health and Education Trust.

    PubMed

    Parry, E; Parry, V

    1998-11-01

    The Tropical Health and Education Trust (THET) was established to strengthen medical education and training for health care in developing countries. The Trust responds to requests from training institutions with a wide range of activities and programmes. Projects to meet specific needs are planned in outline with the Deans or Directors of institutions, as a basis for a long-term link with a similar institution in the United Kingdom. These links are now the preferred method for meeting requests to develop skills, strengthen services and promote staff development. However, funding is always necessary for their support. THET has promoted students' community-based training by enabling students in a team-training programme in Ethiopia to make interventions in primary health care. A prize for the best students' community, clinical or laboratory projects in six African countries encourages enquiry by the students, promotes independent learning, and relates academic work to problems in health care. Work with Ministries of Health includes a continuing medical education programme for rural medical officers in Uganda, courses in basic and life-saving surgery for Ethiopian health and medical officers, and a programme to update the skills of laboratory technologists in rural hospitals in Ghana. The range of projects that THET supports is wide because the needs, defined by those who are working in, and responsible for, training in the health service are diverse. PMID:10211253

  19. Health information technology in primary health care in developing countries: a literature review.

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Maia, Maria de Fatima Santos

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the debate and initiatives concerning the use of information technology (IT) in primary health care in developing countries. The literature from 1992-2002 was identified from searches of the MEDLINE, Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature Database (LILACS), Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases. The search identified 884 references, 350 of which were classified according to the scheme described by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). For the analysis of advantages, problems and perspectives of IT applications and systems, 52 articles were selected according to their potential contribution to the primary health-care processes in non-developed countries. These included: 10 on electronic patient registries (EPR), 22 on process and programmatic action evaluation and management systems (PPAEM) and 20 on clinical decision-support systems (CDS). The main advantages, limitations and perspectives are discussed. PMID:15640923

  20. Developing a Measure of Value in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Ken Lee, K H; Matthew Austin, J; Pronovost, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    There is broad support to pay for value, rather than volume, for health care in the United States. Despite the support, practical approaches for measuring value remain elusive. Value is commonly defined as quality divided by costs, where quality reflects patient outcomes and costs are the total costs for providing care, whether these be costs related to an episode, a diagnosis, or per capita. Academicians have proposed a conceptual approach to measure value, in which we measure outcomes important to patients and costs using time-driven activity-based costing. This approach is conceptually sound, but has significant practical challenges. In our commentary, we describe how health care can use existing quality measures and cost accounting data to measure value. Although not perfect, we believe this approach is practical, valid, and scalable and can establish the foundation for future work in this area. PMID:27325323

  1. [The economic-industrial health care complex and the social and economic dimension of development].

    PubMed

    Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira; Maldonado, José

    2012-12-01

    The strategic role of health care in the national development agenda has been increasingly recognized and institutionalized. In addition to its importance as a structuring element of the Social Welfare State, health care plays a leading role in the generation of innovation - an essential element for competitiveness in knowledge society. However, health care's productive basis is still fragile, and this negatively affects both the universal provision of health care services and Brazil's competitive inclusion in the globalized environment. This situation suggests the need of a more systematic analysis of the complex relationships among productive, technological and social interests in the scope of health care. Consequently, it is necessary to produce further knowledge about the Economic-Industrial Health Care Complex due to its potential for contributing to a socially inclusive development model. This means reversing the hierarchy between economic and social interests in the sanitary field, thus minimizing the vulnerability of the Brazilian health care policy. PMID:23250391

  2. The development and maturation of a statewide academic health care system: Clarian Health Partners/Indiana University Health.

    PubMed

    Handel, David J; Kleit, Stuart A; Handel, Daniel A

    2014-02-01

    As health care reform continues, health care organizations are evolving both structurally and operationally to position themselves to meet the challenges ahead. Academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals) particularly need an effective strategy that will allow them to meet their tripartite missions of patient care, education, and research in this time of increasing competition and resource constraints. Clarian Health Partners, recently renamed Indiana University Health, is a health care entity that developed from a partnership of the Indiana University Hospitals and Methodist Hospital of Indiana. This case study explores the history behind the development of Clarian Health Partners, the model employed, and the lessons learned. It discusses the governance and management models implemented, the steps taken to integrate the two partners in the new system, and the specific challenges of physician partnerships and collaborations. As mergers and consolidations continue in an era of health care reform, the lessons learned from previous endeavors, such as that of Clarian Health Partners, may be applicable. PMID:24362393

  3. Developing a promotion plan for health care marketing.

    PubMed

    Hallums, A

    1994-07-01

    Promotion of a health care provider's services is essential for communication with its customers and consumers. It is relevant to an organization's marketing strategy and is an element of what is described as the marketing mix. This paper considers the relationship of promotion to the marketing of services and proposes a plan for the promotion of the organization as a whole which can also be applied to an individual service or specialty. Whilst specific reference is made to an National Health Service (NHS) Trust it is also relevant to a Directly Managed Unit. PMID:7952707

  4. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs. PMID:22575784

  5. Transnational health care: from a global terminology towards transnational health region development.

    PubMed

    Mainil, Tomas; Van Loon, Francis; Dinnie, Keith; Botterill, David; Platenkamp, Vincent; Meulemans, Herman

    2012-11-01

    Within European cross-border health care, recent studies have identified several types of international patients. Within the Anglo-Saxon setting, the specific terminology of medical tourism is used. The analytical purpose of the paper is to resolve this semantic difference by suggesting an alternative terminology, 'transnational health care' that is understood as a 'context-controlled and coordinated network of health services'. For demand-driven trans-border access seekers and cross-border access searchers, there is a need to opt for regional health-policy strategies. For supply-driven sending context actors and receiving context actors, there would be organizational benefits to these strategies. Applying the terminology of trans-border access seekers, cross-border access searchers, sending context and receiving context actors results in a transnational patient mobility typology of twelve types of international patients, based on the criteria of geographical distance, cultural distance and searching efforts, public/private/no cover and private/public provision of health services. Finally, the normative purpose of the paper is to encourage the use of this terminology to promote a policy route for transnational health regions. It is suggested that the development of transnational health regions, each with their own medical and supportive service characteristics, could enhance governmental context-controlled decision power in applying sustainable health destination management. PMID:22939046

  6. Primary Health Care Experiences in the Developing World: Lessons for Canada?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sheila A.

    1990-01-01

    Primary health care, as practised in many developing countries, is a set of guidelines for designing health strategies that are both appropriate to the health needs of the population and to cultural and socio-economic contexts. Four aspects of primary health care experience in developing countries may be relevant to Canadian health care: the integration of health and development, participation of the community in problem identification and program planning, the role of the community-based worker, and the use of health information. Canadian physicians may draw on this experience to address present challenges in our health system: providing health services to marginal groups, viewing health in a broader perspective, the escalating costs of health services, and increasing community involvement in planning health services. PMID:21249109

  7. The Future of Home Health project: developing the framework for health care at home.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa; Schiller, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    In addition to providing high-quality care to vulnerable patient populations, home healthcare offers the least costly option for patients and the healthcare system, particularly in postacute care. As the baby boom generation ages, policymakers are expressing concerns about rising costs, variation in home healthcare service use, and program integrity. The Alliance for Home Health Quality and Innovation seeks to develop a research-based strategic framework for the future of home healthcare for older Americans and those with disabilities. This article describes the initiative and invites readers to provide comments and suggestions. PMID:25654456

  8. Death with Dignity: The Developing Debate Among Health Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Oakman, Brittany N; Campbell, Hope E; Runk, Lindsay M

    2015-06-01

    The right-to-die movement-known variously as death with dignity, physician-assisted suicide, or aid in dying-remains controversial. The recently publicized death of 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who chose to end her life through physician-assisted suicide, forced many health care professionals to evaluate or re-evaluate their stance on the issue. Currently, only five states have aid-in-dying laws, but many others have bills under consideration. The legalized process for physician-assisted suicide has a strict set of procedures that physicians and patients must follow to ensure the competency and safety of all parties involved. Opposition against legalizing physician-assisted suicide encompasses more than simply moral, religious, or ethical differences. While some individuals believe that physician-assisted suicide gives patients autonomy in their end-of-life care, health care professionals also may have reservations about the liability of the situation. Pharmacists, in particular, play a pertinent role in the dispensing of, and counseling about, the medications used to assist patients in hastening their death. It is imperative that pharmacists be aware of the intended use of the particular medication so that they can make informed decisions about their participation and ensure that they perform all the necessary steps required to remain compliant with the laws or statutes in their jurisdiction. This practice places an increased burden on pharmacists to evaluate their opinion on the concept of death with dignity and whether or not they want to participate. PMID:26048466

  9. [Commodification of health care services for development: the case of Colombia].

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Oscar

    2008-09-01

    This is a succinct analysis of the circular relationship between health and development and the changes occurring over recent decades regarding health care services production and delivery that have resulted in a new paradigm. From the late 1970s through the 1980s, three major, worldwide shifts occurred that changed health care services in Colombia and in other Latin American countries: the privatization of government entities, the commodification of health care services, and the failure of the Soviet model. Health care system reform in Colombia, considered by some experts to be a model, is an example of health care commodification that, 15 years later, has not achieved the coverage, nor the equity, nor the efficiency, nor the quality, that it should have. More so than the market, the problem has been with the market entities that seek disproportionate profits. A solution for this situation is to appeal to nonprofit organizations for the purchase and sale of health care services. PMID:19115549

  10. Health Care Technical Advisory Committee on Curriculum Development. Job Clusters, Competencies and Task Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Montana Coll., Havre. Montana Center for Vocational Education, Research, Curriculum and Personnel Development.

    This skills inventory for health care occupations was developed by a technical committee in Montana to assist in the development of model curricula and to address state labor market needs. The committee included employers from hospitals and other health care providers, members of trade and professional associations, and educators. The validated…

  11. Developing New Mexico Health Care Policy: An application of the Vital Issues Process

    SciTech Connect

    Engi, D.; Icerman, L.

    1995-06-01

    The Vital Issues Process, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories Strategic Technologies Department, was utilized by the Health Care Task Force Advisory Group to apply structure to their policy deliberations. By convening three expert panels, an overarching goal for the New Mexico health care system, seven desired outcomes, nine policy options, and 17 action items were developed for the New Mexico health care system. Three broadly stated evaluation criteria were articulated and used to produce relative rankings of the desired outcomes and policy options for preventive care and information systems. Reports summarizing the policy deliberations were submitted for consideration by the Health Care Task Force, a Joint Interim Committee of the New Mexico Legislature, charged with facilitating the development and implementation of a comprehensive health care delivery system for New Mexico. The Task Force reported its findings and recommendations to the Second Session of the 41st New Mexico State Legislature in January 1994.

  12. Developing a multivariate electronic medical record integration model for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Lau, Francis; Price, Morgan; Lesperance, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multivariate electronic medical record (EMR) integration model for the primary health care setting. Our working hypothesis is that an integrated EMR is associated with high quality primary health care. Our assumption is that EMR integration should be viewed as a form of complex intervention with multiple interacting components that can impact the quality of care. Depending on how well the EMR is integrated in the practice setting, one can expect a corresponding change in the quality of care as measured through a set of primary health care quality indicators. To test the face validity of this model, a Delphi study is being planned where health care providers and information technology professionals involved with EMR adoption are polled for their feedback. This model has the potential to quantify and explain the factors that influence successful EMR integration to improve primary health care. PMID:23388317

  13. Health care utilization patterns in developing countries: role of the technology environment in "deriving" the demand for health care.

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    Health care services, in combination with several intermediate (proximate) determinants of health such as environmental sanitation and nutrition, directly influence health status. In the economics literature, this is referred to as the health production technology. Although many studies recognize that demand for health care depends on the health production technology, otherwise known as a "derived" demand, this review indicates that few of them have so far been able to fully incorporate this technology in estimating significant determinants of health care use. Understanding the technology environment could help explain why substantial portions of the population do not gain access to care even when financial factors do not appear to be a barrier. Also, low utilization of health services may simply reflect the low productivity of these services when other complementary factors such as nutrition or clean water and sanitation are lacking. Finally, since health-producing technology is often a multistep (multivisit) process, health care demand studies generally offer an incomplete picture of health care utilization patterns because they focus on a single event such as the first visit of an illness episode. Researchers should obtain more complete information on the interaction between all health production inputs, their availability and access to them. Multidisciplinary methodologies are likely to be useful. PMID:1638667

  14. Primary health care in support of community development.

    PubMed

    Ferrinho, P; Robb, D; Cornielje, H; Rex, G

    1993-01-01

    A community development approach has been adopted in the outreach component of the work of the Alexandra Health Centre in South Africa. The importance of local township organizations has been recognized and the Centre is seen not only as providing technical solutions but also as helping people to achieve improved living conditions. This requires clear motivation, rigorous management, purposeful action by teams of health staff, and planning in conjunction with the community. PMID:8185757

  15. Development of a College Student's Mistrust of Health Care Organizations Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Kirchofer, Gregg M.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Kleinfelder, JoAnn; Bryant, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a College Student's Mistrust of Health Care Organizations (CSMHCO) scale and determine the relationship between medical mistrust with the use of a variety of health care services. Methods: A convenience sample of college students (n = 545) at 2 universities in the United States was recruited in…

  16. Steps, challenges and lessons in developing community mental health care

    PubMed Central

    THORNICROFT, GRAHAM; TANSELLA, MICHELE; LAW, ANN

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarises our own accumulated experience from developing community-orientated mental health services in England and Italy over the last 20-30 years. From this we have provisionally concluded that the following issues are central to the development of balanced mental health services: a) services need to reflect the priorities of service users and carers; b) evidence supports the need for both hospital and community services; c) services need to be provided close to home; d) some services need to be mobile rather than static; e) interventions need to address both symptoms and disabilities; and f) treatment has to be specific to individual needs. In this paper we consider ten key challenges that often face those trying to develop community-based mental health services: a) dealing with anxiety and uncertainty; b) compensating for a possible lack of structure in community services; c) learning how to initiate new developments; d) managing opposition to change within the mental health system; e) responding to opposition from neighbours; f) negotiating financial obstacles; g) avoiding system rigidities; h) bridging boundaries and barriers; i) maintaining staff morale; and j) creating locally relevant ser- vices rather than seeking “the right answer” from elsewhere. PMID:18560483

  17. Child Development: Day Care. 6. Health Services: A Guide for Project Directors and Health Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, A. Frederick, Jr.

    This manual is written to help day care directors, physicians, and others concerned with the health of children in day care to plan and carry out a group of services that will meet the health needs of children and their parents. It is divided into three parts. Part One is primarily concerned with Planners and Project Directors, and includes…

  18. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  19. Diabetes Connect: Developing a Mobile Health Intervention to Link Diabetes Community Health Workers With Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Cherrington, Andrea L; Agne, April A; Lampkin, Yolanda; Birl, Annie; Shelton, Tanya C; Guzman, Alfredo; Willig, James H

    2015-01-01

    Community health worker (CHW) interventions can help improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. There is limited evidence on how to effectively integrate CHW programs with primary care efforts. Mobile health technology (mHealth) can connect CHWs to members of the health care team and enhance care. We tested a model for the integration of a CHW-delivered mHealth intervention to improve diabetes self-management. Seventy-two African American patients with diabetes were followed using the mHealth tool. This project partnered an academic institution, a safety-net clinic, and African American churches. The integration of mHealth technology into CHW programs was successfully achieved and readily accepted. PMID:26353025

  20. Health care assistants' role, function and development: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Bowman, S; Bray, K; Leaver, G; Pilcher, T; Plowright, C; Stewart, L

    2003-01-01

    Intensive care has developed as a speciality since the 1950s; during this time there have been major technological advances in health care provision leading to a rapid expansion of all areas of critical care. The ongoing problem of recruiting appropriately qualified nurses has affected staffing levels in many units and continues to be a national problem. For many, the answer lies in employing health care assistants to support the work of registered nurses. A key aim of the British Association of Critical Care Nurses is to promote the art and science of critical care nursing by providing representation for its members, by responding to political and professional change and by producing and publishing position statements. A primary component of the work surrounding the development of this second position statement was the gathering of contemporary information in relation to the role of health care assistants within critical care units throughout the UK, through a survey of 645 critical care units within the UK. At present the impact upon the role of the critical care nurse is not fully understood, with research in this area suggesting that although there is a role for the health care assistant in the critical care environment, this should only be undertaken with a full analysis of this impact upon the work of the registered nurse. PMID:12940689

  1. [Evolution and new perspectives of health care financing in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Audibert, Martine; Mathonnat, Jacky; de Roodenbeke, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Over the last twenty five years, the perspective of health care financing has dramatically changed in developing countries. In this context, it is worth reviewing the literature and the experiences in order to understand the major shifts on this topic. During the sixties, health care policies focused on fighting major epidemics. Programs were dedicated to reduce the threat to population health. Financing related to the mobilization of resources for these programs and most of them were not managed within national administrations. The success of these policies was not sustainable. After Alma Ata, primary health care became a priority but it took some years before the management of the health care district was introduced as a major topic. In the eighties, with the district policy and the Bamako Initiative, the economic approach became a major part of all health care policies. At that time, most of health care financing was related to cost recovery strategies. All the attention was then drawn on how it worked: Fee policies, distribution of revenues, efficient use of resources and so on. In the second half of the nineties, cost recovery was relegated to the back scene, health care financing policy then becoming a major front scene matter. Two major reasons may explain this change in perspective: HIV which causes a major burden on the whole health system, and fighting poverty in relation with debts reduction. In most developing countries, with high HIV prevalence, access to care is no longer possible within the framework of the ongoing heath care financing scheme. Health plays a major role in poverty reduction strategies but health care officials must take into account every aspect of public financing. New facts also have to be taken into account: Decentralization/autonomy policies, the growing role of third party payment and the rising number of qualified health care professionals. All these facts, along with a broader emphasis given to the market, introduce a need for

  2. Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management And Quality Oucomes in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Haas, Sheila A; Vlasses, Frances; Havey, Julia

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple demands and challenges inherent in establishing staffing models in ambulatory heath care settings today. If health care administrators establish a supportive physical and interpersonal health care environment, and develop high-performing interprofessional teams and staffing models and electronic documentation systems that track performance, patients will have more opportunities to receive safe, high-quality evidence-based care that encourages patient participation in decision making, as well as provision of their care. The health care organization must be aligned and responsive to the community within which it resides, fully invested in population health management, and continuously scanning the environment for competitive, regulatory, and external environmental risks. All of these challenges require highly competent providers willing to change attitudes and culture such as movement toward collaborative practice among the interprofessional team including the patient. PMID:27439249

  3. Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Training: Systematic Development and Implementation in a Large Medical System.

