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1

Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care ... save lives." Photo: Fran Sandridge For Melanie Modlin, volunteering to take part in a clinical trial was ...

2

The Fresno County Refugee Health Volunteer Project: A Case Study in Cross-Cultural Health Care Delivery.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Fresno County Refugee Health Volunteer Project enables individuals, families, and community groups to meet their health care needs. In spite of various problems, valuable progress has been made since 1984. The program is a model approach to health care which builds on the strength and skills of the community. (VM)

Rowe, Donald R.; Spees, H. P.

1987-01-01

3

Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.  

PubMed

The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement. PMID:24083746

Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

2013-01-01

4

Urban community health volunteers.  

PubMed

An evaluation was made of the effectiveness of an urban community health volunteer programme in Pokhara, Nepal, in sensitizing and motivating people for the improvement of health knowledge and skills and the use of services. Despite weaknesses and inadequate management support, there has been a sharp increase in coverage by the health services. If management support were properly developed the programme could undoubtedly play a vital role in raising health standards. It was clearly demonstrated that the utilization of services can be increased if access to them is improved. PMID:8439362

Chaulagai, C N

1993-01-01

5

The Volunteer Health Advisor Program of Cambridge Health Alliance: "A Bridge Between the Community and the Health Care System" Cambridge, Massachusetts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cambridge Health Alliance's Volunteer Health Advisor (VHA) Program was developed to create an effective and cost efficient outreach network to improve community health status. The program's mission is to improve community health by working collaboratively with faith-based and community-based organizations to recruit, train, and support a…

Perspectives in Peer Programs, 2005

2005-01-01

6

Volunteering in dementia care - a Norwegian phenomenological study  

PubMed Central

Introduction The number of people suffering from dementia will increase dramatically in the future, and this will be a great challenge and concern for health care services. It is assumed that volunteers will strengthen community health care services more in the future than they do today. Aim The aim of this study was to elucidate lived experiences of working as a volunteer in an activity center with adapted activities for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia. Methods Qualitative interviews were implemented in a group of nine female volunteers from an activity center in southern Norway. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with a descriptive phenomenological method. Results Volunteering in an activity center for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia was reported to provide experiences of being useful and feeling satisfied with performing a good job. It was an advantage for the volunteers to have had experiences from life in general, but also as a health professional or as being the next of kin of a dementia sufferer. It was important for the volunteers to focus on the dementia sufferer and show caring behavior, and interaction with and the appreciation of the health care professionals were also important. The volunteers were motivated by being able to have influence and participate in the planning of the work, to be a part of the social setting, and to learn. However, for some volunteers it was difficult to adjust to an appropriate role. Conclusion In order to promote volunteering in a caring context, mutual trust and freedom should be emphasized. Being conscious of important volunteer characteristics like their experiences, knowledge, and caring behavior, as well as a focus on the staff showing appreciation and providing feedback, may be the difference between success and failure.

Soderhamn, Ulrika; Landmark, Bj?rg; Aasgaard, Live; Eide, Hilde; Soderhamn, Olle

2012-01-01

7

A national survey of health professionals and volunteers working in voluntary hospice services in the UK. I. Attitudes to current issues affecting hospices and palliative care.  

PubMed

This paper reports results from a national survey in 1999 of voluntary hospice services in the UK. It focuses on volunteer and staff views of the purposes of hospice care, and on current debates within palliative care. Twenty-five hospice services, stratified by region, services provided (inpatient care, day care and/or home care) and number of beds were randomly sampled from amongst 175 voluntary hospices in the UK. Nineteen participated. Seventy per cent of a random sample of professional and voluntary staff within these hospices returned a postal questionnaire. Both volunteers and professionals considered care of the whole person, pain and symptom control, quality of life and dying peacefully to be important aspects of hospice care. Most doctors chose care of the whole person as the most important aspect, and they were more likely to choose this option than other staff. Hospice volunteers were less positive than hospice staff (particularly doctors and nurses) in their attitudes to extending hospice care to noncancer patients (where many volunteers held no strong view), to restricting care to patients with specialist palliative care needs, and less negative about euthanasia. These findings illustrate the importance of including hospice volunteers and the general public, as well as hospice staff, in debates about the future of hospice and palliative care in the UK. Further research is needed into lay and professional views of the role of hospices and palliative care services. PMID:15690867

Addington-Hall, Julia M; Karlsen, Saffron

2005-01-01

8

Is volunteering a public health intervention? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the health and survival of volunteers  

PubMed Central

Background Volunteering has been advocated by the United Nations, and American and European governments as a way to engage people in their local communities and improve social capital, with the potential for public health benefits such as improving wellbeing and decreasing health inequalities. Furthermore, the US Corporation for National and Community Service Strategic Plan for 2011–2015 focused on increasing the impact of national service on community needs, supporting volunteers’ wellbeing, and prioritising recruitment and engagement of underrepresented populations. The aims of this review were to examine the effect of formal volunteering on volunteers’ physical and mental health and survival, and to explore the influence of volunteering type and intensity on health outcomes. Methods Experimental and cohort studies comparing the physical and mental health outcomes and mortality of a volunteering group to a non-volunteering group were identified from twelve electronic databases (Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, HMIC, SSCI, ASSIA, Social Care Online, Social Policy and Practice) and citation tracking in January 2013. No language, country or date restrictions were applied. Data synthesis was based on vote counting and random effects meta-analysis of mortality risk ratios. Results Forty papers were selected: five randomised controlled trials (RCTs, seven papers); four non-RCTs; and 17 cohort studies (29 papers). Cohort studies showed volunteering had favourable effects on depression, life satisfaction, wellbeing but not on physical health. These findings were not confirmed by experimental studies. Meta-analysis of five cohort studies found volunteers to be at lower risk of mortality (risk ratio: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.66, 0.90). There was insufficient evidence to demonstrate a consistent influence of volunteering type or intensity on outcomes. Conclusion Observational evidence suggested that volunteering may benefit mental health and survival although the causal mechanisms remain unclear. Consequently, there was limited robustly designed research to guide the development of volunteering as a public health promotion intervention. Future studies should explicitly map intervention design to clear health outcomes as well as use pragmatic RCT methodology to test effects.

2013-01-01

9

Health and Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health plays a central role in people’s perceptions of their quality of life, and access to good health care is a key ingredient\\u000a in an overall sense of security and well-being. This chapter examines how health and health care have evolved over the course\\u000a of Ireland’s economic boom. Media coverage highlights the negatives: increasing suicide, road deaths, binge drinking and

Richard Layte; Anne Nolan; Brian Nolan

10

Holding on to what you have got: keeping hospice palliative care volunteers volunteering.  

PubMed

In all, 119 hospice palliative care volunteers from 3 community-based hospice programs completed the Volunteer Retention Questionnaire (VRQ), a 33-item survey designed for this study. The VRQ asks volunteers to rate the importance of each item to their decision to continue volunteering. The items that received the highest mean importance ratings included enjoying the work they do, feeling adequately prepared/trained to perform their role, and learning from their patients' experiences/listening to their patients' life stories. Being recognized (eg, pins for years of service or being profiled in the hospice newsletter), receiving phone calls/cards from their volunteer coordinator on special occasions, and being reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses were among the items that received the lowest mean importance ratings. Suggestions for improving volunteer retention are provided. PMID:22811213

Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Jones, Richard

2013-08-01

11

Health-Care Access in a Rural Area: Perspectives from Russian-Speaking Immigrants, English-Speaking Doctors, and Volunteer Interpreters  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health-care access for immigrants in the United States is often problematic because of language barriers, lack of health insurance, or differing expectations based on divergent medical systems in the U.S. and the immigrants' home countries. Such difficulties are exacerbated when a linguistic-minority population lives in a rural community that has…

Brua, Charles R.

2009-01-01

12

CYCLES OF POVERTY, FOOD INSECURITY, AND PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS AMONG AIDS CARE VOLUNTEERS IN URBAN ETHIOPIA  

PubMed Central

With the rollout of AIDS therapies, volunteer AIDS care has been promoted across Africa under the assumption that volunteerism is economically imperative in settings of health professional and resource scarcity. As low-income volunteers have become a major part of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment workforces, it is imperative to question how poverty impacts their well-being. This chapter presents epidemiologic data collected during the 2008 food crisis from a sample of 110 AIDS care volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as well as narratives offered by HIV-positive volunteers, highlighting a widely overlooked way in which food insecurity and mental distress impact efforts to treat AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Food insecurity and elevated common mental disorder (CMD) symptom loads were common and tightly linked among the volunteers in the sample. Volunteers who were HIV-positive (17 percent) fared slightly worse in terms of food insecurity and psychosocial well-being. However, positive HIV serostatus was not associated with CMD in multivariate analyses accounting for food insecurity. Narratives illustrate how being HIV-positive shaped experiences of psychosocial stress, which involved unemployment and lack of prospects for marital relationships or strife within them. Our focus demonstrates the potential for mixing ethnographic and epidemiological methods to inform policy questions regarding poverty-reduction through compensation for volunteers’ valuable labor, as well as AIDS care program sustainability. [volunteerism, AIDS care, food insecurity, livelihoods, HIV, psychosocial health

Maes, Kenneth; Shifferaw, Selamawit

2013-01-01

13

Understanding Data Concepts: A Guide for Health Planning Volunteers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Much of the information which volunteers in health planning are asked to consider is presented in statistical terms. The understanding of such terms is therefore essential to sound decisionmaking by volunteers. This document provides a nontechnical explan...

K. T. Phillips

1982-01-01

14

Health Benefits of Volunteering in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigate positive effects of volunteering on psychological well-being and self-reported health using all four waves of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Confirming previous research, volunteering was positively related to both outcome variables. Both consistency of volunteering over time and diversity of participation are significantly…

Piliavin, Jane Allyn; Siegl, Erica

2007-01-01

15

Peer education for advance care planning: volunteers' perspectives on training and community engagement activities  

PubMed Central

Background Peer education by volunteers may aid attitudinal change, but there is little understanding of factors assisting the preparation of peer educators. This study contributes to conceptual understandings of how volunteers may be prepared to work as peer educators by drawing on an evaluation of a training programme for peer education for advance care planning (ACP). Objectives To report on volunteers’ perspectives on the peer education training programme, their feelings about assuming the role of volunteer peer educators and the community engagement activities with which they engaged during the year after training. To examine broader implications for peer education. Design Participatory action research employing mixed methods of data collection. Participants Twenty-four older volunteers and eight health and social care staff. Data collection methods Evaluative data were gathered from information provided during and at the end of training, a follow-up survey 4 months post-training; interviews and focus groups 6 and 12 months post-training. Findings Volunteers’ personal aims ranged from working within their communities to using what they had learnt within their own families. The personal impact of peer education was considerable. Two-thirds of volunteers reported community peer education activities 1 year after the training. Those who identified strongly with a community group had the most success. Conclusion We reflect on the extent to which the programme aided the development of ‘critical consciousness’ among the volunteers: a key factor in successful peer education programmes. More research is needed about the impact on uptake of ACP in communities.

Seymour, Jane E; Almack, Kathryn; Kennedy, Sheila; Froggatt, Katherine

2013-01-01

16

Women Veterans Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... be a sign of dementia. Learn more » Comprehensive Primary Care No other health service in the world understands ... care anywhere. Learn more » Women and Dementia Comp. Primary Care WVCC Women Veterans Health Care Did you know ...

17

Volunteering and mental health: Benefits of engagement or social selection?  

Microsoft Academic Search

While studies have focused exclusively on explicating the beneficial effects of volunteer work, little is known about whether social selection processes also influence the relationship between volunteering and health at different stages of the adulthood. Given the fact that people experience numerous life transitions over the life course, their social engagement and personal well-being are likely to be affected. Scarce

Yunqing Li

2004-01-01

18

Health care in Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brazil has great geopolitical importance because of its size, environmental resources, and potential economic power. The organisation of its health care system reflects the schisms within Brazilian society. High technology private care is available to the rich and inadequate public care to the poor. Limited financial resources have been overconcentrated on health care in the hospital sector and health professionals

A Haines

1993-01-01

19

Volunteering  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In recent decades, there has been a burgeoning interest in the study of volunteering, and the number of publications devoted\\u000a to volunteering has grown exponentially. In this chapter, we examine emerging theories and new directions in volunteering\\u000a research. First, we discuss multi-level perspectives that try to understand volunteering in complex interaction with the organizational\\u000a and institutional context. Next, we present

Lesley Hustinx; Femida Handy; Ram A. Cnaan

20

Primary Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains 13 articles and book/film reviews on various topics related to the diffusion of health care information in developing countries; beginning with two articles which define primary health care, and suggest principles related to the community, communication, and the health practitioner upon which primary health care should be…

Lauffer, Sandra, Ed.

1979-01-01

21

Integrating Oral Health Care into Primary Health Care System  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Systematic evaluation is an integral part of the organization and delivery of community oral health care programmes, ensuring the effectiveness of these community-based interventions. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and practice of primary health care (PHC) personnel regarding their duties toward oral health. Methods and Material. A cross-sectional study was carried out among three groups of PHC personnel in the city of Kerman (Iran). Volunteer personnel completed a piloted questionnaire which included demographic data, some question regarding their knowledge about oral health, their duties and also their practice regarding public oral health. All data were analyzed using chi-square and Pearson correlation test. Results. One hundred and fifty-seven out of 225 eligible personnel participated in the study. Sixty percent were auxiliary health workers (Behvarz). All personnel had a good level of knowledge regarding oral health. Despite significant differences among the knowledge of the personnel toward oral health, there was no significant difference between their knowledge related to their duties regarding oral health. The auxiliary health worker group had a higher rate (45.6%) for better public oral health practice. Conclusion. The study showed the personnel have good knowledge of their duties regarding oral health. However, their practice is not in line with their knowledge and needs more attention.

Hajizamani, Abolghasem; Malek Mohammadi, Tayebeh; Hajmohammadi, Ebadollah; Shafiee, Shahin

2012-01-01

22

Understanding Volunteer Peer Health Educators' Motivations: Applying Social Learning Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers conducted focus group interviews with college student peer health educators to determine what factors motivated them to volunteer for a peer health education program. Examination of their life experiences, motivations, and program expectations indicated that life experiences, belief in the effectiveness of peer health education, and…

Klein, Nicole Aydt; And Others

1994-01-01

23

Teamwork in health care.  

PubMed

It is becoming increasingly clear that maintaining and improving the health of the population, and doing so in a financially sustainable manner, requires the coordination of acute medical care with long-term care, and social support services, that is, team-based care. Despite a growing body of evidence on the benefits of team-based care, the health care ecosystem remains "resistant" to a broader implementation of such care models. This resistance is a function of both system-wide and organizational barriers, which result primarily from fragmentation in reimbursement for health care services, regulatory restrictions, and the siloed nature of health professional education. To promote the broader adoption of team-based care models, the health care system must transition to pay for value reimbursement, as well as break down the educational silos and move toward team-based and value-based education of health professionals. PMID:24896572

Landman, Natalie; Aannestad, Liv K; Smoldt, Robert K; Cortese, Denis A

2014-01-01

24

Types of health care providers  

MedlinePLUS

This article describes health care providers involved in primary care, nursing care, and specialty care. This is just ... PRIMARY CARE A primary care provider (PCP) is a person you may see first for checkups and health ...

25

Environmental Volunteering and Health Outcomes over a 20-Year Period  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study tested the hypothesis that volunteering in environmental organizations in midlife is associated with greater physical activity and improved mental and physical health over a 20-year period. Design and Methods: The study used data from two waves (1974 and 1994) of the Alameda County Study, a longitudinal study of health and…

Pillemer, Karl; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; Reid, M. C.; Wells, Nancy M.

2010-01-01

26

For Health Care Providers  

Cancer.gov

For Health Care Providers Training Categories Palliative Care Clinical Trials Translational Research Palliative Care Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care For Oncology (EPEC™-O )Format: Web-based self-study, 3 plenary sessions and 15 content

27

American Health Care Association  

MedlinePLUS

... AHCA/NCAL PAC Federal Political Directors Political Events Solutions Facility Operations Affordable Care Act Clinical Emergency Preparedness Finance Health Information Technology Integrity Medicaid Medicare Patient ...

28

Be safe, be prepared: emergency system for advance registration of volunteer health professionals in disaster response.  

PubMed

Following the September 11, 2001, incident in the United States (US) and subsequent natural disasters, the US, like other countries, has focused on improving its overall disaster response capabilities. One mechanism that is under development to improve the country's surge capacity, i.e., its ability to substantially increase the number of volunteer health care professionals available to respond during a disaster, is the Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP). Registries, like ESAR-VHP, are significant tools for disaster planning and deployment. The goal of ESAR-VHP is to create a state-based registry of volunteer health professionals, verify their credentials prior to a disaster, and provide opportunities for education and training in disaster response. Each of these steps is necessary in ensuring access to patient services during an emergency, while also providing for the safety of the volunteer health professional. This article speaks to the registered nurse as a volunteer acting within these types of registries. Specifically, it addresses the development of a personal and professional response plan, and registration programs that provide the preparation needed to enable a nurse responder to work effectively within a disaster response team and facilitate preregistration with one and only one registry. The legal implications of responding are also discussed. PMID:17279858

Peterson, Cheryl

2006-09-01

29

Vacation health care  

MedlinePLUS

Travel health tips ... BEFORE LEAVING Planning ahead of time can make your travels smoother and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 - 6 weeks before ...

30

Monitoring health care.  

PubMed

Health risk determinants in obstetrics and gynecology are readily obtainable from state birth records. This study demonstrates the manner in which these determinants may be used to assess health care delivery and monitor its progress. The over-all problem is quite complex. Some parameters are interrelated, while others are not. In addition, any specific parameter may be causally related to many different antecedents, acting singly or in combination. Hence, one must take care not to generalize about deficiencies in our health care systems and thereby propose simplistic, unworkable solutions. However, the study does clearly identify certain specific areas of risk which deserve greater attention than they have hitherto received from health care officials, physicians, and responsible citizens. We believe that the approach outlined in this paper offers a means to achieve unbiased, ongoing monitoring of health care, which may, in turn, be used in attempts to improve the delivery of health services. PMID:1166865

Herrmann, W L; Moore, J S

1975-10-15

31

Long Term Care Ombudsman Volunteers: Making a Measurable Difference for Nursing Home Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the roles and participation of volunteers in a Long Term Care Ombudsman Program (LTCOP) and assesses if differences exist between nursing homes with and without volunteer ombudsmen. Volunteers are found to favorably influence the environment in nursing homes by encouraging a supportive climate in which residents and their representatives can voice complaints. Furthermore, the working relationships between

Priscilla D. Allen

32

Health Care System Accessibility  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND People who are deaf use health care services differently than the general population; little research has been carried out to understand the reasons. OBJECTIVE To better understand the health care experiences of deaf people who communicate in American Sign Language. DESIGN Qualitative analyses of focus group discussions in 3 U.S. cities. PARTICIPANTS Ninety-one deaf adults who communicate primarily in American Sign Language. MEASUREMENTS We collected information about health care communication and perceptions of clinicians' attitudes. We elicited stories of both positive and negative encounters, as well as recommendations for improving health care. RESULTS Communication difficulties were ubiquitous. Fear, mistrust, and frustration were prominent in participants' descriptions of health care encounters. Positive experiences were characterized by the presence of medically experienced certified interpreters, health care practitioners with sign language skills, and practitioners who made an effort to improve communication. Many participants acknowledged limited knowledge of their legal rights and did not advocate for themselves. Some participants believed that health care practitioners should learn more about sociocultural aspects of deafness. CONCLUSIONS Deaf people report difficulties using health care services. Physicians can facilitate change to improve this. Future research should explore the perspective of clinicians when working with deaf people, ways to improve communication, and the impact of programs that teach deaf people self-advocacy skills and about their legal rights.

Steinberg, Annie G; Barnett, Steven; Meador, Helen E; Wiggins, Erin A; Zazove, Philip

2006-01-01

33

Lean health care.  

PubMed

Principles of Lean management are being adopted more widely in health care as a way of improving quality and safety while controlling costs. The authors, who are chief executive officers of rural North Carolina hospitals, explain how their organizations are using Lean principles to improve quality and safety of health care delivery. PMID:23802475

Hawthorne, Henry C; Masterson, David J

2013-01-01

34

Volunteers in specialist palliative care: a survey of adult services in the United kingdom.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Worldwide, the demand for specialist palliative care is increasing but funding is limited. The role of volunteers is underresearched, although their contribution reduces costs significantly. Understanding what volunteers do is vital to ensure services develop appropriately to meet the challenges faced by providers of palliative care. Objective: The study's objective is to describe current involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in U.K. specialist palliative care. Design: An online survey was sent to 290?U.K. adult hospices and specialist palliative care services involving volunteers covering service characteristics, involvement and numbers of volunteers, settings in which they are involved, extent of involvement in care services, specific activities undertaken in each setting, and use of professional skills. Results: The survey had a 67% response rate. Volunteers were most commonly involved in day care and bereavement services. They entirely ran some complementary therapy, beauty therapy/hairdressing, and pastoral/faith-based care services, and were involved in a wide range of activities, including sitting with dying patients. Conclusions: This comprehensive survey of volunteer activity in U.K. specialist palliative care provides an up-to-date picture of volunteer involvement in direct contact with patients and their families, such as providing emotional care, and the extent of their involvement in day and bereavement services. Further research could focus on exploring their involvement in bereavement care. PMID:24475743

Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Bravery, Ruth; Hill, Matthew; Morris, Sara; Ockenden, Nick; Payne, Sheila; Candy, Bridget

2014-05-01

35

Volunteers in Specialist Palliative Care: A Survey of Adult Services in the United Kingdom  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background: Worldwide, the demand for specialist palliative care is increasing but funding is limited. The role of volunteers is underresearched, although their contribution reduces costs significantly. Understanding what volunteers do is vital to ensure services develop appropriately to meet the challenges faced by providers of palliative care. Objective: The study's objective is to describe current involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in U.K. specialist palliative care. Design: An online survey was sent to 290?U.K. adult hospices and specialist palliative care services involving volunteers covering service characteristics, involvement and numbers of volunteers, settings in which they are involved, extent of involvement in care services, specific activities undertaken in each setting, and use of professional skills. Results: The survey had a 67% response rate. Volunteers were most commonly involved in day care and bereavement services. They entirely ran some complementary therapy, beauty therapy/hairdressing, and pastoral/faith-based care services, and were involved in a wide range of activities, including sitting with dying patients. Conclusions: This comprehensive survey of volunteer activity in U.K. specialist palliative care provides an up-to-date picture of volunteer involvement in direct contact with patients and their families, such as providing emotional care, and the extent of their involvement in day and bereavement services. Further research could focus on exploring their involvement in bereavement care.

Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L.; Bravery, Ruth; Hill, Matthew; Morris, Sara; Ockenden, Nick; Payne, Sheila

2014-01-01

36

Health Resort Opatija Volunteer Fire Brigade and Rescue Society.  

PubMed

Not only the health service but also several other humanitarian institutions and societies were active in Abbazia÷Opatija, the most important town on the once Austrian Riviera, the town that was also known as the Austrian Nice. The most important of the societies was The Health Resort Opatija Volunteer Fire Brigade and Rescue Society. The authors of this article have been particularly interested in the society's founding and its activity until it moved into the new building at 6, St. Florjan's Street in 1910. The fast urbanisation and the development of the industry raised the need of the well organised activity of putting out fires. The German gymnastics societies were the first to include the education and the skills development of the volunteer firemen into their programmes. The first volunteer fire brigades appeared in Austria after 1863. The huge fire that broke out in Vienna in 1881 showed that the fast and efficient rescuing demanded a well prepared organization of a team of rescuers. Based on the initiative of the chimney sweep Franz Drescher and The South Railway Company, the volunteer fire brigade was founded in Opatija already in 1886. The founding of the volunteer rescue society was based on the idea given by dr. Jaromir Mundy, the permanent guest in Opatija and a friend of prof. dr. Theodor Billroth, in 1894. The intertwining activity of the both societies resulted in their formal joining. The head physician became dr. Franz Tripold, the chief commander was Franz Doberlet junior. For his special merits, the general assembly of the Health Resort Opatija Volunteer Fire Brigade and Rescue Society appointed him the honourable commander of the society in 1903 and he received a special photo album with the photos of the volunteer firemen and the rescuers' practice. The Emperor Franz Joseph I Jubilee Fire Station, the Rescue Station And the Sanatorium (Kaiser Franz Joseph I Jubiläums - Feuerwehrrüstungshaus, Rettungsstation und Erholungsheim) was given to the use on 1st October 1910. Since then, the two societies worked at this same location. The Volunteer Fire Brigade Opatija has been located in this building ever since. PMID:22047481

Fischinger, Janez; Fischinger, Ales; Fischinger, Dusa

2011-01-01

37

KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC volunteers for Days of Caring '99 unfold protective materials before getting ready to paint at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

1999-01-01

38

KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Volunteers for Days of Caring '99 set up the paint trays for painting at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

1999-01-01

39

KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A volunteer for Days of Caring '99 prepares a light fixture before painting the walls in the hallway at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

1999-01-01

40

KSC volunteers help paint Baxley Manor as part of Days of Caring '99  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC volunteers with Days of Caring '99 share tasks while getting ready to paint at Baxley Manor, an apartment building for senior citizens on Merritt Island. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

1999-01-01

41

Health-Care Hub  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

Bowman, Darcia Harris

2004-01-01

42

Health care automation companies.  

PubMed

Health care automation companies: card transaction processing/EFT/EDI-capable banks; claims auditing/analysis; claims processors/clearinghouses; coding products/services; computer hardware; computer networking/LAN/WAN; consultants; data processing/outsourcing; digital dictation/transcription; document imaging/optical disk storage; executive information systems; health information networks; hospital/health care information systems; interface engines; laboratory information systems; managed care information systems; patient identification/credit cards; pharmacy information systems; POS terminals; radiology information systems; software--claims related/computer-based patient records/home health care/materials management/supply ordering/physician practice management/translation/utilization review/outcomes; telecommunications products/services; telemedicine/teleradiology; value-added networks. PMID:10153839

1995-12-01

43

Mercury and health care.  

PubMed

Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries' health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

2010-08-01

44

KSC volunteers help Meals on Wheels as part of Days of Caring '99  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KSC volunteers at Miracle City Mall, Titusville, help unload containers for Meals on Wheels delivery as part of their '99 Days of Caring participation. The volunteers will also help deliver the meals. Coordinated by the KSC Community Relations Council, Days of Caring provides an opportunity for employees to volunteer their services in projects such as painting, planting flowers, reading to school children, and more. Organizations accepting volunteers include The Embers, Yellow Umbrella, Serene Harbor, Domestic Violence Program, the YMCA of Brevard County, and others.

1999-01-01

45

Health Care Megatrends and Health Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health psychology is a major new area of professional psychological practice that has emerged during a period of rapid changes in the health care industry. In this article, published literature is examined for historical, educational, and health care delivery system contributions. Four megatrends in medicine and health care that impinge upon health psychology are described.

Richard H. Dana; W. Theodore May

1986-01-01

46

Containing Health Care Costs  

PubMed Central

As the federal government shifted from its traditional roles in health to the payment for personal health care, the relationship between public and private sectors has deteriorated. Today federal and state revenue funds and trusts are the largest purchasers of services from a predominantly private health system. This financing or “gap-filling” role is essential; so too is the purchaser's concern for the costs and prices it must meet. The cost per person for personal health care in 1980 is expected to average $950, triple for the aged. Hospital costs vary considerably and inexplicably among states; California residents, for example, spend 50 percent more per year for hospital care than do state of Washington residents. The failure of each sector to understand the other is potentially damaging to the parties and to patients. First, and most important, differences can and must be moderated through definite changes in the attitudes of the protagonists.

Derzon, Robert A.

1980-01-01

47

The impacts of using community health volunteers to coach medication safety behaviors among rural elders with chronic illnesses.  

PubMed

It is a challenge for rural health professionals to promote medication safety among older adults taking multiple medications. A volunteer coaching program to promote medication safety among rural elders with chronic illnesses was designed and evaluated. A community-based interventional study randomly assigned 62 rural elders with at least two chronic illnesses to routine care plus volunteer coaching or routine care alone. The volunteer coaching group received a medication safety program, including a coach and reminders by well-trained volunteers, as well as three home visits and five telephone calls over a two-month period. All the subjects received routine medication safety instructions for their chronic illnesses. The program was evaluated using pre- and post-tests of knowledge, attitude and behaviors with regard to medication safety. Results show the volunteer coaching group improved their knowledge of medication safety, but there was no change in attitude after the two-month study period. Moreover, the group demonstrated three improved medication safety behaviors compared to the routine care group. The volunteer coaching program and instructions with pictorial aids can provide a reference for community health professionals who wish to improve the medication safety of chronically ill elders. PMID:23414637

Wang, Chi-Jane; Fetzer, Susan J; Yang, Yi-Ching; Wang, Jing-Jy

2013-01-01

48

Health care interactional suffering in palliative care.  

PubMed

A secondary analysis of 2 qualitative studies was conducted to explore the experiences of suffering caused by interactions with health care providers in the hospital setting. Interview transcripts from 20 palliative care patients and 15 palliative care informal caregivers in University Malaya Medical Centre were thematically analyzed. The results of health care interactional suffering were associated with themes of attention, understanding, communication, competence, and limitation. These 5 themes may serve as a framework for the improvement in interaction skills of health care providers in palliative care. PMID:23689367

Beng, Tan Seng; Guan, Ng Chong; Jane, Lim Ee; Chin, Loh Ee

2014-05-01

49

The Kindergarten Intervention Program: Development of an Early Mental Health Program Using Trained Volunteers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Kindergarten Intervention Program in Los Angeles, a model for recruiting, training, and supervising volunteers to help kindergarten students with special needs. Provides specific steps for initiating an early intervention mental health program using trained volunteers. (TE)

Munn, Janelle; And Others

1989-01-01

50

Volunteering and depressive symptoms among residents in a continuing care retirement community.  

PubMed

This descriptive study examined the relationship between volunteer activities, depressive symptoms, and feelings of usefulness among older adults using path analysis. Survey data was collected via interview from residents of a continuing care retirement community. Neither feelings of usefulness nor volunteering were directly associated with depressive symptoms. Volunteering was directly associated with feelings of usefulness and indirectly associated with depressive symptoms through total physical activity. Age, fear of falling, pain, physical activity, and physical resilience explained 31% of the variance in depressive symptoms. Engaging in volunteer work may be beneficial for increasing feelings of usefulness and indirectly improving depressive symptoms among older adults. PMID:24313849

Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Resnick, Barbara

2014-01-01

51

Poor retention does not have to be the rule: retention of volunteer community health workers in Uganda  

PubMed Central

Globally, health worker shortages continue to plague developing countries. Community health workers are increasingly being promoted to extend primary health care to underserved populations. Since 2004, Healthy Child Uganda (HCU) has trained volunteer community health workers in child health promotion in rural southwest Uganda. This study analyses the retention and motivation of volunteer community health workers trained by HCU. It presents retention rates over a 5-year period and provides insight into volunteer motivation. The findings are based on a 2010 retrospective review of the community health worker registry and the results of a survey on selection and motivation. The survey was comprised of qualitative and quantitative questions and verbally administered to a convenience sample of project participants. Between February 2004 and July 2009, HCU trained 404 community health workers (69% female) in 175 villages. Volunteers had an average age of 36.7 years, 4.9 children and some primary school education. Ninety-six per cent of volunteer community health workers were retained after 1 year (389/404), 91% after 2 years (386/404) and 86% after 5 years (101/117). Of the 54 ‘dropouts’, main reasons cited for discontinuation included ‘too busy’ (12), moved (11), business/employment (8), death (6) and separation/divorce (6). Of 58 questionnaire respondents, most (87%) reported having been selected at an inclusive community meeting. Pair-wise ranking was used to assess the importance of seven ‘motivational factors’ among respondents. Those highest ranked were ‘improved child health’, ‘education/training’ and ‘being asked for advice/assistance by peers’, while the modest ‘transport allowance’ ranked lowest. Our findings suggest that in our rural, African setting, volunteer community health workers can be retained over the medium term. Community health worker programmes should invest in community involvement in selection, quality training, supportive supervision and incentives, which may promote improved retention.

Ludwick, Teralynn; Brenner, Jennifer L; Kyomuhangi, Teddy; Wotton, Kathryn A; Kabakyenga, Jerome Kahuma

2014-01-01

52

Poor retention does not have to be the rule: retention of volunteer community health workers in Uganda.  

