Sample records for health coaching home

  1. Health coaching for the underserved.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Meg

    2013-05-01

    Twelve individuals (four homeless, two formerly homeless, and six low-income) received 12 weeks of free health coaching, an intervention normally undertaken by clients who pay $40 to $200 out of pocket for coaching services. The health coaching relationships were conducted with protocols developed for managing executive health at a Fortune 100 firm. This experimental model was constructed to explore what happens when coaching conversations for change and possibility are delivered to marginalized and underserved communities that typically undergo vastly different interactions with authorities in law, healthcare, and social services. Phase 1 of the project recruited the homeless individuals from street sites throughout San Francisco, California, and a temporary shelter. Phase 2 of the project worked with low-income and formerly homeless individuals who occupied a subsidized housing complex. Of the coaching recipients, three were black, five were Hispanic, three were of mixed race, and one declined to disclose his ethnicity. Half were Spanish speaking; immigrant status was recent for five of the 12. None had ever talked with a health coach before; only three knew how to utilize low-cost public health clinics. This case report illustrates how the motivational power of coaching conversations was a modestly useful methodology in breaking through the social isolation and loneliness of street-dwelling adults with chronic health problems. It also was a useful methodology for developing capacity for accomplishing short-term goals that were self-identified. Additionally, health coaching presented an opportunity for transitioning poverty-level individuals from passive recipients using public health sector services to more empowered actors with first-stage awareness who initiated preventive health actions. PMID:24416675

  2. Health Coaching as an Intervention in Health Management Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan W. Butterworth; Ariel Linden; Wende McClay

    2007-01-01

    Healthy lifestyle behaviors can prevent the onset of chronic illness and help manage existing conditions. Health coaching interventions are increasingly being incorporated into health management programs, which are implemented in a variety of settings, from physician practices to the broader population level (e.g. throughout health plans, employer groups). To date, motivational interviewing-based health coaching is the only technique to have

  3. Complexity and Health Coaching: Synergies in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gail J.; Wong, Winnie; Rush, Danica

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in this paper addresses the complexities and ambiguities for persons living with chronic illness in order to provide person-centered care and support that are unique and responsive to the context of persons' lives. Informed by complexity thinking and relational inquiry, the RN health coach is an emergent innovation of creative action with community and groups that support persons as they shape their health and patterns of living. PMID:24102025

  4. Complexity and health coaching: synergies in nursing.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gail J; Cross, Nadine; Wilson, Michelle; Biernacki, Shauna; Wong, Winnie; Adib, Behnam; Rush, Danica

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in this paper addresses the complexities and ambiguities for persons living with chronic illness in order to provide person-centered care and support that are unique and responsive to the context of persons' lives. Informed by complexity thinking and relational inquiry, the RN health coach is an emergent innovation of creative action with community and groups that support persons as they shape their health and patterns of living. PMID:24102025

  5. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  6. Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care What is Home Health Care? How Do I ... More About Home Health Care? What is Home Health Care? Home health care helps seniors live independently for ...

  7. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  8. Improving awareness, accountability, and access through health coaching

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Johnston, Sharon; Irving, Hannah; Nash, Kate; Ward, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess patients’ experiences with and perceptions of health coaching as part of their ongoing care. Design A qualitative research design using semistructured interviews that were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Setting Ottawa, Ont. Participants Eleven patients (> 18 years of age) enrolled in a health coaching pilot program who were at risk of or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients’ perspectives were assessed with semistructured interviews. Interviews were conducted with 11 patients at the end of the pilot program, using a stratified sampling approach to ensure maximum variation. Main findings All patients found the overall experience with the health coaching program to be positive. Patients believed the health coaching program was effective in increasing awareness of how diabetes affected their bodies and health, in building accountability for their health-related actions, and in improving access to care and other health resources. Conclusion Patients perceive one-on-one health coaching as an acceptable intervention in their ongoing care. Patients enrolled in the health coaching pilot program believed that there was an improvement in access to care, health literacy, and accountability, all factors considered to be precursors to behavioural change. PMID:25932483

  9. Evaluation of Telephone Health Coaching of German Health Insurants with Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Härter, Martin; Dwinger, Sarah; Seebauer, Laura; Simon, Daniela; Herbarth, Lutz; Siegmund-Schultze, Elisabeth; Temmert, Daniel; Bermejo, Isaac; Dirmaier, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate how patients with chronic conditions evaluate telephone health coaching provided by their health insurance company. Methods: A retrospective survey was conducted among coaching participants ("n" = 834). Outcomes included the general evaluation of the coaching, the evaluation of process and…

  10. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    PubMed

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management. PMID:24070747

  11. 76 FR 52377 - Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach...current and accurate information concerning the securities of Diamond Home Services, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  12. Home Health Services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicare doesn't pay for: 24-hour-a-day care at home Meals delivered to your home Homemaker ... get home health care if you attend adult day care. Note: Home health services may also include medical ...

  13. An investigation of coaches' perceptions of the causes of home advantage.

    PubMed

    Gayton, W F; Broida, J; Elgee, L

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated the personal experiences of 144 high school coaches in terms of their perceptions of the causes of the home advantage. Surveys were distributed to varsity coaches of local high school sports asking them to assign a percentage value to each of the most common explanations of -the home advantage, reflecting the perceived importance of each, e.g., social support, travel or fatigue, site familiarity, officials' bias, and self-fulfilling prophecy. A 3 x 6 repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that no differences were significant in attribution of the causes of home advantage for the combinations of sex of coach and sex of athlete. A significant difference was noted in the percentages assigned across the five explanations provided the coaches. Post hoc comparison indicated that site familiarity was seen as the most important explanation across the combinations of the sex of coach and sex of athlete. PMID:11453226

  14. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved quality of life and significant cost savings. Your respiratory care ... your family and home situation to help your health care provider plan for your care after you are ...

  15. Home health care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  16. Improving Health Care with a Virtual Human Sleep Coach Technical Report CS-2011-10

    E-print Network

    Waterloo, University of

    , Virtual Human Coach, Improving Sleep Habits. 1. Introduction Persuasive technology is defined as anyImproving Health Care with a Virtual Human Sleep Coach Technical Report CS-2011-10 Cristina Ribeiro on people's health. The sleep coach application is a persuasive technology that raises student's awareness

  17. Virtual Training and Coaching of Health Behavior: Example from Mindfulness Meditation Training

    PubMed Central

    Hudlicka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Objective Computer-based virtual coaches are increasingly being explored for patient education, counseling, and health behavior training and coaching. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Virtual Mindfulness Coach for training and coaching in mindfulness meditation. Method The coach was implemented as an embodied conversational character, providing mindfulness training and coaching via mixed initiative, text-based, natural language dialogue with the student, and emphasizing affect-adaptive interaction. (The term ‘mixed initiative dialog’ refers to a human-machine dialogue where either can initiate a conversation or a change in the conversation topic.) Results Findings from a pilot evaluation study indicate that the coach-based training is more effective in helping students establish a regular practice than self-administered training using written and audio materials. The coached group also appeared to be in more advanced stages of change in terms of the transtheoretical model, and have a higher sense of self-efficacy regarding establishment of a regular mindfulness practice. Conclusion These results suggest that virtual coach-based training of mindfulness is both feasible, and potentially more effective, than a self-administered program. Of particular interest is the identification of the specific coach features that contribute to its effectiveness. Practice Implications Virtual coaches could provide easily-accessible and cost-effective customized training for a range of health behaviors. The affect-adaptive aspect of these coaches is particularly relevant for helping patients establish long-term behavior changes. PMID:23809167

  18. Health coaching in primary care: a feasibility model for diabetes care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health coaching is a new intervention offering a one-on-one focused self-management support program. This study implemented a health coaching pilot in primary care clinics in Eastern Ontario, Canada to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of integrating health coaching into primary care for patients who were either at risk for or diagnosed with diabetes. Methods We implemented health coaching in three primary care practices. Patients with diabetes were offered six months of support from their health coach, including an initial face-to-face meeting and follow-up by email, telephone, or face-to-face according to patient preference. Feasibility was assessed through provider focus groups and qualitative data analysis methods. Results All three sites were able to implement the program. A number of themes emerged from the focus groups, including the importance of physician buy-in, wide variation in understanding and implementing of the health coach role, the significant impact of different systems of team communication, and the significant effect of organizational structure and patient readiness on Health coaches’ capacity to perform their role. Conclusions It is feasible to implement health coaching as an integrated program within small primary care clinics in Canada without adding additional resources into the daily practice. Practices should review their organizational and communication processes to ensure optimal support for health coaches if considering implementing this intervention. PMID:24708783

  19. Client-centred coaching in the paediatric health professions: a critical scoping review.

    PubMed

    Schwellnus, Heidi; King, Gillian; Thompson, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Purpose: Coaching is mainstream in business and is expanding into paediatric health care. With the focus on evidence-informed health practice, it is imperative to identify the key active components of interventions. Coaching is by definition a complex intervention with numerous components. The purpose of this critical review is to determine how coaching is currently defined, its prevalence in paediatric health care services and the frequency of the active components of coaching and to consider the findings of research to date. Method: A critical review of the literature was conducted. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were based on the International Coach Federation, which stipulates that coaching is a collaborative process that involves client-centred goal setting, facilitation, self-discovery and capacity building. Seventeen studies were selected for thorough review. Results: Throughout the literature, there was inconsistency in how coaching was defined. Studies included various components, but overall the literature lacked cohesion. Conclusion: To advance the field, a list of components that foster client engagement was developed along with a comprehensive definition of coaching involving affective, behavioural and cognitive components and a path of research necessary to evaluate this complex intervention. Implications for Rehabilitation A comprehensive approach to coaching involves consideration of multiple components. A coaching approach can enhance engagement in rehabilitation interventions. The operationalization of holistic ABC coaching that encapsulates the important components, which are affective, behavioural and cognitive in nature. PMID:25289943

  20. Efficacy of Adjunct In-Home Coaching to Improve Outcomes in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmer, Susan G.; Zebell, Nancy M.; Culver, Michelle A.; Urquiza, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to test whether increasing the exposure to coaching by adding an in-home component to clinic-delivered Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) will increase the speed of parenting skill acquisition and show greater improvements in children's behaviors and parental stress. Methods: Seventy-three parent-child…

  1. Unobtrusive Monitoring of Divided Attention in a Cognitive Health Coaching Intervention for the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    McKanna, James A.; Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of cognitive functionality is an important aspect of care for elders. Unfortunately, few tools exist to measure divided attention, the ability to allocate attention to different aspects of tasks. An accurate determination of divided attention would allow inference of generalized cognitive decline, as well as providing a quantifiable indicator of an important component of driving skill. We propose a new method for determining relative divided attention ability through unobtrusive monitoring of computer use. Specifically, we measure performance on a dual-task cognitive computer exercise as part of a health coaching intervention. This metric indicates whether the user has the ability to pay attention to both tasks at once, or is primarily attending to one task at a time (sacrificing optimal performance). The monitoring of divided attention in a home environment is a key component of both the early detection of cognitive problems and for assessing the efficacy of coaching interventions. PMID:21347030

  2. Home Health Aides

    MedlinePLUS

    ... skills demonstrating competency, and passing a written exam. Training Home health aides may be trained in housekeeping ... all workers was $34,750. On-the-job Training Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in ...