    PubMed

    Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Corso, Meghan L; Nielsen, Matthew K; Corso, Kent A; Polizzi, Nicholas C; Earles, Jay E

    2016-09-01

    The expansion of integrated, collaborative, behavioral health services in primary care requires a trained behavioral health workforce with specific competencies to deliver effective, evidence-informed, team-based care. Most behavioral health providers do not have training or experience working as primary care behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and require structured training to function effectively in this role. This article discusses one such training program developed to meet the needs of a large healthcare system initiating widespread implementation of the primary care behavioral health model of service delivery. It details the Department of Defense's experience in developing its extensive BHC training program, including challenges of addressing personnel selection and hiring issues, selecting a model for training, developing and implementing a phased training curriculum, and improving the training over time to address identified gaps. Future directions for training improvements and lessons learned in a large healthcare system are discussed. PMID:27484777

  4. Health care development: integrating transaction cost theory with social support theory.

    PubMed

    Hajli, M Nick; Shanmugam, Mohana; Hajli, Ali; Khani, Amir Hossein; Wang, Yichuan

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of Web 2.0 technologies has already been influential in many industries, and Web 2.0 applications are now beginning to have an impact on health care. These new technologies offer a promising approach for shaping the future of modern health care, with the potential for opening up new opportunities for the health care industry as it struggles to deal with challenges including the need to cut costs, the increasing demand for health services and the increasing cost of medical technology. Social media such as social networking sites are attracting more individuals to online health communities, contributing to an increase in the productivity of modern health care and reducing transaction costs. This study therefore examines the potential effect of social technologies, particularly social media, on health care development by adopting a social support/transaction cost perspective. Viewed through the lens of Information Systems, social support and transaction cost theories indicate that social media, particularly online health communities, positively support health care development. The results show that individuals join online health communities to share and receive social support, and these social interactions provide both informational and emotional support. PMID:25068990

  5. Progress in the development of integrated mental health care in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kevin; McCollam, Allyson

    2002-01-01

    The development of integrated care through the promotion of 'partnership working' is a key policy objective of the Scottish Executive, the administration responsible for health services in Scotland. This paper considers the extent to which this goal is being achieved in mental health services, particularly those for people with severe and enduring mental illness. Distinguishing between the horizontal and vertical integration of services, exploratory research was conducted to assess progress towards this objective by examining how far a range of functional activities in Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) and their constituent Local Health Care Co-operatives (LHCCs) were themselves becoming increasingly integrated. All PCTs in Scotland were surveyed by postal questionnaire, and followed up by detailed telephone interviews. Six LHCC areas were selected for detailed case study analysis. A Reference Group was used to discuss and review emerging themes from the fieldwork. The report suggests that faster progress is being made in the horizontal integration of services between health and social care organisations than is the case for vertical integration between primary health care and specialist mental health care services; and that there are significant gaps in the extent to which functional activities within Trusts are changing to support the development of integrated care. A number of models are briefly considered, including the idea of 'intermediate care' that might speed the process of integration. PMID:16896397

  6. Developing Governance Structures in Health Care System Consolidation: A Framework for Nurse Leaders.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Colleen H; Bentley, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Given the acceleration and increasing complexity of integrative care models across health systems, the question how governance and management structure(s) should be operationalized and evolved to achieve peak system performance is paramount. In a recent evaluation of partnerships with the University of Kentucky HealthCare (UK HealthCare), the conceptualization of the integration management model was explored. It was recognized that nursing leadership, governance structure, and relationships are vital for successful movement and migration of appropriate care models. In this case, the evolving governance models and the forecasted impact on models of care delivery were carefully considered. This included the potential impact on nursing practice. As the model was developed, a conceptual framework was utilized to examine potential variant relationship arrangements and to provide organization to key constructs. Utilization of a blueprint to optimize decision making and provide a replicable approach was essential to management of the integration philosophy. PMID:27584887

  7. Eliciting health care priorities in developing countries: experimental evidence from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Font, Joan Costa; Forns, Joan Rovira; Sato, Azusa

    2016-02-01

    Although some methods for eliciting preferences to assist participatory priority setting in health care in developed countries are available, the same is not true for poor communities in developing countries whose preferences are neglected in health policy making. Existing methods grounded on self-interested, monetary valuations that may be inappropriate for developing country settings where community care is provided through 'social allocation' mechanisms. This paper proposes and examines an alternative methodology for eliciting preferences for health care programmes specifically catered for rural and less literate populations but which is still applicable in urban communities. Specifically, the method simulates a realistic collective budget allocation experiment, to be implemented in both rural and urban communities in Guatemala. We report evidence revealing that participatory budget-like experiments are incentive compatible mechanisms suitable for revealing collective preferences, while simultaneously having the advantage of involving communities in health care reform processes. PMID:25841770

  8. Advances in the conceptualization and measurement of Health Care Empowerment: development and validation of the Health Care Empowerment inventory.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mallory O; Rose, Carol Dawson; Dilworth, Samantha E; Neilands, Torsten B

    2012-01-01

    The Health Care Empowerment Model offers direction for the investigation of patient-controlled engagement and involvement in health care. At the core of the model is the construct of Health Care Empowerment (HCE), for which there exist no validated measures. A set of 27 candidate self-report survey items was constructed to capture five hypothesized inter-related facets of HCE (informed, engaged, committed, collaborative, and tolerant of uncertainty). The full item set was administered to 644 HIV-infected persons enrolled in three ongoing research studies. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses resulted in a two factor solution comprising four items each on two subscales: (1) HCE: Informed, Committed, Collaborative, and Engaged HCE ICCE) and (2) HCE Tolerance of Uncertainty (HCE TU). Subscale scores were evaluated for relationships with relevant constructs measured in the three studies, including depression, provider relationships, medication adherence, and HIV-1 viral load. Findings suggest the utility of this 8-item Health Care Empowerment Inventory (HCEI) in efforts to measure, understand, and track changes in the ways in which individuals engage in health care. PMID:23029184

  9. 76 FR 44956 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement; Correctional Health Care Executive Curriculum Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... National Institute of Corrections Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement; Correctional Health Care... care, restorative therapy, health information management, and medical specialty services, including... personnel, correctional health care executives must judiciously contract with community-based facilities...

  10. Development and Applications of an Outcomes Assessment Framework for Care Management Programs in Learning Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Kuntz-Melcavage, Kara; Forrest, Christopher B.; Lu, Yanyan; Piet, Leslie; Evans, Kathy; Uriyo, Maria; Sherry, Melissa; Richardson, Regina; Hawkins, Michelle; Neale, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and apply an outcomes assessment framework (OAF) for care management programs in health care delivery settings. Background: Care management (CM) refers to a regimen of organized activities that are designed to promote health in a population with particular chronic conditions or risk profiles, with focus on the triple aim for populations: improving the quality of care, advancing health outcomes, and lowering health care costs. CM has become an integral part of a care continuum for population-based health care management. To sustain a CM program, it is essential to assure and improve CM effectiveness through rigorous outcomes assessment. To this end, we constructed the OAF as the foundation of a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment. Innovations: To construct the OAF, we first systematically analyzed the operation process of a CM program; then, based on the operation analysis, we identified causal relationships between interventions and outcomes at various implementation stages of the program. This set of causal relationships established a roadmap for the rest of the outcomes assessment. Built upon knowledge from multiple disciplines, we (1) formalized a systematic approach to CM outcomes assessment, and (2) integrated proven analytics methodologies and industrial best practices into operation-oriented CM outcomes assessment. Conclusion: This systematic approach to OAF for assessing the outcomes of CM programs offers an opportunity to advance evidence-based care management. In addition, formalized CM outcomes assessment methodologies will enable us to compare CM effectiveness across health delivery settings. PMID:25992387

  11. Defining quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Buck, A S

    1992-05-01

    The difficulty and importance of developing and implementing a definition of quality in health care is discussed. Some current definitions are considered, and a recommended definition of quality health care is presented. PMID:1630660

  12. [How to develop advanced practice nursing in complex health care systems?].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, Dan; Mengal, Yves; Pirson, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advanced nursing practitioners (ANP) have developed new roles in health care systems and this tendency is continuing to grow. Postgraduate trainedANP interact directly with the person, i.e. the individual and his/her family - in many fields of practice and in a context of collaboration withfellow nurses and other health care professionals. The potential benefits of ANP interventions have been demonstrated in many fields. In particular, ANP are public health actors, able to participate in the interdisciplinary response to supportive care ofpatients with chronic diseases. However, the development of advanced practice nursing (APN) in a complex health care system requires a systemic approach coordinated with the various levels of training of nursing practitioners and other health care professionals. This is an essential prerequisite to allow ANPs to develop new roles adapted to their capacities (legal qualification, high level, specialist training, modalities of collaboration, etc.). To achieve an added value for patients, for the health care system in terms ofresults and to ensure adequate nursing conditions, the authors emphasize the importance of structured development of APN and propose an awareness phase comprising adoption of a conceptual model of APN and the establishment of a structured list of existing nursing practices in order to prepare a methodical implementation strategy. PMID:26168623

  13. Recent developments in the use of online resources and mobile technologies to support mental health care.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Carolyn L; Roberts, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    This review describes recent developments in online and mobile mental health applications, including a discussion of patient portals to support mental health care. These technologies are rapidly evolving, often before there is systematic investigation of their effectiveness. Though there are some reviews of the effectiveness of mental health mobile apps, perhaps the more significant development is innovation in technology evaluation as well as new models of interprofessional collaboration in developing behavioural health technologies. Online mental health programs have a strong evidence base. Their role in population health strategies needs further exploration, including the most effective use of limited clinical staff resources. Patient portals and personal health records serve to enhance mental health treatment also, though concerns specific to mental health must be addressed to support broader adoption of portals. Provider concerns about sharing psychiatric notes with patients hinder support for portals. Health information exchange for mental health information requires thoughtful consent management strategies so mental health patients can benefit. Finally, the broad array of health information technologies may overwhelm patients. User-friendly, well-designed, patient-centred health information technology homes may integrate these functions to promote a holistic approach to care plans and overall wellness. Such technology homes have special security needs and require providers and patients to be well informed about how best to use these technologies to support behavioural health interventions. PMID:26523397

  14. [The academization of health care. An interim report in the context of current developments and challenges].

    PubMed

    Kälble, K

    2013-08-01

    In the last two decades, the educational landscape for health-care training has been seen in a new light as a result of complex social changes. Against this background, the present report offers an interim appraisal and assessment of the process of making health care more academic in view of current developments and challenges. The report begins with a short description and examination of the present training situation at a pre-academic level; several reform ideas are also presented. Following this, the report reconstructs the first phase of the academization of health care in the 1990s before the advent of the Bachelor's and Master's university degrees, which were created in the framework of the Bologna Reforms, and in which it first became possible to academicize to a limited extent certain areas of the large spectrum of health-care practices. The central part of the report is a discussion of the present situation and the newest developments in the field of academic health care within the context of the Bologna process and further changing conditions. In the conclusion, the report discusses the future prerequisites that could promote a sustainable and qualitative development of the academization of health care. PMID:23884529

  15. Using Mobile Health to Support the Chronic Care Model: Developing an Institutional Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Nundy, Shantanu; Dick, Jonathan J.; Goddu, Anna P.; Hogan, Patrick; Lu, Chen-Yuan E.; Solomon, Marla C.; Bussie, Arnell; Chin, Marshall H.; Peek, Monica E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of successful health system implementation. Program Development. An iterative process of program design was built upon a pilot study and engaged multiple institutional stakeholders. Patients identified having a “human face” to the pilot program as essential. Stakeholders recognized the need to integrate the program with primary and specialty care but voiced concerns about competing demands on clinician time. Program Description. Nurse administrators at a university-affiliated health plan use automated text messaging to provide personalized self-management support for member patients with diabetes and facilitate care coordination with the primary care team. For example, when a patient texts a request to meet with a dietitian, a nurse-administrator coordinates with the primary care team to provide a referral. Conclusion. Our innovative program enables the existing health system to support a de novo care management program by leveraging mobile technology. The program supports self-management and team-based care in a way that we believe engages patients yet meets the limited availability of providers and needs of health plan administrators. PMID:23304135

  16. Developing a composite index of spatial accessibility across different health care sectors: A German example.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Martin; Koller, Daniela; Vogt, Verena; Sundmacher, Leonie

    2016-02-01

    The evolving lack of ambulatory care providers especially in rural areas increasingly challenges the strict separation between ambulatory and inpatient care in Germany. Some consider allowing hospitals to treat ambulatory patients to tackle potential shortages of ambulatory care in underserved areas. In this paper, we develop an integrated index of spatial accessibility covering multiple dimensions of health care. This index may contribute to the empirical evidence concerning potential risks and benefits of integrating the currently separated health care sectors. Accessibility is measured separately for each type of care based on official data at the district level. Applying an Improved Gravity Model allows us to factor in potential cross-border utilization. We combine the accessibilities for each type of care into a univariate index by adapting the concept of regional multiple deprivation measurement to allow for a limited substitutability between health care sectors. The results suggest that better health care accessibility in urban areas persists when taking a holistic view. We believe that this new index may provide an empirical basis for an inter-sectoral capacity planning. PMID:26831039

  17. Nursing and Health Care Reform: Implications for Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Mary; Lyons, Kevin J.; Young, Barbara E.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of registered nurses who graduated in 1986 (n=50) and 1991 (n-58) revealed these opinions: insurance companies increasingly control patient care; workload and paperwork have increased; and there are fewer jobs and less job security. A significant number reported decreased job satisfaction. (SK)

  18. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  19. Developing the Health Care Workforce: A Comparison of Two Work-Based Learning Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Barbara Alice; Harte, Jacqui; Warnes, Anne-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share practice on how two approaches to work-based learning (WBL) are used to develop the knowledge and skills of health care staff with different levels of experience and educational attainment within the Department of Nursing and the Department of Allied Health Professions at a post-1992 university…

  20. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  1. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  2. Developing European guidelines for training care professionals in mental health promotion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although mental health promotion is a priority mental health action area for all European countries, high level training resources and high quality skills acquisition in mental health promotion are still relatively rare. The aim of the current paper is to present the results of the DG SANCO-funded PROMISE project concerning the development of European guidelines for training social and health care professionals in mental health promotion. Methods The PROMISE project brought together a multidisciplinary scientific committee from eight European sites representing a variety of institutions including universities, mental health service providers and public health organisations. The committee used thematic content analysis to filter and analyse European and international policy documents, scientific literature reviews on mental health promotion and existing mental health promotion programmes with regard to identifying quality criteria for training care professionals on this subject. The resulting PROMISE Guidelines quality criteria were then subjected to an iterative feedback procedure with local steering groups and training professionals at all sites with the aim of developing resource kits and evaluation tools for using the PROMISE Guidelines. Scientific committees also collected information from European, national and local stakeholder groups and professional organisations on existing training programmes, policies and projects. Results The process identified ten quality criteria for training care professionals in mental health promotion: embracing the principle of positive mental health; empowering community stakeholders; adopting an interdisciplinary and intersectoral approach; including people with mental health problems; advocating; consulting the knowledge base; adapting interventions to local contexts; identifying and evaluating risks; using the media; evaluating training, implementation processes and outcomes. The iterative feedback process produced

  3. Redirecting health care spending: consumer-directed health care.

    PubMed

    Nolin, JoAnn; Killackey, Janet

    2004-01-01

    In an environment of rising health care costs, defined contribution plans and closely related consumer-directed health plans are emerging as a possible next phase in health plan development and offer new opportunities for the nursing profession. PMID:15586479

  4. Managed health care.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  5. The development of health care policies in Trinidad and Tobago: autonomy or domination?

    PubMed

    Hezekiah, J A

    1989-01-01

    This article is part of a study that described and analyzed the development of nursing education in Trinidad and Tobago from self-government in 1956 to 1986, with special emphasis on the forces that helped to shape the society from colonial times, and consequently, nursing education. Adaptation and application of major concepts from theories of underdevelopment and development and colonialism formed the basis of the study's theoretical framework. The article focuses on the impact of the metropolitan countries on the development of health care policies. Because of the nation's historical legacy of colonialism and its current linkages with the United States and Canada, a major area fundamental to the analysis was to determine whether those two countries had superseded traditional British influences in determining health care policies. This raised the issue of whether or not health care policies could be autonomously developed to meet the needs of the people. PMID:2925302

  6. Developing a Comprehensive Animal Care Occupational Health and Safety Program at a Land-Grant Institution

    PubMed Central

    Goodly, Lyndon J; Jarrell, Vickie L; Miller, Monica A; Banks, Maureen C; Anderson, Thomas J; Branson, Katherine A; Woodward, Robert T; Peper, Randall L; Myers, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    The Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and sound ethical practices require institutions to provide safe working environments for personnel working with animals; this mandate is achieved in part by establishing an effective animal care Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP). Land-grant institutions often face unique organizational challenges in fulfilling this requirement. For example, responsibilities for providing health and safety programs often have historically been dispersed among many different divisions scattered around the campus. Here we describe how our institutional management personnel overcame organizational structure and cultural obstacles during the formation of a comprehensive campus-wide animal care OHSP. Steps toward establishing the animal care OHSP included assigning overall responsibility, identifying all stakeholders, creating a leadership group, and hiring a fulltime Animal Care OHSP Specialist. A web-based portal was developed, implemented, and refined over the past 7 y and reflected the unique organizational structures of the university and the needs of our research community. Through this web-based portal, hazards are identified, risks are assessed, and training is provided. The animal care OHSP now provides easy mandatory enrollment, supports timely feedback regarding hazards, and affords enrollees the opportunity to participate in voluntary medical surveillance. The future direction and development of the animal care OHSP will be based on the research trends of campus, identification of emerging health and safety hazards, and ongoing evaluation and refinement of the program. PMID:26817980

  7. Developing a Comprehensive Animal Care Occupational Health and Safety Program at a Land-Grant Institution.

    PubMed

    Goodly, Lyndon J; Jarrell, Vickie L; Miller, Monica A; Banks, Maureen C; Anderson, Thomas J; Branson, Katherine A; Woodward, Robert T; Peper, Randall L; Myers, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    The Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and sound ethical practices require institutions to provide safe working environments for personnel working with animals; this mandate is achieved in part by establishing an effective animal care Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP). Land-grant institutions often face unique organizational challenges in fulfilling this requirement. For example, responsibilities for providing health and safety programs often have historically been dispersed among many different divisions scattered around the campus. Here we describe how our institutional management personnel overcame organizational structure and cultural obstacles during the formation of a comprehensive campus-wide animal care OHSP. Steps toward establishing the animal care OHSP included assigning overall responsibility, identifying all stakeholders, creating a leadership group, and hiring a fulltime Animal Care OHSP Specialist. A web-based portal was developed, implemented, and refined over the past 7 y and reflected the unique organizational structures of the university and the needs of our research community. Through this web-based portal, hazards are identified, risks are assessed, and training is provided. The animal care OHSP now provides easy mandatory enrollment, supports timely feedback regarding hazards, and affords enrollees the opportunity to participate in voluntary medical surveillance. The future direction and development of the animal care OHSP will be based on the research trends of campus, identification of emerging health and safety hazards, and ongoing evaluation and refinement of the program. PMID:26817980

  8. Health care technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  9. Early Careerist Interest and Participation in Health Care Leadership Development Programs.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jon M; Temple, April

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are increasingly embracing leadership development programs. These programs include a variety of specific activities, such as formally structured leadership development, as well as mentoring, personal development and coaching, 360-degree feedback, and job enlargement, in order to increase the leadership skills of managers and high-potential staff. However, there is a lack of information on how early careerists in health care management view these programs and the degree to which they participate. This article reports on a study undertaken to determine how early careerists working in health care organizations view leadership development programs and their participation in such programs offered by their employers. Study findings are based on a survey of 126 early careerists who are graduates of an undergraduate health services administration program. We found varying levels of interest and participation in specific leadership development activities. In addition, we found that respondents with graduate degrees and those with higher compensation were more likely to participate in selected leadership development program activities. Implications of study findings for health care organizations and early careerists in the offering of, and participation in, leadership development programs are discussed. PMID:26506297

  10. Workforce and Leader Development: Learning From the Baldrige Winners in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin W; Goodson, Jane R; Duarte, Neville T

    2015-01-01

    It is ironic that perhaps the only constant in health care organizations today is change. To compete successfully in health care and position an organization for high performance amid continuous change, it is very important for managers to have knowledge of the best learning and development practices of high-performing organizations in their industry. The rapid increases in the rate of technological change and geometric increases in knowledge make it virtually imperative that human resources are developed effectively. This article discusses the best learning and development practices among the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award winners in the health care industry since 2002 when the industry had its first award-winning organization. PMID:26217991

  11. The Development of Diphosphonates as Significant Health Care Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Marion D.; Centner, Rosemary L.