PubMed

Globally, health worker shortages continue to plague developing countries. Community health workers are increasingly being promoted to extend primary health care to underserved populations. Since 2004, Healthy Child Uganda (HCU) has trained volunteer community health workers in child health promotion in rural southwest Uganda. This study analyses the retention and motivation of volunteer community health workers trained by HCU. It presents retention rates over a 5-year period and provides insight into volunteer motivation. The findings are based on a 2010 retrospective review of the community health worker registry and the results of a survey on selection and motivation. The survey was comprised of qualitative and quantitative questions and verbally administered to a convenience sample of project participants. Between February 2004 and July 2009, HCU trained 404 community health workers (69% female) in 175 villages. Volunteers had an average age of 36.7 years, 4.9 children and some primary school education. Ninety-six per cent of volunteer community health workers were retained after 1 year (389/404), 91% after 2 years (386/404) and 86% after 5 years (101/117). Of the 54 'dropouts', main reasons cited for discontinuation included 'too busy' (12), moved (11), business/employment (8), death (6) and separation/divorce (6). Of 58 questionnaire respondents, most (87%) reported having been selected at an inclusive community meeting. Pair-wise ranking was used to assess the importance of seven 'motivational factors' among respondents. Those highest ranked were 'improved child health', 'education/training' and 'being asked for advice/assistance by peers', while the modest 'transport allowance' ranked lowest. Our findings suggest that in our rural, African setting, volunteer community health workers can be retained over the medium term. Community health worker programmes should invest in community involvement in selection, quality training, supportive supervision and incentives, which may promote improved retention. PMID:23650334

Ludwick, Teralynn; Brenner, Jennifer L; Kyomuhangi, Teddy; Wotton, Kathryn A; Kabakyenga, Jerome Kahuma

2014-05-01

53

Medical volunteering: giving something back.  

PubMed

A national health issue is how to provide medical care for the large number of people who are uninsured or do not qualify for medical coverage. Establishing free health clinics staffed by volunteer health professionals is one approach that is increasing, but this alone will not solve this societal problem. Many volunteer health care providers are needed, and more senior and retired physicians might be recruited. However, practicing general, not subspeciality, medicine in an unfamiliar surrounding with different patient demands may seem intimidating and anxiety producing. However, a conducive clinical environment and working with other volunteer health care staff may alleviate these feelings and make medical volunteering very enjoyable. The Mercy Health Clinic in Montgomery County, Maryland, has had this effect on us who volunteer there and care for its needy patients. PMID:17086461

Reynolds, Herbert Y

2006-01-01

54

Volunteering in Middle and Later Life: Is Health a Benefit, Barrier or Both?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The positive association between volunteering and health has been widely interpreted as evidence of the salutary effect of volunteering during adulthood. Using three waves of data from a national survey, this study uses structural equation models to examine the relationships among volunteering, functional limitations, and depressive symptoms…

Li, Yunqing; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

2006-01-01

55

Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

1994-01-01

56

Reform of Primary Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Never before has American society undergone such dramatic and pervasive changes as those currently effecting national health care needs. New strategies to meet the health care needs created by societal changes must be identified. Consumers, employers, providers, and third-party payers are calling for more cost effective health care, better access and better quality. Simultaneously, the United States has a shortage

Jeanette Lancaster; Wade Lancaster

1995-01-01

57

Child Care Health Connections, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

2002-01-01

58

National Health Care Skill Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet contains draft national health care skill standards that were proposed during the National Health Care Skill Standards Project on the basis of input from more than 1,000 representatives of key constituencies of the health care field. The project objectives and structure are summarized in the introduction. Part 1 examines the need for…

Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

59

[Epidemiology of mental health care].  

PubMed

Mental health care epidemiology seeks to investigate the practical situation of the health care system and services for individuals with mental disorders. In the past decades, mental health care structures in Germany were successively transformed from long-term inpatient treatment capacities to decentralized outpatient and day clinic services. Currently, the proportional relation between treatment facilities in different settings has been stabilized and the strategy of mental health care development focuses on innovative and integrative models of care provision. The aim is to integrate fragmented services by the introduction of network structures to overcome rigid sector boundaries. The need for health care services is associated with multiple factors such as population-based epidemiological data, usage behavior, and health politics. Due to scarce data and poor standards of care it is difficult to determine if current structures of mental health services cover the actual needs. Therefore, a substantial increase of mental health service research is needed. PMID:22371103

Jäger, M; Rössler, W

2012-03-01

60

Volunteer health and emotional wellbeing in marine protected areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Citizen science monitoring programs in the marine environment frequently focus on volunteer collected data precision for conservation and resource use of marine biota. Few studies have examined the social science aspects of volunteer engagement in marine monitoring programs in a quantifiable manner. This research focuses on emotional attitudes of Sea Search volunteers who monitor Marine National Parks and Marine Sanctuaries

Rebecca Sarah Koss; Jonathon ‘Yotti’ Kingsley

2010-01-01

61

Psychology's Role in Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This information packet contains eight two- to three-page publications from the American Psychological Association series "Psychological Services for the 21st Century, Psychology's Role in Health Care: Studying Human Behavior; Promoting Health; Saving Health Care Dollars; Providing Mental Health Services." The focus of the series is the connection…

American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

62

Long Term Health Study for Oil Spill Clean-up Workers and Volunteers  

MedlinePLUS

... With Us A long term health study for oil spill clean-up workers and volunteers Follow-up underway! ... health study for individuals who helped with the oil spill cleanup, took training, signed up to work, or ...

63

Long Term Health Study for Oil Spill Clean-up Workers and Volunteers  

MedlinePLUS

... With Us A long term health study for oil spill clean-up workers and volunteers Follow-up ... health study for individuals who helped with the oil spill cleanup, took training, signed up to work, ...

64

National Health Care Skill Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents the National Health Care Skill Standards, which were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology and West Ed Regional Research Laboratory, in partnership with educators and health care employers. The document begins with an overview of the purpose and benefits of skill standards. Presented next are…

National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education, Okemos, MI.

65

[Health care and regional disparities].  

PubMed

Municipalities in Germany have to advance health care structures to be resistant to demographic transitions and to the changing health care needs of the regional population in upcoming years. Therefore, it is important to note that needs vary from region to region and that care structures have to be differentiated according to this. Indeed regionality and community care have been increasingly referred to in current debate on improving care structures. But the discussed approaches remain relatively unclear and, moreover, fail to overcome care fragmentation and legal or sectoral perspectives. This paper points out the current lack of systematic knowledge about regional health disparities as well as knowledge about models of health care that are appropriate especially for disadvantaged communities and also rural regions. Moreover, knowledge of steering mechanisms that enforce the development of regional care systems are not developed yet. PMID:23474864

Hämel, K; Ewers, M; Schaeffer, D

2013-06-01

66

Volunteer home-based HIV/AIDS care and food crisis in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: sustainability in the face of chronic food insecurity  

PubMed Central

Low-income volunteers constitute a major part of AIDS care workforces in sub-Saharan Africa, yet little research has been conducted to determine how poverty and insecurity among volunteers impact their wellbeing and the sustainability of the AIDS treatment programmes they support. This paper presents longitudinal ethnographic and epidemiological research documenting how the 2008 food crisis in Addis Ababa affected AIDS care volunteerscare relationships and motivations. Ethnographic results highlight the distress and demotivation that rising food costs created for caregivers by contributing to their own and their care recipients’ experiences of food insecurity and HIV-related stigmatization. Epidemiological results underscore a high prevalence of food insecurity (approximately 80%) even prior to the peak of food prices. Rising food prices over the 3 years prior to 2008, underemployment and household per capita incomes averaging less than US$1/day, likely contributed to the very high prevalence of food insecurity reported by caregivers in our sample. We also show that new volunteers recruited in early 2008 by one of the non-governmental organizations (NGOs) involved in this study were more likely to be dependants within their households, and that these participants reported lower rates of food insecurity and higher household income. While this shift in volunteer recruitment may help sustain volunteer care programmes in the face of widespread poverty and underemployment, food insecurity was still highly prevalent (58–71%) among this sub-group. Given the inability of the local NGOs that organize volunteers to address the challenge of food insecurity for programme sustainability, our results raise important policy questions regarding compensation for volunteers’ valuable labour and poverty reduction through public health sector job creation.

Maes, Kenneth C; Shifferaw, Selamawit; Hadley, Craig; Tesfaye, Fikru

2011-01-01

67

The health care learning organization.  

PubMed

To many health care executives, emphasis on marketing strategy has become a means of survival in the threatening new environment of cost attainment, intense competition, and prospective payment. This paper develops a positive model of the health care organization based on organizational learning theory and the concept of the health care offering. It is proposed that the typical health care organization represents the prototype of the learning organization. Thus, commitment to a shared vision is proposed to be an integral part of the health care organization and its diagnosis, treatment, and delivery of the health care offering, which is based on the exchange relationship, including its communicative environment. Based on the model, strategic marketing implications are discussed. PMID:10158798

Hult, G T; Lukas, B A; Hult, A M

1996-01-01

68

Rural Health: The Story of Outreach. A Program of Cooperation in Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rural Health Outreach is a federal program of demonstration grants designed to encourage organizations to cooperate in delivering health care services to rural Americans. Thirteen programs utilizing innovative collaborations between state agencies, schools, nonprofit organizations, hospitals, volunteers, and the private sector are described a year…

Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Rural Health Policy.

69

Health Benefits of Volunteering: A Review of Recent Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volunteering has long been a common ethic in the United States, with people each year giving their time without any expectation of compensation. While these volunteer activities may be performed with the core intention of helping others, there is also a c...

K. Spring N. Dietz R. Grimm

2007-01-01

70

Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... A full continuum of health care, including comprehensive primary care (care for acute and chronic illness and gender- ... local VA health care facility to arrange a primary care appointment. return to top How do I get ...

71

Unlearning in health care  

PubMed Central

Learning in health care is essential if healthcare organisations are to tackle a challenging quality of care agenda. Yet while we know a reasonable amount about the nature of learning, how learning occurs, the forms it can take, and the routines that encourage it to happen within organisations, we know very little about the nature and processes of unlearning. We review the literature addressing issues pivotal to unlearning (what it is, why it is important, and why it is often neglected), and go further to explore the conditions under which unlearning is likely to be encouraged. There is a difference between routine unlearning (and subsequent re-learning) and deep unlearning—unlearning that requires a substantive break with previous modes of understanding, doing, and being. We argue that routine unlearning merely requires the establishment of new habits, whereas deep unlearning is a sudden, potentially painful, confrontation of the inadequacy in our substantive view of the world and our capacity to cope with that world competently.

Rushmer, R; Davies, H

2004-01-01

72

Government Spending on Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The economic constraints of the last decade have led western industrialized nations to consider, if not actually adopt, more stringent controls over costly social policies such as health care. Using recent, nationally representative data from the United States, Great Britain, West Germany, Italy, and Australia, this paper provides an international comparison of attitudes towards government spending on health care. Attitudes

Bernadette C. Hayes; Audrey VandenHeuvel

1996-01-01

73

Prospects for Health Care Reform.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

Kastner, Theodore

1992-01-01

74

Congress enacts health care reform.  

PubMed

Health care reform at last: After nearly a century of effort by Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt on down, the Congress finally agreed on and President Barack Obama signed into law a system that covers most Americans, regulates sharp insurance practices, and embraces a paradigm shift from acute institutionally focused care to chronic disease management based on home and community-based care. PMID:20465039

2010-03-01

75

Does the Relation between Volunteering and Well-Being Vary with Health and Age?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous studies have established a positive association between organizational volunteering and well-being. In the current study, we examined whether the relations between organizational volunteering and positive affect, negative affect, and resilience are modified by respondents' age and number of chronic health conditions. This study used…

Okun, Morris A.; Rios, Rebeca; Crawford, Aaron V.; Levy, Roy

2011-01-01

76

Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

1993-01-01

77

Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

Beatty, Rebecca M.

2000-01-01

78

Trends in Health Care Systems Delivery.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The trend now driving American health care is that the payors are refusing to pay the true economic costs. Health care technology and the public's demand for it, the growth of managed care (Health Maintenance Organizations), and the need to increase the effectiveness of health care are affecting health care delivery. (MLW)

Hughes, Edward F. X.

1989-01-01

79

Health care's service fanatics.  

PubMed

The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life. PMID:23898737

Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

2013-05-01

80

Our experience as a Health Volunteers Overseas-sponsored team in Hu??, Vietnam  

PubMed Central

A group from Texas Oncology and Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center traveled to Huê´, Vietnam, as part of Health Volunteers Overseas. From February 21 to March 6, 2012, five Baylor Sammons medical oncologists and an oncology nurse worked with a medical oncologist and a surgeon at the Huê´ College of Medicine and Pharmacy, suggesting approaches based on available resources. The two groups worked together to find optimal solutions for the patients. What stood out the most for the Baylor Sammons group was the Huê´ team's remarkable work ethic, empathy for patients, and treatment resourcefulness. The Baylor Sammons group also identified several unmet needs that could potentially be addressed by future volunteers in Huê´, including creation of an outpatient hospice program, establishment of breast cancer screening, modernization of the pathology department, instruction in and better utilization of pain management, better use of clinic space, and the teaching of oncology and English to medical students. There was a mutual exchange of knowledge between the two medical teams. The Baylor Sammons group not only taught but also learned how to take good care of patients with limited resources.

Denham, Claude A.; Osborne, Cynthia R.; Green, Nathan B.; Divers, Josephine; Pippen, John E.

2013-01-01

81

Healthy Aging: Paying for Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... This information in Spanish ( en español ) Paying for health care More information on paying for health care Better ... Coping without insurance More information on paying for health care Explore other publications and websites Age Page: Choosing ...

82

Health Care: Constitutional Rights and Legislative Powers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The health care reform debate raises many complex issues including those of coverage, accessibility, cost, accountability, and quality of health care. Underlying these policy considerations are issues regarding the status of health care as a constitutiona...

K. S. Swendiman

2012-01-01

83

Asian American health care attitudes.  

PubMed

This paper describes the results of a survey of health care attitudes of a sample of respondents primarily of Asian American background. The importance of bilingualism, Asian background, age, and other attributes of a physician are discussed with relation to subgroups in the sample. The relative importance of the influence of doctors, family, and friends on the choice of physician and health care facility are also presented. The findings may help with the development of effective market segmentation and improved health care service to the Asian American community. PMID:10538733

Perttula, W; Lowe, D; Quon, N S

1999-01-01

84

Efficiency of families managing home health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last decade, cost-containment pressures, health care reform debates, movement to case-managed health care, and reductions\\u000a in health care benefits have required most families to be responsible for selecting specific health care services that keep\\u000a costs to a minimum. As Eddy [17-20] discussed in a series of articles on making decisions in health care, the consensus among\\u000a health care

Carol E. Smith; Susan V. M. Kleinbeck; Karen Fernengel; Linda S. Mayer

1997-01-01

85

Volunteer health professionals and emergencies: assessing and transforming the legal environment.  

PubMed

Volunteer health professionals (VHPs) are essential in emergencies to fill surge capacity and provide needed medical expertise. While some VHPs are well-organized and trained, others arrive spontaneously at the site of a disaster. Lacking organization, training, and identification, they may actually impede emergency efforts. Complications involving medical volunteers in New York City after September 11, 2001, led Congress to authorize federal authorities to assist states and territories in developing emergency systems for the advance registration of volunteer health professionals (ESARVHP). Through advance registration, volunteers can be vetted, trained, and mobilized more effectively during emergencies. The use of VHPs, however, raises multiple legal questions: What constitutes an emergency, how is it declared, and what are the consequences? When are volunteers liable for their actions? When may volunteers who are licensed or certified in one state legally practice their profession in another state? Are volunteers entitled to compensation for harms they incur? This article examines the legal framework underlying the registration and use of volunteers during emergencies and offers recommendations for legal reform, including: (1) establish minimum standards to facilitate interjurisdictional emergency response, improve coordination, and enhance reciprocity of licensing and credentialing; (2) develop liability provisions for VHPs that balance their need to respond without significant fear of civil liability with patients' rights to legal recourse for egregious harms; and (3) provide basic levels of protections for VHPs harmed, injured, or killed while responding to emergencies. PMID:16181044

Hodge, James G; Gable, Lance A; Cálves, Stephanie H

2005-01-01

86

Unfair inequalities in health and health care.  

PubMed

Inequalities in health and health care are caused by different factors. Measuring "unfair" inequalities implies that a distinction is introduced between causal variables leading to ethically legitimate inequalities and causal variables leading to ethically illegitimate inequalities. An example of the former could be life-style choices, an example of the latter is social background. We show how to derive measures of unfair inequalities in health and in health care delivery from a structural model of health care and health production: "direct unfairness", linked to the variations in medical expenditures and health in the hypothetical distribution in which all legitimate sources of variation are kept constant; "fairness gap", linked to the differences between the actual distribution and the hypothetical distribution in which all illegitimate sources of variation have been removed. These two approaches are related to the theory of fair allocation. In general they lead to different results. We propose to analyse the resulting distributions with the traditional apparatus of Lorenz curves and inequality measures. We compare our proposal to the more common approach using concentration curves and analyse the relationship with the methods of direct and indirect standardization. We discuss how inequalities in health care can be integrated in an overall evaluation of social inequality. PMID:18829124

Fleurbaey, Marc; Schokkaert, Erik

2009-01-01

87

VHA enrollees' health care coverage and use of care.  

PubMed

The authors examined health care coverage for Veterans' Health Administration (VHA) enrollees and how their reliance on VHA care varies by coverage, using the largest and most detailed survey of veterans using VHA services ever conducted. The results showed that a majority of veterans who use VHA services have alternative health care coverage and that most of them use both VHA and non-VHA health care. The findings have important implications for quality of care and coordination of care. PMID:12800686

Shen, Yujing; Hendricks, Ann; Zhang, Shuo; Kazis, Lewis E

2003-06-01

88

Delivering Health Care and Mental Health Care Services to Children in Family Foster Care after Welfare and Health Care Reform.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the essential features of a health care system that can meet the special needs of children in out-of-home care. Discusses some of the major recent changes brought about by welfare and health care reform. Notes that it remains to be seen whether the quality of services will improve as a result of these reforms. (Author)

Simms, Mark D.; Freundlich, Madelyn; Battistelli, Ellen S.; Kaufman, Neal D.

1999-01-01

89

Model Child Care Health Policies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, the model health policies presented in this report are intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the report presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following…

Aronson, Susan; Smith, Herberta

90

Smallfry Smiles: A Guide for Teaching Dental Health in Community Care Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication has been designed to help nurses, teachers, volunteers, health administrators, social workers, and other individuals in the community in improving dental care instruction for the children in a community dental care program. The publication is based on the premise that availability of dental care services does not necessarily…

Johnson, Alice; And Others

91

Day care health risks  

MedlinePLUS

... hepatitis A virus. It is spread by poor hand washing after going to the bathroom or changing a ... and then preparing food. In addition to good hand washing, day care staff and children should get the ...

92

Health care accommodation in Scotland.  

PubMed

The Medical and Nursing Advisers of the Scottish Health Service, Common Services Agency, Building Division, advise upon the planning of health care accommodation. The overall spread of beds by function is given in a review of existing health care buildings in the year 1981. The numbers of hospital beds and of various groups of staff in the hospital and community services are calculated per 100,000 population so that any unusual disparity can be ascertained. One of the parameters for health building planning is fiscal control and so the cost per hospital in-patient week is tabulated for eight groups of specialities. The appropriate responsibilities of the Regional Councils in Scotland in 1979 are considered along with the responsibilities of Health Boards because part of each Social Work Department's work is the provision of accommodation and social care for those in need as opposed to the National Health Service responsibility for the health care of those in hospital and in the community. An overall view of residential accommodation for those requiring medical treatment or social care is presented in tabular form. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Common Services Agency. PMID:7146882

Maclachlan, J

1982-10-01

93

45 CFR 162.414 - Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. 162.414 ...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.414 Implementation specifications: Health care clearinghouses. A health...

2013-10-01

94

Should we ration health care?  

PubMed

The paper begins by drawing a distinction between "allocation"--the distribution of resources between different categories, and "rationing"--the distribution of scarce resources within a single category. I argue that the current allocation of funds to health care makes some form of rationing unavoidable. The paper next considers proposals by Daniel Callahan and Norman Daniels supporting age rationing publicly-financed life-extending medical care. I provide reasons for doubting that either argument succeeds. The final section of the paper sets forth an alternative approach which holds that if people have any rights to health care, then they have a right to a decent minimum. PMID:10296994

Jecker, N S

1989-01-01

95

The Health Care Home Model: Primary Health Care Meeting Public Health Goals  

PubMed Central

In November 2010, the American Public Health Association endorsed the health care home model as an important way that primary care may contribute to meeting the public health goals of increasing access to care, reducing health disparities, and better integrating health care with public health systems. Here we summarize the elements of the health care home (also called the medical home) model, evidence for its clinical and public health efficacy, and its place within the context of health care reform legislation. The model also has limitations, especially with regard to its degree of involvement with the communities in which care is delivered. Several actions could be undertaken to further develop, implement, and sustain the health care home.

Greene, Danielle

2012-01-01

96

Help Yourself to Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A booklet on health care for limited English speakers provides information on choosing the right doctor, buying medicine, paying the bill, and the individual's role in maintaining his or her health. Cartoons, questions and puzzles concerning the message in cartoons and narrative passages, checklists about an individual's personal habits related to…

Snyder, Sarah

97

Improving China's Health Care System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overall, health outcomes in China have improved tremendously over the past three decades, especially thanks to the reduction in some traditional infectious diseases. However, death rates from chronic diseases have been on the rise, not least owing to changes in life styles and deteriorating environmental conditions. Supply of health care is overwhelmingly provided publicly and hospitals have been absorbing a

Richard Herd; Yu-Wei Hu; Vincent Koen

2010-01-01

98

Health care's 100 most wired.  

PubMed

They're wired all right, and America's 100 most techno-savvy hospitals and health systems share one more thing: a commitment to using technology to link with employees, patients, suppliers, and insurers. "We want to be a health care travel agency for our community," says one chief information officer. "And we see Internet technology as a key." PMID:10081454

Solovy, A; Serb, C

1999-02-01

99

The female community health volunteer programme in Nepal: decision makers' perceptions of volunteerism, payment and other incentives.  

PubMed

The Female Community Health Volunteer (FCHV) Programme in Nepal has existed since the late 1980s and includes almost 50,000 volunteers. Although volunteer programmes are widely thought to be characterised by high attrition levels, the FCHV Programme loses fewer than 5% of its volunteers annually. The degree to which decision makers understand community health worker motivations and match these with appropriate incentives is likely to influence programme sustainability. The purpose of this study was to explore the views of stakeholders who have participated in the design and implementation of the Female Community Health Volunteer regarding Volunteer motivation and appropriate incentives, and to compare these views with the views and expectations of Volunteers. Semi-structured interviews were carried out in 2009 with 19 purposively selected non-Volunteer stakeholders, including policy makers and programme managers. Results were compared with data from previous studies of Female Community Health Volunteers and from interviews with four Volunteers and two Volunteer activists. Stakeholders saw Volunteers as motivated primarily by social respect, religious and moral duty. The freedom to deliver services at their leisure was seen as central to the volunteer concept. While stakeholders also saw the need for extrinsic incentives such as micro-credit, regular wages were regarded not only as financially unfeasible, but as a potential threat to the Volunteers' social respect, and thereby to their motivation. These views were reflected in interviews with and previous studies of Female Community Health Volunteers, and appear to be influenced by a tradition of volunteering as moral behaviour, a lack of respect for paid government workers, and the Programme's community embeddedness. Our study suggests that it may not be useful to promote a generic range of incentives, such as wages, to improve community health worker programme sustainability. Instead, programmes should ensure that the context-specific expectations of community health workers, programme managers, and policy makers are in alignment if low attrition and high performance are to be achieved. PMID:20382464

Glenton, Claire; Scheel, Inger B; Pradhan, Sabina; Lewin, Simon; Hodgins, Stephen; Shrestha, Vijaya

2010-06-01

100

Social support, volunteering and health around the world: cross-national evidence from 139 countries.  

PubMed

High levels of social capital and social integration are associated with self-rated health in many developed countries. However, it is not known whether this association extends to non-western and less economically advanced countries. We examine associations between social support, volunteering, and self-rated health in 139 low-, middle- and high-income countries. Data come from the Gallup World Poll, an internationally comparable survey conducted yearly from 2005 to 2009 for those 15 and over. Volunteering was measured by self-reports of volunteering to an organization in the past month. Social support was based on self-reports of access to support from relatives and friends. We started by estimating random coefficient (multi-level) models and then used multivariate logistic regression to model health as a function of social support and volunteering, controlling for age, gender, education, marital status, and religiosity. We found statistically significant evidence of cross-national variation in the association between social capital variables and self-rated health. In the multivariate logistic model, self-rated health were significantly associated with having social support from friends and relatives and volunteering. Results from stratified analyses indicate that these associations are strikingly consistent across countries. Our results indicate that the link between social capital and health is not restricted to high-income countries but extends across many geographical regions regardless of their national-income level. PMID:22305947

Kumar, Santosh; Calvo, Rocio; Avendano, Mauricio; Sivaramakrishnan, Kavita; Berkman, Lisa F

2012-03-01

101

National Health Care Reform, Medicaid, and Children in Foster Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines access to health care for children in out-of-home care under current law, reviews how health care access for these children would be affected by President Clinton's health care reform initiative, and proposes additional measures that could be considered to improve access and service coordination for children in the child welfare system.…

Halfon, Neal; And Others

1994-01-01

102

Optimization of preventive health care facility locations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Preventive health care programs can save lives and contribute to a better quality of life by diagnosing serious medical conditions early. The Preventive Health Care Facility Location (PHCFL) problem is to identify optimal locations for preventive health care facilities so as to maximize participation. When identifying locations for preventive health care facilities, we need to consider the characteristics of

Wei Gu; Xin Wang; S. Elizabeth McGregor

2010-01-01

103

Veteran's Health Care Issues.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides services and benefits to veterans who meet certain eligibility criteria. VA carries out its programs nationwide through three administrations and the Board of Veterans Appeals (BVA). The Veterans Health Adm...

S. V. Panangala

2007-01-01

104

Health Care Financing Review, 1987 Annual Supplement.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Quality of care research is the subject of the entire issue of the Health Care Financing Review. Aspects discussed in detail are: Quality of health care measurement: a research priority; Monitoring adverse outcomes of surgery using administrative data; Me...

1987-01-01

105

Who's on Your Health Care Team?  

MedlinePLUS

... easy access to the care you need. Your Health Care Team Work with your doctors to create the ... expect from your primary diabetes doctor. Visiting Your Health Care Team Stay up-to-date on our latest ...

106

Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

107

Rural health care support mechanism. Final rule.  

PubMed

In this document, the Federal Communications Commission reforms its universal service support program for health care, transitioning its existing Internet Access and Rural Health Care Pilot programs into a new, efficient Healthcare Connect Fund. This Fund will expand health care provider access to broadband, especially in rural areas, and encourage the creation of state and regional broadband health care networks. Access to broadband for medical providers saves lives while lowering health care costs and improving patient experiences. PMID:23476995

2013-03-01

108

Health Care Reform: A Values Debate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses the crisis in health care, considering costs, lack of access, and system ineffectiveness. Reviews "Setting Relationships Right," the Catholic Health Association's proposal for health care reform. Advocates educators' awareness of children's health needs and health care reform issues and support for the Every Fifth Child Act of 1992. (DMM)

Popko, Kathleen

1992-01-01

109

Health care and the elderly.  

PubMed

America's health care crisis is hitting our elderly and threatens to cripple Medicare, the elderly's financial support system. Medicare was designed to ensure that every elderly American would be protected against the destruction of life savings as a result of illness. Elderly Americans would be able to enjoy their golden years without the financial burden of medical bills. Today, this vision is almost extinct. Medicare has been placed on the endangered species list. Market predictions indicate that Medicare's Hospital insurance Trust Fund will be depleted by 1988 if current trends continue. The elderly presently must pay on the average about 14% of their health care bill. In addition, Medicare pays little for long-term care; and about 45% of long-term care is paid for out-of-pocket by the elderly and their families. Alternative approaches are desperately needed of Medicare if our elderly are to survive. PMID:10311941

Eisdorfer, C

1985-01-01

110

Five Steps to Safer Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Systems Hospital Resources Long-Term Care Resources Primary Care Resources System Design Resources Prevention & Chronic Care Announcements Evidence-Based Decisionmaking Improving Primary Care Practice Resources Quality & Patient Safety Comprehensive Unit-based ...

111

Managed care and children with special health care needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing care to children with special health care needs within a managed care environment presents special challenges for providers and parents alike. The goal of managed care is to contain costs by encouraging or requiring members to obtain services through a designated network. In managed care programs, children and families may experience limited access to specialized care and services, along

Jeanne M. Rhoades Smucker

2001-01-01

112

Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care Print A A A Text Size What's in ... if you're concerned about paying for mental health care. Lots of people need help and worry that ...

113

Health care clinics in Cambodia.  

PubMed

Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care. PMID:7787486

Wollschlaeger, K

1995-04-01

114

Brentwood community health care assessment.  

PubMed

Background: The Community Alliance for Research Empowering Social Change (CARES) is an academic-community research partnership designed to train community members on research methods and develop the infrastructure for community-based participatory research (CBPR) to examine and address racial/ethnic health disparities. The Brentwood Community Health Assessment (BCHA) was developed through a CBPR pilot project grant from CARES.Objectives: The purpose of the BCHA is to assess health care utilization and identify existing barriers to health care access among a multi-ethnic community in the Hamlet of Brentwood, New York.Methods: Using CBPR approaches, the community-academic research partnership develop the study design and survey instrument. Trained Bilingual (English/Spanish) data collectors verbally administered surveys door-to-door to residents of Brentwood from October 2010 to May 2011. Inclusion criteria required participants to be at least 18 years of age and speak either English or Spanish.Results: Overall, 232 residents completed the BCHA; 49% were male, 66% Hispanic, 13% non-Hispanic White, 13% non-Hispanic Black, 29% had less than a high school education, and 33% were born in United States. The assessment results revealed that most residents are able to access health care when needed and the most significant barriers to health care access are insurance and cost.Conclusions: We describe the community-academic partnered process used to develop and implement the BCHA and report assessment findings; the community-partnered approach improved data collection and allowed access into one of Suffolk County's most vulnerable communities. PMID:24859100

Goodman, Melody S; Gonzalez, Maria; Gil, Sandra; Si, Xuemei; Pashoukos, Judith L; Stafford, Jewel D; Ford, Elsa; Pashoukos, Dennis A

2014-01-01

115

Management of acute respiratory infections by community health volunteers: experience of Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC).  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of management practices for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in improving the competency of community health volunteers in diagnosing and treating acute respiratory infections among children. METHODS: Data were collected by a group of research physicians who observed the performance of a sample of 120 health volunteers in 10 sub-districts in Bangladesh in which Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) had run a community-based ARI control programme since mid-1992. Standardized tests were conducted until the 95% interphysician reliability on the observation of clinical examination was achieved. FINDINGS:The sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates in diagnosing and treating ARIs were significantly higher among the health volunteers who had basic training and were supervised routinely than among those who had not. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis and treatment of ARIs at the household level in developing countries are possible if intensive basic training and the close supervision of service providers are ensured.

Hadi, Abdullahel

2003-01-01

116

Home health-care bibliography.  

PubMed

A home health-care bibliography is presented. The bibliography includes a selection of references to descriptive reports, research papers, editorials, letters, and commentaries on home health-care (HHC) services. This bibliography represents important literature from the past 12 years on program planning, marketing, trends, and reimbursement for HHC services as well as specific types of home therapy. The bibliography can be helpful to pharmacy administrators and clinicians who are interested in designing HHC programs or becoming involved in the provision of home therapy. PMID:3085486

Harris, W L; Mellott, P J

1986-03-01

117

Changing health-care systems.  

PubMed

Many governments are encouraging competition for resources between health centres in an attempt to reduce costs and improve the quality of services. However, opponents to managed care believe that this will create more administrative costs and reduce patient choice. So-called purchasing organizations are being established to direct patients to the most cost-effective care. Assessing performance is complicated as very sick or difficult-to-treat patients are likely to be more costly. Statistical techniques can be used to clarify the impact of risk factors, such as smoking, on the outcome of care. PMID:18611652

Holthof, B

1995-01-01

118

Discussion of patient-centered care in health care organizations.  