  3. National training and education standards for health and wellness coaching: the path to national certification.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Meg; Wolever, Ruth Q; Lawson, Karen; Moore, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to announce the findings of the job task analysis as well as national training and education standards for health and wellness coaching (HWC) that have been developed by the large-scale, collaborative efforts of the National Consortium for Credentialing Health and Wellness Coaches (NCCHWC) and (2) to invite commentary from the public. The rapid proliferation of individuals and organizations using the terms of health and/or wellness coaches and the propagation of private industry and academic coach training and education programs endeavoring to prepare these coaches has created an urgent and pressing need for national standards for use of the term health and wellness coach, as well as minimal requirements for training, education, and certification. Professionalizing the field with national standards brings a clear and consistent definition of health and wellness coaching and accepted practice standards that are uniform across the field. In addition, clear standards allow for uniform curricular criteria to ensure a minimal benchmark for education, training, and skills and knowledge evaluation of professional health and wellness coaches. PMID:25984418

  4. Home Health Visiting in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamerman, Sheila B.; Kahn, Alfred J.

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of home health visiting programs in Europe, with special emphasis on Denmark and Great Britain, where home health visiting has been in place for decades. Concludes that European home health visiting programs have been successful because they are an integral part of comprehensive, universal maternal and child health systems.…

  5. Integrating big data and actionable health coaching to optimize wellness.

    PubMed

    Hood, Leroy; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Price, Nathan D

    2015-01-01

    The Hundred Person Wellness Project (HPWP) is a 10-month pilot study of 100 'well' individuals where integrated data from whole-genome sequencing, gut microbiome, clinical laboratory tests and quantified self measures from each individual are used to provide actionable results for health coaching with the goal of optimizing wellness and minimizing disease. In a commentary in BMC Medicine, Diamandis argues that HPWP and similar projects will likely result in 'unnecessary and potential harmful over-testing'. We argue that this new approach will ultimately lead to lower costs, better healthcare, innovation and economic growth. The central points of the HPWP are: 1) it is focused on optimizing wellness through longitudinal data collection, integration and mining of individual data clouds, enabling development of predictive models of wellness and disease that will reveal actionable possibilities; and 2) by extending this study to 100,000 well people, we will establish multiparameter, quantifiable wellness metrics and identify markers for wellness to early disease transitions for most common diseases, which will ultimately allow earlier disease intervention, eventually transitioning the individual early on from a disease back to a wellness trajectory. PMID:25575752

  6. Experience with Health Coach-Mediated Physician Referral in an Employed Insured Population

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sowmya R.; Rogers, Robert S.; Mailhot, Johanna R.; Galvin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Given increasing interest in helping consumers choose high-performing (higher quality, lower cost) physicians, one approach chosen by several large employers is to provide assistance in the form of a telephonic “health coach” — a registered nurse who assists with identifying appropriate and available providers. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the health coach’s influence on provider choice and the quality of the user experience in the early introduction of this service. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey of 3490 employees and covered dependents of a large national firm that offered health coach services to all employees and covered dependents. The survey began in September 2007 with proportionate stratified sampling of 1750 employees and covered dependents who used the services between October 2007 and February 2008, and 1740 non-users. PARTICIPANTS Insured adults (ages 21–64) employed by a large national firm or covered dependents of employees. MEASUREMENTS Awareness of the service, reason for using service, visits to providers recommended by service, use of health advice provided by service, user satisfaction. MAIN RESULTS The primary reason for using the service was to obtain provider referrals (73%). Fifty-two percent of users sought a specialist referral, 33% a PCP referral and 9% a hospital referral. Eighty-nine percent of users seeking a provider referral were referred in-network; 81% of those referred visited the referred provider. Measures of satisfaction with both the service and the care delivered by recommended providers were over 70%. CONCLUSIONS Customers largely follow the provider recommendation of the health coach. Users express general satisfaction with existing health coach services, but differences in performance between vendors highlight the need for the services to be well implemented. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1428-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20556533

  7. Benchmarking Home Health Care Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula Howard

    1997-01-01

    Benchmarking data is a relatively new process in the home health care industry. But the results can assist an agency in the strategic planning— staffing needs and program development—for the present and future. This descriptive research project benchmarked home health care data at the national, state (ie, North Carolina), and local (ie, Triangle area: Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill) level

  8. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Health and Wellness Coaching: Defining a Key Behavioral intervention in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Sforzo, Gary A.; Dill, Diana; Kaye, Miranda; Bechard, Elizabeth M.; Southard, Mary Elaine; Kennedy, Mary; Vosloo, Justine; Yang, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Primary Objective: Review the operational definitions of health and wellness coaching as published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. Background: As global rates of preventable chronic diseases have reached epidemic proportions, there has been an increased focus on strategies to improve health behaviors and associated outcomes. One such strategy, health and wellness coaching, has been inconsistently defined and shown mixed results. Methods: A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)—guided systematic review of the medical literature on health and wellness coaching allowed for compilation of data on specific features of the coaching interventions and background and training of coaches. Results: Eight hundred abstracts were initially identified through PubMed, with 284 full-text articles ultimately included. The majority (76%) were empirical articles. The literature operationalized health and wellness coaching as a process that is fully or partially patient-centered (86% of articles), included patient-determined goals (71%), incorporated self-discovery and active learning processes (63%) (vs more passive receipt of advice), encouraged accountability for behaviors (86%), and provided some type of education to patients along with using coaching processes (91%). Additionally, 78% of articles indicated that the coaching occurs in the context of a consistent, ongoing relationship with a human coach who is trained in specific behavior change, communication, and motivational skills. Conclusions: Despite disparities in how health and wellness coaching have been operationalized previously, this systematic review observes an emerging consensus in what is referred to as health and wellness coaching; namely, a patient-centered process that is based upon behavior change theory and is delivered by health professionals with diverse backgrounds. The actual coaching process entails goal-setting determined by the patient, encourages self-discovery in addition to content education, and incorporates mechanisms for developing accountability in health behaviors. With a clear definition for health and wellness coaching, robust research can more accurately assess the effectiveness of the approach in bringing about changes in health behaviors, health outcomes and associated costs that are targeted to reduce the global burden of chronic disease. PMID:24416684

  9. Teacher Consultation and Coaching within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method: Thirty-six classrooms within 5 urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to…

  10. The Role of Physical and Health Educators and Coaches in the Prevention of Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; And Others

    All teachers, coaches, and guidance counselors should be concerned about eating disorders as a health and life threatening illness. While no reliable research studies or statistics exist on the incidence of eating disorders among athletes and aerobic exercisers, estimates suggest that 10-20% of the female high school population and a much higher…

  11. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care at home after they have been in the hospital ... dolls to help you practice different procedures. Home Health Care Assistance The hospital social worker can help families ...

  12. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Mothe, Dolores; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as homemakers/home health aides and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following competencies…

  13. Home Health Visiting in Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheila B. Kamerman; Alfred J. Kahn

    European countries have a long history of providing home health visiting services. These services contrast in many ways with the services of those programs in the United States described by Douglas Powell in this journal issue. Most notably, the European programs are typically universal in that they are offered to all families. In describing the European programs, Sheila Kamerman and

  14. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimerā€™s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  15. Coaching without a Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbacher-Reed, Christina; Powers, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Ironically, at a time when coaching seems to have come into its own as a way to improve teacher practice, school districts across the United States are experiencing funding cuts and eliminating coaching positions. The threats that budget woes pose to established school coaching programs led the authors to ask themselves what practices schools and…

  16. Health coaching can make a difference in your life.

    E-print Network

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    Stroke Ulcerative colitis If you have a condition, such as these listed below, see inside for health Osteoporosis Overweight/obesity Parkinson's disease Prostate cancer Seizures Sickle cell anemia Stomach ulcers

  17. How Coaches Manage Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruder, M. Karen

    1991-01-01

    Presents stress management strategies for coaches, focusing on what stress is, how it affects the body, and what to do to minimize the effects of stress on health. The article explains on- and off-the-job stress factors so coaches can recognize potential stress situations and handle them as they occur. (SM)

  18. Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

  19. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures. PMID:26032224

  20. Home Health and Informal Care Utilization

    E-print Network

    and Sano also are supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Address correspondence to: Carolyn W. Zhu, PhD, Health Economist, GeriatricHome Health and Informal Care Utilization and Costs Over Time in Alzheimer's Disease Carolyn W. Zhu

  1. Coaching Younger Practitioners and Students Using Components of the Co-Active Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Coaching is used to improve performance, achieve preset goals and obtain desired results. Several coaching models have been used in health professions for leadership and professional development. This article describes some components of Co-Active Coaching® that can be applied while coaching pharmacy students and younger practitioners. Co-Active Coaching requires the coach to use a broad range of communication skills, including listening, asking powerful questions, making insightful comments, offering encouragement, and giving sincere praise. The characteristics of the ideal candidate for coaching and the value of coaching are also discussed. PMID:20498744

  2. Enhancing home visiting with mental health consultation.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Barbara Dillon; Mackrain, Mary; Perry, Deborah F; O'Brien, Kevin; Gwaltney, Margaret K

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting programs have been successful in engaging and enrolling families who are at high risk for stress, depression, and substance abuse. However, many of these mothers may not be receiving mental health services because home visitors lack the knowledge and skills to identify mental health or determine how to appropriately address these problems. In response, a growing number of home visiting programs are expanding their capacity by integrating a mental health provider into their ongoing operations. This approach, referred to as early childhood mental health consultation, involves a partnership between a professional consultant with early childhood mental health expertise and home visiting or family support programs, staff, and families. This integrated model holds the promise of promoting parent and child behavioral health by enhancing the capacity of home visitors to identify and appropriately address the unmet mental health needs of children and families. The article highlights efforts under way in several federally funded Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children's Health Project sites where local programs are testing the effectiveness of this model. PMID:24187122

  3. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): A Quality Improvement Collaborative for Weight Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Abigail E.; John, Priya M.; Vable, Anusha M.; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L.; Chin, Marshall H.; Quinn, Michael T.; Burnet, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians’ Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians’ Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs. PMID:23727964

  4. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): a quality improvement collaborative for weight management programs.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Abigail E; John, Priya M; Vable, Anusha M; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians' Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians' Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs. PMID:23727964

  5. Home Health Management Aide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mincemoyer, Betty Jane

    The report describes a demonstration project to provide a course of study at the senior high level in home health management for the academically handicapped. The course consisted of practice in nursing skills, home management and laboratory work in food preparation techniques, the family, and child care. Activities included field trips,…

  6. Home visits work for behavioral health patients.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    Whenbehavioral healthpatientswhohave been hospitalized are cared for in their home, hospital readmissions drop. PyscHealth's Home Intervention Project won a gold award from URAC. Program's goal is to increase compliance with post-hospital outpatient follow-up therapy and reduce rehospitalizations. PMID:19186491

  7. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  8. Overview of Home Health Aides: United States, 2007

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Aide Survey, 2007. Figure 5. Source of health insurance for home health aides: United States, 2007 Page ... 4. Home health aides employed by agencies offering health insurance, by agency type and size: United States, 2007 ...