    1978-01-01

    The historical development of the use of diphosphonates in detergents is presented as well as physical chemistry, physiological response, toxicology, and human clinical trials with these compounds. (BB)

  12. REACH-Meharry community-campus partnership: developing culturally competent health care providers.

    PubMed

    Fort, Jane G; McClellan, Linda

    2006-05-01

    An important national health care effort is elimination of racial and ethnic disparities in six specific conditions: infant mortality, cancer screening and management, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus infection, and child and adult immunizations. To address this concern, several health entities in Nashville, Tennessee responded to a grant initiative from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) demonstration project. The resulting award is the Nashville REACH 2010 Project, charged to develop sustainable methods to reduce and, in time, eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease and diabetes in the North Nashville community, where mortality rates of these diseases are substantially higher than in other parts of the county. As one of its many interests, the project included potential health care providers to receive and disseminate messages about disease prevention and health education. The present paper describes the community-campus partnership between the Nashville REACH 2010 project and the post-baccalaureate program of Meharry Medical College, a partnership that enfolded Meharry's pre-professional health care students into the community-based participatory service research project to increase the awareness and sensitivity of future minority health care providers to issues in minority and poor, underserved populations and to increase potential providers' familiarity with the processes involved in community-based participatory research. PMID:16809876

  13. Innovating Professional Development for Future Health Care Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Charlene; Rucinski, Ann; Schakelman, Justin

    2001-01-01

    Describes a Web-based professional development curriculum that was designed at the University of Delaware for the internship portion of the Registered Dieticians program. Topics include distance learning; technology integration; combining in-class with online instruction; multimedia use for problem-based learning case studies; course management…

  14. Developing a preceptorship/mentorship model for home health care nurses.

    PubMed

    DeCicco, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Preceptorship and mentorship programs are used in the health care sector to educate nurses, enhance their leadership skills, and improve their quality of work life. Recognizing the importance of these initiatives, Saint Elizabeth Health Care sought funding to create an innovative model of preceptorship/mentorship that meets the unique needs of home health care nurses. The methods utilized included focus groups, key informant interviews, and a workflow analysis. Factors that influence preceptorship such as nursing workload, preceptor training and remuneration were examined to develop a new model that offers career enhancement and leadership opportunities for preceptors and mentors, and promotes a welcoming environment for preceptees. Reward and recognition programs were created for preceptors to acknowledge their leadership contribution at the front line. This study demonstrates how evidence and innovation were used to create a preceptorship/mentorship model to develop community nursing leaders of the future. PMID:18444063

  15. Developing Crew Health Care and Habitability Systems for the Exploration Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathy; Sawin, Charles F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss the specific mission architectures associated with the NASA Exploration Vision and review the challenges and drivers associated with developing crew health care and habitability systems to manage human system risks. Crew health care systems must be provided to manage crew health within acceptable limits, as well as respond to medical contingencies that may occur during exploration missions. Habitability systems must enable crew performance for the tasks necessary to support the missions. During the summer of 2005, NASA defined its exploration architecture including blueprints for missions to the moon and to Mars. These mission architectures require research and technology development to focus on the operational risks associated with each mission, as well as the risks to long term astronaut health. This paper will review the highest priority risks associated with the various missions and discuss NASA s strategies and plans for performing the research and technology development necessary to manage the risks to acceptable levels.

  16. Characteristics of health care organizations associated with learning and development: lessons from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Monica

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of health care organizations associated with an ability to learn from experiences and to develop and manage change were explored in this study. Understanding of these characteristics is necessary to identify factors influencing success in learning from the past and achieving future health care quality objectives. A literature review of the quality improvement, strategic organizational development and change management, organizational learning, and microsystems fields identified 20 organizational characteristics, grouped under (a) organizational systems, (b) key actors, and (c) change management processes. Qualitative methods, using interviews, focus group reports, and archival records, were applied to find associations between identified characteristics and 6 Swedish health care units externally evaluated as delivering high-quality care. Strong support for a characteristic was defined as units having more than 4 sources describing the characteristic as an important success factor. Eighteen characteristics had strong support from at least 2 units. The strongest evidence was found for the following: (i) key actors have long-term commitment, provide support, and make sense of ambiguous situations; (ii) organizational systems encourage employee commitment, participation, and involvement; and (iii) change management processes are employed systematically. Based on the results, a new model of "characteristics associated with learning and development in health care organizations" is proposed. PMID:19851236

  17. Health Care Social Media: Expectations of Users in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Affordability, acceptability, accommodation, availability, and accessibility are the five most important dimensions of access to health services. Seventy two percent of the Indian population lives in semi-urban and rural areas. The strong mismatched ratio of hospitals to patients, rising costs of health care, rapidly changing demographics, increasing population, and heightened demands in pricing for technological health care usage in emerging economies necessitate a unique health delivery solution model using social media. A greater disease burden lies in the health care delivery in developing country like India. This is due to the lack of health care infrastructure in the majority of semi-urban and rural regions. New techniques need to be introduced in these regions to overcome these issues. In the present scenario, people use social media from business, automobiles, arts, book marking, cooking, entertainment, and general networking. Developed and advanced countries like the United States have developed their communication system for many years now. They have already established social media in a number of domains including health care. Similar practice incidences can be used to provide a new dimension to health care in the semi-urban regions of India. Objective This paper describes an extended study of a previous empirical study on the expectations of social media users for health care. The paper discusses what the users of social media expect from a health care social media site. Methods Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the significance of the affect of four factors (privacy, immediacy, usability, and communication) on the usage of health care social media. Privacy, immediacy, usability, and communication were the independent variables and health care social media was the dependant variable. Results There were 103 respondents who used the online questionnaire tool to generate their responses. The results from the multiple regression

  18. Health Care Engagement of Limited English Proficient Latino Families: Lessons Learned from Advisory Board Development

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Lisa Ross; Polk, Sarah; Chrismer, Marilyn Camacho; Giusti, Flor; Thompson, Darcy A.; Sibinga, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Background Specific information on the development and evaluation of patient/family engagement in health care improvement for populations with limited English proficiency (LEP) is lacking. Objectives We sought to provide information for use by other health care organizations aiming to engage LEP populations through advisory groups. Methods Informed by community-based research principles, we formed a family advisory board of LEP Latino families and conducted a multimodal evaluation of initial implementation and partnership development. Results The board met process measures goals for sustained engagement of LEP families and for establishing a group structure and process. Board outcomes included contributions to clinic educational materials and initiation of a project to increase the child friendliness of the physical space. Mothers on the board reported satisfaction with their participation. Conclusions We successfully sustained engagement of LEP Latino families in health care improvement using an advisory board. To promote patient-centered care and address health care disparities, LEP populations should be included in patient engagement programs. PMID:26639378

  19. THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF A MODEL TO PREDICT SUSTAINABILITY OF CHANGE IN HEALTH CARE SETTINGS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Innovations adopted through organizational change initiatives are often not sustained leading to diminished quality, productivity, and consumer satisfaction. Research explaining variance in the use of adopted innovations in health care settings is sparse, suggesting the need for a theoretical model to guide research and practice. In this article, we describe the development of a hybrid conjoint decision theoretic model designed to predict the sustainability of organizational change in health care settings. An initial test of the model’s predictive validity using expert scored hypothetic profiles resulted in an r-squared value of .77. The test of this model offers a theoretical base for future research on the sustainability of change in health care settings. PMID:22262947

  20. [Features and developments of Primary Care in a Public Health perspective].

    PubMed

    Damiani, Gianfranco; Azzolini, Elena; Silvestrini, Giulia; Ricciardi, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, substantial changes of the population structure have occurred, both at the national and international levels, due to several factors, including demographic changes and technological progress. At the same time, an epidemiological transition is occurring, characterized by a shift from diseases with an acute onset and a rapid resolution, to chronic-degenerative conditions which require more long-term care solutions. This shift seems to contribute to an increased life expectancy of the population, and a larger proportion of elderly individuals having complex health needs. The above described changes of the population structure, in combination with the current economic and financial crisis, require a redefinition of health system priorities at different levels, and the identification of specific intervention approaches. Today Primary Care is generally considered to have a key role in the progress of health systems and governments and international agencies, including the World Bank and the World Health Organisation have already increased investments and introduced reforms of Primary Care. However, there still remains much to be done, particularly with regards to the definition of specific aspects related to Primary Care. In this article the characteristics and developments of two main concepts, Primary Care (PC), which describes the delivery of Primary Care services, and Primary Health Care (PHC), which is more broadly defined by a level of governance or stewardship, are described. The distinction between PC and PHC implies the need for a characterization of system governance or stewardship, and of governance for care delivery. The first entails decision-making mechanisms for protecting the health both of individuals and of communities, by setting health, appropriateness and economic sustainability goals. These decisionmaking mechanisms further take into account the consequent responsibilities and risks compared to the achieved results toward citizens

  1. Creating incentives to move upstream: developing a diversified portfolio of population health measures within payment and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, John

    2015-03-01

    I examined the feasibility of developing a balanced portfolio of population health measures that would be useful within the current deliberations about health care and payment reform. My commentary acknowledges that an obstacle to the selection of population health metrics is the differing definitions of population health. Rather than choosing between these definitions, I identified five categories of indicators, ranging from traditional clinical care prevention interventions to those that measure investment in community-level nonclinical services, that in various combinations might yield the most promising results. I offer concrete examples of markers in each of the categories and show that there is a growing number of individuals eager to receive concrete recommendations and implement population health pilot programs. PMID:25602896

  2. Vacation health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 - 6 ... If you are taking medicine, talk to your health care provider before leaving. Carry all medicines with you ...

  3. Vacation health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001937.htm Vacation health care To use the sharing features on this page, ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 to ...

  4. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Affordable Care Act Clinical Practice Emergency Preparedness Finance Health Information Technology ICD-10 Integrity Medicaid Medicare ... Facility Operations Affordable Care Act Clinical Emergency Preparedness Finance Health Information Technology Integrity Medicaid Medicare Patient Privacy ...

  5. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  6. Partnerships among community development, public health, and health care could improve the well-being of low-income people.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David; Andrews, Nancy

    2011-11-01

    Safe, vibrant neighborhoods are vital to health. The community development "industry"-a network of nonprofit service providers, real estate developers, financial institutions, foundations, and government-draws on public subsidies and other financing to transform impoverished neighborhoods into better-functioning communities. Although such activity positively affects the "upstream" causes of poor health, the community development industry rarely collaborates with the health sector or even considers health effects in its work. Examples of initiatives-such as the creation of affordable housing that avoids nursing home placement-suggest a strong potential for cross-sector collaborations to reduce health disparities and slow the growth of health care spending, while at the same time improving economic and social well-being in America's most disadvantaged communities. We propose a four-point plan to help ensure that these collaborations achieve positive outcomes and sustainable progress for residents and investors alike. PMID:22068396

  7. Professional Development in Law, Health Care, and Aging: A Model Fellowship Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    2000-01-01

    Argues there is a growing need for a core of professionals with the education and sensitivities necessary to integrate the fields of law, health care, and gerontology. Paper describes a professional development fellowship program which attempts to address this need by having recently graduated attorneys assess, on a firsthand level, provisions of…

  8. Screening of Infants at Eight Months for Atypical Development in Primary Health Care in Southern Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivberg, Bengt; Lundqvist, Pia; Johanson, Ingmarie; Nordström, Berit; Persson, Bengt A.

    2016-01-01

    Screening studies of a population in primary health care are sparsely reported. The aim was to describe observed atypical behaviours that may be associated with autism spectrum conditions, in a population (n?=?4,329) of infants at eight months. Observations were performed by paediatric nurses. An observational instrument, named SEEK developed for…

  9. Demand-oriented and demand-driven health care: the development of a typology.

    PubMed

    Rijckmans, Madeleine; Garretsen, Henk; van de Goor, Ien; Bongers, Inge

    2007-09-01

    In most European countries, there is an increasing demand for demand-oriented and demand-driven approaches in the development of health care policy and the organization of health care services. Both approaches, in which the main focus is on 'the demand', are seen as counterparts of the supply-oriented approach, that has 'the supply' as point of departure. However, there is much confusion about the definition of the concepts. To identify the different views, and to examine to what extent there is consensus in the Netherlands about the concepts of demand-orientation and demand-driven care, a Delphi study was done among 26 experts; scientists, health care insurance companies, health care suppliers, the government, independent advisory bodies and client interest groups. The study resulted in a typology. The similarities and differences between the two concepts were demonstrated in five dimensions; responsibility, control, need-determination, formal embedment of vision in organization and choice. Furthermore, the typology was used to identify existing types of services as being either demand-oriented or demand-driven services. The typology provides an understanding of the similarities and differences between the two concepts, and appears to be a useful tool in identifying services to the extent that they are demand oriented or demand driven. PMID:17727554

  10. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education, Okemos, MI.

    This document presents the National Health Care Skill Standards, which were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology and West Ed Regional Research Laboratory, in partnership with educators and health care employers. The document begins with an overview of the purpose and benefits of skill standards. Presented next are…

  11. Development of a periodic health examination form for the frail elderly in long-term care

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Henry Yu-Hin; White, Joy; Sergeant, Myles; Moore, Ainsley Elizabeth; Patterson, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To create an evidence-based periodic health examination (PHE) form geared to long-term care (LTC) residents. Design Two-phase study: literature review to develop a quantitative, cross-sectional, self-administered survey, and administration of the survey followed by a focus group. A PHE form for LTC residents was developed based on participants’ recommendations. Setting Hamilton, Ont. Participants A total of 106 health care professionals completed the survey; 10 LTC physicians participated in the focus group. Main outcome measures The items deemed most important and most likely to be performed during a PHE; themes from focus group discussions. Results Respondents’ top 4 most important PHE items were also the top 4 items they thought were most likely to be performed during a PHE in LTC: reviewing active health status, reviewing pain control, reviewing medications, and screening for falls. Thematic analysis from the focus group discussion generated 3 main themes: current physician perspectives on the existing annual health examination in LTC, conceptual ideas for the new PHE form, and physician perspectives on the optimization of care in LTC settings. The findings from the survey, along with the themes from the focus group, were incorporated to create a PHE form for LTC residents. Conclusion The proposed PHE form emphasizes tracking a patient’s functional course over time and combines evidence-based preventive health interventions and health assessments with what is clinically important for LTC.

  12. Developing DNP students as adaptive leaders: a key strategy in transforming health care.

    PubMed

    Kendall-Gallagher, Deborah; Breslin, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    The success of graduates with a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree in transforming health care will depend significantly on their leadership ability to think strategically, innovate, and engage stakeholders in meaningful system improvement. Known as adaptive work, these graduates will need a portfolio of adaptive leadership skills that prepare them to move health care from a volume-driven to value-based system. This article describes development of a core DNP leadership course in a postmaster's point of entry DNP program at an academic health science center school of nursing. The course, designed as DNP students' initial step on their professional development journey to becoming adaptive leaders capable of driving transformative change, created an alternative lens for students to undertake strategic adaptive change initiatives within themselves and their organizations. PMID:24075257

  13. Educating advanced level practice within complex health care workplace environments through transformational practice development.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Sally; Jackson, Carrie; Webster, Jonathan; Manley, Kim

    2013-10-01

    Over the past 20 years health care reform has influenced the development of advanced level practitioner roles and expectations. How advanced level practitioners work to survive the highly stimulating, yet sometimes overwhelming aspects of balancing high quality provision with political reform agendas, amidst economic constraint is considered. Transformational approaches (encompassing education and practice led service development) can provide, promote and 'provoke' a harnessing of complex issues workplace environment to produce creative solutions. Transformational Practice Development provides a structured, rigorous, systematic approach that practitioners, teams and health care consumers alike can utilise to achieve skills and attributes needed for successful innovation. The authors present case study materials from action orientated locally delivered Practice Development, as a complex strategic intervention approach to influence and promote advanced level practice expertise. Initiated through facilitation of transformational leadership, and resultant team based improvements, we present how strategic collaborative processes can harness work chaos and complexity to provide sustainable and productive workplace cultures of effectiveness. PMID:23453607

  14. Health care informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng

    2003-03-01

    The health care industry is currently experiencing a fundamental change. Health care organizations are reorganizing their processes to reduce costs, be more competitive, and provide better and more personalized customer care. This new business strategy requires health care organizations to implement new technologies, such as Internet applications, enterprise systems, and mobile technologies in order to achieve their desired business changes. This article offers a conceptual model for implementing new information systems, integrating internal data, and linking suppliers and patients. PMID:12670013

  15. Development of guidelines to facilitate improved support of South Asian carers by primary health care teams

    PubMed Central

    Katbamna, S; Baker, R; Ahmad, W; Bhakta, P; Parker, G

    2001-01-01

    Background—Evidence based guidelines are regarded as an appropriate basis for providing effective health care, but few guidelines incorporate the views of users such as carers. Aim—To develop guidelines to assist primary health care teams (PHCTs) in their work with carers within South Asian communities. Methods—The guidelines were drawn up by a development group consisting of members of teams in areas with South Asian communities (Leicester and Bradford). The teams were invited to make their recommendations based on a systematic review of literature on minority ethnic carers and the findings of a study of the needs and experiences of local South Asian carers. A grading system was devised to enable the teams and a group of expert peer reviewers to assess the quality of evidence in support of each recommendation. Results—The teams agreed seven recommendations, graded according to available evidence and strength of opinion. External peer review supported the PHCTs' interpretation of evidence and their recommendations. The recommendations included consideration of communication and information for carers, coordination of care within teams, and recognition by team members of the roles of carers and their cultural and religious beliefs. Conclusion—There are particular steps that PHCTs can take to improve their support of South Asian carers. It is possible to develop guidelines that take users' views into account and incorporate evidence from qualitative studies. Key Words: primary health care; South Asian carers; guidelines PMID:11533424

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A RURAL COMMUNITY HEALTH CARE MODEL BASED ON INDIAN INDIGENOUS SYSTEM OF MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Hyma, B.; Ramesh, A.; Subhadra, N.L.

    1988-01-01

    Based on the principles of primary health care as outlined by WHO at the Alma Ata Conference in 1978, many voluntary organizations in India have been formulating, organizing and experimenting with the comprehensive rural community health Schemes. The goal is to indentify the felt needs at both individual and community levels and facilitate direct participation in decision making, develop suitable alternative, ecologically Sound indigenous models for socioeconomic well-being. In this context the Indian system of medicine has a useful and complementary role to play in the preventive and curative aspects of primary health care programmes. With the above objectives in mind the investigators undertook a brief survey of a “comprehensive rural health” project. The primary aim of this project is to develop a community health care model using innovative alternative methods using Indian indigenous system of medicine and participatory research techniques to improve rural health services of the surrounding under privileged villages. Many gaps exist in the assessment, however, a birds eye-view is presented here. PMID:22557645

  17. Health care for diabetic patients in developing countries: a case from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, M; Abdel-Fattah, M; Zaki, A; Bedwani, R; Assad, S; Tognoni, G; Nicolucci, A

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this was to evaluate the pattern of care for diabetic patients in Alexandria as a model from a developing country. It is a cross-sectional multi-centric. One thousand diabetic patients who had diabetes for no less than one year were randomly selected from 14 out-patient clinics and diabetic centres. Results showed that monitoring of the glycaemic state was based, almost entirely upon fasting blood glucose levels, with only a small minority (4%) having HbA measurements. During the previous 12 months, an electrocardiogram had not been performed in 26% of the subjects studies and the fundus was not examined in 38%. Twenty nine percent did not receive neurological examination, and feet were not inspected in 24%. Testing for albuminuria, serum creatinine, blood cholesterol, and triglycerides was performed only in 34%, 37%, 36% and 32% respectively. Patient's habits in seeking care revealed that 78% regularly attended the medical centre for follow up, 64% followed dietetic instructions, and 89% were compliant with prescribed therapy. Only 8% did self examination of blood glucose and 26% checked glucose in urine by themselves. Generally, the pattern of care provided for health insured diabetic patients is better than that received by non-health-insured cases. It is concluded that in Egypt the quality of diabetes care differs in many aspects from the recommended standards and that structural as well as organisational improvements are urgently needed, particularly to guarantee adequate care to non-health insured patients. PMID:10962591

  18. Measuring Quality of Maternal and Newborn Care in Developing Countries Using Demographic and Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Dettrick, Zoe; Gouda, Hebe N.; Hodge, Andrew; Jimenez-Soto, Eliana

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the greatest obstacles facing efforts to address quality of care in low and middle income countries is the absence of relevant and reliable data. This article proposes a methodology for creating a single “Quality Index” (QI) representing quality of maternal and neonatal health care based upon data collected as part of the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) program. Methods Using the 2012 Indonesian Demographic and Health Survey dataset, indicators of quality of care were identified based on the recommended guidelines outlined in the WHO Integrated Management of Pregnancy and Childbirth. Two sets of indicators were created; one set only including indicators available in the standard DHS questionnaire and the other including all indicators identified in the Indonesian dataset. For each indicator set composite indices were created using Principal Components Analysis and a modified form of Equal Weighting. These indices were tested for internal coherence and robustness, as well as their comparability with each other. Finally a single QI was chosen to explore the variation in index scores across a number of known equity markers in Indonesia including wealth, urban rural status and geographical region. Results The process of creating quality indexes from standard DHS data was proven to be feasible, and initial results from Indonesia indicate particular disparities in the quality of care received by the poor as well as those living in outlying regions. Conclusions The QI represents an important step forward in efforts to understand, measure and improve quality of MNCH care in developing countries. PMID:27362354

