Sample records for health coaching home

  1. Effect of a health coaching self-management program for older adults with multimorbidity in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Chang, HeeKyung

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Although a growing number of older people are suffering from multimorbidity, most of the health problems related to multimorbidity can be improved by self-management. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a health coaching self-management program for older adults with multimorbidity in nursing homes. Methods Older adults with multimorbidity from one nursing home in Korea were randomly allocated to either an intervention group (n=22) or conventional group (n=21). Participants in the intervention group met face to face with the researchers twice a week for 8 weeks, during which time the researchers engaged them in goal setting and goal performance using the strategies in the health coaching self-management program. Regular care was provided to the other participants in the conventional group. Results Participants in the intervention group had significantly better outcomes in exercise behaviors (P=0.015), cognitive symptom management (P=0.004), mental stress management/relaxation (P=0.023), self-rated health (P=0.002), reduced illness intrusiveness (P<0.001), depression (P<0.001), and social/role activities limitations (P<0.001). In addition, there was a significant time-by-group interaction in self-efficacy (P=0.036). According to the goal attainment scales, their individual goals of oral health and stress reduction were achieved. Conclusion The health coaching self-management program was successfully implemented in older adults with multimorbidity in a nursing home. Further research is needed to develop and evaluate the long-term effects of an intervention to enhance adherence to self-management and quality of life for older adults with multimorbidity. PMID:25045253

  2. A Socialization Intervention in Remote Health Coaching for Older Adults in the Home*

    PubMed Central

    Jimison, Holly B.; Klein, Krystal A.; Marcoe, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that social ties enhance both physical and mental health, and that social isolation has been linked to increased cognitive decline. As part of our cognitive training platform, we created a socialization intervention to address these issues. The intervention is designed to improve social contact time of older adults with remote family members and friends using a variety of technologies, including Web cameras, Skype software, email and phone. We used usability testing, surveys, interviews and system usage monitoring to develop design guidance for socialization protocols that were appropriate for older adults living independently in their homes. Our early results with this intervention show increased number of social contacts, total communication time (we measure email, phone, and Skype usage) and significant participant satisfaction with the intervention. PMID:24111362

  3. Health Coaching Available Starting November 20th

    E-print Network

    Marsh, David

    Health Coaching Available Starting November 20th ! If you've completed your health survey and printed your report, which explains what you are doing well and what you can do better, health coaches are now available. . Our health coaches can work with you to help you take your health to the next level

  4. Complexity and Health Coaching: Synergies in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gail J.; Wong, Winnie; Rush, Danica

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in this paper addresses the complexities and ambiguities for persons living with chronic illness in order to provide person-centered care and support that are unique and responsive to the context of persons' lives. Informed by complexity thinking and relational inquiry, the RN health coach is an emergent innovation of creative action with community and groups that support persons as they shape their health and patterns of living. PMID:24102025

  5. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  6. Health coaching can make a difference in your life.

    E-print Network

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    Health coaching can make a difference in your life. If you have a long-term health condition:30 am­11:00 pm ET Saturday 9:00 am­2:00 pm ET July 2013 #12;Healthy Insights if you have a long-term, are pregnant, or if you just want to take better care of your health, nurse coaches and health coaches

  7. Group health coaching: strengths, challenges, and next steps.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Colin; Wolever, Ruth Q; Manning, Linda; Elam, Roy; Moore, Margaret; Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Duskey, Heidi; Anderson, Chelsea; Curtis, Rebecca L; Masemer, Susan; Lawson, Karen

    2013-05-01

    There is great need for cost effective approaches to increase patient engagement and improve health and well-being. Health and wellness coaching has recently demonstrated great promise, but the majority of studies to date have focused on individual coaching (ie, one coach with one client). Newer initiatives are bringing a group coaching model from corporate leadership development and educational settings into the healthcare arena. A group approach potentially increases cost-effective access to a larger number of clients and brings the possible additional benefit of group support. This article highlights some of the group coaching approaches currently being conducted across the United States. The group coaching interventions included in this overview are offered by a variety of academic and private sector institutions, use both telephonic and in-person coaching, and are facilitated by professionally trained health and wellness coaches as well as trained peer coaches. Strengths and challenges experienced in these efforts are summarized, as are recommendations to address those challenges. A working definition of "Group Health and Wellness Coaching" is proposed, and important next steps for research and for the training of group coaches are presented. PMID:24416678

  8. Group Health Coaching: Strengths, Challenges, and Next Steps

    PubMed Central

    Wolever, Ruth Q.; Manning, Linda; Elam, Roy; Moore, Margaret; Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Duskey, Heidi; Anderson, Chelsea; Curtis, Rebecca L.; Masemer, Susan; Lawson, Karen

    2013-01-01

    There is great need for cost effective approaches to increase patient engagement and improve health and well-being. Health and wellness coaching has recently demonstrated great promise, but the majority of studies to date have focused on individual coaching (ie, one coach with one client). Newer initiatives are bringing a group coaching model from corporate leadership development and educational settings into the healthcare arena. A group approach potentially increases cost-effective access to a larger number of clients and brings the possible additional benefit of group support. This article highlights some of the group coaching approaches currently being conducted across the United States. The group coaching interventions included in this overview are offered by a variety of academic and private sector institutions, use both telephonic and in-person coaching, and are facilitated by professionally trained health and wellness coaches as well as trained peer coaches. Strengths and challenges experienced in these efforts are summarized, as are recommendations to address those challenges. A working definition of “Group Health and Wellness Coaching” is proposed, and important next steps for research and for the training of group coaches are presented. PMID:24416678

  9. The Coach Is In: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose:?This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer.?Methods:?In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff received step-by-step instructions for implementing an evidence-based nutritional management program. After each session, participants were asked to implement the care step they had just learned. Coaching calls helped facilitate implementation. Staff in 18 NHs in 12 states completed the course. Evaluation data were collected using a resident data form, pre- and post-training quizzes, a participant course evaluation survey, and a supervisor’s report.?Results:?NH staff attended an average of 4.8 teleconferences, with 5 staff members typically attending each teleconference. Average quiz scores increased 30% (p < .0001) from pre- to post-training. A majority of course participants (N = 35) said they would participate in a similar course (82.9%) and would recommend the course (80%). Just under half preferred the coaching course to a more traditional 1- to 2-day conference. Nine of 12 reporting supervisors said their facility planned to continue the new nutritional care program. The 10 NHs that submitted resident data assessed an average of 5 residents using the recommended protocols.?Implications:?We recommend the coaching course format. Dissemination outcomes may improve if resources currently used for short-duration training activities are used instead on coaching activities that support NHs over extended periods. PMID:22048808

  10. Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care What is Home Health Care? How Do I ... About Home Health Care? What is Home Health Care? Home health care helps seniors live independently for ...

  11. WHAT IS WELLNESS COACHING? Wellness coaching is a tool to lead and inspire you toward better health and

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    program. All employees covered under the Rice University group health plan are eligible for free wellnessWHAT IS WELLNESS COACHING? Wellness coaching is a tool to lead and inspire you toward better health and well-being! WHF's certified coaches act as encouraging guides to help individuals reach their own

  12. The study of health coaching: the ithaca coaching project, research design, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sforzo, Gary A

    2013-05-01

    Health coaching (HC) is a process holding tremendous potential as a complementary medical intervention to shape healthy behavior change and affect rates of chronic lifestyle diseases. Empirical knowledge of effectiveness for the HC process, however, is lacking. The purposes of this paper are to present the study protocol for the Ithaca Coaching Project while also addressing research design, methodological issues, and directions for HC research. This is one of the first large-scale, randomized control trials of HC for primary prevention examining impact on physical and emotional health status in an employee population. An additional intent for the project is to investigate self-determination theory as a theoretical framework for the coaching process. Participants (n=300) are recruited as part of a campus-wide wellness initiative and randomly assigned to one of three levels of client-centered HC or a control with standard wellness program care. Repeated measures analyses of covariance will be used to examine coaching effectiveness while path analyses will be used to examine relationships between coaching processes, self-determination variables, and health outcomes. There is a great need for well-designed HC studies that define coaching best practices, examine intervention effectiveness, provide cost:benefit analysis, and address scope of practice. This information will allow a clearer definition of HC to emerge and determination of if, and how, HC fits in modern-day healthcare. This is an exciting but critical time for HC research and for the practice of HC. PMID:24416673

  13. Improving awareness, accountability, and access through health coaching

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Johnston, Sharon; Irving, Hannah; Nash, Kate; Ward, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess patients’ experiences with and perceptions of health coaching as part of their ongoing care. Design A qualitative research design using semistructured interviews that were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Setting Ottawa, Ont. Participants Eleven patients (> 18 years of age) enrolled in a health coaching pilot program who were at risk of or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients’ perspectives were assessed with semistructured interviews. Interviews were conducted with 11 patients at the end of the pilot program, using a stratified sampling approach to ensure maximum variation. Main findings All patients found the overall experience with the health coaching program to be positive. Patients believed the health coaching program was effective in increasing awareness of how diabetes affected their bodies and health, in building accountability for their health-related actions, and in improving access to care and other health resources. Conclusion Patients perceive one-on-one health coaching as an acceptable intervention in their ongoing care. Patients enrolled in the health coaching pilot program believed that there was an improvement in access to care, health literacy, and accountability, all factors considered to be precursors to behavioural change.

  14. Evaluation of Telephone Health Coaching of German Health Insurants with Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Härter, Martin; Dwinger, Sarah; Seebauer, Laura; Simon, Daniela; Herbarth, Lutz; Siegmund-Schultze, Elisabeth; Temmert, Daniel; Bermejo, Isaac; Dirmaier, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate how patients with chronic conditions evaluate telephone health coaching provided by their health insurance company. Methods: A retrospective survey was conducted among coaching participants ("n" = 834). Outcomes included the general evaluation of the coaching, the evaluation of process and…

  15. 76 FR 52377 - Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach...current and accurate information concerning the securities of Diamond Home Services, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  16. Home Health Services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicare doesn't pay for: 24-hour-a-day care at home Meals delivered to your home Homemaker ... get home health care if you attend adult day care. Note: Home health services may also include medical ...

  17. Health Coaching Education: A Conversation With Pioneers in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

  18. Health coaching education: a conversation with pioneers in the field.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

  19. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved quality of life and significant cost savings. Your respiratory care ... your family and home situation to help your health care provider plan for your care after you are ...

  20. Home health care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  1. THE IMPACT OF LIFE COACHING ON GOAL ATTAINMENT, METACOGNITION AND MENTAL HEALTH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony M. Grant

    2003-01-01

    Despite its high media profile and growing popularity there have been no empirical investi- gations of the impact of life coaching on goal attainment, metacognition or mental health. This exploratory study used life coaching as a means of exploring key metacognitive factors involved as individuals move towards goal attainment. In a within-subjects design, twenty adults completed a life coaching program.

  2. Home Health in Chinatown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    The document reports on the successful efforts of the San Francisco Home Health Service, which brings much needed homemaker/home health aide services to hundreds of elderly people in the San Francisco Chinatown area. Providing historical and cultural background information about the area, its residents, and its particular health problems, the…

  3. Using motivational interviewing: through evidence-based health coaching.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Melinda

    2014-10-01

    To enhance compliance and achieve better outcomes, providers must actively engage their patients and caregivers in different ways than in the past. One strategy that has gained national attention is motivational interviewing through evidence-based health coaching. A closer look at this exciting new clinical skill reveals what it is, how it works, why it is so successful, and why our traditional patient approach has fallen short. PMID:25268529

  4. Approach to Antihypertensive Adherence: A Feasibility Study on the Use of Student Health Coaches for Uninsured Hypertensive Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucinda B. Leung; Andrew M. Busch; Sarah L. Nottage; Naira Arellano; Eva Glieberman; Nicholas J. Busch; Stephen R. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Despite pharmacologic advances, medication non-adherence continues to challenge primary care providers in blood pressure (BP) management. Medical, nursing and pharmacy students (n = 11) were recruited and trained as health coaches for uninsured, hypertensive patients (n = 25) of a free clinic in an uncontrolled open trial. Pre–post analysis was conducted on BP, medication adherence, frequency of home BP monitoring,

  5. Health Coaching: Adding Value in Healthcare Reform

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, debate about the nation's ailing healthcare system has moved to the forefront. In 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was signed into law. This groundbreaking piece of legislation impacts every aspect of the health industry, affecting everyone from doctors and health-care facilities to insurers and benefits consultants to business owners and patients. The ultimate goal of PPACA is to decrease the number of uninsured Americans and reduce the overall costs of healthcare. PMID:24416677

  6. Efficacy of Adjunct In-Home Coaching to Improve Outcomes in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmer, Susan G.; Zebell, Nancy M.; Culver, Michelle A.; Urquiza, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to test whether increasing the exposure to coaching by adding an in-home component to clinic-delivered Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) will increase the speed of parenting skill acquisition and show greater improvements in children's behaviors and parental stress. Methods: Seventy-three parent-child…

  7. Australian rural football club leaders as mental health advocates: an investigation of the impact of the Coach the Coach project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mental ill health, especially depression, is recognised as an important health concern, potentially with greater impact in rural communities. This paper reports on a project, Coach the Coach, in which Australian rural football clubs were the setting and football coaches the leaders in providing greater mental health awareness and capacity to support early help seeking behaviour among young males experiencing mental health difficulties, especially depression. Coaches and other football club leaders were provided with Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training. Method Pre-post measures of the ability of those club leaders undertaking mental health training to recognise depression and schizophrenia and of their knowledge of evidence supported treatment options, and confidence in responding to mental health difficulties were obtained using a questionnaire. This was supplemented by focus group interviews. Pre-post questionnaire data from players in participating football clubs was used to investigate attitudes to depression, treatment options and ability to recognise depression from a clinical scenario. Key project stakeholders were also interviewed. Results Club leaders (n = 36) who were trained in MHFA and club players (n = 275) who were not trained, participated in this evaluation. More than 50% of club leaders who undertook the training showed increased capacity to recognise mental illness and 66% reported increased confidence to respond to mental health difficulties in others. They reported that this training built upon their existing skills, fulfilled their perceived social responsibilities and empowered them. Indirect benefit to club players from this approach seemed limited as minimal changes in attitudes were reported by players. Key stakeholders regarded the project as valuable. Conclusions Rural football clubs appear to be appropriate social structures to promote rural mental health awareness. Club leaders, including many coaches, benefit from MHFA training, reporting increased skills and confidence. Benefit to club players from this approach was less obvious. However, the generally positive findings of this study suggest further research in this area is desirable. PMID:20482809

  8. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches.

    PubMed

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet Hoffman

    2015-03-01

    Approximately two thirds of those older than 60 years have a hypertension diagnosis. The aim of our program, Health Coaches for Hypertension Control, is to improve hypertension self-management among rural residents older than 60 years through education and support offered by trained community volunteers called Health Coaches. Participants received baseline and follow-up health risk appraisals with blood work, educational materials, and items such as blood pressure monitors and pedometers. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks on 146 participants who demonstrated statistically significant increases in hypertension-related knowledge from baseline to 8 weeks that persisted at 16 weeks, as well as significant improvements in stage of readiness to change behaviors and in actual behaviors. Furthermore, clinically significant decreases in all outcome measures were observed, with statistically significant changes in systolic blood pressure (-5.781 mmHg; p = .001), weight (-2.475 lb; p < .001), and glucose (-5.096 mg/dl; p = .004) after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Although 40.4% of participants met the Healthy People 2020 definition of controlled hypertension at baseline, the proportion of participants meeting this definition at 16 weeks postintervention increased to 51.0%. This article describes a university-community-hospital system model that effectively promotes hypertension self-management in a rural Appalachian community. PMID:24837989

  9. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-01-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

  10. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-04-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

  11. Training meals on wheels volunteers as health literacy coaches for older adults.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Donald L; Freimuth, Vicki S; Johnson, Sharon D; Kaley, Terry; Parmer, John

    2014-05-01

    Homebound older adults constitute a "hardly reached" population with respect to health communication. Older adults also typically suffer from health literacy challenges, which put them at increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Suboptimal interactions with providers are one such challenge. Interventions to improve interactive health literacy focus on training consumers/patients in question preparation and asking. Meals on Wheels volunteers are uniquely suited to coach their clients in such interaction strategies. Seventy-three Meals on Wheels volunteers participated in workshops to train as health literacy coaches. The 3- to 4-hour workshops included units on communicating with older adults, on the nature of health literacy, and on the process of interactive health literacy coaching. Participants viewed and discussed videos that modeled the targeted communication behaviors for older adult patients interacting with physicians. They role-played the coaching process. After 9 months, coaches participated in a "booster" session that included videos of ideal coaching practices. Evaluation questionnaires revealed that participants had favorable reactions to the workshops with respect to utility and interest. They especially appreciated learning communication skills and seeing realistic videos. A measure of knowledge about the workshop material revealed a significant increment at posttest. Fidelity of coaching practices with respect to workshop curriculum was confirmed. This training in interactive health literacy for community-based lay volunteers constitutes one way to implement the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy for one "hardly reached" population. An online tool kit containing all workshop materials is available. PMID:23877229

  12. The Process of Patient Empowerment in Integrative Health Coaching: How Does it Happen?

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Karen L.; Gray, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Emerging healthcare delivery models suggest that patients benefit from being engaged in their care. Integrative health coaching (IHC) is designed to be a systematic, collaborative, and solution-focused process that facilitates the enhancement of life experience and goal attainment regarding health, but little research is available to describe the mechanisms through which empowerment occurs in the health coaching process. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe apparent key components of the empowerment process as it actually occurs in IHC. A sample of 69 recorded health coaching sessions was drawn from 12 participants enrolled in a randomized controlled study comparing two different methods of weight-loss maintenance. Two researchers coded the word-for-word transcripts of sessions focusing on the structure of the sessions and communication strategies used by the coaches. Three basic sections of a coaching session were identified, and two main themes emerged from the communication strategies used: Exploring Participant's Experience and Active Interventions. In IHC, health coaches do not direct with prefabricated education based on the patient's presenting problem; rather, they use a concordant style of communication. The major tenets of the health coaching process are patient-centeredness and patient control focused around patient-originated health goals that guide the work within a supportive coaching partnership. As the field of health coaching continues to define itself, an important ongoing question involves how the structure of the provider-patient interaction is informed by the role of the healthcare provider (eg, nurse, therapist, coach) and in turn shapes the empowerment process. PMID:24416672

  13. Teacher Consultation and Coaching Within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elise Cappella; Bridget K. Hamre; Ha Yeon Kim; David B. Henry; Stacy L. Frazier; Marc S. Atkins; Sonja K. Schoenwald

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method: Thirty-six classrooms within 5 urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to intervention (training + consultation\\/coaching) and control (training only) conditions. Classroom and child

  14. Integrative Health Coaching and Motivational interviewing: Synergistic Approaches to Behavior Change in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Wolever, Ruth Q

    2013-07-01

    As rates of preventable chronic diseases and associated costs continue to rise, there has been increasing focus on strategies to support behavior change in healthcare. Health coaching and motivational interviewing are synergistic but distinct approaches that can be effectively employed to achieve this end. However, there is some confusion in the literature about the relationship between these two approaches. The purpose of this review is to describe a specific style of health coaching-integrative health coaching-and motivational interviewing, including their origins, the processes and strategies employed, and the ways in which they are similar and different. We also provide a case example of how integrative health coaching and motivational interviewing might be employed to demonstrate how these approaches are synergistic but distinct from each other in practice. This information may be useful for both researchers and clinicians interested in investigating or using behavior change interventions to improve health and cost outcomes in chronic disease. PMID:24416683

  15. Integrating big data and actionable health coaching to optimize wellness.

    PubMed

    Hood, Leroy; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Price, Nathan D

    2015-01-01

    The Hundred Person Wellness Project (HPWP) is a 10-month pilot study of 100 'well' individuals where integrated data from whole-genome sequencing, gut microbiome, clinical laboratory tests and quantified self measures from each individual are used to provide actionable results for health coaching with the goal of optimizing wellness and minimizing disease. In a commentary in BMC Medicine, Diamandis argues that HPWP and similar projects will likely result in 'unnecessary and potential harmful over-testing'. We argue that this new approach will ultimately lead to lower costs, better healthcare, innovation and economic growth. The central points of the HPWP are: 1) it is focused on optimizing wellness through longitudinal data collection, integration and mining of individual data clouds, enabling development of predictive models of wellness and disease that will reveal actionable possibilities; and 2) by extending this study to 100,000 well people, we will establish multiparameter, quantifiable wellness metrics and identify markers for wellness to early disease transitions for most common diseases, which will ultimately allow earlier disease intervention, eventually transitioning the individual early on from a disease back to a wellness trajectory. PMID:25575752

  16. Can life coaching improve health outcomes? – A systematic review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, coaching has received special attention as a method to improve healthy lifestyle behaviours. The fact that coaching has found its way into healthcare and may provide new ways of engaging the patients and making them accountable for their health, justifies the need for an overview of the evidence regarding coaching interventions used in patient care, the effect of the interventions, and the quality of the studies published. However, in order to provide a clear definition of the coaching interventions selected for this review, we have found it necessary to distinguish between health coaching and life coaching. In this review, we will only focus on the latter method and on that basis assess the health related outcomes of life coaching. Methods Intervention studies using quantitative or qualitative methods to evaluate the outcome of the life coach interventions were identified through systematic literature searches in PubMed, Embase, Psycinfo, and CINAHL. The quality of the methodology was independently assessed by three of the authors using a criteria list. Results A total of 4359 citations were identified in the electronic search and five studies were included; two of them were randomized controlled trials and met all quality criteria. The two studies investigating objective health outcomes (HbA1c) showed mixed but promising results, especially concerning the patient group that usually does not benefit from intensified interventions. Conclusion Because of the very limited number of solid studies, this review can only present tendencies for patient outcomes and a preliminary description of an effective life coaching intervention. The coaching method used in these studies aims to improve self-efficacy and self-empowerment. This may explain why the studies including disadvantaged patients showed the most convincing results. The findings also indicate that some patients benefit from being met with an alternative approach and a different type of communication than they are used to from health care personnel. In order to get a closer look at what is in the ‘black box’, we suggest that the description and categorisation of the coaching methods are described more comprehensively, and that research into this area is supplemented by a more qualitative approach. PMID:24148189

  17. Telephone-based health coaching for chronically ill patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of chronic conditions constitutes a major burden for patients and healthcare systems and is predicted to increase in the upcoming decades. Improving the self-management skills of patients is a strategy to steer against this burden. This could lead to better outcomes and lower healthcare costs. Health coaching is one method for enhancing the self-management of patients and can be delivered by phone. The effects of telephone-based health coaching are promising, but still inconclusive. Economic evaluations and studies examining the transferability of effects to different healthcare systems are still rare. Aim of this study is to evaluate telephone-based health coaching for chronically ill patients in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a prospective randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of telephone-based health coaching with usual care during a 4-year time period. Data are collected at baseline and after 12, 24 and 36 months. Patients are selected based on one of the following chronic conditions: diabetes, coronary artery disease, asthma, hypertension, heart failure, COPD, chronic depression or schizophrenia. The health coaching intervention is carried out by trained nurses employed by a German statutory health insurance. The frequency and the topics of the health coaching are manual-based but tailored to the patients’ needs and medical condition, following the concepts of motivational interviewing, shared decision-making and evidence-based-medicine. Approximately 12,000 insurants will be enrolled and randomized into intervention and control groups. Primary outcome is the time until hospital readmission within two years after enrolling in the health coaching, assessed by routine data. Secondary outcomes are patient-reported outcomes like changes in quality of life, depression and anxiety and clinical values assessed with questionnaires. Additional secondary outcomes are further economic evaluations like health service use as well as costs and hospital readmission rates. The statistical analyses includes intention-to-treat and as-treated principles. The recruitment will be completed in September 2014. Discussion This study will provide evidence regarding economic and clinical effects of telephone-delivered health coaching. Additionally, this study will show whether health coaching is an adequate option for the German healthcare system to address the growing burden of chronic diseases. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien; DRKS) DRKS00000584. PMID:24135027

  18. Case Report of Hemoglobin A1c and Weight Reduction in Integrative Health Coaching

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Integrative health coaching (IHC) offers significant health improvement in biometric measures without pharmaceuticals. In this case of newly diagnosed impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) with obesity, IHC used the patient's strengths to reverse IGT, prevent frank diabetes, and reduce weight by 40 lbs or 21% of her original weight. This intervention included a client self-assessment and 14 in-person health coaching sessions over 11 months. IHC provides a framework to accomplish short-term goals and identify and overcome barriers while drawing on the strengths and aims of the individual. PMID:24278844

  19. Merck Manual: Home Health Handbook

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over a century, healthcare professionals have consulted the Merck Manual for trusted, concise and correct discussions of diagnosis ... for home users, written in everyday language. The Merck Manual - Home Health Handbook is the ideal source for ...

  20. Evaluating the Treatment Fidelity of Parents Who Conduct In-Home Functional Communication Training with Coaching via Telehealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suess, Alyssa N.; Romani, Patrick W.; Wacker, David P.; Dyson, Shannon M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Lee, John F.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Waldron, Debra B.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective, descriptive evaluation of the fidelity with which parents of three children with autism spectrum disorders conducted functional communication training (FCT) in their homes. All training was provided to the parents via telehealth by a behavior consultant in a tertiary-level hospital setting. FCT trials coached by the…

  1. Experience with Health Coach-Mediated Physician Referral in an Employed Insured Population

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sowmya R.; Rogers, Robert S.; Mailhot, Johanna R.; Galvin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Given increasing interest in helping consumers choose high-performing (higher quality, lower cost) physicians, one approach chosen by several large employers is to provide assistance in the form of a telephonic “health coach” — a registered nurse who assists with identifying appropriate and available providers. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the health coach’s influence on provider choice and the quality of the user experience in the early introduction of this service. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey of 3490 employees and covered dependents of a large national firm that offered health coach services to all employees and covered dependents. The survey began in September 2007 with proportionate stratified sampling of 1750 employees and covered dependents who used the services between October 2007 and February 2008, and 1740 non-users. PARTICIPANTS Insured adults (ages 21–64) employed by a large national firm or covered dependents of employees. MEASUREMENTS Awareness of the service, reason for using service, visits to providers recommended by service, use of health advice provided by service, user satisfaction. MAIN RESULTS The primary reason for using the service was to obtain provider referrals (73%). Fifty-two percent of users sought a specialist referral, 33% a PCP referral and 9% a hospital referral. Eighty-nine percent of users seeking a provider referral were referred in-network; 81% of those referred visited the referred provider. Measures of satisfaction with both the service and the care delivered by recommended providers were over 70%. CONCLUSIONS Customers largely follow the provider recommendation of the health coach. Users express general satisfaction with existing health coach services, but differences in performance between vendors highlight the need for the services to be well implemented. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1428-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20556533

  2. Coaching vs Psychotherapy in health and Wellness: Overlap, Dissimilarities, and the Potential for Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Health coaches and psychotherapists both work with the art and science of facilitating change in their patients and clients. While the evolving field of health coaching and the established disciplines of clinical or counseling psychology share major areas of overlap, there are also significant distinctions between the two fields. This article outlines those similarities and dissimilarities with the intention of fostering a cooperative and mutually enriching stance between the two helping professions for the benefit of the respective professionals and the countless clients and patients they serve. PMID:24416682

  3. Coaches' Perceptions of French Sports Clubs: Health-Promotion Activities, Aims and Coach Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoye, Aurélie; Sarrazin, Philippe; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Kokko, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the benefits of participating in sport, sports clubs have been recognised as health promoting organizations. To examine health-promotion activities in Finnish sports clubs, Kokko et al. developed a set of standards for health-promoting sports clubs (HPSC). Objective: The present study extends this line of research, by (1)…

  4. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Health and Wellness Coaching: Defining a Key Behavioral intervention in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Sforzo, Gary A.; Dill, Diana; Kaye, Miranda; Bechard, Elizabeth M.; Southard, Mary Elaine; Kennedy, Mary; Vosloo, Justine; Yang, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Primary Objective: Review the operational definitions of health and wellness coaching as published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. Background: As global rates of preventable chronic diseases have reached epidemic proportions, there has been an increased focus on strategies to improve health behaviors and associated outcomes. One such strategy, health and wellness coaching, has been inconsistently defined and shown mixed results. Methods: A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)—guided systematic review of the medical literature on health and wellness coaching allowed for compilation of data on specific features of the coaching interventions and background and training of coaches. Results: Eight hundred abstracts were initially identified through PubMed, with 284 full-text articles ultimately included. The majority (76%) were empirical articles. The literature operationalized health and wellness coaching as a process that is fully or partially patient-centered (86% of articles), included patient-determined goals (71%), incorporated self-discovery and active learning processes (63%) (vs more passive receipt of advice), encouraged accountability for behaviors (86%), and provided some type of education to patients along with using coaching processes (91%). Additionally, 78% of articles indicated that the coaching occurs in the context of a consistent, ongoing relationship with a human coach who is trained in specific behavior change, communication, and motivational skills. Conclusions: Despite disparities in how health and wellness coaching have been operationalized previously, this systematic review observes an emerging consensus in what is referred to as health and wellness coaching; namely, a patient-centered process that is based upon behavior change theory and is delivered by health professionals with diverse backgrounds. The actual coaching process entails goal-setting determined by the patient, encourages self-discovery in addition to content education, and incorporates mechanisms for developing accountability in health behaviors. With a clear definition for health and wellness coaching, robust research can more accurately assess the effectiveness of the approach in bringing about changes in health behaviors, health outcomes and associated costs that are targeted to reduce the global burden of chronic disease. PMID:24416684

  5. The Role of Physical and Health Educators and Coaches in the Prevention of Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; And Others

    All teachers, coaches, and guidance counselors should be concerned about eating disorders as a health and life threatening illness. While no reliable research studies or statistics exist on the incidence of eating disorders among athletes and aerobic exercisers, estimates suggest that 10-20% of the female high school population and a much higher…

  6. Personalized Health Planning With Integrative Health Coaching to Reduce Obesity Risk Among Women Gaining Excess Weight During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nancy Y.; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva

    2013-01-01

    Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women. PMID:24278848

  7. Behavioral health coaching for rural veterans with diabetes and depression: a patient randomized effectiveness implementation trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and diabetes cause significant burden for patients and the healthcare system and, when co-occurring, result in poorer self-care behaviors and worse glycemic control than for either condition alone. However, the clinical management of these comorbid conditions is complicated by a host of patient, provider, and system-level barriers that are especially problematic for patients in rural locations. Patient-centered medical homes provide an opportunity to integrate mental and physical health care to address the multifaceted needs of complex comorbid conditions. Presently, there is a need to not only develop robust clinical interventions for complex medically ill patients but also to find feasible ways to embed these interventions into the frontlines of existing primary care practices. Methods/design This randomized controlled trial uses a hybrid effectiveness-implementation design to evaluate the Healthy Outcomes through Patient Empowerment (HOPE) intervention, which seeks to simultaneously address diabetes and depression for rural veterans in Southeast Texas. A total of 242 Veterans with uncontrolled diabetes and comorbid symptoms of depression will be recruited and randomized to either the HOPE intervention or to a usual-care arm. Participants will be evaluated on a host of diabetes and depression-related measures at baseline and 6- and 12-month follow-up. The trial has two primary goals: 1) to examine the effectiveness of the intervention on both physical (diabetes) and emotional health (depression) outcomes and 2) to simultaneously pilot test a multifaceted implementation strategy designed to increase fidelity and utilization of the intervention by coaches interfacing within the primary care setting. Discussion This ongoing blended effectiveness-implementation design holds the potential to advance the science and practice of caring for complex medically ill patients within the constraints of a busy patient-centered medical home. Trial registration Behavioral Activation Therapy for Rural Veterans with Diabetes and Depression: NCT01572389. PMID:24774351

  8. Coping Skills Training in a Telephone Health Coaching Program for Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Vanessa; Jaser, Sarah S.; Lindemann, Evie; Galasso, Pamela; Beale, Alison; Holl, Marita G.; Grey, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this paper is to describe components of a health coaching intervention based on coping skills training delivered via telephone. This intervention was provided to urban adolescents at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reinforcing a school-based curriculum designed to promote a healthy lifestyle and prevent T2DM. Method Health coaching via telephone was provided to at-risk, urban youth enrolled in a study of an intervention to reduce risk for T2DM. Vignettes are used to describe the use of several coping skills in this high risk youth population. Results A variety of vignettes illustrate how telephone health coaching reinforced lifestyle changes in students by incorporating coping skills training. Discussion Given the benefits and the challenges of the telephone health coaching intervention, several suggestions for others who plan to use a similar method are described. PMID:21514490

  9. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care at home after they have been in the hospital ... dolls to help you practice different procedures. Home Health Care Assistance The hospital social worker can help families ...