  9. Integrative Health Coach Training: A Model for Shifting the Paradigm Toward Patient-centricity and Meeting New National Prevention Goals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Linda L.; Lake, Noelle H.; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Perlman, Adam; Wroth, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the evolution, training, and results of an emerging allied health profession skilled in eliciting sustainable health-related behavior change and charged with improving patient engagement. Methods: Through techniques sourced from humanistic and positive psychology, solution-focused and mindfulness-based therapies, and leadership coaching, Integrative Health Coaching (IHC) provides a mechanism to empower patients through various stages of learning and change. IHC also provides a method for the creation and implementation of forward-focused personalized health plans. Results: Clinical studies employing Duke University Integrative Medicine's model of IHC have demonstrated improvements in measures of diabetes and diabetes risk, weight management, and risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke. By supporting and enabling individuals in making major lifestyle changes for the improvement of their health, IHC carries the potential to reduce rates and morbidity of chronic disease and impact myriad aspects of healthcare. Conclusion: As a model of educational and clinical innovation aimed at patient empowerment and lifestyle modification, IHC is aligned well with the tenets and goals of recently sanctioned federal healthcare reform, specifically the creation of the first National Prevention and Health Promotion Strategy. Practice Implications: IHC may allow greater patient-centricity while targeting the lifestyle-related chronic disease that lies at the heart of the current healthcare crisis. PMID:24416674

  10. Interaction Coaching with Mothers of Children with Congenital Deaf-Blindness at Home: Applying the Diagnostic Intervention Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Marleen J.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne; van Dijk, Jan P. M.; Ruijssenaars, Wied A. J. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the application of the Diagnostic Intervention Model and its effects in two case studies of 3-year-old boys, Rolf and Ruud, using individual interaction coaching with their mothers. Positive effects were found for all the target categories in both cases, although an interaction that used materials appeared to be more…

  11. Home Health Aide. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappella, Barbara Ann; Davis, Evelyn

    This packet contains a program guide and a Career Merit Achievement Plan (Career MAP) for the implementation of a home health aide program in Florida secondary and postsecondary schools. The program guide outlines the legal authority for the program, describes the program content and structure, provides a program description, and includes a…

  12. New trends in health smart homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norbert Noury; Gilles Virone; Pierre Barralon; Jingchun Ye; Vincent Rialle; Jacques Demongeot

    2003-01-01

    The concept of Health Smart House aims at giving an autonomous life, in their own home, to people who would normally be placed in institutions: patients suffering from a chronic disease, handicapped people, and also fragile elderly. We propose an overview of the researches on the concept. It then presents the main trends in each the technological fields of concern-Information

  13. Building a peer mentor home health aide program: implications for home health aide retention.

    PubMed

    Kreiser, Athena Lu; Adamski, Tom; Gallagher, Bridget

    2010-09-01

    The Home Health Aide (HHA) industry is challenged with low wages, little possibility of career advancement, and high turnover rates. Jewish Home Lifecare, Home Assistance Personnel Inc. (HAPI) is a home care aide agency that has developed a Peer Mentor HHA program. Peer Mentor HHAs mentor newly hired/trained HHAs within our agency. This career path leads to higher paying work that allows for growth of our workforce for the identified growing care need and positively impacts HHA retention. PMID:20811183

  14. Home health nurses' perceived care errors.

    PubMed

    Absulem, Said; Hardin, Heather

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) estimates that every year 44,000 to 98,000 people die due to errors in hospitals, costing approximately $37.6 billion each year (2000). However, limited data are available detailing the extent of healthcare errors outside of hospitals. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess how home health nurses perceive and deal with errors. A convenience sample of home health agencies (N = 33) located in a Southeastern state participated in the study. Packets containing sealed surveys, a flier, and a description of the study were mailed to the nurses. Nurses were asked to complete a survey about their most significant care error and how they responded. Results from the study on home health nurses' perceptions (N = 203) indicate that the perceived care errors were medication (40%), laboratory (15.5%), wound care (6.5%), scheduling and wrong patient visits (6%), teaching-care errors (5%), and needle sticks (1%). Medication errors remain the most commonly occurring error in the home healthcare area. PMID:21675394

  15. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are here: Plan of care Share What’s home health care & what should I expect? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  16. The Early Childhood Coaching Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Dathan D.; Shelden, M'Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based and highly effective, "coaching" helps early childhood practitioners support other professionals and families as they enhance existing knowledge, develop new skills, and promote healthy development of young children. This hands-on guide shows professionals how to conduct skillful coaching in any setting--home, school, or community.…

  17. Reconceptualizing compliance in home health care.

    PubMed

    Vivian, B G

    1996-01-01

    The term "compliance" and its traditional definitions frequently are criticized in the literature. Although a number of authors advocate a collaborative model of compliance, with compliance decisions and responsibilities for health outcomes shared by provider and patient, few describe this model in practice. This study investigated compliance communication in two home care agencies. Findings from interviews with 6 nurses and observation during home visits to 25 patients (N = 31) revealed a prosocial, collaborative model of compliance that coincides with the participative model of medical care (Smith, 1989) and a redefinition of compliance advanced by Kontz (1989). PMID:8716881

  18. Instructional Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  19. Handbook for Home Health Aide Training. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    The home health aide is a member of a team which provides home health care services, usually a part of the overall health services furnished by the local county health department. She does those things which are required to maintain normal physical and emotional comfort and to help the patient toward independent living in his own home, working…

  20. The Future of Home Health project: developing the framework for health care at home.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa; Schiller, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    In addition to providing high-quality care to vulnerable patient populations, home healthcare offers the least costly option for patients and the healthcare system, particularly in postacute care. As the baby boom generation ages, policymakers are expressing concerns about rising costs, variation in home healthcare service use, and program integrity. The Alliance for Home Health Quality and Innovation seeks to develop a research-based strategic framework for the future of home healthcare for older Americans and those with disabilities. This article describes the initiative and invites readers to provide comments and suggestions. PMID:25654456

  1. Reading Coaching Discourse: Exploring Coaching Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineke, Sally Frances

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the discourse of elementary school reading coaches and teachers during coaching interactions in four Alabama schools. Coach/teacher dyads recorded naturally occurring coaching dialogue over periods of 3 to 6 weeks. Each participant shared her views on coaching and commented on the recorded discourse during post-interviews…

  2. Behavioral Coaching

    PubMed Central

    Seniuk, Holly A.; Witts, Benjamin N.; Williams, W. Larry.; Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis. PMID:25729141

  3. Improving care transitions from hospital to home: standardized orders for home health nursing with remote telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Sheila; Wood, Felecia; Schuck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template. PMID:23938358

  4. Urban/rural differences in home health patients and services.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J A; Sen, A; Chan, B Y; Commins, P P

    1991-08-01

    Using data from the Wisconsin Annual Survey of Home Health Agencies, we describe urban/rural differences for home health care patients. Our findings indicate that urban dwellers are more likely to be home health patients than are rural residents. Urban home health patients are more apt to be nonelderly, male, and have "other conditions" as their primary diagnosis. They are also likely to be more physically dependent and to receive home care longer. Urban home health patients are more typical of long-term care patients, whereas rural patients may be better described as recipients of postacute care, often recovering from diabetes and heart attacks. Possible problems with rural access to home health care are discussed. PMID:1894150

  5. Nursing Assistant/Homemaker-Home Health Aide Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Hartford Board of Education, CT.

    The demand for the services of homemaker-home health aides has increased tremendously. In one year, for example, the Visiting Nurse and Home Care Association of East Hartford, Connecticut, had a nearly 155 percent increase in the demand for homemaker-home health aide service. The East Hartford Public Schools developed a vocational program that…

  6. Athletic coaches as violence prevention advocates.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L; Tancredi, Daniel J; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Decker, Michele R; Silverman, Jay G; O'Connor, Brian; Stetkevich, Nicholas; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) is a significant public health problem. Coaching Boys Into Men (CBIM) is an evidence-based ARA prevention program that trains coaches to deliver violence prevention messages to male athletes. Assessing acceptability and impact of CBIM on coaches may inform prevention efforts that involve these important adults in health promotion among youth. As part of a two-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial of CBIM in 16 high schools in Northern California, coaches completed baseline and postseason surveys (n = 176) to assess their attitudes and confidence delivering the program. Coaches in the intervention arm also participated in interviews (n = 36) that explored program acceptability, feasibility, and impact. Relative to controls, intervention coaches showed increases in confidence intervening when witnessing abusive behaviors among their athletes, greater bystander intervention, and greater frequency of violence-related discussions with athletes and other coaches. Coaches reported the program was easy to implement and valuable for their athletes. Findings illustrate the value of exploring attitudinal and behavioral changes among ARA prevention implementers, and suggest that coaches can gain confidence and enact behaviors to discourage ARA among male athletes. Coaches found the program to be feasible and valuable, which suggests potential for long-term uptake and sustainability. PMID:25015237

  7. What Good Coaches Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching guru Jim Knight suggests that how we think about coaching can enhance or interfere with our success as a coach. He suggests that coaches take a partnership approach to collaboration and adopt seven principles that define how coaches interact with collaborating teachers: equality, choice, voice, reflection, dialogue, praxis,…

  8. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  9. Using TQM to improve management of home health aides.

    PubMed

    Dansky, K H; Brannon, D

    1996-12-01

    Home health aides are at the front line of the home health industry, raising quality of care issues and human resource (HR) management challenges. Total quality management (TQM) provides a framework to help meet those challenges. The authors investigated the relationship between TQM and HR effectiveness in home health agencies. Results suggest that TQM practices are related to HR effectiveness. Suggestions are offered to make human resource management consistent with a TQM culture. PMID:8968324

  10. Home Health Care Nurses' Perceptions of Empowerment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathleen M. Williamson

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study involved the triangulation of qualitative (interview and observation) and quantitative methods (Psychological Empowerment Instrument). This study examined the individual home care nurses' perception of empowerment and how it influences decisions in the home clinical setting. Fifteen nurses were self-selected to participate. All completed an interview, and were observed and given Likert Instrument to complete. A framework analysis

  11. Home Health Care With Telemonitoring Improves Health Status for Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Elizabeth; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Struk, Cynthia J.; DiCarlo, Christina M.; Kikano, George; Pińa, Ileana L.; Boxer, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Home telemonitoring can augment home health care services during a patient's transition from hospital to home. Home health care agencies commonly use telemonitors for patients with heart failure although studies have shown mixed results in the use of telemonitors to reduce rehospitalizations. This randomized trial investigated if older patients with heart failure admitted to home health care following a hospitalization would have a reduction in rehospitalizations and improved health status if they received telemonitoring. Patients were followed up to 180 days post-discharge from home health care services. Results showed no difference in the time to rehospitalizations or emergency visits between those who received a telemonitoring vs. usual care. Older heart failure patients who received telemonitoring had better health status by home health care discharge than those who received usual care. Therefore for older adults with heart failure telemonitoring may be important adjunct to home health care services to improve health status. PMID:23438509

  12. Mental health services in nursing homes: A survey of nursing home administrative personnel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor Molinari; Deborah Hedgecock; Larry Branch; Lisa M. Brown; Kathy Hyer

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Mental health problems are pervasive in nursing homes (NHs), but little is known regarding the delivery of mental health services in these settings. To fill this gap in knowledge, we conducted a survey of NH administrative personnel views on mental health services use.Design and methods: We analyzed 146 surveys from NH administrative personnel, reflecting 70% of the NHs that

  13. Reengineering a Home Health Care Agency to Achieve Cost Effectiveness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Lou Connolly

    1997-01-01

    Home health care agencies face a clear challenge in a managed care environment: reduce costs and maintain and improve quality. Organizational efficiencies and customer satisfaction are the outcomes of the reengineered home care organization. The staff of UCSD Home Care recognized that for one agency to survive and thrive, major changes had to occur. The major phases of the staff-driven,

  14. Multimodal platform for communication, training and health monitoring at home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Rumin?ski; T. Kocejko; A. Bujnowski; J. Wtorek

    2009-01-01

    Health monitoring at home could be an important element of care and support environment for older people. Diversity of diseases and different needs of users require universal design of a home platform. In this work the design of multimodal platform for communication, training and patient monitoring at home is presented and discussed. Two specific problems were investigated: visually guided human-computer

  15. Recovery Coaches and Substance Exposed Births: An Experiment in Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph P.; Choi, Sam; Hong, Jun Sung; Hernandez, Pedro; Larrison, Christopher R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Substance exposed infants present a major challenge to child welfare and public health systems. Prenatal substance exposure and continued substance abuse in the home are associated with a wide range of adverse social, emotional, and developmental outcomes. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the use of recovery coaches in…

  16. Coaching Behavior of Girls Youth Softball Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupnow, Allan; Stotlar, David

    A study examined coaches' behavior and classified the types and rates of coaches' behavior by time of athletic season (early or late), win/loss record, and throughout the time frame within a single contest. Subjects included all the volunteer coaches in a 13 team, softball program for 10-12 year old girls. The season consisted of a double…