  19. An exploration of the applicability of situational segmentation in the health care market: development of a situational taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Gehrt, K C; Pinto, M B

    1990-01-01

    Competition in the health care market has intensified in recent years. Health care providers are increasingly adopting innovative marketing techniques to secure their positions in the marketplace. This paper examines an innovative marketing technique, situational segmentation, and assesses its applicability to the health care market. Situational segmentation has proven useful in many consumer goods markets but has received little attention in the context of health care marketing. A two-stage research process is used to develop a taxonomy of situational factors pertinent to health care choice. In stage one, focus group interviews are used to gather information which is instrumental to questionnaire development. In stage two, the responses of 151 subjects to a 51 item questionnaire are factor analyzed. The results demonstrate that situational segmentation is a viable strategy in the health care market. PMID:10105663

  20. Migration of health-care workers from developing countries: strategic approaches to its management.

    PubMed

    Stilwell, Barbara; Diallo, Khassoum; Zurn, Pascal; Vujicic, Marko; Adams, Orvill; Dal Poz, Mario

    2004-08-01

    Of the 175 million people (2.9% of the world's population) living outside their country of birth in 2000, 65 million were economically active. The rise in the number of people migrating is significant for many developing countries because they are losing their better-educated nationals to richer countries. Medical practitioners and nurses represent a small proportion of the highly skilled workers who migrate, but the loss for developing countries of human resources in the health sector may mean that the capacity of the health system to deliver health care equitably is significantly compromised. It is unlikely that migration will stop given the advances in global communications and the development of global labour markets in some fields, which now include nursing. The aim of this paper is to examine some key issues related to the international migration of health workers and to discuss strategic approaches to managing migration. PMID:15375449

  1. The Quality Assurance Project: introducing quality improvement to primary health care in less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, D D; Heiby, J R; Hatzell, T A

    1991-01-01

    Persistently excessive morbidity and mortality rates in less developed countries (LDCs) served by primary health care systems suggest that the quality of services is inadequate. The PRICOR project, sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development, has designed and implemented methods for quality assessment and problem solving in LDC health systems. After developing comprehensive lists of essential activities and tasks, similar to practice parameters, for seven child survival interventions, PRICOR supported comprehensive quality assessment studies in twelve LDC countries. The studies, yielding over 6000 observations of health worker-client encounters, indicated highly prevalent, serious program deficiencies in areas including diagnosis, treatment, patient education and supervision. To facilitate corrective action, PRICOR assisted managers in conducting operations research to resolve priority problems revealed by the assessments. The recently initiated Quality Assurance Project is building on PRICOR techniques in designing and implementing sustainable continuous quality improvement programs for LDC health systems. PMID:1782383

  2. Migration of health-care workers from developing countries: strategic approaches to its management.

    PubMed Central

    Stilwell, Barbara; Diallo, Khassoum; Zurn, Pascal; Vujicic, Marko; Adams, Orvill; Dal Poz, Mario

    2004-01-01

    Of the 175 million people (2.9% of the world's population) living outside their country of birth in 2000, 65 million were economically active. The rise in the number of people migrating is significant for many developing countries because they are losing their better-educated nationals to richer countries. Medical practitioners and nurses represent a small proportion of the highly skilled workers who migrate, but the loss for developing countries of human resources in the health sector may mean that the capacity of the health system to deliver health care equitably is significantly compromised. It is unlikely that migration will stop given the advances in global communications and the development of global labour markets in some fields, which now include nursing. The aim of this paper is to examine some key issues related to the international migration of health workers and to discuss strategic approaches to managing migration. PMID:15375449

  3. Strengthening Intersectoral Collaboration for Primary Health Care in Developing Countries: Can the Health Sector Play Broader Roles?

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Omokhoa Adedayo; Ofili, Antoinette Ngozi

    2010-01-01

    Many strategic challenges impeding the success of primary health care are rooted in weak strategic inputs, including intersectoral collaboration. Some encouraging evidence from programmes, projects, and studies suggests that intersectoral collaboration is feasible and useful. The strategy has the potential to fast-track the attainment of Millenium Development Goals. However, the strategy is not commonly utilised in developing countries. The health sector expects inputs from other sectors which may not necessarily subscribe to a shared responsibility for health improvement, whereas the public expects ‘‘health” from the health sector. Yet, the health sector rarely takes on initiatives in that direction. The sector is challenged to mobilise all stakeholders for intersectoral collaboration through advocacy and programming. Pilot projects are advised in order to allow for cumulative experience, incremental lessons and more supportive evidence. PMID:20454703

  4. The future of health care.

    PubMed

    Grossman, J H

    1992-10-01

    Future changes in patient care to curb costs and refocus on health versus medical care are discussed, and efforts at the New England Medical Center (NEMC) to measure patient outcomes and reorganize the delivery of care are described. Medical care is not the only determinant of an individual's health; lifestyle choices and the community also play important roles. The rate of increase in the cost of medical care must be contained. The future of health-care reform will be predicated on packages for the administration of care; for any given condition, all of the elements of medical care would be combined so that clinical and functional outcomes are achieved at a given price (episode-of-illness pricing). The success of medical care should be determined on the basis of the patient's ability to function, not on clinical indicators alone. Also, the prices for new generations of drugs should be determined on whether the new drugs improve patients' quality of life. Health-care professionals in hospitals should not be divided according to their specialties; instead, they should compose multidisciplinary teams that can care for patients over time. NEMC is developing a process and structure in which various health-care professionals work together to design health-care plans that cover a full episode of illness. The future of health care will also be influenced by global trends, including international medical-care inflation, standardization of process and outcome measurements, and a shift in emphasis from medicine to health. The health-care industry is in transition as this country searches for the best way to improve the health and functioning of each citizen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1442820

  5. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:25372574

  6. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Maple, Brenda T.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1993-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:25372246

  7. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10114933

  8. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10122365

  9. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Lazenby, Helen C.

    1992-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10120177

  10. Local politicization of Primary Health Care as an instrument for development: a case study of community health workers in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Twumasi, P A; Freund, P J

    1985-01-01

    The integrated approach of the Primary Health Care Concept has obvious implications for development. In view of Zambia's commitment to Primary Health Care it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of present institutional frameworks and the problems that may arise in shifting towards community responsibility for the provision of health. It is often assumed that the Primary Health Care approach of working through the community should be free of serious implementation problems. However, experience from community participation projects in a wide variety fields carried out in many countries, including Zambia has shown that failure to account for local institutional arrangements and political interests has hindered success. This article presents the theoretical issues involved in community participation research, reviews relevant literature and presents a case study of a community health worker in Western Province, Zambia. The case study derives from an on-going UNICEF/Government of Zambia sponsored project which is monitoring and evaluating the impact of child health and nutrition services in rural areas. The study illustrates some of the problems encountered by a CHW because of clashes with local political interests. An alternative model is proposed which if implemented can help alleviate and/or avoid these types of conflicts. PMID:4012349

  11. Developing quality indicators for family support services in community team-based mental health care.

    PubMed

    Serene Olin, S; Kutash, Krista; Pollock, Michele; Burns, Barbara J; Kuppinger, Anne; Craig, Nancy; Purdy, Frances; Armusewicz, Kelsey; Wisdom, Jennifer; Hoagwood, Kimberly E

    2014-01-01

    Quality indicators for programs integrating parent-delivered family support services for children's mental health have not been systematically developed. Increasing emphasis on accountability under the Affordable Care Act highlights the importance of quality-benchmarking efforts. Using a modified Delphi approach, quality indicators were developed for both program level and family support specialist level practices. These indicators were pilot tested with 21 community-based mental health programs. Psychometric properties of these indicators are reported; variations in program and family support specialist performance suggest the utility of these indicators as tools to guide policies and practices in organizations that integrate parent-delivered family support service components. PMID:23709287

  12. The health care learning organization.

    PubMed

    Hult, G T; Lukas, B A; Hult, A M

    1996-01-01

    To many health care executives, emphasis on marketing strategy has become a means of survival in the threatening new environment of cost attainment, intense competition, and prospective payment. This paper develops a positive model of the health care organization based on organizational learning theory and the concept of the health care offering. It is proposed that the typical health care organization represents the prototype of the learning organization. Thus, commitment to a shared vision is proposed to be an integral part of the health care organization and its diagnosis, treatment, and delivery of the health care offering, which is based on the exchange relationship, including its communicative environment. Based on the model, strategic marketing implications are discussed. PMID:10158798

  13. The UP College of Nursing Collaborating Center for Nursing Development in Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Yapchiongco, A S

    1990-01-01

    Officially designated as one of WHO's Collaborating Centers for Nursing Development (CCND), the UP College of Nursing in the Philippines will take on a leading role in achieving "health for all" through primary health care (PHC). The 1978 Declaration of Alma-Ata called for the goal of health for all by the year 2000, and recognized the key role of the nursing profession in this effort. In order to be designated a WHO collaborating center, an institution must be able to provide scientific and technical leadership at the national and international level, must be a stable institution, and must have the capacity to contribute to WHO programs. A WHO collaborating center forms part of an international network of institutions. Having become such a center, the UP College will form part of the Global Network for Nursing Development, organized in March 1987. The Global Network's functions include: 1) coordinating activities and promoting technical cooperation; 2) disseminating and exchanging informational; 3) monitoring trends in health services development and assessing their implications for nursing development; 4) supporting research; 5) gathering support and resources; and 6) promoting the goals of nursing development. As part of the Global Network, the UP College has developed a 4-year plan to fulfill the network's functions. During the June 1989 inauguration of the CCND, the Philippine Secretary of Health, Dr. Alfredo R. A. Bengzon, noted the country's lopsided ratio of health personnel per population, and issued a challenge to the UP College to lead the country in accelerating nursing development. PMID:2093189

  14. Caring for Kids: Useful Information and Hard-to-Find Facts about Child Health and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Patricia A.

    With input and recommendations from physicians, health care professionals, and parents, this book for parents, grandparents, and child caregivers provides numerous interesting facts, pages of useful information, and listings of resources to guide and inform anyone who cares for children. Section 1, on child health care, provides a brief history of…

  15. Gamma delta T cell responses associated with the development of tuberculosis in health care workers.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane J; Pinto, Luisa; Costa, Leonor; Martins, Marta; Leandro, Clara; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Arroz, Maria J; Ventura, Fernando A; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2005-03-01

    This study evaluated T cell immune responses to purified protein derivative (PPD) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in health care workers who remained free of active tuberculosis (HCWs w/o TB), health care workers who went on to develop active TB (HCWs w/TB), non-health care workers who were TB free (Non-HCWs) and tuberculosis patients presenting with minimal (Min TB) or advanced (Adv TB) disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated with Mtb and PPD and the expression of T cell activation markers CD25+ and HLA-DR+, intracellular IL-4 and IFN-gamma production and cytotoxic responses were evaluated. PBMC from HCWs who developed TB showed decreased percentages of cells expressing CD8+CD25+ in comparison to HCWs who remained healthy. HCWs who developed TB showed increased gammadelta TCR+ cell cytotoxicity and decreased CD3+gammadelta TCR- cell cytotoxicity in comparison to HCWs who remained healthy. PBMC from TB patients with advanced disease showed decreased percentages of CD25+CD4+ and CD25+CD8+ T cells that were associated with increased IL-4 production in CD8+ and gammadelta TCR+ phenotypes, in comparison with TB patients presenting minimal disease. TB patients with advanced disease showed increased gammadelta TCR+ cytotoxicity and reduced CD3+gammadelta TCR- cell cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that HCWs who developed TB show an early compensatory mechanism involving an increase in lytic responses of gammadelta TCR+ cells which did not prevent TB. PMID:15708307

  16. Multilateral Boundary Spanners: Creating Virtuous Cycles in the Development of Health Care Networks.

    PubMed

    Patru, Daniela; Lauche, Kristina; van Kranenburg, Hans; Ziggers, Gerrit Willem

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how health care networks achieve their goals is critical for managers and researchers alike. Our study addresses this issue by applying qualitative methods to retrospectively study the involvement of boundary spanners in the setup and implementation of a health care network in the Netherlands. We found that boundary spanners who acted multilaterally, that is, both within and across organizations, could successfully represent their organizations' interests at the network level and implement the required intraorganizational developments. By acting multilaterally, these boundary spanners generated virtuous cycles in the development of the network, whereby their successful actions supported the actions of their subordinates in setting up and implementing network agreements. In contrast, boundary spanners who had not been acting multilaterally before the network's kickoff were insufficiently prepared to enact their network-related tasks, and only successfully did so once they began operating both within and across organizations. PMID:26067578

  17. Health care in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, A

    1993-01-01

    Brazil has great geopolitical importance because of its size, environmental resources, and potential economic power. The organisation of its health care system reflects the schisms within Brazilian society. High technology private care is available to the rich and inadequate public care to the poor. Limited financial resources have been overconcentrated on health care in the hospital sector and health professionals are generally inappropriately trained to meet the needs of the community. However, recent changes in the organisation of health care are taking power away from federal government to state and local authorities. This should help the process of reform, but many vested interests remain to be overcome. A link programme between Britain and Brazil focusing on primary care has resulted in exchange of ideas and staff between the two countries. If primary care in Brazil can be improved it could help to narrow the health divide between rich and poor. Images p503-a p504-a p505-a PMID:8448465

  18. A decade of integration and collaboration: the development of integrated health care in Sweden 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ahgren, Bengt; Axelsson, Runo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The recent history of integrated health care in Sweden is explored in this article, focusing on the first decade of the 2000s. In addition, there are some reflections about successes and setbacks in this development and challenges for the next decade. Description of policy and practice The first efforts to integrate health care in Sweden appeared in the beginning of the 1990s. The focus was on integration of intra-organisational processes, aiming at a more cost-effective health care provision. Partly as a reaction to the increasing economism at that time, there was also a growing interest in quality improvement. Out of this work emerged the ‘chains of care’, integrating all health care providers involved in the care of specific patient groups. During the 2000s, many county councils have also introduced inter-organisational systems of ‘local health care’. There has also been increasing collaboration between health professionals and other professional groups in different health and welfare services. Discussion and conclusion Local health care meant that the chains of care and other forms of integration and collaboration became embedded in a more integrative context. At the same time, however, policy makers have promoted free patient choice in primary health care and also mergers of hospitals and clinical departments. These policies tend to fragment the provision of health care and have an adverse effect on the development of integrated care. As a counterbalance, more efforts should be put into evaluation of integrated health care, in order to replace political convictions with evidence concerning the benefits of such health care provision. PMID:21677844

  19. User-Centered Design of Health Care Software Development: Towards a Cultural Change.

    PubMed

    Stanziola, Enrique; Uznayo, María Quispe; Ortiz, Juan Marcos; Simón, Mariana; Otero, Carlos; Campos, Fernando; Luna, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Health care software gets better user efficiency, efficacy and satisfaction when the software is designed with their users' needs taken into account. However, it is not trivial to change the practice of software development to adopt user-centered design. In order to produce this change in the Health Informatics Department of the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, a plan was devised and implemented. The article presents the steps of the plan, shows how the steps were carried on, and reflects on the lessons learned through the process. PMID:26262073

  20. Goal orientation and conflicts: Motors of change in development projects in health care service.

    PubMed

    Elg, Mattias; Kollberg, Beata; Lindmark, Jan; Olsson, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    In this article we present parts of a larger research study, which aims at explaining how a process-oriented innovation unfolds and develops over time in Swedish health care. Through a longitudinal field study of a national and a local development project, we analyze how the flow model--a process-oriented innovation that emphasizes the sequence of activities a patient undertakes through the health care system--has been developed in Swedish health care. We propose to explain how the development projects unfold over time through the use of process theories of organizational development and change. The national project is best understood as a process of evolution from the phase of selection of projects and teleological (goal-oriented, socially constructed development) and dialectic theory (development via conflict of 2 opposing ideas from different organizational entities) through the process in which national ideas face real-world practice. We also propose a synthesis of dialectics and teleological motors for explaining local development. This synthesis proposes that local development teams have a rather broad notion of what it takes to implement the flow model. The team knows the goal, procedures, and activities from a broad perspective. Through a search-and-interact process, in which other organizational entities such as IT consultants, medical units and politicians have a heavy influence, the group sets and implements goals. Details of how to proceed are, however, constructed in the process of acting. This occurs as ideas are developed and tested in real settings. We conclude the article by presenting managerial implications for understanding these process patterns. PMID:17235254

  1. Developing the DESCARTE Model: The Design of Case Study Research in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Carolan, Clare M; Forbat, Liz; Smith, Annetta

    2016-04-01

    Case study is a long-established research tradition which predates the recent surge in mixed-methods research. Although a myriad of nuanced definitions of case study exist, seminal case study authors agree that the use of multiple data sources typify this research approach. The expansive case study literature demonstrates a lack of clarity and guidance in designing and reporting this approach to research. Informed by two reviews of the current health care literature, we posit that methodological description in case studies principally focuses on description of case study typology, which impedes the construction of methodologically clear and rigorous case studies. We draw from the case study and mixed-methods literature to develop the DESCARTE model as an innovative approach to the design, conduct, and reporting of case studies in health care. We examine how case study fits within the overall enterprise of qualitatively driven mixed-methods research, and the potential strengths of the model are considered. PMID:26336896

  2. Gender Difference in Health-Care Expenditure: Evidence from India Human Development Survey

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Nandita; Moradhvaj; Bora, Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background While the gender disparity in health and mortality in various stages of life in India is well documented, there is limited evidence on female disadvantage in health-care expenditure (HCE). Aims Examine the gender difference in HCE in short-term and major morbidity in India, and understand the role of factors underlying the difference. Data and Methods Using two rounds of nationally representative panel data—the India Human Development Survey (IHDS) 2004–2005 and 2011–2012 (IHDS I & II)—we calculate morbidity prevalence rate and mean HCE by gender, and examine the adjusted effect of gender on major morbidity-related HCE by using a two-part regression model. Further, we performed Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition of the gender gap in HCE in major morbidity to understand the contribution of demographic and socio-economic factors. Results Health-care expenditure on females was systematically lower than on males across all demographic and socio-economic groups. Multivariate analysis confirms that female HCE is significantly lower than male HCE even after controlling demographic and socio-economic factors (β = -0.148, p = 0.000, CI:-0.206–0.091). For both short-term and major morbidity, a female disadvantage on HCE increased from IHDS I to IHDS II. For instance, the male–female gap in major morbidity related expenditure increased from INR 1298 to INR 4172. A decomposition analysis of gender gap in HCE demonstrates that about 48% of the gap is attributable to differences in demographic and socio-economic factors (endowment effect), whereas 50% of the gap is due to the differential effect of the determinants (coefficient effect). Interpretation Indians spend less on female health care than on male health care. Most of the gender gap in HCE is not due to differential distribution of factors affecting HCE. PMID:27391322

  3. Profile of an excellent nurse manager: identifying and developing health care team leaders.

    PubMed

    Kallas, Kathryn D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the profile of an excellent nurse manager who can lead effective health care teams. Leadership attributes and competencies that characterize an excellent nurse manager and tools to identify them are lacking in the literature but are required to efficiently and effectively address the growing shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in health care team leadership roles and the critical linkage of these roles to patient outcomes. A profile of an excellent nurse manager was developed on the basis of the responses of nurse managers across the United States who had been identified as excellent or competent by chief nurse executive assessment or/and the Nurse Manager Ability, Leadership, and Support of Nurses staff survey to the Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory: Self Instrument. Statistically significant distinctions exist between nurse managers who are excellent and those who are competent as assessed by the Five Practices of Exemplary Leadership, which together comprise the profile of an excellent nurse manager. The Kouzes and Posner Leadership Practices Inventory: Self Instrument can be used to identify, recruit, and develop RNs in the nurse manager role as excellent leaders of effective health care teams. PMID:24896579

  4. Development of scales to assess patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rukhsana; Bates, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the development of scales to measure patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions and thus contributes to promoting awareness of physician-patient intercultural interaction processes. Surveys were administrated to a total of 682 participants. Exploratory factor analyses were employed to assess emergent scales and subscales to develop reliable instruments. The first two phases were devoted to formative research and pilot study. The third phase was devoted to scale development, which resulted in a five-factor solution to measure patient perception of physicians' cultural competence for patient satisfaction. PMID:22477717

  5. Developing a framework of service convenience in health care: An exploratory study for a primary care provider.

    PubMed

    Tuzovic, Sven; Kuppelwieser, Volker

    2016-01-01

    From retail health clinics and online appointment scheduling to (mobile) kiosks that enable patient check-in and automate the collection of copays and open balances, convenience has become an important topic in the health care sector over the last few years. While service convenience has also gained much interest in academia, one common limitation is that authors have adopted a "goods-centered" perspective focusing primarily on retail settings. Results of this exploratory study reveal that health care service convenience encompasses seven different dimensions: decision, access, scheduling, registration and check-in, transaction, care delivery, and postconsultation convenience. Implications and future research suggestions are discussed. PMID:27215644

  6. A call to action for evidence-based military women's health care: developing a women's health research agenda that addresses sex and gender in health and illness.