PubMed

The tradition of inherent knowledge and power of health care providers stands in stark contrast to the principles of self-determination and patient participation in patient-centered care. At the organizational level, patient-centered care is a merging of patient education, self-care, and evidence-based models of practice and consists of 4 broad domains of intervention including communication, partnerships, health promotion, and physical care. As a result of the unexamined discourse of knowledge and power in health care, the possibilities of patient-centered care have not been fully achieved. In this article, we used a critical social theory lens to examine the discursive influence of power upon the integration of patient-centered care into health care organizations. We begin with an overview of patient-centered care, followed by a discussion of the various ways that it has been introduced into health care organizations. We proceed by deconstructing the inherent power and knowledge of health care providers and shed light on how these long-standing traditions have impeded the integration of patient-centered care. We conclude with a discussion of viable solutions that can be used to implement patient-centered care into health care organizations. This article presents a perspective through which the integration of patient-centered care into health organizations can be examined. PMID:22722519

Fredericks, Suzanne; Lapum, Jennifer; Schwind, Jasna; Beanlands, Heather; Romaniuk, Daria; McCay, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

119

Training meals on wheels volunteers as health literacy coaches for older adults.  

PubMed

Homebound older adults constitute a "hardly reached" population with respect to health communication. Older adults also typically suffer from health literacy challenges, which put them at increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Suboptimal interactions with providers are one such challenge. Interventions to improve interactive health literacy focus on training consumers/patients in question preparation and asking. Meals on Wheels volunteers are uniquely suited to coach their clients in such interaction strategies. Seventy-three Meals on Wheels volunteers participated in workshops to train as health literacy coaches. The 3- to 4-hour workshops included units on communicating with older adults, on the nature of health literacy, and on the process of interactive health literacy coaching. Participants viewed and discussed videos that modeled the targeted communication behaviors for older adult patients interacting with physicians. They role-played the coaching process. After 9 months, coaches participated in a "booster" session that included videos of ideal coaching practices. Evaluation questionnaires revealed that participants had favorable reactions to the workshops with respect to utility and interest. They especially appreciated learning communication skills and seeing realistic videos. A measure of knowledge about the workshop material revealed a significant increment at posttest. Fidelity of coaching practices with respect to workshop curriculum was confirmed. This training in interactive health literacy for community-based lay volunteers constitutes one way to implement the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy for one "hardly reached" population. An online tool kit containing all workshop materials is available. PMID:23877229

Rubin, Donald L; Freimuth, Vicki S; Johnson, Sharon D; Kaley, Terry; Parmer, John

2014-05-01

120

Ethics of rural health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

One quarter of the US population live in areas designated as rural. Delivery of rural health care can be difficult with unique challenges including limited access to specialists such as oncologists. The Rural Cancer Outreach Program is an alliance between an academic medical center and five rural hospitals. Due to the presence of this program, the appropriate use of narcotics

Laurie J. Lyckholm; Mary Helen Hackney; Thomas J. Smith

2001-01-01

121

Hedging opportunities in health care.  

PubMed

Medical care futures contracts offer new hedging opportunities to increase protection against unexpected price changes. Commodity futures contracts can be designed explicitly to hedge volatile group health insurance premiums and capitated hospital and physician prices. This article describes one way to design and use these hedging instruments. PMID:10103960

Hayes, J A

1990-03-01

122

Simulation in Health Care Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past 15 years there has been widespread adoption of sim- ulation in health care education as a method to train and assess learners. Multiple fac- tors have contributed to this movement, including reduced patient availability, limited faculty teaching time, technological advances in diagnosis and treatment that require a new skills set, greater attention to patient safety with the

S. Barry Issenberg; Ross J. Scalese

2008-01-01

123

Interactive Computerized Health Care Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acknowledgments: This work has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (IRI-9523646 and IRI-9701617) and by a gift from the University of Wisconsin Medical School, Department of Medicine 2 2 Abstract The Patient Education and Activation System (PEAS) project aims to prepare people to take a more active role in their health care decisions. In this paper, we

Susan W. McRoy; Alfredo Liu-Perez; Syed S. Ali

124

Towards an alternative economics of health care.  

PubMed

It is argued here that an economics centred on subjective utility-maximization is unsuitable for the analysis and policy grounding of health care provision. To some extent, the peculiarities of health care have been recognized by mainstream health economists, who sometimes abandon Paretian welfare considerations to focus on needs instead. This article examines important peculiarities of health care that are relatively neglected in the literature. Some of these concern health care needs: while health itself is a universal need, needs for health care provision are largely involuntary, varied, and idiosyncratic. These issues have important consequences for the planning of health care systems and the extent of transaction costs in any market-based system. These factors, combined with the inherent dynamism of modern health care needs and capabilities, create an opening for alternative approaches to health care economics. PMID:19099619

Hodgson, Geoffrey M

2009-01-01

125

Global health and primary care research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A strong primary health care system is essential to provide effective and efficient health care in both resource-rich and resource-poor countries. Although a direct link has not been proven, we can reasonably expect better economic status when the health of the population is improved. Research in primary care is essential to inform practice and to develop better health systems and

John W. Beasley; Barbara Starfield; Chris van Weel; Walter W. Rosser; Cynthia L. Haq

2007-01-01

126

Consumer-directed health care: understanding its value in health care reform.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to describe the importance of consumer-directed health care as the essential strategy needed to lower health care costs and support its widespread adoption for making significant strides in health care reform. The pros and cons of health care consumerism are discussed. The intent is to show that the viability of the US health care system depends on the application of appropriate consumer-directed health care strategies. PMID:20145464

Guo, Kristina L

2010-01-01

127

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential

Don E Detmer

2003-01-01

128

Financing the health care Internet.  

PubMed

Internet-related health care firms have accelerated through the life cycle of capital finance and organizational destiny, including venture capital funding, public stock offerings, and consolidation, in the wake of heightened competition and earnings disappointments. Venture capital flooded into the e-health sector, rising from $3 million in the first quarter of 1998 to $335 million two years later. Twenty-six e-health firms went public in eighteen months, raising $1.53 billion at initial public offering (IPO) and with post-IPO share price appreciation greater than 100 percent for eighteen firms. The technology-sector crash hit the e-health sector especially hard, driving share prices down by more than 80 percent for twenty-one firms. The industry now faces an extended period of consolidation between e-health and conventional firms. PMID:11192423

Robinson, J C

2000-01-01

129

Volunteer Watershed Health Monitoring by Local Stakeholders: New Mexico Watershed Watch  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volunteers monitor watershed health in more than 700 programs in the US, involving over 400,000 local stakeholders. New Mexico Watershed Watch is a student-based watershed monitoring program sponsored by the state's Department of Game and Fish which provides high school teachers and students with instruction on methods for water quality…

Fleming, William

2003-01-01

130

Legal Issues Regarding the Use of Volunteer Health Personnel in Response Efforts: Frequently Asked Questions  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the response to Hurricane Katrina, volunteer health professionals (VHPs) from around the country have offered to provide medical assistance in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Many are responding through organized governmental and private sector response efforts and others arrive spontaneously. The participation of VHPs in the response efforts gives rise to several legal and regulatory issues. The Center

131

An Innovative Approach for Building Health Promotion Program Capacity: A Generic Volunteer Training Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We examined the feasibility of creating a generic training curriculum for volunteers in health pro- motion programs for older adults by identifying common core content topics across 10 national programs. We also considered additional material that could augment common core content topics. De- sign and Methods: We reviewed in detail program manuals and associated materials from 10 national evidence-based

Ellen C. Schneider; Mary Altpeter; Nancy Whitelaw

132

An Innovative Approach for Building Health Promotion Program Capacity: A Generic Volunteer Training Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: We examined the feasibility of creating a generic training curriculum for volunteers in health promotion programs for older adults by identifying common core content topics across 10 national programs. We also considered additional material that could augment common core content topics. Design and Methods: We reviewed in detail program…

Schneider, Ellen C.; Altpeter, Mary; Whitelaw, Nancy

2007-01-01

133

Using Trained Volunteer Instructors: An Example of Community Health Education Programming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After receiving training and support materials, volunteer instructors with no previous subject matter expertise (n=4) were found to be as effective as subject experts (n=4) in teaching health and nutrition education classes in a Healthy Mothers/Healthy Babies program. (SK)

Konstant, Lyn C.; And Others

1991-01-01

134

Job satisfaction in health-care organizations  

PubMed Central

Job satisfaction among health-care professionals acquires significance for the purpose of maximization of human resource potential. This article is aimed at emphasizing importance of studying various aspects of job satisfaction in health-care organizations.

Bhatnagar, Kavita; Srivastava, Kalpana

2012-01-01

135

The Cultural Geography of Health Care Delivery.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article shows how health care delivery is related to cultural or human geography. This is accomplished by describing health care delivery in terms of 12 popular themes of cultural geography. (JDH)

Gesler, Wilbert M.

1987-01-01

136

Point-of-care systems, informatics, and health care delivery.  

PubMed

Evolving information technology has had profound effects on business operations and the marketplace. The health care services industry, particularly hospitals, clinics, and medical offices, has historically lagged behind other industries in the implementation of comprehensive, integrated, computerized data management tools. Health care reformers are looking to the promises of the information technology "revolution" as a means of improving systemic efficiency and health care quality. This study discusses the impact of informatics, or information technology, on the delivery of health care services. We present the evolution of informatics and the predicted future benefits of integrated computerized patient records and point-of-care systems. PMID:10162811

Montoya, I D; Carlson, J W

1996-12-01

137

The Emerging Imperative for Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are widespread and growing concerns about the variable and too often inadequate quality of health care in the United States. As a result, health care quality is being questioned and subjected to scrutiny as never before. Awareness of the quality deficits, combined with rising health care expenditures and changing attitudes of payers and consumers, has given rise to a

Kenneth W. Kizer

138

Special Health Care Procedures in the Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 147 school districts in Georgia examined the extent to which special health care procedures are performed in a school setting, the involvement of teachers performing special health care procedures, training and supervision issues, and the availability of written procedures. Results found teachers performed health care procedures more…

Heller, Kathryn Wolff; And Others

1997-01-01

139

Communicating in Multicultural Health Care Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigates the multicultural demands of health care delivery by examining the role of organizational communication in promoting effective multicultural relations in modern health care systems. The paper describes the multicultural make-up of modern health care systems--noting, for example that providers from different professional…

Kreps, Gary L.; Kunimoto, Elizabeth

140

Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

1996-01-01

141

Medical Students as Hospice Volunteers: Reflections on an Early Experiential Training Program in End-of-Life Care Education.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Despite an increase in the content of palliative medicine curricula in medical schools, students are rarely exposed to end-of-life (EOL) care through real-patient experiences during their preclinical education. Objective: To evaluate the utility and impact of exposure to EOL care for first year medical students (MS-1s) through a hospice volunteer experience. Methods: Patients and Families First (PFF), a hospice volunteer training program in EOL care, was piloted on three cohorts of MS-1s as an elective. Fifty-five students received 3 hours of volunteer training, and were then required to conduct at least two consecutive hospice visits on assigned patients to obtain course credit. Students' reflective essays on their experiences were analyzed using qualitative methodology and salient themes were extracted by two investigators independently and then collaboratively. Results: The following five themes were identified from students' reflective essays: perceptions regarding hospice patients; reactions regarding self; normalcy of EOL care at home; impact of witnessing death and dying; and suggestions for improving EOL care education for medical students. Conclusion: Hospice volunteering during preclinical years may provide valuable experiential training for MS-1s in caring for seriously ill patients and their families by fostering personal reflection and empathic skills, thereby providing a foundation for future patient encounters during clinical training. PMID:24754869

Mott, Melissa L; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Marschke, Michael; Levine, Stacie

2014-06-01

142

Modeling Health Care Policy Alternatives  

PubMed Central

Background Computer models played an important role in the health care reform debate, and they will continue to be used during implementation. However, current models are limited by inputs, including available data. Aim We review microsimulation and cell-based models. For each type of model, we discuss data requirements and other factors that may affect its scope. We also discuss how to improve models by changing data collection and data access procedures. Materials and Methods We review the modeling literature, documentation on existing models, and data resources available to modelers. Results Even with limitations, models can be a useful resource. However, limitations must be clearly communicated. Modeling approaches could be improved by enhancing existing longitudinal data, improving access to linked data, and developing data focused on health care providers. Discussion Longitudinal datasets could be improved by standardizing questions across surveys or by fielding supplemental panels. Funding could be provided to identify causal parameters and to clarify ranges of effects reported in the literature. Finally, a forum for routine communication between modelers and policy makers could be established. Conclusion Modeling can provide useful information for health care policy makers. Thus, investing in tools to improve modeling capabilities should be a high priority.

Ringel, Jeanne S; Eibner, Christine; Girosi, Federico; Cordova, Amado; McGlynn, Elizabeth A

2010-01-01

143

Satisfaction with Health Care among Latinas  

PubMed Central

Despite growing interest in disparities in access to health care, relatively little is known about different facets of care among Latinas, their satisfaction with the care they receive, and the predictors of satisfaction. This study examined whether various health care access and context factors, the quality of the patient-physician interaction, and medical mistrust predict satisfaction with health care among Latina immigrants in New York City. Structured interviews were conducted with 220 Latinas predominantly from the Dominican Republic and aged 40 years or over. Of the access to health care variables examined, greater waiting time predicted dissatisfaction with health care. Greater quality of the patient-physician interaction predicted less dissatisfaction. The effect of the patient-physician interaction on dissatisfaction was mediated, in part, by waiting time. The results illustrate the important role of specific health care factors in satisfaction with care.

Abraido-Lanza, Ana F.; Cespedes, Amarilis; Daya, Shaira; Florez, Karen R.; White, Kellee

2013-01-01

144

Empowering women and health care.  

PubMed

Women health workers have made great contributions to the health of their community for many years. In India, women physicians have established some hospitals, e.g., Christian Medical Colleges in Ludhiana and Vellore. Some such hospitals operate in remote areas to serve the poor and the suffering. Women health workers of Jamkhed, Deen Bandhu of Pachod, have proved that village women can improve the health status of their community, particularly that of women and children, if they receive encouragement to learn health care skills In India, community health care lies mainly with women (e.g., nursing personnel and in rural areas). Yet, despite their competence and experience, few become physicians, health project directors, and administrators because the society continues to be patriarchal and discriminates against females. Women need to become empowered to ensure equal opportunities for training and promotion and equal wages for equal work. In Bangladesh, use of bicycles to visit houses allows women paramedical workers from Gonasasthya Kendra, Sawar, freedom and imparts confidence. People must identify customs, practices, laws, attitudes, religious misrepresentations, and policies that discriminate against women and then oppose them. They should set these changes in motion at home, in villages, and from district to national, and even global levels. In India, society blames the mother for having a girl, but the man donates the chromosome determining sex. In Gandhigram, a woman physician and her peers have effected an apparent change in attitude toward the birth of a girl. Now the people confer equal happiness to her birth as they do to a boy's birth. Yet, female infanticides still occur in some villages of Salem District of Tamil Nadu. Sex determination tests often lead to abortion of female fetuses. Once a woman marries she has no right to her maternal home and often suffers from domestic violence. Many people resist legislation to grant women more rights, e.g., property rights. Various media promote women's empowerment. PMID:12286352

Shiva, M

1993-02-01

145

Competition and integration in Swedish health care.  

PubMed

Despite of an insignificant track record of quasi-market models in Sweden, new models of this kind have recently been introduced in health care; commonly referred to as "choice of care". This time citizens act as purchasers; choosing the primary care centre or family physician they want to be treated by, which, in turn, generates a capitation payment to the chosen unit. Policy makers believe that such systems will be self-remedial, that is, as a result of competition the strong providers survive while unprofitable ones will be eliminated. Because of negative consequences of the fragmented health care delivery, policy makers at the same time also promote different forms of integrated health care arrangements. One example is "local health care", which could be described as an upgraded community-oriented primary care, supported by adaptable hospital services, fitting the needs of a local population. This article reviews if it is possible to combine this kind of integrated care system with a competition driven model of governance, or if they are incompatible. The findings indicate that some choice of care schemes could hamper the development of integration in local health care. However, geographical monopolies like local health care, enclosed in a non-competitive context, lack the stimulus of competition that possibly improves performance. Thus, it could be argued that if choice of care and local health care should be combined, patients ought to choose between integrated health care arrangements and not among individual health professionals. PMID:20153910

Ahgren, Bengt

2010-07-01

146

Contribution of Primary Care to Health Systems and Health  

PubMed Central

Evidence of the health-promoting influence of primary care has been accumulating ever since researchers have been able to distinguish primary care from other aspects of the health services delivery system. This evidence shows that primary care helps prevent illness and death, regardless of whether the care is characterized by supply of primary care physicians, a relationship with a source of primary care, or the receipt of important features of primary care. The evidence also shows that primary care (in contrast to specialty care) is associated with a more equitable distribution of health in populations, a finding that holds in both cross-national and within-national studies. The means by which primary care improves health have been identified, thus suggesting ways to improve overall health and reduce differences in health across major population subgroups.

Starfield, Barbara; Shi, Leiyu; Macinko, James

2005-01-01

147

The demand for private health care under national health insurance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the demand for private health care and supplemental health insurance in Israel, where universal national health insurance provides all inhabitants with a standard package of medical care. Our theoretical model and empirical study follow research previously conducted in four other countries. It was found that the self-employed in Israel demand more private health services and supplemental health

Y. Machnes

2006-01-01

148

Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

Kimmey, James R.

1994-01-01

149

Beneficence, justice, and health care.  

PubMed

This paper argues that societal duties of health promotion are underwritten (at least in large part) by a principle of beneficence. Further, this principle generates duties of justice that correlate with rights, not merely "imperfect" duties of charity or generosity. To support this argument, I draw on a useful distinction from bioethics and on a somewhat neglected approach to social obligation from political philosophy. The distinction is that between general and specific beneficence; and the approach from political philosophy has at times been called equality of concern. After clarifying the distinction and setting out the basis of the equality of concern view, I argue that the result is a justice-based principle of "specific" beneficence that should be reflected in a society's health policy. I then draw on this account to criticize, refine, and extend some prominent health care policy proposals from the bioethics literature. PMID:24783323

Kelleher, J Paul

2014-03-01

150

Burnout and connectedness in the job demands-resources model: studying palliative care volunteers and their families.  

PubMed

This study examined the role of burnout and connectedness in the job demands-resources (JD-R) model among palliative care volunteers. It was hypothesized that (a) exhaustion mediates the relationship between demands and depression, and between demands and retention; (b) cynicism mediates the relationship between resources and retention; and (c) connectedness mediates the relationship between resources and retention. Hypotheses were tested in 2 separate analyses: structural equation modeling (SEM) and path analyses. The first was based on volunteer self-reports (N = 204), while the second analysis concerned matched data from volunteers and their family members (N = 99). While strong support was found for cynicism and connectedness as mediators in both types of analyses, this was not altogether the case for exhaustion. Implications of these findings for the JD-R model and volunteer organizations are discussed. PMID:22207713

Huynh, Jasmine-Yan; Winefield, Anthony H; Xanthopoulou, Despoina; Metzer, Jacques C

2012-09-01

151

New perspectives on health and health care policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care reform has been the primary focus of policymakers for much of the past year, culminating with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that was signed into law by President Obama on March 23, 2010. The vigorous national debate on the act has highlighted the importance of innovative, high-quality research on health and health care policy.

Darren Lubotsky; Bhashkar Mazumder; Zach Seeskin

2010-01-01

152

Health Care Reform: Opportunities for Improving Adolescent Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health care reform represents a major step toward achieving the goal of improved preventive and primary care services for all Americans, including children and adolescents. Adolescence is a unique developmental age district from both childhood and adulthood with special vulnerabilities, health concerns, and barriers to accessing health care. It is…

Irwin, Charles E., Jr., Ed.; And Others

153

Paid Sick Days and Health Care Use  

PubMed Central

Background In identifying factors of health care use, past research has focused on individual-level characteristics or on the health care system itself. This study investigates whether access to paid sick days, an amenable environmental factor outside the health care system, is associated with primary and emergency care use. Methods A nationally representative sample of 14,302 U.S. working adults extracted from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey data was used. Multiple logistic regressions were performed, controlling for demographic variables, health conditions and status, and access to health care. Results Workers with lower socioeconomic status, poorer health status, or without health insurance or regular places for care were more likely to lack paid sick leave than higher-status workers. For all U.S. working adults, access to paid sick days benefits was significantly associated with increased use of outpatient care but not with reduced use of ER. For U.S. working adults with health insurance coverage, access to paid sick days benefits was significantly associated with increased use of outpatient care and reduced use of emergency care. Conclusions A public policy mandating paid sick days may help facilitate timely access to primary care, reduce avoidable emergency care use, and reduce health disparities among workers.

Cook, Won Kim

2011-01-01

154

Physicians’ utilization of health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To describe how physicians attend to their own health care needs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Rhode Island.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of Blue Cross\\/Blue Shield providers. The 306 respondents (67% of 458) primarily (92%) had MD or DO degrees.\\u000a The nonphysician providers were chiropractors, dentists, optometrists, and podiatrists.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: A mailed survey provided data describing the respondents’ medical conditions and utilization of

Tom J. Wachtel; Victoria L. Wilcox; Anne W. Moulton; Dominick Tammaro; Michael D. Stein

1995-01-01

155

Consumer-directed health care: implications for health care organizations and managers.  

PubMed

This article uses a pyramid model to illustrate the key components of consumer-directed health care. Consumer-directed health care is considered the essential strategy needed to lower health care costs and is valuable for making significant strides in health care reform. Consumer-directed health care presents new challenges and opportunities for all health care stakeholders and their managers. The viability of the health system depends on the success of managers to respond rapidly and with precision to changes in the system; thus, new and modified roles of managers are necessary to successfully sustain consumerism efforts to control costs while maintaining access and quality. PMID:20436329

Guo, Kristina L

2010-01-01

156

Dual Loyalty in Prison Health Care  

PubMed Central

Despite the dissemination of principles of medical ethics in prisons, formulated and advocated by numerous international organizations, health care professionals in prisons all over the world continue to infringe these principles because of perceived or real dual loyalty to patients and prison authorities. Health care professionals and nonmedical prison staff need greater awareness of and training in medical ethics and prisoner human rights. All parties should accept integration of prison health services with public health services. Health care workers in prison should act exclusively as caregivers, and medical tasks required by the prosecution, court, or security system should be carried out by medical professionals not involved in the care of prisoners.

Stover, Heino; Wolff, Hans

2012-01-01

157

Tuberculosis among health care workers.  

PubMed

To assess the annual risk for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among health care workers (HCWs), the incidence rate ratio for tuberculosis (TB) among HCWs worldwide, and the population-attributable fraction of TB to exposure of HCWs in their work settings, we reviewed the literature. Stratified pooled estimates for the LTBI rate for countries with low (<50 cases/100,000 population), intermediate (50-100/100,000 population), and high (>100/100,000 population) TB incidence were 3.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0%-4.6%), 6.9% (95% CI 3.4%-10.3%), and 8.4% (95% CI 2.7%-14.0%), respectively. For TB, estimated incident rate ratios were 2.4 (95% CI 1.2-3.6), 2.4 (95% CI 1.0-3.8), and 3.7 (95% CI 2.9-4.5), respectively. Median estimated population-attributable fraction for TB was as high as 0.4%. HCWs are at higher than average risk for TB. Sound TB infection control measures should be implemented in all health care facilities with patients suspected of having infectious TB. PMID:21392441

Baussano, Iacopo; Nunn, Paul; Williams, Brian; Pivetta, Emanuele; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Scano, Fabio

2011-03-01

158

Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Providers Working in Primary Health Care Units Concerning Emergency Contraception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The aim of the current study was to explore the extent of knowledge health care providers working in primary health care units in Aydin, Turkey, had about emergency contraception (EC), to determine whether they provide EC counseling, and to understand the barriers and misconceptions in this context. Methods: A total of 120 health care professionals working in primary health

Hilmiye Aksu; Mert Kucuk; Banu Karaoz

2010-01-01

159

Rx for Rising Health Care Premiums.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strategies for containing the cost of providing health insurance for college employees include cost sharing with employees, cost reduction through options such and managed care, incentives for use of health maintenance organizations, offering health care alternatives, and entering into multiple-employer purchasing groups. (MSE)

Younger, Sandra Millers

1990-01-01

160

Special Issue: The Family and Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses research and interventions related to family health care. Topics include health promotion; risk behaviors; vulnerability and illness onset; choosing health care systems; stress; caregiving and coping; family counseling; and family responses to Alzheimer's Disease, pediatric cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and obesity. (JAC)

Doherty, William J., Ed.; McCubbin, Hamilton I., Ed.

1985-01-01

161

Keynote Address: The Health Care Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An address to dental school deans looks at anticipated changes in the health care system, the public sector's changing role in health care, and draws implications for dentistry. It is suggested that academic health centers, and especially dental schools, will be particularly affected by these trends. (MSE)

Wilensky, Gail

1996-01-01

162

Selecting Performance Indicators for Prison Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improving prison health care requires a robust measurement dashboard that addresses multiple domains of care. We sought to identify tested indicators of clinical quality and access that prison health managers could use to ascertain gaps in performance and guide quality improvement. We used the RAND\\/UCLA modified Delphi method to select the best indicators for correctional health. An expert panel rated

Steven M. Asch; Cheryl L. Damberg; Liisa Hiatt; Stephanie S. Teleki; Rebecca Shaw; Terry E. Hill; Rhondee Benjamin-Johnson; David P. Eisenman; Sonali P. Kulkarni; Emily Wang; Brie Williams; Ambeshie Yesus; Corita R. Grudzen

2011-01-01

163

Refugee health: a new model for delivering primary health care.  

PubMed

Providing health care to newly arrived refugees within the primary health care system has proved challenging. The primary health care sector needs enhanced capacity to provide quality health care for this population. The Primary Care Amplification Model has demonstrated its capacity to deliver effective health care to patients with chronic disease such as diabetes. This paper describes the adaption ofthe model to enhance the delivery ofhealth care to the refugee community. A 'beacon' practice with an expanded clinical capacity to deliver health care for refugees has been established. Partnerships link this practice with existing local general practices and community services. Governance involves collaboration between clinical leadership and relevant government and non-government organisations including local refugee communities. Integration with tertiary and community health sectors is facilitated and continuing education of health care providers is an important focus. Early incorporation of research in this model ensures effective feedback to inform providers of current health needs. Although implementation is currently in its formative phase, the Primary Care Amplification Model offers a flexible, yet robust framework to facilitate the delivery of quality health care to refugee patients. PMID:21133306

Kay, Margaret; Jackson, Claire; Nicholson, Caroline

2010-01-01

164

Appropriate Perspectives for Health Care Decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

NICE uses cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the health benefits expected to be gained by using a technology with the health that is likely to be forgone due to additional costs falling on the health care budget and displacing other activities that improve health. This approach to informing decisions will be appropriate if the social objective is to improve health, the

Karl Claxton; Simon Walker; Steven Palmer; Mark Sculpher

2010-01-01

165

Retention of female volunteer community health workers in Dhaka urban slums: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Volunteer community health workers (CHWs) are a key approach to improving community-based maternal and child health services in developing countries. BRAC, a large Bangladeshi non-governmental organization (NGO), has employed female volunteer CHWs in its community-based health programs since 1977, recently including its Manoshi project, a community-based maternal and child health intervention in the urban slums of Bangladesh. A case–control study conducted in response to high dropout rates in the first year of the project showed that financial incentives, social prestige, community approval and household responsibilities were related to early retention in the project. In our present prospective cohort study, we aimed to better understand the factors associated with retention of volunteer CHWs once the project was more mature. Methods We used a prospective cohort study design to examine the factors affecting retention of volunteer CHWs who remained in the project after the initial start-up period. We surveyed a random sample of 542 CHWs who were working for BRAC Manoshi in December 2008. In December 2009, we revisited this cohort of CHWs and interviewed those who had dropped out about the main reasons for their dropping out. We used a multivariable generalized linear model regression analysis with a log link to estimate the relative risk (RR) of independent factors on retention. Results Of the 542 CHWs originally enrolled, 120 had dropped out by the end of one year, mainly because they left the slums. CHWs who received positive community appraisal (adjusted RR?=?1.45, 95% confidence interval (CI)?=?1.10 to 1.91) or were associated with other NGOs (adjusted RR?=?1.13, 95% CI?=?1.04 to 1.23) were more likely to have been retained in the project. Although refresher training was also associated with increased retention (adjusted RR?=?2.25, 95% CI?=?1.08 to 4.71) in this study, too few CHWs had not attended refresher training regularly to make it a meaningful predictor of retention that could be applied in the project setting. Conclusion Factors that affect retention of CHWs may change over time, with some factors that are important in the early years of a project losing importance as the project matures. Community health programs operating in fragile urban slums should consider changing factors over program duration for better retention of volunteer CHWs.

2014-01-01

166

Health Care Experiment at Many Farms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an experimental program of health care for a Navajo community, and discusses the use of personal physician care where a para-medical referral system may have been more technologically efficient. (AL)

McDermott, Walsh; And Others

1972-01-01

167

Future delivery of health care: Cybercare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health-care system reforms can change the structure of the current U.S. health-care system, from centralized large hospitals to a distributed, networked healthcare system. In our model, medical care is delivered locally in neighborhoods and individual homes, using computer technologies like telemedicine, to link patients and primary care providers to tertiary medical providers. This decentralization could reduce costs enough to provide

C. EVERETT KOOP; ROBYN MOSHER; LUIS KUN; JIM GEILING; ELIOT GRIGG; SARAH LONG; RONALD C. MERRELL; RICHARD SATAVA; JOSEPH M. ROSEN

2008-01-01

168

Consumer Financial Issues in Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

While government officials, health care providers, and insurers debate the cause and cure of high and rising health care costs,\\u000a consumers face the daunting task of making critical health care decisions for themselves and family members in a complex market.\\u000a This chapter describes the characteristics of and key players in that market. Reasons given in the academic and popular press

Deanna L. Sharpe

169

Spirulina in health care management.  

PubMed

Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management. PMID:18855693

Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

2008-10-01

170

Identification of Energy Issues in Health Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report delineates significant issues that should be considered in order to achieve energy conservation in health care facilities. Comprehensive, factual, and practical solutions must be found for two reasons. First, escalating costs in both health ca...

R. Plunkett

1978-01-01

171

Coming Together To Cut Health Care Costs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how, through a shared plan, the Health Insurance Initiative of the Independent Colleges and Universities in Florida (ICUF) is saving participating institutions millions in costs associated with providing employee health care. (EV)

Heron, W. David; Donatelli, Ben

2003-01-01

172

Health volunteers' knowledge of cardiovascular disease prevention and healthy lifestyle following a community trial: Isfahan healthy heart program  

PubMed Central

Background: Health volunteers can have a great effect by training the population about prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and lifestyle modification. This study evaluated the health volunteers’ knowledge following the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) that was performed between 2000 and 2006. Materials and Methods: In this study, 491 females were selected among health volunteers in the Isfahan and Najafabad districts as intervention areas and Arak as a reference area through 2000-2001 until 2006. They participated in training courses on CVD, its complications, methods of prevention of risk factors control as well healthy lifestyle promotion. The health volunteers’ level of knowledge was assessed before and after training. Results: Before intervention, there was no significant difference between the scores of health volunteers in the intervention and the control regions in terms of knowledge about recognizing the symptoms, complications and prevention of CVD and relevant risk factors and healthy lifestyle. However, their knowledge scores increased significantly in the fields of CVD (? = 0.13, P = 0.04), hypertension (? = 0.18, P = 0.009), healthy nutrition (? = 0.19, P = 0.007), appropriate physical activity (? = 0.17, P = 0.01) and dealing with stress (? = 0.16, P = 0.02) after trainings. Conclusion: The 6 year interventional program of IHHP showed that training health volunteers on prevention of CVD, their risk factors and modification of lifestyle continued to be effective even in a long time.

Roohafza, Hamidreza; Khani, Azam; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Bahonar, Ahmad; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

2014-01-01

173

Consumer-driven health care marketing.  