  17. A Study on a Home Health Care Support Information System for Health Evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Inada; H. Horio; K. Nakazawa; Y. Sekita; T. Yamanaka; E. Harasawa; H. Hosaka; K. Ishikawa

    1998-01-01

    The need for home health care has been increasing in Japan and the application of various techniques such as medical informatics are desired to support home health care services. Therefore, we developed an information system for health evaluation of the elderly including patients at home by applying a multifunctional telephone set and an IC memory card, by which complaints, symptoms,

  18. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  19. Smartphone-Enabled Health Coach Intervention for People With Diabetes From a Modest Socioeconomic Strata Community: Single-Arm Longitudinal Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower socioeconomic strata (SES) populations have higher chronic disease risks. Smartphone-based interventions can support adoption of health behaviors that may, in turn, reduce the risks of type 2 diabetes-related complications, overcoming the obstacles that some patients may have with regular clinical contact (eg, shiftwork, travel difficulties, miscommunication). Objective The intent of the study was to develop and test a smartphone-assisted intervention that improves behavioral management of type 2 diabetes in an ethnically diverse, lower SES population within an urban community health setting. Methods This single-arm pilot study assessed a smartphone application developed with investigator assistance and delivered by health coaches. Participants were recruited from the Black Creek Community Health Centre in Toronto and had minimal prior experience with smartphones. Results A total of 21 subjects consented and 19 participants completed the 6-month trial; 12 had baseline glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels >7.0% and these subjects demonstrated a mean reduction of 0.43% (SD 0.63) (P<.05) with minimal changes in medication. Conclusions This project supported the feasibility of smartphone-based health coaching for individuals from lower SES with minimal prior smartphone experience. PMID:24907918

  20. High School Coaches' Knowledge of Disordered Eating Behavior in Female Athletes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allison Woerpel

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover more about high school coaches' knowledge of disordered eating behavior in female athletes. In a sample of 98 coaches from Minnesota, it was found that the majority of coaches were not familiar with the Female Athlete Triad, a phenomenon describing three interrelated health problems: disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. However, coaches provided

  1. The Experience of Critical Self-Reflection by Life Coaches: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Deanna Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of critical self-reflection by life coaches. Life coaching is expanding within many disciplines including education, health care, business, social work, and wellness. Life coaching involves a coach working with an individual or groups aimed at effecting change for professional and personal…

  2. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  3. Veterans Health Administration: A Model for Transforming Nursing Home Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sonne Lemke

    2012-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration nursing homes, now called Community Living Centers (CLCs), are engaged in systematic transformation of their environments and their care and work practices. A brief history of nursing home care for Veterans illustrates the competing values that influence CLCs. Monitoring data show that CLCs have reduced institutional features, improved the personalization of care, and empowered direct care

  4. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  5. Integrating Mental Health Parity for Homebound Older Adults Under the Medicare Home Health Care Benefit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joan K. Davitt; Zvi D. Gellis

    2011-01-01

    Despite high rates of mental illness, very few homebound older adults receive treatment. Comorbid mental illness exacerbates physical health conditions, reduces treatment adherence, and increases dependency and medical costs. Although effective treatments exist, many home health agencies lack capacity to effectively detect and treat mental illness. This article critically analyzes barriers within the Medicare home health benefit that impede access

  6. Home-based chronic care. An expanded integrative model for home health professionals.

    PubMed

    Suter, Paula; Hennessey, Beth; Harrison, Gregory; Fagan, Martha; Norman, Barbara; Suter, W Newton

    2008-04-01

    The Chronic Care Model (CCM) developed by is an influential and accepted guide for the care of patients with chronic disease. Wagner acknowledges a current healthcare focus on acute care needs that often circumvents chronic care coordination. He identifies the need for a "division of labor" to assist the primary care physician with this neglected function. This article posits that the role of chronic care coordination assistance and disease management fits within the purview of home healthcare and should be central to home health chronic care delivery. An expanded Home-Based Chronic Care Model (HBCCM) is described that builds on Wagner's model and integrates salient theories from fields beyond medicine. The expanded model maximizes the potential for disease self-management success and is intended to provide a foundation for home health's integral role in chronic disease management. PMID:18408515

  7. Capital Needs: Coach Cars

    E-print Network

    Bustamante, Fabiįn E.

    Capital Needs: Mechanical #12;Coach Cars · Deteriorating Conditions Widespread Worn & Patched Seating Corrosion Damage End Door Area Patch Under Seating Area Floor Bulges & Patch Repairs #12;Coach Car Maintenance Needs · This is an example of Metra's schedule for the life of their coach cars. Year 2048Year

  8. Characteristics of Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Ann; Gilley, Jerry W.; Kouider, Elies

    2010-01-01

    Coaching has become ubiquitous in organizations. Despite its growth in popularity, the concept remains largely untested through empirical inquiry. This study examined the skills and behaviors associated with managerial coaching. Results indicate a link between specific managerial skills, behaviors, and coaching. (Contains 4 tables.)

  9. Efforts to reduce homemaker\\/home health aide turnover in a home care agency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurel A. Ditson

    1994-01-01

    The Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) of the Denver area conducted an action research project that identified and reduced high turnover rates of homemakers and home health aides. The research team worked to minimize attrition in the VNA's professional staff, which had annual turnover in excess of 95% and staffing losses as high as 60% from the first to the second

  10. Coaching to promote professional development in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; Penney, Vivian

    This article presents coaching, which facilitates the highest form of learning, as a potential strategy for promoting professional development in nursing. In doing so, it sets out what coaching is and highlights its benefits in terms of team building, adaptation to changes, career planning and professional development. Having established the rudiments of coaching and identifying its qualities, the article then sets out strategies of coaching using three models: the 3-D Technique Model, The Practice Spiral Model and The Grow Model. Three case histories are presented to explain how these models could be used to implement coaching and personal learning plans (PLP). Directions are provided where training for coaching is available. It is concluded that coaching can be a powerful tool in enhancing nurses' and other health professionals' ability to contribute to the success of healthcare organisations. PMID:24933546

  11. Nurse Retention in Home Health Care: Addressing the Revolving Door

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kasey Chapin

    1999-01-01

    An effective retention plan will be a critical component of a home health care agency's leap into the year 2000. Assessing current turnover and retention rates for your agency, surveying exiting and current staff, identifying the internal factors that lead to turnover, addressing these factors, and measuring the effects of your action plan at regular intervals are all key components

  12. Project OASIS: Volunteer Mental Health Paraprofessionals Serving Nursing Home Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crose, Royda; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Details a demonstration project which was developed to train older adult volunteers as mental health paraprofessionals for nursing homes. Discusses the effectiveness of the program for residents, as well as benefits to the staff. Includes details of recruitment, training and supervision of volunteers, services they provide, and problems…

  13. COMPETITION AND QUALITY IN HOME HEALTH CARE MARKETS†

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, KYOUNGRAE; POLSKY, DANIEL

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Market-based solutions are often proposed to improve health care quality; yet evidence on the role of competition in quality in non-hospital settings is sparse. We examine the relationship between competition and quality in home health care. This market is different from other markets in that service delivery takes place in patients’ homes, which implies low costs of market entry and exit for agencies. We use 6 years of panel data for Medicare beneficiaries during the early 2000s. We identify the competition effect from within-market variation in competition over time. We analyze three quality measures: functional improvements, the number of home health visits, and discharges without hospitalization. We find that the relationship between competition and home health quality is nonlinear and its pattern differs by quality measure. Competition has positive effects on functional improvements and the number of visits in most ranges, but in the most competitive markets, functional outcomes and the number of visits slightly drop. Competition has a negative effect on discharges without hospitalization that is strongest in the most competitive markets. This finding is different from prior research on hospital markets and suggests that market-specific environments should be considered in developing polices to promote competition. PMID:23670849

  14. Supporting Patient Autonomy: Decision Making in Home Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.; Kaye, Lenard W.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the policies and procedures that home health care agencies have developed to handle incapacitated patients and life-sustaining treatment decisions. Although most directors, staff, and patients agree that patients know their legal rights, only 67% of agencies reported having existing policies on advance directives, and only 41.5% had…

  15. Harvard@Home: Reproductive Health in the 21st Century

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From Harvard@Home, this website presents more than seven hours of video clips from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study's third-annual conference on women, gender, and society held in October of 2004. Titled _Reproductive Health in the 21st Century_, the "conference examines a broad array of issues surrounding reproductive health and features panels of distinguished physicians, scholars, and health policy advocates discussing the scientific, ethical, and social dimensions of medical and technological advances in the field and their global implications." Conference topics include The Politics and Ethics of Bodily Integrity; In Vitro Fertilization in the Muslim Middle East; Women Workers as Reproducers; and The Moral Issue of Sex Selection, to name a few. In addition to the video clips, the website contains topic summaries, short biographies of the numerous panelists, a feedback survey form, and links to related Harvard@Home programs. This site is also reviewed in the February 4, 2005_NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

  16. Is particle board in the home detrimental to health

    SciTech Connect

    Daugbjerg, P. (Univ. of Copenhagen, Glostrup (Denmark))

    1989-04-01

    A questionnaire concerning health and living conditions was sent to the parents of 1387 children aged 0-15 years to answer the question if children living in homes built with large amounts of particle board had more headaches and respiratory and skin symptoms than other children. There were 1376 possible respondents, and of those 1036 (75.3)% returned the questionnaire. Of the questionnaires returned, 972 (70.6%) were analyzable. The children lived in homes with much particle board (group A); little particle board, or homes as group A but treated in a special way (group B); and homes with no particle board (group C). For the 0- to 5-year-old children, living in homes with much particle board was a risk factor for developing wheezy bronchitis, eye and nose irritation, and coughing. For the 6- to 15-year-old children, living in a home with much particle board was not a risk factor. Risk factors for headache, irritation of the throat, and need for daily antiasthmatic medication were analyzed for all the children collectively. Living in a home with much particle board was a risk factor for all three conditions.

  17. The Coach and the Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Bob; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation and coaching should not be linked, these authors argue. Although it's tempting for evaluators to identify deficiencies and then specify coaching as a remediation strategy, doing so turns coaching into a consequence of a poor evaluation and termination into a consequence of failed coaching. Another mistake is to use coaching as a data…

  18. Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    This report is intended to provide home performance contractor trainers with a resource to keep both their workers and home residents safe and healthy. This document is an attempt to describe what we currently believe is safe, what we believe is unsafe, and what we’re unsure about. It is intended to identify health and safety issues and provide historical context and current understanding of both risks and mitigation strategies. In addition, it provides links to more in-depth resources for each issue. When we tighten the thermal envelope of a house to improve comfort and reduce energy use, we have to be sure that we are not compromising the indoor air quality of the home. This means identifying and mitigating or eliminating pollution sources before and after you make changes to the home. These sources can include materials and finishes in the home, exhaust gasses from combustion appliances, soil gasses such as radon, and moisture from a bathroom, kitchen, or unvented clothes dryer. Our first responsibility is to do no harm — this applies both to our clients and to our employees. Currently, there are many new products that are widely used but whose health effects are not well understood. Our in ability to have perfect information means the directive to do no harm can be difficult to obey. Each home is a little bit different, and in the face of a situation you’ve never encountered, it’s important to have a solid grasp of the fundamental concepts of building science when the hard and fast rules don’t apply . The home performance industry is gaining momentum, and has the potential to expand greatly as energy costs continue to rise. It is imperative that we remain vigilant about protecting the health and safety of our workers and our customers. It only takes a few news stories about a family that got sick after their home was tightened by a home performance contractor to scare off potential customers and taint the reputation of the entire industry. Good reputations take time to build, but can be quickly damaged.