  10. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a five-unit home health aide course. Each unit contains 4 to 36 lesson plans. Unit topics and representative lesson plan topics are as follows: (1) introduction (ethical and legal responsibilities, time management, reporting and recording); (2) communication (techniques, meeting the public, therapeutic…

  11. Collaboration and synergy in the field of health and wellness coaching: naïve or necessary?

    PubMed

    Wolever, Ruth Q

    2013-07-01

    The rise of health and wellness coaching holds significant promise for facilitating sustainable behavior change to help legions of individuals prevent and manage chronic disease. We all know the threats associated with the staggering epidemic of chronic disease and associated unhealthy lifestyles. But did we get here through a failure of personal responsibility? A failure of family units to support appropriate health behaviors? A failure of educational systems to teach healthy behaviors? A failure of medicine to cultivate health behaviors in patients? A failure of municipalities from an urban planning perspective? A failure of the social sciences to apply the latest in adult learning theory, psychology, and behavioral economics to health behaviors? A failure of government to incentivize or reinforce health behaviors? A failure of industry to prioritize health over capital? A failure of society to integrate all of the above? Or is this just the perfect time to synergize all that we know from numerous disciplines to conquer the challenge of unhealthy behavior that creates chronic disease? From my perspective as a health psychologist, understanding the origins of the problems will help us draft the solution. But from my perspective as a coach, how we got here is much less important than how we get out of here. PMID:24416680

  12. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  13. Impact of Peer Health Coaching on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Patients With Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Thom, David H.; Ghorob, Amireh; Hessler, Danielle; De Vore, Diana; Chen, Ellen; Bodenheimer, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Peer health coaches offer a potential model for extending the capacity of primary care practices to provide self-management support for patients with diabetes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test whether clinic-based peer health coaching, compared with usual care, improves glycemic control for low-income patients who have poorly controlled diabetes. METHOD We undertook a randomized controlled trial enrolling patients from 6 public health clinics in San Francisco. Twenty-three patients with a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level of less than 8.5%, who completed a 36-hour health coach training class, acted as peer coaches. Patients from the same clinics with HbA1C levels of 8.0% or more were recruited and randomized to receive health coaching (n = 148) or usual care (n = 151). The primary outcome was the difference in change in HbA1C levels at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were proportion of patients with a decrease in HbA1C level of 1.0% or more and proportion of patients with an HbA1C level of less than 7.5% at 6 months. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model with and without adjustment for differences in baseline variables. RESULTS At 6 months, HbA1C levels had decreased by 1.07% in the coached group and 0.3% in the usual care group, a difference of 0.77% in favor of coaching (P = .01, adjusted). HbA1C levels decreased 1.0% or more in 49.6% of coached patients vs 31.5% of usual care patients (P = .001, adjusted), and levels at 6 months were less than 7.5% for 22.0% of coached vs 14.9% of usual care patients (P = .04, adjusted). CONCLUSIONS Peer health coaching significantly improved diabetes control in this group of low-income primary care patients. PMID:23508600

  14. Improved cost, health, and satisfaction with a health home benefit plan for self-insured employers and small physician practices.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Jerry; Kapp, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We compared the impacts on total costs, health, and satisfaction among 615 adults enrolled 2 years in an employer's health home benefit plan to their baseline year in a standard preferred provider organization plan. The new plan combined strong continuity care incentives with nurse coaching support. After 24 months, total medical costs were 23% lower than the baseline year, biometric measures improved for more than 85% of members, and patient satisfaction exceeded 85%. Emergency department visits decreased by 16% and hospital days decreased by 48%. Health home benefit plans engaging small primary care physician practices and members in coordinated continuity care can deliver high value. PMID:23448916

  15. Mindfulness: An effective coaching tool for improving physical and mental health

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Jo Lynne W.; Kiken, Laura; Holt, Melissa; McCain, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides an overview of the mechanisms of action, evidence base, and practice of mindfulness, with an emphasis on how to easily incorporate this valuable skill into practice. Data sources: PubMed, CINAHL, PsychInfo Databases. Conclusions: Conscious attention to the present moment in a receptive way is known as mindfulness. A growing body of research indicates that mindfulness can be taught and cultivated to improve physical and mental health. Implications for practice: Accordingly, as part of the coaching competency, mindfulness can be practiced and taught by advanced practice nurses to support lifestyle and behavioral changes, decrease perceived stress, enhance quality of life, and, ultimately, improve health and health outcomes. PMID:24259186

  16. Psychiatric Home Health: Patient Advocacy in the Home Setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toni Rhein; Rita R. Callahan

    1999-01-01

    Patient transition from hospital to home can be a devastating experience. A change in environment requires time for adjusting appropriately; the amount of time differs for each individual. This transition can be more stressful for psychiatric patients readjusting to their environment. Home health psychiatric nursing is a unique and intriguing specialty. For patients requiring in-home care management, it is essential

  17. Health Insurance & Patient-Centered Medical Homes

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Health Insurance & Patient- Centered Medical Homes Office of Rural Health Area Health Education insurance coverage for routine care for patients who undergo clinical trials · Health Care Cost Database · In the fall of 2010, the CSI took the lead · As chief insurance regulator, the CSI can bring private health

  18. The “Health Coaching” programme: a new patient-centred and visually supported approach for health behaviour change in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health related behaviour is an important determinant of chronic disease, with a high impact on public health. Motivating and assisting people to change their unfavourable health behaviour is thus a major challenge for health professionals. The objective of the study was to develop a structured programme of counselling in primary care practice, and to test its feasibility and acceptance among general practitioners (GPs) and their patients. Methods Our new concept integrates change of roles, shared responsibility, patient-centredness, and modern communication techniques—such as motivational interviewing. A new colour-coded visual communication tool is used for the purpose of leading through the 4-step counselling process. As doctors’ communication skills are crucial, communication training is a mandatory part of the programme. We tested the feasibility and acceptance of the “Health Coaching” programme with 20 GPs and 1045 patients, using questionnaires and semistructured interviewing techniques. The main outcomes were participation rates; the duration of counselling; patients’ self-rated behavioural change in their areas of choice; and ratings of motivational, conceptual, acceptance, and feasibility issues. Results In total, 37% (n=350) of the patients enrolled in step 1 completed the entire 4-Step counselling process, with each step taking 8–22 minutes. 50% of ratings (n=303) improved by one or two categories in the three-colour circle, and the proportion of favourable health behaviour ratings increased from 9% to 39%. The ratings for motivation, concept, acceptance, and feasibility of the “Health Coaching” programme were consistently high. Conclusions Our innovative, patient-centred counselling programme for health behaviour change was well accepted and feasible among patients and physicians in a primary care setting. Randomised controlled studies will have to establish cost-effectiveness and promote dissemination. PMID:23865509

  19. Patient Satisfaction and Perceived Success with a Telephonic Health Coaching Program: The Natural Experiments for Translation in Diabetes (NEXT-D) Study, Northern California, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Goler, Nancy C.; Sanna, Rashel S.; Boccio, Mindy; Bellamy, David J.; Brown, Susan D.; Neugebauer, Romain S.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Wiley, Deanne M.; Schmittdiel, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Health coaching can improve lifestyle behaviors known to prevent or manage chronic conditions such as diabetes. However, little is known about the patient experience with telephonic coaching programs in real-world care settings. We examined patient satisfaction, patient’s perceived success in achieving program goals, and the patient-level correlates of these outcomes in a voluntary telephonic coaching program at a large integrated health care delivery system in northern California. Methods Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients who participated in a telephonic coaching program in 2011 were sent a cross-sectional survey about their satisfaction with health coaching and perceived success with program goals. We examined associations with patient characteristics. Results The survey response rate was 34%; analyses were based on the 32% who completed the survey. Of those who had completed 2 or more sessions (n = 232 [52%]), most reported being satisfied (70%) or neutral (20%) with the program, and 71% would recommend health coaching. Healthy weight, healthful eating, and physical activity were the most common topics discussed (88%). Adjusting for demographic characteristics, 73% of those who had 2 or more sessions reported that health coaching helped achieve their weight-related goal. Outcomes were positively correlated with patient activation but not consistently correlated with patient demographic characteristics. Conclusion Levels of satisfaction and perceived success with telephonic health coaching provided by a health plan were high and positively correlated with the number of sessions completed and patient activation. Voluntary telephonic health coaching programs should promote retention and assess patients’ activation levels. PMID:24176083

  20. Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

  1. Home Health and Informal Care Utilization

    E-print Network

    and Sano also are supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Address correspondence to: Carolyn W. Zhu, PhD, Health Economist, GeriatricHome Health and Informal Care Utilization and Costs Over Time in Alzheimer's Disease Carolyn W. Zhu

  2. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): A Quality Improvement Collaborative for Weight Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Abigail E.; John, Priya M.; Vable, Anusha M.; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L.; Chin, Marshall H.; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians’ Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians’ Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs. PMID:23727964

  3. Home health care: the dietitian's role.

    PubMed

    Birge, K R; Maxwell, D R

    1979-01-01

    Nutritional services are an important part of the home care program. Medicare, Medicaid, and other third-party mechanisms do not reimburse providers for such services, even though the cost for home care is lower than for institutional care. Recognizing the need for nutritional services, the Veterans Administration has included the dietitian as a member of the home care team. Skills and guidelines developed by The American Dietetic Association for home and ambulatory care were adapted and utilized in developing a dietetic home care procedure which helps to avoid institutional care and provides a better quality of life at home. Nutritional services should be an integral part of all home health care programs. Because most home care programs do not have funds for a dietitian's service, legislative and/or regulatory action is needed to provide reimbursement for nutritional home care services. PMID:368104

  4. HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater New Haven Community Council, CT.

    THE HOME HEALTH AIDE PERFORMS SIMPLE PERSONAL CARE FUNCTIONS UNDER NURSING SUPERVISION IN THE HOME CARE OF AN ILL OR DISABLED PERSON. THE PROJECT OBJECTIVES WERE TO TRAIN AS AIDES 30 MEN AND WOMEN AGE 45 YEARS AND OLDER WITH LIMITED INCOMES TO MEET A COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT NEED AND TO EXPERIMENT IN RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, TRAINING, AND EMPLOYMENT…

  5. UNIVERSITY OF UTAH COACHING WELLNESS

    E-print Network

    Feschotte, Cedric

    discovery, dissemination, and application of the scientific foundations of physical activity. Coaching, physical activity, and stress reduction. Careers held by graduates Senior Health Fitness Specialist Clinical Partnerships Include: PEAK Health and Fitness University Sleep/Wake Center Madsen Health

  6. The effectiveness of peer health coaching in improving glycemic control among low-income patients with diabetes: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amireh Ghorob; Mercedes Maria Vivas; Diana De Vore; Victoria Ngo; Thomas Bodenheimer; Ellen Chen; David H Thom

    2011-01-01

    Background  Although self-management support improves diabetes outcomes, it is not consistently provided in health care settings strained\\u000a for time and resources. One proposed solution to personnel and funding shortages is to utilize peer coaches, patients trained\\u000a to provide diabetes education and support to other patients. Coaches share similar experiences about living with diabetes\\u000a and are able to reach patients within and

  7. Reliability assessment of home health care services.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, Stergiani; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Lekka, Irini; Maglaveras, Nicos; Pappas, Costas

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a model of reliability assessment of services in Home Health Care Delivery is presented. Reliability is an important quality dimension for services and is included in non-functional requirements of a system. A stochastic Markov model for reliability assessment is applied to patient communication services, in the field of home health care delivery. The methodology includes the specification of scenarios, the definition of failures in scenarios as well as the application of the analytical model. The results of the methodology reveal the critical states of the Home Health Care System and recommendations for improvement of the services are proposed. The model gives valuable results in predicting service reliability and, independently of the error types, it can be applied to all fields of Regional Health Network (RHN). PMID:17911722

  8. Integrative Health Coach Training: A Model for Shifting the Paradigm Toward Patient-centricity and Meeting New National Prevention Goals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Linda L.; Lake, Noelle H.; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Perlman, Adam; Wroth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the evolution, training, and results of an emerging allied health profession skilled in eliciting sustainable health-related behavior change and charged with improving patient engagement. Methods: Through techniques sourced from humanistic and positive psychology, solution-focused and mindfulness-based therapies, and leadership coaching, Integrative Health Coaching (IHC) provides a mechanism to empower patients through various stages of learning and change. IHC also provides a method for the creation and implementation of forward-focused personalized health plans. Results: Clinical studies employing Duke University Integrative Medicine's model of IHC have demonstrated improvements in measures of diabetes and diabetes risk, weight management, and risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke. By supporting and enabling individuals in making major lifestyle changes for the improvement of their health, IHC carries the potential to reduce rates and morbidity of chronic disease and impact myriad aspects of healthcare. Conclusion: As a model of educational and clinical innovation aimed at patient empowerment and lifestyle modification, IHC is aligned well with the tenets and goals of recently sanctioned federal healthcare reform, specifically the creation of the first National Prevention and Health Promotion Strategy. Practice Implications: IHC may allow greater patient-centricity while targeting the lifestyle-related chronic disease that lies at the heart of the current healthcare crisis. PMID:24416674

  9. The Impact of a Value-Based Insurance Design Plus Health Coaching on Medication Adherence and Medical Spending.

    PubMed

    Musich, Shirley; Wang, Sara; Hawkins, Kevin

    2014-09-23

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate medication adherence, medical services utilization, and combined medical and pharmacy expenditures associated with diabetes and hypertension value-based insurance design (VBID) plus health/disease coaching programs implemented by a large employer. A pre/post participant versus nonparticipant study design was used to measure medication possession ratios (MPRs), inpatient admissions, emergency room utilization, and combined medical and pharmacy expenditures for employees/spouses with diabetes (n=1090; average 23 months follow-up) and hypertension (n=3254; average 13 months follow-up) participating in a VBID plus health/disease coaching relative to eligible nonparticipants. Outcome measures were propensity score weighted and regression adjusted to estimate the independent impact of the programs. MPRs for diabetes and hypertension were significantly increased 3 to 4 percentage points for VBID participants, while MPRs for respective nonparticipants decreased by about 10 percentage points. Employer-paid pharmacy expenditures increased significantly for both participants with diabetes and hypertension while out-of-pocket patient co-payments decreased significantly. Medical expenditures for diabetes VBID participants decreased but not significantly. Hypertension participants experienced medical expenditure increases. Medical services utilization of inpatient admissions and emergency room visits underwent minimal change. Thus employer-sponsored diabetes and hypertension VBID plus health/disease coaching programs can be expected to lower patient co-payments and significantly increase medication adherence. Meanwhile, medical spending outcomes indicated that increased diabetes and hypertension pharmacy expenditures were partially offset by medical savings (for diabetes) but not sufficiently to be cost neutral. (Population Health Management 2014;xx:xxx-xxx). PMID:25247449

  10. The Early Childhood Coaching Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Dathan D.; Shelden, M'Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based and highly effective, "coaching" helps early childhood practitioners support other professionals and families as they enhance existing knowledge, develop new skills, and promote healthy development of young children. This hands-on guide shows professionals how to conduct skillful coaching in any setting--home, school, or community.…

  11. Home Health Integration for the Future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James F. Veronesi

    2001-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997, coupled with the effects of the Prospective Payment System implemented in October 2000, has created a situation that seriously compromises the financial viability of existing home health agencies. To survive the maelstrom, agencies must act rapidly to stem the financial hemorrhage and prevent closure. Attention to patient volumes, allowable reimbursement, timely submission of requests

  12. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePLUS

    ... You are here: Plan of care Share Home health care: what it is and what to expect What is home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... agency listed. What should you expect from home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  13. Reconceptualizing compliance in home health care.

    PubMed

    Vivian, B G

    1996-01-01

    The term "compliance" and its traditional definitions frequently are criticized in the literature. Although a number of authors advocate a collaborative model of compliance, with compliance decisions and responsibilities for health outcomes shared by provider and patient, few describe this model in practice. This study investigated compliance communication in two home care agencies. Findings from interviews with 6 nurses and observation during home visits to 25 patients (N = 31) revealed a prosocial, collaborative model of compliance that coincides with the participative model of medical care (Smith, 1989) and a redefinition of compliance advanced by Kontz (1989). PMID:8716881

  14. Behavioral coaching.

    PubMed

    Seniuk, Holly A; Witts, Benjamin N; Williams, W Larry; Ghezzi, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis. PMID:25729141

  15. The future of home health project: developing the framework for health care at home.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa; Schiller, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    In addition to providing high-quality care to vulnerable patient populations, home healthcare offers the least costly option for patients and the healthcare system, particularly in postacute care. As the baby boom generation ages, policymakers are expressing concerns about rising costs, variation in home healthcare service use, and program integrity. The Alliance for Home Health Quality and Innovation seeks to develop a research-based strategic framework for the future of home healthcare for older Americans and those with disabilities. This article describes the initiative and invites readers to provide comments and suggestions. PMID:25654456

  16. Coaching for results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dave Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to help coaches better understand their approach to coaching and to help those being coached to have a sense of options in selecting a coach. And, to overview the field of coaching and offer a typology of approaches. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper lays out the purposes of coaching, then review two models or approaches to

  17. Prospective rates for episodes of home health care.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Paul L

    2002-01-01

    Starting October 1, 2000, Medicare began paying providers of home health care at fixed, predetermined rates for services and items bundled into 60-day episodes of home health care. The episode payment rates vary with the patient's clinical, functional, and services utilization characteristics. This new approach was expected to redistribute Medicare payments among home health agencies, extend the cost savings introduced by the Interim Payment System, improve the coordination of services, and reduce the number of unnecessary home health visits. PMID:12079152

  18. Nursing interventions for urinary incontinence in home health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valerie Hiser

    1999-01-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a significant health care issue among older patients in the acute care, extended care, and home care settings. With the shift toward health care delivery in the home setting, it is becoming increasingly necessary for home health care professionals to become knowledgeable about the causes, assessment, and treatment. This article will review the epidemiology, causes, assessment,

  19. The effectiveness of medical assistant health coaching for low-income patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia: protocol for a randomized controlled trial and baseline characteristics of the study population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic disease do not reach goals for management of their conditions. Self-management support provided by medical assistant health coaches within the clinical setting may help to improve clinical outcomes, but most studies to date lack statistical power or methodological rigor. Barriers to large scale implementation of the medical assistant coach model include lack of clinician buy-in and the absence of a business model that will make medical assistant health coaching sustainable. This study will add to the evidence base by determining the effectiveness of health coaching by medical assistants on clinical outcomes and patient self-management, by assessing the impact of health coaching on the clinician experience, and by examining the costs and potential savings of health coaching. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effectiveness of clinic-based medical assistant health coaches to improve clinical outcomes and self-management skills among low-income patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia. A total of 441 patients from two San Francisco primary care clinics have been enrolled and randomized to receive a health coach (n?=?224) or usual care (n?=?217). Patients participating in the health coaching group will receive coaching for 12 months from medical assistants trained as health coaches. The primary outcome is a change in hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, or LDL cholesterol among patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, respectively. Self-management behaviors, perceptions of the health care team and clinician, BMI, and chronic disease self-efficacy will be measured at baseline and after 12 months. Clinician experience is being assessed through surveys and qualitative interviews. Cost and utilization data will be analyzed through cost-predictive models. Discussion Medical assistants are an untapped resource to provide self-management support for patients with uncontrolled chronic disease. Having successfully completed recruitment, this study is uniquely poised to assess the effectiveness of the medical assistant health coaching model, to describe barriers and facilitators to implementation, and to develop a business case for sustainability. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT-01220336 PMID:23433349

  20. A WBAN-based System for Health Monitoring at Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris A. Otto; Emil Jovanov; Aleksandar Milenkovic

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype system for continual health monitoring at home. The system consists of an unobtrusive wireless body area network (WBAN) and a home health server. The WBAN sensors monitor user's heart rate and locomotive activity and periodically upload time-stamped information to the home server. The home server may integrate this information into a local database for user's

  1. The Health Care Home Model: Primary Health Care Meeting Public Health Goals

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    In November 2010, the American Public Health Association endorsed the health care home model as an important way that primary care may contribute to meeting the public health goals of increasing access to care, reducing health disparities, and better integrating health care with public health systems. Here we summarize the elements of the health care home (also called the medical home) model, evidence for its clinical and public health efficacy, and its place within the context of health care reform legislation. The model also has limitations, especially with regard to its degree of involvement with the communities in which care is delivered. Several actions could be undertaken to further develop, implement, and sustain the health care home. PMID:22515874

  2. Home visiting and child health surveillance attendance.

    PubMed

    Lever, Marie; Moore, John

    2005-07-01

    This project tested the hypothesis that low attendance rates at a Sure Start child health surveillance session might increase if appointments were preceded by intervention home visits from research assistants drawn from the local community. The assistants would explain the purpose of surveillance and discuss problems preventing attendance. A randomised control trial showed no increase in surveillance attendance after two-thirds of the intervention group were successfully visited. This negative finding was despite the partnership with local people acting as research assistants working well. Other factors that might have influenced attendance were investigated at an evaluation interview undertaken by community members in homes after the surveillance date. Only 55 per cent of the families could be contacted for evaluation. Six out of 10 of those who had no evaluation were the same families who had not attended the surveillance session. The reasons why these families missed surveillance sessions is yet to be identified. Further research is needed that explores the reason why some families do come for surveillance, the nature of the barriers to attendance in those who do not attend and to look for opportunities for fresh interventions that might give more children access to pre-school facilities. PMID:16095253

  3. Youth Sport Coaches' Qualities for Successful Coaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dae-Woo Choi; Min-Haeng Cho; Young-Kum Kim

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the most important qualities that youth sport coaches need for successful coaching. It used the Delphi Technique among 67 of the 93 youth sport coaches from Daejon Sport Council in South Korea. In the first Delphi round, 52 items suggested by the coaches were divided into seven categories by a panel of professors: (a)

  4. Coaches' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Secondary School Athletic Directors, Washington, DC.

    This manual focuses on the coach's relationships and interactions with students, school personnel, civic groups, and community agencies. The first chapter examines how athletics, as an integral part of education, can make a significant contribution (a) to the development of the individual, (b) in meeting society's needs, and (c) in transmitting…

  5. Softball Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopiano, Donna; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A collection of articles provides current instructional information to softball players and coaches. Topics discussed in the series include practice, basic skills, defense, pitching, catching, offense, and warm-up exercises to be used in conjunction with other conditioning drills. (JN)

  6. Athletic coaches as violence prevention advocates.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L; Tancredi, Daniel J; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Decker, Michele R; Silverman, Jay G; O'Connor, Brian; Stetkevich, Nicholas; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) is a significant public health problem. Coaching Boys Into Men (CBIM) is an evidence-based ARA prevention program that trains coaches to deliver violence prevention messages to male athletes. Assessing acceptability and impact of CBIM on coaches may inform prevention efforts that involve these important adults in health promotion among youth. As part of a two-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial of CBIM in 16 high schools in Northern California, coaches completed baseline and postseason surveys (n = 176) to assess their attitudes and confidence delivering the program. Coaches in the intervention arm also participated in interviews (n = 36) that explored program acceptability, feasibility, and impact. Relative to controls, intervention coaches showed increases in confidence intervening when witnessing abusive behaviors among their athletes, greater bystander intervention, and greater frequency of violence-related discussions with athletes and other coaches. Coaches reported the program was easy to implement and valuable for their athletes. Findings illustrate the value of exploring attitudinal and behavioral changes among ARA prevention implementers, and suggest that coaches can gain confidence and enact behaviors to discourage ARA among male athletes. Coaches found the program to be feasible and valuable, which suggests potential for long-term uptake and sustainability. PMID:25015237

  7. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  8. Does "Word Coach" Coach Words?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Tom; Horst, Marlise

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the design and testing of an integrated suite of vocabulary training games for Nintendo[TM] collectively designated "My Word Coach" (Ubisoft, 2008). The games' design is based on a wide range of learning research, from classic studies on recycling patterns to frequency studies of modern corpora. Its general usage and learning…

  9. Medical team training and coaching in the veterans health administration; assessment and impact on the first 32 facilities in the programme

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Neily; Peter D Mills; Pamela Lee; Brian Carney; Priscilla West; Katherine Percarpio; Lisa Mazzia; Douglas E Paull; James P Bagian

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundCommunication is problematic in healthcare. The Veterans Health Administration is implementing Medical Team Training. The authors describe results of the first 32 of 130 sites to undergo the programme. This report is unique; it provides aggregate results of a crew resource-management programme for numerous facilities.MethodsFacilities were taught medical team training and implemented briefings, debriefings and other projects. The authors coached

  10. Educating refugees to improve their home environmental health

    PubMed Central

    Korfmacher, Katrina Smith; George, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Rochester's Healthy Home was a hands-on home environmental health museum that educated over 3500 visitors between June 2006 and December 2009. The Healthy Home provided visitors with the tools, resources, and motivation to make their homes healthier by reducing environmental hazards. The Healthy Home focused on empowering low-income renters to protect their families from home health risks, but served a broad audience. Based on the Healthy Home's initial successes with diverse visitors, in 2009 the county health department provided funding for a six-month project to educate 200 recently arrived refugees. This report summarizes the project's innovative approach to home health education, presents evaluation data on impacts on refugees and other visitors, suggests implications for resettlement agencies, and provides guidelines for those interested in replicating this approach in their own community. PMID:22836539

  11. Can Low-Cost Support Programmes with Coaching Accelerate Doctoral Completion in Health Science Faculty Academics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Hilary; Bentley, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Career development for full-time Health Sciences academics through to doctoral studies is a monumental task. Many academics have difficulty completing their studies in the minimum time as well as publishing after obtaining their degree. As this problem is particularly acute in the Health Sciences, the PhD Acceleration Programme in Health Sciences…

  12. Healing at Home: 100 Years of Public Health Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Ellen T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "Now More than Ever" (Fahy); "Healing at Home" (photo essay); "Amelia Greenwald: Pioneer in International Public Health Nursing" (Mayer); "Alaska's Watched Pot" (Nord); and "Gertrude Weld Peabody: Unsung Patron of Public Health Nursing Education" (Doona). (JOW)

  13. With Home Testing, Consumers Take Charge of Their Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Search Help? With Home Testing, Consumers Take Charge of Their Health Share this page: Was this ... now hearing themselves called "consumers" who are taking charge of their own health care. "People today aren' ...

  14. COACH trial: A randomized controlled trial of nurse practitioner/community health worker cardiovascular disease risk reduction in urban community health centers: Rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jerilyn K; Himmelfarb, Cheryl R Dennison; Szanton, Sarah L; Bone, Lee; Hill, Martha N; Levine, David M

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite well-publicized guidelines on the appropriate management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes, implementation of risk-reducing practices remains poor. This paper describes the rationale and design of a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a comprehensive program of CVD risk reduction delivered by nurse practitioner (NP)/community health worker (CHW) teams versus enhanced usual care in improving the proportion of patients in urban community health centers who achieve goal levels recommended by national guidelines for lipids, blood pressure, HbA1c and prescription of appropriate medications. Methods The COACH (Community Outreach and Cardiovascular Health) trial is a randomized controlled trial in which patients at federally-qualified community health centers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: comprehensive intensive management of CVD risk factors for one year by a NP/CHW team or an enhanced usual care control group. Results A total of 3899 patients were assessed for eligibility and 525 were randomized. Groups were comparable at baseline on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with the exception of statistically significant differences in total cholesterol and hemoglobin A1c. Conclusions This study is a novel amalgam of multilevel interdisciplinary strategies to translate highly efficacious therapies to low-income federally-funded health centers that care for patients who carry a disproportionate burden of CVD, type 2 diabetes and uncontrolled CVD risk factors. The impact of such a community clinic-based intervention is potentially enormous. PMID:21241828

  15. Assessing risk for violence on home health visits.

    PubMed

    McPhaul, Kathleen; Lipscomb, Jane; Johnson, Jeffrey

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and test measures for assessing risk of violence toward staff during home visits. Home visiting health workers from public and private home visiting programs in a Mid-Atlantic state (n = 130) were surveyed to assess exposure to risky home visits, verbal and physical violence, and workplace violence safety climate. Two measures demonstrated evidence of reliability and validity moving the safety research closer to developing tools and processes for protecting home care clinicians. PMID:20463511

  16. Are ADNs Prepared to Be Home Health Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Monahan, Frances D.

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 132 of 350 home health nurses identified techniques and skills associate degree nurses (ADNs) should acquire to work for home health agencies. Accredited ADN programs reported that only 24 of the techniques are taught in all programs and 55 of the skills are taught in 90% of the programs. (SK)

  17. Coaching Behavior of Girls Youth Softball Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupnow, Allan; Stotlar, David

    A study examined coaches' behavior and classified the types and rates of coaches' behavior by time of athletic season (early or late), win/loss record, and throughout the time frame within a single contest. Subjects included all the volunteer coaches in a 13 team, softball program for 10-12 year old girls. The season consisted of a double…

  18. Wireless Sensor Networks for Home Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris R. Baker; Kenneth Armijo; Simon Belka; Merwan Benhabib; Vikas Bhargava; Nathan Burkhart; Artin Der Minassians; Gunes Dervisoglu; Lilia Gutnik; M. Brent Haick; Christine Ho; Mike Koplow; Jennifer Mangold; Stefanie Robinson; Matt Rosa; Miclas Schwartz; Christo Sims; Hanns Stoffregen; Andrew Waterbury; Eli S. Leland; Trevor Pering; Paul K. Wright

    2007-01-01

    Abstract— Sophisticated electronics are within reach of average users. Cooperation between wireless sensor networks and existing consumer electronic infrastructures can assist in the areas of health care and patient monitoring. This will improve the quality of life of patients, provide early detection for certain ailments, and improve doctor-patient efficiency. The goal of our work is to focus on health-related applications

  19. Get Home Delivery Health All NYT

    E-print Network

    Connor, Ed

    Restaurants Tilt to Tap Water 10. Restaurants: Go, Eat, You Never Know Go to Complete List » nytimes.com/health Everything you need to know about heart disease Also in Health: Hip resurfacing: is it right for you of a Prostate Test By JANE E. BRODY Published: May 8, 2007 After his annual physical, a middle-age man is told

  20. Payment reform will shift home health agency valuation parameters.

    PubMed

    Hahn, A D

    1998-12-01

    Changes authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 have removed many of the payment benefits that motivated past home health agency acquisition activity and temporarily have slowed the rapid pace of acquisitions of home health agencies. The act required that Medicare's cost-based payment system be replaced with a prospective payment system (PPS) and established an interim payment system to provide a framework for home health agencies to make the transition to the PPS. As a consequence, realistic valuations of home health agencies will be determined primarily by cash flows, with consideration given to operational factors, such as quality of patient care, service territory, and information systems capabilities. The limitations imposed by the change in payment mechanism will cause acquisition interest to shift away from home health agencies with higher utilization and revenue expansion to agencies able to control costs and achieve operating leverage. PMID:10338795

  1. Death, Grief, and the Home Health Worker: A Systems Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stan C. Weeber

    2005-01-01

    As the burden of long-term care shifts from nursing homes to home-based care, home health workers are increasingly likely to serve an older clientele susceptible to chronic disease and death. A significant occupational stressor in such cases is a lack of knowledge about what constitutes professionally appropriate interaction with dying patients and their families. Utilizing social systems theory and findings

  2. Coaching for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin; Ratey, Nancy; Maynard, Sandy; Sussman, Susan; Wright, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite limited scientific study on ADHD coaching as an intervention for adults with ADHD, the field of ADHD coaching has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years. ADHD coaching is becoming a bona fide profession where one must advance through a rigorous training process, in order to be certified as a professional ADHD coach.…

  3. Development of HIHM (Home Integrated Health Monitor) for ubiquitous home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Beom Oh; Park, Kwang Suk

    2007-01-01

    Home Integrated Health Monitor (HIHM) was developed for ubiquitous home healthcare. From quantitative analysis, we have elicited modal of chair. The HIHM could detect Electrocardiogram (ECG) and Photoplethysmography (PPG) non-intrusively. Also, it could estimate blood pressure (BP) non-intrusively, measure blood glucose and ear temperature. Detected signals and information were transmitted to home gateway and home server through Zigbee communication technology. Home server carried them to Healthcare Center, and specialists such as medical doctors could monitor by Internet. There was also feedback system. This device has a potential to study about ubiquitous home healthcare. PMID:18001965

  4. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  5. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality. PMID:24497648

  6. The role of the mental health nurse in home health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melissa Trimbath; Judith Brestensky

    1990-01-01

    Traditional home health care agencies across the country have provided emotional support in conjunction with medical-surgical follow-up services. It has only been in recent years that agencies have focused on specialized mental health programs. This article discusses the development of a mental health program and describes a case history that exemplifies how effective a home care mental health program can

  7. Home Diuretic Protocol for Heart Failure: Partnering with Home Health to Improve Outcomes and Reduce Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Richard P; Wight, Joseph N; Cannon, Ann; Whalen, Moira; Bachman, David

    2014-01-01

    Context: The management of heart failure (HF) is challenging, with high rates of readmission and no single solution. MaineHealth, a health care system serving southern Maine, has shown initial success with home health nurses partnering with physicians in the management of complex patients with HF using the MaineHealth Home Diuretic Protocol (HDP). Objective: To demonstrate that augmented diuretic therapy, both oral and intravenous, an evidence-based treatment for care of patients with HF experiencing fluid retention, can be delivered safely in the home setting using the HDP and can improve outcomes for recently hospitalized patients with HF. Design: In late 2011, the MaineHealth HDP was implemented in two hospitals and in the home health agency serving those hospitals. The patient population included recently hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of advanced HF, eligible for home health services and telemonitoring. Main Outcome Measures: Home health nurses reported data on the patients managed using the protocol, including interventions made, physical findings, lab values, and patient disposition after each episode of care. Questionnaires were used to determine patient and clinician satisfaction. Results: Sixty patients meeting the criteria above were enrolled between November 2011 and January 2014. The protocol was initiated 84 times for 30 of these patients. Sixteen patients had multiple activations. The readmission rate was 10% and no adverse outcomes were observed. Clinician and patient satisfaction was 97% or greater. Conclusion: The MaineHealth HDP can be delivered effectively and safely to improve outcomes, reducing readmissions and allowing patients to remain at home. PMID:25102518

  8. MyCoach: In Situ User Evaluation of a Virtual and Physical Coach for Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemans, Margit; Haaker, Timber; Szwajcer, Ellen

    Running is an enjoyable exercise for many people today. Trainers help people to reach running goals. However, today’s busy and nomadic people are not always able to attend running classes. A combination of a virtual and physical coach should be useful. A virtual coach (MyCoach) was designed to provide this support. MyCoach consists of a mobile phone (real time) and a web application, with a focus on improving health and well-being. A randomised controlled trial was performed to evaluate MyCoach. The results indicate that the runners value the tangible aspects on monitoring and capturing their exercise and analysing progress. The system could be improved by incorporating running schedules provided by the physical trainer and by improving its usability. Extensions of the system should focus on the real-time aspects of information sharing and “physical” coaching at a distance.

  9. The history of quality measurement in home health care.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J

    2009-02-01

    Quality improvement is as central to home health care as to any other field of health care. With the mandated addition in 2000 of Outcome Assessment and Information Set (OASIS) and outcome-based quality improvement (OBQI), Medicare home health agencies entered a new era of documenting, tracking, and systematically improving quality. OBQI is augmented by the Medicare Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) program, which is now entering the ninth in a series of work assignments, with the tenth scope in the planning stages. Evidence has shown that applied quality improvement methods can drive better outcomes using important metrics, such as acute care hospitalization. This article reviews key findings from the past 2 decades of home care quality improvement research and public policy advances, describes specific examples of local and regional programmatic approaches to quality improvement, and forecasts near-future trends in this vital arena of home health care. PMID:19217497

  10. ASSESSMENT: Coaching Efficacy As Indicators Of Coach Education Program Needs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lena Fung

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the level of coaching efficacy among a group of high school coaches so as to gain an insight for planning future coach preparation programs. In this study, the Coaching Efficacy Scale was used to assess the efficacy of high school coaches in four dimensions: Motivating Athletes, Strategy Use, Coaching Techniques, and Character

  11. Home health PPS: new payment system, new hope.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M; Dombi, W A

    2000-01-01

    In light of the financial turmoil most home health providers experienced over the past two years, a new payment system brings a sense of hope. The prospective payment methodology will provide different incentives than a cost-based reimbursement system. These new incentives will open the way for new approaches to deliver home health care. However, this new hope is accompanied by a sense of anxiety because the system is new and untested. PMID:10787823

  12. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  13. Job satisfaction of rural public and home health nurses.