    PubMed

    Trego, Lori; Wilson, Candy; Steele, Nancy

    2010-10-01

    Women in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines are serving in complex occupational specialties that sustain national policy and ensure combat effectiveness of our forces. Their roles have evolved from supportive roles during early conflicts to active roles in combat support and counterinsurgency operations today. Although women have received military health care over the past three decades, sex- and gender-specific care has been limited to reproductive needs and has rarely addressed military-specific health risks and outcomes. The complexity of military jobs and increased deployments to combat operations has led to increased occupational and health risks for women. As differences have been noted between men and women's deployment-related health outcomes, it is incumbent on the Military Health Care System (MHS) to create an evidence base that addresses sex and gender differences in the health of its service members. A working group of military women's health advanced practice nurses (APN) and research experts proposes to address this gap in knowledge and practices through sex- and gender-specific research. A sex-and gender-based research agenda for military women's health will be a valuable instrument to those who are dedicated to the health of this population, including members of the Army, Navy, and Air Force military nursing community. Using the knowledge that the research agenda generates, military health care providers can develop clinical practice guidelines, influence policy, and participate in program development to improve the health of servicewomen. Shaping a sex- and gender-specific military women's health research agenda will create the foundation for future evidence-based care. PMID:20798161

  7. HealthCare.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask for more info Site Search Search Need health insurance? See if you qualify You can enroll in ... September 01 Start the school year strong with health insurance See More Footer Resources About the Affordable Care ...

  8. Reproductive health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Mark C; Ross, Lawrence S

    2014-02-01

    Most patients in the United States with reproductive health disorders are not covered by their health insurance for these problems. Health insurance plans consider reproductive care as a lifestyle choice not as a disease. If coverage is provided it is, most often, directed to female factor infertility and advanced reproductive techniques, ignoring male factor reproductive disorders. This article reviews the history of reproductive health care delivery and its present state, and considers its possible future direction. PMID:24286778

  9. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  10. Women’s autonomy in health care decision-making in developing countries: a synthesis of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Osamor, Pauline E; Grady, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Autonomy is considered essential for decision-making in a range of health care situations, from health care seeking and utilization to choosing among treatment options. Evidence suggests that women in developing or low-income countries often have limited autonomy and control over their health decisions. A review of the published empirical literature to identify definitions and methods used to measure women’s autonomy in developing countries describe the relationship between women’s autonomy and their health care decision-making, and identify sociodemographic factors that influence women’s autonomy and decision-making regarding health care was carried out. An integrated literature review using two databases (PubMed and Scopus) was performed. Inclusion criteria were 1) publication in English; 2) original articles; 3) investigations on women’s decision-making autonomy for health and health care utilization; and 4) developing country context. Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria, including eleven from South Asia, five from Africa, and one from Central Asia. Most studies used a definition of autonomy that included independence for women to make their own choices and decisions. Study methods differed in that many used study-specific measures, while others used a set of standardized questions from their countries’ national health surveys. Most studies examined women’s autonomy in the context of reproductive health, while neglecting other types of health care utilized by women. Several studies found that factors, including age, education, and income, affect women’s health care decision-making autonomy. Gaps in existing literature regarding women’s autonomy and health care utilization include gaps in the areas of health care that have been measured, the influence of sex roles and social support, and the use of qualitative studies to provide context and nuance. PMID:27354830

  11. Information needs of health care workers in developing countries: a literature review with a focus on Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pakenham-Walsh, Neil; Bukachi, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Health care workers in developing countries continue to lack access to basic, practical information to enable them to deliver safe, effective care. This paper provides the first phase of a broader literature review of the information and learning needs of health care providers in developing countries. A Medline search revealed 1762 papers, of which 149 were identified as potentially relevant to the review. Thirty-five of these were found to be highly relevant. Eight of the 35 studies looked at information needs as perceived by health workers, patients and family/community members; 14 studies assessed the knowledge of health workers; and 8 looked at health care practice. The studies suggest a gross lack of knowledge about the basics on how to diagnose and manage common diseases, going right across the health workforce and often associated with suboptimal, ineffective and dangerous health care practices. If this level of knowledge and practice is representative, as it appears to be, it indicates that modern medicine, even at a basic level, has largely failed the majority of the world's population. The information and learning needs of family caregivers and primary and district health workers have been ignored for too long. Improving the availability and use of relevant, reliable health care information has enormous potential to radically improve health care worldwide. PMID:19356239

  12. Developing a tool for mapping adult mental health care provision in Europe: the REMAST research protocol and its contribution to better integrated care

    PubMed Central

    Amaddeo, Francesco; Gutiérrez-Colosía, Mencia R.; Salazzari, Damiano; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan Luis; Montagni, Ilaria; Tedeschi, Federico; Cetrano, Gaia; Chevreul, Karine; Kalseth, Jorid; Hagmair, Gisela; Straßmayr, Christa; Park, A-La; Sfetcu, Raluca; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Garcia-Alonso, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mental health care is a critical area to better understand integrated care and to pilot the different components of the integrated care model. However, there is an urgent need for better tools to compare and understand the context of integrated mental health care in Europe. Method The REMAST tool (REFINEMENT MApping Services Tool) combines a series of standardised health service research instruments and geographical information systems (GIS) to develop local atlases of mental health care from the perspective of horizontal and vertical integrated care. It contains five main sections: (a) Population Data; (b) the Verona Socio-economic Status (SES) Index; (c) the Mental Health System Checklist; (d) the Mental Health Services Inventory using the DESDE-LTC instrument; and (e) Geographical Data. Expected results The REMAST tool facilitates context analysis in mental health by providing the comparative rates of mental health service provision according to the availability of main types of care; care placement capacity; workforce capacity; and geographical accessibility to services in the local areas in eight study areas in Austria, England, Finland, France, Italy, Norway, Romania and Spain. Discussion The outcomes of this project will facilitate cooperative work and knowledge transfer on mental health care to the different agencies involved in mental health planning and provision. This project would improve the information to users and society on the available resources for mental health care and system thinking at the local level by the different stakeholders. The techniques used in this project and the knowledge generated could eventually be transferred to the mapping of other fields of integrated care. PMID:27118959

  13. Issues Concerning The Development Of A Mobile Platform For Health Care Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korba, Larry W.; Liscano, Ramiro; Green, David; Durie, Nelson

    1989-03-01

    There are a number of problems that must yet be overcome before robotic technology can be applied in a hospital or a home care setting. The four basic problems are: cost, safety, finding appropriate applications and developing application specific solutions. Advanced robotics technology is now costly because of the complexity associated with autonomous systems. In any application, it is most important that the safety of the individuals using or exposed to the vehicle is ensured. Often in the health care field, innovative and useful new devices require an inordinate amount of time before they are accepted. The technical and ergonomic problems associated with any application must be solved so that cost containment, safety, ease of use, and quality of life are ensured. This paper discusses these issues in relation to our own development of an autonomous vehicle for health care applications. In this advancement, a commercially available platform is being equipped with an on-board, multiprocessor computer system and a variety of sensor systems. In order to develop pertinent solutions to the technical problems, there must be a framework wherein there is a focus upon the practical issues associated with the end application.

  14. Rural Health and Spiritual Care Development: A Review of Programs across Rural Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Carey, Lindsay B; Hennequin, Christine; Krikheli, Lillian; O'Brien, Annette; Sanchez, Erin; Marsden, Candace R

    2016-06-01

    Given declining populations in rural areas and diminishing traditional religious support, this research explores whether spiritual care education programs would be beneficial for and appreciated by those working in rural health and/or community organizations. An overview of literature identified three dominant rural health issues affecting the provision of spiritual care in rural areas, namely the disparity between rural and urban areas in terms of resources, the lack of access to services, plus the need for education and training within rural areas. Spiritual Health Victoria Incorporated (Victoria, Australia) sought to address these issues with the implementation of a variety of spiritual education programs within rural areas. Results of an evaluation of these programs are presented specifying participant demographics, reasons why participants attended, their evaluation of the program and any recommendations for future programs. In overall terms, the results indicated that at least 90 % of participants favorably rated their attended program as either 'very good' or 'good' and indicated that the main reason for their attendance was to develop their own education and/or practice of spiritual care within their rural context for the benefit of local constituents. Several recommendations are made for future programs. PMID:26350290

  15. Health Care System Accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Annie G; Barnett, Steven; Meador, Helen E; Wiggins, Erin A; Zazove, Philip

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND People who are deaf use health care services differently than the general population; little research has been carried out to understand the reasons. OBJECTIVE To better understand the health care experiences of deaf people who communicate in American Sign Language. DESIGN Qualitative analyses of focus group discussions in 3 U.S. cities. PARTICIPANTS Ninety-one deaf adults who communicate primarily in American Sign Language. MEASUREMENTS We collected information about health care communication and perceptions of clinicians' attitudes. We elicited stories of both positive and negative encounters, as well as recommendations for improving health care. RESULTS Communication difficulties were ubiquitous. Fear, mistrust, and frustration were prominent in participants' descriptions of health care encounters. Positive experiences were characterized by the presence of medically experienced certified interpreters, health care practitioners with sign language skills, and practitioners who made an effort to improve communication. Many participants acknowledged limited knowledge of their legal rights and did not advocate for themselves. Some participants believed that health care practitioners should learn more about sociocultural aspects of deafness. CONCLUSIONS Deaf people report difficulties using health care services. Physicians can facilitate change to improve this. Future research should explore the perspective of clinicians when working with deaf people, ways to improve communication, and the impact of programs that teach deaf people self-advocacy skills and about their legal rights. PMID:16499543

  16. Achieving health care affordability.

    PubMed

    Payson, Norman C

    2002-10-01

    Not all plans are jumping headlong into the consumer-centric arena. In this article, the CEO of Oxford Health Plans discusses how advanced managed care can achieve what other consumer-centric programs seek to do--provide affordable, quality health care. PMID:12391815

  17. Lean health care.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Henry C; Masterson, David J

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Lean management are being adopted more widely in health care as a way of improving quality and safety while controlling costs. The authors, who are chief executive officers of rural North Carolina hospitals, explain how their organizations are using Lean principles to improve quality and safety of health care delivery. PMID:23802475

  18. Developing integrated health and social care services for older persons in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Leichsenring, Kai

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This paper is to distribute first results of the EU Fifth Framework Project ‘Providing integrated health and social care for older persons—issues, problems and solutions’ (PROCARE—http://www.euro.centre.org/procare/). The project's first phase was to identify different approaches to integration as well as structural, organisational, economic and social-cultural factors and actors that constitute integrated and sustainable care systems. It also served to retrieve a number of experiences, model ways of working and demonstration projects in the participating countries which are currently being analysed in order to learn from success—or failure—and to develop policy recommendations for the local, national and European level. Theory The paper draws on existing definitions of integrated care in various countries and by various scholars. Given the context of an international comparative study it tries to avoid providing a single, ready-made definition but underlines the role of social care as part and parcel of this type of integrated care in the participating countries. Methods The paper is based on national reports from researchers representing ten organisations (university institutes, consultancy firms, research institutes, the public and the NGO sector) from 9 European countries: Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, and the UK. Literature reviews made intensive use of grey literature and evaluation studies in the context of at least five model ways of working in each country. Results As a result of the cross-national overview an attempt to classify different approaches and definitions is made and indicators of relative importance of the different instruments used in integrating health and social care services are provided. Conclusions The cross-national overview shows that issues concerning co-ordination and integration of services are high on the agenda in most countries. Depending on the state of

  19. The Women's Health Care Empowerment Model as a Catalyst for Change in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Mitroi, Lavinia R; Sahak, Medina; Sherzai, Ayesha Z; Sherzai, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Women's empowerment has been attempted through a number of different fields including the realms of politics, finance, and education, yet none of these domains are as promising as health care. Here we review preliminary work in this domain and introduce a model for women's empowerment through involvement in health care, titled the "women's health care empowerment model." Principles upon which our model is built include: acknowledging the appropriate definition of empowerment within the cultural context, creating a women's network for communication, integrating local culture and tradition into training women, and increasing the capability of women to care for their children and other women. PMID:24945243

  20. Development and piloting of a plan for integrating mental health in primary care in Sehore district, Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Shidhaye, Rahul; Shrivastava, Sanjay; Murhar, Vaibhav; Samudre, Sandesh; Ahuja, Shalini; Ramaswamy, Rohit; Patel, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background The large treatment gap for mental disorders in India underlines the need for integration of mental health in primary care. Aims To operationalise the delivery of the World Health Organization Mental Health Gap Action Plan interventions for priority mental disorders and to design an integrated mental healthcare plan (MHCP) comprising packages of care for primary healthcare in one district. Method Mixed methods were used including theory of change workshops, qualitative research to develop the MHCP and piloting of specific packages of care in a single facility. Results The MHCP comprises three enabling packages: programme management, capacity building and community mobilisation; and four service delivery packages: awareness for mental disorders, identification, treatment and recovery. Challenges were encountered in training primary care workers to improve identification and treatment. Conclusions There are a number of challenges to integrating mental health into primary care, which can be addressed through the injection of new resources and collaborative care models. PMID:26447172

  1. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Singer, Naphtale; Cowan, Cathy A.

    1991-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10112766

  2. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Levit, Katharine R.; Maple, Brenda T.; Stewart, Madie W.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10110874

  3. Low-Cost Rural Health Care and Health Manpower Training. An Annotated Bibliography with Special Emphasis on Developing Countries. Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Frances M., Comp.

    This fourth volume in a bibliography series on low-cost rural health care contains 700 entries covering the 1960's-1970's and focusing on developing countries. The bibliography is organized under five major subject headings: reference works, organization and planning, implementation of primary health care, training and utilization of primary…

  4. Health-Care Hub

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  5. Health care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S

    1984-07-01

    This is the third and last article reporting professional exchange tours between American nurses and nurses of other countries. In this article, the health care system of Kenya is discussed and comparisons made between this system and our own. Out of this comparison come several insights into our own way of doing things and possibilities for improving them. "Health Care in the Soviet Union" appeared in the April 1984 issue of The Nurse Practitioner. "Health Care in China" appeared in the May 1984 issue of the journal. PMID:6462542

  6. Modernization and development: impact on health care decision-making in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Singh, Debra Anne Kaur; Earnest, Jaya; Lample, May

    2015-01-01

    Uganda has faced numerous challenges over the past 50 years from overcoming political conflict and civil unrest, to rapid population growth, to combating the HIV epidemic and ever-growing health needs. Women in Uganda have had a major role to play in the health of families and communities. The researchers' purpose in this study, undertaken in rural Uganda, was to a) identify a people-centered definition of development, b) compare it to the process of modernization, and c) investigate how these processes have changed the role women play in decision-making, in areas directly and indirectly related to their health and that of their families. Twenty-two men and women participated in focus group discussion and completed questionnaires. Based on our analysis of discussions it appears that both modernization and development have impacted health positively and negatively. Key themes distilled from interviews included that modernization has led to the breakdown of families; increased maternal responsibility for children; diminished land and economic resources; and an erosion of cultural values and practices that had previously provided stability for the society. In terms of development, women play an increasing role in decision-making processes in the household and are gaining increasing respect for their expertise in a number of areas, notably health care. We propose a movement of grassroots discourse on modernization. Development, and its effect on health, is necessary if the positive aspects of Ugandan culture and those of similar emerging societies are not to be lost (International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 1966). PMID:23862662

  7. Health Care Shadows: A Unique Opportunity for Health Care Exploration and the Development of Standard-Based Skills. [Fourth Edition]. Career Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Primary Health Care.

    Shadows is an individualized, hands-on, real-world career experience that provides students with a structured look at the future world of work in health care. The program helps students build a bridge between school-based learning and established health care skills standards. Shadows focuses on expanding the student's horizons beyond the classroom…

  8. Home health care in France.

    PubMed

    Charles, B

    1990-02-23

    Home health care in France has a long tradition, but is limited in its development. Since 1970 hospitals are by law permitted to extend services at home. Apart from this, patient associations are a driving force in the organization of home health care. There is a trend to more home health care, but this is hampered by splitting of responsibilities of local, departmental or central authorities. The hospital pharmacist is recommended to focus on his scientific and technical competence. Improved relations between community pharmacists and hospital pharmacists are advocated. PMID:2314994

  9. What is the health care product?

    PubMed

    France, K R; Grover, R

    1992-06-01

    Because of the current competitive environment, health care providers (hospitals, HMOs, physicians, and others) are constantly searching for better products and better means for delivering them. The health care product is often loosely defined as a service. The authors develop a more precise definition of the health care product, product line, and product mix. A bundle-of-elements concept is presented for the health care product. These conceptualizations help to address how health care providers can segment their market and position, promote, and price their products. Though the authors focus on hospitals, the concepts and procedures developed are applicable to other health care organizations. PMID:10119211

  10. Health promotion through self-care and community participation: Elements of a proposed programme in the developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Bhuyan, Khanindra Kumar

    2004-01-01

    Background The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation emerged during 1970s, primarily out of concerns about the limitation of professional health system. Since then there have been rapid growth in these areas in the developed world, and there is evidence of effectiveness of such interventions. These areas are still in infancy in the developing countries. There is a window of opportunity for promoting self care and community participation for health promotion. Discussion A broad outline is proposed for designing a health promotion programme in developing countries, following key strategies of the Ottawa Charter for health promotion and principles of self care and community participation. Supportive policies may be framed. Self care clearinghouses may be set up at provincial level to co-ordinate the programme activities in consultation with district and national teams. Self care may be promoted in the schools and workplaces. For developing personal skills of individuals, self care information, generated through a participatory process, may be disseminated using a wide range of print and audio-visual tools and information technology based tools. One such potential tool may be a personally held self care manual and health record, to be designed jointly by the community and professionals. Its first part may contain basic self care information and the second part may contain outlines of different personally-held health records to be used to record important health and disease related events of an individual. Periodic monitoring and evaluation of the programme may be done. Studies from different parts of the world indicate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of self care interventions. The proposed outline has potential for health promotion and cost reduction of health services in the developing countries, and may be adapted in different situations. Summary Self care, community participation and health promotion are emerging but dominant

  11. Continuing Trends in Health and Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ronald W.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses current trends in health and health care, assesses significance of current data, and investigates causes and implications of the data for future health and health care. For journal availability, see SO 506 144. (Author/DB)

  12. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skilled nursing - home health; Skilled nursing - home care; Physical therapy - at home; Occupational therapy - at home; Discharge - home ... being in the hospital, skilled nursing center, or rehabilitation facility. You should probably be able to go ...