PubMed

In this article, a health care marketing executive takes an opposing view: That the consumer will not only continue to exercise choice but also, at annual renewal time, veto power. In part, that is because the consumers are feeling the rising cost of health care much more directly than in the past, through ever-higher premiums, deductibles and copayments. As they assumed more of the burden of medical care delivery, consumers are becoming more knowledgeable about and discriminating toward the health care system and provider plans they are offered. They understand--as does their employer--that no longer are all health care plans alike or at parity with each other. The consumer is also demanding greater access to freedom of provider choice, quality of health care coverage. PMID:10164646

Upton, R L

1997-01-01

174

Hurdles to health: immigrant and refugee health care in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Refugees and asylum seekers face a number of barriers to accessing health care and improved health status. These include language difficulties, financial need and unemployment, cultural differ- ences, legal barriers and a health workforce with generally low awareness of issues specific to refugees. Importantly, current Australian govern- ment migration and settlement policy also impacts on access to health and health

Sally B Murray; Sue A Skull

2005-01-01

175

45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section 162...Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard....

2010-10-01

176

45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a)...

2009-10-01

177

45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.406 Section...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a)...

2013-10-01

178

Health Care Costing: Data, Methods, Future Directions  

Cancer.gov

Health Services and Economics Branch staff have collaborated with colleagues at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and Emory University to develop a supplement to the journal Medical Care. The supplement, published in July 2009, examines a broad array of methodologic issues related to health care cost estimation. The supplement's papers are led by experts in health economics, epidemiology, health services research, and biostatistics.

179

Female farmworkers' health during pregnancy: health care providers' perspectives.  

PubMed

Pregnant farmworkers and their fetuses are at increased risk of negative health outcomes due to environmental and occupational factors at their workplaces. Health care providers who serve farm communities can positively affect workers' health through the informed care they deliver. Yet, interviews with rural health care providers reveal limited knowledge about agricultural work or occupational and environmental health risks during pregnancy. Professional associations, government organizations, academic institutions, and practice settings must renew their efforts to ensure that environmental and occupational health education, especially as it relates to women and their children, is incorporated into academic and practice environments. PMID:23799657

Kelley, Maureen A; Flocks, Joan D; Economos, Jeannie; McCauley, Linda A

2013-07-01

180

Toward a 21st-century health care system: Recommendations for health care reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

The coverage, cost, and quality problems of the U.S. health care system are evident. Sustainable health care reform must go beyond financing expanded access to care to substantially changing the organization and delivery of care. The FRESH-Thinking Project (www.fresh-thinking.org) held a series of workshops during which physicians, health policy experts, health insurance executives, business leaders, hospital administrators, economists, and others

K. Arrow; A. Auerbach; J. Bertko; L. P. Casalino; F. J. Crosson; A. Enthoven; E. Falcone; R. C. Feldman; V. R. Fuchs; A. M. Garber; M. R. Gold; D. A. Goldman; G. K. Hadfield; M. A. Hall; R. I. Horwitz; M. Hooven; P. D. Jacobson; T. S. Jost; L. J. Kotlikoff; J. Levin; S. Levine; R. Levy; K. Linscott; H. S. Luft; R. Mashal; D. McFadden; D. Mechanic; D. Meltzer; J. P. Newhouse; R. G. Noll; J. B. Pietzsch; P. Pizzo; R. D. Reischauer; S. Rosenbaum; W. Sage; L. D. Schaeffer; E. Sheen; B. N. Silber; J. Skinner; S. M. Shortell; S. O. Thier; S. Tunis; L. Wulsin Jr; P. Yock; G. B. Nun; S. Bryan; O. Luxenburg; Ven van de W. P. M. M; J. Cooper

2009-01-01

181

45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered...

2013-10-01

182

45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered...

2009-10-01

183

45 CFR 162.410 - Implementation specifications: Health care providers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Implementation specifications: Health care providers. 162.410 Section...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.410 Implementation specifications: Health care providers. (a) A covered...

2010-10-01

184

Health Training Needs of Child Care Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Child care professionals in Hawaii were surveyed to assess health training needs. Respondents reported a high degree of comfort in managing common health conditions. The most commonly requested health services involved speech/language testing and vision/hearing screening. The most requested health/safety workshop topic was behavioral problems. The…

Caulfield, Rick; Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle

2001-01-01

185

Inquiries into health care: learning or lynching?  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a spectrum of reasons for inquiries into health care: learning, catharsis, reassurance, and accountability. The tension is immediately obvious. Is the primary purpose learning or lynching? We need to learn from major health inquiries. New Zealand needs a culture of inquiry that encourages health professionals to discuss their concerns. We need mechanisms that enable health professionals to share,

Ron Paterson

186

Legislating health care coverage for the unemployed.  

PubMed

Because the unemployed and their families are often likely to develop stress-related health problems, ensuring them access to health care is a public health issue. Congressional efforts thus far to legislate health coverage for the unemployed have proposed a system that recognizes people's basic need for coverage but has several limitations. PMID:4029798

Palley, H A; Feldman, G; Gallner, I; Tysor, M

1985-01-01

187

Factors Important to Success in the Volunteer Long-Term Care Ombudsman Role  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study found that the satisfaction of one state's largely older volunteers' altruistic, affiliation, and self-improvement motives corresponded to increased organizational loyalty and better performance across several dimensions. Younger volunteers served for shorter periods and were more highly motivated by the "self-improvement" need.…

Nelson, H. Wayne; Hooker, Karen; DeHart, Kimberly N.; Edwards, John A.; Lanning, Kevin

2004-01-01

188

Motivations, concerns, and expectations of Scandinavian health professionals volunteering for humanitarian assignments.  

PubMed

International nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) involved in humanitarian assistance employ millions of volunteers. One of the major challenges for the organizations is the high turnover rate among their personnel. Another is recruiting the right persons. As part of a series of studies investigating factors that affect the recruitment process and the success of assignment, this qualitative study examined health professionals' motivations for volunteering, their various concerns, and their expectations about themselves and the organizations for which they would work. The findings from focus group interviews with potential humanitarian volunteers were considered within the framework of Hertzberg's theory of motivations and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. The study has significant implications for personnel policy and practice in the humanitarian sector. Recruitment officers should have the self-actualized person, as described by Maslow, in mind when interviewing candidates. This perspective would make it easier for them to understand the candidates' thoughts and concerns and would lead to more effective interventions. Program officers should have satisfiers and dissatisfiers, as identified by Herzberg, in mind when planning programs. The probability that personnel will leave humanitarian work is lower if they perceive working conditions as good. PMID:16580984

Bjerneld, Magdalena; Lindmark, Gunilla; McSpadden, Lucia Ann; Garrett, Martha J

2006-01-01

189

Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

2006-01-01

190

Migrant farmworker children: health status, barriers to care, and nursing innovations in health care delivery.  

PubMed

Migrant farmworkers are one of the most health care-impoverished populations in the United States. Mobility, hazardous occupations, cultural diversity, and low socioeconomic status place migrants, and particularly migrant children, at high risk for inadequate health care and preventable health problems. This article presents a synthesis of the existing research on migrant demographics, major health risks, and geographic, financial, and cultural barriers to health care access. Innovative nursing strategies to enhance access and improve the health of migrant children are explored. These include the use of lay community outreach workers, the creation of alternative health care delivery models, and the development of information tracking systems. PMID:9592438

Gwyther, M E; Jenkins, M

1998-01-01

191

Library Services and Health Care Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses progress made in meeting the information needs of health care administrators and the role of the library in providing information for administrative decision making. Highlights include health care economics; a shifting power structure; quality improvement initiatives; standards; communicating the role and value of library services; and…

Buchanan, Holly Shipp

1993-01-01

192

Military Family and the Health Care System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This chapter reviews the scientific literature on the role of the family in health promotion, self/family care, social support, health care utilization, and recovery. Although it is clear that military families have a direct impact on the demand for healt...

D. S. Nice

1993-01-01

193

Teaching Primary Health Care: An Interdisciplinary Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing and radiology students (n=15) at the University of Malta who completed an interdisciplinary module on primary health care reported they found the theoretical material applicable to practice; the module enabled them to learn about their potential role in primary health care. (SK)

Bezzina, Paul; Keogh, Johann J.; Keogh, Mariana

1998-01-01

194

Safe Practices for Better Health Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Modern health care is highly complex, high risk, and error prone. Not surprisingly, health care errors and consequent adverse events are a leading cause of death and injury, even though well-documented methods to prevent the occurrence of many of these er...

K. W. Kizer L. N. Blum

2005-01-01

195

Medical Devices Used in Home Health Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report was written by the CDRH Ad Hoc Home Health Care Committee in order to begin to address specific concerns associated with medical devices used in home health care. The report includes summaries of the following eight device-related issues: accre...

C. L. Backinger E. J. McCarthy

1992-01-01

196

Health Care Industry. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy in the health care industry and lists program contacts. The following 35 organizations operate basic skills upgrading programs for health care workers: American Hospital Association; Chinese American Civic Association; Massachusetts Department of Employment and Training; BostonWorks;…

BCEL Brief, 1991

1991-01-01

197

Power Rx for the health care industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

While electricity has had a huge impact on the health care community through the development of highly sophisticated diagnostic tools and procedures, more mundane electro-technologies offer substantial opportunities as well. From innovative lighting techniques to energy management systems to new technologies for medical waste disposal, advanced electricity-based technologies can enhance health care services and help cut costs when facilities know

Lamarre

1994-01-01

198

The Pharmaceutical Industry and Health Care Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

While the goals of President Clinton's health care reform plan—to expand access to health care by the underserved and reduce the unacceptably high cost of care—are important, his proposed mechanisms for doing so include provisions that are counterproductive. Blacklisting certain drugs from the Medicare program, imposing red tape on physicians who participate in Medicare, and establishing a Medicare rebate tax

1994-01-01

199

The Pharmaceutical Industry and Health Care Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

:While the goals of President Clinton's health care reform plan—to expand access to health care by the underserved and reduce the unacceptably high cost of care—are important, his proposed mechanisms for doing so include provisions that are counterproductive. Blacklisting certain drugs from the Medicare program, imposing red tape on physicians who participate in Medicare, and establishing a Medicare rebate tax

William L. Lucas

1994-01-01

200

Catastrophic payments for health care in Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Out-of-pocket (OOP) payments are the principal means of financing health care throughout much of Asia. We estimate the magnitude and distribution of OOP payments for health care in fourteen countries and territories accounting for 81% of the Asian population. We focus on payments that are catastrophic, in the sense of severely disrupting household living standards, and approximate such payments by

Eddy van Doorslaer; Owen ODonnell; Ravindra P. Rannan-Eliya; Aparnaa Somanathan; Shiva Raj Adhikari; Charu C. Garg; Deni Harbianto; Alejandro N. Herrin; Mohammed Nazmul Huq; Shamsia Ibragimova; Anup Karan; Tae-Jin Lee; Gabriel M. Leung; Jui-Fen Rachel Lu; Chiu Wan Ng; Badri Raj Pande; Rachel Racelis; Sihai Tao; Keith Tin; Kanjana Tisayaticom; Laksono Trisnantoro; Chitpranee Vasavid; Yuxin Zhao

2007-01-01

201

Integrated health care systems: emerging models.  

PubMed

Health care institutions and professionals are transforming the organizational structure of the nation's delivery system. Buyers and payers of health care are seeking more effective and efficient services for their dollars. Several new model organizational structures seek to put the providers who are aligning themselves with one another into a better position to deal with today's marketplace. PMID:8945275

Riley, D W

1994-01-01

202

Biomedical equipment systems for rural health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomedical equipment technology can be of significant help in bringing health care to large rural populations. Of the possible technology alternatives, providing an equipment package to the health worker to take to the domestic site is most appropriate. Equipment choice must give priority to preventive care especially for the mother and the child. Besides the general equipment design features of

Sujoy K. Guha

1992-01-01

203

Lasers and optics in health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lasers and optics have affected health care in a myriad of ways. This paper surveys their impact on three aspects of health care: (1) surgery and medicine, (2) biology, and (3) biotechnology. In surgery, fiber optics have enabled the development of endoscopes, which allow access to most sites within the body. Endoscopes have, in turn, led to the development of

THOMAS F. DEUTSCH

1997-01-01

204

A Comprehensive Primary Health Care Delivery Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This primary health care model is based on four assumptions: emphasis on collective, not individual, needs; coordination of preventive/episodic care with secondary/tertiary care; comprehensive, holistic approach; and partnership and equality among professional disciplines and community members. Stakeholders involved are medical, nursing, and…

Pullen, Carol; And Others

1994-01-01

205

Pertussis Vaccination for Health Care Workers  

PubMed Central

Pertussis, an acute respiratory infection caused by Bordetella pertussis, classically manifests as a protracted cough illness. The incidence of pertussis in the United States has been increasing in recent years. Immunity wanes after childhood vaccination, leaving adolescents and adults susceptible to infection. The transmission of pertussis in health care settings has important medical and economic consequences. Acellular pertussis booster vaccines are now available for use and have been recommended for all adolescents and adults. These vaccines are safe, immunogenic, and effective. Health care workers are a priority group for vaccination because of their increased risk of acquiring infection and the potential to transmit pertussis to high-risk patients. Health care worker vaccination programs are likely to be cost-effective, but further research is needed to determine the acceptability of pertussis vaccines among health care workers, the duration of immunity after booster doses, and the impact of vaccination on the management of pertussis exposures in health care settings.

Sandora, Thomas J.; Gidengil, Courtney A.; Lee, Grace M.

2008-01-01

206

Transforming Care Delivery through Health Information Technology  

PubMed Central

The slow but progressive adoption of health information technology (IT) nationwide promises to usher in a new era in health care. Electronic health record systems provide a complete patient record at the point of care and can help to alleviate some of the challenges of a fragmented delivery system, such as drug-drug interactions. Moreover, health IT promotes evidence-based practice by identifying gaps in recommended treatment and providing clinical decision-support tools. In addition, the data collected through digital records can be used to monitor patient outcomes and identify potential improvements in care protocols. Kaiser Permanente continues to advance its capability in each of these areas.

Wheatley, Benjamin

2013-01-01

207

The Future of U.S. Health Care and Its Effect on Health Care Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces trends in health care, including growth of managed care, increased consumer choice, and changes in administration and funding of academic health centers, and examines the challenges they create for teaching, research, and practice. The Oregon Health Plan and its effect on Oregon Health Sciences University are used for illustration. (MSE)

Hildick, Sue; Kohler, Peter O.

1998-01-01

208

Selective primary health care: the counter revolution.  

PubMed

Primary health care in the WHO sense was triggered indirectly by the failure of the Malaria Eradication Programme. The response to this failure was an ideological change which considered that health services were not purely a way of delivering health care interventions to people but were something important to individuals and groups in their own right. Key changes of this idea called primary health care were linked to qualities such as power, ownership, equity and dignity. Such an ideological change involves the evolution of new forms to reflect the changes in content and some of these structures still require development. The advocates of highly selected and specific health interventions plus the managerial processes to implement them have ignored, or put on one side, the ideas which are at the core of what could be described as the primary health care revolution. They are in this sense counter revolutionaries. PMID:3388069

Newell, K W

1988-01-01

209

Vaccine perceptions among Oregon health care providers.  

PubMed

Health care providers exert a significant influence on parental pediatric vaccination decisions. We conducted hour-long interviews with traditional and alternative health care providers in which we explored a range of associations between vaccination perceptions and practice. A key finding was that the Health Belief Model constructs of perceived susceptibility to and severity of either an illness or an adverse vaccine event partially explained health care provider (HCP) beliefs about the risks or benefits of vaccination, especially among alternative care providers. Low or high perceived susceptibility to a vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) or of the severity of a given VPD affects whether an HCP will promote or oppose pediatric vaccination recommendations. Beyond these perceptions, health and vaccination beliefs are affected by the contextual factors of personal experience, group norms, immunology beliefs, and beliefs about industry and government. Building powerful affective heuristics might be critical to balancing the forces that defeat good public health practices. PMID:23964059

Bean, Sandra J; Catania, Joseph A

2013-09-01

210

Remote health-care monitoring using Personal Care Connect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Caring for patients with chronic illnesses is costly—nearly $1.27 trillion today and predicted to grow much larger. To address this trend, we have designed and built a platform, called Personal Care Connect (PCC), to facilitate the remote monitoring of patients. By providing caregivers with timely access to a patient's health status, they can provide patients with appropriate preventive interventions, helping

Marion Blount; Virinder M. Batra; Andrew N. Capella; Maria Ebling; William F. Jerome; Sherri M. Martin; Michael Nidd; Michael R. Niemi; Steven P. Wright

2007-01-01

211

Health care technology and quality of care.  

PubMed

The increasing costs and complexity of technologic advances in diagnosis and treatment have been accompanied by other important issues. They are often moral or ethical in nature; they include the public's desire and determination to have access to these "high-tech" advances; and the quality and equity with which those advances are apportioned and applied must be addressed. Seven criteria that can be applied to technology assessment are identified as is a process for that assessment. Together, these procedures can provide valuable information and assistance to those who make decisions about health benefits coverage--both in the public and the private sectors. PMID:2980910

Schaffarzick, R W

1987-08-01

212

Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

1994-01-01

213

Assistive Communication Robot for Preoperative Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Health care costs and ageing population are two factors which are of major concern to western governments in the 21st century.\\u000a Existing work in affective health care is primary focused on developing avatars in the tele-health space. This paper reports\\u000a on the modeling of emotions (anxiety level) of patients in pre-operative stage using communication robots to assist nurses\\u000a in providing

Rajiv Khosla; Mei-Tai Chu; Kerstin Denecke; K. G. Yamada; T. Yamaguchi

2010-01-01

214

Petroleum and health care: evaluating and managing health care's vulnerability to petroleum supply shifts.  

PubMed

Petroleum is used widely in health care-primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies-and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services. PMID:21778473

Hess, Jeremy; Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

2011-09-01

215

Petroleum and Health Care: Evaluating and Managing Health Care's Vulnerability to Petroleum Supply Shifts  

PubMed Central

Petroleum is used widely in health care—primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies—and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services.

Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

2011-01-01

216

Telemedicine Health Care Delivery System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Interactive Telemedicine Systems (ITS) system was specifically developed to address the ever widening gap between our medical care expertise and our medical care delivery system. The frustrating reality is that as our knowledge of how to diagnose and ...

J. H. Sanders

1991-01-01

217

Rewarding altruism: addressing the issue of payments for volunteers in public health initiatives.  

PubMed

Lay involvement in public health programmes occurs through formalised lay health worker (LHW) and other volunteer roles. Whether such participation should be supported, or indeed rewarded, by payment is a critical question. With reference to policy in England, UK, this paper argues how framing citizen involvement in health only as time freely given does not account for the complexities of practice, nor intrinsic motivations. The paper reports results on payment drawn from a study of approaches to support lay people in public health roles, conducted in England, 2007-9. The first phase of the study comprised a scoping review of 224 publications, three public hearings and a register of projects. Findings revealed the diversity of approaches to payment, but also the contested nature of the topic. The second phase investigated programme support matters in five case studies of public health projects, which were selected primarily to reflect role types. All five projects involved volunteers, with two utilising forms of payment to support engagement. Interviews were conducted with a sample of project staff, LHWs (paid and unpaid), external partners and service users. Drawing on both lay and professional perspectives, the paper explores how payment relates to social context as well as various motivations for giving, receiving or declining financial support. The findings show that personal costs are not always absorbed, and that there is a potential conflict between financial support, whether sessional payment or expenses, and welfare benefits. In identifying some of the advantages and disadvantages of payment, the paper highlights the complexity of an issue often addressed only superficially. It concludes that, in order to support citizen involvement, fairness and value should be considered alongside pragmatic matters of programme management; however policy conflicts need to be resolved to ensure that employment and welfare rights are maintained. PMID:24581065

South, Jane; Purcell, Martin E; Branney, Peter; Gamsu, Mark; White, Judy

2014-03-01

218

[Primary care in maternal-child health].  

PubMed

The theoretical and methodological elements of primary health care (PHC) include a philosophy of work and an epistemological focus toward the processes of health and illness, as well as a practical medical anthropological knowledge of the culture-specific aspects of disease. The work methodology of PHC requires care of the individual as a bio-psycho-socio-affective being integrated into a particular environment; none of the aspects of being should be neglected or given priority. Care should also be integrated in the sense of providing preventive health care as well as curative and rehabilitative services, in all phases from training of health personnel to record keeping. The primary health care team is multidisciplinary in constitution and interdisciplinary in function. PHC assumes that health care will be accessible to users and that continuity of care will be provided. The need for community participation in all phases of health care has been reiterated in several international health declarations. A well-functioning PHC system will require new types of pre- and postgraduate health education in a changing social and professional system and continuing education under adequate supervision for health workers. Research capability for identifying community health problems, a rigorous evaluation system, and epidemiologic surveillance are also needed. All of these elements are applicable to the field of maternal and child health as well as to PHC. The most appropriate place to intervene in order to correct existing imbalances in access to health care for mothers and children is in the PHC system. Examples of areas that should be stressed include vaccinations, nutrition, psychomotor development, early diagnosis and treatment for handicapped children, prevention of childhood accidents, school health and absenteeism, all aspects of health education, adoption and alternatives to abandonment of children, alcoholism and addiction, adolescent pregnancy and family planning, dental health, and mental problems. Trained primary care pediatricians working within the community as part of the PHC system will be required to confront and solve complex health problems. The training needed does not signify a new speciality or subspeciality, but rather a training methodology and a new type of professional practice. PMID:3752740

Pedreira Massa, J L

1986-07-01

219

[Professional health cards (CPS): informatic health care system in France].  

PubMed

The Professional Health Card Public interest group (Groupement d'Intérêt Public-Carte de professionnel de Santé (GIP-CPS)) was founded in 1993 as a joint initiative by the different parties involved in health care in France: the state, the representatives of the health care professions and the compulsory and complementary health insurance organizations. The CPS system enables safe exchange and electronic sharing of medical data. Via Intranet connections and Extranet hosting of medical files, databases, the CPS system enables health care professionals who access servers to be identified with certainty. For email exhanges, the CPS systems guarantees the sender's identity and capacity. The electronic signature gives legal value to the email. The system also enables confidential email. The health card system (CPS) contributes to making the health service efficient. Shared medical files, health care networks, health warning systems or electronic requests for reimbursement of health insurance expenses all use the CPS system. More than 300,000 health care professionals use it regularly. The freedom of movement of patients throughout Europe has led to the growth of exchanges and information sharing between health professionals in the States of the Union. More and more health professionals will be leaving their own countries to work in foreign countries in the future. It is essential that their freedom of movement is accompanied by the ability to prove their rights to practice. PMID:16385785

Fortuit, P

2005-09-01

220

Health Update: Development of New National Child Care Health Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the absence of national standards which are uniformly applicable to health, safety, sanitation, and nutrition aspects of child care programs. Explains the responsive collaborative project of the American Academy of Pediatrics and American Public Health Association to develop national reference standards for out-of-home child care

Aronson, Susan S.

1988-01-01

221

Promoting coordination in Norwegian health care1  

PubMed Central

Introduction The Norwegian health care system is well organized within its two main sectors—primary health and long-term care on the one hand, and hospitals and specialist services on the other. However, the relation between them lacks mediating structures. Policy practice Enhancing coordination between primary and secondary health care has been central in Norwegian health care policy in the last decade. In 2003 a committee was appointed to identify coordination problems and proposed a lot of practical and organisational recommendations. It relied on an approach challenging primary and secondary health care in shared geographical regions to take action. However, these proposals were not implemented. In 2008 a new Minister of Health and Care worked out plans under the key term “Coordination Reform”. These reform plans superseded and expanded the previous policy initiatives concerning cooperation, but represented also a shift in focus to a regulative and centralised strategy, including new health legislation, structural reforms and use of economic incentives that are now about to be implemented. Discussion The article analyses the perspectives and proposals of the previous and the recent reform initiatives in Norway and discusses them in relation to integrated care measures implemented in Denmark and Sweden.

Rom?ren, Tor Inge; Torjesen, Dag Olaf; Landmark, Brynjar

2011-01-01

222

Geographic Disparities in Children's Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. It is widely believed that only a minority of vulnerable children and adolescents receive any mental health services. Although health care dispar- ities associated with sociodemographic characteristics are well known, almost no information exists about another potentially important source of disparity for children: How does state of residence affect mental health service use? Methods. Observational analysis was conducted us-

Roland Sturm; Jeanne S. Ringel; Tatiana Andreyeva

2010-01-01

223

Space technology in remote health care  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A program for an earth-based remote health service system is discussed as a necessary step for the development and verification of a remote health services spacecraft capability. This demonstration program is described to provide data for developing health care for future manned space missions.

Belasco, N.

1974-01-01

224

Health Care Reform: Recommendations and Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health care reform needs to assure coverage to all children regardless of income level or illnesses; address benefits, financing, administration, and delivery systems; provide substantial subsidies to low-income families; be equitable for all people; provide better monitoring of child health; protect and strengthen health providers who assist…

Lewit, Eugene M.; And Others

1993-01-01

225

Health Care Issues of Incarcerated Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents health profile of the female offender. Discusses needs in areas of gynecology, breast assessment, and health education and services related to childbearing and parenting. Describes incarcerated health care delivery system and looks to communication and education, nursing personnel, and community resources for potential solutions to…

McGaha, Glenda S.

1987-01-01

226

Prostate cancer support groups, health literacy and consumerism: are community-based volunteers re-defining older men's health?  

PubMed

In this article we describe the connections between prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs) and men's health literacy and consumer orientation to health care services. The study findings are drawn from participant observations conducted at 16 PCSGs in British Columbia, Canada and 54 individual interviews that focused on men's experiences of attending group meetings. Men's communication and interactions at PCSGs provide important insights for how men talk about and conceptualize health and illness. For example, biomedical language often predominated at group meetings, and men used numbers and measures to engage with risk discourses in linking prostate cancer markers to various treatment options and morbidity and mortality rates. Many groups afforded opportunities for men to interact with health care providers as a means to better understand the language and logic of prostate cancer management. The health literacy skills fostered at PCSGs along with specific group-informed strategies could be mobilized in the men's subsequent clinical consultations. Consumer discourses and strategies to contest power relations with health care professionals underpinned many men's search for prostate cancer information and their commitment to assisting other men. Key were patients' rights, and perhaps responsibility, to compare diverse health products and services in making decisions across the entire trajectory of their prostate cancer. Overall, the study findings reveal PCSGs as having the capacity to contest as well as align with medical expertise and services facilitating men's transition from patient to informed health care consumers. The processes through which this occurs may direct the design of older men's health promotion programs. PMID:21177714

Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L; McKenzie, Michael M; Hislop, T Gregory; Gerbrandt, Julieta S; Oglov, Valerie

2011-11-01

227

Reflections on curative health care in Nicaragua.  

PubMed Central

Improved health care in Nicaragua is a major priority of the Sandinista revolution; it has been pursued by major reforms of the national health care system, something few developing countries have attempted. In addition to its internationally recognized advances in public health, considerable progress has been made in health care delivery by expanding curative medical services through training more personnel and building more facilities to fulfill a commitment to free universal health coverage. The very uneven quality of medical care is the leading problem facing curative medicine now. Underlying factors include the difficulty of adequately training the greatly increased number of new physicians. Misdiagnosis and mismanagement continue to be major problems. The curative medical system is not well coordinated with the preventive sector. Recent innovations include initiation of a "medicina integral" residency, similar to family practice. Despite its inadequacies and the handicaps of war and poverty, the Nicaraguan curative medical system has made important progress.

Slater, R G

1989-01-01

228

Spina Bifida: Guidelines of Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These guidelines were written to help families coordinate the health care that may be needed by a child with spina bifida. The booklet begins with general information about spina bifida. It then discusses the goals of health care, the health care team, the importance of periodic health care, and record keeping procedures. The child's health care

Minnesota State Dept. of Health, Minneapolis. Services for Children with Handicaps.

229

Health captology--application of persuasive technologies to health care.  

PubMed

Professionals in industries such as advertising and sales have used techniques of persuasion to enhance the efficacy of marketing campaigns and sales revenues. In contrast, health care has traditionally relied on the persuasive power of facts and evidence to encourage healthy behavior. The evidence suggests, however, that this current approach is failing. Health care experts and opinion leaders cite overwhelming evidence of an epidemic in diseases such as obesity and diabetes, despite numerous initiatives to educate the public how to prevent morbidity and mortality. Health captology, the application of persuasive technology to health care, attempts to leverage proven persuasive techniques to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:15853239

Chan, Albert S

2004-01-01

230

The Ottawa Charter and acute health care.  

PubMed

The Ottawa Charter is a significant document in relation to health promotion and the priorities for action needed to facilitate health for all people. The relevance of this document to an intensive care setting and the extent to which it may be translated into meaningful practice is examined in this paper. Acute care is an area lying at the extreme end of tertiary health, and at first glance it may be difficult to reconcile the significance of health promotion and the Ottawa Charter with this particular area of health care practice. On closer inspection, however, the relevance of the Charter lies in its impact on the number and type of patients seen in the Intensive Care Unit, and on the effect that the implementation of the health promotion action areas has on the client base. Even at the extreme end of tertiary care it is equally important to be aware of public health issues and to advocate, enable and mediate, where necessary, on behalf of and alongside patients, particularly as we care for them when they are most vulnerable. A commitment to both action and meaningful practice must continue to be pursued while equity in health remains a goal to be achieved. PMID:18556735

Munster, Francesca

2008-06-01

231

Statements of Antitrust Enforcement Policy in Health Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The antitrust guidelines for health care providers are designed to encourage agreements that promote efficiency in the health care industry and lower health care costs to consumers. The nine statements detail new antitrust enforcement policies and princip...

1996-01-01

232

20 CFR 402.65 - Health care information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Health care information. 402.65 Section...RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.65 Health care information. We have some information about health care programs under titles XVIII...

2013-04-01

233

47 CFR 54.602 - Health care support mechanism.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care support mechanism. 54.602... Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.602 Health care support mechanism. (a)...

2013-10-01

234

47 CFR 54.601 - Health care provider eligibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care provider eligibility. 54.601... Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers Defined Terms and Eligibility § 54.601 Health care provider eligibility....

2013-10-01

235

45 CFR 162.1401 - Health care claim status transaction.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care claim status transaction. 162.1401 ...REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claim Status § 162.1401 Health care claim status transaction. The...

2013-10-01

236

42 CFR 476.76 - Cooperation with health care facilities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Cooperation with health care facilities. 476.76 Section... § 476.76 Cooperation with health care facilities. Before implementation...review procedures with each involved health care...

2013-10-01

237

20 CFR 402.65 - Health care information.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Health care information. 402.65 Section 402...RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.65 Health care information. We have some information about health care programs under titles XVIII and XIX...

2014-04-01

238

7 CFR 205.238 - Livestock health care practice standard.  

...2014-01-01 false Livestock health care practice standard. 205.238 Section...Requirements § 205.238 Livestock health care practice standard. (a) The producer...and maintain preventive livestock health care practices, including: (1)...

2014-01-01

239

Nongrowth strategies and options in health care.  

PubMed

Changing economic and market forces in health care delivery have stimulated much management thinking about innovative, entrepreneurial forms of strategic growth. Along with this thinking comes a new imperative to rethink strategies to include nongrowth options in either services or markets. The health care manager must go beyond describing the strategies and tactics as simple reversals of the organizational pattern of growth in explaining the available nongrowth options. Examples of nine nongrowth options demonstrate their practicality and relevance to health care organizations. PMID:10302290

Breindel, C L

1988-01-01

240

Future developments in health care performance management  

PubMed Central

This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance.

Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

2013-01-01

241

Future developments in health care performance management.  

PubMed

This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. PMID:24255600

Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

2013-01-01

242

Health and Safety Considerations: Caring for Young Children with Exceptional Health Care Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual on health and safety considerations in caring for young children with exceptional health care needs is a product of Project EXCEPTIONAL (EXceptional Children: Education in Preschool Techniques for Inclusion, Opportunity-building, Nurturing And Learning), which has the goal of increasing the quality and quantity of inclusive child care

Presler, Betty

243

Financial burden of health care expenditures: Turkey.  