    PubMed

    Juhl, N; Dunkin, J W; Stratton, T; Geller, J; Ludtke, R

    1993-03-01

    Based on Vroom's expectancy theory, this study was conducted to identify differences in job satisfaction between nurses working in public health settings, and staff nurses and administrators working in both settings. Questionnaires containing an adaptation of a job satisfaction scale were mailed to all 258 registered nurses practicing in public health and home health settings (response rate 57%) in a rural midwestern state. Respondents were asked to rate their satisfaction with various dimensions of their jobs, as well as how important each aspect was to them. Although both groups of nurses reported low satisfaction with salary, public health nurses were significantly less satisfied with their salaries than were home health nurses (F = 32.96, P < or = 0.001); home health nurses, however, were significantly less satisfied with benefits/rewards (F = 11.85, P < or = 0.001), task requirements (F = 8.37, P < or = 0.05), and professional status (F = 5.30, P < or = 0.05). Although administrators did not differ significantly from staff nurses on job satisfaction, they did perceive organizational climate (F = 4.50, P < or = 0.05) to be an important feature of satisfaction. These differences may be partially explained by divergent salaries, roles, and responsibilities between public health and home health nurses. PMID:8516258

  14. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  15. Protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a specialized health coaching intervention to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention in women: the HIPP study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pregnancy is a time of significant physiological and physical change for women. In particular, it is a time at which many women are at risk of gaining excessive weight. We describe the rationale and methods of the Health in Pregnancy and Post-birth (HIPP) Study, a study which aims primarily to determine the effectiveness of a specialized health coaching (HC) intervention during pregnancy, compared to education alone, in preventing excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention 12 months post birth. A secondary aim of this study is to evaluate the mechanisms by which our HC intervention impacts on weight management both during pregnancy and post birth. Methods/Design The randomized controlled trial will be conducted with 220 women who have a BMI > 18.5 (American IOM cut-off for normal weight), are 18 years of age or older, English speaking, no history of disordered eating or diabetes and are less than 18 weeks gestation at recruitment. Women will be randomly allocated to either a specialized HC intervention group or an Education Alone group. Our specialized HC intervention has two components: (1) one-on-one sessions with a Health Coach, and (2) two by two hour educational group sessions led by a Health Coach. Women in the Education Alone group will receive two by two hour educational group sessions with no HC components. Body Mass Index, waist circumference, and psychological factors including motivation, readiness to change, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and body dissatisfaction will be assessed at baseline (14-16 weeks gestation), and again at follow-up: 32 weeks gestation, 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months postpartum. Discussion Our study responds to the urgent need to design effective interventions in pregnancy to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention. Our pregnancy HC intervention is novel and innovative and has been designed to be easily adopted by health professionals who work with pregnant women, such as obstetricians, midwives, allied health professionals and health psychologists. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000331932 PMID:22272935

  16. Health for the Hopeful: A Study of Attachment Behavior in Home Health Care Nurses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bret L. Simmons; Debra L. Nelson; James Campbell Quick

    2003-01-01

    Home health nursing is a growth industry in Western industrialized countries and is a stressful occupation. The current study builds on a line of research that examined the positive effects of attachment behavior at work on health for executives, managers, military officer candidates, and basic military trainees. The present study of 175 home health nurses from the U.S. Southwest included

  17. Adding home health care to the discussion on health information technology policy.

    PubMed

    Ruggiano, Nicole; Brown, Ellen L; Hristidis, Vagelis; Page, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    The potential for health information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health care has resulted in several U.S. policy initiatives aimed at integrating health information technology into health care systems. However, home health care agencies have been excluded from incentive programs established through policies, raising concerns on the extent to which health information technology may be used to improve the quality of care for older adults with chronic illness and disabilities. This analysis examines the potential issues stemming from this exclusion and explores potential opportunities of integrating home health care into larger initiatives aimed at establishing health information technology systems for meaningful use. PMID:23937673

  18. The Coaching of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Bruce; Showers, Beverly

    1982-01-01

    Teachers, like athletes, are more likely to adopt new ways of doing their jobs if they are coached, and they are also likely to get worse before they get better. This article describes the coaching of teachers and includes an interview with a football coach to illustrate parallels with athletics. (PGD)

  19. Characteristics of Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Ann; Gilley, Jerry W.; Kouider, Elies

    2010-01-01

    Coaching has become ubiquitous in organizations. Despite its growth in popularity, the concept remains largely untested through empirical inquiry. This study examined the skills and behaviors associated with managerial coaching. Results indicate a link between specific managerial skills, behaviors, and coaching. (Contains 4 tables.)

  20. Automated Assessment of Cognitive Health Using Smart Home Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The goal of this work is to develop intelligent systems to monitor the well being of individuals in their home environments. OBJECTIVE This paper introduces a machine learning-based method to automatically predict activity quality in smart homes and automatically assess cognitive health based on activity quality. METHODS This paper describes an automated framework to extract set of features from smart home sensors data that reflects the activity performance or ability of an individual to complete an activity which can be input to machine learning algorithms. Output from learning algorithms including principal component analysis, support vector machine, and logistic regression algorithms are used to quantify activity quality for a complex set of smart home activities and predict cognitive health of participants. RESULTS Smart home activity data was gathered from volunteer participants (n=263) who performed a complex set of activities in our smart home testbed. We compare our automated activity quality prediction and cognitive health prediction with direct observation scores and health assessment obtained from neuropsychologists. With all samples included, we obtained statistically significant correlation (r=0.54) between direct observation scores and predicted activity quality. Similarly, using a support vector machine classifier, we obtained reasonable classification accuracy (area under the ROC curve = 0.80, g-mean = 0.73) in classifying participants into two different cognitive classes, dementia and cognitive healthy. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that it is possible to automatically quantify the task quality of smart home activities and perform limited assessment of the cognitive health of individual if smart home activities are properly chosen and learning algorithms are appropriately trained. PMID:23949177

  1. Mental health service use by the elderly in nursing homes.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, B J; Wagner, H R; Taube, J E; Magaziner, J; Permutt, T; Landerman, L R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Because current Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations influence the disposition of US nursing home residents who have mental illness, National Nursing Home Survey (1985) data are analyzed for predictors of mental health service use. METHODS. Elderly residents' rates of mental health service use are presented. Logistic regression yielded odds ratios for treatment by both mental health specialists and general practitioners for client and service system variables. RESULTS. Among the two thirds of elderly residents with a mental disorder (including dementia), only 4.5% receive any mental health treatment in a 1-month period. The ratio of specialist to general practitioner care is approximately 1:1. Patients seen by a specialist are likely to be younger (aged 65 to 74); live in the Northeast; and have a diagnosis of schizophrenia (13:1), dementia (3:1), or other mental disorders (5:1). Prior residence in a psychiatric hospital predicts care by both health professional types. Rural location, nonproprietary ownership of the nursing home, and aggressive behavior point to general physician care. CONCLUSIONS. Our findings indicate significant neglect of the mental health needs of older nursing home residents and underscore the importance of monitoring the regulations for screening and treatment of mental disorders under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. PMID:8438968

  2. Coaching to promote professional development in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; Penney, Vivian

    This article presents coaching, which facilitates the highest form of learning, as a potential strategy for promoting professional development in nursing. In doing so, it sets out what coaching is and highlights its benefits in terms of team building, adaptation to changes, career planning and professional development. Having established the rudiments of coaching and identifying its qualities, the article then sets out strategies of coaching using three models: the 3-D Technique Model, The Practice Spiral Model and The Grow Model. Three case histories are presented to explain how these models could be used to implement coaching and personal learning plans (PLP). Directions are provided where training for coaching is available. It is concluded that coaching can be a powerful tool in enhancing nurses' and other health professionals' ability to contribute to the success of healthcare organisations. PMID:24933546

  3. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health...

  4. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health...

  5. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health...

  6. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health...

  7. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS...residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health...

  8. Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

  9. Providing Coaching and Cotinine Results to Preteens to Reduce Their Secondhand Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wahlgren, Dennis R.; Liles, Sandy; Jones, Jennifer A.; Hughes, Suzanne C.; Matt, Georg E.; Ji, Ming; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Swan, Gary E.; Chatfield, Dale; Ding, Ding

    2011-01-01

    Background: Secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) poses health risks to children living with smokers. Most interventions to protect children from SHSe have coached adult smokers. This trial determined whether coaching and cotinine feedback provided to preteens can reduce their SHSe. Methods: Two hundred one predominantly low-income families with a resident smoker and a child aged 8 to 13 years who was exposed to two or more cigarettes per day or had a urine cotinine concentration ? 2.0 ng/mL were randomized to control or SHSe reduction coaching groups. During eight in-home sessions over 5 months, coaches presented to the child graphic charts of cotinine assay results as performance feedback and provided differential praise and incentives for cotinine reductions. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the differential change in SHSe over time by group. Results: For the baseline to posttest period, the coaching group had a greater decrease in both urine cotinine concentration (P = .039) and reported child SHSe in the number of cigarettes exposed per day (child report, P = .003; parent report, P = .078). For posttest to month 12 follow-up, no group or group by time differences were obtained, and both groups returned toward baseline. Conclusions: Coaching preteens can reduce their SHSe, although reductions may not be sustained without ongoing counseling, feedback, and incentives. Unlike interventions that coach adults to reduce child SHSe, programs that increase child avoidance of SHSe have the potential to reduce SHSe in all settings in which the child is exposed, without requiring a change in adult smoking behavior. PMID:21474574

  10. Project OASIS: Volunteer Mental Health Paraprofessionals Serving Nursing Home Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crose, Royda; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Details a demonstration project which was developed to train older adult volunteers as mental health paraprofessionals for nursing homes. Discusses the effectiveness of the program for residents, as well as benefits to the staff. Includes details of recruitment, training and supervision of volunteers, services they provide, and problems…

  11. ESP for Nursing Assistants and Home Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivian, Sigrid

    1984-01-01

    Describes two courses in vocational English-as-a-second-language for students preparing to become nursing assistants and home health workers. The first course prepares the students to meet entrance requirements for the vocational training course; the second provides language support for the course in which the students are enrolled. (SED)

  12. Home Health Services in a Climate of Cost Containment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty Pesznecker; Barbara Horn; Joanne Werner; Virginia Kenyon

    1987-01-01

    A survey of Medicare certified agencies in the Northwest Region conducted to identify clinical problems of patients and families resulting from early discharge from hospitals revealed many concerns related to health care delivery. Major areas of concern were: (1) Home Care and Community Services; (2) Reimbursement and Funding; (3) Rules and Regulations; (4) Continuity of Care; (5) Quality of Care;

  13. The Coach and the Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Bob; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation and coaching should not be linked, these authors argue. Although it's tempting for evaluators to identify deficiencies and then specify coaching as a remediation strategy, doing so turns coaching into a consequence of a poor evaluation and termination into a consequence of failed coaching. Another mistake is to use coaching as a data…

  14. Harvard@Home: Reproductive Health in the 21st Century

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From Harvard@Home, this website presents more than seven hours of video clips from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study's third-annual conference on women, gender, and society held in October of 2004. Titled _Reproductive Health in the 21st Century_, the "conference examines a broad array of issues surrounding reproductive health and features panels of distinguished physicians, scholars, and health policy advocates discussing the scientific, ethical, and social dimensions of medical and technological advances in the field and their global implications." Conference topics include The Politics and Ethics of Bodily Integrity; In Vitro Fertilization in the Muslim Middle East; Women Workers as Reproducers; and The Moral Issue of Sex Selection, to name a few. In addition to the video clips, the website contains topic summaries, short biographies of the numerous panelists, a feedback survey form, and links to related Harvard@Home programs. This site is also reviewed in the February 4, 2005_NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

  15. Nurses, community health workers, and home carers: gendered human resources compensating for skewed health systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. George

    2008-01-01

    This review examines the experiences of nurses, community health workers, and home carers in health systems from a gender analysis. With respect to nursing, current discussions around delegation take place over layers of historical struggle that mark the evolution of nursing as a profession. Female community health workers also struggle to be recognized as skilled workers, in addition to defending

  16. Parent involvement with children's health promotion: the Minnesota Home Team.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, C L; Luepker, R V; Murray, D M; Kurth, C; Mullis, R; Crockett, S; Jacobs, D R

    1988-01-01

    This study compares the efficacy of a school-based program to an equivalent home-based program with 2,250 third grade students in 31 urban schools in Minnesota in order to detect changes in dietary fat and sodium consumption. The school-based program, Hearty Heart and Friends, involved 15 sessions over five weeks in the third grade classrooms. The home-based program, the Home Team, involved a five-week correspondence course with the third graders, where parental involvement was necessary in order to complete the activities. Outcome measures included anthropometric, psychosocial and behavioral assessments at school, and dietary recall, food shelf inventories, and urinary sodium data collected in the students' homes. Participation rates for all aspects of the study were notably high. Eighty-six per cent of the parents participated in the Home Team and 71 per cent (nearly 1,000 families) completed the five-week course. Students in the school-based program had gained more knowledge at posttest than students in the home-based program or controls. Students in the home-based program, however, reported more behavior change, had reduced the total fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat in their diets, and had more of the encouraged foods on their food shelves. The data converge to suggest the feasibility and importance of parental involvement for health behavior changes with children of this age. PMID:3407811

  17. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program...expansion supplements of $100,000 to 10 Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA...Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX...

  18. 77 FR 41547 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...July 13, 2012 Part III Department of Health and Human Services...431 et al. Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...and Enforcement Requirements for Home Health Agencies; Proposed Rule Federal...

  19. A look to the future. Home health PPS.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M

    1999-03-01

    HCFA continues to move toward its goal of implementing a per-episode prospective payment system for home health care. What is in store for agencies, and how can they be prepared for all of the changes that will come when the shift from the current interim payment system to the new model is complete? If they are to thrive, agencies must understand the background behind IPS and PPS and what the future holds. PMID:10387560

  20. A Home Health Care System for Family Doctor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, Ryuji; Taketa, Norihiro

    We propose a constitution technique of small-scale Home Health Care system for family doctor that has been developed by applying various API of JAVA. One function is vital data transmission which allows a family doctor to check the data of elderly persons with ease via Internet. Vital data is encrypted and transmitted for the purpose of security. The other function is telecommunication with voice and face image for care consulting.

  1. Early home oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Varavithya, W; Pichaipat, V; Mangklasiri, R; Thanomsingh, P; Pavabutara, P

    1986-10-01

    This is a detailed account and comparison of use of 3 types of home-prepared oral rehydration solution versus no early treatment in 4 Thai villages from March 1983 to February 1984. The solutions, prepared with boiling water in a standard 750 ml fish sauce bottle contained: 2 spoons sugar and 2 spoon handle tips salt; 2 spoons sugar and 2 spoon tips tea; or 2 spoon tips salt in rice water as opposed to boiling water. Amounts dispensed were specified by number of watery stools and age of sufferer. All treatment was followed by breast feeding or soft diet within 2-4 hours. There were 0.05 episodes of diarrhea per person yearly, 0.10 per child, 9.5% in infants under 1 year, and 20.1% per child aged 1-4. Recovery rates ranged from 91-99% with home treatment, the highest with the tea mixture. Acceptability was good except for the rice water mixture: rice water is used for pig and dog food in this culture. In the test villages, 6.6% of diarrhea episodes required rehydration at the health center, while the control village needed treatment for 25.9% of episodes at the local health center, provincial hospital or private clinics. The estimated cost of therapy for each diarrheal episode was over $2.00 US for purchased medication, or 30 times the expense of home mixed solution. Medicines used were oral rehydration solutions, sulfa, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, kaolin, loperamide, or herbs. Analysis of some home mixed solutions is reported. The tea mixture contained virtually no electrolytes, but was effective because it was used earlier than solution requiring mealtime rice water, for example. In this trial, where treatment was under control of villagers and fully integrated into the primary health care system, early home treatment was more effective than later care in the center. PMID:3805938

  2. Coaching the Multiplicity of Mind: A Strengths-based Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Professional health and wellness coaches are passionate about helping people learn, change, and grow. We are lifelong students of what enables humans to perform at our best. The phrase coaching the whole person is common coaching parlance; full engagement in self-care often requires that clients shift a spectrum of beliefs, motives, and perspectives in order to make changes that are sustainable. Just as important is the need for coaches to fully engage in their own self-care in order to best serve their clients. PMID:24416685

  3. Coaching the Multiplicity of Mind: A Strengths-based Model.

    PubMed

    Moore, Margaret

    2013-07-01

    Professional health and wellness coaches are passionate about helping people learn, change, and grow. We are lifelong students of what enables humans to perform at our best. The phrase coaching the whole person is common coaching parlance; full engagement in self-care often requires that clients shift a spectrum of beliefs, motives, and perspectives in order to make changes that are sustainable. Just as important is the need for coaches to fully engage in their own self-care in order to best serve their clients. PMID:24416685

  4. Effectiveness of general practice based, practice nurse led telephone coaching on glycaemic control of type 2 diabetes: the Patient Engagement And Coaching for Health (PEACH) pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of goal focused telephone coaching by practice nurses in improving glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in Australia. Design Prospective, cluster randomised controlled trial, with general practices as the unit of randomisation. Setting General practices in Victoria, Australia. Participants 59 of 69 general practices that agreed to participate recruited sufficient patients and were randomised. Of 829 patients with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) >7.5% in the past 12 months) who were assessed for eligibility, 473 (236 from 30 intervention practices and 237 from 29 control practices) agreed to participate. Intervention Practice nurses from intervention practices received two days of training in a telephone coaching programme, which aimed to deliver eight telephone and one face to face coaching episodes per patient. Main outcome measures The primary end point was mean absolute change in HbA1c between baseline and 18 months in the intervention group compared with the control group. Results The intervention and control patients were similar at baseline. None of the practices dropped out over the study period; however, patient attrition rates were 5% in each group (11/236 and 11/237 in the intervention and control group, respectively). The median number of coaching sessions received by the 236 intervention patients was 3 (interquartile range 1-5), of which 25% (58/236) did not receive any coaching sessions. At 18 months’ follow-up the effect on glycaemic control did not differ significantly (mean difference 0.02, 95% confidence interval ?0.20 to 0.24, P=0.84) between the intervention and control groups, adjusted for HbA1c measured at baseline and the clustering. Other biochemical and clinical outcomes were similar in both groups. Conclusions A practice nurse led telephone coaching intervention implemented in the real world primary care setting produced comparable outcomes to usual primary care in Australia. The addition of a goal focused coaching role onto the ongoing generalist role of a practice nurse without prescribing rights was found to be ineffective. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN50662837. PMID:24048296

  5. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  6. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Larsen, Torben; Strömberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis, and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following components: integrated multidisciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimised treatment. Discussion We summarised the state of the art of home-based care for heart failure patients in Europe, described the typical content of such care to provide a guide for health care providers. PMID:24250283

  7. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  8. The nurse manager: change agent, change coach?

    PubMed

    Stefancyk, Amanda; Hancock, Beverly; Meadows, Mary T

    2013-01-01

    Change in today's health care landscape is a daily, if not hourly, reality. The nurse manager must have strong leadership skills to navigate through change with a focus on the patient and the provision of safe and reliable care. The historical term for those leading change is "change agent." In this article, the authors introduce the idea of a change coach, building on the nurse manager foundational skill of coaching and weaving this concept into the manager's role in change. A change coach uses the coaching behaviors including guidance, facilitation, and inspiration to inspire others toward change, altering human capabilities, and supporting and influencing others toward change. An exemplar of the nurse manager's role as a change coach in practice is provided using American Organization of Nurse Executives' Care Innovation and Transformation initiative. It is the agile manager that is able to successfully move between the roles of change agent and change coach to continuously transform the environment and how care is delivered. PMID:23222749

  9. Home Foreclosure, Health, and Mental Health: A Systematic Review of Individual, Aggregate, and Contextual Associations

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The U.S. foreclosure crisis intensified markedly during the Great Recession of 2007-09, and currently an estimated five percent of U.S. residential properties are more than 90 days past due or in the process of foreclosure. Yet there has been no systematic assessment of the effects of foreclosure on health and mental health. Methods and Findings I applied systematic search terms to PubMed and PsycINFO to identify quantitative or qualitative studies about the relationship between home foreclosure and health or mental health. After screening the titles and abstracts of 930 publications and reviewing the full text of 76 articles, dissertations, and other reports, I identified 42 publications representing 35 unique studies about foreclosure, health, and mental health. The majority of studies (32 [91%]) concluded that foreclosure had adverse effects on health or mental health, while three studies yielded null or mixed findings. Only two studies examined the extent to which foreclosure may have disproportionate impacts on ethnic or racial minority populations. Conclusions Home foreclosure adversely affects health and mental health through channels operating at multiple levels: at the individual level, the stress of personally experiencing foreclosure was associated with worsened mental health and adverse health behaviors, which were in turn linked to poorer health status; at the community level, increasing degradation of the neighborhood environment had indirect, cross-level adverse effects on health and mental health. Early intervention may be able to prevent acute economic shocks from eventually developing into the chronic stress of foreclosure, with all of the attendant benefits this implies for health and mental health status. Programs designed to encourage early return of foreclosed properties back into productive use may have similar health and mental health benefits. PMID:25849962

  10. Executive Coaching and Consulting: Different Strokes for Different Folks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William H. Berman; George Bradt

    2006-01-01

    Increasing frustration with the politics and economics of traditional mental health care has led many psychologists to consider shifting to or adding executive coaching as a core competency in their practices. Experience with work-related issues in clinical practice makes this appear to be a logical extension of traditional clinical and counseling work. There are many types of executive coaching and

  11. Soccer Coaching Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Bill

    The basic principles and techniques of soccer are explained and illustrated with photographs and diagrams to aid teachers who are introducing soccer into the physical education curriculum. In addition, it is designed to guide youth soccer coaches who wish to improve their presentations. The book discusses: (1) coaching methods; (2) passing and…

  12. The Student Success Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuhauser, Claudia; Weber, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    An innovative position, a Student Success Coach, was created in response to a newly developed undergraduate-degree program on the recently established University of Minnesota Rochester campus. Student Success Coaches serve as the link between the academic and student affairs sides of the campus. They interact closely with students and faculty to…

  13. Instructional Coaching. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Julie; Steiner, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Schools and districts invest a great deal of time and money in professional development for teachers through instructional coaching. With this effort comes the responsibility to design coaching programs that have the greatest potential to improve classroom instruction and, in turn, increase student learning. What research is available to help…

  14. Lesson Study: Beyond Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca; Foster, David; Hurd, Jacqueline; Fisher, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The authors assert that lesson study--a collaborative, teacher-led approach to learning from practice--offers a deeper, broader, more sustainable method of improving teacher practice than one-on-one coaching does. In lesson study, teachers and coaches of all levels of experience can work together, each bringing his or her own professional…

  15. A Coaching Psychology Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008), John Radford considers "what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education". In this article, the author looks at the possible inclusion of coaching psychology within undergraduate psychology programmes. Coaching psychology as an applied area of psychology…

  16. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  17. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  18. Wireless health data exchange for home healthcare monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema. PMID:22319296

  19. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach. PMID:25105087

  20. Advanced care planning: a study on home health nurses.

    PubMed

    Badzek, Laurie A; Leslie, Nan; Schwertfeger, Renee Unice; Deiriggi, Pamela; Glover, Jacqueline; Friend, Laura

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess home health nurses' (HHNs) knowledge, comfort levels, barriers, and personal participation in advanced care planning (ACP), a practice that recognizes patient preferences for health care treatment. Licensed nurses who identified home care as their primary area of practice (N = 519) were surveyed about their knowledge of laws governing ACP and their perceptions of patients' preferences for ACP. Most respondents were women (97%), and the average age of the respondents was 54 years. Most nurses felt knowledgeable and capable of educating patients on advance directives (ADs), although the nurses' knowledge of laws governing ACP was limited and often inaccurate. Generally, nurses felt comfortable during ACP discussions with patients and families. HHNs perceived patient or family reluctance as the greatest barrier hindering discussions of ACP. No association was found between level of education and whether a nurse had a personal AD. Twenty percent of the nurses had their valid personal AD. A greater knowledge base concerning ACP would facilitate HHN discussions with patients and families. Recognition of patient preferences can be enhanced by understanding and overcoming barriers that hinder discussions of ACP. Educational opportunities focusing on ACP are encouraged for all health care providers. PMID:16728288

  1. A Statewide Assessment of Electronic Health Record Adoption and Health Information Exchange among Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Erika L; McGinnis, Sandra; Moore, Jean; Kaushal, Rainu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine rates of electronic health record (EHR) adoption and health information exchange (HIE) among New York State (NYS) nursing homes. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected from a novel survey administered between November 2011 and March 2012 to all NYS nursing homes. Study Design We used a cross-sectional study design to assess level of EHR implementation, automation of key functionalities, participation in HIE, and barriers to adoption. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We used descriptive statistics to characterize rates of EHR adoption and participation in HIE and logistic regression to identify nursing home characteristics associated with EHR adoption and HIE. Principal Findings We received responses from 375 of 632 nursing homes (59.3 percent). Of respondents, almost one in five (n?=?66, 18.0 percent) reported having a fully implemented and operational EHR and a majority (n?=?192, 54.4 percent) reported electronically exchanging information. Nursing homes with 100–159 beds were significantly less likely than other facilities to have implemented or be in the process of implementing an EHR (p?=?.011). Conclusions Our findings present an important systematic look at EHR adoption and HIE by NYS nursing homes. Although the nursing home sector has been reported to lag in health information technology adoption, our results are encouraging. However, they suggest much room for growth and highlight the need for targeted initiatives to achieve more widespread adoption in this important health care sector. PMID:24359612

  2. Predicting Improvement in Urinary and Bowel Incontinence for Home Health Patients Using Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Westra, Bonnie L.; Savik, Kay; Oancea, Cristina; Choromanski, Lynn; Holmes, John H.; Bliss, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to discover which patient and support system characteristics and interventions documented by home health clinicians were associated with improvement in urinary and bowel incontinence contrasting logistic regression and data mining approaches. Subjects and Setting 1,793 patients in this study had 2,072 episodes of care representing all non-maternity patients who were ages 18 or older and receiving skilled home health services in 2004 from a convenience sample of 15 home health agencies. Design This study is a secondary analysis of data from 15 home health agencies' electronic health records. Instruments Data for this study were documented by home care clinicians using the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) structured assessment form and the Omaha System interventions, which is a standardized terminology. Results There were 684 patients with urinary incontinence and 187 with bowel incontinence. By discharge 38% improved in urinary incontinence and 45% improved their bowel incontinence. Using logistic regression, no patient or support system characteristics were associated with improvement in either urinary or bowel incontinence, only a limited number of interventions were significant. A data mining decision tree was producible only for bowel incontinence, demonstrating a combination of patient and support system factors as well as selected interventions were important in determining whether patients would improve in bowel incontinence. Conclusions Home health patients have complex comorbid conditions requiring home care nurses to have broad, generalized knowledge. Future research is needed to determine if the inclusion of a certified wound, ostomy, and continence nurse would improve outcomes. PMID:21287773

  3. Work environment characteristics of high-quality home health agencies.

    PubMed

    Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Riggs, Jennifer S; Farag, Amany A

    2011-10-01

    This concurrent mixed-method study examines the nurse work environment of high-quality Medicare-certified home health agencies. High-quality (n=6) and low-quality (n=6) home health agencies were recruited using agency-level publicly reported patient outcomes. Direct care registered nurses (RNs) from each agency participated in a focus group and completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nurse Work Index (PES-NWI). No significant differences were found in the PES-NWI results between nurses working in high- and low-quality agencies, though nurses in high-quality agencies scored higher on all subscales. Nurses working in all the high-quality agencies identified themes of adequate staffing, supportive managers, and team work. These themes were not consistently identified in low-quality agencies. Themes of supportive managers and team work are reflective of effective leadership at the manager level. Agencies struggling to improve quality of care might consider developing their managers' leadership skills. PMID:20935216

  4. Health Coaching and Genomics—Potential Avenues to Elicit Behavior Change in Those at Risk for Chronic Disease: Protocol for Personalized Medicine Effectiveness Study in Air Force Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Vorderstrasse, Allison A.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Kraus, William E.; Maldonado, Maj Carlos J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD) are prevalent chronic diseases from which military personnel are not exempt. While many genetic markers for these diseases have been identified, the clinical utility of genetic risk testing for multifactorial diseases such as these has not been established. The need for a behavioral intervention such as health coaching following a risk counseling intervention for T2D or CHD also has not been explored. Here we present the rationale, design, and protocol for evaluating the clinical utility of genetic risk testing and health coaching for active duty US Air Force (AF) retirees and beneficiaries. Primary Study Objectives: Determine the direct and interactive effects of health coaching and providing genetic risk information when added to standard risk counseling for CHD and T2D on health behaviors and clinical risk markers. Design: Four-group (2 X 2 factorial) randomized controlled trial. Setting: Two AF primary care clinical settings on the west coast of the United States. Participants: Adult AF primary care patients. Intervention: All participants will have a risk counseling visit with a clinic provider to discuss personal risk factors for T2D and CHD. Half of the participants (two groups) will also learn of their genetic risk testing results for T2D and CHD in this risk counseling session. Participants randomized to the two groups receiving health coaching will then receive telephonic health coaching over 6 months. Main Outcome Measures: Behavioral measures (self-reported dietary intake, physical activity, smoking cessation, medication adherence); clinical outcomes (AF composite fitness scores, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipids, T2D/CHD risk scores) and psychosocial measures (self-efficacy, worry, perceived risk) will be collected at baseline and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months. Conclusion: This study tests novel strategies deployed within existing AF primary care to increase adherence to evidence-based diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and medication recommendations for CHD and T2D risk reduction through methods of patient engagement and self-management support. PMID:24416670

  5. Home health care services: management and effectiveness in changing times.

    PubMed

    Shick, Robert; Balinsky, Warren

    2006-01-01

    New York City has the largest Medicaid personal care program (a form of home health care which includes many of the activities of daily living) in the country with approximately 45,000 clients and an annual budget of $1.5 billion. During the late 1980s and into the 1990s, New York State was experiencing budget difficulties, and established savings targets for local governments providing personal care services. In response, New York City, through its Home Attendant Program, began using different means of assessing clients' service needs to produce these savings. This article examines Task Based Assessment (a new service assessment methodology), and determines the degree to which it was successful, organizational issues that were faced by New York City and the 60 nonprofit and profit making companies contracted to deliver the service, legal challenges that were raised by advocacy groups and another alternative to the delivery of personal care services, a capitated long term care program. Task Based Assessment did not achieve its goals and the authors suggest, based on the positive experience from the capitated long term care program in controlling personal care hours, that it is more effective to expand these capitated programs than to seek to achieve further cost savings through the Home Attendant Program. PMID:16583747

  6. Coaching Youth Livestock Projects

    E-print Network

    Merten, Kyle J.; Boleman, Chris

    2008-07-10

    ?sfuturewhile webuildcharacterintheshowring. ?Itdoesn?tmatterwhatplaceyoungcompetitorsget attheendoftheshow;iftheyhavelearnedsome- thingnew,theyhavewonfirstplaceanyway. CoachingYouth Livestock Projects Kyle J. Merten and ChrisT. Boleman * * ExtensionAssociate for Program Development...

  7. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...170 Section 410.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY... § 410.170 Payment for home health services, for medical and...

  8. Framing the evidence for health smart homes and home-based consumer health technologies as a public health intervention for independent aging: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Meyer, Ellen; Lazar, Amanda; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a critical need for public health interventions to support the independence of older adults as the world’s population ages. Health smart homes (HSH) and home-based consumer health (HCH) technologies may play a role in these interventions. Methods We conducted a systematic review of HSH and HCH literature from indexed repositories for health care and technology disciplines (e.g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore) and classified included studies according to an evidence-based public health (EBPH) typology. Results One thousand, six hundred and thirty nine candidate articles were identified. Thirty-one studies from the years 1998–2011 were included. Twenty-one included studies were classified as emerging, 10 as promising and 3 as effective (first tier). Conclusion The majority of included studies were published in the period beginning in the year 2005. All 3 effective (first tier) studies and 9 of 10 of promising studies were published during this period. Almost all studies included an activity sensing component and most of these used passive infrared motion sensors. The three effective (first tier) studies all used a multicomponent technology approach that included activity sensing, reminders and other technologies tailored to individual preferences. Future research should explore the use of technology for self-management of health by older adults, social support and self-reported health measures incorporated into personal health records, electronic medical records, and community health registries. PMID:23639263

  9. Tools: Successful Coaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative

    2013-01-01

    This webpage contains tools for math coaches and math specialists to utilize before, during, and after teacher observations. These tools are built upon NCSM's PRIME Leadership Framework to enable math specialists and coaches to build relationships and encourage leadership in others and created by The Robert Noyce Foundation in conjunction with Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative (SMVI). Each tool can be previewed on the left by clicking the name of the tool and can be viewed in full by clicking beneath the tool name.

  10. Coaching for workers with chronic illness: Evaluating an intervention.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, Alyssa K; Beatty, Joy E; Joffe, Rosalind

    2014-07-01

    Working with chronic illness may present challenges for individuals-for instance, managing symptoms at work, attaining accommodations, and career planning while considering health limitations. These challenges may be stressful and lead to strains. We tested a 12-week, 6-session, phone-based coaching intervention designed to help workers manage these challenges and reduce strains. Using theories of stress and resources, we proposed that coaching would help boost workers' internal resources and would lead to improved work ability perceptions, exhaustion and disengagement burnout, job self-efficacy, core self-evaluations, resilience, mental resources, and job satisfaction, and that these beneficial effects would be stable 12 weeks after coaching ended. Fifty-nine full-time workers with chronic illnesses were randomly assigned to either a coaching group or a waitlisted control group. Participants completed online surveys at enrollment, at the start of coaching, after coaching ended, and 12 weeks postcoaching. Compared with the control group, the coaching group showed significantly improved work ability perceptions, exhaustion burnout, core self-evaluations, and resilience-yet no significant improvements were found for job self-efficacy, disengagement burnout, or job satisfaction. Indirect effects of coaching on work ability, exhaustion and disengagement burnout, and job satisfaction were observed through job self-efficacy, core self-evaluations, resilience, and mental resources. Results indicated that the positive effects of coaching were stable 12 weeks after coaching ended. Results suggest that this coaching intervention was helpful in improving the personal well-being of individuals navigating challenges associated with working and managing chronic illness. PMID:24796227

  11. 65 FR 41128 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-07-03

    ...mental health, we looked at the relationship between home health resource use and mental health diagnoses (psychoses, drug psychoses, and neurotic disorders). We found that this group of conditions did not greatly...

  12. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable...methodology for in- and outpatient health care professional services provided...FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care [T]he...