  13. Health care automation companies.

    PubMed

    1995-12-01

    Health care automation companies: card transaction processing/EFT/EDI-capable banks; claims auditing/analysis; claims processors/clearinghouses; coding products/services; computer hardware; computer networking/LAN/WAN; consultants; data processing/outsourcing; digital dictation/transcription; document imaging/optical disk storage; executive information systems; health information networks; hospital/health care information systems; interface engines; laboratory information systems; managed care information systems; patient identification/credit cards; pharmacy information systems; POS terminals; radiology information systems; software--claims related/computer-based patient records/home health care/materials management/supply ordering/physician practice management/translation/utilization review/outcomes; telecommunications products/services; telemedicine/teleradiology; value-added networks. PMID:10153839

  14. The Southern Rural Access Program and Alabama's Rural Health Leaders Pipeline: A Partnership To Develop Needed Minority Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackley, Benjamin P.; Wheat, John R.; Moore, Cynthia E.; Garner, Robert G.; Harrell, Barbara W.

    2003-01-01

    In Alabama's Black Belt counties, two organizations collaborate to recruit and prepare rural minority and disadvantaged students for health care careers. Premedical students and other college students in the programs shadow health professionals, visit medical schools, complete health projects, participate in summer seminars and tutorials, receive…

  15. Children with Special Health Needs in School: Developing an Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and an Individualized Health Care Plan (IHCP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janz, Jan; And Others

    This paper considers ways to help children with special health needs by utilizing the Individualized Education Program (IEP) and the Individualized Health Care Plan (IHCP). Results of a study which found a lack of necessary health information in school documents is summarized. The school nurse is seen as a pivotal person in the identification and…

  16. Development and implementation of training for interdisciplinary research in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Moira; Reid, Graham; Brown, Judith Belle; Burge, Fred; Dicenso, Alba; Watt, Susan; McWilliam, Carol; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Meredith, Leslie

    2010-06-01

    The authors describe a national training program in Canada focusing on research in primary health care (PHC). The program, sponsored by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research's Strategic Training in Health Research Program, is called Transdisciplinary Understanding and Training on Research-Primary Health Care (TUTOR-PHC); it began in 2002 and is funded to continue until 2015. The purpose-built curriculum has two main goals: (1) to build a cadre of skilled, independent researchers to enhance the evidence base for PHC practice and policy and (2) to increase the interdisciplinary focus in PHC research. The program consists of three elements: (1) a three-day on-site symposium, (2) four online workshops (three weeks each), and (3) two online interdisciplinary discussion groups (seven weeks each). Participants develop PHC research skills during in-person and online workshops. They gain knowledge of and experience in interdisciplinary PHC research through participation in interdisciplinary discussion groups and by observing mentor interactions. Both the symposium and the online components involve a variety of interactive education approaches. The 77 graduates from across Canada represent 14 disciplines, most commonly family medicine, nursing, epidemiology, psychology, social work, and sociology. Graduates of the program publish at a high rate and are building their careers in PHC research. The structure of TUTOR-PHC encourages not only skill development and content uptake but also the exchange of tacit knowledge. The complete program leads to a synthesis of skills, knowledge, personal communication abilities, and cross-discipline curiosity, creating a well-rounded collaborative PHC researcher. PMID:20505396

  17. Cultural affiliation and the importance of health care attributes. Marketers can develop segmentation strategies for targeted patient groups.

    PubMed

    Dolinsky, A L; Stinerock, R

    1998-01-01

    Culturally based values are known to influence consumer purchase decisions, but little is known about how those values affect health care choices. To rectify that situation and provide health care marketers with a framework for developing culturally based segmentation strategies, the authors undertook an exploratory research project in which Hispanic-, African-, and Anglo-Americans were asked to rate the importance of 16 different health care attributes. Those attributes can be grouped under five categories: quality of physician, quality of nurses and other medical staff, economic issues, access to health care, and nonmedically related experiential aspects. Survey responses identified distinct differences in the importance attached to the various attributes by the three cultural groups. The study also looks at the impact of six demographic and social characteristics on the evaluations made by each cultural group. Those characteristics are educational level, gender, age, health status, marital status, and number of people living in the household. PMID:10179392

  18. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and Health Care Reform in the United States.

    PubMed

    McCanne, Don R

    2009-01-01

    Among OECD nations, the United States is an outlier in having the highest per capita health care costs in a system that unnecessarily exposes many individuals to financial hardship, physical suffering, and even death. President Obama and Congress are currently involved in a process to reform the flawed health care system. The OECD has contributed to that process by releasing a paper, "Health Care Reform in the United States," which describes some of the problems that must be addressed, but then provides proposed solutions that omit consideration of a more equitable and efficient universal public insurance program. The same omission is taking place in Washington, DC. By reinforcing proposals that support the private insurance industry, the source of much of the waste and inequities in health care, the authors of the OECD paper have failed in their responsibility to inform on policies rather than politics. PMID:19927410

  19. Developing Shared Learning in Multiprofessional Health Care Education: For Whose Benefit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Josephine M.; Walsh, Rosemary S.

    1997-01-01

    A literature review and study of a baccalaureate health care education program examined approaches to shared learning. The study recommended that the value of multidisciplinary collaboration be extended to all stakeholders, including consumers, administrators, and policymakers. (SK)

  20. Evaluation of an Interprofessional Continuing Professional Development Initiative in Primary Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Sargeant, Joan; Hollett, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Interest in collaborative care approaches and in interprofessional education (IPE) to prepare providers for interprofessional collaboration is increasing and particularly so in the field of primary health care. Although evidence for the effectiveness of IPE is mixed, Barr et al. (2005) have proposed a useful framework for evaluating…

  1. Developing mental health-care quality indicators: toward a common framework

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Carl Erik; Spaeth-Rublee, Brigitta; Alan Pincus, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Objective Inconsistent performance measurement schemes hinder attempts to make international comparisons about mental health-care quality. This report describes a project undertaken by an international collaborative group that aims to develop a common framework of measures that will allow for international comparisons of mental health system performance. Design Representatives from each country submitted reports of quality measurement initiatives in mental health. Indicators were reviewed, and all measurable indicators were compiled and organized. Sample Twenty-nine programs from 11 countries and two cross-national programs submitted reports. Methods Indicators were evaluated according to measurable inclusion criteria. Results These methods yielded 656 total measures that were organized into 17 domains and 80 subdomains. Conclusions No single program contained indicators in all domains, highlighting the need for a comprehensive, shared scheme for international measurement. By collecting and organizing measures through an inductive compilation of existing programs, the present study has generated a maximally inclusive basis for the creation of a common framework of international mental health quality indicators. PMID:23175534

  2. International assistance and health care reform in Poland: barriers to project development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Sabbat, J

    1997-09-01

    The restoration of democracy in Poland initiated a major system transformation including reform of the health sector. The international community were quick to respond to the need for assistance. Polish proposals were supported by international experts and projects were developed together with international development agencies and donors. Donors had no experience of central and eastern Europe, these countries had never been beneficiaries of aid and neither side had experience working together. Progress and absorption of funds was slow. Comparative experience from developing countries was used to analyze the barriers encountered in project development and implementation in Poland. The conditions necessary for implementation were not satisfied. Insufficient attention was paid to the project process. Barriers originate on the side of both donors and recipients and additionally from programme characteristics. The most serious problems experience in Poland were lack of government commitment to health care reform leading to failure to provide counterpart funds and low capacity for absorption of aid. Rent seeking attitudes were important. Donor paternalistic attitudes, complex procedures and lack of innovative approach were also present. Poor coordination was a problem on both sides. Multi-lateral projects were too complex and it was not always possible to integrate project activities with routine ones. External consultants played an excessive role in project development and implementation, absorbing a large portion of funds. The barriers have been operationalised to create a checklist which requires validation elsewhere and may be useful for those working in this field. PMID:10170090

  3. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  4. Supporting Immigrant Family Strengths: Promoting Optimal Health, Health Care, and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotanek, Jane M.; Rocha, Lisa Oglesby; Flores, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    An extensive literature documents that a lower level of acculturation is associated with better health outcomes among U.S. immigrants, despite the many hardships these families face. It is likely that cultural practices and strong family networks contribute to this phenomenon, which has been termed the "healthy immigrant effect". This article…

  5. Health care and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Peck, J; Bezold, C

    1992-07-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a harbinger for change in health care. There are many powerful forces poised to transform the industrialized health care structure of the twentieth century, and AIDS may act as either a catalyst or an amplifier for these forces. AIDS could, for example, swamp local resources and thereby help trigger national reform in a health care system that has already lost public confidence. AIDS can also hasten the paradigm shift that is occurring throughout health care. Many of the choices society will confront when dealing with AIDS carry implications beyond health care. Information about who has the disease, for example, already pits traditional individual rights against group interests. Future information systems could make discrimination based upon medical records a nightmare for a growing number of individuals. Yet these systems also offer the hope of accelerated progress against not only AIDS but other major health threats as well. The policy choices that will define society's response to AIDS can best be made in the context of a clearly articulated vision of a society that reflects our deepest values. PMID:10119289

  6. Integrating mental health into chronic care in South Africa: the development of a district mental healthcare plan

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Inge; Fairall, Lara; Bhana, Arvin; Kathree, Tasneem; Selohilwe, One; Brooke-Sumner, Carrie; Faris, Gill; Breuer, Erica; Sibanyoni, Nomvula; Lund, Crick; Patel, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background In South Africa, the escalating prevalence of chronic illness and its high comorbidity with mental disorders bring to the fore the need for integrating mental health into chronic care at district level. Aims To develop a district mental healthcare plan (MHCP) in South Africa that integrates mental healthcare for depression, alcohol use disorders and schizophrenia into chronic care. Method Mixed methods using a situation analysis, qualitative key informant interviews, theory of change workshops and piloting of the plan in one health facility informed the development of the MHCP. Results Collaborative care packages for the three conditions were developed to enable integration at the organisational, facility and community levels, supported by a human resource mix and implementation tools. Potential barriers to the feasibility of implementation at scale were identified. Conclusions The plan leverages resources and systems availed by the emerging chronic care service delivery platform for the integration of mental health. This strengthens the potential for future scale up. PMID:26447176

  7. Enhancing transgender health care.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, E

    2001-01-01

    As awareness of transgender men and women grows among health care educators, researchers, policymakers, and clinicians of all types, the need to create more inclusive settings also grows. Greater sensitivity and relevant information and services are required in dealing with transgender men and women. These individuals need their identities to be recognized as authentic, they need better access to health care resources, and they need education and prevention material appropriate to their experience. In addition, a need exists for activities designed to enhance understanding of transgender health issues and to spur innovation. PMID:11392924

  8. [Quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Medina, J L; De Melo, P C

    2000-01-01

    Quality assurance is a relatively recent concern but already plays a major role in health care management and provision. Quality involves the definition of a comprehensive programme tailored by realistic and effective objectives and norms that include the structured review of procedures (namely clinical audits) and the use of up-to-date protocols. The involvement and motivation of health professionals, together with an adequate internal and external communication strategy, play a key role in the planning and application of these programmes. The use of programmed assessment, based on a solid knowledge of current practice, should have practical implications, optimising procedures in order to improve the quality of care. This commitment towards quality in health care should go far beyond governmental policy and should have clear support from health professionals. PMID:11234496

  9. Containing Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Derzon, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    As the federal government shifted from its traditional roles in health to the payment for personal health care, the relationship between public and private sectors has deteriorated. Today federal and state revenue funds and trusts are the largest purchasers of services from a predominantly private health system. This financing or “gap-filling” role is essential; so too is the purchaser's concern for the costs and prices it must meet. The cost per person for personal health care in 1980 is expected to average $950, triple for the aged. Hospital costs vary considerably and inexplicably among states; California residents, for example, spend 50 percent more per year for hospital care than do state of Washington residents. The failure of each sector to understand the other is potentially damaging to the parties and to patients. First, and most important, differences can and must be moderated through definite changes in the attitudes of the protagonists. PMID:6770551

  10. Developing personal values: trainees' attitudes toward strikes by health care providers.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Ting T; Srinivasan, Malathi; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Kravitz, Richard L; Wilkes, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Worldwide, health care providers use strikes and job actions to influence policy. For health care providers, especially physicians, strikes create an ethical tension between an obligation to care for current patients (e.g., to provide care and avoid abandonment) and an obligation to better care for future patients by seeking system improvements (e.g., improvements in safety, to access, and in the composition and strength of the health care workforce). This tension is further intensified when the potential benefit of a strike involves professional self-interest and the potential risk involves patient harm or death. By definition, trainees are still forming their professional identities and values, including their opinions on fair wages, health policy, employee benefits, professionalism, and strikes. In this article, the authors explore these ethical tensions, beginning with a discussion of reactions to a potential 2005 nursing strike at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. The authors then propose a conceptual model describing factors that may influence health care providers' decisions to strike (including personal ethics, personal agency, and strike-related context). In particular, the authors explore the relationship between training level and attitudes toward taking a job action, such as going on strike. Because trainees' attitudes toward strikes continue to evolve during training, the authors maintain that open discussion around the ethics of health care professionals' strikes and other methods of conflict resolution should be included in medical education to enhance professionalism and systems-based practice training. The authors include sample case vignettes to help initiate these important discussions. PMID:21436671

  11. Health care entrepreneurship: financing innovation.

    PubMed

    Grazier, Kyle L; Metzler, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is often described as the ability to create new ventures from new or existing concepts, ideas and visions. There has been significant entrepreneurial response to the changes in the scientific and social underpinnings of health care services delivery. However, a growing portion of the economic development driving health care industry expansion is threatened further by longstanding use of financing models that are suboptimal for health care ventures. The delayed pace of entrepreneurial activity in this industry is in part a response to the general economy and markets, but also due to the lack of capital for new health care ventures. The recent dearth of entrepreneurial activities in the health services sector may also due to failure to consider new approaches to partnerships and strategic ventures, despite their mutually beneficial organizational and financing potential. As capital becomes more scarce for innovators, it is imperative that those with new and creative ideas for health and health care improvement consider techniques for capital acquisition that have been successful in other industries and at similar stages of development. The capital and added expertise can allow entrepreneurs to leverage resources, dampen business fluctuations, and strengthen long term prospects. PMID:16583848

  12. Czechoslovakia's changing health care system.

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, M W; Raffel, N K

    1992-01-01

    Before World War II, Czechoslovakia was among the most developed European countries with an excellent health care system. After the Communist coup d'etat in 1948, the country was forced to adapt its existing health care system to the Soviet model. It was planned and managed by the government, financed by general tax money, operated in a highly centralized, bureaucratic fashion, and provided service at no direct charge at the time of service. In recent years, the health care system had been deteriorating as the health of the people had also been declining. Life expectancy, infant mortality rates, and diseases of the circulatory system are higher than in Western European countries. In 1989, political changes occurred in Czechoslovakia that made health care reform possible. Now health services are being decentralized, and the ownership of hospitals is expected to be transferred to communities, municipalities, churches, charitable groups, or private entities. Almost all health leaders, including hospital directors and hospital department heads, have been replaced. Physicians will be paid according to the type and amount of work performed. Perhaps the most important reform is the establishment of an independent General Health Care Insurance Office financed directly by compulsory contributions from workers, employers, and government that will be able to negotiate with hospitals and physicians to determine payment for services. PMID:1454975

  13. Establishment of primary health care in Vietnam.

    PubMed Central

    Birt, C A

    1990-01-01

    Basic demographic and epidemiological data relevant to health problems in Vietnam are described in this paper. Existing health service arrangements are referred to, with particular emphasis on the strategy for development of primary health care. The establishment of the paediatric centre in Ho Chi Minh City is reported, and examples of its valuable work in primary health care development are described. PMID:2121182

  14. Conditional Disease Development extracted from Longitudinal Health Care Cohort Data using Layered Network Construction

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Venkateshan; Swartz, Fredrik; Kiani, Narsis A.; Silberberg, Gilad; Tsipras, Giorgos; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Alexanderson, Kristina; Tegnèr, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Health care data holds great promise to be used in clinical decision support systems. However, frequent near-synonymous diagnoses recorded separately, as well as the sheer magnitude and complexity of the disease data makes it challenging to extract non-trivial conclusions beyond confirmatory associations from such a web of interactions. Here we present a systematic methodology to derive statistically valid conditional development of diseases. To this end we utilize a cohort of 5,512,469 individuals followed over 13 years at inpatient care, including data on disability pension and cause of death. By introducing a causal information fraction measure and taking advantage of the composite structure in the ICD codes, we extract an effective directed lower dimensional network representation (100 nodes and 130 edges) of our cohort. Unpacking composite nodes into bipartite graphs retrieves, for example, that individuals with behavioral disorders are more likely to be followed by prescription drug poisoning episodes, whereas women with leiomyoma were more likely to subsequently experience endometriosis. The conditional disease development represent putative causal relations, indicating possible novel clinical relationships and pathophysiological associations that have not been explored yet. PMID:27211115

  15. Conditional Disease Development extracted from Longitudinal Health Care Cohort Data using Layered Network Construction.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Venkateshan; Swartz, Fredrik; Kiani, Narsis A; Silberberg, Gilad; Tsipras, Giorgos; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Alexanderson, Kristina; Tegnèr, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Health care data holds great promise to be used in clinical decision support systems. However, frequent near-synonymous diagnoses recorded separately, as well as the sheer magnitude and complexity of the disease data makes it challenging to extract non-trivial conclusions beyond confirmatory associations from such a web of interactions. Here we present a systematic methodology to derive statistically valid conditional development of diseases. To this end we utilize a cohort of 5,512,469 individuals followed over 13 years at inpatient care, including data on disability pension and cause of death. By introducing a causal information fraction measure and taking advantage of the composite structure in the ICD codes, we extract an effective directed lower dimensional network representation (100 nodes and 130 edges) of our cohort. Unpacking composite nodes into bipartite graphs retrieves, for example, that individuals with behavioral disorders are more likely to be followed by prescription drug poisoning episodes, whereas women with leiomyoma were more likely to subsequently experience endometriosis. The conditional disease development represent putative causal relations, indicating possible novel clinical relationships and pathophysiological associations that have not been explored yet. PMID:27211115

  16. Primary care and health reform.

    PubMed

    Calman, Neil S; Golub, Maxine; Shuman, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Skyrocketing health care costs are burdening our people and our economy, yet health care indicators show how little we are achieving with the money we spend. Federal and state governments, along with public-health experts and policymakers, are proposing a host of new initiatives to find solutions. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is designed to address both the quality and accessibility of health care, while reducing its cost. This article provides an overview of models supported by the Affordable Care Act that address one or more goals of the "Triple Aim": better health care for individuals, better health outcomes in the community, and lower health care costs. The models described below rely on the core principles of primary care: comprehensive, coordinated and continuous primary care; preventive care; and the sophisticated implementation of health information technology designed to promote communication between health care providers, enhance coordination of care, minimize duplication of services, and permit reporting on quality. These models will support better health care and reduced costs for people who access health care services but will not address health outcomes in the community at large. Health care professionals, working in concert with community-based organizations and advocates, must also address conditions that influence health in the broadest sense to truly improve the health of our communities and reduce health care costs. PMID:22976358

  17. Nursing Titles and Health Care Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erceg, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Recommends choosing appropriate health care providers for camp, and referring to them by the title their credentials warrant. Explains distinctions among nursing titles and that they vary by state. Discusses developing a health care plan suited to camp's population, program, and location. Presents guidelines required of a health care plan by…

  18. Filovirus Emergence and Vaccine Development: A Perspective for Health Care Practitioners in Travel Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Uzma N.; Sitar, Sandra; Ledgerwood, Julie E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent case reports of viral hemorrhagic fever in Europe and the United States have raised concerns about the possibility for increased importation of filoviruses to non-endemic areas. This emerging threat is concerning because of the increase in global air travel and the rise of tourism in central and eastern Africa and the greater dispersion of military troops to areas of infectious disease outbreaks. Marburg viruses (MARV) and Ebola viruses (EBOV) have been associated with outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fever involving high mortality (25 – 90% case fatality rates). First recognized in 1967 and 1976 respectively, subtypes of MARV and EBOV are the only known viruses of the Filoviridae family, and are among the world’s most virulent pathogens. This article focuses on information relevant for health care practitioners in travel medicine to include, the epidemiology and clinical features of filovirus infection and efforts toward development of a filovirus vaccine. PMID:21208830