  19. 77 FR 41547 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...July 13, 2012 Part III Department of Health and Human Services...431 et al. Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...and Enforcement Requirements for Home Health Agencies; Proposed Rule Federal...

  20. 77 FR 67067 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ...November 8, 2012 Part II Department of Health and Human Services...484, et al. Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...and Enforcement Requirements for Home Health Agencies; Final Rule Federal...

  1. 76 FR 40987 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ...133 July 12, 2011 Part II Department of Health and Human Services...440, et al. Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...

  2. 75 FR 70371 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...Part II Department of Health and Human Services...424 et al. Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...in Certification Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices; Final Rule...

  3. 75 FR 43235 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ...Part II Department of Health and Human Services...424, et al. Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...in Certification Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices; Proposed...

  4. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program...expansion supplements of $100,000 to 10 Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA...Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX...

  5. With the support of COACHES AND CONTEXT: DO COACHES ORCHESTRATE?

    E-print Network

    ORCHESTRATE? METHODS More than 10 years of coaching experience; Recognized by academics and peers as top; Graduated as physical education teachers; Highest coaching certification in their respective sports

  6. The home as a framework for health care.

    PubMed

    Mann, K J

    1997-04-01

    The past two or three decades have witnessed a steep rise in the cost of health and social services. It is anticipated that this uphill climb will continue and bring these systems to a complete collapse within a few decades. The prevention of this crisis depends on the elimination of some of the causes of the rise: (a) we do not want to save costs by sacrificing the quality of our services; (b) we have no control over the quantity of clients utilizing these services, or the seriousness of their problems; (c) we can, however, replace part of the expensive institutional care by the more natural and cost-effective home care, supplied by volunteers, strengthened by human and technological services. These principles guided an Israeli organization called Yad Sarah, whose leadership in the supply of home and community care enables thousands of ill, elderly and disabled people to remain at home and thus save the high cost of institutionalization. PMID:9158927

  7. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  8. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebų, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  9. Tools for Coaches

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    This webpage contains resources that were developed from the The Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative which brought intensive in-class coaching to math teachers. Their coaching model involves an ongoing process of pre-teaching conferences, in-class experiences, and post-conferences. The focus of the pedagogical content coaching is on students’ thinking, understanding, and work products. There are videos of coaches discussing signature elements of their practice in working with teachers as well as videos on lesson planning and faculty/student debriefing by grade. All other helpful materials are available to download in PDF.

  10. Effectiveness of general practice based, practice nurse led telephone coaching on glycaemic control of type 2 diabetes: the Patient Engagement And Coaching for Health (PEACH) pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of goal focused telephone coaching by practice nurses in improving glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in Australia. Design Prospective, cluster randomised controlled trial, with general practices as the unit of randomisation. Setting General practices in Victoria, Australia. Participants 59 of 69 general practices that agreed to participate recruited sufficient patients and were randomised. Of 829 patients with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) >7.5% in the past 12 months) who were assessed for eligibility, 473 (236 from 30 intervention practices and 237 from 29 control practices) agreed to participate. Intervention Practice nurses from intervention practices received two days of training in a telephone coaching programme, which aimed to deliver eight telephone and one face to face coaching episodes per patient. Main outcome measures The primary end point was mean absolute change in HbA1c between baseline and 18 months in the intervention group compared with the control group. Results The intervention and control patients were similar at baseline. None of the practices dropped out over the study period; however, patient attrition rates were 5% in each group (11/236 and 11/237 in the intervention and control group, respectively). The median number of coaching sessions received by the 236 intervention patients was 3 (interquartile range 1-5), of which 25% (58/236) did not receive any coaching sessions. At 18 months’ follow-up the effect on glycaemic control did not differ significantly (mean difference 0.02, 95% confidence interval ?0.20 to 0.24, P=0.84) between the intervention and control groups, adjusted for HbA1c measured at baseline and the clustering. Other biochemical and clinical outcomes were similar in both groups. Conclusions A practice nurse led telephone coaching intervention implemented in the real world primary care setting produced comparable outcomes to usual primary care in Australia. The addition of a goal focused coaching role onto the ongoing generalist role of a practice nurse without prescribing rights was found to be ineffective. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN50662837. PMID:24048296

  11. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  12. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  13. Recommendations for Homemaker/Home Health Aide Training and Services. Public Health Service Publication Number 1891.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    These guidelines relate to the recruitment, selection, training, and utilization of homemaker/home health aides. Some of the major tenets which the document develops are: (1) adequate leadership and financial support, (2) broad definition of the role based on an ongoing assessment of family health and social needs, (3) identification of a…

  14. Wireless Health Data Exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema. PMID:22319296

  15. Wireless health data exchange for home healthcare monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema. PMID:22319296

  16. A Coaching Psychology Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008), John Radford considers "what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education". In this article, the author looks at the possible inclusion of coaching psychology within undergraduate psychology programmes. Coaching psychology as an applied area of psychology…

  17. Lesson Study: Beyond Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca; Foster, David; Hurd, Jacqueline; Fisher, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The authors assert that lesson study--a collaborative, teacher-led approach to learning from practice--offers a deeper, broader, more sustainable method of improving teacher practice than one-on-one coaching does. In lesson study, teachers and coaches of all levels of experience can work together, each bringing his or her own professional…

  18. Coaches as System Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael; Knight, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The role of school leadership--of principals and coaches--must be played out on a systems level to get widespread and sustainable improvement. Successful, whole-system education reform relies on capacity building, teamwork, pedagogy, and systemic reform. The strategies of good coaches and the right drivers for whole-system reform go hand in hand.…

  19. Executive coaching enhances goal attainment, resilience and workplace well-being: a randomised controlled study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony M. Grant; Linley Curtayne; Geraldine Burton

    2009-01-01

    In a randomised controlled study, 41 executives in a public health agency received 360-degree feedback, a half-day leadership workshop, and four individual coaching sessions over 10 weeks. The coaching used a cognitive-behavioural solution-focused approach. Quantitative and qualitative measures were taken. This is the first published randomised controlled study in which coaching was conducted by professional executive coaches external to the

  20. [Health hazards for immigrants when travelling to their home countries].

    PubMed

    Brunvatne, Reidun; Blystad, Hans; Hoel, Terje

    2002-06-20

    Vacations in the home country are important and positive events in the lives of immigrants, events that allow them to maintain contact with their culture, relatives and friends. However, vacations also carry certain health risks, though these risks can to some degree be prevented. Infectious disease is the greatest risk. Some children and adolescents also run the risk of female genital mutilation, forced marriage, and the risk og being left behind in the home country against their will. Among the notifiable diseases registered with the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS), five stand out as having a higher incidence in people of foreign background than in people of Norwegian origin: malaria, hepatitis A, shigella infection, typhoid and paratyphoid fever. This higher incidence is partly the result of less use of pre-travel vaccines and malaria prophylaxis. Immigrants as a group are exposed to varied risks and should be given high priority in relation to vaccines and malaria prophylaxis for travel abroad. High priority should also be given to preventive health measures designed to reduce the risk of female genital mutilation and other violations against children and young people on visit to their country of origin. PMID:12119784

  1. The ‘how-to’ of health behaviour change brought to life: a theoretical analysis of the Co-Active coaching model and its underpinnings in self-determination theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erin S. Pearson

    2011-01-01

    Self-determination theory (SDT) and Co-Active life coaching (CALC) serve in a complementary capacity whereby both are concerned with investigating the natural growth tendencies of individuals with respect to self-motivation. SDT provides a framework for examining the processes that regulate health behaviours, while the Co-Active model provides the tools necessary to bring desired changes to fruition. Although an increasing amount of

  2. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  3. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  4. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  5. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  6. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  7. "Curriculum Development for Home and Health Nursing," January 1995-1996. Final Report on Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Mary

    In 1995, Southwestern College, in California, participated in a project to develop a home health course for registered nurses and students interested in working in home health settings. The course was intended to provide nurses and students with the knowledge and clinical skills required for home health care, improve collaboration among community…

  8. Correlates of Suicide among Home Health Care Utilizers Who Died by Suicide and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jennifer L.; Bruce, Martha L.; Conwell, Yeates

    2006-01-01

    Home health care patients often have several late-life risk factors for suicide and constitute a high risk group for suicidal behaviors. In this study, we examined the characteristics of 14 older adult home health care utilizers who died by suicide and four community controls who used similar services. Both groups of home health care utilizers had…

  9. Coach Hiring Requirements Coach Appointment Forms

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    submission SUA Meeting Travel & Safety Requirements (Part 3) CPR and 1st Aid Certifications 1st at sportclb@umn.edu or 6126256017. #12;Travel/Vehicle Lease Assistant Brian Schmidt Travel and Vehicle and Questions 612.625.6017 sportclb@umn.edu Program Assistant Coaching Requirements, Meeting Space

  10. Framing the evidence for health smart homes and home-based consumer health technologies as a public health intervention for independent aging: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Meyer, Ellen; Lazar, Amanda; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a critical need for public health interventions to support the independence of older adults as the world’s population ages. Health smart homes (HSH) and home-based consumer health (HCH) technologies may play a role in these interventions. Methods We conducted a systematic review of HSH and HCH literature from indexed repositories for health care and technology disciplines (e.g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore) and classified included studies according to an evidence-based public health (EBPH) typology. Results One thousand, six hundred and thirty nine candidate articles were identified. Thirty-one studies from the years 1998–2011 were included. Twenty-one included studies were classified as emerging, 10 as promising and 3 as effective (first tier). Conclusion The majority of included studies were published in the period beginning in the year 2005. All 3 effective (first tier) studies and 9 of 10 of promising studies were published during this period. Almost all studies included an activity sensing component and most of these used passive infrared motion sensors. The three effective (first tier) studies all used a multicomponent technology approach that included activity sensing, reminders and other technologies tailored to individual preferences. Future research should explore the use of technology for self-management of health by older adults, social support and self-reported health measures incorporated into personal health records, electronic medical records, and community health registries. PMID:23639263

  11. Health Coaching and Genomics—Potential Avenues to Elicit Behavior Change in Those at Risk for Chronic Disease: Protocol for Personalized Medicine Effectiveness Study in Air Force Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Vorderstrasse, Allison A.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Kraus, William E.; Maldonado, Maj Carlos J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD) are prevalent chronic diseases from which military personnel are not exempt. While many genetic markers for these diseases have been identified, the clinical utility of genetic risk testing for multifactorial diseases such as these has not been established. The need for a behavioral intervention such as health coaching following a risk counseling intervention for T2D or CHD also has not been explored. Here we present the rationale, design, and protocol for evaluating the clinical utility of genetic risk testing and health coaching for active duty US Air Force (AF) retirees and beneficiaries. Primary Study Objectives: Determine the direct and interactive effects of health coaching and providing genetic risk information when added to standard risk counseling for CHD and T2D on health behaviors and clinical risk markers. Design: Four-group (2 X 2 factorial) randomized controlled trial. Setting: Two AF primary care clinical settings on the west coast of the United States. Participants: Adult AF primary care patients. Intervention: All participants will have a risk counseling visit with a clinic provider to discuss personal risk factors for T2D and CHD. Half of the participants (two groups) will also learn of their genetic risk testing results for T2D and CHD in this risk counseling session. Participants randomized to the two groups receiving health coaching will then receive telephonic health coaching over 6 months. Main Outcome Measures: Behavioral measures (self-reported dietary intake, physical activity, smoking cessation, medication adherence); clinical outcomes (AF composite fitness scores, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipids, T2D/CHD risk scores) and psychosocial measures (self-efficacy, worry, perceived risk) will be collected at baseline and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months. Conclusion: This study tests novel strategies deployed within existing AF primary care to increase adherence to evidence-based diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and medication recommendations for CHD and T2D risk reduction through methods of patient engagement and self-management support. PMID:24416670

  12. 76 FR 68525 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ...November 4, 2011 Part II Department of Health and Human Services...424, and 484 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for...