PubMed

In this study, we examine whether and to what extent the health insurance system in Turkey provided adequate protection against high out of pocket expenditures in the period prior to "The Health Transformation Programme". Furthermore, we examine the distribution of out of pocket expenditures by demographic characteristics, poverty status, health service type, access to health care and self-reported health status. We employ the 2002/03 National Household Health Expenditure Survey data to analyze financial burden of health care expenditure. Following the literature, we define high burdens as expenses above 10 and 20% of income. We find that 19% of the nonelderly population were living in families spending more than 10% of family income and that 14% of the nonelderly population were living in families spending more than 20% of family income on health care. Furthermore, the poor and those living in economically less developed regions had the greatest risk of high out of pocket burdens. The risk of high financial burdens varied by the type of insurance among the insured due to differences in benefits among the five separate public schemes that provided health insurance in the pre-reform period. Our results are robust to three alternative specifications of the burden measure and including elderly adults in the sample population. We see that prior to the reforms there were not adequate protection against high health expenditures. Our study provides a baseline against which policymakers can measure the success of the health care reform in terms of providing financial protection. PMID:23113149

Sulku, S Nur; Bernard, D Minbay

2012-01-01

244

The Shifting Landscape of Health Care: Toward a Model of Health Care Empowerment  

PubMed Central

In a rapidly changing world of health care information access and patients’ rights, there is limited conceptual infrastructure available to understand how people approach and engage in treatment of medical conditions. The construct of health care empowerment is defined as the process and state of being engaged, informed, collaborative, committed, and tolerant of uncertainty regarding health care. I present a model in which health care empowerment is influenced by an interplay of cultural, social, and environmental factors; personal resources; and intrapersonal factors. The model offers a framework to understand patient and provider roles in facilitating health care empowerment and presents opportunities for investigation into the role of health care empowerment in multiple outcomes across populations and settings, including inquiries into the sources and consequences of health disparities.

2011-01-01

245

The ORIGINS of Primary Health Care and SELECTIVE Primary Health Care  

PubMed Central

I present a historical study of the role played by the World Health Organization and UNICEF in the emergence and diffusion of the concept of primary health care during the late 1970s and early 1980s. I have analyzed these organizations’ political context, their leaders, the methodologies and technologies associated with the primary health care perspective, and the debates on the meaning of primary health care. These debates led to the development of an alternative, more restricted approach, known as selective primary health care. My study examined library and archival sources; I cite examples from Latin America.

Cueto, Marcos

2004-01-01

246

Marketing Public Health Through Older Adult Volunteering: Experience Corps as a Social Marketing Intervention  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We present a social marketing conceptual framework for Experience Corps Baltimore City (EC) in which the desired health outcome is not the promoted product or behavior. We also demonstrate the feasibility of a social marketing–based recruitment campaign for the first year of the Baltimore Experience Corps Trial (BECT), a randomized, controlled trial of the health benefits of EC participation for older adults. Methods. We recruited older adults from the Baltimore, MD, area. Participants randomized to the intervention were placed in public schools in volunteer roles designed to increase healthy behaviors. We examined the effectiveness of a recruitment message that appealed to generativity (i.e., to make a difference for the next generation), rather than potential health benefits. Results. Among the 155 participants recruited in the first year of the BECT, the average age was 69 years; 87% were women and 85% were African American. Participants reported primarily generative motives as their reason for interest in the BECT. Conclusions. Public health interventions embedded in civic engagement have the potential to engage older adults who might not respond to a direct appeal to improve their health.

Tanner, Elizabeth K.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Xue, Qian-Li; Rebok, George W.; Frick, Kevin D.; Carlson, Michelle C.; Wang, Tao; Piferi, Rachel L.; McGill, Sylvia; Whitfield, Keith E.; Fried, Linda P.

2010-01-01

247

Case Studies in Primary Health Care  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How does one learn about primary health care? Some might attend public health schools while others will find different ways to explore this fascinating field on their own. One particularly nice resource on the subject is this course from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Offered as part of the Open Course Ware initiative, the course was first developed in the fall of 2011 and was co-taught by Henry Taylor and Henry Perry. It was designed to introduce students to "the origins, concepts, and development of community-based primary health care through case studies from both developing and developed countries." The materials here include the syllabus, lecture materials, readings, and assignments. Within the Lecture Materials section visitors can watch or listen to conversions on the roots of community-based primary health care and women's empowerment via public health. Additionally, visitors can look over the course assignments or check out some of the discussion questions.

Perry, Henry; Taylor, Henry

2011-01-01

248

Status report on primary health care (1987-1993).  

PubMed

This article describes the legislative mandate for the development of primary health care (PHC) in the Philippines and provides a discussion of the attempts made to realize the goals of that mandate. Two major Department of Health thrusts are delineated: 1) from 1986 to 1991 Under-Secretary Alfredo Bengzon sought to deemphasize the implementation of primary health care in favor of an approach which sought to forge partnerships with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to realize a concept of "Community Health Development" and 2) from 1992 to 1995, Secretary Juan Flavier restored attention to the implementation of PHC which would be operational under the guidance of local government units. The difference in the two approaches is primarily a difference in their manner of execution. Despite some problems, the first initiative achieved important goals such as 1) implementing an information system to allow targeting of areas for social development, 2) organizing the First National Convention of NGOs for Health, 3) encouraging collaborative activities with NGOs, and 4) support of the activities of Barangay Health Workers (BHWs). The second initiative involved recognition of additional volunteer health workers; following community organizing as a basic approach for empowerment; expanding the prior initiatives; and making plans to identify model PHC barangays, monitor levels of PHC implementation, and prepare a BHW operational manual. This review ends by considering various issues and offering recommendations which include: 1) spelling out the role of local chief executives, 2) adopting a single terminology to describe the current approach, 3) defining the role of the BHW (multipurpose worker or health worker), 4) adopting a convergence of efforts strategy, 5) monitoring levels of PHC, 6) documenting the PHC implementation process, 7) dealing with program sustainability issues, and 8) improving the management of local health facilities. PMID:12291346

Bautista, V A

1995-04-01

249

[Quality of maternal and child health care in different models of Primary Health Care].  

PubMed

This study evaluated the quality of the maternal and child health care in two different models of Primary Health Care. Interviews were carried out by trained personnel with 1200 families randomly selected. Processes of assistance for maternal and child health care were evaluated by Family Health Strategy Teams and traditional health centers. In the evaluation of child health care, the precocity of the first consultation, the regular assessment of growth and development, the recommendations for accident prevention and prophylactic use of iron supplementation and vitamin A had been statistically associated with the model of the health care. Regarding prenatal health care the results showed statistically significant differences between the two models for breastfeeding counseling, nutritional recommendations and cervical preventive screening using Papanicolaou smear. For women health care out of pregnancy period, the results revealed that counseling for breasts auto-examination, preventive screening using Papanicolaou smear in last year and participation in family planning programs were associated with health Primary Health Care model. All the pointed differences had shown better performance of the Family Health Strategy Teams. PMID:21049154

Caldeira, Antônio Prates; Oliveira, Rafael Morroni de; Rodrigues, Oreston Alves

2010-10-01

250

Implementation of Advanced Health Care Technology into Existing Competency-Based Health Care Program. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was undertaken to develop new curriculum materials that could be incorporated into an existing health assistant program to cover recent advances in health care technology. Area physicians' offices were toured and meetings were held with administrators of local hospitals in order to discover what kinds of advances in health care

Klemovage, Shirley

251

Home Health Care: An Alternative in Institutionalization (Home Health Care Task Force Program Implementation Committee).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Inflation, increasing costs of health care delivery in institutions, and the increasing need to be more cost efficient in matching needs with services, indicate that home health care may have a critical role in the '80s. Emphasis on providing home health ...

1981-01-01

252

Revolutionizing Health Care Through Information Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. health care system is acknowledged to be the world's most advanced scientifically and technologically. But amid multimilliondollar diagnostic instruments, highly trained caregivers, and a vast facilities infrastructure, the most fundamental and p...

2004-01-01

253

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care Quick Links Facts for Families - Numerical List Facts for Families - ... and print a PDF version of this document . Religion and spirituality can be important in the lives ...

254

Effect of Wealth on Health Insurance and Health Care Expenditures  

Microsoft Academic Search

While there is an extensive literature estimating the effects of income on health insurance and expenditures, the effect of wealth has not been widely studied. Given the recent significant declines in the global financial and housing markets, it is important to estimate the effect of wealth on the demand for health insurance and health care expenditures. Wealth and lifetime income

Didem Bernard; William Encinosa; Jessica Banthin

2010-01-01

255

Hospice Care  

MedlinePLUS

... by providing a holistic approach. That means giving spiritual, mental, emotional and physical comfort to the patients, ... care. The team includes doctors, nurses, social workers, spiritual counselors, home health aides, bereavement counselors and volunteers. ...

256

Integrating Public Health and Personal Care in a Reformed US Health Care System  

PubMed Central

Compared with other developed countries, the United States has an inefficient and expensive health care system with poor outcomes and many citizens who are denied access. Inefficiency is increased by the lack of an integrated system that could promote an optimal mix of personal medical care and population health measures. We advocate a health trust system to provide core medical benefits to every American, while improving efficiency and reducing redundancy. The major innovation of this plan would be to incorporate existing private health insurance plans in a national system that rebalances health care spending between personal and population health services and directs spending to investments with the greatest long-run returns.

Chernichovsky, Dov

2010-01-01

257

Health-Care Reform for Childbirth  

PubMed Central

In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education discusses the current health-care crisis and the need for health-care reform to promote, support, and protect natural, safe, and healthy childbirth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

Budin, Wendy C.

2010-01-01

258

Emerging trends in health care finance.  

PubMed

Access to capital will become more difficult. Capital access is dependent on ability to repay debt, which, in turn, is dependent on internally generated cash flows. Under any health care reform proposal, revenue inflows will be slowed. The use of corporate finance techniques to limit financial risk and lower cost will be a permanent response to fundamental changes to the health care system. These changes will result in greater balance sheet management, centralized capital allocation, and alternative sources of capital. PMID:7614219

Sterns, J B

1994-01-01

259

The physician's perception of health care.  

PubMed

A general malaise appears to have settled on the American medical scene; most Americans continue to trust their own physicians but do not trust the medical profession or the health system as a whole, while many physicians feel harassed by the regulatory, bureaucratic, or litigious intrusions upon the patient-doctor relationship. The strains on mutual trust among physicians, their patients, and the public are being played out against a background of contradictions. The advances of biomedicine are offset by the neglect of social and behavioural aspects of medical care. Preoccupation with specialized, hospital-based treatment is accompanied by isolation of public health and preventive interests from medical education and practice. Society remains uncertain whether health care is a right or a privilege while accepting public responsibility for financing the health care of certain groups such as the indigent sick (Medicaid), the elderly (Medicare), Native Americans, or members of the armed forces and veterans. Rising expectations about better outcomes through advances in technology are accompanied by rising anxieties about cost, appropriateness of care, access, and quality. Physicians must alter their perception of health care by adopting a population-based approach to need, a commitment to restoring equity in staffing patterns and compensation between primary care and specialty care, and adoption of a social contract that provides for full access by all Americans to basic cost-effective preventive and clinical services before spending on less cost-effective services. PMID:8064752

Lawrence, R S

1994-01-01

260

Veterans Health Administration -- More Than Just Caring.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This program provides a fast-paced look at the provision of medical care to veterans through the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). It focuses on four important missions - medical care, medical research, medical education, and VA/DOD support. The prima...

1994-01-01

261

The Health of Children in Foster Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative study of school nurses describes what the nurses want to do for school children in foster care, what they are actually doing, and how the school organization affects the provision of care. The study looked at the nurses' practice through the lens of the Social Ecological Model of Health, identified interventions using the…

Schneiderman, Janet U.

2004-01-01

262

Plasma health care - AIMS, constraints, and progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health Care covers three areas of interest for cold atmospheric pressure plasmas: Cosmetics, Hygiene and Medicine. These areas can be subdivided into personal and professional care. In this review will concentrate on Hygiene and Medicine. In professional hygiene the most important plasma contribution is sterilization, decontamination and disinfection. The main aim is the prevention of diseases or their containment. Progress

G. E. Morfill; J. L. Zimmerman; S. Karrer

2010-01-01

263

Improving Health Care for Assisted Living Residents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore how medical care is delivered to older people in assisted living (AL) settings and to suggest ways for improving it. Design and Methods: We present a review of the limited research available on health care for older AL residents and on building testable models of better ways to organize primary…

Kane, Robert L.; Mach, John R., Jr.

2007-01-01

264

Model Child Care Health Policies. Fourth Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, this document compiles model health policies intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the document presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following areas: (1)…

Aronson, Susan S.

265

Mental health stigma and primary health care decisions.  

PubMed

People with serious mental illness have higher rates of mortality and morbidity due to physical illness. In part, this occurs because primary care and other health providers sometimes make decisions contrary to typical care standards. This might occur because providers endorse mental illness stigma, which seems inversely related to prior personal experience with mental illness and mental health care. In this study, 166 health care providers (42.2% primary care, 57.8% mental health practice) from the Veteran?s Affairs (VA) medical system completed measures of stigma characteristics, expected adherence, and subsequent health decisions (referral to a specialist and refill pain prescription) about a male patient with schizophrenia who was seeking help for low back pain due to arthritis. Research participants reported comfort with previous mental health interventions. Path analyses showed participants who endorsed stigmatizing characteristics of the patient were more likely to believe he would not adhere to treatment and hence, less likely to refer to a specialist or refill his prescription. Endorsement of stigmatizing characteristics was inversely related to comfort with one?s previous mental health care. Implications of these findings will inform a program meant to enhance VA provider attitudes about people with mental illness, as well as their health decisions. PMID:24774076

Corrigan, Patrick W; Mittal, Dinesh; Reaves, Christina M; Haynes, Tiffany F; Han, Xiaotong; Morris, Scott; Sullivan, Greer

2014-08-15

266

Smart Use of Volunteers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volunteers pose a special area of concern for child care centers. On one hand, they are indispensable as they donate countless hours of time, energy, and resources. On the other hand, there are challenges to coordinating the efforts of volunteering parents. The use of volunteers has incredible potential for benefit from the center, child, and…

Vissing, Yvonne

2008-01-01

267

Are health care professionals able to judge cancer patients' health care preferences correctly? A cross-sectional study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Health care for cancer patients is primarily shaped by health care professionals. This raises the question to what extent health care professionals are aware of patients' preferences, needs and values. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent there is concordance between patients' preferences in cancer care and patients' preferences as estimated by health care professionals.

Hester Wessels; Alexander de Graeff; Klaske Wynia; Miriam de Heus; Cas LJJ Kruitwagen; Saskia CCM Teunissen; Emile E Voest

2010-01-01

268

Health care expenditure and income in Europe.  

PubMed

In this work we have tried to analyse the variations in health care expenditure in all the countries of the European Community except Greece and Portugal. We have wanted to provide additional evidence on the empirical relationship between expenditure on health care and income. Our analysis, starting from the approach of Fuchs and Baumol, has been an extension of the traditional studies on health care international comparisons, in at least three directions: we have not imposed any restrictions on the price effects, we have analysed dynamic models instead of the cross-sectional analysis and we have used proper deflators. We have deflated health care expenditure in each country by means of its sectoral price index and by the purchasing parity power of its currency, to allow international comparisons. In the former case we express health care in terms of 'expenditure', in the latter we express health care in terms of 'weighted quantity'. Income elasticities, in the short and in the long-run, have been estimated using econometric methods that allow us to obtain simultaneously equilibrium long-run relationships, if any, and adjustment processes in the short-run. We have found cointegrating relationships and we have estimated consistent estimators of the elasticities. The estimated income elasticities are greater than one in all the models analysed. PMID:8261034

Murillo, C; Piatecki, C; Saez, M

1993-07-01

269

Personalized health care: from theory to practice.  

PubMed

The practice of medicine stands at the threshold of a transformation from its current focus on the treatment of disease events to an emphasis on enhancing health, preventing disease and personalizing care to meet each individual's specific health needs. Personalized health care is a new and strategic approach that is driven by personalized health planning empowered by personalized medicine tools, which are facilitated by advances in science and technology. These tools improve the capability to predict health risks, to determine and quantify the dynamics of disease development, and to target therapeutic approaches to the needs of the individual. Personalized health care can be implemented today using currently available technologies and know-how and thereby provide a market for the rational introduction of new personalized medicine tools. The need for early adoption of personalized health care stems from the necessity to reduce the egregious and wasteful burden of preventable chronic diseases, which is not effectively addressed by our current approach to care. PMID:22180345

Snyderman, Ralph

2012-08-01

270

States with more health care spending have better-quality health care: lessons about Medicare.  

PubMed

Based on broad measures of health system quality and performance, states with more total health spending per capita have better-quality care. This fact contrasts with a previous finding that states with higher Medicare spending per enrollee have poorer-quality care. However, quality results from the total funds available and not from Medicare or any single payer. Moreover, Medicare payments are disproportionately high in states that have a disproportionately large social burden and low health care spending overall. These and other vagaries of Medicare spending pose critical challenges to research that depends on Medicare spending to define regional variation in health care. PMID:19056754

Cooper, Richard A

2009-01-01

271

Pharmacy in the health care center: a model for health care delivery.  

PubMed

Health care consumers use a plethora of services which are accessible on an ambulatory basis. These include the services of pharmacists, optometrists, nurses, dentists, audiologists, orthotics, and so forth. Since many of these services are provided in physically and financially separate facilities and often are not located in close proximity to one another, consumers may spend a large amount of time traveling between locations. Economic inefficiencies due to the size and dispersion of separate and independent facilities may produce an increase in the cost of ambulatory health care services. Thus, the concept of a health care center, an ambulatory health care analog to the multispecialty shopping center, is proposed as a potential alternative and improvement in the delivery of these services. Space, location, personnel, and initial capital requirements for a model health care center are projected based on existing data for the establishment of each separate auxiliary health care facility. Projections are made to determine the appropriate and necessary site for the health care center's trade area. Potential revenues are calculated by examining some pharmacy operations which are beginning to pioneer these areas and utilizing revenue figures for the various individual services. The results indicate that the pharmacy, as a frequently visited health care facility, may be an excellent choice around which to develop the health care center concept in metropolitan areas. PMID:10256904

Stark, D C; Wertheimer, A I

1982-01-01

272

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health: Refugee Health Care  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These online course materials were generated from a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH) course on Refugee Health Care. The materials were put online as part of the JHSPH OpenCourseWare program which provides "free, searchable access to JHSPH's course materials for educators, students, and self-learners around the world." The Refugee Health Care course "addresses the provision of basic health requirements for refugees and the coordination of care among agencies concerned with them." Site visitors will find a selection of downloadable lecture notes on such topics as Hemorrhagic Fever Outbreak Investigation, Control of Communicable Diseases, Health and Human Rights Principles for Refugee Health, and more. The site also offers a downloadable Reading List, and case study materials.

273

Health care consumerism movement takes a step forward.  

PubMed

One of the contributing factors to both the increase in health care costs and the backlash to managed care was the lack of consumer awareness of the cost of health care service, the effect of health care costs on profits and wages, and the need to engage consumers more actively as consumers in health care decisions. This article reviews the birth of the health care consumerism movement and identifies gaps in health care consumerism today. The authors reveal some of the keys to building a sustainable health care consumerism framework, which involves enlisting consumers as well as other stakeholders. PMID:20608112

Thompson, Michael; Cutler, Charles M

2010-01-01

274

Health care coalitions: continuity and change.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study has been to investigate how coalitions have changed during 1983-1986, to describe the current characteristics of coalitions, and to speculate about their future roles and likely evolution. Several insights emerge from the empirical findings of this study. First, the number of operational health care coalitions has greatly expanded over the last several years to the point where almost every state and metropolitan area of the country has at least one. Second, the service area of most coalitions is generally county-wide, although there has been significant growth in the number of coalitions that serve states. Third, coalitions are expanding their membership composition and including not only business members but also hospitals, physicians, insurance companies, and labor organizations. Fourth, coalitions are becoming more financially secure; most have annual cash budgets, and most rely on dues. Fifth, coalitions are increasingly hiring and using paid professional staff. Last, coalitions are expanding their agendas beyond investigating direct health care costs to examine some of the underlying issues (such as hospital and medical professional liability issues, the financing of uncompensated care, and ethical issues) and are developing programs to address them. For the near future, the extension of recent trends suggests how coalitions will look and function. Further down the road, health care coalitions may evolve into health care public/private policy forums or associations of health benefits managers and/or associations for managed care purchasers. In conclusion, the trends we documented and the projections of the future of coalitions appear to be in keeping with the summary perspective of John T. Dunlop (1987) who indicates: Coalitions provide a continuing forum in which parties become more interested and informed about health care costs, utilization and the problems and operations of the other participants. The discourse encourages a more extensive and informed development and sharing of data. Coalitions reflect and need to recognize the inevitable internal conflicts and interests of the constituent organizations. While some coalitions tend to flounder on internal conflicts and capacity to generate effective leadership; many are fruitfully addressing the hard issues of health care in a community, such as managed care, capitation payments, excess beds and capital requirements, and access to health care by the uninsured. As coalitions mature, beyond discourse and data, they are likely to concentrate on a few of the distinctive problems of their communities and the interaction within the health care environment to address these problems. PMID:10304443

Mullner, R M; Young, G W; Andersen, R M

1988-01-01

275

e Health networking to cater to Rural Health Care and Health Care for the Aged  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with health care problems in India and the possible solutions from the information and communication technologies (ICT) point of view. It first presents the requirements of the rural population, the aged, the chronic patients, and the accident victims, and then brings out the appropriate ICT to tailor to the needs of healthcare as an integrated solution to

D. S. Venkateswarlu; K. S. Verma; K. S. R. Murthy

2007-01-01

276

Health care technology as a policy issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

he rapidly rising costs of health care became the most im- portant health policy issue in many countries during the 1980s and early 1990s. These costs are now threatening the prospects for providing higher quality services to broader population groups, especially in the United States. The reasons for rising costs clearly include the aging of the popula- tion, with associated

H. David Banta

1994-01-01

277

Planning health care on dairy farms  

Microsoft Academic Search

TWENTY-FIVE years ago, the gurus of the veterinary profession extolled the benefits of preventive medicine and the 'whole herd' approach to cattle health care. Although the message was slow to penetrate, their ideas and ideals are now being received and applied. In this article, Richard Sibley discusses some of the important considerations when formulating and applying a herd health plan

Richard Sibley

2000-01-01

278

Insurance and Innovation in Health Care Markets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Innovation policy often involves an uncomfortable trade-off between rewarding innovators sufficiently and providing the innovation at the lowest possible price. However, in health care markets with insurance for innovative goods, society may be able to ensure efficient rewards for inventors and the efficient dissemination of inventions. Health insurance resembles a two-part pricing contract in which a group of consumers pay

Darius Lakdawalla; Neeraj Sood

2005-01-01

279

Synthesis of Private Sector Health Care Initiatives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is part of the Private Sector Health Care Initiatives Project, sponsored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The project as a whole is designed to yie...

1984-01-01

280

Medicaid, the States and Health Care Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care reform in the US is relying extensively on Medicaid for achieving universal health coverage. This article addresses the question of whether Medicaid is an appropriate foundation for reducing the ranks of the uninsured, given its dependence on economic conditions and the vulnerability of state budgets, along with the ever-changing preferences of governors and legislators. This article assesses the

Laura Katz Olson

2012-01-01

281

Children and Federal Health Care Cuts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Children's Defense Fund report summarizes findings of a national survey, which indicate detrimental effects of Federal budget cuts in health care funds on economically disadvantaged mothers and children. Suggests that health funds for mothers and children are more important than defense expenditures and tax cuts for the non-needy. (MJL)

Freedomways, 1983

1983-01-01

282

Hispanic Health Care Survey of Southeastern Wisconsin.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of a study on the health care needs and utilization patterns of Hispanic (primarily Mexican American) families in southeastern Wisconsin are presented in this report. The methodology of the study, which included two surveys in a 9 county area, is described. Findings of the two studies, one focusing on health services utilization by…

Kvasnica, Barbara; And Others

283

Universal health care: the changing international discourse.  

PubMed

Nearly 34 years ago, in 1978 in the face of a looming crisis in the health of the world's populations and rising health inequality, 134 countries came together to sign the historic Alma Ata Declaration where the idea of primary health care as the chosen path to "Health for All" was formulated. However even before the declaration and more so since, countries have diverse interpretations of Universalism, each setting it in the context of its own health care model. These have ranged from the minimalist to the more comprehensive welfare state. Today, as health statistics reveal, the crisis has deepened, not only in the developing world but also in the developed world. It is important to debate the nature of the crisis and understand current policy initiatives and their ideological legitimations. The paper attempts to trace, clarify and account for the shifts in international discourse on universal health care (UHC). It argues that the idea of UHC is still with us, but there have occurred substantial shifts in discourse and meaning, shaped by changing international and national contexts and social forces impinging on health systems. The current concept of universal health coverage has only a notional allusion to universality of Alma Ata and disregards its fundamental principles. It concludes that the shifts are detrimental and its value in promoting health for all is likely to be severely limited. PMID:24351385

Bisht, Ramila

2013-01-01

284

Health Care Financing Study, South Carolina Health Service Area 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present health care system has evolved during a period of strong economic growth, low unemployment, businesses providing comprehensive first dollar group hospitalization plans for their employees, governmental grant programs, Medicare/Medicaid and rea...

1982-01-01

285

["Health is life": children's perceptions of health care].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of health among children in the care of child protective services in Haute-Savoie (France). A qualitative study was conducted to explore children's perceptions of health care. The study involved interviews with children and a quality of life questionnaire. The results show that many aspects of the quality of life of children in care are adversely affected, including energy, sleep, pain, and emotional responses. The children interviewed also identified two main issues in their life: their relationship with their family and their education. The results show that children in care tend to have a passive view of health, which appears to be related to a lack of self-confidence and to a lack of trust in relationships and institutions. The results highlight the impact of social factors on health inequalities and confirm the importance of social relationships, the sense of control over one's life, and the feeling of recognition. PMID:23472983

Robin, Pierrine

2012-01-01

286

Who pays for health care in Ghana?  

PubMed Central

Background Financial protection against the cost of unforeseen ill health has become a global concern as expressed in the 2005 World Health Assembly resolution (WHA58.33), which urges its member states to "plan the transition to universal coverage of their citizens". An important element of financial risk protection is to distribute health care financing fairly in relation to ability to pay. The distribution of health care financing burden across socio-economic groups has been estimated for European countries, the USA and Asia. Until recently there was no such analysis in Africa and this paper seeks to contribute to filling this gap. It presents the first comprehensive analysis of the distribution of health care financing in relation to ability to pay in Ghana. Methods Secondary data from the Ghana Living Standard Survey (GLSS) 2005/2006 were used. This was triangulated with data from the Ministry of Finance and other relevant sources, and further complemented with primary household data collected in six districts. We implored standard methodologies (including Kakwani index and test for dominance) for assessing progressivity in health care financing in this paper. Results Ghana's health care financing system is generally progressive. The progressivity of health financing is driven largely by the overall progressivity of taxes, which account for close to 50% of health care funding. The national health insurance (NHI) levy (part of VAT) is mildly progressive and formal sector NHI payroll deductions are also progressive. However, informal sector NHI contributions were found to be regressive. Out-of-pocket payments, which account for 45% of funding, are regressive form of health payment to households. Conclusion For Ghana to attain adequate financial risk protection and ultimately achieve universal coverage, it needs to extend pre-payment cover to all in the informal sector, possibly through funding their contributions entirely from tax, and address other issues affecting the expansion of the National Health Insurance. Furthermore, the pre-payment funding pool for health care needs to grow so budgetary allocation to the health sector can be enhanced.

2011-01-01

287

Children with Special Health Care Needs: How Immigrant Status is Related to Health Care Access, Health Care Utilization, and Health Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

To compare health care access, utilization, and perceived health status for children with SHCN in immigrant and nonimmigrant\\u000a families. This cross-sectional study used data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey to identify 1404 children\\u000a (ages 0–11) with a special health care need. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were used to examine relations between\\u000a immigrant status and health access, utilization,

Joyce R. Javier; Lynne C. Huffman; Fernando S. Mendoza; Paul H. Wise

2010-01-01

288

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

PubMed Central

Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries). The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security) framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-01

289

Inquiries into health care: learning or lynching?  

PubMed

There is a spectrum of reasons for inquiries into health care: learning, catharsis, reassurance, and accountability. The tension is immediately obvious. Is the primary purpose learning or lynching? We need to learn from major health inquiries. New Zealand needs a culture of inquiry that encourages health professionals to discuss their concerns. We need mechanisms that enable health professionals to share, learn, and implement changes for improvement. We need processes that support more informed scrutiny of health service quality by the public and media. There will continue to be a place for inquiries by the HDC and Coroners where external scrutiny is necessary. PMID:19098953

Paterson, Ron

2008-11-28

290

Fitch ratings. Health care special report.  

PubMed

Fitch Ratings continues to believe that the current and projected personnel shortages, especially among registered nurses (RNs). present one of the greatest operating challenges for health care providers nationwide. As noted in Fitch Research on "Health Care Staffing Shortage," dated June 21, 2001 (available on Fitch's web site at www.fitchratings. com), staffing is an area that is creating enormous expense inflation for health care providers and presenting one of the biggest areas of uncertainty in assessing an organization's credit quality. Shortages are becoming increasingly widespread, affecting health care providers in urban and rural areas regardless of size. Since health care is a labor intensive business, salary and benefit costs are key determinants of profitability. Fitch believes the attention given to the nursing shortage and potential looming crisis has created a sense of urgency, with many hospitals developing innovative strategies for work force development. In addition, federal, state, and local governments are creating programs and/or providing financial support to help alleviate shortages. Yet, the benefits of many of these initiatives may not be realized for many years, and Fitch expects health care providers to continue experiencing inflating salary and benefit expenses with growing temporary staffing usage and competitive pressure to increase overall compensation. Fitch believes managing labor costs is critical to achieving profitability, especially as the ability to increase revenue diminishes. Fitch believes the nursing shortage will continue to represent an area of extreme expense pressure for health care providers for years to come. Imbalanced supply and demand, which is expected to worsen as retiring nurses outstrip replacements, should create financial strain for many providers in an industry that is gearing up to meet the aging population's anticipated demand for more services. Fitch plans to closely monitor management strategies for dealing with vacancy and turnover rates, as well as trends in agency spending, to determine financial implications among its rated portfolio. PMID:14528733

2003-01-01

291

Health Care Policy and Medical Sociology  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Health policy concerns are important, but to some extent, understudied within medical sociology, ­particularly at the overall\\u000a broadest system level. Even in smaller studies that look at specific aspects of health care and health behavior issues, sociologists\\u000a have not paid much attention in the past few decades to drawing out the implications of the research being done for policy\\u000a questions

Jennie Jacobs Kronenfeld

292

The politics of health care reform.  

PubMed

Reform of the health care system is a complex process. Opinions vary as to the need for reform and the specific policy changes to be implemented. The Clinton administration has presented a proposal for health care policy reform, but alternative proposals have been recommended. A review of the legislative process indicates the many opportunities to amend or "kill" proposed health reform legislation. Given lack of success of the broad changes proposed in the Clinton plan, it is expected that incremental approaches will be more tried in the future. Active participation of neuroscience nurses in this process is strongly encouraged. The projected impact of health care reform on neuroscience nursing practice must be considered. PMID:7769327

Sklar, C J

1995-02-01

293

Virtual health care center in Georgia.  

PubMed

Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center". PMID:18673518

Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

2008-01-01

294

Community health workers and primary health care in Honduras.  

PubMed

Community participation and utilization of community health workers (CHWs) are essential components of the primary health care model. The success of CHWs is dependent on their training and subsequent community support. Community-prepared nurses are ideal CHW educators. A training program for CHWs was implemented in Honduras emphasizing the principles of adult learning and problem-based learning. Following a 4-month program of training a primary health care clinic was opened and managed by CHWs for a population over 10,000. Approximately 80% of local health problems were managed by the CHWs proving that well-trained CHWs can have a significant impact on the delivery of health care. PMID:8240881

Quillian, J P

1993-01-01

295

Primary care in Cuba: A public health approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cuba's primary health care model is presented. Unlike ambulatory care services, which are but one component of primary care, Cuba's model is a comprehensive public health approach that meets the World Health Organization's definition of primary care. The history of the development of Cuba's model is presented, including an update on the innovative neighborhood\\/home clinics. Achievements in health outcomes as

Karen A. Swanson; Janice M. Swanson; Ayesha E. Gill; Chris Walter

1995-01-01

296

Health Care for the International Student: Asia and the Pacific.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook consists of 24 papers addressing various aspects on health care and health care systems and services for foreign students from the Asia Pacific Region. The papers are: "Providing Health Care for International Students" (Donald F. B. Char); "Major Health Care Systems in Asia and the Pacific: Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong" (Julia…

Naughton, June C., Ed.; And Others

297

Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed.

Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

2013-01-01

298

Health Care Delivery in Athletics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A structural framework is provided for a responsive athletic injury control program, the Health Supervision Loop in Sport. The use of certified athletic trainers is recommended to lessen the risk of sport-related injuries. (FG)

Clarke, Kenneth S.

1982-01-01

299

[Health care reform as a development of the health care system].  

PubMed

The German health care system is undergoing a serious crisis. Current health care policies have been failing badly. The parties involved in the provision of health care are willing and able to conduct health reform. All healthcare workers expect to be included in the decision-making processes. They anticipate that their expertise and skills will be appreciated and employed to make improvements. Wise and thoughtful health policy decisions would focus on measures to support innovative practices within the existing system and strengthen current change processes. It is proposed that the reform be based on sustainable procedures. Change Management within the health care system should be guided by the principles of the Learning Organisation and the varied experience with sophisticated industrial management practices. Successful health systems development opens up new opportunities for social and economic growth. PMID:17902407

Huber, Ellis

2007-01-01

300

Leadership models in health care - a case for servant leadership.  

PubMed

Our current health care system is broken and unsustainable. Patients desire the highest quality care, and it needs to cost less. To regain public trust, the health care system must change and adapt to the current needs of patients. The diverse group of stakeholders in the health care system creates challenges for improving the value of care. Health care providers are in the best position to determine effective ways of improving the value of care. To create change, health care providers must learn how to effectively lead patients, those within health care organizations, and other stakeholders. This article presents servant leadership as the best model for health care organizations because it focuses on the strength of the team, developing trust and serving the needs of patients. As servant leaders, health care providers may be best equipped to make changes in the organization and in the provider-patient relationship to improve the value of care for patients. PMID:24486078

Trastek, Victor F; Hamilton, Neil W; Niles, Emily E

2014-03-01

301

Psychiatric and Medical Health Care Policies in Juvenile Detention Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study aims to examine the existing health care policies in U.S. juvenile detention centres. The results conclude that juvenile detention facilities have many shortfalls in providing care for adolescents, particularly mental health care.

Pajer, Kathleen A.; Kelleher, Kelly; Gupta, Ravindra A.; Rolls, Jennifer; Gardner, William

2007-01-01

302

Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities  

MedlinePLUS

... 2013 Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities On This Page Key findings Most residential ... National Survey of Residential Care Facilities Most residential care communities did not use electronic health records in ...

303

Plan for Home Health Care in the Bluegrass Region.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This plan for home health care in the Kentucky Bluegrass Region provides for medical care and supportive services to sick or disabled persons according to Kentucky State health care regulations and policies. Currently there are six home agencies operating...

1974-01-01

304

Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions  

MedlinePLUS

Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Caring for a Seriously or Chronically Ill ... role in managing their own care. Why Include Teens? Time flies. Before you know it, your 13- ...

305

Effects of a Brief Training Program for Lay Health Volunteers To Facilitate Smoking Cessation among African Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study evaluated training program to train lay health volunteers in facilitating smoking cession for a low-income, African American community. Program applied constructs of the Social Cognitive Theory, namely self-efficacy and outcome expectations relating to the processes of behavioral change. Results highlighted changes in knowledge, outcome…

Sullivan, Therese A.; Sharma, Manoj; Stacy, Richard

2002-01-01

306

States With More Health Care Spending Have Better-Quality Health Care: Lessons About Medicare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on broad measures of health system quality and performance, states with more total health spending per capita have better-quality care. This fact contrasts with a previous finding that states with higher Medicare spending per enrollee have poorer- quality care. However, quality results from the total funds available and not from Medicare or any single payer. Moreover, Medicare payments are

Richard A. Cooper

2009-01-01

307

Improving motivation among health care workers in private health care organizations : A perspective of nursing personnel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The study aims to explore the experiences of nursing personnel in private health care organizations in Lithuania, in terms of their work motivation and satisfaction, promotion and quitting the job, interpersonal interaction at work and to identify areas for sustainable improvement to the health care services they provide. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The research problem includes the following questions. What

Zydziunaite Vilma; Katiliute Egle

2007-01-01

308

Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

2008-01-01

309

Child Care Health Connections, 2001: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the six 2001 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, and resources for child care providers.…

Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.

2001-01-01

310

From needs to health care needs.  

PubMed

One generally considered plausible way to allocate resources in health care is according to people's needs. In this paper I focus on a somewhat overlooked issue, that is the conceptual structure of health care needs. It is argued that what conceptual understanding of needs one has is decisive in the assessment of what qualifies as a health care need and what does not. The aim for this paper is a clarification of the concept of health care need with a starting point in the general philosophical discussion about needs. I outline three approaches to the concept of need and argue that they all share the same conceptual underpinnings. The concept of need is then analyzed in terms of a subject x needing some object y in order to achieve some goal z. I then discuss the relevant features of the object y and the goal z which make a given need qualify as a health care need and not just a need for anything. PMID:23344674

Gustavsson, Erik

2014-03-01

311

Positive rights, negative rights and health care.  

PubMed

In the current debate about healthcare reform in the USA, advocates for government-ensured universal coverage assume that health care is a right. Although this position is politically popular, it is sometimes challenged by a restricted view of rights popular with libertarians and individualists. The restricted view of rights only accepts 'negative' rights as legitimate rights. Negative rights, the argument goes, place no obligations on you to provide goods to other people and thus respect your right to keep the fruits of your labour. A classic enumeration of negative rights includes life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Positive rights, by contrast, obligate you either to provide goods to others, or pay taxes that are used for redistributive purposes. Health care falls into the category of positive rights since its provision by the government requires taxation and therefore redistribution. Therefore, the libertarian or individualist might argue that health care cannot be a true right. This paper rejects the distinction between positive and negative rights. In fact, the protection of both positive and negative rights can place obligations on others. Furthermore, because of its role in helping protect equality of opportunity, health care can be tied to the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. There is, therefore, good reason to believe that health care is a human right and that universal access should be guaranteed. The practical application, by governments and non-governmental organisations, of several of the arguments presented in this paper is also discussed. PMID:20935318

Bradley, Andrew

2010-12-01

312

Just health care (I): Is beneficence enough?  

PubMed

Few in our society believe that access to health care should be determined primarily by ability to pay. We believe instead that society has an obligation to assure access to adequate health care for all. This is the view explicitly endorsed in the President's Commission Report Securing Access to Health Care. But there is an important moral ambiguity here, for this obligation may be construed as being either beneficence-based or justice-based. A beneficence-based construal would yield a much weaker obligation with respect to the distribution of health care. In the first section of this paper I argue that the President's Commission is committed only to this weaker construal of this obligation. In the second section I argue that such a beneficence-based obligation is really rooted in a libertarian conception of justice, similar to that recently articulated by Engelhardt, and that this conception is seriously flawed when it comes to effecting a just distribution of health care. PMID:2675374

Fleck, L M

1989-06-01

313

Volunteering as a community mental health educator: Positives and negatives for recovery Volunteering as a community mental health educator: Positives and negatives for recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract An advocacy role that is highly visible within the community is that of a consumer educator, when people with lived experience of mental illness use their personal experience to educate others in the community. This study investigated the positives and negatives for recovery of volunteering in an advocacy role as a consumer educator. A phenomenological qualitative research design was

Shelly Read; Debra J Rickwood

314

Haitian picuristes/injectionists as alternatives to conventional health care providers in South Florida.  

PubMed

Barriers in seeking access to conventional health care services continue to be a problem in the United States, especially among recent racial and ethnic immigrants who tend to be least able to afford adequate health insurance coverage. Ethnic immigrants sometimes seek out traditional healers as unconventional providers of health care services to overcome barriers in accessing the conventional health care delivery system. The purpose of this work is to provide insight into the practices of Picuristes or Haitian "lay injectionists" in their role as alternative, unconventional providers of health care services among Haitian immigrants in South Florida. Based on in-depth interviews with 10 picuristes who were identified through venue and snowball sampling and who volunteered to participate in a larger exploratory study that examined various aspects of picuriste practices, findings revealed benefits and risks of seeking health care services from these traditional practitioners. Among the benefits reported to their services were greater accessibility, affordability, convenience, and cultural compatibility. Risks observed from analysis of picuriste interviews included the lack of formal medical training for picuristes, their nonadherence to established standards for safe injections and their potential to expose clients and the community to contaminated needles, syringes, and other biohazardous waste materials. Insight was also gained into how picuristes learned to practice their trade and to incorporate Haitian cultural beliefs regarding the relationship between clients and healers. Given the continuation of barriers to health care among ethnic immigrants, implications for conventional heath care practice and social policy are also discussed. PMID:21932978

Rahill, Guitele J; Dawkins, Marvin P; De La Rosa, Mario

2011-01-01

315

Confronting AIDS. Directions for Public Health, Health Care, and Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is addressed to anyone involved with or affected by the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, including legislators, researchers, health care personnel, insurance providers, educators, health officials, executives in the pharmaceutical industry, blood bank administrators, and other concerned individuals. The following…

Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

316

Increasing psychology's role in health research and health care.  

PubMed

The reductionistic, exclusionary, and dualistic tenets of the biomedical model have profoundly affected U.S. health care and health research as well as psychology practice, psychological science, and graduate education in psychology. Although the biomedical model was a success story in many ways, by the end of the 20th century its limitations had become increasingly apparent. These limitations included the biomedical model's failure to adequately address the changing nature of disease facing the U.S. health care system, escalating health care costs, the role of behavior in health and illness, and patients' mental health concerns. Medicine's recent paradigm shift from the biomedical to the biopsychosocial model is occurring in U.S. health care, professional medical education, and health research, with significant implications for psychology. This paradigm shift provides psychology with both opportunities and challenges. Psychology must proactively and deliberately embrace the biopsychosocial model if it is to take full advantage of the opportunities this paradigm shift presents. The American Psychological Association can play an important leadership role in this effort. PMID:23895594

Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

2013-01-01

317

Health Literacy Implications for Health Care Reform: Workshop Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Prior to the workshop, panelists were provided with a commissioned paper prepared by the Center for Health Care Strategies, reviewing the provisions of the ACA as they relate to health literacy.1 To set the stage for the panel discussions the authors of t...

2011-01-01

318

Economic Effects of Health Care Reform on Virginia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study estimates the impact of the 2010 health care reform law (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act\\/Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act) on Virginia’s economy. Health care reform is a complex and multifaceted law that was enacted with the joint goals of improving health insurance coverage for U.S. residents, decreasing the costs of health care, and improving overall

Terance J. Rephann

2011-01-01

319

U.S. Health Care Policy and the Rising Uninsured  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lack of adequate health insurance affects one's ability to access care, which directly affects one's health. In the 21st century, there are 44 million people in the United States without health care insurance. The majority of people without health care insurance are working people under age 65, because most people over age 65 are retired and have health insurance

Thomas Falen

2005-01-01

320

Value-Driven Health Care: The purchaser perspective  

PubMed Central

Summary The four cornerstones of value-driven health care are health information technology standards, quality standards, price standards and incentives. Value-driven health care seeks to directly link quality health care to reimbursement. The four cornerstones of this movement are health information technology standards, quality standards, price standards and incentives. These standards and the how purchasers plan to implement them are summarized.

Carlos, Ruth C.

2008-01-01

321

Addressing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Systems Hospital Resources Long-Term Care Resources Primary Care Resources System Design Resources Prevention & Chronic Care Announcements Evidence-Based Decisionmaking Improving Primary Care Practice Resources Quality & Patient Safety Comprehensive Unit-based ...

322

Study Finds Personal Health Records Do Not Impact Hypertension Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Systems Hospital Resources Long-Term Care Resources Primary Care Resources System Design Resources Prevention & Chronic Care Announcements Evidence-Based Decisionmaking Improving Primary Care Practice Resources Quality & Patient Safety Comprehensive Unit-based ...

323

Health care reform and global budgeting.  

PubMed

Americans seem to have reached a consensus about the urgent need to devise a cost containment strategy that leaves intact a pluralistic health care system. One option is global budgeting--the imposition of a national health care budget with all-payer price controls. This article reviews the factual and legal bases for global budgeting and examines proposed mechanisms to cap expenditures or fix prices for all medical goods and services. Also discussed are the implications of financial restraints on a free market economy, the experiences of other countries attempting to control health care costs while providing universal coverage, the complications of global budgeting, and ways to safeguard medical excellence and innovation if global budgeting is adopted. PMID:10126799

Domolky, S

1993-01-01

324

ERP implementation in rural health care.  

PubMed

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems provide organizations with the opportunity to integrate individual, functionally-oriented information systems. Although much of the focus in the popular press has been placed on ERP systems in large for-profit organizations, small hospitals and clinics are candidates for ERP systems. Focusing information systems on critical success factors (CSFs) allows the organization to address a limited number of areas associated with performance. This limited number of factors can provide management with an insight into dimensions of information that must be addressed by a system. Focuses on CSFs for small health-care organizations. In addition, also considers factors critical to the implementation of health-care information systems. Presents two cases. The results indicate support for the continuing use of CSFs to help focus on the benefits of ERPs. Focusing on groups of tangible and intangible benefits can also assist the rural health-care organization in the use of ERPs. PMID:12211339

Trimmer, Kenneth J; Pumphrey, Lela D; Wiggins, Carla

2002-01-01

325

Power Rx for the health care industry  

SciTech Connect

While electricity has had a huge impact on the health care community through the development of highly sophisticated diagnostic tools and procedures, more mundane electro-technologies offer substantial opportunities as well. From innovative lighting techniques to energy management systems to new technologies for medical waste disposal, advanced electricity-based technologies can enhance health care services and help cut costs when facilities know where and how to apply them. Recognizing that few hospitals and clinics have the in-house expertise to fully exploit such opportunities, EPRI has launched an initiative to help utilities deliver the Institute's research results to this crucial customer segment. The resulting partnerships promise to be of mutual benefit to the utility and health care industries as they both move through a period of substantial change. 6 figs.

Lamarre, L.

1994-06-01

326

Transforming a health care information management system.  

PubMed

The article presents results from a survey of 98 top executives at Baylor Health Care System (BHCS), a large, multifunction health care organization in Dallas, Texas. The survey assessed the executives' perceptions of current BHCS quality practices using the first survey developed for the health care industry based on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) criteria. Findings regarding the quality of BHCS internal and external data and information include the need for a $50 million information system transformation to achieve seven critical success factors for all business units and improved internal and external data and information for the business process redesign and quality transformation. Results highlight the need for further research investigating the information and analysis MBNQA criteria. PMID:10174724

Prybutok, V R; Spink, A

1997-11-01

327

Health Care Costs Workshop Agenda  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

328

Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory  

SciTech Connect

Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

Al-Khatib, Issam A. [Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, P.O. Box 14, Birzeit, Ramallah, West Bank (Palestinian Territory, Occupied)], E-mail: ikhatib@birzeit.edu; Sato, Chikashi [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho (United States)

2009-08-15

329

Mapping the literature of health care chaplaincy  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study examined citation patterns and indexing coverage from 2008 to 2010 to determine (1) the core literature of health care chaplaincy and (2) the resources providing optimum coverage for the literature. Methods: Citations from three source journals (2008–2010 inclusive) were collected and analyzed according to the protocol created for the Mapping the Literature of Allied Health Professions Project. An analysis of indexing coverage by five databases was conducted. A secondary analysis of self-citations by source journals was also conducted. Results: The 3 source journals—Chaplaincy Today, the Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy, and the Journal of Pastoral Care and Counseling—ranked as the top 3 journals in Zone 1 and provided the highest number of most frequently cited articles for health care chaplaincy. Additional journals that appeared in this highly productive zone covered the disciplines of medicine, psychology, nursing, and religion, which were also represented in the Zones 2 and 3 journals. None of the databases provided complete coverage for the core journals; however, MEDLINE provided the most comprehensive coverage for journals in Zones 1 and 2, followed by Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and ATLA. Self-citations for the source journals ranged from 9% to 16%. Conclusions: Health care chaplaincy draws from a diverse body of inter-professional literature. Libraries wishing to provide access to journal literature to support health care chaplaincy at their institutions will be best able to do this by subscribing to databases and journals that cover medical, psychological, nursing, and religion- or spirituality-focused disciplines.

Johnson, Emily; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Tartaglia, Alexander; McDaniel, Jennifer

2013-01-01

330

45 CFR 162.404 - Compliance dates of the implementation of the standard unique health identifier for health care...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.404 Section...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.404 Compliance...standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Health...

2009-10-01

331

45 CFR 162.404 - Compliance dates of the implementation of the standard unique health identifier for health care...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...standard unique health identifier for health care providers. 162.404 Section...Standard Unique Health Identifier for Health Care Providers § 162.404 Compliance...standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Health...

2010-10-01

332

Software quality assessment for health care systems.  

PubMed

The problem of defining a quality model to be used in the evaluation of the software components of a Health Care System (HCS) is addressed. The model, based on the ISO/IEC 9126 standard, has been interpreted to fit the requirements of some classes of applications representative of Health Care Systems, on the basis of the experience gained both in the field of medical Informatics and assessment of software products. The values resulting from weighing the quality characteristics according to their criticality outline a set of quality profiles that can be used both for evaluation and certification. PMID:10179767

Braccini, G; Fabbrini, F; Fusani, M

1997-01-01

333

Megamarketing strategies for health care services.  

PubMed

Megamarketing, as coined by Kotler (1968), is a strategic way of thinking which takes an enlarged view of the skills and resources needed to enter and operate in obstructed or protected markets. The concept of megamarketing emphasizes the mastering and coordination of economic, psychological, political, and public relation skills and suggest that organizations can take a proactive stance in shaping macroenvironmental conditions. As health care delivery is characterized by a highly regulated environment, this marketing approach has definite applications for the health care marketer. PMID:10106844

Mobley, M F; Elkins, R L

1990-01-01

334

[The future of public health care hospitals].  

PubMed

The subvention from the government for public health care system hospitals will decrease in Finland 1993. This causes that in future hospitals will work more like private enterprises. Expenses have to be covered by incomes from sales of health care services. Hospitals have to be able to estimate the demand of their services and the situation caused by the competition. They have to be able to create new profile and also be able to market their services. The presupposition for all things mentioned above is the creativity of people working in different wards. Creativity helps to obtain the same or even better quality of services with smaller resources. PMID:8427951

Miettinen, M; Miettinen, S

1993-01-01

335

Across the health-social care divide: elderly people as active users of health care and social care.  

PubMed

Several ways in which elderly people may assume an active role when using welfare services are discussed here. Selected findings are presented from a study that explored the experience and behaviour of elderly people on discharge from inpatient care with regard to criteria indicating user influence or control (namely participation, representation, access, choice, information and redress). Data were collected via semistructured interviews with service users (n = 30) soon after their return home from hospital. A number of differences were revealed between health care and social care in relation to users being provided with opportunities to assume an active role and in being willing and able to assume an active role. These differences were manifest in elderly service users accessing services, seeking information, exercising choice and acting independently of service providers. It appeared paradoxical that contact points were more easily defined with regard to health care yet users were more likely to exercise choice and act independently in securing social care. It is suggested that social care needs and appropriate service delivery are more easily recognised than making the link between perceived health care needs and appropriate services. In addition, it appeared that informal and private providers are more widely available and accessible for social care. If comprehensive continuing care is to be provided, incorporating both health and social care elements, greater uniformity appears to be required across the welfare sector. Lessons for social care provision from the delivery of health care suggest the clear definition of contact points to facilitate service use. Making health care more accessible, however, does not appear to be easily attainable due to the monopoly provision of health care and the lack of direct purchasing power by potential users. PMID:11560726

Roberts, K

2001-03-01

336

Health care reform and equity: promise, pitfalls, and prescriptions.  

PubMed

The United States has made little progress during the past decade in addressing health care disparities. Recent health care reforms offer an historic opportunity to create a more equitable health care system. Key elements of health care reform relevant to promoting equity include access, support for primary care, enhanced health information technology, new payment models, a national quality strategy informed by research, and federal requirements for health care disparity monitoring. With effective implementation, improved alignment of resources with patient needs, and most importantly, revitalization of primary care, these reforms could measurably improve equity. PMID:21242565

Fiscella, Kevin

2011-01-01

337

[Evolution of primary health care in Spain].  

PubMed

Coinciding with the celebration of the 35th anniversary of the journal of nursing, invented in 1977, conducted a systematic review of all issues published (371) to identify items (222) and news (94) related to primary care health. Events are arranged temporarily and refer to accompanying the evolution of primary care model. The Analysis Shows the evolution of primary care, since its inception in 1978, has been reflected in the type of articles and the content of news published, be an excellent indicator of its development and contribution for the nurses. PMID:23390875

Martínez Riera, José Ramón

2012-12-01

338

Health care of homeless veterans  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important to understand the needs of those veterans who are homeless. We describe characteristics of homeless male veterans\\u000a and factors associated with needing VA benefits from a two-city, community survey of 531 homeless adults. Overall, 425 were\\u000a male, of whom 127 were veterans (29.9%). Significantly more veterans had a chronic medical condition and two or more mental\\u000a health

Thomas P. O’Toole; Alicia Conde-Martel; Jeanette L. Gibbon; Barbara H. Hanusa; Michael J. Fine

2003-01-01

339

Medicaid managed care and public health data.  

PubMed Central

In summary, there are a number of ways in which state public health data can be of value in the design of Medicaid managed care plans. At the level of the purchaser, such as a state Medicaid agency, public health data can assist in decision-making around pricing policy and can be useful in prioritizing interventions for those conditions that most severely affect the covered population. Quality assurance standards such as the HEDIS clinical performance measures can be used to define a baseline of prevention-oriented services or, by adding additional customized data points, to emphasize a particular service. From the standpoint of the managed care plan, public health data can be useful in understanding the needs of a community it serves or would like to serve and in estimating the prevalence of various conditions in that community that will influence the premium it will charge. Thus, there are multiple routes through which public health goals and priorities can be incorporated into managed care and can leverage the power of managed care to improve the public's health. Images p228-a

Rutherford, G W; Backer, H D

1999-01-01

340

Assessing and enhancing health care providers' response to domestic violence.  

PubMed

This study aimed to examine possible changes from 2008 to 2012 in the skills of health care staff in identifying and intervening in domestic violence (DV). A longitudinal descriptive study design with volunteer samples (baseline; n = 68, follow-up; n = 100) was used to acquire information regarding the present state and needs of the staff in practices related to DV. The results of the baseline survey were used as a basis for planning two interventions: staff training and drafting practical guidelines. Information was collected by questionnaires from nurses, physicians, and social workers and supplemented by responses from the interviews. The data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A chi-square test was used to test the statistical significance of the data sets. In addition, participants' quotes are used to describe specific phenomena or issues. The comparison showed that overall a small positive change had taken place between the study periods. However, the participants were aware of their own shortcomings in identifying and intervening in DV. Changes happen slowly, and administrative support is needed to sustain such changes. Therefore, this paper offers recommendations to improve health care providers' response to DV. Moreover, there is a great need for evaluating the training programme used. PMID:24864205

Leppäkoski, Tuija; Flinck, Aune; Paavilainen, Eija

2014-01-01

341

Assessing and Enhancing Health Care Providers' Response to Domestic Violence  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to examine possible changes from 2008 to 2012 in the skills of health care staff in identifying and intervening in domestic violence (DV). A longitudinal descriptive study design with volunteer samples (baseline; n = 68, follow-up; n = 100) was used to acquire information regarding the present state and needs of the staff in practices related to DV. The results of the baseline survey were used as a basis for planning two interventions: staff training and drafting practical guidelines. Information was collected by questionnaires from nurses, physicians, and social workers and supplemented by responses from the interviews. The data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A chi-square test was used to test the statistical significance of the data sets. In addition, participants' quotes are used to describe specific phenomena or issues. The comparison showed that overall a small positive change had taken place between the study periods. However, the participants were aware of their own shortcomings in identifying and intervening in DV. Changes happen slowly, and administrative support is needed to sustain such changes. Therefore, this paper offers recommendations to improve health care providers' response to DV. Moreover, there is a great need for evaluating the training programme used.

Leppakoski, Tuija; Paavilainen, Eija

2014-01-01

342

The Contribution of Health Services Research to Improved Dermatologic Care  

PubMed Central

To translate scientific discovery into improved health, we must study health care itself: ie, how people access health care, costs or other barriers to the provision of good care, and what happens to patients as a result of this care. Health services research (HSR) is the interdisciplinary field that studies health care and its effects. This paper reviews different types of HSR and highlights some dermatologic examples that have resulted in improved health care systems or have helped us understand access to existing systems. The paper also addresses some of the political and systematic challenges for health services research overall, and for individual investigators and program leaders.

Chren, Mary-Margaret

2011-01-01

343

Social Learning Theory and Behavioral Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health costs in the US have risen at astronomic rates, rising from 4.6% of the GNP in 1950 to 8.3% in 1975. Yet, despite the compounding costs of medical care, the health of the population has not improved significantly since 1950, when viewed from the standpoint of increased longevity or decrease in the incidence of the major causes of death

Kenton L. Burns

1979-01-01

344

[Health care structure legislation--reform of health insurance].  

PubMed

On January 1st, 1993, the German Health Care Structure Reform Act has come into effect. It will fundamentally change the system of health insurance as well as the health care system. By the reform act, new structural and controlling elements have been installed in all central branches of health care, and, at the same time, a new order for the competition between the sickness funds has been established. Far-reaching structural alterations affect the hospital sector, the drug market and the system of ambulatory care. In the hospital sector, there will be a change-over to a price system consisting of special payments, payment according to diagnostic-related groups, and differentiated per-diem rates. On the drug market there will be introduced, besides a drug budget for doctors, a positive list for pharmaceuticals which will be worked out jointly by representatives of the medical profession and the sickness funds. In the ambulatory sector, licensing restrictions for doctors intending to set up practice will be introduced and the importance of the general practitioner or family doctor will be enhanced. The Health Care Structure Reform Act provides for self-government of the sickness funds and the medical profession with a wide range of controlling and shaping instruments. It also places the Ministry of Health in a better position to take influence. After the expire of the budgeting phase, competitive elements resp. extended controlling measures in the contracts sector will become more and more important features of the health care system. It remains to be seen whether the new controlling instruments will suffice to cause the intended limitation of expenditure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8471809

Pick, P

1993-03-01

345

State health care reform: An analysis of strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States health care system faces significant challenges, particularly with problems of the uninsured and with the rising costs of care. These problems lead many to study and discuss strategies for reforming the health care system. Four different plans for ideal health care reform, set forth by notable scholars or organizations, are explained herein. Then, states within the United

Jennifer M Wrathall

2007-01-01

346

Health Care Reform: How Will It Impact You?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the impact of health care reform on child-care centers and child-care employees. Topics covered include requirements to provide health insurance for all employees; subsidies for businesses with fewer than 50 employees; subsidies for low income employees; family coverage; health are costs for 2 working parents; and costs to day-care

Lukaszewski, Thomas

1993-01-01

347

Intelligent Patient and Nurse Scheduling in Ambulatory Health Care Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ambulatory health care centers are the major arena for delivery of primary health care to patients. In contrast to hospital or urgent care scheduling systems, ambulatory health care centers offer different challenge for scheduling optimization. The aim is similar, i.e. to reduce the average waiting time and maintain high resource utilization, but the concept is different. In this paper we

G. Stiglic; P. Kokol

2005-01-01

348

Cancer care--A stress for health professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Literature related to health care professionals dealing with stress of cancer care is still in its infancy. The authors distinguish papers of general interest (the most frequent), papers identifying stressors, and papers about stress consequences. Most of them recognize death of the patients as a major stressor for health care professionals. There are also additional stressors specific to health care

Nicole Delvaux; Darius Razavi; Christine Farvacques

1988-01-01

349

Whither the state in Yugoslav health care?  

PubMed

As part of their broader sociopolitical system of self-managing socialism, the Yugoslavs have attempted to create a health care system which is simultaneously destaticized, depoliticized, decentralized, democratized and economically and socially efficient. This paper provides a description and evaluation of the evolving self-managed health sector in post-World War II Yugoslavia. I argue that, despite repeated institution restructuring and innovation and some noteworthy accomplishments, the Yugoslavs have fallen short of their health objectives. After presenting alternative explanations for these shortcomings, I propose that they can best be understood in terms of the contradictions the Yugoslavs have encountered in their efforts to simultaneously pursue destatization, depoliticization, decentralization, democratization and social and economic efficiency. I conclude with an ideologically unpopular proposal that some form of continuous and legitimate central state coordination may be necessary to resolve current critical problems in Yugoslav health care (e.g. persistent deficits in health financing, shortages of basic medical supplies, duplication of expensive medical technology, unemployed health workers despite unmet health needs, persistent health inequalities). PMID:4071110

Parmelee, D E

1985-01-01

350

ARTEMIS: a collaborative framework for health care.  

PubMed

Patient centered healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative process. This involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with diverse perspectives: primary care physicians, hospital administrators, labs, clinics, and insurance. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The use of multi-media collaboration technology can facilitate timely delivery of patient care and reduce cost at the same time. During the last five years, the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, recently renamed ARPA) developed a number of generic key subsystems of a comprehensive collaboration environment. These subsystems are intended to overcome the barriers that inhibit the collaborative process. Three subsystems developed under this program include: MONET (Meeting On the Net)--to provide consultation over a computer network, ISS (Information Sharing Server)--to provide access to multi-media information, and PCB (Project Coordination Board)--to better coordinate focussed activities. These systems have been integrated into an open environment to enable collaborative processes. This environment is being used to create a wide-area (geographically distributed) research testbed under DARPA sponsorship, ARTEMIS (Advance Research Testbed for Medical Informatics) to explore the collaborative health care processes. We believe this technology will play a key role in the current national thrust to reengineer the present health-care delivery system. PMID:8130536

Reddy, R; Jagannathan, V; Srinivas, K; Karinthi, R; Reddy, S M; Gollapudy, C; Friedman, S

1993-01-01

351

A telemedicine health care delivery system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Interactive Telemedicine Systems (ITS) system was specifically developed to address the ever widening gap between our medical care expertise and our medical care delivery system. The frustrating reality is that as our knowledge of how to diagnose and treat medical conditions has continued to advance, the system to deliver that care has remained in an embryonic stage. This has resulted in millions of people being denied their most basic health care needs. Telemedicine utilizes an interactive video system integrated with biomedical telemetry that allows a physician at a base station specialty medical complex or teaching hospital to examine and treat a patient at multiple satellite locations, such as rural hospitals, ambulatory health centers, correctional institutions, facilities caring for the elderly, community hospital emergency departments, or international health facilities. Based on the interactive nature of the system design, the consulting physician at the base station can do a complete history and physical examination, as if the patient at the satellite site was sitting in the physician's office. This system is described.

Sanders, Jay H.

1991-01-01

352

The VA Maryland Health Care System's telemental health program.  

PubMed

The VA Maryland Health Care System introduced videoconferencing technology to provide psychiatry, evidenced-based psychotherapy, case management, and patient education at rural clinics where it was difficult to recruit providers. Telemental health services enable rural clinics to offer additional services, such as case management and patient education. Services have been expanded to urban outpatient clinics where a limited number of mental health clinic hours are available. This technology expands the availability of mental health providers and services, allowing patients to receive services from providers located at distant medical centers. PMID:22662735

Koch, Edward F

2012-05-01

353

How Stigma Interferes with Mental Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many people who would benefit from mental health services opt not to pursue them or fail to fully participate once they have begun. One of the reasons for this disconnect is stigma; namely, to avoid the label of mental illness and the harm it brings, people decide not to seek or fully participate in care. Stigma yields 2 kinds of harm that may…

Corrigan, Patrick

2004-01-01

354

Health Care Assistant. Instructor [Guide.] Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This instructor's guide contains 65 lessons designed to aid teachers in presenting a course in basic nursing procedures for students studying for careers as health care assistants. Lesson plans consist of a scope, objectives, suggested supplementary teaching and learning items; references, an introduction, a lesson outline, handouts, evaluation…

Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

355

Public trust in Dutch health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the development of a valid and reliable instrument to measure different dimensions of public trust in health care in the Netherlands. This instrument is needed because the concept was not well developed, or operationalized in earlier research. The new instrument will be used in a research project to monitor trust and to predict behaviour of people such

G. F. M. Straten; R. D. Friele; P. P. Groenewegen

2002-01-01

356

General practitioners' perceptions of effective health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To explore general practitioners' perceptions of effective health care and its application in their own practice; to examine how these perceptions relate to assumptions about clinicians' values and behaviour implicit in the evidence based medicine approach. Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting Eight general practices in North Thames region that were part of the Medical Research Council

Zelda Tomlin; Charlotte Humphrey; Stephen Rogers

1999-01-01

357

Solar Energy for Health Care Institutions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Solar energy is discussed in a booklet designed to help health care administrators prepare to use solar energy to achieve savings and stabilize rising energy costs. Solar energy is suggested because the sun is the most abundant and inexhaustible source of...