  19. Health care in Armenia today.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, R G; Chobanian, A V

    1994-01-01

    Although one of the smallest of the new independent states of the former Soviet Union, the Republic of Armenia has an ancient tradition and a strong ethnic identification, greatly enhanced by the diaspora. In addition to the problems following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Armenia has had to contend with a draining war in Nagorno-Karabakh and the after-effects of a devastating earthquake in 1988. Humanitarian efforts have ranged from emergency supply deliveries to longer-term sustainable health care partnerships. The United States government, through the Agency for International Development, has organized such partnerships, partially as a result of a multinational mission in 1992 and a subsequent hospital-to-hospital program developed by the American International Health Alliance. We describe the current state of health care in Armenia and some of the problems that need to be addressed to improve health care services to its citizens. PMID:8023481

  20. Health care utilisation in India.

    PubMed

    Duggal, R

    1994-02-01

    India has a plurality of health care systems as well as different systems of medicine. The government and local administrations provide public health care in hospitals and clinics. Public health care in rural areas is concentrated on prevention and promotion services to the detriment of curative services. The rural primary health centers are woefully underutilized because they fail to provide their clients with the desired amount of attention and medication and because they have inconvenient locations and long waiting times. Public hospitals provide 60% of all hospitalizations, while the private sector provides 75% of all routine care. The private sector is composed of an equal number of qualified doctors and unqualified practitioners, with a greater ratio of unqualified to qualified existing in less developed states. In rural areas, qualified doctors are clustered in areas where government services are available. With a population barely able to meet its nutritional needs, India needs universalization of health care provision to assure equity in health care access and availability instead of a large number of doctors who are profiting from the sicknesses of the poor. PMID:12288588

  1. Managing the health care market in developing countries: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Broomberg, J

    1994-09-01

    There is increasing interest in the prospects for managed market reforms in developing countries, stimulated by current reforms and policy debates in developed countries, and by perceptions of widespread public sector inefficiency in many countries. This review examines the prospects for such reforms in a developing country context, primarily by drawing on the arguments and evidence emerging from developed countries, with a specific focus on the provision of hospital services. The paper begins with a discussion of the current policy context of these reforms, and their main features. It argues that while current and proposed reforms vary in detail, most have in common the introduction of competition in the provision of health care, with the retention of a public monopoly of financing, and that this structure emerges from the dual goals of addressing current public sector inefficiencies while retaining the known equity and efficiency advantages of public health systems. The paper then explores the theoretical arguments and empirical evidence for and against these reforms, and examines their relevance for developing countries. Managed markets are argued to enhance both efficiency and equity. These arguments are analysed in terms of three distinct claims made by their proponents: that managed markets will promote increased provider competition, and hence, provider efficiency; that contractual relationships are more efficient than direct management; and that the benefits of managed markets will outweigh their costs. The analysis suggests that on all three issues, the theoretical arguments and empirical evidence remain ambiguous, and that this ambiguity is attributable in part to poor understanding of the behaviour of health sector agents within the market, and to the limited experience with these reforms. In the context of developing countries, the paper argues that most of the conditions required for successful implementation of these reforms are absent in all but a

  2. The development of mental health services within primary care in India: learning from oral history

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In India very few of those who need mental health care receive it, despite efforts of the 1982 National Mental Health Programme and its district-level component the District Mental Health Programme (DMHP) to improve mental health care coverage. Aims To explore and unpack the political, cultural and other historical reasons for the DMHP’s failures and successes since 1947 (post-independence era), which may highlight issues for today’s current primary mental health care policy and programme. Methods Oral history interviews and documentary sourcing were conducted in 2010–11 with policy makers, programme managers and observers who had been active in the creation of the NMHP and DMHP. Results The results suggest that the widely held perception that the DMHP has failed is not entirely justified, insofar that major hurdles to the implementation of the plan have impacted on mental health coverage in primary care, rather than faults with the plan itself. These hurdles have been political neglect, inadequate leadership at central, state and district levels, inaccessible funding and improperly implemented delivery of services (including poor training, motivation and retention of staff) at district and community levels. Conclusion At this important juncture as the 12th Five Year Plan is in preparation, this historical paper suggests that though the model may be improved, the most important changes would be to encourage central and state governments to implement better technical support, access to funds and to rethink the programme leadership at national, state and district levels. PMID:25089154

  3. Health care interactional suffering in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Beng, Tan Seng; Guan, Ng Chong; Jane, Lim Ee; Chin, Loh Ee

    2014-05-01

    A secondary analysis of 2 qualitative studies was conducted to explore the experiences of suffering caused by interactions with health care providers in the hospital setting. Interview transcripts from 20 palliative care patients and 15 palliative care informal caregivers in University Malaya Medical Centre were thematically analyzed. The results of health care interactional suffering were associated with themes of attention, understanding, communication, competence, and limitation. These 5 themes may serve as a framework for the improvement in interaction skills of health care providers in palliative care. PMID:23689367

  4. Benchmarks of fairness for health care reform: a policy tool for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, N.; Bryant, J.; Castano, R. A.; Dantes, O. G.; Khan, K. S.; Pannarunothai, S.

    2000-01-01

    Teams of collaborators from Colombia, Mexico, Pakistan, and Thailand have adapted a policy tool originally developed for evaluating health insurance reforms in the United States into "benchmarks of fairness" for assessing health system reform in developing countries. We describe briefly the history of the benchmark approach, the tool itself, and the uses to which it may be put. Fairness is a wide term that includes exposure to risk factors, access to all forms of care, and to financing. It also includes efficiency of management and resource allocation, accountability, and patient and provider autonomy. The benchmarks standardize the criteria for fairness. Reforms are then evaluated by scoring according to the degree to which they improve the situation, i.e. on a scale of -5 to 5, with zero representing the status quo. The object is to promote discussion about fairness across the disciplinary divisions that keep policy analysts and the public from understanding how trade-offs between different effects of reforms can affect the overall fairness of the reform. The benchmarks can be used at both national and provincial or district levels, and we describe plans for such uses in the collaborating sites. A striking feature of the adaptation process is that there was wide agreement on this ethical framework among the collaborating sites despite their large historical, political and cultural differences. PMID:10916911

  5. Health Care Marketing: Role Evolution of the Community Health Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syre, Thomas R.; Wilson, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses role delineation in the health education profession, defines and presents principles of health care marketing, describes marketing plan development, and examines major ethical issues associated with health care marketing when utilized by community health educators. A marketing plan format for community health education is…

  6. Cancer Screening: Should Cancer Screening be Essential Component of Primary Health Care in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Bobdey, Saurabh; Balasubramanium, Ganesh; Kumar, Abhinendra; Jain, Aanchal

    2015-01-01

    primary health care package in developing countries. PMID:26236443

  7. Selected key issues in the development and drafting of public managed behavioral health care carve-out contracts.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, J; Rosenbaum, S; Burgess, W; DeCourcy, L

    1998-12-01

    The development of managed behavioral health care carve-out contracts covering a discrete subset of benefits available for use by persons with mental health and/or substance abuse disorders poses major challenges for public purchasers. This Issue Brief explores several key issues that arise when drafting such agreements. Many of the issues that arise in the drafting of carve-out agreements will require the public purchaser to resolve basic policy questions well before the drafting of requests for proposals or contracts can proceed. Analyses of public sector managed behavioral health care contracts by attorneys at the Center for Health Policy Research suggest that there are four essential areas that must be addressed if mental health and substance abuse services are carved-out (either by the purchaser or by a comprehensive managed health care entity): (1) what population is eligible for enrollment; (2) what services is the contractor expected to furnish; (3) what triggers a duty on the part of the mental health or substance abuse carve-out contractor to provide services; and (4) how are services furnished by the managed behavioral health care contractor integrated with or coordinated with services furnished by a beneficiary's primary health care provider, with pharmaceutical benefits, and with other services that may be available to a beneficiary through a fee-for-service or other mechanism. However a purchaser chooses to resolve these four issues, it is essential that parallel clarifying clauses are also built into the contracts of primary health care providers and other entities providing needed services for persons whose mental health and substance abuse service needs are covered by the carve-out. Underlying all of these issues is the fact that ambiguity, vagueness, or failure to define terms and responsibilities can create unexpected and unwelcome clinical and financial liabilities to purchasers. PMID:12426706

  8. Aiming to improve the quality of primary mental health care: developing an intervention for underserved communities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to improve the quality of primary mental healthcare in underserved communities through involvement with the wider primary care team members and local community agencies. Methods We developed training intended for all GP practice staff which included elements of knowledge transfer, systems review and active linking. Seven GP Practices in four localities (North West England, UK) took part in the training. Qualitative evaluation was conducted using thirteen semi-structured interviews and two focus groups in six of the participating practices; analysis used principles of Framework Analysis. Results Staff who had engaged with the training programme reported increased awareness, recognition and respect for the needs of patients from under-served communities. We received reports of changes in style and content of interactions, particularly amongst receptionists, and evidence of system change. In addition, the training program increased awareness of – and encouraged signposting to - community agencies within the practice locality. Conclusions This study demonstrates how engaging with practices and delivering training in a changing health care system might best be attempted. The importance of engaging with community agencies is clear, as is the use of the AMP model as a template for further research. PMID:24741996

  9. Values in health care.

    PubMed

    Gish, O

    1984-01-01

    The first part of the paper is concerned with the health care values of various groups; namely, those which are resource oriented, disease oriented, political decision-makers, organized sellers and purchasers of health care and patients. These groups are further divided according to selected political/ideological and socio-economic characteristics, essentially along capitalist and socialist lines. Some of the ways in which the values held by these groups are determined, formulated and, by implication at least, changed and the political, economic and other bases for some of their practical applications are identified. The second part of the paper focuses upon values in public health education and related practice. It is argued that to become more useful to the 'health of the public' the new public health worker will have to become more activist, assuming an adversarial stance toward the market economy in capitalist countries and oppressive governmental structures everywhere. A wider integration of knowledge concerning the effects of health of all types of economic, social and political practices is required; this, in turn, would contribute to the emergence of alternative forms of public health analysis and practice. The recognition of wider forms of public health leadership should follow, coupled with organizational changes directed at the greater participation of popular groupings in all types of public health activities. PMID:6484620

  10. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... as X-rays or MRIs Rehab, physical or occupational therapy, or chiropractic care Mental health, behavioral health, or substance abuse care Hospice, home health, skilled nursing, or durable medical equipment Prescription drugs Dental and ...

  11. Recent developments in false claims enforcement: a minefield for health care providers.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Glenn V; Walton, Victor A

    2007-01-01

    Actions under the False Claims Act represent potentially billions of dollars in damages returned to the state and federal governments each year for fraud recovery. Over the past several years, health care providers have been the target of about half of the FCA suits filed and have paid out an even greater percentage of the damages recovered. Because of the enumerable opportunities for fraud, waste, and abuse in the health care industry, it will likely continue to be a prominent target of FCA suits. Key provisions of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, effective on January 1, 2007, will only increase the reach of the FCA. Providers beware. PMID:19175229

  12. Whose Choice? Developing a Unifying Ethical Framework for Conscience Laws in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Brown, Benjamin P; Hasselbacher, Lee; Chor, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Since abortion became legal nationwide, federal and state "conscience clauses" have been established to define the context in which health professionals may decline to participate in contested services. Patients and health care providers may act according to conscience in making health care decisions and in deciding whether to abstain from or to participate in contested services. Historically, however, conscience clauses largely have equated conscience in health care with provider abstinence from such services. We propose a framework to analyze the ethical implications of conscience laws. There is a rich literature on the exercise of conscience in the clinical encounter. This essay addresses the need to ensure that policy, too, is grounded in an ethical framework. We argue that the ideal law meets three standards: it protects patients' exercise of conscience, it safeguards health care providers' rights of conscience, and it does not contradict standards of ethical conduct established by professional societies. We have chosen Illinois as a test of our framework because it has one of the nation's broadest conscience clauses and because an amendment to ensure that women receive consistent access to contested services has just passed in the state legislature. Without such an amendment, Illinois law fails all three standards of our framework. If signed by the governor, the amended law will provide protections for patients' positive claims of conscience. We recommend further protections for providers' positive claims as well. Enacting such changes would offer a model for how ethics-based analysis could be applied to similar policies nationwide. PMID:27400014

  13. Silence, shame and abuse in health care: theoretical development on basis of an intervention project among staff.

    PubMed

    Wijma, Barbro; Zbikowski, Anke; Brüggemann, A Jelmer

    2016-01-01

    As health care exists to alleviate patients' suffering it is unacceptable that it inflicts unnecessary suffering on patients. We therefore have developed and evaluated a drama pedagogical model for staff interventions using Forum Play, focusing on staff's experiences of failed encounters where they have perceived that the patient felt abused. In the current paper we present how our preliminary theoretical framework of intervening against abuse in health care developed and was revised during this intervention. During and after the intervention, five important lessons were learned and incorporated in our present theoretical framework. First, a Forum Play intervention may break the silence culture that surrounds abuse in health care. Second, organizing staff training in groups was essential and transformed abuse from being an individual problem inflicting shame into a collective responsibility. Third, initial theoretical concepts "moral resources" and "the vicious violence triangle" proved valuable and became useful pedagogical tools during the intervention. Four, the intervention can be understood as having strengthened staff's moral resources. Five, regret appeared to be an underexplored resource in medical training and clinical work.The occurrence of abuse in health care is a complex phenomenon and the research area is in need of theoretical understanding. We hope this paper can inspire others to further develop theories and interventions in order to counteract abuse in health care. PMID:26922381

  14. Funding Rural Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kim

    This paper provides first-time grant writers with suggestions on how to approach a private funding source. While intended for rural health care advocates, the remarks are equally applicable for educators and others. The rural crisis has produced many heart-rending stories about medically indigent people, but there is a lack of reliable statistics…

  15. Health Care Workforce Development in Rural America: When Geriatrics Expertise Is 100 Miles Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumosa, Nina; Horvath, Kathy J.; Huh, Terri; Livote, Elayne E.; Howe, Judith L.; Jones, Lauren Ila; Kramer, B. Josea

    2012-01-01

    The Geriatric Scholar Program (GSP) is a Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) workforce development program to infuse geriatrics competencies in primary care. This multimodal educational program is targeted to primary care providers and ancillary staff who work in VA's rural clinics. GSP consists of didactic education and training in geriatrics…

  16. Bridging the Human Resource Gap in Primary Health Care Delivery Systems of Developing Countries With mHealth: Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile health (mHealth) has the potential to solve human resource issues in the health care sector. mHealth is of particular interest in developing countries, where widespread mobile networks and access to devices are connecting people like never before. Objective The aim of this paper was to review published and unpublished literature, field projects, and pilot studies on mHealth usage in overcoming shortage of human health resources in developing countries. Methods A narrative literature review was undertaken using an iterative approach in extracting literature focused on mHealth and human health resources of low-income countries, especially India. The present review has undertaken comprehensive coverage of the work on related field projects that have been either published, accepted for publication, or pilot tested. Results This review presented the use of mHealth across various dimensions of primary health care, including data collection, disease surveillance, health education, supervision, monitoring, and feedback. Field studies of fast, error-free data collection and transmission using mHealth were also documented. New apps for supervision, monitoring, and utilization of innovative health education tools were documented in the current review. Practical limitations of mHealth and challenges set forth in developing countries included issues of data security, cost constraints, health provider privacy, and technical barriers. Conclusions In the present review, we have documented a few mHealth projects that contribute to the proficient use of human resources. These projects pave the path for the efficient utilization of mHealth, offering solutions to emerging human resource challenges and simultaneously revamping the health care delivery in resource-limited settings. PMID:25099436

  17. Effective health care teams: a model of six characteristics developed from shared perceptions.

    PubMed

    Mickan, Sharon M; Rodger, Sylvia A

    2005-08-01

    This study into understanding health care teams began with listening to participants' teamwork experiences. It unfolded through a dialectic of iterations, analyses and critique towards a simplified model comprising six key characteristics of effective teams. Using the complementary theoretical perspectives of personal construct theory and inductive theory building, three research methods were used to collect a range of participant perspectives. A purposive sample of 39 strategic informants participated in repertory grid interviews and clarification questionnaires. A further 202 health care practitioners completed a purpose designed Teamwork in Healthcare Inventory. All responses were transformed through three iterations of interactive data collection, analysis, reflection and interpretation. Unstructured participant perspectives were qualitatively categorised and analysed into hierarchies to determine comparative contributions to effective teamwork. Complex inter-relationships between conceptual categories were investigated to identify four interdependent emerging themes. Finally, a dynamic model of teamwork in health care organisations emerged that has functional utility for health care practitioners. This Healthy Teams Model can be utilised in conjunction with a Reflective Analysis and Team Building Guide to facilitate team members to critically evaluate and enhance their team functioning. PMID:16076597

  18. Developing a Mobile Learning Solution for Health and Social Care Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. D.; Dearnley, C. A.; Laxton, J. C.; Coates, C. A.; Treasure-Jones, T.; Campbell, R.; Hall, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we share our experiences of a large-scale five-year innovative programme to introduce mobile learning into health and social care (H&SC) practice placement learning and assessment that bridges the divide between the university classroom and the practice setting in which these students learn. The outputs are from the Assessment &…

  19. Health Care Improvement and Continuing Interprofessional Education: Continuing Interprofessional Development to Improve Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcock, Peter M.; Janes, Gillian; Chambers, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Health care improvement and continuing professional education must be better understood if we are to promote continuous service improvement through interprofessional learning in the workplace. We propose that situating interprofessional working, interprofessional learning, work-based learning, and service improvement within a framework of social…

  20. Phytotherapy in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanele; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  1. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  2. The development and application of a public health skills assessment tool for use in primary care organisations.