  13. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable...methodology for in- and outpatient health care professional services provided...FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care [T]he...

  14. Stroke Therapy Coach DESCRIPTION

    E-print Network

    Sheikh, Yaser Ajmal

    and battery pack. The Stroke Therapy Coach is composed of a tablet for clinician programming, a Kinect for monitoring motion, a suite of fun virtual games to motivate rehabilitation practice, and a machine learning

  15. Tools: Successful Coaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative

    2013-01-01

    This webpage contains tools for math coaches and math specialists to utilize before, during, and after teacher observations. These tools are built upon NCSM's PRIME Leadership Framework to enable math specialists and coaches to build relationships and encourage leadership in others and created by The Robert Noyce Foundation in conjunction with Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative (SMVI). Each tool can be previewed on the left by clicking the name of the tool and can be viewed in full by clicking beneath the tool name.

  16. Coaching the Job Seeker with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Freddie

    Career counselors and job search coaches must be prepared to assist disabled clients as this sector of the labor market increases. As the work force ages, there are greater numbers of workers dealing with disabilities and serious health problems. Sadly, individuals with disabilities often approach the job search process with misconceptions,…

  17. Developing a Coaching Portfolio: Enhancing Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubball, Harry; Robertson, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A portfolio is a well-organized document containing critical analyses and evidence related to a coach's background, context(s) of coaching, approach to coaching, coaching accomplishments, and goals for further development. Here, the authors describe different types of coaching portfolios as well as strategies for developing a coaching portfolio.…

  18. The Healthy Homes Initiative Housing conditions can significantly affect public health.

    E-print Network

    deficiencies that affect health and safety. · Build capacity and competency among public health, environmentalThe Healthy Homes Initiative Housing conditions can significantly affect public health. Nationwide the United States. Most public health efforts take a categoric approach to health and safety hazards

  19. The Safe Medical Devices Act and Home Health Care: Risk Management Issues and Solutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fay A. Rozovsky

    1997-01-01

    On July 31, 1996, new regulations took effect that were promulgated under the Safe Medical Devices Act (SMDA). These regulations squarely address the home health care provider, creating new reporting and communication challenges for home health care agencies (HHAs). As the months have elapsed, questions have begun to emerge regarding the SMDA regulations that reflect the unique nature of home

  20. Supervised Classification of Activities of Daily Living in Health Smart Homes using SVM

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Supervised Classification of Activities of Daily Living in Health Smart Homes using SVM Anthony) on real data. Index Terms--Support vector machines, Activities of Daily Living, Health Smart Homes, Sensor smart homes to achieve this goal [1]. Several solutions are stud- ied by laboratories and companies

  1. Coaching Considerations: FAQs Useful in the Development of Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The National Advisory Board for the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse have identified a number of considerations that it believed needed further discussion as schools, districts, and states embrace literacy coaching. It negotiated and discussed a number of issues surrounding coaching and agreed on 10 key ideas that should be part of the discussions…

  2. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...governing payments for certain non-VA health care, 38 CFR 17.56, applicable to...rule, we estimate that each home health care and hospice provider that does...negotiated contracts offer home health care or hospice care to veterans...

  3. Pre-Exercise Screening and Health Coaching in CHD Secondary Prevention: A Qualitative Study of the Patient Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, R.; Gillies, M.; Barber, J.; MacIntyre, K.; Harkins, C.; Findlay, I. N.; McCloy, K.; Gillie, A.; Scoular, A.; MacIntyre, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention programmes can be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD). In particular, UK guidelines, including those from the Department of Health, emphasize physical activity. However, the effects of secondary prevention programmes with an exercise component are moderate and uptake is highly…

  4. The Art of Coaching Teachers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elena Aguilar

    2013-03-16

    This weblog by Elena Aguilar details important issues about coaching teachers. The topics in the entries vary in content, but are always centered around the idea of transforming instruction through coaching.

  5. Health consumption as work: the home pregnancy test as a domesticated health tool.

    PubMed

    Childerhose, Janet E; Macdonald, Margaret E

    2013-06-01

    A growing array of biomedical goods and services has become central to the North American experience of navigating illness and pursuing good health. Yet despite the utility of consumption as an analytical framework within the social sciences, the selection, purchase, and use of biomedical goods and services has been understudied. By using the home pregnancy test as a case study, we suggest new approaches to thinking about the consumption of these goods and services. We chose the home pregnancy test because it is the best-known example of a mass-produced diagnostic tool used by consumers. We draw on two sources of data for this qualitative analysis: a set of stories submitted between 2003 and 2005 by women and men to an online exhibit mounted by the National Institutes of Health called "A Thin Blue Line: The History of the Pregnancy Test Kit," which we analysed between 2006 and 2007; and web sampling conducted in 2009 and 2010 of personal web and video logs of women and men who have posted stories and opinions about their experiences with contemporary home pregnancy testing products. We adapt the term "domestication" from Science and Technology Studies scholarship to describe the movement of diagnostic devices into homes for use by consumers. Specifically, we propose that the consumption of domesticated biomedical devices, goods, and services should be theorized as work performed by consumers, in two senses: as a form of tool use that allows non-experts to produce diagnostic knowledge about their own bodies and health; and as the ongoing biopolitical work that is expected of citizens to produce healthy bodies. Our paper draws attention to these understudied phenomena, while suggesting new approaches to theorizing the social and cultural elements of goods and services for health. PMID:23608088

  6. Home Health News New Sensors Stick To Organs To Monitor Health What is this? EMAIL PRINT RSS

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Home Health News New Sensors Stick To Organs To Monitor Health Share What is this? EMAIL PRINT RSS function in pigs, scientists say Buzz Digg Facebook More... WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new New Sensors Stick to Organs to Monitor Health Pliable electronic devices already tracking heart

  7. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    PubMed

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training. PMID:12557465

  8. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  9. Antecedents of perceived coach interpersonal behaviors: the coaching environment and coach psychological well- and ill-being.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Juliette; Taylor, Ian M; Spray, Christopher M; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2012-08-01

    Embedded in the self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) framework, we obtained self-report data from 418 paid and voluntary coaches from a variety of sports and competitive levels with the aim of exploring potential antecedents of coaches' perceived autonomy supportive and controlling behaviors. Controlling for socially desirable responses, structural equation modeling revealed that greater job security and opportunities for professional development, and lower work-life conflict were associated with psychological need satisfaction, which, in turn, was related to an adaptive process of psychological well-being and perceived autonomy support toward athletes. In contrast, higher work-life conflict and fewer opportunities for development were associated with a distinct maladaptive process of thwarted psychological needs, psychological ill-being, and perceived controlling interpersonal behavior. The results highlight how the coaching context may impact upon coaches' psychological health and their interpersonal behavior toward athletes. Moreover, evidence is provided for the independence of adaptive and maladaptive processes within the self-determination theory paradigm. PMID:22889690

  10. Attitudes of female athletes toward their male and female coaches 

    E-print Network

    Newcomb, Connie Karcher

    1976-01-01

    ATTITUDES OF FEMALE ATHLETES TOWARD THEIR MALE AND FEMALE COACHES A Thesis by CONNIE KARCHER NEWCOMB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AEM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1976 Major Subject: Health and Physical Education ATTITUDES OF FEMALE ATHLETES TOWARD THEIR MALE AND FEMALE COACHES A Thesis by CONNIE KARCHER NEWCOMB Approved as to style and content by: Co-chair of C mmittee Head of epartment Member...

  11. Drugs and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kenneth S., Ed.

    This volume is based on the premise that professional preparation for coaching should include viable experiences in drug education, with particular reference to coping with drug-related problems. The first section provides general information on the purposes and effects of drugs, controls, and concepts of doping. The second section deals with four…

  12. Merging home and health via contemporary care delivery: program management insights on a home telehealth project.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Chon; Rosenthal, David A

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a home telehealth program that uses innovative informatics and telemedicine technologies to meet the needs of a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We provide background information for the program inclusive of descriptions for the decision support system, patient selection process, and selected home telehealth technologies. Lessons learned based on interview data collected from the project team highlight issues regarding implementation and management of the program. Our goal is to provide useful information to other healthcare systems considering home telehealth as a contemporary option for care delivery. PMID:18769182

  13. 78 FR 40271 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ...128 July 3, 2013 Part II Department of Health and Human Services...Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014, Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements, and...

  14. 76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

  15. 78 FR 72255 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ...December 2, 2013 Part III Department of Health and Human Services...Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014, Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements, and...

  16. Training of Home Health Aides and Nurse Aides: Findings from National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Manisha; Ejaz, Farida K.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the…

  17. Home and community care services: a major opportunity for preventive health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louisa R Jorm; Scott R Walter; Sanja Lujic; Julie E Byles; Hal L Kendig

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Australia, the Home and Community Care (HACC) program provides services in the community to frail elderly living at home and their carers. Surprisingly little is known about the health of people who use these services. In this study we sought to describe health-related factors associated with use of HACC services, and to identify potential opportunities for targeting preventive

  18. Sensor-enhanced health information system architectures for home and telecare: concept and prototype

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver J. Bott; Michael Marschollek; Joachim Bergmann; Uw Wolf; Reinhold Haux

    Demographic trends towards an aging society motivate the search for alternative health care paradigms. Information technology driven home-care and telecare are popular concepts, and a lot of projects resulted in corresponding systems. Thus the question arises what implications for health information system (HIS) architectures emerge and how sensor technology as a core technolog yf or home and telecare can systematically

  19. Challenges in Achieving Health for All in the Boarding Home Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babiski, Laura; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Boarding Home Support Program for adults with mental health problems uses health promotion mechanisms of self-care, mutual aid, and healthy environments. The program is challenged by increased numbers of persons served, substandard homes, and conflicts between tenant and operator needs and between individual and group tenant needs. (SK)

  20. Home telecare study for patients with chronic lung disease in the Sydney West Area Health Service.

    PubMed

    Shany, Tal; Hession, Michael; Pryce, David; Galang, Rowena; Roberts, Mary; Lovell, Nigel; Basilakis, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technologies may be used to provide health care services to people living at home. The term "home telecare" has been coined for this service. The elderly and patients with chronic pulmonary conditions, heart disease and diabetes have been thought to be obvious beneficiaries. The evidence base supporting home telecare is growing; however, there is a need for studies of long-term deployment and integration with existing health system processes. We discuss the experiences gained from one such pilot conducted in the Sydney West Area Health Service, which examines the integration of home telecare within the framework of an existing respiratory ambulatory care service. Interim results demonstrate high levels of reliability and positive patient attitude towards use of home monitoring. Clinical staff acceptance levels appeared lower. Effects on health burden, such as hospital admissions and nurse workload, were not significantly altered. The study results have been essential in developing local telecare knowledge within the health care community. PMID:21191167

  1. Blending Key Ingredients to Assure Quality in Home Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Deloris G.

    1986-01-01

    Careful staff selection, training, and review are among the methods the author recommends to home care agencies striving to provide top-notch services. Discusses measuring the quality of care employees are providing, accreditation, and the benefits of accreditation. (CT)

  2. Nutritional Knowledge of UK Coaches

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05). In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice. PMID:24727434

  3. Health Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home by Activity Prediction

    E-print Network

    Cook, Diane J.