  13. Play@home in practice: health visitors' views of perceived facilitators and barriers to programme implementation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Irene; Barton, Gil

    2013-07-01

    Health visitors in Scotland gift 'play@home', a book-based early intervention programme, to parents as part of the universal health visiting service. The provision of health improvement information to parents is recognised as a core function of health visiting and yet evidence shows that not every family receives the play@home resources. This paper discusses the perceived facilitators and barriers to implementing this programme through exploring the views of ten health visitors and four health visiting managers in two health board areas in Scotland. The findings conclude that increasingly vulnerable families, supported by fewer qualified health visitors, present challenges to the health visiting service. The play@home programme is valued by health visitors as a flexible tool with which to engage with families. Collaborative working with other services enhances provision and play@home does become embedded in practice over time. Strategic policy links to raise the profile of play@home are improving. PMID:23914476

  14. Coaching Considerations: FAQs Useful in the Development of Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The National Advisory Board for the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse have identified a number of considerations that it believed needed further discussion as schools, districts, and states embrace literacy coaching. It negotiated and discussed a number of issues surrounding coaching and agreed on 10 key ideas that should be part of the discussions…

  15. Community Sport Coaching and Citizenship Education: educating the coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Blundell; Peter Cunningham

    The paper explores design considerations for a Foundation Degree in Community Sports Coaching with a focus on cricket. We view coaching as social practice and explore the potential for seeing Community Sports Coaches as 'agents of Citizenship Education'. Cricket's position is historically ironic in post-colonial Britain, being both the game of the colonial elite yet also woven into the habitus

  16. Middle Grades Literacy Coaching from the Coach's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Antony T.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated middle grades literacy coaches' perspectives on their efforts to facilitate teacher change and impact classroom practice. Data were collected from three coaches as they worked with a variety of teachers in middle school settings, using field observation and interviews with coaches, teachers, and principals.…

  17. Constant Contact Guide For Coaches

    E-print Network

    - Ethnicity/Race #12;#12;To add a new student, click the "add" button (circled in red to fill it out. School Information - School name - School phone number - School mailing address Coach Information Primary Coach - First & last name

  18. [Diet counseling through "Shoku-dietary Coaching"].

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Naoko

    2005-11-01

    "Shoku-dietary Coaching" is a skill under development by Kageyama, who applies "coaching," widely used in the business field, to diet counseling. This counseling aims at improving conventional "nutritional guidance-type diet counseling" and promoting self-motivation so that healthy clients eagerly improve their own health, and clients with obesity or lifestyle-related diseases can learn self-control. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, the basis for the differentiation between healthy and unhealthy conditions is not only the parameters measured by medical devices. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, attention is directed to clients' assessment of their own lifestyle, dietary goals they have, and actions they will take to achieve them. To increase the health level of clients, we are developing techniques to enhance their motivation by showing sympathy with and support for their dietary behavior and health awareness. In addition, we give guidance through both theory and the practice of such things as having three meals a day at regular hours, knowing the kinds and daily amounts of foods appropriate for each client, and clarifying the percentages of seasonings necessary for cooking. The habit of having meals at regular hours alleviates stress, promotes communication with people sitting at the same table, and increases the health level of both the client and the others. These are important elements in the theory of Shoku-dietary Coaching. Putting the above into practice should not be limited to clients, but should include the clinic staff so as to deepen their own understanding and communication. Enhanced communication reinforces team medical care in the clinic. Communication skills which involve respect for others, continuous motivation of individuals, and achievement of purposes that may even require a long time may be useful for all people. PMID:16372759

  19. Pre-Exercise Screening and Health Coaching in CHD Secondary Prevention: A Qualitative Study of the Patient Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, R.; Gillies, M.; Barber, J.; MacIntyre, K.; Harkins, C.; Findlay, I. N.; McCloy, K.; Gillie, A.; Scoular, A.; MacIntyre, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention programmes can be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD). In particular, UK guidelines, including those from the Department of Health, emphasize physical activity. However, the effects of secondary prevention programmes with an exercise component are moderate and uptake is highly…

  20. The Principal as Formative Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nidus, Gabrielle; Sadder, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Formative coaching, an approach that uses student work as the foundation for mentoring and professional development, can help principals become more effective instructional leaders. In formative coaching, teaches and coaches analyze student work to determine next steps for instruction. This article shows how a principal can use the steps of the…

  1. Coaching Education in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Tom, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Because of increasingly large numbers of nonteacher elementary and secondary coaches, there is concern about the effect on participants and on the future of athletics. Nine articles highlight five North American national coaching education programs, three states with secondary coaching education programs, and a directory of U.S. sport…

  2. The College of Public Health (CPH) is home to four academic departments, three institutes, and one

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    #12;The College of Public Health (CPH) is home to four academic departments, three institutes, and the Center for Global Health. CPH also houses a Georgia Public Health Training Center. By bringing together of Public Health allows UGA to better address the serious disease and health problems that affect

  3. Moving Toward Medicare Home Health Coverage for Persons with Alzheimer's Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Cabin

    2008-01-01

    Medicare home health care policy does not incorporate research evidence of effective palliative home care interventions for Alzheimer's disease and dementia patients and caregivers. This article examines the dissonance between the needs and burdens of Alzheimer's disease patients and caregivers, research results on medical and palliative care interventions, and medicalized public policy in the Medicare home health benefit. The article

  4. Americans Needing Home Care, United States. Data from the National Health Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Barbara A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents information from the Home Care Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on the types of help needed by adults with chronic health problems who live outside of institutions. Home care items discussed include: (1) assistance in basic physical activities; (2) assistance in home management activities; (3) adults…

  5. Huddle-coaching: a dynamic intervention for trainees and staff to support team-based care.

    PubMed

    Shunk, Rebecca; Dulay, Maya; Chou, Calvin L; Janson, Susan; O'Brien, Bridget C

    2014-02-01

    Many outpatient clinics where health professionals train will transition to a team-based medical home model over the next several years. Therefore, training programs need innovative approaches to prepare and incorporate trainees into team-based delivery systems. To address this need, educators at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center included trainees in preclinic team "huddles," or briefing meetings to facilitate care coordination, and developed an interprofessional huddle-coaching program for nurse practitioner students and internal medicine residents who function as primary providers for patient panels in VA outpatient primary care clinics. The program aimed to support trainees' partnerships with staff and full participation in the VA's Patient Aligned Care Teams. The huddle-coaching program focuses on structuring the huddle process via scheduling, checklists, and designated huddle coaches; building relationships among team members through team-building activities; and teaching core skills to support collaborative practice. A multifaceted evaluation of the program showed positive results. Participants rated training sessions and team-building activities favorably. In interviews, trainees valued their team members and identified improvements in efficiency and quality of patient care as a result of the team-based approach. Huddle checklists and scores on the Team Development Measure indicated progress in team processes and relationships as the year progressed. These findings suggest that the huddle-coaching program was a worthwhile investment in trainee development that also supported the clinic's larger mission to deliver team-based, patient-aligned care. As more training sites shift to team-based care, the huddle-coaching program offers a strategy for successfully incorporating trainees. PMID:24362383

  6. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...governing payments for certain non-VA health care, 38 CFR 17.56, applicable to...rule, we estimate that each home health care and hospice provider that does...negotiated contracts offer home health care or hospice care to veterans...

  7. Coaching efficacy in intercollegiate coaches: sources, coaching behavior, and team variables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas D. Myers; Tiffanye M. Vargas-Tonsing; Deborah L. Feltz

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the influence of (a) proposed sources of efficacy information on dimensions of coaching efficacy and (b) coaching efficacy on coaching behavior and team variables.Design: A field correlational design tested relationships at two time points: near the beginning and at three-fourths of the way through a season of competition.Method: At Time 1, head coaches (n=135) completed a questionnaire

  8. Exploring workplace violence among home care workers in a consumer-driven home health care program.

    PubMed

    Nakaishi, Lindsay; Moss, Helen; Weinstein, Marc; Perrin, Nancy; Rose, Linda; Anger, W Kent; Hanson, Ginger C; Christian, Mervyn; Glass, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    Nominal research has examined sexual harassment and workplace violence against home care workers within consumer-driven home care models such as those offered in Oregon. This study examined home care workers' experiences of violence while providing care to consumer employers, the patients who hire and manage home care workers. Focus groups and interviews were conducted in Oregon with 83 home care workers, 99 Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) employees, and 11 consumer employers. Home care workers reported incidents of workplace physical violence (44%), psychological abuse (65%), sexual harassment (41%), and sexual violence (14%). Further, three themes were identified that may increase the risk of workplace violence: (1) real and perceived barriers to reporting violence; (2) tolerance of violence; and (3) limited training to prevent violence. To ensure worker safety while maintaining quality care, safety policies and training for consumer employers, state DHS employees, and home care workers must be developed. PMID:24053217

  9. Understanding challenges in the front lines of home health care: a human-systems approach.

    PubMed

    Beer, Jenay M; McBride, Sara E; Mitzner, Tracy L; Rogers, Wendy A

    2014-11-01

    A human-systems perspective is a fruitful approach to understanding home health care because it emphasizes major individual components of the system - persons, equipment/technology, tasks, and environments - as well as the interaction between these components. The goal of this research was to apply a human-system perspective to consider the capabilities and limitations of the persons, in relation to the demands of the tasks and equipment/technology in home health care. Identification of challenges and mismatches between the person(s) capabilities and the demands of providing care provide guidance for human factors interventions. A qualitative study was conducted with 8 home health Certified Nursing Assistants and 8 home health Registered Nurses interviewed about challenges they encounter in their jobs. A systematic categorization of the challenges the care providers reported was conducted and human factors recommendations were proposed in response, to improve home health. The challenges inform a human-systems model of home health care. PMID:24958610

  10. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation.

    PubMed

    Dossey, Barbara M; Hess, Darlene

    2013-07-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)-the foundational philosopher of modern nursing-to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.(1) (,) (2) The Institute of Medicine report(3) and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  11. My Home Planet Earth: My Health My World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World series which explores environmental health issues. It includes (1) an activities guide for teachers, which focuses on physical science, life science, and environment and health, presenting activity based lessons that entice students to discover concepts in science,…

  12. NCSM Coaching Corner: Resources for Mathematics Specialists

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    Coaching Corner is a section of the website of the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics. This page is designed to support specialists, coaches and leaders of coaching programs as they progress through the stages of leadership growth. Coaching Corner points to key aspects of knowledge that specifically apply to coaches and coaching programs and provides resources to support a specialist, coach or leader in gaining such knowledge. Sections include Resources for Coaches, Resources for Coaching Leaders, Professional Learning Opportunities, FAQs, and links to supportive websites.

  13. The Healthy Homes Initiative Housing conditions can significantly affect public health.

    E-print Network

    Association, and the World Health Organization. · Identify and implement low-cost, reliable, and practical-based organizations, and others, including the American Public Health Association, National Environmental HealthThe Healthy Homes Initiative Housing conditions can significantly affect public health. Nationwide

  14. Association of Language Spoken at Home with Health and School Issues among Asian American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Stella M.; Huang, Zhihuan J.; Schwalberg, Renee H.; Overpeck, Mary D.; Kogan, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between language spoken at home and school and health risks and behaviors of Asian American adolescents. Data from the World Health Organization Study of Health Behavior in School Children indicated increased risk for physical, psychosocial, and school health problems among these students. The risks were greater for the…

  15. Health Profile of Aging Family Caregivers Supporting Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaki, Kiyoshi; Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    The health status of 206 female caregivers supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at home was investigated using objective (i.e., presence of chronic health conditions and activity limitations) and subjective (i.e., self-perceived health status) health measures compared with those of women in the general population in 2…

  16. The effectiveness of health coaching, home blood pressure monitoring, and home-titration in controlling hypertension among low-income patients: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Bennett; Kelsey Laird; David Margolius; Victoria Ngo; David H Thom; Thomas Bodenheimer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the many antihypertensive medications available, two-thirds of patients with hypertension do not achieve blood pressure control. This is thought to be due to a combination of poor patient education, poor medication adherence, and \\

  17. Innovations in coaching and mentoring: implications for nurse leadership development.

    PubMed

    Fielden, Sandra L; Davidson, Marilyn J; Sutherland, Valerie J

    2009-05-01

    This longitudinal study sought to examine ways in which coaching and mentoring relationships impact on the professional development of nurses in terms of career and leadership behaviours, and evaluating the differences and similarities between those coaching and mentoring relationships. According to the UK government, leadership in nursing is essential to the improvement of service delivery, and the development and training of all nurses is vital in achieving effective change. A coaching and mentoring programme was used to explore the comparative advantages of these two approaches for the leadership development of nurses in acute, primary care and mental health settings. A longitudinal in-depth study was conducted to measure differences and similarities between the mentoring and coaching process as a result of a six-month coaching/mentoring programme. Five nurses from six UK Health Care Trusts were allocated to a coaching group (n = 15) or a mentoring group (n = 15), these were coached or mentored by a member of the senior directorate from their own Trust. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected at three time points (T1 = baseline, T2 = 4 months and T3 = 9 months) using semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. While mentoring was perceived to be 'support' and coaching was described as 'action', descriptions of the actual process and content were quite similar. However, while both groups reported significant development in terms of career development, leadership skills and capabilities, mentees reported the highest level of development with significantly higher scores in eight areas of leadership and management and in three areas of career impact. Implications for nurses and health services are discussed. PMID:19401502

  18. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  19. 76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

  20. 78 FR 40271 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ...128 July 3, 2013 Part II Department of Health and Human Services...Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014, Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements, and...

  1. Preparing Newly Licensed Associate Degree Nurses to Work in Home Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan Chaya; Margaret Reilly; Denise Davin; Mari Moriarty; Valerie Nero-Reid; Peri Rosenfeld

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an innovative learning program, designed for associate degree nurse (ADN) graduates, developed at the visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY) to expand its hiring pool of potential applicants to home health care nursing positions. The program, “Transitions to Home Health Care,” provides a strong emphasis on independent judgment, assessment skills, and collaboration with other professions and

  2. Home and community care services: a major opportunity for preventive health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louisa R Jorm; Scott R Walter; Sanja Lujic; Julie E Byles; Hal L Kendig

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Australia, the Home and Community Care (HACC) program provides services in the community to frail elderly living at home and their carers. Surprisingly little is known about the health of people who use these services. In this study we sought to describe health-related factors associated with use of HACC services, and to identify potential opportunities for targeting preventive

  3. Training of Home Health Aides and Nurse Aides: Findings from National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Manisha; Ejaz, Farida K.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the…

  4. Training of Home Health Aides and Nurse Aides: Findings From National Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manisha Sengupta; Farida K. Ejaz; Lauren D. Harris-Kojetin

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007 respectively. This paper focuses on the commonalities and differences in the perceptions of CNAs and HHAs regarding

  5. IMPROVING INDOOR AIR IN NEW ZEALAND HOMES: THE RESPIRATORY HEALTH EFFECTS OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE EXPOSURE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie Gillespie-Bennett; Nevil Pierse; Kristin Wickens; Julian Crane; Helen Viggers; Sarah Nicholls; Philippa Howden-Chapman

    Many homes in New Zealand are poorly constructed and maintained for the climate with inadequate heating resulting in winter temperatures that frequently fall below the World Health Organisation recommended level of 18°C. Approximately 30% of New Zealand homes are heated by unflued portable gas heaters. To investigate the link between the indoor air environment and respiratory health effects in children,

  6. 76 FR 9502 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ...0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar...set forth an update to the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including...payment amounts, under the Medicare prospective payment system for HHAs. This...

  7. Effectiveness of home visits by public health nurses in maternal and child health: an empirical review.

    PubMed Central

    Combs-Orme, T; Reis, J; Ward, L D

    1985-01-01

    The effectiveness of public health nursing in promoting maternal and child health through home visits is summarized from empirical studies published between 1960 and 1984. Eight reports identified through a comprehensive reference search were first classified according to the components of nursing service studied (assessment, teaching, counseling or support, referral, and clinical services). The results of each study were then analyzed for study population characteristics, the research design and statistical methods employed, the reliability of the measures used, significant treatment effects, sample size, and statistical power. The research is evenly divided among studies employing an experimental design, a quasi-experimental design, and samples of low-income and middle-income mothers. The reliability of the measures was, with one exception, not reported. All but one study had final sample sizes for treatment and control or comparison groups of fewer than 100 subjects. Four of the studies thus had sample sizes sufficiently large to detect a medium treatment effect; power calculations showed that none could measure a small treatment impact. Within the methodological limitations of these studies, our review found that under certain circumstances public health nurses can effectively impart health knowledge to high-risk mothers and can effect positive change in maternal attitudes and parenting practices that in turn can be associated with positive changes in infant health and development. Cumulative knowledge from this body of research suggests that a priority for future evaluations of public health nursing is development of theoretical frameworks that maximize the fit between the needs of the population served and the services provided and between the outcomes measured and the nursing services being assessed. PMID:3931163

  8. Home Health News New Sensors Stick To Organs To Monitor Health What is this? EMAIL PRINT RSS

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Home Health News New Sensors Stick To Organs To Monitor Health Share What is this? EMAIL PRINT RSS New Sensors Stick to Organs to Monitor Health Pliable electronic devices already tracking heart generation of flexible, miniaturized devices that stick onto organs promises better diagnosis and control

  9. Protective roles of home and school environments for the health of young Canadians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Freeman; Matthew King; Emmanuel Kuntsche; William Pickett

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundThe relationships of home and school environments, health risk behaviours and two sentinel adolescent health outcomes were examined in an aetiological analysis. The analysis focused on determinants of the health of young people and the role of school settings in the optimisation of health.MethodsRecords were examined from the Canadian sample of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Survey. 3402

  10. Coaching the toxic leader.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Manfred F R Kets

    2014-04-01

    In his work as an executive coach, psychotherapist Kets de Vries sometimes comes across bosses with mental demons. The four kinds he encounters most frequently are pathological narcissists, who are selfish and entitled, have grandiose fantasies, and pursue power at all costs; manic-depressives, who can leave a trail of emotional blazes behind them; passive-aggressives, who shy away from confrontation but are obstructive and under-handed; and the emotionally disconnected--literal-minded people who cannot describe or even recognize their feelings. Left unchecked, these personalities can warp the interactions, plans, and systems of entire organizations. But with appropriate coaching, toxic bosses can learn to manage their conditions and become effective mentors and leaders. This article describes how to recognize each pathology and, step by step, guide people who suffer from it toward healthier and more-productive interactions. PMID:24830286

  11. Participatory health research: celebrating smoke-free homes.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Vivian R; McKay, Shari; Bighead, Shirley; Boucher, Gail; Bourassa, Carrie; Butt, Peter; Clinton, Andrea; Crowe, Jackie; Felix, Fred; Jorgenson, Derek; LaRocque, Karen; McKee, Nora; Nketia, Irene; Rabbitskin, Norma; Thunderchild, Ella; Troupe, Cheryl; Turner, Tara

    2013-09-01

    For community engagement to be successful, the interests of the community must be taken into account and researchers must become facilitators. Patience is required. Meaningful and sustainable relationships that have been developed over time promote mutual learning and capacity building among the partners (Elders, community members, health care providers, and researchers). In addition, community engagement leads to the sharing of available resources (eg, human, time, and financial) and to a sustained commitment by the partners. This mutual commitment makes future projects easier to develop and complete. Thus, authentic transformative health development, informed by participatory health research, becomes an ongoing process. PMID:24029518

  12. A remote data access architecture for home-monitoring health-care applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao-Hung Lin; Shuenn-Tsong Young; Te-Son Kuo

    2007-01-01

    With the aging of the population and the increasing patient preference for receiving care in their own homes, remote home care is one of the fastest growing areas of health care in Taiwan and many other countries. Many remote home-monitoring applications have been developed and implemented to enable both formal and informal caregivers to have remote access to patient data

  13. Bringing them home: a Gippsland mental health workforce recruitment strategy.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Keith; Maybery, Darryl; Moore, Terry

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on preliminary findings of a novel program piloted in 2010 to address rural mental health workforce shortages. The program involved exposing allied health and nursing students from rural backgrounds studying in Melbourne to mental health service employment opportunities in Gippsland. A longitudinal study is underway to evaluate the effect and outcomes of the program and includes surveying participants' interest in rural mental health work through an online questionnaire immediately prior to and following the program; and surveying career decisions at 6 months and yearly intervals. Paired sample t-tests were used to analyse participants' level of interest in rural work (pre-event 4.67 (1.50); post-event 5.93 (0.96); P=0.001), career in a rural setting (pre-event 4.67 (1.63); post-event 5.67 (1.23); P=0.006), mental health work (pre-event 4.73 (1.39); post-event 6.07 (0.80); P<0.000) and rural mental health career (pre-event 4.73 (1.33); post-event 5.80 (1.21); P=0.002). These findings indicate a significant increase from pre- to post-event and are supported by strong effect sizes suggesting that the program had a significant effect on participant interest in rural mental health work. Longer-term evaluation will determine whether the program influences participant career decisions and thereby addressing mental health workforce shortages in Gippsland. PMID:22513025

  14. Analysis of county-level data concerning the use of Medicare home health benefits.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, J

    1985-01-01

    A multiple regression analysis was undertaken of variables identified in the literature as underlying the relationship between community characteristics and the availability and use of home health services. The literature on social science and health care administration was reviewed to identify the variables that theoretically underlie different rates of home health care use among communities. County statistics then were used to quantify many of those variables that, when considered in combination, should explain much of the use of home health services. Three categories of variables--general community characteristics, health sector characteristics, and service availability--contribute roughly equal amounts to the total explained variance of 25 percent. Viewed from the opposite perspective, 75 percent of the use of Medicare home health benefits remains unexplained despite the purported strong association between the variables employed in this analysis and the use of home health services. These findings abase the long-held belief that substitution of inpatient services for home care is commonplace, and they suggest the potential effectiveness of community-level strategies to promote the use of home health services, particularly efforts to increase their availability. PMID:3918323

  15. Pre-Service Education for Nurses' Aides in Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Home Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    The guide was developed on the basis of advice from a widely representative committee appointed by the Colorado State Department of Public Health. The materials were tested in a course in an urban center and a course in a rural center. The initial portion of the manual presents: (1) guidelines for organizing preparatory nurse aide courses, (2)…

  16. The Behavioral Health Laboratory: Building a Stronger Foundation for the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Tew; Johanna Klaus; David W. Oslin

    2010-01-01

    The Veterans Health Affairs is in the process of implementing a new model for the delivery of primary care: The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH). One critical challenge of any PCMH model will be the integration of basic mental health treatment into primary care. Such a mental health integration program must be flexible enough to incorporate new evidence-based treatments as patient

  17. At-Home AIDS Test Raises Health Issues

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Allison Hertz (NewsHour Extra; )

    2005-11-30

    People around the world come together on Dec. 1 each year for World AIDS Day, a time to commemorate those lost to the deadly disease and to celebrate progress made to stop its spread. One way of preventing the spread of the disease is early detection of the HIV virus, which some say could be more easily done at home.

  18. Analysis of a home health agency's productivity system.

    PubMed

    Hellman, E A

    1991-12-01

    Productivity is an important issue in home care. Employee perceptions of an equitable system are crucial and have been linked to job satisfaction, motivation, and production. Ten staff nurses, and all supervisors and program directors were interviewed to elicit perceptions of the productivity system. Staff nurses' time sheets for seven months were evaluated retrospectively for visit length, number of visits per day, payer source, mileage per day, and travel time per day. Mean time in minutes spent in the patient's home on intravenous visits (n = 58 visits) was approximately twice as long as that of home care visit (n = 11,573 visits). Mean length of hospice visits (n = 368 visits) was 25 to 29 minutes longer than that of mean home care visits. The proportion of Medicare reimbursement was negatively correlated with productivity bonus point achievement (when two high and two low bonus point outliers were removed). Recommended changes were based on both qualitative analysis of employee perceptions of the productivity system and quantitative analysis of time sheets. PMID:1766909

  19. One-on-one coaching to improve pain assessment and management practices of pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C Céleste; Gagnon, Anita; Rennick, Janet; Rosmus, Christina; Patenaude, Hélène; Ellis, Jaqueline; Shapiro, Carla; Filion, Françoise; Ritchie, Judith; Byron, Jasmine

    2007-12-01

    Pain in children is infrequently assessed and managed by nurses. One-on-one coaching based on audit with feedback and the use of opinion leaders have been effective in changing professional health care practices. Coaching by an opinion leader for changing pediatric nurses' pain practices was tested in a clustered randomized trial in six Canadian pediatric hospitals. The rate of pain assessments, nurses' knowledge, and nonpharmacological interventions increased in the coaching group. However, there were significant site differences that could not be attributed to the coaching but to factors inherent in the sites. The context in which interventions are implemented will influence the effectiveness of individualized interventions. PMID:18036467

  20. How Coaching Forensics Made Me a Better Writing Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    The author, a high school teacher and forensics coach, describes ways to teach writing--including on-demand essays--that draw on successful practices she developed in coaching. Students learn the importance of using personal conviction and qualified thesis statements to build arguments, as well as learning "The Debater Four-Step," an effective…

  1. Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

  2. Advocating for Coaching Education with the New "National Coaching Report"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodey, Kimberly J.; Brylinsky, Jody; Kuhlman, Jolynn

    2008-01-01

    There is much variability in coach preparation across the United States. No one model of coach development seems to fit the needs of all levels of sport competition or the wide variety of consumers. Moreover, there are many entities involved in prescribing requirements such as national governing bodies, state legislatures and boards of education,…

  3. Japan's experience in long-term home health care of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Imamura, K

    1993-01-01

    Due to increasing national health expenditure and an aging society, Japan in the 1980s started to reinforce home health care, going beyond her long-time investment in institutional care. Since 1983, a sequence of policies was issued focused mainly on frail elderly care. In support of this governmental approach, a variety of enterprises and charity activities have flourished. Now, however, in the midst of a worldwide recession, rationing as health policy is under reconsideration and has an influence on health care for minorities, including the elderly. In Japan, home health care is under review and a new service system was initiated in April 1992. In this article, the newly inaugurated community-based home visiting nursing scheme is introduced together with a short history of elderly care and related business activities in Japan. Feasibility of the new scheme is discussed and compared with the previous version of home visiting nursing, which had its base in hospitals. PMID:10129424

  4. Home

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) in August 2011. CPTAC is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows. Read more.

  5. Effects of Medicare Payment Reform: Evidence from the Home Health Interim and Prospective Payment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Sood, Neeraj; Escarce, José J; Grabowski, David C; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Medicare continues to implement payment reforms that shift reimbursement from fee-for-service towards episode-based payment, affecting average and marginal payment. We contrast the effects of two reforms for home health agencies. The Home Health Interim Payment System in 1997 lowered both types of payment; our conceptual model predicts a decline in the likelihood of use and costs, both of which we find. The Home Health Prospective Payment System in 2000 raised average but lowered marginal payment with theoretically ambiguous effects; we find a modest increase in use and costs. We find little substantive effect of either policy on readmissions or mortality. PMID:24395018

  6. Nutrition and Eating in Female College Athletes: A Survey of Coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaimee L. Heffner; Benjamin M. Ogles; Ellsa Gold; Kimberlyann Marsden; Michael Johnson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to gather information from coaches regarding their monitoring\\/management of athlete eating and weight, knowledge of nutritional health issues, availability of prevention\\/intervention services for athletes at their school, expience with athletes exhibiting symptoms of eating and body image disturbances, and their attitudes toward eating and weight in the sport. A total of 303 coaches

  7. Medicare and Medicaid programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update for CY 2014, home health quality reporting requirements, and cost allocation of home health survey expenses. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    This final rule will update the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, the low-utilization payment adjustment (LUPA) add-on, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective January 1, 2014. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule establishes rebasing adjustments, with a 4-year phase-in, to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates; the national per-visit rates; and the NRS conversion factor. In addition, this final rule will remove 170 diagnosis codes from assignment to diagnosis groups within the HH PPS Grouper, effective January 1, 2014. Finally, this rule will establish home health quality reporting requirements for CY 2014 payment and subsequent years and will clarify that a state Medicaid program must provide that, in certifying HHAs, the state's designated survey agency carry out certain other responsibilities that already apply to surveys of nursing facilities and Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF-IID), including sharing in the cost of HHA surveys. For that portion of costs attributable to Medicare and Medicaid, we will assign 50 percent to Medicare and 50 percent to Medicaid, the standard method that CMS and states use in the allocation of expenses related to surveys of nursing homes. PMID:24294635

  8. Coaches, Sexual Harassment and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Kari; Brackenridge, Celia

    2009-01-01

    Sexual harassment in sport has become an active research field within the past decade yet we know relatively little about the characteristics of the harassing coach. How are harassing coaches characterised by their victims, that is, the athletes themselves? Do they demonstrate specific kinds of behaviours? One purpose of this article is to address…

  9. The Power of Educational Coaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ben Johnson

    2013-01-31

    In this brief article Ben Johnson discusses the process of educational coaching. The form of coaching that Johnson refers to, involves peer teachers, supervisors, and principals asking open-ended questions of their colleagues in order to bring about change in the classroom.

  10. Relational Demography in Coaching Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagas, Michael; Paetzold, Ramona; Ashley, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The decline in the proportion of female head coaches in the intercollegiate ranks is one of the most significant issues in the realm of women's sports today. To extend the body of research that has studied this topic, we investigated the impact relational demographic effects on the work attitudes of coaches, which differs from previous research…

  11. Coaches, sexual harassment and education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kari Fasting; Celia Brackenridge

    2009-01-01

    Sexual harassment in sport has become an active research field within the past decade yet we know relatively little about the characteristics of the harassing coach. How are harassing coaches characterised by their victims, that is, the athletes themselves? Do they demonstrate specific kinds of behaviours? One purpose of this article is to address these types of questions. Another is

  12. Student Focused Math Content Coaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Foster

    This 8-page PDF details strategies used by math coaches in the Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative where the focus is on students’ thinking and on their work products. This document includes various approaches that coaches may use with teachers to gain trust and important pre-observation and post observation questioning and reflection techniques.

  13. Appendix 14-Ia Coach's Employment

    E-print Network

    Swaddle, John

    Appendix 14-Ia Coach's Employment Non Institutional Camp/Clinic Revised August 2010 ATHLETICS STAFF MEMBERS' EMPLOYMENT AT A NON-WILLIAM & MARY CAMP/CLINIC Coach's Name: ______ Sport) No athletics department staff member may be employed (salary or volunteer) in any capacity by a camp or clinic

  14. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  15. Letters of Appointment Head Coach

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    during the term of this appointment. 3. You will receive pay raises that the state budget process and collective bargaining agreements provide for your rank during the term of your appointment. 4. Athletic any future appointment rights. The position of Men's Golf Head Coach, as is the case with all coaching

  16. Letters of Appointment Assistant Coach

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    with other duties during the term of this appointment. 3. You will receive pay raises that the state budget. Athletic coach appointments are temporary by nature, expire at the end of the term stated and do not establish any future appointment rights. The position of Assistant Tennis Coach, as is the case with all

  17. Determining the relevance of a certification exam to home health care nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Holland, D E

    1999-01-01

    Home health care is enjoying increased use and popularity. Unfortunately, in today's cost-cutting environment, home healthcare is also subject to increased scrutiny and inevitable reimbursement limitations. This is borne out by the impact on home healthcare as a result of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Berke (1998) reports that those at greatest risk for cutbacks in care are those that can least afford it--the oldest, sickest, poorest, and most frail. Compounding the financial dilemma that home health care clients face are multiple providers of care, an unrealistic media presentation of health care, and less time for anyone to provide psychosocial-focused care (Simmons, 1990). Home health care clients have a desperate need for an advocate to provide expert navigation through the health care system. Home health care providers are aware of and often responsible for bridging gaps in health, medical benefits, and social services. This article describes a process for determining the relevance of a certification to community nursing clinical practice--using the Advanced Certification in Continuity of Care (A-CCC) exam as the example. PMID:10695177

  18. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  19. www.henley.ac.uk/coaching The Henley Centre for Coaching

    E-print Network

    Reading, University of

    and evolving learning community and invite anyone interested in Coaching & Behavioural Change at Henley to comewww.henley.ac.uk/coaching The Henley Centre for Coaching & Behavioural Change Coaching & Behavioural Change at Henley #12;For further information visit: www.henley.ac.uk/coaching2 `There has been

  20. Register Connect Health People Food Beaches Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Education

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    Register Connect Health People Food Beaches Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Obits Knowledge Cafe Page 1 / 3 #12;Comics Horoscope Puzzles & Games 1. Photos can capture the colors

  1. Home front: post-deployment mental health and divorces.

    PubMed

    Negrusa, Brighita; Negrusa, Sebastian

    2014-06-01

    Since 2003, about 14 % of U.S. Army soldiers have reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following deployments. In this article, we examine how post-deployment symptoms of PTSD and of other mental health conditions are related to the probability of divorce among married active-duty U.S. Army soldiers. For this purpose, we combine Army administrative individual-level longitudinal data on soldiers' deployments, marital history, and sociodemographic characteristics with their self-reported post-deployment health information. Our estimates indicate that time spent in deployment increases the divorce risk among Army enlisted personnel and that PTSD symptoms are associated with further increases in the odds of divorce. Although officers are generally less likely to screen positive for PTSD than enlisted personnel, we find a stronger relationship between PTSD symptoms and divorces among Army officers who are PTSD-symptomatic than among enlisted personnel. We estimate a larger impact of deployments on the divorce risk among female soldiers, but we do not find a differential impact of PTSD symptoms by gender. Also, we find that most of the effect of PTSD symptoms occurs early in the career of soldiers who deploy multiple times. PMID:24781649

  2. The Coaching Experience of 16 Urban Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James-Ward, Cheryl; Potter, Nina Salcedo

    2011-01-01

    This study followed 16 principals in an urban district who were assigned leadership coaches for 6 months. Coaches were provided to principals who were of low-performing schools or new to the position. The study was part of a descriptive evaluation to examine (1) what principals and coaches actually did and (2) what impact the coaching experience…

  3. Supporting Professional Growth through Mentoring and Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutilek, Linda M.; Earnest, Garee W.