R. D. Cummings

1976-01-01

358

Health Care Struggle between Young and Old.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses establishing relative priorities between health care needs of the young and the old. Argues that it is fair to limit assistance to those already old when there are genuine social needs for children. The elderly should lead the way in recognizing the importance of the needs of children. (SLD)

Callahan, Daniel

1991-01-01

359

Health care's most wired. A wired exchange.  

PubMed

There was a time when innovation in health care information technology meant being at the cutting edge of managerial systems. Hospitals made significant investments in financially oriented technology. In the past five years, the investment in clinical IT appears to have outstripped the investment in managerial systems, including enterprise resource planning aimed at improving the supply chain. PMID:15453607

Solovy, Alden

2004-08-01

360

Counseling and Mental Health Care in Palestine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors provide a brief overview of counseling and mental health care in Palestine, including their history and a summary of their current status. Finally, a discussion is presented of future trends in the development of the profession with regard to recent changes in the region.

Shawahin, Lamise; Ciftci, Ayse

2012-01-01

361

HEALTH CARE RESOURCE USE AND STROKE OUTCOME  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Background and Purpose: Outcome in patients hospitalized for acute stroke varies considerably be- tween populations. Within the framework of the GAIN International trial, a large multicenter trial of a neuroprotective agent (gavestinel, glycine antagonist), stroke outcome in relation to health care resource use has been compared in a large number of countries, allowing for differences in case mix. Methods:

Kjell Asplund; Sharron Ashburner; Kathy Cargill; Margaret Hux; Ken Lees

362

Health Care Communication with Low Literate Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Low literate patients face difficulties when they read health care information. The complex process of reading can be summarized in five steps: input, decoding, encoding, output, and feedback. Each occurs automatically for the fluent reader; the low literate reader might encounter stumbling blocks in one or more of the steps. Once the patient has…

McKeon, Christine A.

363

Health Care Assistant Core. Instructor Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the core curriculum for a basic high school course for health care assistants. It is designed as a 1-semester course of study, after which students can take a course in an emphasis area, such as veterinary, nursing, pharmacology, or physical therapy, in which they learn skills for specific entry-level jobs. The curriculum…

Feilner, Veronica; Robling, Jeannine

364

Life Contentment and Mental Health Care Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: It is now well documented that satisfaction with mental health services is influenced by a variety of other factors (e.g., race, diagnosis, functioning level). Because of a generally brighter outlook, this study examined whether care satisfaction is also influenced by contentment in housing, social relations, or existence in general.…

Prince, Jonathan D.

2005-01-01

365

Ownership Status and Home Health Care Performance  

PubMed Central

Few studies have analyzed for-profit and nonprofit differences in the home health care sector. Using data from the National Home and Hospice Care Survey, we found that patients in nonprofit agencies were more likely to be discharged within 30 days under Medicare cost-based payment compared to patients in for-profit agencies. However, this difference in length of enrollment did not translate into meaningful differences in discharge outcomes between nonprofit and for-profit patients, suggesting that – under a cost-based payment system – nonprofits may behave more efficiently relative to for-profits. These results highlight the importance of organizational and payment factors in the delivery of home health care services.

Grabowski, David C.; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Stevenson, David G.; Keating, Nancy L.

2009-01-01

366

Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization  

PubMed Central

Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs.

Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

2012-01-01

367

Centella asiatica Improves Physical Performance and Health-Related Quality of Life in Healthy Elderly Volunteer  

PubMed Central

Recently, oxidative stress has been reported to contribute an important role in the decline of physical function as age advances. Numerous antioxidants can improve both physical and psychological performances resulting in the increase of health-related quality of life (HQOL). Therefore, we hypothesized that Centella asiatica, a medicinal plant reputed for nerve tonic, strength improvement and antioxidant activity, could improve the physical performance and HQOL especially in the physical satisfaction aspect, of the healthy elderly volunteer. To test this hypothesis, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was performed. Eighty healthy elderly were randomly assigned to receive placebo or standardized extract of C. asiatica at doses of 250, 500 and 750?mg once daily for 90 days. The subjects were evaluated to establish baseline data of physical performance using 30-s chair stand test, hand grip test and 6-min walk test. The health-related quality of life was assessed using SF-36. These assessments were repeated every month throughout the 3-month experimental period using the aforementioned parameters. Moreover, 1 month after the cessation of C. asiatica treatment, all subjects were also evaluated using these parameters again. The results showed that after 2 months of treatment, C. asiatica at doses of 500 and 750?mg per day increased lower extremity strength assessed via the 30-s chair stand test. In addition, the higher doses of C. asiatica could improve the life satisfaction subscale within the physical function subscale. Therefore, the results from this study appear to support the traditional reputation of C. asiatica on strength improvement, especially in the lower extremities of the elderly. C. asiatica also possesses the potential to be a natural resource for vigor and strength increase, in healthy elderly persons. However, further research is essential.

Mato, Lugkana; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Tongun, Terdthai; Piyawatkul, Nawanant; Yimtae, Kwanchanok; Thanawirattananit, Panida; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

2011-01-01

368

Allied Health Technologies Multiskilled Patient Care Technician Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide explains the national health care skills standards and lists skill standards for health care technicians, especially in Michigan. The 10 sections of the guide cover the following: (1) introduction to the national health care skills strands; (2) allied health technologies multiskilled curriculum framework and program design…

Wiersema, Mary; Stacy, Carole Ann

369

Barriers to Health Care among the Elderly in Japan  

PubMed Central

Japan is undergoing a set of health care reforms aimed at cutting rising health care costs and increasing the efficiency of health care delivery. This empirical study used a large-scale community survey on 15,302 elderly people 65 years and older (56.0% women) conducted in seven municipalities in 2006, to reveal clear-cut evidence of barriers to necessary care. The reasons for not getting health care is attributed to health care cost for the elderly with lower income, while higher income counterparts reported being busy or having a condition not serious enough to seek care.

Murata, Chiyoe; Yamada, Tetsuji; Chen, Chia-Ching; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Hirai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Katsunori

2010-01-01

370

Women's Health and Women's Health Care: Recommendations of the 1996 AAN Expert Panel on Women's Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fundamental features of excellent women's health care are as follows: awareness of women's lives and diversity, comprehensive life-span care, a range of services and providers, and accessibility. Policy recommendations include not limiting health care benefits to employment, focus on prevention and promotion, and expansion of advanced practice…

Conway-Welch, Colleen; And Others

1997-01-01

371

Health Insurance, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes: A Model of Elderly Health Dynamics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prescription drug coverage creates a change in medical care consumption, beyond standard moral hazard, arising both from the differential cost-sharing and the relative effectiveness of different types of care. We model the dynamic supplemental health insurance decisions of Medicare beneficiaries, their medical care demand, and subsequent health

Yang, Zhou; Gilleskie, Donna B.; Norton, Edward C.

2009-01-01

372

Health Care for Micronesians and Constitutional Rights  

PubMed Central

Under the Compacts of Free Association (COFA), people from the Freely Associated States — the Republic of Palau (ROP), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), and the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) — have been migrating to the United States in increasing numbers. In 1996, Congress passed broad welfare reform (Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act) which limited certain federal benefits previously available to COFA migrants, including Medicaid benefits. Prior to July 2010, the State of Hawai‘i had continued to include COFA migrants under its state-funded Medicaid program. In the face of budget constraints, the State removed these people from its Medicaid rolls. A challenge on the legal basis of the denial of equal protection of the laws, ie, the Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, was successful in reinstating health care to the COFA migrants in December 2010. From the health worker's perspective, regardless of various social justice arguments that may have been marshaled in favor of delivering health care to the people, it was an appeal to the judicial system that succeeded. From the attorney's perspective, the legal victories are potentially limited to the four walls of the courtroom without community involvement and related social justice movements. Together, the authors propose that in order to better address the issue of health care access for Micronesian peoples, we must work together, as health and legal advocates, to define a more robust vision of both systems that includes reconciliation and community engagement.

Shek, Dina

2011-01-01

373

Cost-effectiveness analysis in health care.  

PubMed

With the skyrocketing costs of modern health care, many health policy planners turn to cost effective analysis (CEA) or cost benefit analysis (CBA) to get quantitative answers for appropriateness of health procedures. This article analyzes how well approaches like CEA or CBA handle the hidden ethical judgements for such problems as: alternative treatments for an identical goal, the most effective utilization of funds earmarked for a particular goal, empirical support for the adoption of previously underfunded medical programs, and exposing noncostworthy care. Areas of analysis that involve human capital methodologies, whereby human value is often defined by economic worth, was shown to discriminate against low wage earners. The quandary of how to determine the value of human life and health is an essential problem but is certainly not straight forward. A particular criticism of CEA where there exist ethical shortcomings is the analysis of health care for the elderly (e.g. the elderly have a worse expenditure of dollars for lifespan extension). If CEA or CBA is applied in an appropriate manner, CEA can encompass many of our democratic society's values, and therefore philosophers, historians, and students of the humanities are encouraged to provide input in this domain of analysts and economics. PMID:2501235

Emery, D D; Schneiderman, L J

1989-01-01

374

Justice, health care, and the elderly.  

PubMed

Concern over rising health costs in the United States has led to an intensifying policy debate over health care for the elderly and a rethinking of questions on intergenerational justice and the claims of the aged on social resources. Major contributions to this debate have been made by Daniel Callahan in his Setting Limits (Simon & Schuster; 1987) and by Norman Daniels in his Am I My Parents' Keeper? (Oxford University Press; 1988). Brock reviews Callahan's and Daniels' work, identifying the central focus of both as the age-group problem of resource allocation. He sees Callahan as calling upon a communitarian political philosophy and Daniels as arguing from a tradition of political liberalism. While disagreeing in part with both authors, Brock identifies compatible elements in their arguments that contribute significantly to the public debate over health care and the aged. PMID:11651943

Brock, Dan W

1989-01-01

375

Availability and accessibility of rural health care.  

PubMed

The 1980s saw a retrenchment of the ideology that government intervention could solve the problems of inadequate access to health services in rural areas. Increased emphasis was placed on an ideology that promoted deregulation and competitive market solutions. During the 1980s, the gap in the availability of physicians in metropolitan versus nonmetropolitan areas widened. Also during that time period, the gap between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan populations' utilization of physician services widened. In addition, many indicators of the health status of nonmetropolitan residents versus metropolitan residents worsened during the 1980s. As we enter the 1990s, concern about equitable access to needed health care services and for the vulnerability and fragility of rural health systems has resurfaced. A number of national policies and a research agenda to improve accessibility and availability of health services in rural areas are being considered. PMID:10107686

Hicks, L L

1990-10-01

376

Complementary and alternative medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals  

PubMed Central

Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts). Female gender (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.004), higher educational background (p < 0.001), higher annual household income (p = 0.001), private health insurance (p = 0.001) and non-Christian (p < 0.001) were factors associated with more likely CAM use. Multivariate analysis identified female gender (p < 0.001), non-Christian (p = 0.001) and private health insurance (p = 0.015) as independent predictors of CAM use. Most health care professionals thought they did not have adequate knowledge (58.8%) nor were up to date with the best evidence (79.2%) on CAM use in oncology. Health care professionals who used CAM were more likely to recommend it to patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of potential benefits and risks associated with these therapies.

2011-01-01

377

Primary health care in Senegal: lessons learned.  

PubMed

USAID began funding the Rural Health Delivery Services Project (RHDS) in Sine Saloum region (later divided into 2 regions--Kaolack and Fatick) of Senegal in 1977. Its aim was to improve the health of rural inhabitants and to set up a model health care delivery system. It specifically set out to increase agricultural output by reducing illness-related absence from work. USAID funds and local taxes paid for the construction of almost 400 village health huts, each staffed by a 1st aid worker and a traditional birth attendant. In 1982, 90% of villagers sought preventive and curative services from the health huts. In 1984, USAID extended funding to a 2nd phase of the RHDS II/Child Survival (CS) project which aimed to expand preventive health efforts and to introduce new preventive services targeting pregnant women and children. These services were immunizations, malaria control, oral rehydration therapy, and growth monitoring. Other objectives were to integrate these services and to institute program sustainability. Other agencies also were involved, such as UNICEF. RHDS II/CS successfully integrated several interventions at health hut and health post levels. An evaluation team found that the spirit of village-based primary health care made the RHDS system work. No follow-up survey to a 1982-83 baseline survey occurred, making it difficult for the team to determine whether RHDS II/CS achieved child survival goals. It recommended that teams have both expatriate and native representatives who are flexible and adaptable to local conditions and constraints and that agencies be pragmatic in their objectives and expectations about what evaluation teams can accomplish and provide advance documents to team members to allow them more of their often limited time in the country to do field work. The team called for donor agencies to cooperate on reporting requirements. It also suggested that new programs should be added to existing health systems and structures instead of forsaking previous successes. PMID:1458220

Hauck, F R; King, J; Vian, T

1992-01-01

378

Primary care in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Health care and health status in general practice ambulatory care centres.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To assess the health care and health status of patients attending primary care clinics in Bosnia and Herzegovina. DESIGN: Assisted administration patient survey. SETTING: Two ambulatory care clinics (ambulantas) in each of three cities in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Tuzla, Mostar, and Banja Luka. PARTICIPANTS: Patients attending the ambulantas during a 1-week period in March 1999; 885 answered questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Each patient listed demographic characteristics and answered questions on satisfaction with health care and with the physical and financial accessibility of health care services and medications. A validated health status questionnaire (EuroQoL), previously used in parts of the former Yugoslavia, was administered. RESULTS: Only 22% of patients were employed; 57% could not pay the nominal fee to see a physician; 71% walked to the clinic; mean distance from patients' homes to the clinics was 2.3 km; 63% could not get the medications prescribed (in 85% of cases because of cost, not availability); 80% to 90% of answers to satisfaction questions suggested high satisfaction with the care patients received from their doctors; 67% of the time patients were referred to a specialist by general practitioners; 33% had problems walking; 17% had problems with self-care; 36% had problems with usual daily activities; 72% had at least some pain or discomfort; and 62% described at least some anxiety or depression. The three cities showed significant differences; patients in Tuzla generally had lower health status and more problems with health care. CONCLUSION: Unemployment and financial considerations reduced health care access in Bosnia and Herzegovina. While only one third of patients had physical difficulties, two thirds had emotional problems or pain. Satisfaction with physicians' care was high.

Godwin, M.; Hodgetts, G.; Bardon, E.; Seguin, R.; Packer, D.; Geddes, J.

2001-01-01

379

Primary care as a platform for full continuum health care risk management.  

PubMed

Health care clinical and financial risk is a multivectored problem, requiring multivectored solutions that extend beyond primary care. Worksite clinics have emerged that leverage empowered primary care, but incorporate a range of tactics aimed at driving appropriate care and cost by disrupting health care's perverse incentives. This article describes some of those approaches and shows evidence of the performance that can result. PMID:24402068

Klepper, Brian

2013-01-01

380

National standard health care provider identifier--HCFA. Proposed rule.  

PubMed

This rule proposes a standard for a national health care provider identifier and requirements concerning its use by health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers. The health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers would use the identifier, among other uses, in connection with certain electronic transactions. The use of this identifier would improve the Medicare and Medicaid programs, and other Federal health programs and private health programs, and the effectiveness and efficiency of the health care industry in general, by simplifying the administration of the system and enabling the efficient electronic transmission of certain health information. It would implement some of the requirements of the Administrative Simplification subtitle of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. PMID:10179329

1998-05-01

381

Children with special health care needs: how immigrant status is related to health care access, health care utilization, and health status.  

PubMed

To compare health care access, utilization, and perceived health status for children with SHCN in immigrant and nonimmigrant families. This cross-sectional study used data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey to identify 1404 children (ages 0-11) with a special health care need. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were used to examine relations between immigrant status and health access, utilization, and health status variables. Compared to children with special health care needs (CSHCN) in nonimmigrant families, CSHCN in immigrant families are more likely to be uninsured (10.4 vs. 4.8%), lack a usual source of care (5.9 vs. 1.9%), report a delay in medical care (13.0 vs. 8.1%), and report no visit to the doctor in the past year (6.8 vs. 2.6%). They are less likely to report an emergency room visit in the past year (30.0 vs. 44.0%), yet more likely to report fair or poor perceived health status (33.0 vs. 16.0%). Multivariate analyses suggested that the bivariate findings for children with SHCN in immigrant families largely reflected differences in family socioeconomic status, parent's language, parental education, ethnicity, and children's insurance status. Limited resources, non-English language, and limited health-care use are some of the barriers to staying healthy for CSHCN in immigrant families. Public policies that improve access to existing insurance programs and provide culturally and linguistically appropriate care will likely decrease health and health care disparities for this population. PMID:19554437

Javier, Joyce R; Huffman, Lynne C; Mendoza, Fernando S; Wise, Paul H

2010-07-01

382

Digital health care: where health care, information technology, and the Internet converge.  

PubMed

The digital health care industry applies information technologies to facilitate communications, commerce, transactions, business problem solving, and enhanced decision making for one or more groups that supply, consume, or finance health care services and products. The variation among companies is significant, but each one attempts to leverage information technology to drive sustainable evolutionary change. In an overview of the industry, a framework is provided to understand the maze of business plans. PMID:11184348

Frank, S R; Williams, J R; Veiel, E L

2000-01-01

383

Family-Centered Care: Current Applications and Future Directions in Pediatric Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family-centered care (FCC) is a partnership approach to health care decision-making between the family and health care provider.\\u000a FCC is considered the standard of pediatric health care by many clinical practices, hospitals, and health care groups. Despite\\u000a widespread endorsement, FCC continues to be insufficiently implemented into clinical practice. In this paper we enumerate\\u000a the core principles of FCC in pediatric

Dennis Z. KuoAmy; Amy J. Houtrow; Polly Arango; Karen A. Kuhlthau; Jeffrey M. Simmons; John M. Neff

384

[Elderly care in the supplementary health system].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the assistance provided to the elderly by the supplementary health care system. Information was collected from interviews with managers of chronic diseases management programs and/or of specific programs in this area. Information was organized in cases and analyzed. Eleven companies operating private health plans in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo were investigated. A general care model for the elderly was defined for the analysis. This model consists in a proposal for a care and assistance system hierarchically organized according to the deterioration of the functional capacity of the elderly (levels of dependence). None of the six companies that had health plans for the elderly already implemented provided full assistance to all enrolled seniors. There are major differences in the stage of development of their programs. Four companies had already implemented plans and two companies had plans in development. Even with the teams of managers and professionals working on some level within the advocated model, none of these companies followed any logic of integrated care and monitoring in all stages of the ageing process in accordance with the degree of dependence of the associate. PMID:18813610

Veras, Renato Peixoto; Caldas, Célia Pereira; Araújo, Denizar Viana; Mendes, Rosana Kuschniere Walter

2008-01-01

385

Health Literacy: Critical Opportunities for Social Work Leadership in Health Care and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One-third of U. S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to…

Liechty, Janet M.

2011-01-01

386

Budget-makers and health care systems.  

PubMed

Health programs are shaped by the decisions made in budget processes, so how budget-makers view health programs is an important part of making health policy. Budgeting in any country involves its own policy community, with key players including budgeting professionals and political authorities. This article reviews the typical pressures on and attitudes of these actors when they address health policy choices. The worldview of budget professionals includes attitudes that are congenial to particular policy perspectives, such as the desire to select packages of programs that maximize population health. The pressures on political authorities, however, are very different: most importantly, public demand for health care services is stronger than for virtually any other government activity. The norms and procedures of budgeting also tend to discourage adoption of some of the more enthusiastically promoted health policy reforms. Therefore talk about rationalizing systems is not matched by action; and action is better explained by the need to minimize blame. The budget-maker's perspective provides insight about key controversies in healthcare policy such as decentralization, competition, health service systems as opposed to health insurance systems, and dedicated vs. general revenue finance. It also explains the frequency of various "gaming" behaviors. PMID:23958590

White, Joseph

2013-10-01

387

Teaching primary health care: a comprehensive approach.  

PubMed

The MEDEX Primary Health Care Series, an integrated training system for everyone in primary care (PHC), was published in 1983. It is now used in over 70 countries and has demonstrated its value in the developing world. The Series lays considerable emphasis on the crucial link between the performance of health workers and the management support with which they are provided. It was the result of 10 years of development and field testing. The Series is so widely employed because its development involved health centers and health workers associated in PHC programs in Guyana, Lesotho, Micronesia, Pakistan, and Thailand. It also addresses everyday problems and provides pragmatic solutions which PHC programs can apply. Attention is given to the development of skills in health workers, using a competency-based methodology, in contrast to the concentration on knowledge acquition found in more conventional training programs. Training activities are detailed for as little as 15 minutes at a time in courses lasting 6-15 months. Dialogic methods are used for the more peripheral workers who may not be literate. Management is given systematic, practical treatment. The Series advocates disease prevention and health promotion and helps to train health workers to diagnose an treat the most common clinical problems. It can be used to strengthen existing programs or to start new ones. It has a consistent formant, facilitating local adaption. Any part of the Series can be copied or reproduced for noncommercial purposes without persmission from the publisher. The Series is based on the realistic and pragmatic organization of health care delivery systems found in most countries and places great importance on the use of health center presonnel to orientate and link resources at the center to needs at the periphery. Nurses, the health center person at the middle level of the PHC, often fulfills the role of trainer and supervisor of the community health worker. The diagnostic, curative and community health skills in the Series are consistent with the expanding role of nursing in PHC. The Series is published in English but also available in a mini-edition in Spanish with increasing interest in a French translation. Various sections have been translated into 21 other languages. A newsletter and a network of series users (MEDINET) has been established. PMID:3252832

Smith, R A; Mehra, S; Devereaux, M O; Rich, J

1988-01-01

388

Adopted Children with Special Health Care Needs: Characteristics, Health, and Health Care by Adoption Type. ASPE Research Brief.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research brief presents information on adopted children with special health care needs, using data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN). The analysis takes advantage of questions in the NS-CSHCN tha...

2008-01-01

389

Health policies and the relationships between socioeconomic status, access to health care, and health  

PubMed Central

Health policies tend to focus on improving the access to health care of persons of low-socioeconomic status to improve their health. This commentary argues that health policies directly directed at health and socioeconomic status (and other components of individual welfare) will also be effective if one wants to improve the well-being of the poor.

2013-01-01

390

Health posts: providers of basic health care and family planning in the rural areas.  

PubMed

The integrated project was introduced in in Korea in 1977 to raise the family planning practice rate by integrating parasite control and nutrition programs with family planning and thereby help enhance the health and living standard of community residents. A new integrated approach was introduced in 1984 to provide health services including basic health care and preventive medication through primary health posts in remote rural areas. Several strategies were adopted including: strengthening the functions of the steering committees at various levels; consolidating cooperative relationships between the government and related organization; and conducting training and educational activities to generate positive participation of the community volunteers in the integrated program. Of 3483 eligible couples, 2446 (70.2%) practiced family planning in 1983. In May 1985, the rate increased to 75%. Of 10,381 persons examined, 813 persons (7.9%) suffered from parasite infection in 1983, but the rate decreased to 5.8% in May 1985. An effort to improve environmental sanitation resulted in housing improvement, latrine improvement, kitchen improvement, and piped water supply. Despite manpower shortage and financial difficulties, the 11 community health practitioners (CHPs) have been active in various project activities, including health education on nutrition improvement, maternal health service, child healt service, and medical treatment. To further expand and develop the project, more primary health posts now engage in activities such as providing IEC materials to publicize the function and role of the primary health posts, fully utilize village health workers to motivate community residents and secure basic facilities and medical supplies and provide necessary manpower. PMID:12313891

Yang, J M

1985-10-01

391

Health Care Costs in End-of-Life and Palliative Care: The Quest for Ethical Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health reform in the United States must address both access to medical services and universal insurance coverage, as well as health care cost containment. Uncontrolled health care costs will undermine improvements in access and coverage in the long-run, and will also be detrimental to other important social programs and goals. Accordingly, the authors offer an ethical perspective on health care

Bruce Jennings; Mary Beth Morrissey

2011-01-01

392

Reforming the Health Care System for Children and the Elderly to Balance Cure and Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues in balancing health services and costs in a changing society, where groups have differential access to health care, are discussed, including need for a universal health care system, growing cost of health care for the elderly, prolongation of life among older adults, and the claims of children on services. (MSE)

Callahan, Daniel

1992-01-01

393

Mapping the literature of health care management  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The research provides an overview of the health care management literature and the indexing coverage of core journal literature. Method: Citations from five source journals for the years 2002 through 2004 were studied using the protocols of the Mapping the Literature of Allied Health Project and Mapping the Literature of Nursing Project. The productivity of cited journals was analyzed by applying Bradford's Law of Scattering. Results: Journals were the most frequently cited format, followed by books. Only 3.2% of the cited journal titles from all 5 source journals generated two-thirds of the cited titles. When only the health care management practitioner–oriented source journals were considered, two-thirds of the output of cited journal titles came from 10.8% of the titles. Science Citation Index and PubMed provided the best overall coverage of the titles cited by all 5 source journals, while the cited titles from the 2 practitioner-oriented journals were covered most completely by Social Sciences Citation Index and Business Source Complete. Conclusions: Health care management is a multidisciplinary field. Librarians must consider the needs of their users and assist them by providing the necessary materials and combination of indexes to access this field adequately.

Taylor, Mary K.; Gebremichael, Meseret D.; Wagner, Catherine E.

2007-01-01

394

Sustainable medicines and global health care.  

PubMed

The global population has now exceeded 7 billion, and forests and other resources around the world are being irreversibly depleted for energy, food, shelter, material goods, and drugs to accommodate population needs. For most of the world's population, plants, based on many well-established systems of medicine, in either crude or extract form, represent the foundation of primary health care for the foreseeable future. Contemporary harvesting methods for medicinal plants are severely depleting these critical indigenous resources. However, maintaining and enhancing the availability of quality medicinal agents on a sustainable basis is an unappreciated public health care concept. To accomplish these goals for future health care, and restore the health of the Earth, a profound paradigm shift is necessary: ALL medicinal agents should be regarded as a sustainable commodity, irrespective of their source. Several approaches to enhancing the availability of safe and efficacious plant-based medicinal agents will be presented including integrated strategies to manifest the four pillars (information, botany, chemistry, and biology) for medicinal plant quality control. These integrated initiatives involve information systems, DNA barcoding, metabolomics, biotechnology, nanotechnology, in-field analysis of medicinal plants, and the application of new detection techniques for the development of medicinal plants with enhanced levels of safe and reproducible biological agents. PMID:21308611

Cordell, Geoffrey A

2011-07-01

395

Enabling innovation in health-care delivery.  

PubMed

Achieving lasting performance improvement in health care is a demanding challenge. Service delivery processes are frequently fragmented with many symptoms of poor behaviour observable. Competing vested interests within the National Health Service (NHS) and experiences of muddled and muddied top-down government exhortation suggest the need for a balanced perspective in which the expectations of patients, staff, management and government can be considered, agreed and enabled. Our conclusion is that effective innovation is best achieved by establishing a 'Train-Do-Train-Do' cycle in which all 'players' in the system must be actively involved. The particular methodology of 'managing by projects' for effective bottom-up step-by-step innovation in NHS practice is described. It takes a holistic and systematic view of health-care delivery as a service business process to be optimized via a five-step procedure. The core tool element of this methodology is the multidiscipline natural-group task force used to execute the change process in an enterprise. When properly constituted, motivated and driven, it is very capable of transforming a 'mess' into an effective health-care delivery process. PMID:18647942

Parnaby, John; Towill, Denis R

2008-08-01

396

[The scientific entertainer in primary health care].  

PubMed

The scientific method is capable of being applied in primary care. In this article we defend the role of the "scientific entertainer "as strategic and necessary in achieving this goal. The task has to include playful and light-hearted content. We explore some words in English that may help us to understand the concept of "scientific entertainer" from a semantic point of view (showman, master of ceremonies, entrepreneur, go-between) also in Spanish language (counsellor, mediator, methodologist) and finally in Latin and Greek (tripalium, negotium, chronos, kairos). We define the clinical, manager or research health-worker who is skilled in primary care as a "primarylogist". PMID:22018794

Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Santos, José Manuel; Lapetra, José

2012-09-01

397

Health in Day Care: A Manual for Health Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addressed especially to community pediatricians, but also useful to other health workers, this manual discusses aspects of day care that require a physician's attention. Chapter I historically traces the positive effect of a nurturing environment upon the development of the infant and child, covering the period from the early 1900s to the present.…

Deitch, Selma R., Ed.

398

Health Insurance Eligibility, Utilization of Medical Care, and Child Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors study the effect of public insurance for children on their utilization of medical care and health outcomes by exploiting recent expansions of the Medicaid program to low-income children. These expansions doubled the fraction of children eligible for Medicaid between 1984 and 1992. Take-up of these expansions was much less than full, however, even among otherwise uninsured children. Despite

Janet Currie; Jonathan Gruber

1996-01-01

399

Health related issues for individuals with special health care needs.  

PubMed

More than 50 million individuals in the United States with developmental disabilities, complex medical problems, significant physical limitations, and a vast array of other conditions considered under the rubric of "disabilities" live in our communities, many as a result of deinstitutionalization and mainstreaming. Children and adults with special health care needs have become a much more integral and visible component of everyday life. This process represents an ongoing change in perceptions about individuals with disabilities and subsequent reform of policies concerning the rights and the principles of care for people with special needs. The reform was built upon an increased role for the family and community health practitioners in providing needed care. PMID:19269390

Waldman, H Barry; Rader, Rick; Perlman, Steven P

2009-04-01

400

Associations and foundations in the field of health care and their role in the health system of Poland.  

PubMed

The article presents data on associations and foundations active in health care field in Poland, on the basis of a review of research done by Klon/Jawor Association and the Central Statistical Office. The article also applies to the issue of cooperation between NGOs and governmental adminstration in the health area and identifies lacking information that is necessary for better planning of national health policy. In Poland there are about three thousand associations and foundations whose main focus is the health care. In 2010, they accounted for about 7% of all non-governmental organizations. Results of representative nationwide surveys from 2008 and 2010 indicate that the NGO's active in the field of health care have, in most cases, legal form of associations. Almost half of the organizations declared national or international scope of action. Headquarters of most organizations were mainly in the cities, and only, one in twenty in the village. Most organizations were located in the mazowieckie province and a significant fraction of them was in Warsaw itself. Organizations were stood out by a relatively large number of personnel on the background of the entire NGO sector. Half of the organizations employed paid workers, the majority also collaborated with volunteers who were not members of the organization. More than a third of organizations dealt with the rehabilitation, therapy and long-term care, and about 1/3 dealt with prevention, health promotion and education, and blood donations. World Health Organization indicates the need for systematic collection of data about the role of the nongovernmental sector in health. In Poland, legal regulations require the public institutions and organizations to cooperate with NGOs to achieve health objectives. In spite of relevant data on NGOs in the field of health care in Poland, the necessary information to assess their potential are still lacking. Recognition of the capacity and limitations ofNGOs could enable better planning of national health policy. PMID:23745378

Piotrowicz, Maria; Cianciara, Dorota

2013-01-01

401

The Mexican-American in the Health Care System.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mexican Americans differ from Anglo Americans in their types of health problems, relation to the American health care system, and responses to health care. Mexican Americans tend to underutilize available health resources because of fear of discrimination, perception of health workers as government representatives, and language and cultural…

Stambler, Moses

402

Perspectives and concerns of clients at primary health care facilities involved in evaluation of a national mental health training programme for primary care in Kenya  

PubMed Central

Background A cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a national Kenyan mental health primary care training programme demonstrated a significant impact on the health, disability and quality of life of clients, despite a severe shortage of medicines in the clinics (Jenkins et al. Submitted 2012). As focus group methodology has been found to be a useful method of obtaining a detailed understanding of client and health worker perspectives within health systems (Sharfritz and Roberts. Health Transit Rev 4:81–85, 1994), the experiences of the participating clients were explored through qualitative focus group discussions in order to better understand the potential reasons for the improved outcomes in the intervention group. Methods Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 10 clients from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 clients from the control group where staff had not received the training during the earlier randomised controlled trial. Results These focus group discussions suggest that the clients in the intervention group noticed and appreciated enhanced communication, diagnostic and counselling skills in their respective health workers, whereas clients in the control group were aware of the lack of these skills. Confidentiality emerged from the discussions as a significant client concern in relation to the volunteer cadre of community health workers, whose only training comes from their respective primary care health workers. Conclusion Enhanced health worker skills conferred by the mental health training programme may be responsible for the significant improvement in outcomes for clients in the intervention clinics found in the randomised controlled trial, despite the general shortage of medicines and other health system weaknesses. These findings suggest that strengthening mental health training for primary care staff is worthwhile even where health systems are not strong and where the medicine supply cannot be guaranteed. Trial registration ISRCTN 53515024.