    Health Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home by Activity Prediction Sajal K. Das and Diane J objective of this paper is to investigate techniques for using agent-based smart home technologies-based smart home project funded by NSF. 1 Introduction and Motivation We live in an increasingly connected

  4. With Home Testing, Consumers Take Charge of Their Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and what it means." Nichols directs the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory and Point-of-Care Testing at Baystate ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  5. Supervisor Toolkit Employee Coaching and Feedback

    E-print Network

    Marsh, David

    Supervisor Toolkit Employee Coaching and Feedback Performance Development #12;Objectives for Today Understand how coaching and feedback support employee performance and development Identify and utilize coaching and feedback models for employee communication Enhance supervisor communication competencies

  6. Health promotion in the home: 1. Food poisoning: the link with home hygiene.

    PubMed

    Perry, B

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of food poisoning in the UK is increasing substantially, with about 50% arising in the home. Many different organisms cause food-borne infections, including Salmonella, Campylobacter and Shigella. Storing food correctly is important. Many households shop only once a week and food is often kept for several days before being eaten. Standards of domestic kitchen hygiene must be improved if the incidence of food poisoning is to be reduced Hand washing, kitchen cleanliness and disinfection are essential. PMID:8680190

  7. At-Home AIDS Test Raises Health Issues

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Allison Hertz (NewsHour Extra; )

    2005-11-30

    People around the world come together on Dec. 1 each year for World AIDS Day, a time to commemorate those lost to the deadly disease and to celebrate progress made to stop its spread. One way of preventing the spread of the disease is early detection of the HIV virus, which some say could be more easily done at home.

  8. Medicare home health payment reform may jeopardize access for clinically complex and socially vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David; Peng, Timothy; Brickner, Carlin; Kurowski, Daniel; Christopher, Mary Ann; Sheehan, Kathleen M

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act directed Medicare to update its home health prospective payment system to reflect more recent data on costs and use of services-an exercise known as rebasing. As a result, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will reduce home health payments 3.5 percent per year in the period 2014-17. To determine the impact that these reductions could have on beneficiaries using home health care, we examined the Medicare reimbursement margins and the use of services in a national sample of 96,621 episodes of care provided by twenty-six not-for-profit home health agencies in 2011. We found that patients with clinically complex conditions and social vulnerability factors, such as living alone, had substantially higher service delivery costs than other home health patients. Thus, the socially vulnerable patients with complex conditions represent less profit-lower-to-negative Medicare margins-for home health agencies. This financial disincentive could reduce such patients' access to care as Medicare payments decline. Policy makers should consider the unique characteristics of these patients and ensure their continued access to Medicare's home health services when planning rebasing and future adjustments to the prospective payment system. PMID:24889943

  9. Development of a quality ranking model for home health care providers.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Justin W

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to increase transparency and simplify consumer decision-making regarding the selection of a home health care provider. Currently, quality information on home health care providers is fragmented and difficult to interpret. In this study, a quality-ranking model is developed by selecting multidimensional quality indicators across multiple sources and respective weights using expert judgment. Given the weights and providers' performance on each quality indicator, a composite score is calculated that summarizes a home health care provider's overall quality level. This quality information empowers consumers to narrow their search and select the best-performing, most efficient providers. PMID:23924223

  10. Home

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) in August 2011. CPTAC is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows. Read more.

  11. What Great Coaches Do Differently: 11 Elements of Effective Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Rob; Whitaker, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Why do some athletic coaches succeed every season while others suffer loss after loss? This book describes the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes of great athletic coaches. Where do they focus their attention? How do they spend their time and energy? And how can others gain the same advantages? Here, Rob Haworth and Todd Whitaker describe the…

  12. Social work services in home health care: challenges for the new prospective payment system era.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Seon

    2002-01-01

    The implementation of the Prospective Payment System (PPS) provides a unique opportunity for social workers to be better integrated into home health care. To do so, it is important for social workers to define their roles and eliminate any barriers to providing social workers services, which may improve patient outcomes. Two focus groups with home health nurses (n = 10) and social workers (n = 8) were conducted in a large urban home health agency to define social work roles and identify barriers to providing social work services. This paper categorizes the barriers to providing social work services into informational, systems/organizational, and inter-professional barriers and presents possible solutions to these barriers as home health agencies strive to provide care under PPS. PMID:12371790

  13. Smart Home-based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients

    E-print Network

    Cook, Diane J.

    the best possible quality of life for individuals with diabetes. #12;Introduction Medical researchers consoles, health monitoring, sensor data analysis, smart homes #12;Abstract Background: Researchers and medical practitioners have long sought the ability to continuously and automatically monitor patients

  14. Register Connect Health People Food Beaches Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Education

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Register Connect Health People Food Beaches Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Entertainment Life Opinion Obits Knowledge Cafe #12;Comics Horoscope Puzzles & Games MUST-SEE PHOTOS 1. Desert

  15. Home health care and burn care: an educational and economical program.

    PubMed

    Dattolo, J; Trout, S; Connolly, M L

    1996-01-01

    Changes in health care reimbursement have challenged providers of health care to work smarter instead of harder, with more efficient and effective use of resources. Patients with burn injuries remain hospitalized for dressing changes that could be completed in the home environment by health care professionals. An early discharge for a select group of patients from a resource-intensive hospital stay to a quality, cost-effective home care program was achieved. An educational program was developed to provide home care nurses the necessary knowledge and skill to care for the patient with burn injuries at home. This program combines didactic classroom lectures with a clinical orientation for home care registered nurses. The outcome for patients is a well-integrated continuity of care with a decreased length of hospital stay. PMID:8675510

  16. Sports Psychology and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Greta L., Ed.

    This monograph documents the speeches presented at the 1988 Symposium on Sports Psychology and the Coach. Presentations ranged from empirical research studies to anecdotal methodologies for coping with problems of anxiety. The following presentations are included: (1) "The Coach as Psychologist: When and How" (Robert Rotella); (2) "Psychology for…

  17. Letters of Appointment Head Coach

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    during the term of this appointment. 3. You will receive pay raises that the state budget process and collective bargaining agreements provide for your rank during the term of your appointment. 4. Athletic any future appointment rights. The position of Men's Golf Head Coach, as is the case with all coaching

  18. Student Focused Math Content Coaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Foster

    This 8-page PDF details strategies used by math coaches in the Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative where the focus is on students’ thinking and on their work products. This document includes various approaches that coaches may use with teachers to gain trust and important pre-observation and post observation questioning and reflection techniques.

  19. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  20. Coaches Guide to Sport Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, Larry M.

    This guide for athletic coaches offers a practical approach to the administrative functions of organizing, planning, leading, and controlling. Included are chapters on coaching administration, fund raising, organizing competitions, and designing effective budgets and controls. The guide addresses the following topics: (1) the categories of…

  1. More Than Mentors: Principal Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Gary; Castagna, Claire; Warren, Betsy

    2003-01-01

    A professional development program for leadership, Coaching Leaders to Attain Student Success (CLASS), prepares individuals to coach new and experienced school principals. The program is the product of collaboration between the New Teacher Center at University of California Santa Cruz and the Association of California School Administrators. (MLF)

  2. The Power of Educational Coaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ben Johnson

    2013-01-31

    In this brief article Ben Johnson discusses the process of educational coaching. The form of coaching that Johnson refers to, involves peer teachers, supervisors, and principals asking open-ended questions of their colleagues in order to bring about change in the classroom.

  3. Home and Health in the Third Age — Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kylén, Maya; Ekström, Henrik; Haak, Maria; Elmståhl, Sölve; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens. PMID:25019267

  4. Outcomes for Children with Problematic Behavior in School and at Home Served By Public Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, K.; Xue, Y.; Wotring, J.

    2004-01-01

    The authors report outcomes for 4,777 youth served by the public mental health system in Michigan who had problems in school, at home, in interpersonal relationships, or in modulating their mood. Cluster analysis identified five subgroups: Pervasive Problems with Mood Disturbance (i.e., severe or moderate impairment in school, at home, in behavior…

  5. Effect of professional oral health care on the elderly living in nursing homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mieko Adachi; Kazuyuki Ishihara; Shu Abe; Katsuji Okuda; Tatsuya Ishikawa

    2002-01-01

    Objective. We evaluated the effectiveness of professional oral health care (POHC) given by dental hygienists once a week for 24 months to 141 elderly persons needing daily care and living in 2 nursing homes. Study Design. Elderly subjects with POHC and without POHC living in 2 nursing homes were examined for 24 months to detect any fevers of 37.8°C or

  6. Promoting health and home safety for children of parents with intellectual disability: a randomized controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gwynnyth Llewellyn; David McConnell; Anne Honey; Rachel Mayes; Domenica Russo

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a home-based intervention targeted to parents with intellectual disability to promote child health and home safety in the preschool years. A total of 63 parents were recruited for the study with 45 parents (40 mothers and 5 fathers) from 40 families completing the project. The research design permitted comparison

  7. Why Mental Health Centers Should Not Do Home-Based Family Centered Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leverington, John J.; Bryce, Marvin

    Home Based Family Centered (HBFC) services give primary responsibility for evaluation, service planning, and counseling to the direct service in-home family therapist. In the mental health center (MHC), the psychiatrist may see a child once in the office and make a diagnosis and recommendation for the child, and sometimes for the parents. Also in…

  8. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  9. A Home-Based Infant Mental Health Intervention: The Centrality of Relationships in Reflective Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherston, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the essential relationship needs and capacities of infants, parents, practitioners, and supervisors in a story about reflective practice. The author shares her experience supervising a home visitor who is a trainee in an infant mental health intervention program. The home visitor's relationship with her supervisor was a…

  10. Heuristic algorithms for a vehicle routing problem with simultaneous delivery and pickup and time windows in home health care

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    windows in home health care Ran LIUa,b , Xiaolan XIEa,b , Vincent AUGUSTOa , Carlos RODRIGUEZa a Ecole addresses a vehicle scheduling problem encountered in home health care logistics. It concerns the delivery are tested on test instances derived from existing VRPTW benchmarks. Keywords: Home health care logistics

  11. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  12. Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

  13. Low-Cost, Take-Home, Beating Heart Simulator for Health-Care Education

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    Low-Cost, Take-Home, Beating Heart Simulator for Health-Care Education Devin R. BERG1, Andrew simulator connects to a personal computer where the user interacts with the model through a graphical user the intended design goal of being a useful educational tool for health- care students. Long-term, the simulator

  14. Understanding How Ontario High School Teacher-Coaches Learn to Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Geoff; Culver, Diane; Camiré, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are approximately 52,000 teacher-coaches coaching 750,000 high school student-athletes in Canada. Despite this large population, Canadian high school teacher-coaches remain relatively unstudied. High school coaches in Canada are often asked to coach sports with which they are unfamiliar, and because they are not required to…

  15. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  16. HIV/AIDS and home-based health care

    PubMed Central

    Opiyo, Pamella A; Yamano, Takashi; Jayne, TS

    2008-01-01

    This paper highlights the socio-economic impacts of HIV/AIDS on women. It argues that the socio-cultural beliefs that value the male and female lives differently lead to differential access to health care services. The position of women is exacerbated by their low financial base especially in the rural community where their main source of livelihood, agricultural production does not pay much. But even their active involvement in agricultural production or any other income ventures is hindered when they have to give care to the sick and bedridden friends and relatives. This in itself is a threat to household food security. The paper proposes that gender sensitive policies and programming of intervention at community level would lessen the burden on women who bear the brunt of AIDS as caregivers and livelihood generators at household level. Improvement of medical facilities and quality of services at local dispensaries is seen as feasible since they are in the rural areas. Other interventions should target freeing women's and girls' time for education and involvement in income generating ventures. Two separate data sets from Western Kenya, one being quantitative and another qualitative data have been used. PMID:18348721

  17. Failure to Rehire: Why Coaches Get Fired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify reasons coaches were not rehired in public school coaching positions. The intent was to use this information for content modification of courses in coach education. At the entry level, coaches are too often concerned only with their particular sport and how to develop successful athletes or winning teams.…

  18. Coaching in Community Settings: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettles, Saundra Murray

    Coaching is a means of instruction that combines elements of mentoring and tutoring in natural community environments. Coach and student characteristics, processes of coaching, and outcomes of coaching in varied community settings and across different developmental levels are examined. Programs utilizing adults and peers from the community in…

  19. Geographical Mobility Patterns of College Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, George H.; Loy, John W.