    2001-01-01

    Compares peer mentoring, peer coaching, and executive coaching. Presents an evaluation of extension professionals with peer coaches, indicating that it increased their skills in program planning and implementation. Suggests that peer coaching is more successful over a shorter time frame and requires follow-up. (SK)

  4. Mentoring Connections between Coaches and Female Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lough, Nancy L.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the role that mentoring could have in helping female athletes become leaders in their sports through coaching, focusing on: women in coaching; the importance of mentoring potential female coaches; successful mentoring relationships for female coaches; and strategies for mentors. This type of collaboration may help reverse the ongoing…

  5. A Coach's Code of Conduct. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Linda; Ewing, Marty; Martino, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Coaches exert a profound impact on our youths; therefore, society sets high expectations for them. As such, whether coaches are compensated or work solely as volunteers, they are responsible for executing coaching as a professional. If we are to continue to enhance the cultural perceptions of coaching, we must strive to develop and master the…

  6. National Standards for Athletic Coaches. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brylinsky, Jody

    This digest asserts that the question of coach preparation and training has become a priority issue for many schools and communities, though the research is limited. It examines reasons to have coach education; the scope of sport participation; the status of coach education and training in the United States; National standards for coach education;…

  7. Reflective Coaching Conversations: A Missing Piece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Debra S.; Taylor, Barbara M.; Burnham, Bobbie; Schock, Rynell

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to document and describe coaching conversations between literacy coaches and teachers in elementary schools that were seeing gains in students' reading achievement. Participants were drawn from literacy coaches in twenty-four Reading First schools in Minnesota. Detailed notes of the coaching conversations were…

  8. Coaching in Community Settings: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettles, Saundra Murray

    Coaching is a means of instruction that combines elements of mentoring and tutoring in natural community environments. Coach and student characteristics, processes of coaching, and outcomes of coaching in varied community settings and across different developmental levels are examined. Programs utilizing adults and peers from the community in…

  9. Facility Organizational and Facility Resident Characteristics in Nursing Homes Serving Residents With a Mental Health History

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn Frahm; Denise Gammonley; Ning Jackie Zhang; Seung Chun Paek

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health disorders among nursing home residents has been noted. The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. A retrospective, cross-sectional design was conducted using the 2003 national Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting facility data merged with the resident-level Minimum Data Set resulting in 2,499 nursing

  10. Assisting Patients to Age in Place: An Innovative Pilot Program Utilizing the Patient Centered Care Model (PCCM) in Home Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gail Silver; Jeffrey M. Keefer; Peri Rosenfeld

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how one large not-for-profit home health care agency sought to stimulate a practice change among their nurses to better service the frail, complex patient population in a Long-Term Home Health Care Program (LTHHCP). This LTHHCP designed an innovative initiative that encouraged a combination of coaching techniques, assessment tools, and a range of patient-centered evidence-based practices to provide

  11. Home and Health in the Third Age — Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kylén, Maya; Ekström, Henrik; Haak, Maria; Elmståhl, Sölve; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens. PMID:25019267

  12. Medicare and Medicaid programs; CY 2015 Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update; Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements; and survey and enforcement requirements for home health agencies. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    This final rule updates Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective for episodes ending on or after January 1, 2015. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule implements the second year of the four-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates. This rule provides information on our efforts to monitor the potential impacts of the rebasing adjustments and the Affordable Care Act mandated face-to-face encounter requirement. This rule also implements: Changes to simplify the face-to-face encounter regulatory requirements; changes to the HH PPS case-mix weights; changes to the home health quality reporting program requirements; changes to simplify the therapy reassessment timeframes; a revision to the Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) personnel qualifications; minor technical regulations text changes; and limitations on the reviewability of the civil monetary penalty provisions. Finally, this rule also discusses Medicare coverage of insulin injections under the HH PPS, the delay in the implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), and a HH value-based purchasing (HH VBP) model. PMID:25376056

  13. Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-11-01

    The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program. PMID:24662895

  14. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-05-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

  15. Sexual Health Education at School and at Home: Attitudes and Experiences of New Brunswick Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Angela D.; Byers, E. Sandra; Sears, Heather A.; Cohen, Jacqueline N.; Randall, Hilary E. S.

    2002-01-01

    Examined New Brunswick parents' attitudes toward sexual health education (SHE) at school and home. Surveys of parents with K-8 children indicated that most parents believed: SHE should be provided in the school and shared between home and school; SHE should begin in elementary or middle school; and a broad range of topics should be included. Most…

  16. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  17. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn Frahm; Denise Gammonley; Ning Jackie Zhang; Seung Chun Paek

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were found to be in regular contact

  18. Coaching your unit team for results.

    PubMed

    Detmer, Sarah S

    2002-09-01

    Communication and critical thinking skills are core to the coaching processes. Bringing the coaching role to the individual and team level at the bedside is the key to improved results in patient care, nurse retention, clinical performance including error reduction, negotiation, and staff empowerment. Application of coaching concepts where the nurse meets the patient insures the growth and effectiveness of a coaching culture. Clinical review, individual communication, and teamwork examples are explored as effective arenas for coaching at the unit level. PMID:12271765

  19. Psychology Can Be Indispensable to Health Care Reform and the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine N. Runyan

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) was passed into legislation in March 2010, making health care reform a reality. Perhaps the most well-developed model of primary care that aligns with the PPACA's agenda is the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Integrated care, as defined by collaborative care between mental health and primary care providers and systems, will undoubtedly play

  20. Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

  1. Five Years of HHS Home Health Care Evaluations: Using Evaluation to Change National Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Grob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, American Evaluation Association member George Grob, now retired from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and currently President of the Center for Public Program Evaluation, made a testimony on Medicare home health care fraud and abuse before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. The occasion was to announce the…

  2. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  3. Demanding work schedules and mental health in nursing assistants working in nursing homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanne Geiger-brown; Carles Muntaner; Jane Lipscomb; Alison Trinkoff

    2004-01-01

    Nursing home assistants have physically and emotionally challenging jobs, and they often work demanding schedules in order to provide 24-h care. While the physical effects of demanding work schedules have been studied, little is known about the impact on mental health. This study explored the relationship between demanding scheduling variables and mental health indicators of depression, anxiety and somatization. A

  4. Health literacy. Part 2. Practical techniques for getting your message home.

    PubMed

    Pontius, Deborah J

    2014-01-01

    Health literacy promotion techniques are important for the school nurse's tool kit. Forty-three percent of the adult population have difficulty understanding basic health information, yet written materials sent home from schools are often at a level well above the average reader. Learning and applying techniques to improve the appearance and comprehension of your written materials will help to get the school nurse's message home. This article is the second and final in a series of articles focusing on health literacy. The first article, focusing on verbal communication, was published in the September 2013 issue of NASN School Nurse. PMID:24624755

  5. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment Using Smart Home Monitoring of Complex Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the automated assessment of resident well-being. We hypothesize that the functional health of individuals, or ability of individuals to perform activities independently without assistance, can be estimated by tracking their activities using smart home technologies. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for assessing activity quality in smart homes. To validate our approach we quantify activity quality for 179 volunteer participants who performed a complex, interweaved set of activities in our smart home apartment. We observed a statistically significant correlation (r=0.79) between automated assessment of task quality and direct observation scores. Using machine learning techniques to predict the cognitive health of the participants based on task quality is accomplished with an AUC value of 0.64. We believe that this capability is an important step in understanding everyday functional health of individuals in their home environments. PMID:25530925

  6. Advance directives in home health and hospice agencies: United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Helaine E; Hickman, Susan E; Foster, Gregory L

    2011-11-01

    This report provides nationally representative data on policies, storage, and implementation of advance directives (ADs) in home health and hospice (HHH) agencies in the United States using the National Home and Hospice Care Survey. Federally mandated ADs policies were followed in >93% of all agencies. Nearly all agencies stored ADs in a file at the agency, but only half stored them at the patient's residence. Nearly all agencies informed staff about the AD, but only 77% and 72% of home health agencies informed the attending physician and next-of-kin, respectively. Home health and hospice agencies are nearly universally compliant with ADs policies that are required in order to receive Medicare and Medicaid payments, but have much lower rates of adoption of ADs policies beyond federally mandated minimums. PMID:21398271

  7. Impact of the New York Long-Term Home Health Care Program.

    PubMed

    Gaumer, G L; Birnbaum, H; Pratter, F; Burke, R; Franklin, S; Ellingson-Otto, K

    1986-07-01

    The Long-Term Home Health Care Program (LTHHCP), also known as the Nursing Homes Without Walls, is an innovative, comprehensive Medicaid program in New York State that provides nursing home level of care to patients at home. This paper evaluates the performance of the first nine LTHHCP sites over the first 2 years of operation. Across all sites there is clear evidence that the program has been extremely successful in reducing levels of nursing home utilization. In the five upstate sites, considerable cost savings have also been achieved while improving patient survival. In the four New York City sites, patient outcomes have also been favorable, but health care costs for clients have been higher than would have been the case had clients not enrolled in the LTHHCP. Across the entire state, results could have been better if enrollment had been targeted to subsets of the eligible patient groups for whom the LTHHCP is most cost effective. PMID:3088343

  8. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.50 Coinsurance for durable medical equipment...

  9. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.50 Coinsurance for durable medical equipment...

  10. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.50 Coinsurance for durable medical equipment...

  11. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.50 Coinsurance for durable medical equipment...

  12. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ...Director of Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, 3773 Cherry Creek Drive North...hospice care and home health services by the Veterans Health Administration's Office of Geriatrics and...

  13. [Home care for the chronically ill: a self-care health system].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leticia Robles

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on home care for chronically ill adults and seniors. According to our thesis, home care should be understood as a self-care system, and its aim is to guarantee the individual's social and bodily survival. Home care consists of three areas, related to illness, the home, and to life history. Caregiving, usually under women's responsibility, is present throughout the history of the illness and the health-seeking process. The article analyzes these issues in light of the ageing process, the epidemiological changes occurring worldwide, and the urgency to incorporate this analysis into the heath care research agenda. PMID:15073644

  14. The home-based maternal record: a tool for family involvement in health care.

    PubMed

    Shah, P M; Shah, K P; Belsey, M A

    1988-04-01

    The home-based maternal record offers an opportunity for family involvement in health care. Home-based records of maternal health have been used in several developing countries, and have led to increased detection and monitoring of women at high risk for complications during pregnancy. Home-based cards that include menstrual information remind health workers to educate and motivate women for family planning, and serve as a source of health statistics. Records that use pictures and symbols have been used by illiterate traditional birth attendants, and had an accurate completion rate of over 90%. The WHO has prepared a prototype record and guidelines for local adaptation. The objectives were to provide continuity of care throughout pregnancy, ensure recognition of at-risk women, encourage family participation in health care, an provide data on maternal health, breastfeeding, and family planning. The guidelines have been evaluated and results show that the records have improved the coverage, acceptability, and quality of MCH/FP care. The records have also led to an increase in diagnosis and referral of at-risk women and newborns, and the use of family planning and tetanus toxoid immunization has increased in the 13 centers where the reports are being used. Focus group discussions have shown that mothers, community members, primary health workers, and doctors and nurses liked the records. It is important to adapt criteria for high-risk conditions to the local areas where the records will be used to ensure the relevance of risk diagnosis. The evidence shows that home-based maternal and child records can be an important tool in the promotion of self-reliance and family participation in health care. In addition, home-based records can be used for the implementation of primary health care at the local level, and serve as a resource for data collection. PMID:12315434

  15. Before and After Peer Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Georgea M.; Bruder, Shelley

    1987-01-01

    Outcomes of peer coaching in two Ann Arbor, Michigan, schools show that the 41 teachers became comfortable with the process and found it useful in improving collegiality, experimentation, and student learning. (MLF)

  16. [Clinical evaluation of bedridden patients with pneumonia receiving home health care].

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Hajime; Ishida, Tadashi; Tachibana, Hiromasa; Iga, Chiya; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Ito, Akihiro; Ubukata, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Arita, Machiko; Hashimoto, Toru

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia which develops in patients while living in their own home is categorized as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), even if these patients are bedridden and receiving home health care. However, because of the differences in patient backgrounds, we speculated that the clinical outcomes and pathogens of bedridden patients with pneumonia who are receiving home health care would be different from those of CAP. We conducted a prospective study of patients with CAP who were hospitalized at our hospital from April 2007 through September 2009. We compared home health care bedridden pneumonia (performance status 4, PS4-CAP) with non-PS4-CAP in a total of 505 enrolled patients in this study. Among these, 66 had PS4-CAP, mostly associated with aspiration. Severity scores, mortality rate, recurrence rate and length of hospital stay of those with PS4-CAP were significantly higher than those with non-PS4-CAP. Drug resistant pathogens were more frequently isolated from patients with PS4-CAP than from those of non-PS4-CAP. The results of patients with PS4-CAP were in agreement with those of previous health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) reports. The present study suggested home health care bedridden pneumonia should be categorized as HCAP, not CAP. PMID:21226296

  17. Determinants of the use of specialist mental health services by nursing home residents.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, D G; Streit, A; Smyer, M A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines the effects of resident and facility characteristics on the probability of nursing home residents receiving treatment by mental health professionals. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study uses data from the Institutional Population Component of the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, a secondary data source containing data on 3,350 nursing home residents living in 810 nursing homes as of January 1, 1987. STUDY DESIGN. Andersen's health services use model (1968) is used to estimate a multivariate logistic equation for the effects of independent variables on the probability that a resident has received services from mental health professionals. Important variables include resident race, sex, and age; presence of several behaviors and reported mental illnesses; and facility ownership, facility size, and facility certification. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data on 188 residents were excluded from the sample because information was missing on several important variables. For some additional variables residents who had missing information were coded as negative responses. This left 3,162 observations for analysis in the logistic regressions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Older residents and residents with more ADL limitations are much less likely than other residents to have received treatment from a mental health professional. Residents with reported depression, schizophrenia, or psychoses, and residents who are agitated or hallucinating are more likely to have received treatment. Residents in government nursing homes, homes run by chains, and homes with low levels of certification are less likely to have received treatment. CONCLUSIONS. Few residents receive treatment from mental health professionals despite need. Older, physically disabled residents need special attention. Care in certain types of facilities requires further study. New regulations mandating treatment for mentally ill residents will demand increased attention from nursing home administrators and mental health professionals. PMID:8005788

  18. Athletes Coaching Teens (ACT) for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danish, Steven J.

    Athletes Coaching Teens (ACT) is a school-based prevention program for seventh grade students in Richmond, Virginia. The project is a collaborative effort between the Department of Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University and the Richmond City Public Schools. The ACT program is directed at preventing and changing health-compromising…

  19. Case study: the Interact Home Telehealth Project.

    PubMed

    Katalinic, Owen; Young, Ashley; Doolan, David

    2013-10-01

    Two home telehealth technologies (the Intel Health Guide and the Apple iPad) were trialled by four clinical services of the Hunter New England Local Health District. The iPad was selected by the Paediatric Palliative Care Service, the Stroke Service and the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Service. The Intel Health Guide was selected by the Cardiac Coaching Service. The telehealth devices were loaned to a total of 102 patients for different lengths of time, depending on clinical needs, but typically for about 3 months. A total of 42 clinicians were involved. During the trial, 16 technical problems were recorded and resolved, most concerning problems with connectivity. Nonetheless, the use of home telehealth technologies was positively received by clinicians, management and patients alike. Telehealth is now being integrated into the standard practices of the health district. PMID:24218357

  20. Medicare program; home health agency physician certification regulations--HCFA. Decision to reexamine interpretations, with comment.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    This document with comment period announces our decision to reexamine our recent interpretations of the Medicare regulations pertaining to indirect compensation arrangements between home health agencies (HHAs) and physicians who certify or recertify the need for home health services or establish or review the home health plan of care. We are withdrawing recent interpretations regarding indirect compensation arrangements where the physicians are salaried employees of, or have a contractual arrangement to provide services for, an entity that also owns the HHA. This will enable us to evaluate our recent interpretations of these regulations and related provisions of section 1877 of the Social Security Act to ensure consistent application of Medicare policy among providers of services. PMID:10176575

  1. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home-based system will interact.

  2. Beliefs About the Health Effects of “Thirdhand” Smoke and Home Smoking Bans

    PubMed Central

    Winickoff, Jonathan P.; Friebely, Joan; Tanski, Susanne E.; Sherrod, Cheryl; Matt, Georg E.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; McMillen, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke. Thirdhand smoke is residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Children are uniquely susceptible to thirdhand smoke exposure. The objective of this study was to assess health beliefs of adults regarding thirdhand smoke exposure of children and whether smokers and nonsmokers differ in those beliefs. We hypothesized that beliefs about thirdhand smoke would be associated with household smoking bans. METHODS Data were collected by a national random-digit-dial telephone survey from September to November 2005. The sample was weighted by race and gender within Census region on the basis of US Census data. The study questions assessed the level of agreement with statements that breathing air in a room today where people smoked yesterday can harm the health of children. RESULTS Of 2000 eligible respondents contacted, 1510 (87%) completed surveys, 1478 (97.9%) answered all questions pertinent to this analysis, and 273 (18.9%) were smokers. Overall, 95.4% of nonsmokers versus 84.1% of smokers agreed that secondhand smoke harms the health of children, and 65.2% of nonsmokers versus 43.3% of smokers agreed that thirdhand smoke harms children. Strict rules prohibiting smoking in the home were more prevalent among nonsmokers: 88.4% vs 26.7%. In multivariate logistic regression, after controlling for certain variables, belief that thirdhand smoke harms the health of children remained independently associated with rules prohibiting smoking in the home. Belief that secondhand smoke harms the health of children was not independently associated with rules prohibiting smoking in the home and car. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that beliefs about the health effects of thirdhand smoke are independently associated with home smoking bans. Emphasizing that thirdhand smoke harms the health of children may be an important element in encouraging home smoking bans. PMID:19117850

  3. Teacher-to-Teacher: The Heart of the Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shidler, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Coaching occurs when one professional works closely with another professional to increase productivity or to meet a common outcome. For a coach or mentor to be successful, the teacher must believe in the expertise the coach espouses, and the coach must believe in the teacher's abilities. Through "reflective coaching," teachers and coaches

  4. Catching the Bug: How Virtual Coaching Improves Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Megan

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author describes virtual coaching and why it is so effective. The following six points of virtual coaching are explained: (1) Also known as bug-in-ear coaching, virtual coaching is not new; (2) Virtual coaching can save money and time; (3) Bug-in-ear coaching increases the frequency of observations for novice teachers; (4) It…

  5. A home-centered ICT architecture for health-enabling technologies.

    PubMed

    Song, Bianying; Marschollek, Michael; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Gietzelt, Matthias; Franken, Thomas; Haux, Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Population ageing needs health-enabling technologies for delivering pervasive health care. Home care plays an import role in pervasive health care. In this paper, we aim to construct a home-centered health information system architecture which can efficiently manage multi sensors, actuators and decision support systems. Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGI) was used for constructing the service oriented architecture. HL 7 Arden Syntax for medical logic module (MLM) was used to describe the medical knowledge; An Arden compiler was used to interpret the MLMs. The Arden compiler was packed in an OSGI bundle. All of the knowledge bases can share the compiler within the OSGI platform. System within the OSGI-based architecture can change their behaviors during runtime. The proposed prototype architecture was deployed in a case study. PMID:20841648

  6. Medicare program; home health prospective payment system rate update for calendar year 2012. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    This final rule sets forth updates to the home health prospective payment system (HH PPS) rates, including: the national standardized 60-day episode rates; the national per-visit rates; and the low utilization payment amount (LUPA) under the Medicare PPS for home health agencies effective January 1, 2012. This rule applies a 1.4 percent update factor to the episode rates, which reflects a 1 percent reduction applied to the 2.4 percent market basket update factor, as mandated by the Affordable Care Act. This rule also updates the wage index used under the HH PPS, and further reduces home health payments to account for continued nominal growth in case-mix which is unrelated to changes in patient health status. This rule removes two hypertension codes from the HH PPS case-mix system, thereby requiring recalibration of the case-mix weights. In addition, the rule implements two structural changes designed to decrease incentives to upcode and provide unneeded therapy services. Finally, this rule incorporates additional flexibility regarding face-to-face encounters with providers related to home health care. PMID:22059280

  7. Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

  8. Alone in a crowd. A study of social networks in home health and assisted living.

    PubMed

    Tremethick, M J

    2001-05-01

    This study demonstrated the need for intervention in social network development by both clients of home health and residents of assisted living facilities. With the well-known connection between social networks and health, it is vital that nurses working with these populations be aware of the potential for isolation, screen for it, and, if necessary, develop interventions in the care planning process to address the lack of social networks. PMID:11915274

  9. Coaching Life Skills through Football: A Study of Award Winning High School Coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Gould; Karen Collins; Larry Lauer; Yongchul Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study examined how outstanding high school football coaches developed life skills in their players. In-depth phone interviews were conducted with 10 outstanding coaches ranging in age from 47 to 68 years (M = 54). Coaches averaged 31 years of coaching experience, and were highly successful (76.6% winning percentage). Hierarchical content analysis of the data revealed that two general dimensions

  10. The Coach in Asian Society: Impact of social hierarchy on the coaching relationship

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lina Nangalia

    This exploratory case study explores how executive coaches across Asia adapt coaching, from the conventional (essentially Western) understanding, to make it culturally congruent for their clients. It presents how coaching is personalized to an Eastern ethos; thus, constructively challenging coaching concepts and practices that are believed to be universally applicable. The findings bring out how the deeply embedded concept of

  11. Coaches’ Perceptions of a Coach Training Program designed to Promote Youth Developmental Outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Ricardo Falcão; Gordon Bloom; Wade Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate coaches’ perceptions on the impact of a coach training program designed to promote youth developmental outcomes. Participants were coaches of youth sport teams. Multiple methods were used to collect data. Coaches reported many benefits for themselves, their athletes, and their teams. They reported an increase in knowledge and a better understanding of

  12. Poor teaching by the coach: a phenomenological description from athletes' experience of poor coaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian T. Gearity

    2012-01-01

    Background: Winning and losing have consistently been used as one criterion upon which to evaluate coaches. Since winning coaches have long been thought of as knowledgeable and effective at providing instruction, researchers have often studied coaches who have obtained a high winning percentage. While researchers know some about the behaviors and thought processes of winning and losing coaches, this research

  13. Poor teaching by the coach: a phenomenological description from athletes' experience of poor coaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian T. Gearity

    2011-01-01

    Background: Winning and losing have consistently been used as one criterion upon which to evaluate coaches. Since winning coaches have long been thought of as knowledgeable and effective at providing instruction, researchers have often studied coaches who have obtained a high winning percentage. While researchers know some about the behaviors and thought processes of winning and losing coaches, this research

  14. Implementation of a Coaching Program for School Principals: Evaluating Coaches' Strategies and the Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Jason; Preston, Courtney; Goldring, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-phase coaching model that was implemented to help principals improve their instructional leadership practices. We then discuss a rubric based on this coaching model that we used to evaluate coaches' implementation of key model phases and to identify principals' responses to the coaching. After presenting the leadership…

  15. The Role of Biobehavioral, Environmental, and Social Forces on Oral Health Disparities in Frail and Functionally Dependent Nursing Home Elders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rita A. Jablonski; Cindy L. Munro; Mary Jo Grap; Ronald K. Elswick

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature on and discuss how interactions between bio-behavioral aging, nursing home environments, and social forces shaping current health care policies have contributed to oral health disparities in frail and functionally dependent elders who reside in nursing homes. Emerging empirical evidence suggests links between poor oral health with dental plaque deposition and

  16. Population Education in Health and Home Economics: Some Sample Lessons for the Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This booklet contains five sample lessons integrating population education into health and home economics instruction. It is one of four in a series. Materials differ from those in an earlier series (1980) in that lessons are presented at the secondary level only; there is no duplication of lessons from the earlier series in content and teaching…

  17. The Nontoxic Home. Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Everyday Toxics and Health Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadd, Debra Lynn

    The document maintains that the world is filled with health hazards and the best a person can do is to assess the danger of individual products, learn the risks, weigh the risks against the benefits, and decide whether or not to personally take these risks or to subject family members to them. This perspective begins in the home. This book…

  18. MultiStage Real Time Health Monitoring via ZigBee in Smart Homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Dagtas; G. Pekhteryev; Zafer Sahinoglu

    2007-01-01

    We present a framework for a wireless health monitoring system within a smart home using ZigBee technology. Vital signals are collected and processed using a 3-tiered architecture. The first stage is the mobile device carried on the body that runs a number of wired and wireless probes. This device is also designed to perform some basic processing such as the

  19. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  20. Health Effect of Improved Meal Ambiance in a Dutch Nursing Home: A 1Year Intervention Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Françoise A. M Mathey; Vincent G. G Vanneste; Cees de Graaf; Lisette CPGM de Groot; Wija A van Staveren

    2001-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an improved ambiance of food consumption on health and nutritional status of Dutch nursing home elderly residents (n = 38) in a 1-year intervention study.Methods. A parallel group intervention study was performed. Improvement of ambiance focused on three points: (1) physical environment and atmosphere of the dining room,

  1. An Instrument to Predict Job Performance of Home Health Aides--Testing the Reliability and Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Jack; Quina, Patricia

    The development of four paper-and-pencil tests, useful in assessing the effectiveness of inservice training provided to either nurses aides or home health aides, was described. These tests were designed for utilization in employment selection and case assignment. Two tests of 37 multiple-choice items and two tests of 10 matching items were…

  2. 64 FR 58134 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-10-28

    ...the frame for key subgroups or cells. The process assigns a larger...sample similar (in the same cell) to those missed. In the case of the HHA, the cells were defined by the urban or...closely represent the missed units cell by cell. Summary of the Missing Audits in the Home Health Audit Sample and Results...

  3. Health Sciences New Employee Orientation Home Department Clock In/ Out Clock Code

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    _labor_relations/agency_fee/fschart.html MANDATORY ONLINE COURSES: UCSD Learning: http://blink.ucsd.edu/HR/training/resources/web/index.html NewEmployee Health Sciences New Employee Orientation Home Department Clock In/ Out Clock Code 1(in) or 9(out employee ID. " Enter your employee ID. Your employee ID is 2 zeroes followed by the 6-digit number you

  4. A study of integrating digital health network with UPnP in an elderly nursing home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yaw-Jen Lin; Mei-Ju Su; Heng-Shuen Chen; Chiou-I Lin

    2008-01-01

    The percentage of the elderly population grew rapidly in recent years, so the tremendous life and health care needs became an issue of focus in an aging society. The elderly nursing home plays an important role and intends to provide a comfortable environment and living space and serve as safe and healthy place for the elderly. However, the frailty and

  5. Job Satisfaction of Home Health Satisfaction Workers in the Environment of Cost Containment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Marcia; Kadushin, Goldie

    2004-01-01

    This national survey examined the job satisfaction of 228 home health social workers in the restrictive reimbursement environment of the Medicare interim payment system. Administrators' helpfulness in resolving ethical conflicts between patient access to services and agency financial priorities contributed significantly to greater satisfaction in…

  6. A Study of Reliability and Burden of Home Health Assessment Using OASIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David F. Hittle; Peter W. Shaughnessy; Kathryn S. Crisler; Martha C. Powell; Angela A. Richard; Karin S. Conway; Paula M. Stearns; Karen Engle

    2004-01-01

    The Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) is used for outcome reporting, quality improvement, and case mix adjustment of per-episode payment for home health care. The research described here addresses interrater reliability of OASIS items and compares clinician time required to complete patient assessment with and without OASIS. Interrater reliability for OASIS data items was estimated using independent assessments by

  7. Predictors of Home Health Care Service Use by Anglo American, Mexican American and South Korean Elders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Myunghan Choi; Janice D. Crist; Marianne McCarthy; Seon Hae Woo

    Problem statement: This study was designed to identify predictors of the use of home health care services by elders in different ethnic groups. Approach: A cross-sectional study was conducted with convenient sample of Anglo elders (N = 57), Mexican American elders (N = 56) and elders in South Korea (N = 83). Hierarchical multip le regression analysis was conducted. Results:

  8. Health/Home Economics Classroom Activities for Secondary Schools. Schools in an Aging Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    As the fastest-growing segment of society, older adults can be valuable resources for schools. The intent of this guide is to promote education for, with, and about older adults; to confront stereotypic images; and to present an accurate and balanced view of aging. The manual consists of 21 lesson plans for secondary teachers of health and home

  9. Exploring Early Evaluation Techniques of Ambient Health Promoting Devices in Home Environments of Senior

    E-print Network

    Connelly, Kay

    Exploring Early Evaluation Techniques of Ambient Health Promoting Devices in Home Environments of Senior Citizens Living Independently Rajasee Rege School of Informatics Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 rrege@indiana.edu Heekyoung Jung School of Informatics Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408

  10. The Utilization of Home Care by the Elderly in Brazil's Primary Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Wyshak, Grace; Campbell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the utilization of home care by the elderly in Brazil after implementation of the Family Health Strategy (FHS). Methods. Data were derived from a cross-sectional study in a southern city in Brazil. Using the ?2 test and a logistic regression with different levels of determination, we tested the hypothesis that the FHS increased the utilization of home care compared with utilization under the Traditional Primary Health Care (TPHC) system. Results. We interviewed 1593 residents aged 60 years and older. Home care utilization under the FHS was 2.7 times the rate of utilization under the TPHC (95% confidence interval = 1.5, 4.7; P = .001), and utilization increased among the older group, the less educated, those with history of hospitalization, and those with functional limitations. Conclusions. Improvement in access to care resulted in greater utilization of home care. Our findings have policy implications that include expanding the coverage of the FHS throughout big cities where coverage is limited. These findings are important because the population is aging and the family strategy operates in poorer areas; thus, it can promote equity in access to home health care among the elderly. PMID:20724683

  11. Key aspects and health care benefits of patient-centered medical homes part 1 of 3.

    PubMed

    Stack, Eric; Kier, Karen

    2014-03-01

    The concept of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) is one of the latest efforts to provide higher quality of life for patients while aiming to reduce overall health care costs. As part of this health care reform effort, PCMHs strive to provide patient-centered, coordinated, effective, and efficient care that leads to long-term relationships with patients. The objective of this three-part series is to provide a comprehensive review of the PCMH for health care practice sites and professionals, its key features, recognition of quality programs, support and payment models from government and third-party insurers, and patient and professional benefits. Part 1 describes the history and development of PCMHs, the overall concept of the health care model, and the process that is used to recognize quality PCMHs. Because of the current weaknesses and deficiencies in the United States' health care system, there is a definitive need for the establishment and expansion of PCMHs. PMID:24589769

  12. Educating Coaches about Concussion in Sports: Evaluation of the CDC's "Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports" Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covassin, Tracey; Elbin, R. J.; Sarmiento, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concussions remain a serious public health concern. It is important that persons involved in youth sports, particularly coaches, be made aware and educated on the signs and symptoms of concussion. This study assessed the perceptions of youth sport coaches who have received the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's…

  13. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...nonmedical health care institutions (RNHCIs). (b) Purpose. The home benefit provides for limited durable medical equipment (DME) items and RNHCI services in the home setting that are fiscally limited to $700,000 per calendar year, with an...

  14. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...nonmedical health care institutions (RNHCIs). (b) Purpose. The home benefit provides for limited durable medical equipment (DME) items and RNHCI services in the home setting that are fiscally limited to $700,000 per calendar year, with an...

  15. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...nonmedical health care institutions (RNHCIs). (b) Purpose. The home benefit provides for limited durable medical equipment (DME) items and RNHCI services in the home setting that are fiscally limited to $700,000 per calendar year, with an...

  16. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...nonmedical health care institutions (RNHCIs). (b) Purpose. The home benefit provides for limited durable medical equipment (DME) items and RNHCI services in the home setting that are fiscally limited to $700,000 per calendar year, with an...

  17. Toward a Theory of Coaching Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple tensions exist as part of the coaching process. How a coach responds to these tensions is a fundamental determinant of an athlete or team's fate. In today's highly competitive, socially demanding, and ever-changing sports environment, and as the expectations on coaches become more complex, the paradox becomes a critical lens to…

  18. Assessing the Cost of Instructional Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, David S.

    2012-01-01

    School-based instructional coaching is an increasingly popular approach to professional development used to support in-service learning for teachers. However, little is known about the cost of coaching. The following study aims to fill this gap. First, the study describes a framework for measuring the cost of an instructional coaching program;…

  19. Differentiated Coaching: Fostering Reflection with Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Katie; Kissel, Brian; Haag, Karen; Shoniker, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Literacy coaches inspire teacher reflection and promote a culture of ongoing professional learning. This article illustrates the role of literacy coaches, describes how coaches differentiate support for a diverse group of teachers, and explains how teacher reflection can be a catalyst for change and professional growth. The authors, current and…

  20. Coaching the Mentor: Facilitating Reflection and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Stephen P.; Brobeck, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the process of coaching a mentor of experienced teachers. In particular, we sought to determine if coaching would help a mentor to compare her espoused beliefs about mentoring to her mentoring behaviors and possibly resolve any dissonance. The mentor and coach (the co-researchers) participated in a platform…

  1. Coach Education Online: The Montana Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2006-01-01

    Coach education is important, but expensive--both in cost and time to public and private athletic programs. To provide basic coach education to coaches, new, innovative, inexpensive approaches must be developed. Joint efforts between state high school associations and colleges and universities can meet those needs. The "Montana approach" is one…

  2. Challenges of Literacy Coaching in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study examined a state-run, foundation-funded initiative to introduce literacy coaching in a medium-sized urban high school district over a period of two years. Data analyses revealed the complex development and multiple understandings of the process of literacy coaching on the secondary level. The role of the coaches

  3. The Coaching as Teaching Pilot Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl Armon; Steve Venables

    2008-01-01

    This report introduces a new form of coaching education and describes the outcomes of its evaluation. Nine volunteer male youth coaches were recruited for the project. Five participated in a series of educational workshops in which accepted, progressive teaching strategies were taught for the purpose of coaching beginner youth players in basketball. An eight-team league was formed and administered in

  4. Analyzing Teacher Participation in Literacy Coaching Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atteberry, Allison; Bryk, Anthony S.