2013-01-01

403

[Information system in primary health care].  

PubMed

The Croatian Ministry of Health started a health care system computerization project aimed at strengthening the collaboration among health care institutions, expert groups and individual health care providers. A tender for informatic system for Primary Health Care (PHC) general practice, pediatrics and gynecology, a vital prerequisite for project realization, has now been closed. Some important reasons for undertaking the project include rationalization of drug utilization, savings through a reduced use of specialists, consultants and hospitalization, then achievement of better cooperation, work distribution, result linking, data quality improvement (by standardization), and ensuring proper information-based decision making. Keeping non-standardized and thus difficult to process data takes too much time of the PHC team time. Since, however, a vast amount of data are collected on only a few indicators, some important information may remain uncovered. Although decisions made by health authorities should rely on evidence and processed information, the authorities spend most of the time working with raw data from which their decisions ultimately derive. The Informatic Technology (IT) in PHC is expected to enable a different approach. PHC teams should be relieved from the tedious task of data gathering and the authorities enabled to work with the information rather than data. The Informatics Communication Technology (ICT) system consists of three parts: hardware (5000 personal computers for work over the Internet), operative system with basic software (editor, etc.), and PHC software for PHC teams. At the national level (National Public Health Informatics System), a software platform will be built for data collection, analysis and distribution. This data collection will be based on the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC-2) standard to ensure the utilization of medical records and quality assessment. The system permits bi-directional data exchange between a central database and sources at different levels, across the spectrum from basic PHC teams to local authorities. This will enable data collection control, comparisons with national averages and prompt distribution of information over the Internet. The investment into IT is a strategic imperative having no alternative. A cost/benefit analysis has shown its operation in the PHC system to return the investment in two years. As defined according to the Project priorities (with measurable objectives), the use of new technologies will be introduced by stages. PMID:16095193

Stevanovi?, Ranko; Stani?, Arsen; Varga, Sinisa

2005-01-01

404

The Interlinkages between Primary Health Care and Adult Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Illustrates the three central tenets of primary health care (equality, systemic dynamics, and self-reliance) and highlights points of similarity with adult education. Demonstrates adult education's role in promoting health care: information, mobilization, and integration. (SK)

Tandon, Rajesh

1982-01-01

405

Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care  

MedlinePLUS

... 40 years, community health centers (CHCs) have provided primary care and behavioral and mental health services in medically ... 72%) and PAs (72%) served as the patient's primary care provider more frequently than NPs (58%). Table 1. ...

406

Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services  

MedlinePLUS

... 2014 Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services On This Page Key findings Married men ... other not-married men to have had a health care visit in the past 12 months. Figure 1. ...

407

Health Care Reform: Out Greatest Opportunity...Ever!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses inevitability of health care reform in United States, considers the reform process itself, and explains the plan of the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform. Also considers the prospects for Congressional response to reform proposals. (NB)

Keigher, Sharon M.

1993-01-01

408

Health Care Workers Wash Hands More When Patients Watching  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Health Care Workers Wash Hands More When Patients Watching Canadian ... hospital, keep an eye out for hygiene practices: Health care workers are more likely to wash their hands ...

409

Hurricane-Related Information for Health Care Professionals  

MedlinePLUS

... Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Winter Weather Safety Information for Health Care Professionals Language: English Español (Spanish) If youâ??re a health care professional helping at an emergency site, hereâ??s information ...

410

38 CFR 17.901 - Provision of health care.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Health Care Benefits for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered...through the Department of Veterans Affairs. However, the health care benefits...

2013-07-01

411

Different Setting, Different Care: Integrating Prevention and Clinical Care in School-Based Health Centers  

PubMed Central

School-based health centers (SBHCs) are widely credited with increasing students’ access to care by making health services affordable and convenient. SBHCs can also provide a qualitatively different type of health care for children and adolescents than that delivered by community providers. Health services offered in a school setting can integrate clinical care with public health interventions and environmental change strategies. This ability to reach outside the walls of the exam room makes SBHCs uniquely positioned to address the multiple determinants of health. We describe innovative California SBHC programs focusing on obesity prevention, asthma, mental health, and oral health that represent new models of health care for children and adolescents.

Chin, Teresa; Blackburn, Samantha; Echeverria, Cecilia

2010-01-01

412

New developments in a consolidating health care industry.  

PubMed

The current health care industry has recently seen a great deal of consolidation in the form of mergers and acquisitions. These mergers and acquisitions invariably result in a loss of jobs. This paper focuses on two strategies that health care companies use to reduce workforce under these circumstances. Specifically, the paper will focus on the mergers between SmithKline Beckman and Beecham plc in the late 1980s, FHP Health Care and TakeCare Health Plans, and PacifiCare's recent acquisition of FHP Health-care. It will compare and contrast theory, strategy and practices of these six companies as they endeavoured to merge or acquire each other. PMID:10346310

Taylor, D; Kleiner, B H

1998-01-01

413

Literacy and learning in health care.  

PubMed

The relationship between literacy and health outcomes are well documented in adult medicine, yet specific causal pathways are not entirely clear. Despite an incomplete understanding of the problem, numerous interventions have already been implemented with variable success. Many of those who proposed earlier strategies assumed the problem to originate from reading difficulties only. Given the timely need for more effective interventions, it is of increasing importance to reconsider the meaning of health literacy to advance our conceptual understanding of the problem and how best to respond. One potentially effective approach might involve recognizing the known associations between a larger set of cognitive and psychosocial abilities with functional literacy skills. Here we review the current health literacy definition and literature and draw on relevant research from the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology. In this framework, a research agenda is proposed that considers an individual's "health-learning capacity," which refers to the broad constellation of cognitive and psychosocial skills from which patients or family members must draw to effectively promote, protect, and manage their own or a child's health. This new, related concept will lead, ideally, to more effective ways of thinking about health literacy interventions, including the design of health-education materials, instructional strategies, and the delivery of health care services to support patients and families across the life span. PMID:19861481

Wolf, Michael S; Wilson, Elizabeth A H; Rapp, David N; Waite, Katherine R; Bocchini, Mary V; Davis, Terry C; Rudd, Rima E

2009-11-01

414

Effective access to health care in Mexico  

PubMed Central

Background Effective access measures are intended to reflect progress toward universal health coverage. This study proposes an operative approach to measuring effective access: in addition to the lack of financial protection, the willingness to make out-of-pocket payments for health care signifies a lack of effective access to pre-paid services. Methods Using data from a nationally representative health survey in Mexico, effective access at the individual level was determined by combining financial protection and effective utilization of pre-paid health services as required. The measure of effective access was estimated overall, by sex, by socioeconomic level, and by federal state for 2006 and 2012. Results In 2012, 48.49% of the Mexican population had no effective access to health services. Though this represents an improvement since 2006, when 65.9% lacked effective access, it still constitutes a major challenge for the health system. Effective access in Mexico presents significant heterogeneity in terms of federal state and socioeconomic level. Conclusions Measuring effective access will contribute to better target strategies toward universal health coverage. The analysis presented here highlights a need to improve quality, availability, and opportuneness (location and time) of health services provision in Mexico.

2014-01-01

415

Guide to Your Health Care: After Heart Transplantation  

MedlinePLUS

... 66 Routine Health Care Heart Handbook Your Local Primary Care Physician (PCP) Your local physician may be an ... protocols and treatments to prevent infection. Call your primary care physician and/or eye doctor if you have ...

416

Women's health care in China: American travelers' views.  

PubMed

Chinese health care was examined by three American nurses who visited China between 1986 and 1988. A thorough discussion of women's health care as it was presented to the authors is provided. Each author found the experience invaluable to her understanding of the world and the vast differences, as well as commonalities, between health care in the United States and health care in China. PMID:2298690

Gay, J T; Flowers, J S; Tu, K S

1990-01-01

417

[Health care based on patients' needs].  

PubMed

Survival is not enough. We need to build a health system starting from patients' needs without wasting the resources of our grandchildren and great-grandchildren. We have to switch from curative to preventive medicine by firing managers who think they can resolve all problems by cutting expenditures. We need to educate a new cadre of managers able to govern by centering the system on the patients. Managers should consider health care as an asset and should reinforce clinical research. Such a program has been recently adopted in France. PMID:19048556

De Santo, N G; Gesualdo, L; Procaccini, D A; Bellinghieri, G; Perna, A; Savica, V; Santoro, D; Cirillo, M

2008-01-01

418

Child Care Health Connections, 1999: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the six 1999 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

1999-01-01

419

Child Care Health Connections, 2000: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is comprised of the six 2000 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

2000-01-01

420

A Buddhist model for health care reform.  

PubMed

Although medical services are now available in every province in Thailand, there is ongoing discussion surrounding the question of how public health care should be best organized. There is much debate as to whether it should be run by private organizations in libertarian societies like that of the United States or whether it is the government that should be responsible for the welfare of all of its citizens equally, similar to that of the egalitarian system of socialist countries and welfare states. This article is aimed to answer the question: What is the most suitable model of health care system for Thailand? References are drawn from the Pali canon of the Theravada Buddhist tradition, articles, comments, and recommendations of contemporary thinkers in Thailand, to arrive at the most appropriate solution for the Thai society. PMID:18041445

Bhikkhu, Mettanando

2007-10-01

421

Health Care Expenditures Among Asian American Subgroups  

PubMed Central

Using two nationally representative data sets, this study examined health care expenditure disparities between Caucasians and different Asian American subgroups. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that Asian Americans, as a group, have significantly lower total expenditures compared with Caucasians. Results also point to considerable heterogeneities in health care spending within Asian American subgroups. Findings suggest that language assistance programs would be effective in reducing disparities among Caucasians and Asian American subgroups with the exception of Indians and Filipinos, who tend to be more proficient in English. Results also indicate that citizenship and nativity were major factors associated with expenditure disparities. Socioeconomic status, however, could not explain expenditure disparities. Results also show that Asian Americans have lower physician and pharmaceutical costs but not emergency department or hospital expenditures. These findings suggest the need for culturally competent policies specific to Asian American subgroups and the necessity to encourage cost-effective treatments among Asian Americans.

Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Ortega, Alexander N.

2014-01-01

422

Discussing Health Care Costs with Patients  

PubMed Central

Escalating health care costs are affecting patients across the country. As employers and insurance companies face higher expenses, they may move to a cost-sharing strategy, which potentially increases financial burdens on patients. In this situation, physicians may find themselves serving as both medical and financial advisors for their patients. Clinical encounters in which patients experience financial hardship can be awkward and frustrating for both parties. Physicians must learn to discuss issues of affordability in a manner that builds, rather than detracts, from a therapeutic alliance. This article describes our experiences using several communication skills that can help in the discussion of health care costs with patients. The primary skill, empathic communication, which includes “we” statements and “I wish …” statements, serves to create a platform for shared decision-making, negotiation, and a search for alternatives. In addition, it is helpful if physician offices have resource materials available and strategies identified to assist patients facing financial hardship.

Hardee, James T; Platt, Frederic W; Kasper, Ilene K

2005-01-01

423

Medicine, morality and health care social media  

PubMed Central

Social media includes many different forms of technology including online forums, blogs, microblogs (i.e. Twitter), wikipedias, video blogs, social networks and podcasting. The use of social media has grown exponentially and time spent on social media sites now represents one in five minutes spent online. Concomitant with this online growth, there has been an inverse trajectory in direct face-to-face patient-provider moments, which continue to become scarcer across the spectrum of health care. In contrast to standard forms of engagement and education, social media has advantages to include profound reach, immediate availability, an archived presence and broad accessibility. Our opportunity as health care providers to partner with our patients has never been greater, yet all too often we allow risk averse fears to limit our ability to truly leverage our good content effectively to the online community. This risk averse behavior truly limits our capacity to effectively engage our patients where they are -- online.

2012-01-01

424

Do governance choices matter in health care networks?: an exploratory configuration study of health care networks  

PubMed Central

Background Health care networks are widely used and accepted as an organizational form that enables integrated care as well as dealing with complex matters in health care. However, research on the governance of health care networks lags behind. The research aim of our study is to explore the type and importance of governance structure and governance mechanisms for network effectiveness. Methods The study has a multiple case study design and covers 22 health care networks. Using a configuration view, combinations of network governance and other network characteristics were studied on the level of the network. Based on interview and questionnaire data, network characteristics were identified and patterns in the data looked for. Results Neither a dominant (or optimal) governance structure or mechanism nor a perfect fit among governance and other characteristics were revealed, but a number of characteristics that need further study might be related to effective networks such as the role of governmental agencies, legitimacy, and relational, hierarchical, and contractual governance mechanisms as complementary factors. Conclusions Although the results emphasize the situational character of network governance and effectiveness, they give practitioners in the health care sector indications of which factors might be more or less crucial for network effectiveness.

2013-01-01

425

The outcomes of health care process in Iran's rural society  

PubMed Central

Background: Health care systems in rural areas face numerous challenges in meeting the community's needs and adequate attention has not been paid to this problem. The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes of health care process in rural society. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six participants including twenty-one rural health care providers and five clients were selected according to purposive sampling. The data were collected via semi-structured individual interviews and a mini focus group. Data were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis based on methods described by Granheme and Landman. Results: Data analysis eventually led to formation of one category of inefficiency in health care process in rural society including subcategories such as arbitrary self-therapy, slow care process, dissatisfaction with the care process, superficial caring, job stress and burn out of caregivers, and ineffective caring relationship. Conclusion: Outcomes in health care in rural society of Iran represents inefficiency of the current health care process. These outcomes are related to the cultural and social context of rural communities and the structure of the health system. These outcomes in health care in the rural society of Iran represent impairment of the current health care process. The necessity of modifying the existing care trend with new models designed to improve the health care process is felt.

Eskandari, Manije; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Borhani, Fariba

2013-01-01

426

Health Care Reform — A Historic Moment in US Social Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed into law the first U.S. comprehensive health care reform bill, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). After almost a century of failed attempts, the U.S. now has a national health care system which promises to increase access to care, increase consumer choice, and ban insurance discrimination for individuals with preexisting medical

Lawrence O. Gostin; Elenora E. Connors

2010-01-01

427

Health Care Reform: Why? What? When?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dissatisfaction with the U.S. health care system is widespread, but no consen- sus has emerged as to how to reform it. The principal methods of finance—employer-based insurance, means-tested insurance, and Medicare—are deeply and irreparably flawed. Policymakers confront two fundamental questions: Should reform be incremental or com- prehensive? And should priority be given to reforming the financing system or to improving

Victor R. Fuchs; Ezekiel J. Emanuel

2005-01-01

428

Consumer channeling in health care: (im) possible?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In several countries major health care reforms have been implemented in the last decades.\\u000aMost of these reforms focused on a shift from supply-side regulation to a more\\u000ademand-side oriented system. Managed competition can be seen as a blue print for\\u000athe reforms in several European countries including the Netherlands, Germany and\\u000aSwitzerland (Enthoven and van de Ven 2007, van

L. H. H. M. Boonen

2009-01-01

429

Managing the myths of health care.  

PubMed

Myths impede the effective management of health care, for example that the system is failing (indeed, that is a system), and can be fixed by detached social engineering and heroic leadership, or treating it more like a business. This field needs to reframe its management, as distributed beyond the "top"; its strategy as venturing, not planning; its organizing as collaboration beyond control, and especially itself, as a system beyond its parts. PMID:23342753

Mintzberg, Henry

2012-01-01

430

The value marketing chain in health care.  

PubMed

In health care, Michael Porter's value chain can be reconceptualized as a "Value Marketing Chain," in which value is reinforced during each step of the customer recruitment and retention process. "Value" is a concept that must jointly be defined by buyer and seller as they interact every step of the way during the process. This requires the establishment of end-to-end mechanisms for soliciting feedback from customers. PMID:10351394

MacStravic, S

1999-01-01

431

Health care for homeless veterans. Final rule.  

PubMed

This final rule establishes regulations for contracting with community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The HCHV program assists certain homeless veterans in obtaining treatment from non-VA community-based providers. The final rule formalizes VA's policies and procedures in connection with this program and clarifies that veterans with substance use disorders may qualify for the program. PMID:21894657

2011-08-23

432

Can big business save health care?  

PubMed

Corporate America has decided to stop bellyaching about the cost and quality of the health care it helps buy for its employees. Now it's taking concrete action. Large employers such as Wal-Mart, Oracle, Cisco, BP America and many, many others are pressuring providers to meet performance standards, adopt information technology and transform the efficiency of their operations. Big Business wants value for its buck, and it's now putting money where its mouth is. PMID:17302135

Dunn, Philip

2007-01-01

433

TexiCare: an innovative embedded device for pressure ulcer prevention. Preliminary results with a paraplegic volunteer.  

PubMed

This paper introduces the recently developed TexiCare device that aims at preventing pressure ulcers for people with spinal cord injury. This embedded device is aimed to be mounted on the user wheelchair. Its sensor is 100% textile and allows the measurement of pressures at the interface between the cushion and the buttocks. It is comfortable, washable and low cost. It is connected to a cigarette-box sized unit that (i) measures the pressures in real time, (ii) estimates the risk for internal over-strains, and (iii) alerts the wheelchair user whenever necessary. The alert method has been defined as a result of a utility/usability/acceptability study conducted with representative end users. It is based on a tactile-visual feedback (via a watch or a smartphone for example): the tactile modality is used to discreetly alarm the person while the visual modality conveys an informative message. In order to evaluate the usability of the TexiCare device, a paraplegic volunteer equipped his wheelchair at home during a six months period. Interestingly, the first results revealed bad habits such as an inadequate posture when watching TV, rare relief maneuvers, and the occurrence of abnormal high pressures. PMID:23791763

Chenu, Olivier; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bucki, Marek; Diot, Bruno; Cannard, Francis; Payan, Yohan

2013-08-01

434

Can private health care exchanges improve the U.S. health care system?  

PubMed

There are already a number of firms entering the active employee exchange marketplace, and the trend will continue as more employers show interest in this model. Private health exchanges will be a permanent and significant avenue for health care benefits delivery because they are dynamic, powerful and necessary for employers aiming to achieve lower, predictable health care costs. The emergence of efficient and effective health exchanges, combined with a responsibility to provide affordable health coverage, presents an opportunity for employers to take advantage of new options available to help manage costs and improve the health of their population in a way that leads to a workforce that is healthy, present and productive. PMID:24730096

Provancal, Tina

2013-01-01

435

Viral Hepatitis Transmission in Ambulatory Health Care Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the United States, transmission of viral hepatitis from health care-related exposures is uncommon and primarily recognized in the context of outbreaks. Transmission is typically associated with unsafe injection practices, as exemplified by several recent outbreaks that occurred in ambulatory health care settings. To prevent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, health care workers must adhere to standard precautions and follow fundamental

I. T. Williams; J. F. Perz; B. P. Bell

2004-01-01

436

Managing Health Care Organizations: Where Professionalism Meets Complexity Science (Articles)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the intersection of professionalism and complexity science as a source of new insights for improving the health care industry from both a clinical and business point of view. Viewing health care organizations as professional complex adaptive systems suggests eight leadership tasks for addressing the circumstances that engulf health care. Managers who adopt this view will be able

Ruth A. Anderson; Reuben R. Jr

437

A political paradigm for the health care administrator.  

PubMed

It is crucial that health care administrators develop political clout if they wish to influence health care regulation. Health care professionals must learn to represent provider and patient interests effectively in order to have impact on regulation-making bodies. PMID:7429821

Heatwole, K B; Breindel, C L

1980-01-01

438

REGIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH CARE SPENDING IN SWITZERLAND: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we attempt to explain variations across the Swiss regional states (cantons) in public health care expenditures. The large autonomy of the cantons in the organization and financing of health care services creates strong heterogeneity. Per capita public expenditures in health care are assumed to depend on the median voter income, the median tax share, intergovernmental grants, and

MASSIMO FILIPPINI

439

Children Can't Wait for Health Care Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is widespread agreement that the American health care system needs comprehensive reform. This kind of reform will take time, however, and millions of Americans have urgent health care needs that must be met now. This is especially true for the nation's poor children, for whom the health care \\

Communications Specialist James O. Safford III

1993-01-01

440

Children Can't Wait for Health Care Reform  

Microsoft Academic Search

:There is widespread agreement that the American health care system needs comprehensive reform. This kind of reform will take time, however, and millions of Americans have urgent health care needs that must be met now. This is especially true for the nation's poor children, for whom the health care \\

Frances J. Dunston; James O. Safford III

1993-01-01

441

Has the health care debate gotten out of hand?  

PubMed

Has the struggle between private providers and the government over the control of health care services gotten out of hand? Robert Derzon, former director of the Health Care Financing Administration, thinks that both sides have lost their perspective on the issues and need to regain a sense of balance and recognition of each other's rightful role in the health care delivery system. PMID:10242673

Grayson, M A

1979-07-01

442

Gobi versus PHC? Some dangers of selective primary health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article enters the debate concerning comprehensive versus selective primary health care by focusing on UNICEF's 'child survival revolution'. It is argued that UNICEF is dangerously mistaken in believing that its present emphasis on selective primary health care is a precursor or 'leading edge' of comprehensive primary health care. The approach of UNICEF--diffusion of a package of technologies by campaigns

Ben Wisner

1988-01-01

443

The Soaring Cost of Health Care. 1984 National Issues Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Appropriate for secondary school social studies, this booklet covers the causes, problems, and possible solutions for the high cost of American health care. The topic is discussed in five sections. The first section, "The $350 Billion Health Care Bill," discusses how the nation's priority on health care has led to the emergence of medicine as…

Melville, Keith, Ed.

444

7 CFR 15b.38 - Health care facilities.  

...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Health care facilities. 15b.38 Section 15b...Benefits, or Services § 15b.38 Health care facilities. (a) Communications...the purpose of providing emergency health care. (c) Drug and alcohol addicts....

2014-01-01

445

Children and Managed Health Care. Analysis and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the changes managed health care has brought to the delivery and use of medical services and recommends specific steps that will make the existing system more responsive to the needs of children. Systemwide health care reforms must give children stable medical care that emphasizes preventive health and developmental services. (SLD)

Deal, Lisa W.; Shiono, Patricia H.; Behrman, Richard E.

1998-01-01

446

The future of prison health care: a critical analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999, in response to the ongoing controversy surrounding prison health care, the Home Office and the NHS Executive published The Future Organization of Prison Health Care. This article, building on interviews and field notes from research conducted in the health care centres of three local prisons, analyses and critiques the document's premises, and argues that, until the formal and

Joe Sim

2002-01-01

447

Teaching Conflict Management Skills to the Health Care Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The health care organization, as a specialized organizational setting, has some characteristics that make it of special concern to the conflict theorist. In a health care setting, conflict may arise as a result of (1) the complexity of medicine and the bureaucracy of health care delivery, (2) the problems of acquiring relevant information from…

Wilcox, James R.; And Others

448

Patient Satisfaction in Public Outpatient Health Care Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is part of earlier research work conducted in the health care services sector. The customer relationship management concept has encouraged the adoption of a marketing culture not only in the private sector, but in public health care sector as well. In this paper the authors have analysed the factors affecting patient satisfaction in public health care outpatient services.

Hardip Chahal; R. D. Sharma; Mahesh Gupta

2004-01-01

449

Health Care Research That Delivers: Introduction to the Special Issue on Cognitive Factors in Health Care  

PubMed Central

Research that addresses human factors issues in health care has made good progress since the landmark 1999 Institute of Medicine report on medical error (Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 1999), yet patient safety remains a persistent challenge for the health care system. While this challenge reflects many factors, we focus on the need for research that is sufficiently comprehensive to identify threats to patient safety, yet specific enough to explain how provider and patient factors interact with task and health context to egender these threats. Such research should be theory-based, yet also problem-driven; exert experimental control over theoretically relevant variables, yet also involve participants, tasks, and contexts that represent the problems of interest. A tension exists between theory-based, experimentally controlled research on the one hand, and problem-driven research with representative situations on the other. The studies in this special issue are both informed by theory and guided by application, reflecting what Stokes (1997) referred to as “use-inspired basic research.” Collectively, these studies represent progress toward improving patient safety and the quality of health care. However, important work remains to be done to significantly improve health care by more comprehensively managing tensions between theory and application and different research methodologies. We discuss barriers to accomplishing such research in general (the challenge of testing theory in situ in rich environments), and specifically in the health care domain. Significant progress will require research programs that thoughtfully manage mixed methods across a series of converging studies.

Morrow, Daniel G.; Durso, Francis T.

2012-01-01

450

Social Networks in Improvement of Health Care  

PubMed Central

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the “nodes” of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens’ associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally.

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

451

Complementary and alternative health care in Israel  

PubMed Central

The paper explores the patterns of coexistence of alternative/complementary health care (CAM) and conventional medicine in Israel in the cultural, political, and social contexts of the society. The data are drawn from over ten years of sociological research on CAM in Israel, which included observation, survey research, and over one hundred in-depth interviews with a variety of CAM practitioners - many with bio-medical credentials - and with policy makers in the major medical institutions. The analysis considers the reasons for CAM use, number of practitioners, the frequency of CAM use and some of its correlates, and how CAM is regulated. The structure of the relationship between the conventional health care system and CAM is discussed in the public sector, which provides two-thirds of CAM services, and in the private sector, which provides about one-third. The history of the development of these structures and some of the dilemmas of their operation are discussed. A number of policy issues are considered against this background: regulation and licensing, CAM in primary care, reimbursement for CAM treatment, and the inclusion of CAM in education and training for the health professions.

2012-01-01

452

[Ethnography of health care after hospital discharge].  

PubMed

This paper presents an analysis of how Clifford Geertz' anthropological approach contributes to studies and investigations on health care. Geertz' approach relies basically on a semiotic conception of culture adopting thick description as the axis for interpretive elaborations and defending cultural interpretation as a science allowing to understand processes and to construct knowledge. We will present an overview of some constitutive elements of that author's thoughts we consider relevant for understanding the human experience of dealing with the disease/health process. The challenging question is how families deal with the need to provide care to a diseased relative after hospital discharge. We use this issue as an excuse for expounding this theoretical approach, interweaving the two areas. The micro-focus is the kind of healthcare that takes place outside the cultural environment where the technical forms of care based on scientific knowledge occur. We will briefly discuss how this question becomes evident in an object of study, and how it can be investigated according to the ethnography proposed by Geertz (op. cit.), allowing, in the end, for some considerations that further contribute to the construction of knowledge in public health. PMID:19039391

de Castro, Edna Aparecida Barbosa; de Camargo Junior, Kenneth Rochel

2008-12-01

453

A new model for health care delivery  

PubMed Central

Background The health care delivery system in the United States is facing cost and quality pressures that will require fundamental changes to remain viable. The optimal structures of the relationships between the hospital, medical school, and physicians have not been determined but are likely to have a large impact on the future of healthcare delivery. Because it is generally agreed that academic medical centers will play a role in the sustainability of this future system, a fundamental understanding of the relative contributions of the stakeholders is important as well as creativity in developing novel strategies to achieve a shared vision. Discussion Core competencies of each of the stakeholders (the hospital, the medical school and the physicians) must complement the others and should act synergistically. At the same time, the stakeholders should determine the common core values and should be able to make a meaningful contribution to the delivery of health care. Summary Health care needs to achieve higher quality and lower cost. Therefore, in order for physicians, medical schools, and hospitals to serve the needs of society in a gratifying way, there will need to be change. There needs to be more scientific and social advances. It is obvious that there is a real and urgent need for relationship building among the professionals whose duty it is to provide these services.

Kepros, John P; Opreanu, Razvan C

2009-01-01

454

Complementary and alternative health care in Israel.  

PubMed

The paper explores the patterns of coexistence of alternative/complementary health care (CAM) and conventional medicine in Israel in the cultural, political, and social contexts of the society. The data are drawn from over ten years of sociological research on CAM in Israel, which included observation, survey research, and over one hundred in-depth interviews with a variety of CAM practitioners - many with bio-medical credentials - and with policy makers in the major medical institutions. The analysis considers the reasons for CAM use, number of practitioners, the frequency of CAM use and some of its correlates, and how CAM is regulated. The structure of the relationship between the conventional health care system and CAM is discussed in the public sector, which provides two-thirds of CAM services, and in the private sector, which provides about one-third. The history of the development of these structures and some of the dilemmas of their operation are discussed. A number of policy issues are considered against this background: regulation and licensing, CAM in primary care, reimbursement for CAM treatment, and the inclusion of CAM in education and training for the health professions. PMID:22913721

Shuval, Judith T; Averbuch, Emma

2012-01-01

455

Total Quality Management in Health Care - A Study on TQM Implementation and its Application to the Army Health Care System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Total Quality Management (TQM) is the new management philosophy of the Army health care system. TQM consists of principles and tools which can be applied in this health care setting. TQM represents a tremendous departure from the previous traditional mana...

T. H. Auer

1993-01-01

456

The Emerging Role of Health Care Supervisors in Assisted Living  

PubMed Central

Historically, the assisted living (AL) industry has promoted a social, non-medical model of care. Rising health acuity of residents within AL, however, has brought about the need for providing increased health care services. This article examines the key staff role related to health care provision and oversight in AL, described as the health care supervisor. It briefly describes individuals in this role (N = 90) and presents their perspectives regarding their roles and responsibilities as the health care point person within this non-medical environment. Qualitative analyses identified four themes as integral to this position: administrative functions, supervision of care staff, provision of clinical and direct care, and clinical care coordination and communication. The article concludes with recommendations for AL organizations and practice of the emerging health care supervisor role in AL.

Harris-Wallace, Brandy; Schumacher, John G.; Perez, Rosa; Eckert, J. Kevin; Doyle, Patrick J.; Beeber, Anna Song; Zimmerman, Sheryl

2013-01-01

457

Health literacy: a challenge for American patients and their health care providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Health literacy skills are increasingly important for both health and health care. Unfortunately, many patients with the most extensive and complicated health care problems are at greatest risk for misunderstanding their diagnoses, medica- tions and instructions on how to take care of their medical problems. Much health promotion and patient education information has traditionally used printed materials written at

RUTH PARKER

2000-01-01

458

National Health Statistics Reports ... No. 38. Home Health Care and Discharged Hospice Care Patients: United States, 2000 and 2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents national estimates on home health care patients and discharged hospice care patients. Information on characteristics, length of service, medical diagnoses, functional limitations, service use, advance care planning, and emergent and h...

A. Moss C. Caffrey L. Harris-Kojetin M. Sengupta R. Valverde

2011-01-01

459

Health Care Professionals Devise Ways to Get Around Using Electronic Health Record Systems  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Systems Hospital Resources Long-Term Care Resources Primary Care Resources System Design Resources Prevention & Chronic Care Announcements Evidence-Based Decisionmaking Improving Primary Care Practice Resources Quality & Patient Safety Comprehensive Unit-based ...

460

Oversight of Private Health Insurance Submissions to the HealthCare.Gov Plan Finder.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The health care reforms enacted in 2010 seek to increase informed consumer choice by improving Americans access to information about available health insurance options.1 Section 1103 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires the Secretary of Health and Hu...

2013-01-01

461

Coping Among Parents of Children With Special Health Care Needs With and Without a Health Care Home  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionHaving a health care home has been shown to be associated with positive health outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN), but its relationship to parental coping has not been established. The purpose of this study was to explore the health care home as a process of care related to parental coping with day-to-day demands of raising a

Angela Drummond; Wendy S. Looman; Abby Phillips