    PubMed

    Brocklehurst, Neil J; Rowe, Ann

    2003-05-01

    The public health skills assessment instrument described in this paper was developed to provide a key group of UK primary care practitioners (health visitors) with a personal development planning tool and researchers with a robust assessment tool for use in evaluations of innovative local public health programmes. Pilot testing with over 120 practitioners has provided evidence of its reliability and validity as a research instrument as well as yielding useful insights for public health educators, practitioners and policy-makers. Factor analysis confirms 10 core competency domains for health visitors which are remarkably consistent with those recently identified for UK public health specialists, interpreted here as grounds for optimism in the greater co-ordination between strategic and front-line approaches to public health work in primary care. However, results also confirm earlier findings indicating low levels of skill amongst health visitors in tackling health inequalities through interventions such as community development, raising questions about their capability to work effectively in new roles proposed by the Department of Health. PMID:12825466

  3. The Partnered Research Center for Quality Care: Developing Infrastructure to Support Community-partnered Participatory Research in Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Lizaola, Elizabeth; Schraiber, Ron; Braslow, Joel; Kataoka, Sheryl; Springgate, Benjamin F.; Wells, Kenneth B.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based programs have been shown to improve functioning and mental health outcomes, especially for vulnerable populations. However, these populations face numerous barriers to accessing care including lack of resources and stigma surrounding mental health issues. In order to improve mental health outcomes and reduce health disparities, it is essential to identify methods for reaching such populations with unmet need. A promising strategy for reducing barriers and improving access to care is Community Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR). Given the power of this methodology to transform the impact of research in resource-poor communities, we developed an NIMH-funded Center, the Partnered Research Center for Quality Care, to support partnerships in developing, implementing, and evaluating mental health services research and programs. Guided by a CPPR framework, center investigators, both community and academic, collaborated in all phases of research with the goal of establishing trust, building capacity, increasing buy-in, and improving the sustainability of interventions and programs. They engaged in two-way capacity-building, which afforded the opportunity for practical problems to be raised and innovative solutions to be developed. This article discusses the development and design of the Partnered Research Center for Quality Care and provides examples of partnerships that have been formed and the work that has been conducted as a result. PMID:22352082

  4. Disaster severity and emotional disturbance: implications for primary mental health care in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Lima, B R; Chavez, H; Samaniego, N; Pompei, M S; Pai, S; Santacruz, H; Lozano, J

    1989-01-01

    Two months following the 1987 earthquakes in Ecuador, 150 patients in the primary health care clinics of the area were screened for emotional problems; 40% of them were emotionally distressed. Risk factors included not being married, reporting poor physical or emotional health, and having ill-defined physical complaints. The findings from this research are discussed in relation to a disaster of much greater intensity, whose victims were studied by the authors, utilizing the same instrument and research design. The comparison between these 2 groups of disaster victims revealed that: 1) the prevalence of emotional distress was smaller among the Ecuador victims, but the frequency of symptoms among the distressed was similar for both groups; 2) the symptom profiles were remarkably similar; and 3) the most frequent symptoms and the strongest predictors of emotional distress were very similar. These findings support a focused training of health care workers on selected emotional problems that are regularly present among victims of different disasters. PMID:2929384

  5. The historical development of health care law and bioethics in England and Wales: a symbiotic relationship?

    PubMed

    Owusu-Dapaa, Ernest

    2014-04-01

    The paper explores the backward and forward linkage between HCL and bioethics. Indeed, the relationship between the two is so close that it can be considered one of symbiosis. This is particularly the case when an account is taken of how HCL and bioethics positively benefitted from each other in diverse ways during their development into their present status as discrete disciplines. In the first place, the aftermath of the Second World War, such as the Nuremberg trial and unprecedented medical experiment scandals in the 1960s/70s fuelled the increasing participation of lay scholars in exploring and critiquing medical ethics which culminated in the emergence ofbioethics.2 This in turn facilitated the evolution of HCL as a discipline, since academic lawyers involved in early bioethical discourse developed interest in exploring the interface between law and bioethics at the same time that society was waking up to the ethical implications of medical advances. As HCL emerged as a discrete discipline, it consolidated the status of bioethics as a field of inquiry by projecting the relevance of the latter in adjudication of novel cases with significant slippery moral undertones. Thus, the chicken and egg paradox finds a perfect reflection in the emergence of health care law and bioethics in England and Wales. PMID:24946511

  6. Developing and testing an instrument for identifying performance incentives in the Greek health care sector

    PubMed Central

    Paleologou, Victoria; Kontodimopoulos, Nick; Stamouli, Aggeliki; Aletras, Vassilis; Niakas, Dimitris

    2006-01-01

    Background In the era of cost containment, managers are constantly pursuing increased organizational performance and productivity by aiming at the obvious target, i.e. the workforce. The health care sector, in which production processes are more complicated compared to other industries, is not an exception. In light of recent legislation in Greece in which efficiency improvement and achievement of specific performance targets are identified as undisputable health system goals, the purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid instrument for investigating the attitudes of Greek physicians, nurses and administrative personnel towards job-related aspects, and the extent to which these motivate them to improve performance and increase productivity. Methods A methodological exploratory design was employed in three phases: a) content development and assessment, which resulted in a 28-item instrument, b) pilot testing (N = 74) and c) field testing (N = 353). Internal consistency reliability was tested via Cronbach's alpha coefficient and factor analysis was used to identify the underlying constructs. Tests of scaling assumptions, according to the Multitrait-Multimethod Matrix, were used to confirm the hypothesized component structure. Results Four components, referring to intrinsic individual needs and external job-related aspects, were revealed and explain 59.61% of the variability. They were subsequently labeled: job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievement. Nine items not meeting item-scale criteria were removed, resulting in a 19-item instrument. Scale reliability ranged from 0.782 to 0.901 and internal item consistency and discriminant validity criteria were satisfied. Conclusion Overall, the instrument appears to be a promising tool for hospital administrations in their attempt to identify job-related factors, which motivate their employees. The psychometric properties were good and warrant administration to a larger sample of employees in

  7. Wholistic Health Care: Evolutionary Conceptual Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, Deborah Jean

    2016-10-01

    While performing a data search to define "wholistic health care", it was evident that a definite gap existed in published literature. In addition, there are different definitions and several similar terms (whole person care, wholistic health, whole person health, wholism, etc.), which may cause confusion. The purpose of this paper was to present the analysis of "wholistic health care" using Rodgers' Evolutionary Method. The method allows for the historical and social nature of "wholistic health care" and how it changes over time. Attributes, antecedents, and consequences of wholistic health care were reduced using a descriptive matrix. In addition, attributes that consistently occurred in wholistic health care were presented as essential attributes. Definitions of Wholistic Health Care Provider(s), Wholistic Health, Wholistic Illness, Wholistic Healing, and Patient were created from the analysis of the literature review of attributes, antecedents, and consequences of wholistic health care. Wholistic Health Care is defined as the assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of wholistic illness in human beings to maintain wholistic health or enhance wholistic healing. Identified wholistic health needs are addressed simultaneously by one or a team of allied health professionals in the provision of primary care, secondary care, and tertiary care. Wholistic health care is patient centered and considers the totality of the person (e.g., human development at a given age, genetic endowments, disease processes, environment, culture, experiences, relationships, communication, assets, attitudes, beliefs, and lifestyle behaviors). Patient centered refers to the patient as active participant in deciding the course of care. Essential attributes of wholistic health care are faith (spiritual) integrating, health promoting, disease managing, coordinating, empowering, and accessing health care. Wholistic health care may occur in collaboration with a faith-based organization to

  8. Care for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Sharon Brown; Kanze, David Mitchell

    2016-03-01

    Pretravel care for the health care provider begins with an inventory, including the destination, length of stay, logistical arrangements, type of lodging, food and water supply, team members, personal medical needs, and the needs of the community to be treated. This inventory should be created and processed well in advance of the planned medical excursion. The key thing to remember in one's planning is to be a health care provider during one's global health care travel and not to become a patient oneself. This article will help demonstrate the medical requirements and recommendations for such planning. PMID:26900113

  9. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ... about lower-cost facilities and medicines. Understanding your health care costs can help you save money when managing ...

  10. Education for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Drickey, R

    1985-07-01

    Postrevolutionary Nicaragua has developed a new health system in which primary health care is a central component. Great progress has been made in correcting the poor health conditions that existed prior to the revolution. As part of an interdisciplinary health team that emphasizes prevention and community service, physicians in the new system play a different role than they did previously. Training for health workers of all types has been expanded. However, scarce teaching and curricular resources have restrained progress in this area. The U.S. based Committee for Health Rights in Central America (CHRICA) has collaborated with the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health to organize two Colloquia on Health in Nicaragua in the past two years. These Colloquia brought together North American participants who provided current medical training and Nicaraguan participants who provided information about the new health system. The Colloquia, whose participants were eligible to receive CME credit from the UCSF School of Medicine, have led to continuing educational exchanges between health care personnel in the two countries. PMID:10272498

  11. International study of health care organization and financing: development of renal replacement therapy in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kleophas, Werner; Reichel, Helmut

    2007-09-01

    The German health system represents the case of a global budget with negotiated fees and competing medical insurance companies. Physicians in private practice and non-profit dialysis provider associations provide most dialysis therapy. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) modalities are well integrated into the overall health care system. Dialysis therapy, independent of the mode of treatment, is reimbursed at a weekly flat rate. Mandatory health insurance covers health expenses, including those related to ESRD, for more than 90% of the population. Both employees and employers contribute to the premium for this insurance. Private medical insurance covers the remainder of the population. Access to treatment, including dialysis therapy, is uniformly available. PMID:17701342

  12. Caring in Nursing Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mary Brigid

    2015-01-01

    Caring science has been identified and examined in the discipline of nursing for over 40 years. Within this period, the topic has been analyzed and studied resulting in theories, models, books, and articles published nationally and internationally. Although advancements have been made in caring knowledge development, opportunities to integrate caring science into all aspects of nursing abound, including the specialty of nursing professional development. The focus of this article is to present ways in which nursing professional development specialists may incorporate caring science into practice, using Ray's (2010) Transcultural Caring Dynamics in Nursing and Health Care model as an exceptional exemplar for understanding, awareness, and choice for nurses and patients. PMID:26381337

  13. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  14. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care. PMID:7787486

  15. Child Care Health Connections, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

  16. Development and validation of an electronic frailty index using routine primary care electronic health record data

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, Andrew; Bates, Chris; Young, John; Ryan, Ronan; Nichols, Linda; Ann Teale, Elizabeth; Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Parry, John; Marshall, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: frailty is an especially problematic expression of population ageing. International guidelines recommend routine identification of frailty to provide evidence-based treatment, but currently available tools require additional resource. Objectives: to develop and validate an electronic frailty index (eFI) using routinely available primary care electronic health record data. Study design and setting: retrospective cohort study. Development and internal validation cohorts were established using a randomly split sample of the ResearchOne primary care database. External validation cohort established using THIN database. Participants: patients aged 65–95, registered with a ResearchOne or THIN practice on 14 October 2008. Predictors: we constructed the eFI using the cumulative deficit frailty model as our theoretical framework. The eFI score is calculated by the presence or absence of individual deficits as a proportion of the total possible. Categories of fit, mild, moderate and severe frailty were defined using population quartiles. Outcomes: outcomes were 1-, 3- and 5-year mortality, hospitalisation and nursing home admission. Statistical analysis: hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using bivariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Discrimination was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Calibration was assessed using pseudo-R2 estimates. Results: we include data from a total of 931,541 patients. The eFI incorporates 36 deficits constructed using 2,171 CTV3 codes. One-year adjusted HR for mortality was 1.92 (95% CI 1.81–2.04) for mild frailty, 3.10 (95% CI 2.91–3.31) for moderate frailty and 4.52 (95% CI 4.16–4.91) for severe frailty. Corresponding estimates for hospitalisation were 1.93 (95% CI 1.86–2.01), 3.04 (95% CI 2.90–3.19) and 4.73 (95% CI 4.43–5.06) and for nursing home admission were 1.89 (95% CI 1.63–2.15), 3.19 (95% CI 2.73–3.73) and 4.76 (95% CI 3.92–5.77), with good to moderate discrimination

  17. Equity in health care in Namibia: developing a needs-based resource allocation formula using principal components analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zere, Eyob; Mandlhate, Custodia; Mbeeli, Thomas; Shangula, Kalumbi; Mutirua, Kauto; Kapenambili, William

    2007-01-01

    Background The pace of redressing inequities in the distribution of scarce health care resources in Namibia has been slow. This is due primarily to adherence to the historical incrementalist type of budgeting that has been used to allocate resources. Those regions with high levels of deprivation and relatively greater need for health care resources have been getting less than their fair share. To rectify this situation, which was inherited from the apartheid system, there is a need to develop a needs-based resource allocation mechanism. Methods Principal components analysis was employed to compute asset indices from asset based and health-related variables, using data from the Namibia demographic and health survey of 2000. The asset indices then formed the basis of proposals for regional weights for establishing a needs-based resource allocation formula. Results Comparing the current allocations of public sector health car resources with estimates using a needs based formula showed that regions with higher levels of need currently receive fewer resources than do regions with lower need. Conclusion To address the prevailing inequities in resource allocation, the Ministry of Health and Social Services should abandon the historical incrementalist method of budgeting/resource allocation and adopt a more appropriate allocation mechanism that incorporates measures of need for health care. PMID:17391533

  18. [Workflow involving preventive health care promotes the economic development of a company].

    PubMed

    Braun, M

    2003-12-01

    Today's working society obviously develops from industrial production to knowledge-intensive service. In service-oriented working conditions, the importance of the human being as a main performer of economic success increases. Thus, the development leads to a changing spectrum of occupational health risks. Together with socio-demographic developments, individual strain-oriented health disorders connected to one's occupation might endanger an enterprise's capacity of performance and innovation as well as its sustainable enterprise development. Only healthy, motivated and qualified employees are able and ready to keep their creative and customer-oriented potential harnessed and thereby work to the best of their ability. Consequently, occupational health gains a more important role within the enterprise. Although in many enterprises the benefit contribution of preventive work design has not yet been considered that relevant, enterprises have realised that a preventive health-oriented work design might help to better manage current business challenges. An up-to-date definition of health includes the goals of health improvement, personality development as well as a comprehensive well-being. Health is a prerequisite and result of a productive reflection upon the conditions and challenges of work. Business practice shows that a preventive work design should involve an economic benefit for the enterprise. If occupational health is seen as a characteristic of quality and a prerequisite for sustainable enterprise development, economic potentials of preventive work designs will expand considerably. PMID:14685920

  19. Developing a good practice model to evaluate the effectiveness of comprehensive primary health care in local communities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the development of a model of Comprehensive Primary Health Care (CPHC) applicable to the Australian context. CPHC holds promise as an effective model of health system organization able to improve population health and increase health equity. However, there is little literature that describes and evaluates CPHC as a whole, with most evaluation focusing on specific programs. The lack of a consensus on what constitutes CPHC, and the complex and context-sensitive nature of CPHC are all barriers to evaluation. Methods The research was undertaken in partnership with six Australian primary health care services: four state government funded and managed services, one sexual health non-government organization, and one Aboriginal community controlled health service. A draft model was crafted combining program logic and theory-based approaches, drawing on relevant literature, 68 interviews with primary health care service staff, and researcher experience. The model was then refined through an iterative process involving two to three workshops at each of the six participating primary health care services, engaging health service staff, regional health executives and central health department staff. Results The resultant Southgate Model of CPHC in Australia model articulates the theory of change of how and why CPHC service components and activities, based on the theory, evidence and values which underpin a CPHC approach, are likely to lead to individual and population health outcomes and increased health equity. The model captures the importance of context, the mechanisms of CPHC, and the space for action services have to work within. The process of development engendered and supported collaborative relationships between researchers and stakeholders and the product provided a description of CPHC as a whole and a framework for evaluation. The model was endorsed at a research symposium involving investigators, service staff, and key stakeholders

  20. Health care reforms in Poland.

    PubMed

    Baginska, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the shape of the recently reformed health care system in Poland. Until December 31,1998 everyone had access to free health care and the medical institutions were financed by the State. Since January 1, 1999, under the provisions of the Universal Health Insurance Act, hospitals became independent from the State budget and gained more financial resources for their activities. 17 regional health insurance funds contract for medical services with hospitals and individual practices. Most services provided to the insured are paid by the funds that receive premiums, but some are still financed from the State budget. The revised legislation on Medical Care Establishments intended to create a better management of health care institutions and administrative control over the quality of care. The system has been severely criticised: it is too bureaucratic, there are too many insurance funds, patients have experienced problems with access to health care, particularly to special treatment or to treatment available outside the area of the health insurance fund to which the patient belongs. The new Minister for Health suggested that the 17 funds should be replaced by 5 "health funds" that would finance health care and be closely connected to the local government answerable for their activities. This paper will deal with the scope of health care packages, the conditions of provision of health services, obligations of health care providers, patient rights, and the quality of health care. PMID:15685913

  1. Physical and Mental Health, Cognitive Development, and Health Care Use by Housing Status of Low-Income Young Children in 20 American Cities: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, Angela R.; Allison, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the independent effect of homeless and doubled-up episodes on physical and mental health, cognitive development, and health care use among children. Methods. We used data from 4 waves of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, involving a sample of 2631 low-income children in 20 large US cities who have been followed since birth. Multivariate analyses involved logistic regression using the hybrid method to include both fixed and random effects. Results. Of the sample, 9.8% experienced homelessness and an additional 23.6% had a doubled-up episode. Housing status had little significant adverse effect on child physical or mental health, cognitive development, or health care use. Conclusions. Family and environmental stressors common to many children in poverty, rather than just homeless and doubled-up episodes, were associated with young children's poor health and cognitive development and high health care use. Practitioners need to identify and respond to parental and family needs for support services in addition to housing assistance to effectively improve the health and development of young children who experience residential instability, particularly those in homeless families. PMID:21551380

  2. For-Profit/Nonprofit Differences in Center-Based Child Care Quality: Results from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosinsky, Laura Stout; Lord, Heather; Zigler, Edward

    2007-01-01

    In secondary analyses of National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development data, multiple indicators of quality (caregiver wages and turnover; child/staff ratio; caregiver education and professionalism; positive caregiving) were compared between child care centers by sector…

  3. Outbreaks in Health Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Sood, Geeta; Perl, Trish M

    2016-09-01

    Outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks in health care settings can be complex and should be evaluated systematically using epidemiologic tools. Laboratory testing is an important part of an outbreak evaluation. Health care personnel, equipment, supplies, water, ventilation systems, and the hospital environment have been associated with health care outbreaks. Settings including the neonatal intensive care unit, endoscopy, oncology, and transplant units are areas that have specific issues which impact the approach to outbreak investigation and control. Certain organisms have a predilection for health care settings because of the illnesses of patients, the procedures performed, and the care provided. PMID:27515142

  4. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  5. [Reembursing health-care service provider networks].

    PubMed

    Binder, A; Braun, G E

    2015-03-01

    Health-care service provider networks are regarded as an important instrument to overcome the widely criticised fragmentation and sectoral partition of the German health-care system. The first part of this paper incorporates health-care service provider networks in the field of health-care research. The system theoretical model and basic functions of health-care research are used for this purpose. Furthermore already established areas of health-care research with strong relations to health-care service provider networks are listed. The second part of this paper introduces some innovative options for reimbursing health-care service provider networks which can be regarded as some results of network-oriented health-care research. The origins are virtual budgets currently used in part to reimburse integrated care according to §§ 140a ff. SGB V. Describing and evaluating this model leads to real budgets (capitation) - a reimbursement scheme repeatedly demanded by SVR-Gesundheit (German governmental health-care advisory board), for example, however barely implemented. As a final step a direct reimbursement of networks by the German sickness fund is discussed. Advantages and challenges are shown. The development of the different reimbursement schemes is partially based on models from the USA. PMID:25625796

  6. Where Is Health Care Headed?

    PubMed

    Bland, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Looking at the trends, developments, and discoveries points us toward the future, but it is only when we consider these in the context of our understanding about the origins of disease that we can truly gain a clearer view of where health care is headed. This is the view that moves us from a focus on the diagnosis and treatment of a disease to an understanding of the origin of the alteration in function in the individual. This change in both perspective and understanding of the origin of disease is what will lead us to a systems approach to health care that delivers personalized and precision care that is based on the inherent rehabilitative power that resides within the genome. PMID:27547161

  7. Health care in the Yemen Arab Republic.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, S

    1988-01-01

    The Yemen Arab Republic has health-care problems similar to other developing countries yet lacks the abundant oil reserves of its Arabian peninsula neighbors to address these problems. An ambitious 5 year health plan developed in 1977 has been impeded by a lack of material and human resources. The infant mortality rate remains one of the highest in the world, schistosomiasis drains the energy of the people, and tuberculosis and malaria remain endemic. Progress is, however, being made in health-care educational programs within Sanaa University and the Health Manpower Institutes to develop the resources of the Yemeni people to meet the health-care needs of their country. PMID:3225123

  8. Psychology's Role in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

    This information packet contains eight two- to three-page publications from the American Psychological Association series "Psychological Services for the 21st Century, Psychology's Role in Health Care: Studying Human Behavior; Promoting Health; Saving Health Care Dollars; Providing Mental Health Services." The focus of the series is the connection…

  9. Betting against health care.

    PubMed

    Appleby, C

    1996-06-20

    Health care firms of all types helped fuel the biggest short-selling frenzy in the New York Stock Exchange's history, recently hitting a record 2.2 billion shares. While some analysts say this means nothing, the fact is that many investors are "shorting" the stock; in other words, they're betting against it. What appears as a lack of confidence may be nothing more than a simple quirk of Wall Street. Good, bad or indifferent, selling short is no tall tale. PMID:8640268

  10. Developing IntegRATE: a fast and frugal patient-reported measure of integration in health care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Elwyn, Glyn; Thompson, Rachel; John, Roshen; Grande, Stuart W

    2015-01-01

    Background Efforts have been made to measure integration in health care delivery, but few existing instruments have adopted a patient perspective, and none is sufficiently generic and brief for administration at scale. We sought to develop a brief and generic patient-reported measure of integration in health care delivery. Methods Drawing on both existing conceptualisations of integrated care and research on patients’ perspectives, we chose to focus on four distinct domains of integration: information sharing, consistent advice, mutual respect and role clarity. We formulated candidate items and conducted cognitive interviews with end users to further develop and refine the items. We then pilot-tested the measure. Results Four rounds of cognitive interviews were conducted (n = 14) and resulted in a four-item measure that was both relevant and understandable to end users. The pilot administration of the measure (n = 15) further confirmed the relevance and interpretability of items and demonstrated that the measure could be completed in less than one minute. Conclusions This new measure, IntegRATE, represents a patient-reported measure of integration in health care delivery that is conducive to use in both routine performance monitoring and research. The psychometric properties of the measure will be assessed in the next stage of development. PMID:26034467