    2011-01-01

    Many major urban districts have committed large investments to school-based professional development anchored in the work of literacy coaches. At base is a shared belief that instructional coaches are key levers for improvement. Yet, clinical accounts of the role of an instructional coach suggest that this is a complex practice to implement well.…

  5. The Good Coach Dr Jim Parry

    E-print Network

    ) don't know what we're talking about. Examples: Neville Bennett on `creativity' Anon on `anxiety Secondly, `life coach'? Sorry, I just don't care. I mean `sports coach'. So let me just say that, then. (I is `coaching'? Firstly, we don't have to take any notice of anyone else. Some people just say daft things ­ don

  6. Dwelling within political violence: Palestinian women's narratives of home, mental health, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cindy A; Kemp, Susan; El-Zuhairi, Mona

    2014-11-01

    Political violence is increasingly played out within everyday civilian environments, particularly family homes. Yet, within the literature on political violence and mental health, the role of threats to home remains under-explored. Using focus group data from 32 Palestinian women, this paper explores the implications of violations to the home within political violence. Threats to the privacy, control, and constancy of the family home - key dimensions of ontological security (Giddens, 1990) emerged as central themes in women's narratives. Surveillance, home invasions, and actual or threatened destruction of women's home environments provoked fear, anxiety, grief, humiliation, and helplessness, particularly as women struggled to protect their children. Women also described how they mobilized the home for economic, familial and cultural survival. Study findings illuminate the impact of threats to intimate environments on the well-being of women and their families living with chronic political violence, and underscore the importance of attention to violations of place and home in research on civilian experiences of and responses to political violence. PMID:25306419

  7. The Management of Osteoporosis among Home Health and Long Term Care Patients with a Prior Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Warriner, AH; Outman, RC; Saag, KG; Berry, SD; Colón-Emeric, C; Flood, KL; Lyles, KW; Tanner, SB; Watts, NB; Curtis, JR

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a growing health concern as the number of senior adults continues to increase worldwide. Falls and fractures are very common among frail older adults requiring home health and long-term care. Preventative strategies for reducing falls have been identified and many therapies (both prescription and non-prescription) with proven efficacy for reducing fracture risk are available. However, many practitioners overlook the fact that a fragility fracture is diagnostic for osteoporosis even without knowledge of bone mineral density testing. As a result, osteoporosis is infrequently diagnosed and treated in the elderly after a fracture. Based on existing literature, we have developed an algorithm for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis among persons with known prior fracture(s) living in long-term care facilities or receiving home health care. PMID:19279529

  8. Public health and English local government: historical perspectives on the impact of ‘returning home

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Martin; Lock, Karen; Hogarth, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This article uses history to stimulate reflection on the present opportunities and challenges for public health practice in English local government. Its motivation is the paradox that despite Department of Health policy-makers’ allusions to ‘a long and proud history’ and ‘returning public health home’ there has been no serious discussion of that past local government experience and what we might learn from it. The article begins with a short resumé of the achievements of Victorian public health in its municipal location, and then considers the extensive responsibilities that it developed for environmental, preventive and health services by the mid-twentieth century. The main section discusses the early NHS, explaining why historians see the era as one of decline for the speciality of public health, leading to the reform of 1974, which saw the removal from local government and the abolition of the Medical Officer of Health role. Our discussion focuses on challenges faced before 1974 which raise organizational and political issues relevant to local councils today as they embed new public health teams. These include the themes of leadership, funding, integrated service delivery, communication and above all the need for a coherent vision and rationale for public health action in local authorities. PMID:24472776

  9. The Community Health Accreditation Program. Its strategic meaning to the home care industry.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M K

    1988-10-01

    For many reasons, the Community Health Accreditation Program represents the home care industry's best strategic choice as a mechanism to assure and promote the quality as well as the growth of the health care industry. First and foremost, CHAP is a program with a rich tradition and commitment to community health and home care. With a quarter of a century of experience, CHAP knows well that the philosophy o providing care in the home, the methods, and the practitioners who provide care in the home are of a different nature from those who provide in-patient care. If we fail in our growth phase to protect and maintain the uniqueness of home care, we will have lost our greatest asset. Fundamentally CHAP, as a voluntary accreditation process, is built on a firm foundation of commitment to quality by the industry itself and includes a genuine desire to integrate quality improvement into each and every aspect and business function of the services provided. As a voluntary accrediting body. CHAP seeks to become a partner that provides the information and supports the home care industry's quest for quality. CHAP's aim is to provide what the home care industry needs most--experts in key aspects of management--to assist agencies in achieving superior performance. Quality must begin at the top, and it must be inspired and developed within the industry itself. Staff regulatory approaches will not achieve quality; in fact recent studies indicate that regulation may have quite the opposite effect. There is evidence to suggest that patient care is worse in highly regulated states.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10290323

  10. An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sherry L. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)], E-mail: sdixon@nchh.org; Fowler, Cecile [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Martinez, Yolanda [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Jacobs, David E. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

  11. Home Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Home Care Basic Facts & Information Role of Health Care Professionals in Home Care Your physician is the leader of an interdisciplinary ... travel to see the healthcare team. Is Home Care Right for You? Home care is especially useful ...

  12. Seeking stability in the Medicare home health benefit. Margins evaporate; agencies in financial jeopardy.

    PubMed

    2003-07-01

    In a watershed moment for the home care industry, National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) staff has obtained, decoded, deciphered, and tabulated rates of return for all Medicare-participating agencies in the nation. The results show the average rate of return for Medicare agencies in the latest fiscal year--that is, before the October 2002 15 percent cut in home health reimbursements, before audits, and before partial episode payment adjustments--is 5.15 percent. That figure is well below the average 22 percent rate of return the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission alleged that home care agencies were making. Following is the text of NAHC's report, along with a letter from the respected firm of Muse & Associates vouching for the accuracy of NAHC's methodology. PMID:12959032

  13. Insights in public health: the Hawai'i Home Visiting Network: evidence-based home visiting services in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, D Kaulana; Robertson, N Tod; Hayes, Donald K

    2014-05-01

    Home visiting services are cost-effective and improve the health of children and families among those at increased risk. From 1985-2008, home visiting services in Hawai'i were provided primarily through state funding of the Hawai'i Healthy Start Program, but the program was severely reduced due to the economy and state budget changes over the past decade. The Maternal and Child Health Branch (MCHB) in the Family Health Services Division responded to these changes by seeking out competitive grant opportunities and collaborations in order to continue to promote home visiting services to those children and families in need. In 2010, the MCHB was awarded a federally funded Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grant for home visiting services to promote maternal, infant, and early childhood health, safety and development, strong parent-child relationships, and responsible parenting. In 2011, the MCHB was also awarded a competitive MIECHV development grant that funded the re-establishment of the hospital Early Identification program. Families in need of additional support identified through this program are referred for family strengthening services to a network of existing home visiting programs called the Hawai'i Home Visiting Network (HHVN). The HHVN is supported by MIECHV and a small amount of state funds to assist programs with capacity building, training, professional development, quality assurance, and accreditation/certification support. The MIECHV grant requires that programs are evidence-based and address specific outcome measures and benchmarks. The HHVN provides home visiting services to families prenatally through 5 years of age that reside in specific at-risk communities, and is aimed at fostering positive parenting and reducing child maltreatment using a strength-based approach by targeting six protective factors: (1) social connections, (2) nurturing and attachment, (3) knowledge of parenting and child development, (4) parental resilience, (5) social and emotional competence of children, and (6) concrete supports for parents. This article provides an introduction to the HHVN as a diverse network of evidence-based home visiting programs with services currently available on all islands, and highlights aspects of home visiting programs that support the Family-Centered Medical Home (FCMH) model. The HHVN provides important services to families at risk and uses evidence-based practices to yield positive results. Health care professionals can support this network to promote the health of children and families by being aware that these home visiting services exist and encouraging families at-risk to participate. Continued collaboration and expanded partnerships with health providers can help strengthen the home visiting network and improve outcomes for children and families in Hawai'i. PMID:24843840

  14. Team Building through Faculty Coaching and Faculty Coaching System Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slicker, Russ; And Others

    A description is provided of the development and implementation of a Faculty Coaching System, a systematic evaluation process, at Milwaukee Area Technical College (MATC). Introductory comments by Russ Slicker offer a brief history and description of MATC and a profile of MATC's well-established, stable faculty. Next, Beverly Simone discusses the…

  15. Assessment of Airborne Exposures and Health in Flooded Homes Undergoing Renovation

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Kimberly A.; Metwali, Nervana; Perry, Sarah Spencer; Hart, Tom; Kostle, Pamela A.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2008, the Cedar River crested flooding more than 5,000 Cedar Rapids homes. Residents whose homes were flooded were invited to participate in this study. Household assessments and resident interviews were conducted between November 2008 and April 2009. We characterized exposures and symptoms experienced by individuals inhabiting 73 flood-damaged homes. Active air sampling and passive electrostatic dust collectors were used to assess exposures to: culturable mold, culturable bacteria, fungal spores, inhalable particulate matter (iPM), endotoxin, glucans, allergens, lead, asbestos, radon, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Wall moisture levels and relative humidity were also measured. Exposures and questionnaire-based health assessments were compared at two levels of remediation, in-progress and completed. Homes with remediation in-progress (n=24), as compared to the completed homes (n=49), had significantly higher airborne concentrations of mold, bacteria, iPM, endotoxin and glucan. Residents of in-progress homes had a significantly higher prevalence of doctor diagnosed allergies (adjusted OR=3.08; 95%CI: 1.05–9.02) and all residents had elevated prevalence of self-reported wheeze (adjusted OR=3.77; 95%CI: 2.06–6.92) and prescription medication use for breathing problems (adjusted OR=1.38; 95%CI: 1.01–1.88) after the flood as compared to before. Proper post-flood remediation led to improved air quality and lower exposures among residents living in flooded homes. PMID:22519834

  16. Development of a consultation and teaching concept for leg wound treatment in home health care.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Ann-Marie; Willman, Ania

    2007-01-01

    We developed a consultation and teaching concept about leg wounds and their care, for use by patients and caregivers in a home health-care setting. Descriptive data were gathered through a survey distributed to three groups, comprising 21 individuals (18 nurses and 3 health administrators). These participants provided answers regarding group activities, meeting frequency, meeting notes and meeting content, as well as responses to questions regarding the Website, Web materials, film and a pamphlet. Seventeen people answered the survey (81% response rate). They made predominantly positive comments. The combined total average score was 3.6 (1=very bad to 4=very good). The concept was implemented in one municipality in a health-care region in southern Sweden using high bandwidth videophones (640 kbit/s). The results showed that elderly persons at home and nurses working in home health care were interested in using the concept and communicating via videophone. A strength of the Web-based information and communication material is its adaptability to suit both patients and care givers. PMID:17697510

  17. Food, home and health: the meanings of food amongst Bengali Women in London

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores the nature of food and plants and their meanings in a British Bengali urban context. It focuses on the nature of plants and food in terms of their role in home making, transnational connections, generational change and concepts of health. Methods An ethnographic approach to the research was taken, specific methods included participant observation, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. Thirty women of Bengali origin were mostly composed of “mother” and “daughter” pairs. The mothers were over 45 years old and had migrated from Bangladesh as adults and their grown-up daughters grew up in the UK. Results Food and plants play an important role in the construction of home “here” (London) while continuing to connect people to home “there” (Sylhet). This role, however, changes and is re-defined across generations. Looking at perceptions of “healthy” and “unhealthy” food, particularly in the context of Bengali food, multiple views of what constitutes “healthy” food exist. However, there appeared to be little two-way dialogue about this concept between the research participants and health professionals. This seems to be based on “cultural” and power differences that need to be addressed for a meaningful dialogue to occur. Conclusion In summary, this paper argues that while food is critical to the familial spaces of home (both locally and globally), it is defined by a complex interplay of actors and wider meanings as illustrated by concepts of health and what constitutes Bengali food. Therefore, we call for greater dialogue between health professionals and those they interact with, to allow for an enhanced appreciation of the dynamic nature of food and plants and the diverse perceptions of the role that they play in promoting health. PMID:24886061

  18. Getting Home Safe and Sound: Occupational Safety and Health Administration at 38

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHAct) declared that every worker is entitled to safe and healthful working conditions, and that employers are responsible for work being free from all recognized hazards. Thirty-eight years after these assurances, however, it is difficult to find anyone who believes the promise of the OSHAct has been met. The persistence of preventable, life-threatening hazards at work is a failure to keep a national promise. I review the history of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and propose measures to better ensure that those who go to work every day return home safe and sound. These measures fall into 6 areas: leverage and accountability, safety and health systems, employee rights, equal protection, framing, and infrastructure. PMID:18235060

  19. Volunteer youth sport coaches' perspectives of coaching education/certification and parental codes of conduct.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Lenny D; Sherman, Clay P

    2005-09-01

    The vast majority of youth sport programs in the United States relies primarily on parent volunteers to serve as coaches. Unfortunately, most of these volunteer coaches have not received formal training to prepare them adequately for the role of youth sport coach. To exacerbate the issue, according to the popular media, parents and other adults can commit belligerent and even violent acts around, and often resulting from, poorly managed youth sport events. Although some efforts have been made to standardize curricula, provide training for coaches, and contain or prevent inappropriate parent behaviors, few efforts have been directed at investigating the self-described needs and concerns of the coaches from their perspectives. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the concerns and issues of youth sport coaches related to coaching and parental education. Five focus group interviews with 25 volunteer youth sport coaches were conducted to investigate these issues. Results were organized around four higher order themes that emerged from inductive content analyses: (a) coaching education content areas of need, (b) barriers and problems of offering coaching education, (c) coaching education format recommendations, and (d) efficacy of parental codes of conduct. Results were discussed in terms of the potential impact administrators, coaches, and parents could have in implementing formal coaching education programs and developing their coaching education practices. PMID:16270709

  20. Psychosocial risk factors in home and community settings and their associations with population health and health inequalities: A systematic meta-review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matt Egan; Carol Tannahill; Mark Petticrew; Sian Thomas

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of psychosocial risk factors on population health and health inequalities has featured prominently in epidemiological research literature as well as public health policy strategies. We have conducted a meta-review (a review of reviews) exploring how psychosocial factors may relate to population health in home and community settings. METHODS: Systematic review (QUORUM) of literature reviews (published in any

  1. Contesting Contained Bodily Coaching Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Through critical readings of several images and texts, including photographs and artifacts in this collected montage, my aim here is to use multiple interactional analyses (visual culture techniques and deconstructive techniques) to assist in the critique of these presented visual images that represent current coaching policies in the USA.

  2. Bodies Matter in Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasudevan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Reading the implicit invitation in new literacies scholarship to reimagine pedagogy that leans into the lives of youth, Vasudevan reminds readers how the teacher's body is central to the meaning making of students in literacy classrooms. She extends this notion of embodiment to the work of the literacy coach and reiterates Skinner, Hagood,…

  3. Basketball for the New Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Dan; Rose, Jim

    This book is intended for beginning basketball coaches at either the school or agency level. The chapters contain information on simple team administration to the detailed planning and development of team strategy. In addition, the book contains chapters concerning the principles relating to basketball mechanics, conditioning the team, setting up…

  4. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  5. Coaching Basketball; Ten Winning Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeremiah, Maryalyce

    Written primarily for coaches, this book is intended to help formulate a conceptual philosophy and approach to the game of basketball. The basic offensive, defensive, and transitioal fundamentals are stressed, and drills that simulate these fundamentals in a game are presented. The drills differ from most others in that they are designed so that…

  6. Housing affordability and mental health: does the relationship differ for renters and home purchasers?

    PubMed

    Mason, Kate E; Baker, Emma; Blakely, Tony; Bentley, Rebecca J

    2013-10-01

    There is increasing evidence of a direct association between unaffordable housing and poor mental health, over and above the effects of general financial hardship. Type of housing tenure may be an important factor in determining how individuals experience and respond to housing affordability problems. This study investigated whether a relationship exists between unaffordable housing and mental health that differs for home purchasers and private renters among low-income households. Data from 2001 to 2010 of the longitudinal Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey were analysed using fixed-effects linear regression to examine change in the SF-36 Mental Component Summary (MCS) score of individuals aged 25-64 years, associated with changes in housing affordability, testing for an interaction with housing tenure type. After adjusting for age, survey year and household income, among individuals living in households in the lower 40% of the national income distribution, private renters in unaffordable housing experienced somewhat poorer in mental health than when their housing was affordable (difference in MCS = -1.18 or about 20% of one S.D. of the MCS score; 95% CI: -1.95,-0.41; p = 0.003) while home purchasers experienced no difference on average. The statistical evidence for housing tenure modifying the association between unaffordable housing and mental health was moderate (p = 0.058). When alternatives to 40% were considered as income cut-offs for inclusion in the sample, evidence of a difference between renters and home purchasers was stronger amongst households in the lowest 50% of the income distribution (p = 0.020), and between the 30th and 50th percentile (p = 0.045), with renters consistently experiencing a decline in mental health while mean MCS scores of home purchasers did not change. In this study, private renters appeared to be more vulnerable than home purchasers to mental health effects of unaffordable housing. Such a modified effect suggests that tenure-differentiated policy responses to poor housing affordability may be appropriate. PMID:23931950

  7. Home-Based Art Therapy for Older Adults with Mental Health Needs: Views of Clients and Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElroy, Siobhan; Warren, Alison; Jones, Fay

    2006-01-01

    The value of art therapy for older people with mental health problems is well documented although there is a paucity of research for people who are home bound. This study, based in England, involved five clients, all older people with mental health problems, receiving art therapy sessions at home. The clients and caregivers were then interviewed…

  8. Guidelines for Environmental Health Management in Children’s Homes in Sub-Sahara Africa

    PubMed Central

    Muruka, Charles; Muruka, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The field of environmental health focuses on the relationships between human health and well being and the influence of the physical, social and societal environments. Our understanding of the environment–health interface has progressed because of two relatively recent insights: First, the recognition that the unprecedented environmental changes of the last half-century are affecting global population health. Secondly, the recognition that children have greater vulnerability to environmental hazards and are inadequately protected by current regulatory standards. Efforts to redress this situation have shaped the current thrust in environmental health research toward preventing further harm to children’s health. The disproportionate vulnerability of children to environmental hazards can be explained by several reasons. Children are not “little adults.” It is known that children have greater risk of exposure and greater risk of harm compared to adults for many reasons that are unique to each developmental stage. Their behaviour and activity patterns bring them into greater contact with toxins. Children have important biological differences. Immature developing organs and tissues are more vulnerable to harm from toxic exposures. Immature metabolic and physiological systems less effectively protect the child from toxic exposure and effects. In addition, children have additional pathways of exposure that are not applicable to adults, e.g., in utero, via breast milk and via products such as toys, clothing, etc. Children also have a longer “shelf life.” They have much more of their life ahead of them during which time they will be exposed and may develop health problems as a result. Finally, children are more often involuntarily exposed and unable to avoid exposures of their own accord [1]. Due to the AIDS catastrophe in Sub-Saharan Africa, the numbers of children in difficult circumstances have increased. To mitigate the effects of the catastrophe, charitable organizations have sprung up to establish homes for such children, especially those orphaned by AIDS or those infected with HIV. It is important to ensure that environmental health hazards and risks are minimized in these children’s homes. By use of a conceptual synthesis approach, the authors attempt to generate guidelines from literature for environmental health management in children’s homes in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18180543

  9. Is access to home health care a problem in rural areas?

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, G M

    1993-01-01

    In 1987, urban Medicare beneficiaries were 13.7% more likely than their rural counterparts to use Medicare home health care services. Regression analysis shows that rural use rates, particularly those in sparsely populated areas, fall short of those in urban areas, other things being equal. Rural areas have lower Medicare ceilings, proportionately fewer visiting nurse associations, and lower availability of auxiliary services. These factors combined account for 82% of the difference between rural and urban use rates. PMID:8438982

  10. Public Reporting and Market Area Exit Decisions by Home Health Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoungrae; Feldman, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine whether home health agencies selectively discontinue services to areas with socio-economically disadvantaged people after the introduction of Home Health Compare (HHC), a public reporting program initiated by Medicare in 2003. Study Design /Methods We focused on agencies' initial responses to HHC and examined selective market-area exits by agencies between 2002 and 2004. We measured HHC effects by the percentage of quality indicators reported in public HHC data in 2003. Socio-economic status was measured by per capita income and percent college-educated at the market-area level. Data Source(s) 2002 and 2004 Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS); 2000 US Census file; 2004 Area Resource File; and 2002 Provider of Service File. Principal Findings We found a small and weak effect of public reporting on selective exits: a 10-percent increase in reporting (reporting one more indicator) increased the probability of leaving an area with less-educated people by 0.3 percentage points, compared with leaving an area with high education. Conclusion The small level of market-area exits under public reporting is unlikely to be practically meaningful, suggesting that HHC did not lead to a disruption in access to home health care through selective exits during the initial year of the program. PMID:24800158

  11. Tacit Knowledge in Expert Coaching: Science or Art?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Christine; Collins, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Effective coaching is a mixture of pedagogy and principles of sciences, e.g., motor skill acquisition, sociology, and physiology, often referred to as the science of coaching. Instinctive or intuitive coaching has often been incorrectly viewed as the art of coaching. More important should be how coaches develop knowledge, how they access that…

  12. Tacit Knowledge in Expert Coaching: Science or Art?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Nash; Dave Collins

    2006-01-01

    Effective coaching is a mixture of pedagogy and principles of sciences, e.g., motor skill acquisition, sociology, and physiology, often referred to as the science of coaching. Instinctive or intuitive coaching has often been incorrectly viewed as the art of coaching. More important should be how coaches develop knowledge, how they access that knowledge at the appropriate times and how this

  13. E-Coaching Systems: Convenient, Anytime, Anywhere, and Nonhuman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Technologies continue to evolve to provide more compelling and interactive learning opportunities. Coaching has traditionally been face-to-face or by email. By combining the new technologies with coaching, learning developers now have the opportunity to develop an asynchronous, online, nonhuman coaching system, or e-coaching system. An e-coaching

  14. Reading Coach Quality: Findings from Florida Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Julie A.; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Martorell, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on a statewide study of Florida middle-school reading coaches, this article examines what constitutes, contributes to, and is associated with high-quality coaches and coaching. Authors find that coaches generally held many of the qualifications recommended by state and national experts and principals and teachers rated their coaches highly…

  15. Case Study: eCoaching in a Corporate Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri L. C.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative particularistic case study was an exploration and evaluation of an online, asynchronous, non-human coaching system called an "eCoaching system." Developed by the researcher, the eCoaching system combined performance coaching with the latest technologies in eLearning. The coaching was based on the appreciative inquiry approach, and…

  16. Coaching Discourse: Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineke, Sally F.

    2013-01-01

    Although coaching is used in many schools to facilitate teachers' professional learning, few studies look closely at coaching discourse. Exploring how coaching facilitates teachers' professional development, this study used tape-recorded coaching sessions and individual post-interviews to examine the one-on-one coaching interactions of 4…

  17. Domain 1: Philosophy and Ethics National Standards for Sport Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dianne C.

    2004-01-01

    Developing a sound coaching philosophy and displaying ethical behavior is the backbone of effective coaching at any level. Coaches cannot communicate the standards of behavior they expect from their athletes or coaching staff if they have not identified the priorities and values associated with their coaching philosophy. When reflecting on Domain…

  18. Development of a nursing home vision-targeted health-related quality of life questionnaire for older adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. E. Dreer; G. Mcgwin JR; K. Scilley; G. C. Meek; A. Dyer; D. Seker; C. Owsley

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a questionnaire assessing vision-targeted health-related quality of life in older adults residing in nursing homes. Methods: Using content previously identified through structured interviews with nursing home residents, the 57-item Nursing Home Vision-Targeted Health-Related Quality of Life questionnaire (NHVQoL) was drafted with nine subscales—general vision, reading, ocular symptoms, mobility, psychological distress, activities of daily living, activities\\/hobbies, adaptation\\/coping and

  19. Interpretive Flexibility in Mobile Health: Lessons From a Government-Sponsored Home Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile technologies have emerged as important tools that health care personnel can use to gain easy access to client data anywhere. This is particularly useful for nurses and care workers in home health care as they provide services to clients in many different settings. Although a growing body of evidence supports the use of mobile technologies, the diverse implications of mobile health have yet to be fully documented. Objective Our objective was to examine a large-scale government-sponsored mobile health implementation program in the Danish home care sector and to understand how the technology was used differently across home care agencies. Methods We chose to perform a longitudinal case study with embedded units of analysis. We included multiple data sources, such as written materials, a survey to managers across all 98 Danish municipalities, and semistructured interviews with managers, care workers, and nurses in three selected home care agencies. We used process models of change to help analyze the overall implementation process from a longitudinal perspective and to identify antecedent conditions, key events, and practical outcomes. Results Strong collaboration between major stakeholders in the Danish home care sector (government bodies, vendors, consultants, interest organizations, and managers) helped initiate and energize the change process, and government funding supported quick and widespread technology adoption. However, although supported by the same government-sponsored program, mobile technology proved to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between agencies. What was first seen as a very promising innovation across the Danish home care sector subsequently became the topic of debate as technology use arrangements ran counter to existing norms and values in individual agencies. Conclusions Government-sponsored programs can have both positive and negative results, and managers need to be aware of this and the interpretive flexibility of mobile technology. Mobile technology implementation is a complex process that is best studied by combining organization-level analysis with features of the wider sociopolitical and interorganizational environment. PMID:24172852

  20. Home care delivery through the mobile telecommunications platform: the Citizen Health System (CHS) perspective.

    PubMed

    Maglaveras, N; Koutkias, V; Chouvarda, I; Goulis, D G; Avramides, A; Adamidis, D; Louridas, G; Balas, E A

    2002-12-18

    Health delivery practices are shifting towards home care. The reasons are the better possibilities for managing chronic care, controlling health delivery costs, increasing quality of life and quality of health services and the distinct possibility of predicting and thus avoiding serious complications. For the above goals to become routine, new telemedicine and information technology (IT) solutions need to be implemented and integrated in the health delivery scene, and these solutions need to be assessed through evidence-based medicine in order to provide solid proof for their usefulness. Thus, the concept of contact or call centers has emerged as a new and viable reality in the field of IT for health and telemedicine. In this paper we describe a generic contact center that was designed in the context of an EU funded IST for health project with acronym Citizen Health System (CHS). Since the generic contact center is composed by a number of modules, we shall concentrate in the modules dealing with the communication between the patient and the contact center using mobile telecommunications solutions, which can act as link between the internet and the classical computer telephony communication means. We further elaborate on the development tools of such solutions, the interface problems we face, and on the means to convey information from and to the patient in an efficient and medically acceptable way. This application proves the usefulness of wireless technology in providing health care services all around the clock and everywhere the citizen is located, it proves the necessity for restructuring the medical knowledge for education delivery to the patient, and it shows the virtue of interactivity by means of using the limited, yet useful browsing capabilities of the wireless application protocol (WAP) technology. PMID:12467795

  1. Abstract--This paper describes a prototype system for continual health monitoring at home. The system consists of an

    E-print Network

    Milenkovi, Aleksandar

    . The system consists of an unobtrusive wireless body area network (WBAN) and a home health server. The WBAN for building unobtrusive, scalable, and robust wearable health monitoring systems. A WBAN for health monitoring), (iii) storing the processed data, and (iv) transmitting the data to other nodes and/or a WBAN server

  2. Handball Coaches’ Perceptions About the Value of Working Competences According to Their Coaching Background

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Isabel; Borges, Mario; Rosado, Antonio; Souza, Adriano De

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value attributed to given working competences, by Portuguese handball coaches according to their coaching background, certification level, coaching experience, and level of education. A sample of 207 handball coaches responded to a questionnaire which included demographic characteristics and a scale focused on perceptions of the level of importance attributed to working competences. Data analysis included an exploratory factorial analysis applying Maximum Likelihood Factoring (MLF) and Oblimin rotation. These factors were submitted to a One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc multiple comparisons to analyse coaches’ perceptions according to their coaching background. A six factor solution was found where three major domains of competences were highlighted; the first one related to training and competition (e.g. planning and conducting the training, team administration in competition, annual and multi-annual planning, and coaching methodology); the second one related to social and cultural issues and management (e.g. implementation of youth sport development projects, team leadership and coach education) and the third one related to the cognitive background (meta-cognitive competences). The importance ascribed to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level. Highly experienced and qualified coaches perceived competences of everyday practice, social, cultural and management issues related to training and competition as more important than the other coaches. This study suggests the need to consider some working competences, until now not explicitly present in the Portuguese coaching education curriculum which could enable coaches to choose the best way to practice/work in a manner that will foster and support their professional development. Key points Three major domains of competences were highlighted by Portuguese handball coaches. The first one related to training and competition, the second one related to social and cultural issues and management and the third one related to the cognitive background. The importance ascribed by Portuguese handball coaches to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level, as high experienced coaches and coaches with higher certification levels perceived competences related to training and competition of the everyday practice and social, cultural issues and management as more important. The value attributed by Portuguese handball coaches to working competences did not vary according to the coaches’ academic education level. Portuguese handball coaches valued the meta-cognitive competences, the competences to implement sport development project and related to annual and multi-annual planning independently of their coaching background. PMID:24149314

  3. The health care organization of the Dutch East India Company at home.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, I D

    1994-12-01

    The Dutch East India Company ('VOC') organized a health care service on board its vessels as well as its home bases and in its factories in Asia. This health care service was based initially on the Dutch navy model. This study addresses the problems manifesting in the VOC health care in the 200 years of its activities, framed within the general concept of the transition during that period from individual to mass health care. It is argued that the service proved inadequate because of a number of factors, chiefly including the inability of the organization to cope with large numbers of people already ill before boarding or falling ill during the Asia-bound voyages; the ignorance of the causes of malnutritional and (tropical) infectious diseases; the training of surgeons (focused on injury-caused disease rather than on systemic disorders); the inordinate frugality of the directors as well as the fear of junior officials to displease the managerial board; and the preoccupation of the VOC board with detail rather than with a policy addressing fundamental health problems. PMID:11639472

  4. A Water-Damaged Home and Health of Occupants: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R.; Kilburn, Kaye H.; Dennis, Donald P.; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings. PMID:22220187

  5. Health Care Savings with the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Community Care of North Carolina's Experience

    PubMed Central

    DuBard, C. Annette; Ritter, Grant A.; Jackson, Carlos T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the financial impact of integrating a systemic care management intervention program (Community Care of North Carolina) with person-centered medical homes throughout North Carolina for non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities during almost 5 years of program history. It examined Medicaid claims for 169,676 non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities from January 2007 through third quarter 2011. Two models were used to estimate the program's impact on cost, within each year. The first employed a mixed model comparing member experiences in enrolled versus unenrolled months, accounting for regional differences as fixed effects and within physician group experience as random effects. The second was a pre-post, intervention/comparison group, difference-in-differences mixed model, which directly matched cohort samples of enrolled and unenrolled members on strata of preenrollment pharmacy use, race, age, year, months in pre-post periods, health status, and behavioral health history. The study team found significant cost avoidance associated with program enrollment for the non-elderly disabled population after the first years, savings that increased with length of time in the program. The impact of the program was greater in persons with multiple chronic disease conditions. By providing targeted care management interventions, aligned with person-centered medical homes, the Community Care of North Carolina program achieved significant savings for a high-risk population in the North Carolina Medicaid program. (Population Health Management 2013;17:141–148) PMID:24053757

  6. Workplace violence prevention policies in home health and hospice care agencies.

    PubMed

    Gross, Nathan; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Nocera, Maryalice; Casteel, Carri

    2013-01-01

    Workplace violence in the home health industry is a growing concern, but little is known about the content of existing workplace violence prevention programs. The authors present the methods for this study that examined workplace violence prevention programs in a sample of 40 California home health and hospice agencies. Data was collected through surveys that were completed by the branch managers of participating facilities. Programs were scored in six different areas, including general workplace violence prevention components; management commitment and employee involvement; worksite analysis; hazard prevention and control; safety and health training; and recordkeeping and program evaluation. The results and discussion sections consider these six areas and the important gaps that were found in existing programs. For example, although most agencies offered workplace violence training, not every worker performing patient care was required to receive the training. Similarly, not all programs were written or reviewed and updated regularly. Few program differences were observed between agency characteristics, but nonetheless several striking gaps were found. PMID:23452197

  7. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePLUS

    Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed dramatically over the past several decades. These changes ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  8. Peer Coaching and Technology Integration: An Evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann E.; Dawson, Kara; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on an evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching (MPC) program in Florida, USA. First, the design of the MPC materials was analyzed using characteristics of exemplary peer coaching and technology integration models. Second, facilitators (n = 14) and coaches (n = 46) who attended the MPC workshops in Florida were surveyed…

  9. Poor Teaching by the Coach: A Phenomenological Description from Athletes' Experience of Poor Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearity, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Winning and losing have consistently been used as one criterion upon which to evaluate coaches. Since winning coaches have long been thought of as knowledgeable and effective at providing instruction, researchers have often studied coaches who have obtained a high winning percentage. While researchers know some about the behaviors and…

  10. Coaching for survival: the hazards of head coach careers in the German ‘Bundesliga’

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Pestana Barros; Bernd Frick; José Passos

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses how long head coaches survive in the clubs of the first German football league (‘Bundesliga’), where the dismissal of a presumably weak coach is a generally adopted procedure in case of a poor sporting performance of the team. We use duration models for repeated events to accommodate the correlation within individuals. We find that the head coaches

  11. Volunteer Youth Sport Coaches' Perspectives of Coaching Education/Certification and Parental Codes of Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiersma, Lenny D.; Sherman, Clay P.

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of youth sport programs in the United States relies primarily on parent volunteers to serve as coaches. Unfortunately, most of these volunteer coaches have not received formal training to prepare them adequately for the role of youth sport coach. To exacerbate the issue, according to the popular media, parents and other adults…

  12. Providers' Reported and Actual Use of Coaching Strategies in Natural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine; Cambray-Engstrom, Elizabeth; Woods, Juliann

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the agreement between reported and actual use of coaching strategies based on home visit data collected on a diverse sample of providers and families. Paired videotape and contact note data of and from providers during home visits were collected over a six month period and analyzed using structured protocols. Results of…

  13. Under-nutrition at baseline and health services utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbin; Brown, Cynthia J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Roth, David L.; West, Delia Smith; Locher, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Older adults receiving Medicare home health services who experience under-nutrition may be at increased risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. We sought to identify the association between baseline nutritional status and subsequent health service utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services. Design This was a longitudinal study using questionnaires and anthropometric measures designed to assess nutritional status (Mini-Nutritional Assessment [MNA]) at baseline and health services utilization and mortality status at six-month and one-year follow-ups. Setting Participants were evaluated in their homes. Participants 198 older adults who were receiving Medicare home health services. Results Based upon MNA, 12.0% of patients were Malnourished, 51.0% were At Risk for Malnourishment, and 36.9% had Normal Nutrition Status. Based upon body mass index (BMI), 8.1% of participants were underweight, 37.9% were normal weight, 25.3% were overweight, and 28.8% were obese. Using multivariate binary logistic regression analyses, participants who were Malnourished or At Risk for Malnourishment were more likely to experience subsequent hospitalization, emergency room visit, home health aide use, and mortality for the entire sample and hospitalization and nursing home stay for overweight and obese participants. Conclusions Experiencing under-nutrition at the time of receipt of Medicare home health services was associated with increased health services utilization and mortality for the entire sample, and with increased health services utilization only for the overweight and obese subsample. Opportunities exist to address risk of under-nutrition in patients receiving home health services, including those who are overweight or obese, to prevent subsequent adverse health outcomes. PMID:21527170

  14. A mobile-health application to detect wandering patterns of elderly people in home environment.

    PubMed

    Vuong, N K; Goh, S G A; Chan, S; Lau, C T

    2013-01-01

    Wandering is a common and risky behavior in people with dementia (PWD). In this paper, we present a mobile healthcare application to detect wandering patterns in indoor settings. The application harnesses consumer electronics devices including WiFi access points and mobile phones and has been tested successfully in a home environment. Experimental results show that the mobile-health application is able to detect wandering patterns including lapping, pacing and random in real-time. Once wandering is detected, an alert message is sent using SMS (Short Message Service) to attending caregivers or physicians for further examination and timely interventions. PMID:24111292

  15. Marketing environment dynamics and implications for pricing strategies: the case of home health care.

    PubMed

    Ponsford, B J; Barlow, D

    1999-01-01

    This research reviews the factors affecting the pricing or rate schedules of home health care agencies. A large number of factors affect costs and thus rate structures. The major factors include reimbursement structures with accompanying discount structures, administrative burdens, and risks. Channel issues include bargaining power, competition, and size. Staffing issues affect pricing and product through the provider level, productivity, and quality outcomes. Physician and patient issues include quality concerns and choices. These factors are discussed in light of overall marketing strategy and the interaction of pricing with other marketing controllables such as product, place/distribution, and promotion. Economic and accounting principles are also reviewed with consideration to understanding direct and indirect costs in order to enable negotiators to effectively price health care services. PMID:10623194

  16. Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common and costly chronic musculoskeletal conditions world-wide and is associated with substantial pain and disability. Many people with knee OA also experience co-morbidities that further add to the OA burden. Uptake of and adherence to physical activity recommendations is suboptimal in this patient population, leading to poorer OA outcomes and greater impact of associated co-morbidities. This pragmatic randomised controlled trial will investigate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of adding telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention for people with knee OA. Methods/Design 168 people with clinically diagnosed knee OA will be recruited from the community in metropolitan and regional areas and randomly allocated to physiotherapy only, or physiotherapy plus nurse-delivered telephone coaching. Physiotherapy involves five treatment sessions over 6 months, incorporating a home exercise program of 4–6 exercises (targeting knee extensor and hip abductor strength) and advice to increase daily physical activity. Telephone coaching comprises 6–12 telephone calls over 6 months by health practitioners trained in applying the Health Change Australia (HCA) Model of Health Change to provide behaviour change support. The telephone coaching intervention aims to maximise adherence to the physiotherapy program, as well as facilitate increased levels of participation in general physical activity. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include physical activity levels, quality-of-life, and potential moderators and mediators of outcomes including self-efficacy, pain coping and depression. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow-up assessments will also occur at 12 and 18 months. Discussion The findings will help determine whether the addition of telephone coaching sessions can improve sustainability of outcomes from a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention in people with knee OA. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12612000308897 PMID:23231928

  17. Mental Health and Exposure to Patient Distress Among Families of Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Jane L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Jones, Rich N.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Context The effect of suffering among patients with advanced dementia on their family members' mental health has not been investigated. Objectives To describe family members' exposure to distressing symptoms among nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia and associations between such exposure and family member mental health. Methods Data were obtained from an 18-month prospective cohort study of NH residents with advanced dementia and their family member health care proxies (HCPs). Exposure to resident symptoms and associated fear and helplessness was measured quarterly using the Stressful Caregiving Adult Reactions to Experiences of Dying (SCARED) scale (range 0–120). HCP mental health was assessed quarterly using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form (CIDI-SF) (depression), K6 (psychological distress, range, 0–24), and SF-12® mental health subscale. Results Seven hundred seventy-nine SCARED scale assessments were completed by 225 HCPs. The most frequent distressing symptoms were: feeling the resident had had enough (33.2%), choking (21.1%) and pain (18.9%). The symptoms eliciting the greatest fear were thinking the resident was dead and seeing them choke. A sense of helplessness was highest when the resident was observed to be in pain or choking. Family members with SCARED scores > 0 were more likely to meet criteria for depression on the CIDI-SF (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14, 5.85), have a K6 score > 0 (AOR 2.31, 95% CI 1.55, 3.43) and have lower SF-12 scores (adjusted parameter estimate ?1.51, 95% CI ?2.56, ?0.47). Conclusion Family member exposure to distressing symptoms experienced by their loved ones with advanced dementia is not uncommon and is associated with worse mental health. PMID:21402461

  18. Why Do Women Deliver at Home? Multilevel Modeling of Ethiopian National Demographic and Health Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Yebyo, Henock; Alemayehu, Mussie; Kahsay, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite of the existing intensive efforts to improve maternal health in Ethiopia, the proportion of birth delivered at home remains high and is still the top priority among the national health threats. Objective The study aimed to examine effects of individual women and community-level factors of women’s decision on place of delivery in Ethiopia. Methods Data were obtained from the nationally representative 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) which used a two-stage cluster sampling design with rural-urban and regions as strata. The EDHS collected data from a big sample size but our study focused on a sample of 7,908 women whose most recent birth was within five years preceding 2011 and 576 communities in which the women were living in. The data were analyzed using a two-level mixed-effects logistic regression to determine fixed-effects of individual- and community-level factors and random-intercept of between-cluster characteristics. Results In the current study, 6980 out of 7908 deliveries (88.3%) took place at home. Lower educational levels (OR=2.74, 95%CI:1.84,4.70; p<0.0001), making no or only a limited number of ANC visits (OR=3.72,95%CI:2.85, 4.83; p<0.0001), non-exposure to media (OR=1.51, 95%CI 1.13, 2.01; p=0.004), higher parity (OR=2.68, 95%CI:1.96,3.68; p<0.0001), and perceived distance problem to reach health facilities (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.022) were positively associated with home delivery. About 75% of the total variance in the odds of giving birth at home was accounted for the between-community differences of characteristics (ICC=0.75, p<0.0001). With regard to community-level characteristics, rural communities (OR=4.67, 95%CI:3.06,7.11; p<0.0001), pastoralist communities (OR=4.53, 95%CI:2.81,7.28; p<0.0001), communities with higher poverty levels (OR=1.49 95%CI:1.08,2.22; p=0.048), with lower levels of ANC utilization (OR=2.01, 95%CI:1.42,2.85; p<0.0001) and problem of distance to a health facility (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.004) had a positive influence on women to give birth at home. Conclusions Not only individual characteristics of women, but also community-level factors determine women’s decision to deliver at home. PMID:25874886

  19. Practice Patterns among Entrants and Incumbents in the Home Health Market after the Prospective Payment System was Implemented.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjee; Norton, Edward C

    2015-03-01

    Home health care expenditures were the fastest growing part of Medicare from 2001-2009, despite the implementation of prospective payment. Prior research has shown that home health agencies adopted two specific strategies to take advantage of Medicare policies: provide at least 10 therapy visits to get an enormous marginal payment and recertify patients for additional episodes. We study whether there is heterogeneity in the adoption of those strategic behaviors between home health agency entrants and incumbents and find that entrants were more likely to adopt strategic practice patterns than were incumbents. We also find that for-profit incumbents mimicked one of the practice patterns following entrants in the same market. Our findings suggest that it is important to understand the heterogeneity in providers' behavior and how firms interact with each other in the same market. These findings help explain the rapid rise in expenditures in the home health care market. Copyright © 2015?John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25760587

  20. Home National World Business Sports Cricket Entertainment Health Science Bollywood Celebs Geekwerks Now, 'artificial nose' to sniff out bacterial infections!

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Search Home National World Business Sports Cricket Entertainment Health Science Bollywood Celebs/DailyIndia.com Currently trending: Cricket, Charlie Sheen, Shahid Afridi, Lindsay Lohan, Kerala, Lady Gaga, Mumbai, Sachin

  1. Factors influencing the perception of touch by elderly nursing home residents and their health caregivers.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, L M; Buschmann, M B

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine which factors influence the perceptions of touch by elderly nursing home residents and their health caregivers. A random sample of residents (n = 100) and a convenience sample of health caregivers (n = 100) were selected from two nursing homes. The five variables of interest were as follows: staff status; type of touch; area of the body touched; resident's locus of control; and resident's functional level. Vignettes were developed from combinations of variables which described a touch interaction between a resident and caregiver. To determine the main effects of the five variables of interest, fractional factorial analyses of variance were performed. Resident's locus of control appeared to be the most influential factor affecting residents' and caregivers' perceptions of touch. Touch was experienced as positive when it was appropriate to the situation, did not impose greater intimacy than desired, and did not impart a condescending message. Negative touch situations often involved some procedure used in a manner considered "intimate" or when discrepant with the needs of the individual. A conceptual model of interpersonal touch is described and recommendations for further study are discussed. PMID:8225810

  2. Training of home health aides and nurse aides: findings from national data.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Manisha; Ejaz, Farida K; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the commonalities and differences in the perceptions of CNAs and HHAs regarding the initial and continuing education they received to prepare them for their job. More than 80% of HHAs and all CNAs received some initial training. Of these, significantly more HHAs compared to CNAs felt that training had prepared them "very well" for their jobs. The two groups also differed in their assessments of the content of the initial training; for example, more CNAs believed that their training was "excellent" in helping them address patients' limitations in activities of daily living compared to HHAs. The vast majority of HHAs and CNAs received continuing education, and about three fourths in each group assessed this training as being "very useful." In light of the increasing demands for HHAs and CNAs with the aging of America, findings from these national studies could be used to inform educational and training initiatives for this critical workforce. PMID:23095222

  3. Bargaining with patriarchy: former female coaches' experiences and their decision to leave collegiate coaching.

    PubMed

    Kamphoff, Cindra S

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the experiences of former female coaches and their decision to terminate their careers. A feminist perspective and mixed-methods (surveys and interviews) were used to allow for a richer understanding of their experiences. The survey findings, which included 121 former female coaches, suggest that time and family commitments were the main reasons they left coaching. Also, a small number (18%) left coaching for reasons such as opportunity for promotion. Six women from the survey sample were individually interviewed. Through a descriptive analytic strategy and indexing process (Creswell, 1998), three general themes emerged: (a) gender disparities in women's work, (b) technical demands of coaching, and (c) college coaching and normalized sexualities. Overall, the interview findings confirmed the open-ended responses on the survey and described gender discrimination, the centrality of male coaches, and rampant homophobia in U.S. collegiate coaching. In addition, some female coaches discussed perceptions of conflict between working as a coach and motherhood, or women with children as being "distracted" by motherhood. Collectively, the survey and interview results revealed that women have multiple, complex, and overlapping reasons for leaving collegiate coaching. PMID:20949856

  4. Research on home health care telemedicine service system concerned with the improvement of medical resources utilization rate and medical conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Qinghua; Cheng Guoquan; Wang Zhuan; Gao Jing; Tang Ni; Sun Hongyu; Xiu Ningning

    2010-01-01

    There are a lot of people who need health care at home but can't or needn't go to hospital. This paper introduces a solution of home health care telemedicine service system that is composed of remote client system and service center system. The remote client system gathers the vital signs information and transfers it to the service center through 3G\\/CDMA

  5. Health-related quality of life in patients under long-term oxygen therapy: a home-based descriptive study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Janssens; T. Rochat; J. G. Frey; N. Dousse; C. Pichard; J. M. Tschopp

    1997-01-01

    Long-term home oxygen therapy (LTOT) improves survival of hypoxic patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency. However, the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of these patients, when LTOT is initiated, is severely impaired. The present study aims to describe the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients under LTOT, assessed at home, to identify parameters relevant to HRQL, and to describe changes

  6. Recasting the coach as a welfare agent: transprofessional possibilities in the age of

    E-print Network

    ) Coaches: a missing link in the health care system, American Journal of Diseases of Children, 146(2), 211 transprofessional understanding through practitioner enquiry, Journal of Educational Action Research, 17(4), 537 and the repositioning of sport · London 2012 · Widening participation agenda · Out of school opportunities · Life health

  7. Development of a health management support system for patients with diabetes mellitus at home.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shoko; Marukami, Terutaka; Matsuda, Atsuko; Shindo, Akiko; Takemoto, Keiko; Inada, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Recently, a patient with diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 has been increasing in Japan. The patient should be managed not only by a specialist but also by himself focusing his attention on the improvement of his lifestyle at home. In the present study, we tried to develop a health management support system by which a diabetic patient in early stage can easily enter his daily life information, i.e. the biological information such as the data of blood sugar levels and blood pressure levels etc., the information of exercise and diet and send the information to the medical institution with a personal digital assistant (PDA). Afterwards, the patient can receive health instruction information by the physician in charge for self-care at his home with a PDA. The daily life information sent from the patient is stored in a server installed at the medical institution and analyzed. The physician can obtain the results of analysis by using a PC and send the instruction information necessary for patient management to the patient at home by using e-mail after diagnosing the patient's condition by the system. To evaluate usability of the developed patient information input system with a PDA, an experiment was conducted by corporation of 20 volunteers who were possible self management and whose age's range from 20s to 60s by questionnaire survey. As a result, almost examinees answered that lifestyle information could be easily entered by the sense like a mobile-phone and lots of positive opinions were obtained. PMID:20503606

  8. Motivation, goal orientation, coaching, and training habits of women ultrarunners.

    PubMed

    Krouse, Rhonna Z; Ransdell, Lynda B; Lucas, Shelley M; Pritchard, Mary E

    2011-10-01

    Ultrarunners participate in running events that exceed the 26.2-mile marathon distance (e.g., 50k, 50-100 miles). Very little research exists on ultrarunners, especially women. This study is a descriptive study detailing the motivation, goal orientation, demographic characteristics (e.g., age, job demands, family structure), training habits (e.g., hours per week of training), and coach utilization of women ultrarunners. Participants (N = 344) were recruited via the Ultra List serve and 4 popular ultrarunning websites, and they completed a questionnaire on motivation, goal orientation, training, and coaching using Survey Monkey. General health orientation (mean ± SD) (4.71 ± 1.06) and psychological coping (4.71 ± 1.03) were the 2 strongest motivational factors. Participants were higher in task orientation (1.38 ± 0.68) (e.g., finishing the race or accomplishing various goals) than ego orientation (3.38 ± 1.01) (e.g., placing in the top 3 overall or beating an opponent). Women trained an average of 12.49 h·wk(-1) and spent 64% of their time training alone. Training information came from their own experience, blogs, websites, and the Ultra List Serve. Over three-fourths of the participants (80%) did not use a coach because of cost and a perceived lack of necessity. Women ultrarunners in this study were task oriented, internally motivated, health, and financially conscious individuals. With additional information about women ultrarunners, coaches will be better prepared to work with this population and ultrarunners can improve their performance by learning about current participants' practices. PMID:21946910

  9. Characteristics of Participants in Australia's Get Healthy Telephone-Based Lifestyle Information and Coaching Service: Reaching Disadvantaged Communities and Those Most at Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Blythe J.; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Venugopal, Kamalesh; Bauman, Adrian E.

    2011-01-01

    To address increasing rates of overweight and obesity, a population-based telephone intervention was introduced in New South Wales, Australia. The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service[R] (GHS) offered participants a 6-month coaching program or detailed self-help information. Determining the population reach of GHS is of public health

  10. See Me, Hear Me, Coach Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Gregg, Madeleine; Howard, Pamela W.; Ploessl, Donna M.; Maughn, Sharron; Gable, Robert A.; Zigmond, Naomi P.

    2009-01-01

    Although the idea of educational coaching is not new, the way teachers-in-training across six west Alabama counties are receiving job-embedded support is far from routine. Educational consultants 764 miles away are pioneering the use of virtual coaching for professional development. From their offices at the Pennsylvania Training and Technical…

  11. Leadership Development Using Online Group Executive Coaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard L. Brookes

    2009-01-01

    Leadership development initiatives in work settings or in executive MBA programs can use online technology to make executive coaching available to a large number of managers. Previously, the integration of classroom training and challenging work assignments into expanded leadership capability has been facilitated by individual executive coaching or mentoring. This limited the number of potential participants who could access these

  12. Enhancing "OJT" Internships with Interactive Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoho, Alan R.; Barnett, Bruce G.; Martinez, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to examine how the best type of internship, i.e., the full-time, job-embedded model can be enhanced using coaching. Before illustrating an exemplary internship program with coaching, this paper describes what an exemplary full-time, job-embedded internship experiences looks like and expounds on the importance of…

  13. Understanding Expertise from Elite Badminton Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Badminton is a growing sport with a limited amount of expertise both in players and coaches so attempts are being made to extend the expertise internationally. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of coaching expertise in badminton because such an understanding might have implications for a more general understanding of expertise,…

  14. Change is a constant requiring a coach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jo Rolfe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess individualized and team coaching as a tool for empowering library employees to respond to the constantly changing needs of customers. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper documents a variety of strategic models and approaches to coaching that can be adapted for practical implementation with the aim of promoting positive change in employee

  15. Workplace Learning of High Performance Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Clifford J.; Tinning, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Australian coaching workplace (to be referred to as the State Institute of Sport; SIS) under consideration in this study employs significant numbers of full-time performance sport coaches and can be accurately characterized as a genuine workplace. Through a consideration of the interaction between what the workplace (SIS) affords the…

  16. Supervisor Toolkit Employee Coaching and Feedback

    E-print Network

    Marsh, David

    from where they are to where they want or need to be Coaching supports employee reflection, awareness and Gislason, Jossey-Bass #12;What a Coaching Manager Does Differently Provides a space for reflecting. I don't hear you. In this situation, it's really all about me. Self-referential listening: I

  17. Aria Coach Soccer Simulation Team Description

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hesam Montazeri; Ahmad Nickabadi; Sajjad Moradi; Sayyed Ali; Rokni Dezfouli; Mojtaba Solgi; Hamid Reza Baghie; Omid Mola

    This paper describes the most important features of current work- ing coach program of the Aria Soccer Simulation Team and futures works which this team aim to do. Previously, this team participates successfully in 2D and 3D soccer simulation environment. This team is prepared to participate in coach competition in addition to 2D and 3D league.

  18. Angry Parents Place Coaches in Tough Spots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2005-01-01

    Coaches and school administrators have been threatened, verbally abused, or physically assaulted in school sports incidents. Threats to coaches arise in a sports atmosphere that many observers say is marked by heightened incivility from the professional ranks on down to inter- scholastic and youth leagues. The demanding, coarser attitudes of…

  19. Communities of Coaches: The Missing Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnson, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    Interscholastic coaches have unique needs relative to how they learn their practice and progress toward higher levels of professional comfort and competence. The purpose of this article is to review the professional development needs of interscholastic coaches and suggest the use of social-learning techniques, specifically communities of practice,…

  20. COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Dentistry

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Dentistry March 26, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey · Collaborative Satisfaction #12;Dentistry 72.7% #12;Dentistry: 72.8% #12;Dentistry: 91.9% Dentistry 91% #12;Leadership #12;Communication of Priorities Dentistry Dean 36.4% #12;Stated Priorities Dentistry Dean 27.3% #12;Dentistry Dean

  1. Organisational Leadership: Lessons from Professional Coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamm Kellett

    1999-01-01

    Leadership has been considered an essential part of business and society, although there has been little progress towards a workable definition. It has been assumed by organisational and sport researchers alike that sport coaching is a role that necessitates leadership. The notion that coaches are leaders has been explored primarily in youth sport and college athletics. As with leadership studies

  2. Igniting business performance through transformational coaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carole Gaskell; Janet Logan; Lyn Nicholls

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – This case study aims to explore how coaching capability and leadership behaviors were developed at Ageas UK in order to improve business performance and create a cultural change at all levels of the organization. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Following its introduction in early 2010, the Full Potential Group “High performance through coaching” program continues to deliver highly-pragmatic, experiential and business

  3. Coaching Writing: The Power of Guided Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, William J.

    Coaching is the central activity in the "game" of teaching, and it is an activity that can have a lifetime effect on language learners. This book presents a "coaching approach" to instruction in written language--an approach that is eclectic, pragmatic, synthetic. The approach in the book centers on finding balance--ways of working smarter, not…

  4. Exploring Biographical Learning in Elite Soccer Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Qualified and skilled sport coaches are vital to the development of sport in general and of elite sport in particular. Research suggests that the development of coaching expertise in elite sport is a complex matter involving mediated, unmediated and internal learning situations. However, it is less clear to what extent and in which ways these…

  5. Peer Coaching in TEFL/TESL Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacilotto, Silvana; Cummings, Rhoda

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the peer coaching model as a professional development tool for pre-service ESL/EFL teachers, and its possible applicability to the Binational Centres in Brazil, as well as to teacher development programmes in general. Peer coaching, a reflective approach to teacher development,…

  6. "Safeguarding" Sports Coaching: Foucault, Genealogy and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a genealogical account of safeguarding in sport. Drawing specifically on Foucault's work, it examines the "politics of touch" in relation to the social and historical formation of child protection policy in sports coaching. While the analysis has some resonance with the context of coaching as a whole, for…

  7. Coaching Development: Methods for Youth Sport Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Brad; Schoenstedt, Linda

    2011-01-01

    There are increasing demands and requirements in the coaching profession, and as a result, coaching education programs worldwide have seen an increase in overall participation. In addition, many schools and sport programs in the United States have begun to require a minimum standard of certification. This, in turn, has created sport-specific…

  8. Executive coaching effectiveness: A conceptual framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gil Bozer; Andrew Pirola-Merlo

    2007-01-01

    The social trend towards having a personal trainer has extended to the corporate world, with a dramatic rise in the popularity of executive coaching. However, despite this popularity, there has been a dearth of research examining the question of how effective executive coaches are, and what real benefits, if any, are derived both personally and from a corporate perspective by

  9. Academic Coaching Produces More Effective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Harry; Wong, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    The most effective schools have coaches. They meet with the principal on a regular basis to assess the progress of every teacher and student. In an effective school, everyone functions as a team and there is a laser focus on student achievement. This article illustrates how academic coaching produces more effective teachers and how effective…

  10. Beat the Greeks! Come see Coach Alex

    E-print Network

    Westfall, Peter H.

    Beat the Greeks! Come see Coach Alex Third Annual Beat the Greeks Chess Challenge Texas Tech on Facebook @TTU.chess Come watch the best Greek chess players take on TTUChess Head Coach Grand- master Alex Onischuk, one of the top chess players in the world. He'll play 40 or more fraternity representatives

  11. Innovation in Diabetes Care: Improving Consumption of Healthy Food Through a “Chef Coaching” Program: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J.; Pojednic, Rachele M.; Phillips, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation. PMID:25568831

  12. Innovation in diabetes care: improving consumption of healthy food through a "chef coaching" program: a case report.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J; Pojednic, Rachele M; Phillips, Edward M

    2014-11-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation. PMID:25568831

  13. Paraprofessional Home Visitors' Perspectives on Addressing Poor Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Mercer, Constance D.; Saylor, Elizabeth L.; Duggan, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand paraprofessional home visitors' perceptions of their training in addressing poor mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence, and their actions in working with families in addressing these issues. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 paraprofessional home visitors. Three main…

  14. [The medical records of home health care patients: a complement or alternative to an electronic file?].

    PubMed

    Perrot, P; Baudier, F; Schmitt, B

    2005-06-01

    Home health care services for dependant people involve participation and interventions of professionals from the health care, medico-social and social sectors. In order to ensure quality care, the flow of information must appropriately circulate between all of the various care providers. The establishment of an electronic medical file for these patients is a possible solution which has been proposed to be conducted in next years. A paper medical record is the property of the patient and offers the possibility of an alternative and complementary solution. The electronic file would use the existing available file as a starting point, and without any additional organisational structures being implicated, it allows for better coordination of the health, medical and social activities. An experimental implementation of this in the Franch-Comte region of France demonstrated the advantages and benefits of such a tool based on a logic centered upon the individual and the open sharing of practices between professionals in the medical and social sectors. PMID:16001564

  15. Indoor fungal contamination: health risks and measurement methods in hospitals, homes and workplaces.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Delphine; Le Cann, Pierre; Reboux, Gabriel; Millon, Laurence; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Indoor fungal contamination has been associated with a wide range of adverse health effects, including infectious diseases, toxic effects and allergies. The diversity of fungi contributes to the complex role that they play in indoor environments and human diseases. Molds have a major impact on public health, and can cause different consequences in hospitals, homes and workplaces. This review presents the methods used to assess fungal contamination in these various environments, and discusses advantages and disadvantages for each method in consideration with different health risks. Air, dust and surface sampling strategies are compared, as well as the limits of various methods are used to detect and quantify fungal particles and fungal compounds. In addition to conventional microscopic and culture approaches, more recent chemical, immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods are described. This article also identifies common needs for future multidisciplinary research and development projects in this field, with specific interests on viable fungi and fungal fragment detections. The determination of fungal load and the detection of species in environmental samples greatly depend on the strategy of sampling and analysis. Quantitative PCR was found useful to identify associations between specific fungi and common diseases. The next-generation sequencing methods may afford new perspectives in this area. PMID:23586944

  16. [Health effects and psychological stress in pregnant women engaged in work outside the home].

    PubMed

    Anan, Ayumi; Shiiba, Michiyo; Sibata, Eiji; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2010-12-01

    Modern society demands working conditions in which pregnant women can successfully deliver children and maintain a professional position. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of work on the health and psychological stress in working women and their newborns. We reviewed twenty-eight publications and found that health problems in working women occur at high rates. However, there is no report investigating the mechanism by which health problems occur, or describing the precise working conditions and symptoms in pregnant women who are engaged in work outside the home. In addition, the literature uses subjective evaluations, including psychological tests, to quantify stress and anxiety, but no biochemical analyses of stress-related substances were conducted. We suggest that a standard index to represent working conditions and job category, as well as an investigation of the workload of house-keeping, is needed to understand the total work effort by pregnant women in modern times. Finally, measurement of stress-related biological markers may be effective in the investigation from various perspectives of occupational stress in pregnant women. PMID:21229729

  17. Mental Health Problems in Norwegian School Children Placed Out-of-Home: The Importance of Family Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havnen, Karen Skaale; Jakobsen, Reidar; Stormark, Kjell Morten

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to explore the association between mental health problems in children placed out-of-home and family risk factors reported as reasons for placement. The sample consisted of 109 Norwegian children aged 6-12 years. Mental health problems were assessed by the Revised Rutter scales reported by the parents and the…

  18. Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  19. Health, wellbeing and nutritional status of older people living in UK care homes: an exploratory evaluation of changes in food and drink provision

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Kenkmann; Gill M Price; Joanne Bolton; Lee Hooper

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Food and drink are important determinants of physical and social health in care home residents. This study explored whether a pragmatic methodology including routinely collected data was feasible in UK care homes, to describe the health, wellbeing and nutritional status of care home residents and assess effects of changed provision of food and drink at three care homes on

  20. Leaving care and mental health: outcomes for children in out-of-home care during the transition to adulthood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Akister; Matt Owens; Ian M Goodyer

    2010-01-01

    There were 59,500 Children in out-of-home care in England in 2008. Research into this population points to poor health and quality of life outcomes over the transition to adult independence. This undesirable outcome applies to mental health, education and employment. This lack of wellbeing for the individual is a burden for health and social care services, suggesting limitations in the

  1. Can the Medical Home Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Disparities for Transition Services Among Youth with Special Health Care Needs?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicole E. Richmond; Tri Tran; Susan Berry

    The Medical Home (MH) is shown to improve health outcomes for Youth with Special Health Care Needs (YSHCN). Some MH services\\u000a involve Transition from pediatric to adult providers to ensure YSHCN have continuous care. Studies indicate racial\\/ethnic\\u000a disparities for Transition, whereas the MH is shown to reduce health disparities. This study aims to (1) Determine the Transition\\u000a rate for YSHCN

  2. The impact of living in a care home on the health and wellbeing of spinal cord injured people.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brett; Caddick, Nick

    2015-01-01

    In the UK, 20% of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) are discharged from rehabilitation into an elderly care home. Despite this, and knowledge that the home is central to health and wellbeing, little research has examined the impact of being in care homes on the health and wellbeing of people with SCI. The purpose of this study was to address this gap. Twenty adults who lived in care homes or had done so recently for over two years were interviewed in-depth. Qualitative data were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Analyses revealed that living in a care home environment severely damages quality of life, physical health and psychological wellbeing in the short and long-term. Reasons why quality of life, health, and wellbeing were damaged are identified. These included a lack of freedom, control, and flexibility, inability to participate in community life, inability to sustain relationships, safety problems, restricted participation in work and leisure time physical activity, lack of meaning, self-expression, and a future, loneliness, difficulties with the re-housing process, depression, and suicidal thoughts and actions. It is concluded that for people with SCI, the care home environment violates social dignity, is oppressive, and denies human rights. Implications for housing and health care policies are also offered. PMID:25884273

  3. Implementing Literacy Coaching: The Role of School Social Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Garnier, Helen E.; Resnick, Lauren B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of a school's pre-existing social resources on the implementation of a comprehensive literacy-coaching program (Content-Focused Coaching [CFC]). Elementary schools were randomly assigned to receive a CFC-trained coach (n = 15 schools) or to continue with the literacy coaching resources that are standard for…

  4. Being a Leadership Development Coach: A Multi-Faceted Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Christine; McMahon, Margery; Gronn, Peter; Martin, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The use of coaching as a developmental methodology has been instituted as a way to develop leadership in schools in Scotland as elsewhere in the UK. While there are studies that examine the skills and impact of coaching, there is only limited discussion of the process of coaching and the role and experiences of the coaches. This article examines…

  5. Teachers’ perceptions of the coaching role in secondary vocational education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evelien Ketelaar; Perry den Brok; Douwe Beijaard; Henny P. A. Boshuizen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a study on teachers’ perceptions of the coaching role in innovative secondary vocational education (SVE) in the Netherlands. Data from 109 teachers were collected by means of an online questionnaire, asking for their associations with the coaching role, goals concerning the coaching role, and typical coaching activities. Using multiple correspondence analyses, it was explored whether underlying dimensions

  6. The coach–athlete relationship: a motivational model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Genevie Ve A. Mageau; Robert J. Vallerand

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a motivational model of the coach–athlete relationship that describes how coaches may influence athletes' motivation. In line with cognitive evaluation theory (Deci and Ryan, 1980, 1985) and the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (Vallerand, 1997, 2000), a motivational sequence is proposed where coaches' personal orientation towards coaching, the context within

  7. Mentoring and Coaching in Schools: Professional Learning through Collaborative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Suzanne; Pomphrey, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Can mentoring and coaching really improve professional practice? How can research and inquiry improve mentoring and coaching practice? "Mentoring and Coaching in Schools" explores the ways in which mentoring and coaching can be used as a dynamic collaborative process for effective professional learning. It demonstrates how the use of practitioner…

  8. A Look inside Mathematics Coaching: Roles, Content, and Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudzimiri, Rejoice; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Sutton, John; Yopp, David

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics classroom coaching is used across the United States as a means for improving instruction, with the ultimate goal of improving student learning. The job assignments of coaches can vary widely across schools and districts. Regardless of the various forms that coaching can take, there is the consistent expectation that a coach's…

  9. The Rhetoric and Realities of Literacy Coaching: An Autoethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerall, Sara Hellen

    2012-01-01

    I became a literacy coach eight years ago. After working at one school for five years with four different principals and reading everything I could find about being a literacy coach, I was keenly aware of the gap between the rhetoric of literacy coaching and the realities I faced in this role. The available literature around literacy coaching did…

  10. Making it stick: coaching as a tool for organizational change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dianne R. Stober

    2008-01-01

    Coaching has been primarily used as an individual growth and development process within organizations, particularly at the leadership or high potential employee level (Hunt & Weintraub, 2002). While developing top talent is undoubtedly an important use of coaching, other organizational objectives can also benefit from using coaching. Organizational Change (OC) is one such area in which coaching can contribute to

  11. High School Rugby Players' Perception of Coaching Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broodryk, Retief; van den Berg, Pieter Hendrick

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were firstly to determine the players' perceptions of their respective coaches' coaching effectiveness and secondly, determine the difference between big and small schools of the players' perceptions of their respective coaches' coaching effectiveness. Four hundred and seventy six players from 22 schools were asked to fill…

  12. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  13. Understanding the Work and Learning of High Performance Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Cliff J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The development of high performance sports coaches has been proposed as a major imperative in the professionalization of sports coaching. Accordingly, an increasing body of research is beginning to address the question of how coaches learn. While this is important work, an understanding of how coaches learn must be underpinned by an…

  14. Coaching the site manager: effects on learning and managerial practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Styhre

    2007-01-01

    Coaching has emerged as a potentially powerful leadership development approach, capable of effectively blending theoretical knowledge and practical skills in onsite training. To date, little research on the use of coaching in the construction industry has been published and the coaching literature is primarily written by coaches with vested interests. In addition, there are a limited number of critical and

  15. Evaluating the effectiveness of executive coaching: beyond ROI?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth P. De Meuse; Guangrong Dai; Robert J. Lee

    2009-01-01

    The popularity of executive coaching has increased dramatically in both the practitioner world and academia during the past decade. However, evaluating the effectiveness of coaching has lagged behind. Executive coaching is a multidisciplinary practice, and professionals from many different scholarly backgrounds provide coaching services. The paucity of empirical research may be attributed to the lack of a consensus among these

  16. Charting the Research on the Policies and Politics of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Facing relentless pressure to improve student achievement, many states and districts are using coaching as a policy lever to promote changes in practice. This special issue centers on the policies and politics of coaching, and this editorial commentary highlights what we know about the role of coaches and coaching in the field of education. Then I…

  17. Coaching Strategies for Helping Adolescent Athletes Cope with Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jenelle N.; Gilbert, Wade; Morawski, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the various sources of athlete stress and the strategies that coaches can use to help young athletes cope with it. The information is based on a study with a competitive adolescent soccer team and its two coaches, and a review of the coaching and sport psychology literature. The suggested coaching strategies can help to…

  18. Community and Individual Race/Ethnicity and Home Health Care Use among Elderly Persons in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, James B; Lau, Denys T

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the interaction between individual race/ethnicity and community racial/ethnic composition is associated with health-related home care use among elderly persons in the United States. Data Sources A nationally representative sample of community-dwelling elders aged 65+ from the 2000 to 2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (N=23,792) linked to block group-level racial/ethnic information from the 2000 Decennial Census. Design We estimated the likelihood of informal and formal home health care use for four racial/ethnic elderly groups (non-Hispanic [NH] whites, NH-blacks, NH-Asians, and Hispanics) living in communities with different racial/ethnic compositions. Principal Findings NH-Asian and Hispanic elders living in block groups with ?25 percent of residents being NH-Asian or Hispanic, respectively, were more likely to use informal home health care than their counterparts in other block groups. No such effect was apparent for formal home health care. Conclusions NH-Asian and Hispanic elders are more likely to use informal home care if they live in communities with a higher proportion of residents who share their race/ethnicity. A better understanding of how informal care is provided in different communities may inform policy makers concerned with promoting informal home care, supporting informal caregivers, or providing formal home care as a substitute or supplement to informal care. PMID:20662950

  19. Health Care Disparities and Language Use at Home among Latino, Asian American, and American Indian Adolescents: Findings from the California Health Interview Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Lahiff, Maureen; Barreto, Rose M.; Shin, Sunny; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Using the 2001 California Health Interview Survey, this study compared health status, medical insurance, and having a usual source of care for 2,230 ethnic minority adolescents based on language use at home: Group 1, English only; Group 2, both English and another language; and Group 3, exclusively another language. Adjusting for demographic…

  20. Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

  1. HEALTH VIDEOS HEALTH TOPICS Like 17k Follow HOME US / WORLD CONSUMER NEWS POLICY / BIZ SCIENCE / TECH DRUGS HEALTHY LIVING CONDITIONS

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    HEALTH VIDEOS HEALTH TOPICS Like 17k Follow HOME US / WORLD CONSUMER NEWS POLICY / BIZ SCIENCE, but that it changes," said Dr. Ian Rickard, a lecturer in the Department of Anthropology. The UK Medical Research thousands of women in rural Gambia, researchers from Durham University show how the trend towards living

  2. Surveying multiple health professional team members within institutional settings: an example from the nursing home industry.

    PubMed

    Clark, Melissa A; Roman, Anthony; Rogers, Michelle L; Tyler, Denise A; Mor, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Quality improvement and cost containment initiatives in health care increasingly involve interdisciplinary teams of providers. To understand organizational functioning, information is often needed from multiple members of a leadership team since no one person may have sufficient knowledge of all aspects of the organization. To minimize survey burden, it is ideal to ask unique questions of each member of the leadership team in areas of their expertise. However, this risks substantial missing data if all eligible members of the organization do not respond to the survey. Nursing home administrators (NHA) and directors of nursing (DoN) play important roles in the leadership of long-term care facilities. Surveys were administered to NHAs and DoNs from a random, nationally representative sample of U.S. nursing homes about the impact of state policies, market forces, and organizational factors that impact provider performance and residents' outcomes. Responses were obtained from a total of 2,686 facilities (response rate [RR] = 66.6%) in which at least one individual completed the questionnaire and 1,693 facilities (RR = 42.0%) in which both providers participated. No evidence of nonresponse bias was detected. A high-quality representative sample of two providers in a long-term care facility can be obtained. It is possible to optimize data collection by obtaining unique information about the organization from each provider while minimizing the number of items asked of each individual. However, sufficient resources must be available for follow-up to nonresponders with particular attention paid to lower resourced, lower quality facilities caring for higher acuity residents in highly competitive nursing home markets. PMID:24500999

  3. Relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca

    2014-02-01

    Employee turnover is a large and expensive problem in the long-term care environment. Stated intention to leave is a reliable indicator of likely turnover, but actual predictors, especially for nursing assistants, have been incompletely investigated. This quantitative study identifies the relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,589 employees in 18 for-profit nursing homes. A working condition index for the number of beneficial job features was constructed. Poisson regression modeling found that employees who reported four positive features were 77% less likely to state strong intention to leave (PR = 0.23, p < .001). The strength of relationship between working conditions and intention to leave was slightly mediated by employee mental health. Effective workplace intervention programs must address work organization features to reduce employee intention to leave. Healthy workplaces should build better interpersonal relationships, show respect for employee work, and involve employees in decision-making processes. PMID:24652941

  4. Preventing Unintentional Injuries in the Home Using the Health Impact Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Karin A.; Liller, Karen D.; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-01-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social–environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden’s Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social–environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. PMID:25829110

  5. Preventing unintentional injuries in the home using the health impact pyramid.

    PubMed

    Mack, Karin A; Liller, Karen D; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-04-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social-environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden's Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modi?cations of the social environment are being ?eld-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social-environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. PMID:25829110

  6. Role of Health Information Technologies in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    A national effort to reform primary care, known as the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), requires fulfillment of six standards determined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance to (1) enhance access and continuity, (2) identify and manage patient populations, (3) plan and manage care, (4) provide self-care and community support, (5) track and coordinate care, and (6) measure and improve performance. Information technologies play a vital role in the support of most, if not all, of these standards. However, given the newness of the PCMH, little is known on how health information technologies (HITs) have been employed to accomplish these objectives. This article will review the role of HITs, including electronic health records, web-based patient portals, telemedicine, and patient registries, with a focus on diabetes care, and how these technologies have been engaged in the establishment of the PCMH. In addition, we will discuss the benefits and potential risks and barriers to employing these technologies, including privacy and security concerns, as well as describe next steps for future work in this important area. PMID:24124967

  7. Coaching for Agile and Xtreme Practices A Fishbowl with Piranhas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Fraser; Rachel Reinitz; Jutta Eckstein; Joshua Kerievsky; Erik Lundh; Robert Mee; Mary Poppendieck

    2003-01-01

    This panel-fishbowl hybrid will discuss all aspects of coaching — becoming a coach — choosing one and describing what it means\\u000a to be an (in)effective coach. A coach watches, provides feedback, and suggests subtle direction — some will argue that the\\u000a coach is more — for example, an architect or team lead — but that is a matter for debate.

  8. Effects of health insurance on non-working married women’s medical care use and bed days at home

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examines whether bed days are alternative methods to medical care use for treating a particular illness. If bed days at home are considered as an alternative to medical treatment, then medical care use and bed days at home should be influenced by an individual’s health insurance status. Method This study uses data from the 2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) on medical care use and bed days at home for each contracted illness of non-working married women. Results The results suggest that the health insurance status of non-working married women has considerable influence on their choice between medical care use and bed days at home. In addition, those with health insurance are more likely to use medical care and less likely to use bed days at home, but they tend to avoid the simultaneous use of medical care and bed days at home. Conclusions In contrast to previous studies’ findings indicating that absences from work and medical care use among working males may be complements, this study’s results for non-working married women without health insurance suggest that they use rest and medical treatment as substitutes, not complements. PMID:23816313

  9. Home Remodeling

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer. They are found in electrical components, waste oil supplies and a variety of plastic and paper products. Older Homes Asbestos and lead were often used in building and painting older homes, before their health hazards were known. ...

  10. Teaching coaches to coach holistically: can Problem-Based Learning (PBL) help?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robyn L. Jones; Poppy Turner

    2006-01-01

    Background: Coaching, as related to improving others' sporting experience and\\/or performance, at any level is unquestionably a complex business. General agreement exists that the dynamic and intricate nature of the work in teaching, guiding and managing others in this regard precludes any paint-by-number plans that practitioners can easily follow. Consequently, the need to coach holistically, in terms of viewing coaching

  11. Nutritional and health status among nursing home residents in Lebanon: comparison across gender in a national cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study described the differences between elderly men and women living in Lebanese long-term care nursing homes on socio-economic, health and nutritional status. Methods This study used a cross-sectional design. Field researchers obtained data from 221 residents; 148 (67%) women and 73 (33%) men, living in 36 nursing homes. Data on health conditions; nutritional, psychological, and functional status; socio-demographic characteristics, as well as social relations were collected. The analysis used both chi-square and t-test tests. Results The majority of elderly had low socio-economic and poor health status. In comparison to men, women were significantly less educated, had lower occupational status, had no partner, relied financially on their children and relatives, and enjoyed better social relations and health behaviours. Furthermore, the prevalence of both; malnutrition, and at risk of malnutrition, were at 3.2% and 27.6% respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between women and men on Mini Nutritional Assessment, Activities of Daily Living, Geriatric Depression Scale, Body Mass Index, and chronic diseases. While women reported “good” health status compared to men, they continued to have higher prevalence of diseases and chronic pain. Conclusions This study explored the socio-demographic, health, and nutritional status of elderly residing in Lebanese nursing homes and compared these characteristics across gender. The results indicated the need of health support and institutional interventions for elderly women residents. PMID:24950594

  12. Care homes. Home truths.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Netten, A; Mozley, C; Levin, E; Mann, A; Blizard, B; Topan, C; Abbey, A; Kharicha, K; Todd, C

    1998-01-15

    Proposed joint inspectorates of care homes open the way for health input into residential care. An investigation into quality-of-care measures concluded that health professionals should be included in inspectorate teams, particularly in view of the increasing dependency of residents. No association was shown between cost and quality, but higher costs were associated with short-term car provision. When costing residential care, the impact on community and primary healthcare services may need to be taken into account. PMID:10176463

  13. Compatibility in the Coach-Athlete Dyad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carron, Albert V.; Bennett, Bonnie B.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of inclusion, control, and affection behaviors in the interrelationships of coaches and athletes revealed that inclusion was the predominant factor contributing to incompatibility in the dyads. (MJB)

  14. Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program

    SciTech Connect

    Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

  15. Facilitating Out-of-Home Caregiving Through Health Information Technology: Survey of Informal Caregivers’ Current Practices, Interests, and Perceived Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D; Jenchura, Emily C; Asch, Steven M; Rosland, Ann-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic conditions are supported by out-of-home informal caregivers—family members, friends, and other individuals who provide care and support without pay—who, if armed with effective consumer health information technology, could inexpensively facilitate their care. Objective We sought to understand caregivers’ use of, interest in, and perceived barriers to health information technology for out-of-home caregiving. Methods We conducted 2 sequential Web-based surveys with a national sample of individuals who provide out-of-home caregiving to an adult family member or friend with a chronic illness. We queried respondents about their use of health information technology for out-of-home caregiving and used multivariable regression to investigate caregiver and care-recipient characteristics associated with caregivers’ technology use for caregiving. Results Among 316 out-of-home caregiver respondents, 34.5% (109/316) reported using health information technology for caregiving activities. The likelihood of a caregiver using technology increased significantly with intensity of caregiving (as measured by number of out-of-home caregiving activities). Compared with very low intensity caregivers, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of technology use was 1.88 (95% CI 1.01-3.50) for low intensity caregivers, 2.39 (95% CI 1.11-5.15) for moderate intensity caregivers, and 3.70 (95% CI 1.62-8.45) for high intensity caregivers. Over 70% (149/207) of technology nonusers reported interest in using technology in the future to support caregiving. The most commonly cited barriers to technology use for caregiving were health system privacy rules that restrict access to care-recipients’ health information and lack of familiarity with programs or websites that facilitate out-of-home caregiving. Conclusions Health information technology use for out-of-home caregiving is common, especially among individuals who provide more intense caregiving. Health care systems can address the mismatch between caregivers’ interest in and use of technology by modifying privacy policies that impede information exchange. PMID:23841987

  16. Under pressure, out of control, or home alone? Reviewing research and policy debates on the occupational health and safety effects of outsourcing and home-based work.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Michael; Bohle, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The practice of outsourcing or subcontracting of work has grown rapidly in most countries over the past two decades. Outsourcing, de-institutionalization, and a range of other practices have also resulted in a growth of home-based work. Home-based workers, even when not part of a subcontracting process, operate in an isolated situation remote from their employer and other workers. Do such work arrangements expose workers to greater risk of injury, illness, or assault? The authors reviewed international studies of the occupational health and safety (OHS) effects of subcontracting and home-based work undertaken over the past 20 years. Of the 25 studies analyzed, 92 percent found poorer OHS outcomes. The studies were examined for clues about the reasons for these negative outcomes. The authors also identified similarities and differences between subcontracting and home-based work. Despite the evidence of poor OHS outcomes, research into outsourcing has stalled in recent years. With notable exceptions, governments have taken little account of findings on these work arrangements in their laws and policies, in part because neoliberal ideas dominate national and global policy agendas. The authors examine policy challenges and regulatory responses and make suggestions for future research and policy interventions. PMID:18724579

  17. Assessment of community mobilization and home-based HIV counselling and testing offered by health facilities in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Shumba, Constance S; Atuhaire, Lydia; Memiah, Peter; Atukunda, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    Home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBHCT) and community mobilization have been proven to be effective in increasing the number of people linked to HIV care and treatment. An assessment was conducted in 18 health facilities in Uganda to evaluate the availability and extent of home based testing services and community mobilization activities in underserved communities. The performance of the health facilities was assessed using a checklist with indicators of HBHCT and community mobilization. While most of the health facilities (72.2%) had active community mobilization, only 12.2% had HBHCT services and this might have affected universal access to HIV prevention, care and treatment. The health facilities did not accompany their intensive community mobilization activities with HBHCT yet this provided the ideal entry point and opportunity to improve linkage to HIV treatment and care. PMID:24689329

  18. Assessing the Importance Given by Basketball Coaches to Training Contents

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Nuno; Coelho, Eduarda; Sampaio, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the importance given by novice, intermediate and experienced basketball coaches to training contents. To achieve this purpose, a sample composed of Portuguese basketball coaches (n = 212) described how they rate the importance of technical, tactical, physical and drill contents. According to the results, there is a wide-ranging differential from novice to experienced coaches. First, while experienced coaches tend to focus on tactical development, novice and intermediate coaches seem to privilege the improvement of technical skills. Second, whereas significant differences between novice and intermediate coaches were found, evidence confirmed that they were higher (both in number and weight) when comparing experienced coaches against novice and intermediate. The study provided strong support to justify the necessity to adjust coaches’ knowledge to players’ biological developmental, and could form the basis of focused interventions in coaching development. PMID:23486837

  19. NFL head coaches as sensegiving change agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Goosby Smith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to suggest that a key role of the professional US NFL head coach is as a sensemaker, sensegiver, and driver of intentional change. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Intentional change theory and sensemaking are used to explore NFL head coaches' roles as sense-givers of intentional change during their pre-game and post-game press conferences. Findings –

  20. COACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey MEAN COMPARISONS

    E-print Network

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    COACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey MEAN COMPARISONS QUEENS COLLEGE (CUNY) 2012 Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey 2011-12 MEAN/A N/A N/A N/A Q80E Support for engaging undergrads in research 2.90 1.04 3.05 0.35 N/A N/A 3.42 1.03 2

  1. Parents as teachers health literacy demonstration project: integrating an empowerment model of health literacy promotion into home-based parent education.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Lauren N; Smith, Sandra A; Thomson, Nicole R

    2015-03-01

    The Parents as Teachers (PAT) Health Literacy Demonstration project assessed the impact of integrating data-driven reflective practices into the PAT home visitation model to promote maternal health literacy. PAT is a federally approved Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting program with the goal of promoting school readiness and healthy child development. This 2-year demonstration project used an open-cohort longitudinal design to promote parents' interactive and reflective skills, enhance health education, and provide direct assistance to personalize and act on information by integrating an empowerment paradigm into PAT's parent education model. Eight parent educators used the Life Skills Progression instrument to tailor the intervention to each of 103 parent-child dyads. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, paired t tests, and logistic regression combined with qualitative data demonstrated that mothers achieved overall significant improvements in health literacy, and that home visitors are important catalysts for these improvements. These findings support the use of an empowerment model of health education, skill building, and direct information support to enable parents to better manage personal and child health and health care. PMID:24957219

  2. Physician burnout: coaching a way out.

    PubMed

    Gazelle, Gail; Liebschutz, Jane M; Riess, Helen

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five to sixty percent of physicians report burnout across all specialties. Changes in the healthcare environment have created marked and growing external pressures. In addition, physicians are predisposed to burnout due to internal traits such as compulsiveness, guilt, and self-denial, and a medical culture that emphasizes perfectionism, denial of personal vulnerability, and delayed gratification. Professional coaching, long utilized in the business world, provides a results-oriented and stigma-free method to address burnout, primarily by increasing one's internal locus of control. Coaching enhances self-awareness, drawing on individual strengths, questioning self-defeating thoughts and beliefs, examining new perspectives, and aligning personal values with professional duties. Coaching utilizes established techniques to increase one's sense of accomplishment, purpose, and engagement, all critical in ameliorating burnout. Coaching presumes that the client already possesses strengths and skills to handle life's challenges, but is not accessing them maximally. Although an evidence base is not yet established, the theoretical basis of coaching's efficacy derives from the fields of positive psychology, mindfulness, and self-determination theory. Using a case example, this article demonstrates the potential of professional coaching to address physician burnout. PMID:25527340

  3. The mental health implications of maternal employment: Working versus at-home mothering identities The mental health implications of maternal employment: Working versus at-home mothering identities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Elgar; Andrea Chester

    Abstract Past research exploring the effect of employment on mothers' mental health has largely constructed maternal employment as a problem of identity and energy supply within the theory of multiple roles. Specifically, maternal employment has been investigated as either beneficial (role enhancement hypothesis) or detrimental (role strain hypothesis) to women's psychological wellbeing, with little consideration given towards a more complex

  4. Attitudes of female athletes toward their male and female coaches

    E-print Network

    Newcomb, Connie Karcher

    1976-01-01

    rated very high. Hoth coaches were similar in their ability to teach and in how well the coach really "knew" them. It was the attitude of the athletes that the female coach created a more positive public image for women's sports, but the athletes had...- sent in both the minds of the coaches and athletes. It is probable, however, that success in coaching is highly dependent upon the knowledge the coach brings with him to his sport and team, and the manner in which he conducts both (6). Hendry (8...

  5. Health Care Policies for Children in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risley-Curtiss, Christina; Kronenfeld, Jennie Jacobs

    2001-01-01

    Examined health care policies and services for children under 46 state welfare agencies. Found that most states had written policies regarding health care for foster children, but half had no management system to record health care data. Most states did not meet standards set by the Child Welfare League of America for health care of these…

  6. Lessons Learned Coaching Teachers in Behavior Management: The PBIS"plus" Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfeldt, Patricia A.; Pell, Karen; Sechrest, Richard; Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in coaching as a means of promoting professional development and the use of evidence-based practices in schools. This article describes the PBIS"plus" coaching model used to provide technical assistance for classroom- and school-wide behavior management to elementary schools over the course of 3 years. This Tier 2…

  7. Coaching in Context: The Role of Relationships in the Work of Three Literacy Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenhaupt, Rebecca; McKinney, Sarah; Reeves, Todd

    2014-01-01

    In the United States and internationally, instructional coaching has been implemented as a mechanism to increase professional capacity, and in so doing improve student achievement. However, instructional coaches often face resistance from the teachers with whom they work; a manifestation of the egalitarian, isolated culture of teaching in many…

  8. Make the Case for Coaching: Bolster Support with Evidence That Coaching Makes a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Ellen; Medrich, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Policymakers want to see evidence that coaching makes a difference for teachers and students. To this group, making a difference means improving performance on standardized tests. In the current fiscal climate, leaders want to know not only that their investments are based on firm grounds theoretically, but also that instructional coaching works.…

  9. How Do College Coaches Define Character? A Qualitative Study with Division IA Head Coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andy Rudd; Michael J. Mondello

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Rudd (in press) theorized that there are two types of character ,(moral and social) espoused in the sport context. The purpose of this study was to further investigate this theory with a sample of N=12 Division IA head,coaches. The hypothesis ,was that ,coaches ,tend to overemphasize social character over moral character, which may contribute to the ethical problems in

  10. Bargaining with Patriarchy: Former Female Coaches' Experiences and Their Decision to Leave Collegiate Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the experiences of former female coaches and their decision to terminate their careers. A feminist perspective and mixed-methods (surveys and interviews) were used to allow for a richer understanding of their experiences. The survey findings, which included 121 former female coaches, suggest that…

  11. How to Be a Wise Consumer of Coaching: Strategies Teachers Can Use to Maximize Coaching's Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Heidema, Clare; Mitchell, Arlene; Sutton, John

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching is gaining popularity as a school-based effort to increase teacher effectiveness and student achievement. A coach can be broadly defined as a person who works collaboratively with a teacher to improve that teacher's practice and content knowledge, with the ultimate goal of affecting student achievement. By its very nature,…

  12. High-Performance Cricket Coaches' Perceptions of an Educationally Informed Coach Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvan, Hugh; Fyall, Glenn; Culpan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports and discusses the findings of a research project that investigated the recently conceptualized and implemented New Zealand Cricket, Level 3, high-performance coach education programme (CEP). A qualitative methodology was employed to gather data from six coaches involved in the CEP. In particular the researchers sought the…

  13. Public Health, England and Wales: The Conduct of Nursing Homes Regulations 1963 

    E-print Network

    Powell, J. Enoch

    1963-01-01

    These regulations make provision governing the conduct of nursing homes. They require the managers (the person or persons registered in respect of a nursing home) to provide accommodation, care and staff of a satisfactory standard, and limit...

  14. Evolutionary struggles of supply chain strategy in home-based health care delivery

    E-print Network

    Fowler, Katherine Szabo

    2008-01-01

    As the healthcare industry in United States continues to be constrained by increasing costs, new delivery channels are coming into practice. One such channel is home healthcare. Home healthcare presents challenges on the ...

  15. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  16. Implementing Community-Based Long-Term Care: Experience of New York's Long-Term Home Health Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Howard; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes the process of implementing the New York State Long-Term Home Health Care Program (LTHHCP) during its initial three years of operation. Sponsors of similar programs should be aware of the need for program flexibility and the length of time required for start-up and implementation. (JAC)

  17. The learning, physical, and emotional environment of the home in the context of poverty: The infant health and development program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanne Brooks-Gunn; Pamela Kato Klebanov; Fong-ruey Liaw

    1995-01-01

    The impact of individual environmental and biological risks and the number of risks on the home environment of 3-year-olds is examined in a sample of low birth weight, premature infants enrolled in the Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP). The IHDP is a large clinical trial designed to test the efficacy of early intervention services. The effects of 13 risk

  18. Carer Reports of Health Status among Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in Taiwan Living at Home and in Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, K.-Y.; Hsieh, K.; Heller, T.; Davidson, P. W.; Janicki, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the health status of a cohort of adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) residing in family homes or institutions in Taiwan and to examine whether morbidity varied with age, sex, existing diagnosis [Down syndrome (DS), seizures, cerebral palsy (CP), intellectual disability…

  19. Healthy Start Programa Madrina: A Promotora Home Visiting Outreach and Education Program to Improve Perinatal Health among Latina Pregnant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Debra E.; Hock-Long, Linda; Mesure, Maryann; Bryer, Pamela; Zambrano, Neydary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of Healthy Start Programa Madrina (HSPM), a home visiting promotora outreach and education program for Latina pregnant women and to present the 10-year findings of the program (1996-2005). Perinatal health disparities continue to persist among low-income…

  20. Creating Healthful Home Food Environments: Results of a Study with Participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Smalling, Agueda Lara; Thompson, Debbe; Watson, Kathleen B.; Reed, Debra; Konzelmann, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a modified curriculum for the 6-session Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) promoting healthful home food environments and parenting skills related to obesity prevention. Design: Two-group randomized control trial; intervention versus usual EFNEP curriculum. Setting: Texas EFNEP classes. Participants:…

  1. Placement and Permanency Outcomes for Children in Out-of-Home Care by Prior Inpatient Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung Min; Ryan, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal study followed 5,978 children in out-of-home care to examine whether placement and permanency outcomes differ between children with and without a history of inpatient mental health treatment. Method: Data were drawn from child welfare and Medicaid records from the state of Illinois. Logistic regression and survival…

  2. Influencing healthful food choices in school and home environments: results from the TEENS study. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  3. Creating healthful home food environments: Results of a study with participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate a modified curriculum for the 6-session Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), promoting healthful home food environments and parenting skills related to obesity prevention. We used a two-group randomized control trial: intervention versus usual EF...

  4. Developing a Successful Coaching Philosophy: A Step-by-Step Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mullem, Pete; Brunner, Dave

    2013-01-01

    The coaching profession demands a high level of accountability and responsibility for the coach. Challenged to achieve success on the scoreboard and promote the positive personal growth of the athlete, a coach seeks guidance from their coaching philosophy. A coaching philosophy is built on a set of standards by which a coach influences, teaches,…

  5. Death in hospital and at home: population and health policy influences in Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil (1996-2010).

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Fernando Cesar Iwamoto; Cabrera, Marcos Aparecido Sarria

    2015-03-01

    An aging population and epidemiological transition involves prolonged terminal illnesses and an increased demand for end-stage support in health services, mainly in hospitals. Changes in health care and government health policies may influence the death locations, making it possible to remain at home or in an institution. The scope of this article is to analyze death locations in the city of Londrina, State of Paraná, from 1996 to 2010, and to verify the influence of population and health policy changes on these statistics. An analysis was conducted into death locations in Londrina in Mortality Information System (SIM) considering the main causes and locations of death. There was an increase of 28% in deaths among the population in general, though 48% for the population over 60 years of age. There was an increase of deaths in hospitals, which were responsible for 70% of the occurrences, though death frequencies in others locations did not increase, and deaths in the home remained at about 18%. The locations of death did not change during this period, even with health policies that broadened care in other locations, such as the patient´s home. The predominance of hospital deaths was similar to other Brazilian cities, albeit higher than in other countries. PMID:25760123

  6. Internet Protocol Television for Personalized Home-Based Health Information: Design-Based Research on a Diabetes Education System

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Ken; Kwong, Mabel; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV’s potential. Objective Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. Methods This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. Results The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described their experiences with the system in terms that bode well for its educational potential, and they suggested many constructive improvements to the system. Conclusions The integration of Web 2.0 and IPTV merits further technical development, business modeling, and health services and health outcomes research, as a solution to extend the reach and scale of home-based health care. PMID:24613862

  7. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Health Care Fraud Enforcement Disguised as Reform and What It Means for Home Health and Hospice Providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Markette

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act presents new challenges to home health and hospice providers. This article discusses those challenges, along with the impacts that may result from this Act’s implementation. Compliance programs and disclosure are among the implications presented.

  8. The Changing Mental Health Needs of Youth Admitted to Residential Group Home Care: Comparing Mental Health Status at Admission in 1995 and 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Trout, Alexandra; Chmelka, M. Beth; Burns, Barbara J.; Epstein, Michael H.; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Youth entering residential care possess significant emotional and behavioral needs; yet, it is uncertain whether these needs have remained constant or are changing over time. This study examined mental health variables from the admission files of 1,047 youth entering residential group home care in 1995 and 2004. Sequential logistical regression…

  9. Descriptive Analysis of a Novel Health Care Approach: Reverse Colocation—Primary Care in a Community Mental HealthHome

    PubMed Central

    Sirna, Megan; Mangurian, Christina; Dilley, James W.; Shumway, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Persons with serious mental illness have increased rates of chronic medical conditions, have limited access to primary care, and incur significant health care expenditures. Few studies have explored providing medical care for these patients in the ambulatory mental health setting. This study describes a real-world population of mental health patients receiving primary care services in a community mental health clinic to better understand how limited primary care resources are being utilized. Method:Chart review was performed on patients receiving colocated primary care (colocation group, N = 143) and randomly chosen patients receiving mental health care only (mental-health group, N = 156) from January 2006 through June 2011. Demographic and mental and physical health variables were assessed. Results: Compared to the mental-health group, the colocation patients had more psychiatric hospitalizations (mean = 1.07 vs 0.23, P < .01), were more likely to be homeless (P < .01), and were more likely to require intensive case management (P < .01). Interestingly, the colocation group was not more medically ill than the mental-health group on key metabolic measures, including mean body mass index (colocation = 27.8 vs mental-health = 28.7, P = .392), low-density liprotein (colocation = 110.0 vs mental-health = 104.4, P = .480), and glucose (colocation = 94.1 vs mental-health = 109.2, P = .059). The most common medical disorders in the colocation group were related to metabolic syndrome. Conclusions: Colocated primary care services were allocated on the basis of severity of psychiatric impairment rather than severity of medical illness. This program serves as a model for other systems to employ for integrated primary and behavioral health services for patients with serious mental illness. PMID:24511447

  10. Returns to Local-Area Healthcare Spending: Using Health Shocks to Patients far from Home

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Joseph J.

    Health care spending varies widely across markets, and previous research finds little evidence that higher spending translates into better health outcomes. The main innovation in this paper exploits this cross-sectional ...

  11. Effective health care for older people resident in care homes: the optimal study protocol for realist review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Care homes in the UK rely on general practice for access to specialist medical and nursing care as well as referral to therapists and secondary care. Service delivery to care homes is highly variable in both quantity and quality. This variability is also evident in the commissioning and organisation of care home-specific services that range from the payment of incentives to general practitioners (GPs) to visit care homes, to the creation of care home specialist teams and outreach services run by geriatricians. No primary studies or systematic reviews have robustly evaluated the impact of these different approaches on organisation and resident-level outcomes. Our aim is to identify factors which may explain the perceived or demonstrated effectiveness of programmes to improve health-related outcomes in older people living in care homes. Methods/Design A realist review approach will be used to develop a theoretical understanding of what works when, why and in what circumstances. Elements of service models of interest include those that focus on assessment and management of residents’ health, those that use strategies to encourage closer working between visiting health care providers and care home staff, and those that address system-wide issues about access to assessment and treatment. These will include studies on continence, dignity, and speech and language assessment as well as interventions to promote person centred dementia care, improve strength and mobility, and nutrition. The impact of these interventions and their different mechanisms will be considered in relation to five key outcomes: residents’ medication use, use of out of hours’ services, hospital admissions (including use of Accident and Emergency) and length of hospital stay, costs and user satisfaction. An iterative three-stage approach will be undertaken that is stakeholder-driven and optimises the knowledge and networks of the research team. Discussion This realist review will explore why and for whom different approaches to providing health care to residents in care homes improves access to health care in the five areas of interest. It will inform commissioning decisions and be the basis for further research. This systematic review protocol is registered on the PROSPERO database reference number: CRD42014009112. PMID:24887325

  12. Club Sports Coach/Volunteer Code of Conduct

    E-print Network

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Club Sports Coach/Volunteer Code of Conduct Agreement Form I during the 2012-2013 academic year. Club Sport (write legibly) I understand in the Club Sports Handbook and will enforce them in my role as coach. · I

  13. Coaching and family: the beneficial effects of multiple role membership

    E-print Network

    Ryan, Timothy David

    2009-05-15

    An examination of the intersection between work and family for small college coaches was conducted via an online questionnaire to explore variables that affect coaches’ work-family fit. Specifically, the work variables of autonomy, supervisor...

  14. For-profit medicare home health agencies' costs appear higher and quality appears lower compared to nonprofit agencies.

    PubMed

    Cabin, William; Himmelstein, David U; Siman, Michael L; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2014-08-01

    For-profit, or proprietary, home health agencies were banned from Medicare until 1980 but now account for a majority of the agencies that provide such services. Medicare home health costs have grown rapidly since the implementation of a risk-based prospective payment system in 2000. We analyzed recent national cost and case-mix-adjusted quality outcomes to assess the performance of for-profit and nonprofit home health agencies. For-profit agencies scored slightly but significantly worse on overall quality indicators compared to nonprofits (77.18 percent and 78.71 percent, respectively). Notably, for-profit agencies scored lower than nonprofits on the clinically important outcome "avoidance of hospitalization" (71.64 percent versus 73.53 percent). Scores on quality measures were lowest in the South, where for-profits predominate. Compared to nonprofits, proprietary agencies also had higher costs per patient ($4,827 versus $4,075), were more profitable, and had higher administrative costs. Our findings raise concerns about whether for-profit agencies should continue to be eligible for Medicare payments and about the efficiency of Medicare's market-oriented, risk-based home care payment system. PMID:25092849

  15. Do youth in out-of-home care receive recommended mental health and educational services following screening evaluations?

    PubMed Central

    Petrenko, Christie L. M.; Culhane, Sara E.; Garrido, Edward F.; Taussig, Heather N.

    2011-01-01

    For children in out-of-home care, a significant gap exists between those who need services and those who receive them. Screening all children in out-of-home care is recommended to reduce this gap. This study was designed to determine if recommendations from mental health and educational screening evaluations were related to service implementation for youth in out-of-home care. Screening evaluations were completed with 171 maltreated youth (ages 9 to 11) in out-of-home care within the prior year. Written reports summarizing the findings were provided to children's caseworkers. Service utilization was assessed at baseline (T1; before screening reports were completed) and follow-up (T2; 9-12 months later) interviews. For children not already receiving services at T1, logistic regression analyses tested the association between T1 recommendations for services and new service implementation by T2. Mental health (youth-report) and educational (teacher-report) outcomes were analyzed separately. Screening evaluations identified 22% of children with unmet mental health needs and 36% with unmet educational needs at T1. Children who received a recommendation for new services (i.e., all of those with unmet needs) were more likely to receive mental health (OR=2.50, p=.06) and/or educational (OR=3.54, p=.04) services by T2 than children who did not receive recommendations for services. While recommendations increased the odds of receiving services, almost half of the children with unmet mental health needs did not receive services, and 84% of children with unmet educational needs did not receive services by T2. Much work remains to ensure youth receive needed services. PMID:21912444

  16. Behavioral health in the Department of Defense Patient-Centered Medical Home: history, finance, policy, work force development, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Christopher L; Goodie, Jeffrey L

    2012-09-01

    Integrating behavioral health services into the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an important component for meeting the goals of easy access, whole person, coordinated, and integrated care. Unlike most PCMH initiatives, the Department of Defense's (DoD) Military Health System (MHS) launched its PCMH initiative with integrated behavioral health services. This integration facilitates the MHS's goal to meet its strategic imperatives under the "Quadruple Aim" of (1) maximizing readiness, (2) improving the health of the population, (3) enhancing the patient experience of care (including quality, access, and reliability), and (4) responsibly managing per capita cost of care. The MHS experience serves as a guide to other organizations. We discuss the historical underpinnings, funding, policy, and work force development strategies that contributed to integrated behavioral healthcare being a mandated component of the MHS's PCMH. PMID:24073135

  17. Case study of the implementation of cognitive coaching by an instructional coach in a Title 1 elementary school

    E-print Network

    Reed, Linda A.

    2007-09-17

    ethnicity. The purpose of the study was to document teachers' perceptions and understanding of the implementation process and those factors they perceived that inhibited and facilitated the implementation by an instructional coach of the Cognitive Coaching...

  18. Coaching as Inquiry: The South Carolina Reading Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Diane; Mills, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Embedded within traditional notions of coaching are unstated expectations that (a) the coach is an expert and knows what it is that the other person should be doing and (b) based on his or her expertise, the coach should take actions to achieve his or her vision for the other person. Within the South Carolina Reading Initiative, however, literacy…

  19. Benefits of a Teacher and Coach Collaboration: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuberger, Jim

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of a math teacher working with a math coach and the effects of their interaction. A guiding question was whether the coaching intervention had affected the teacher's classroom practices and, if so, in what way. The study utilized data from teacher/coach planning sessions, classroom lessons, follow-up debriefing…

  20. Coaching and Counseling: Where To Draw the Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvert, Audra L.

    Examining the role of the forensics coach as counselor, this paper attempts to define the role more clearly and offers guidelines and suggestions concerning where to draw the line between coaching and counseling "forensicators." The paper advances the premise that coaches have many responsibilities which include significant dimensions of…