    1978-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to compare coaches with respect to: (1) geographical origins; (2) migration from hometown to college; (3) diffusion from undergraduate college to first coaching position; and (4) geographical movement from first coaching position to present coaching position. (Author/AM)

  20. National Standards for Athletic Coaches. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brylinsky, Jody

    This digest asserts that the question of coach preparation and training has become a priority issue for many schools and communities, though the research is limited. It examines reasons to have coach education; the scope of sport participation; the status of coach education and training in the United States; National standards for coach education;…

  1. The Oral Health Self-Care Behavior and Dental Attitudes among Nursing Home Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Meckstroth, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The need for nursing home care will increase for the next several decades. Rural areas will be impacted in particular, as many older adults live in rural areas. Daily oral infection control changes when a person moves from independent living to institutional living. Oral care to dependent individuals is influenced by many factors. The purpose of this study is to determine the association of oral health self-care behavior with dental attitudes in nursing home personnel in a rural state. A survey was provided to attendees at an oral health conference. Questions were asked to determine dental knowledge, oral health self-care behavior, and dental care attitudes. Of 128 long term care health care facilities’ personnel invited, there were 31 attendees, and 21 of the attendees participated (67.7%). Nursing home personnel had a high level of dental knowledge. Oral health self-care behavior was independently influenced by dental knowledge (?=0.17; p=0.0444) and dental attitudes (?=0.55; p=.0081). Further investigation is needed to determine if oral health self-care attitudes and oral self-care behavior of nursing home personnel are factors in the provision of quality daily oral infection control for dependent nursing home residents living in rural areas. PMID:25349776

  2. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ...Director of Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, 3773 Cherry Creek Drive North...hospice care and home health services by the Veterans Health Administration's Office of Geriatrics and...

  3. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multi-Family Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore multiple family members’ perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home. Design Ten multi-family focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting Community setting. Participants Primarily Black and White families. Family members (n = 103) were between the ages of 8–61 years. Analysis A grounded hermeneutic approach. Phenomenon of Interest Risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home environment. Results Ten major themes were identified by family members related to health behaviors in the home environment, including: (a) accessibility to healthy foods and activity, (b) time constraints, (c) stage of youth development, (d) individual investment in health behaviors, (e) family investment in health behaviors, (f) family meals and shared activities, (g) parent modeling, (h) making health behaviors fun, (i) making health behaviors part of the family lifestyle, and (j) community investment in family health behaviors. Conclusions and Implications This study identified the importance of the family system and the reciprocal influences within the home environment on health behaviors. In addition, individual and community-level suggestions were identified. Insights from the families provide leads for future research and ideas for the prevention of youth obesity. PMID:22192951

  4. Usage of an Internet smoking cessation resource: the Australian QuitCoach

    PubMed Central

    Balmford, James; Borland, Ron; Li, Lin; Ferretter, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims The QuitCoach (www.quitcoach.org.au) is a tailored, Internet-delivered smoking cessation advice program. This paper compares QuitCoach users both with smokers in general, and with callers to a telephone-based smoking cessation service (the Victorian Quitline). It also explores patterns of QuitCoach usage by time of year and day of the week. Design and Methods Data are from responses to the QuitCoach online assessment collected between 2003–2007 (n=28,247). Comparison data are from the Victorian Quitline service, from the first five waves of the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey, the 2004–05 National Health Survey, and from anti-smoking TARPS for Australia. Results QuitCoach users were more likely to be female and younger than both smokers in general, and Quitline users. They were intermediate in nicotine dependence. QuitCoach users are less likely to have just quit than Quitline callers. Half of QuitCoach users first use after setting a quit date. Usage is related to anti-smoking advertising and to day of week, being highest earlier in the week. Conclusions The QuitCoach successfully targets the moderately addicted. Use is sensitive to anti-smoking campaigns. There is a need for greater promotion of the QuitCoach as a resource with the capacity to meet the needs of those already quit and those still uncertain as to whether to try. PMID:19320678

  5. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-05-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

  6. Development of a model home health nurse internship program for new graduates: key lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Shur Coyle, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    A nursing shortage, the aging baby boomer population, an escalating need for home health care, and limited availability of health care dollars are threatening to undermine the quality of health care in the United States. The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects a deficit of 275,000 full-time equivalents by 2010 (-12%) and a deficit of 800,000 by 2020 (-29%). This article focuses on one home health agency's strategy to support nurse graduates transitioning from student to professional nurse. Based on Benner's (1984) hallmark theory from novice to expert, the goals of this program are to enhance job satisfaction and social integration, facilitate autonomy, increase critical thinking and psychomotor skills, and develop additional competencies. Eleven key lessons learned are outlined. PMID:20839661

  7. The role of coach education in the development of expertise in coaching 

    E-print Network

    Nash, Christine Scott

    The coach has a crucial role to play in the furtherance of sporting performance however, unlike the athlete, scant attention has been paid to the development of the expert coach. This thesis investigated methods of coach ...

  8. Patient-centered medical homes: presenting a role for the advanced practice mental health nurse.

    PubMed

    Jordow, Rechele L

    2014-03-01

    As the burden of mental illness grows in the United States, recent data show that many in need of behavioral health services are not currently receiving them. Recent passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has presented an opportunity to change the delivery of behavioral health care to a consumer-driven, evidence-based model geared toward the coordination of care within the primary care setting. Psychiatric-mental health clinical nurse specialist/nurse practitioners are in an ideal position to deliver cost-effective behavioral health care in collaboration with primary care providers under the new patient-centered medical home model of care. PMID:24200915

  9. Association of language spoken at home with health and school issues among Asian American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Stella M; Huang, Zhihuan J; Schwalberg, Renee H; Overpeck, Mary D; Kogan, Michael D

    2002-05-01

    The study examined the association of language spoken at home with the school and health risks and behaviors of Asian American adolescents. Using the United States component of the 1997-1998 World Health Organization Study of Health Behavior in School Children, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted of records for Asian children to explore the relationship between language spoken at home and outcome variables regarding health behaviors, psychosocial and school risk factors, and parental factors. Compared to those who usually speak English at home, adolescents who usually speak another language, or who speak two languages equally, face a greater risk for health risk factors, psychosocial and school risk factors, and parental risk factors. Not speaking English at home was associated with higher health risks, including not wearing seat belts and bicycle helmets; higher psychosocial and school risk factors, including feeling that they do not belong at school, difficulty making new friends, and lacking confidence; and higher parental risks, including reporting that parents were not ready to help them or willing to talk to teachers. Adolescents less acculturated to the United States experience a variety of physical and psychosocial risks. School-based interventions such as early identification and outreach, needs assessment, and counseling and support services should be provided to immigrant students and their families. PMID:12109174

  10. Formaldehyde complaint investigations in mobile homes by the Texas Department of Health

    SciTech Connect

    Norsted, S.W.; Kozinetz, C.A.; Annegers, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    The Texas Department of Health sampled for formaldehyde (HCHO) in 443 mobile homes between April, 1979, and May, 1982, at the request of the occupants. Colorimetric detector tubes were used most frequently for sample acquisition. HCHO concentrations ranged from below detectable limits (less than 0.5 ppm) to 8.0 ppm. Twenty-seven percent of homes one year of age or less had mean concentrations equal to or greater than 2.0 ppm while 11.5% of older homes had concentrations of 2.0 ppm or more. An inverse relationship is demonstrated between home age and HCHO level. The primary health complaints reported were headaches, respiratory discomfort, and ocular irritation. Evidence of a dose-response relationship was not present.

  11. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home-based system will interact.

  12. Postflood disaster management and the home health nurse: using theory to guide practice.

    PubMed

    Hunter Revell, Susan M; McCurry, Mary K

    2010-07-01

    Few frameworks exist to guide home health nurses during the response and recovery phases of disasters such as flooding. The Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation is offered as an example of a guiding framework for nurses in postflood management. Phases of the model are linked to the nursing process, and management strategies are applied to individuals and families living in the community. Postcrisis decision-making is detailed through the discussion of nursing diagnoses, interventions, and evaluation. Implications highlight the value of using a theoretical framework to guide practice, develop knowledge, and clarify the home health nurse's role in postflood management. PMID:20694875

  13. Understanding inequities in home health care outcomes: staff views on agency and system factors.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Bourjolly, Joretha; Frasso, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Results regarding staff perspectives on contributing factors to racial/ethnic disparities in home health care outcomes are discussed. Focus group interviews were conducted with home health care staff (N = 23) who represented various agencies from three Northeastern states. Participants identified agency and system factors that contribute to disparities, including: (a) administrative staff bias/discretion, (b) communication challenges, (c) patient/staff cultural discordance, (d) cost control, and (e) poor access to community resources. Participants reported that bias can influence staff at all levels and is expressed via poor coverage of predominantly minority service areas, resulting in reduced intensity and continuity of service for minority patients. PMID:25706958

  14. Athletes Coaching Teens (ACT) for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danish, Steven J.

    Athletes Coaching Teens (ACT) is a school-based prevention program for seventh grade students in Richmond, Virginia. The project is a collaborative effort between the Department of Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University and the Richmond City Public Schools. The ACT program is directed at preventing and changing health-compromising…

  15. COACHE at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) consults with colleges to help them recruit and develop faculty. Founded at Harvard in 2002, with grants from the Ford Foundation and Atlantic Philanthropies, COACHE is now entirely supported by the institutions with which it consults. For non-members, there is plenty to explore on the web site. On the home page, have a peak at Usable Knowledge for various white papers. For instance, ā??Benchmark Best Practices: Tenure and Promotionā?¯ provides COACHEā??s data-driven recommendations for a positive tenure culture. To see COACHE in the news, go to: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/04/associate-professors-less-satisfied-those-other-ranks-survey-finds.

  16. Formaldehyde-related health complaints of residents living in mobile and conventional homes

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, I.M.; Lehnen, R.G.

    1987-03-01

    This paper explores the dose-response relation between formaldehyde (HCHO) concentration and reported health complaints (eye irritation, nose/throat irritation, headaches and skin rash) of nearly 2000 residents living in 397 mobile and 494 conventional homes. The study analyzes the effects of HCHO concentration, age and sex of respondent, and smoking behavior on each of the four health effects. The results demonstrate a positive dose-response relation between HCHO concentration and reported health complaints, with reported health complaints demonstrated at HCHO concentrations of 0.1 ppm and above. Concentrations of 0.4 ppm in manufactured homes as targeted by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), may not be adequate to protect occupants from discomfort and from acute effects of HCHO exposure.

  17. mHealth tools for the pediatric patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Slaper, Michael R; Conkol, Kimberly

    2014-02-01

    The concept of the pediatric patient-centered medical home (PCMH) as a theory has been evolving since it was initially conceived more than 40 years ago. When the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) Council on Pediatric Practice first wrote about this model, "medical home" was defined solely as the central location of a pediatric patient's medical records. Approximately two decades later, the AAP published its inaugural policy statement on this topic. Through this policy statement, the medical home was defined as a place where care for pediatric patients would be accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family-centered, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective. Although the lack of access to providers, especially in rural communities, may inhibit the adoption of the PCMH or chronic care models, technology has evolved to the point where many of the gaps in care can be bridged. mHealth, defined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as the use of mobile and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, health care services, and health research, can be one specific example of how technology can address these issues. One early study has shown that patients who use mHealth tools are more likely to adhere to self-monitoring requirements and, in turn, have significantly improved outcomes. A rapidly evolving and scalable mHealth technology that has the ability to address these issues are self-management mobile applications, or apps. It has been estimated that there are currently more than 40,000 health care-related apps available. Furthermore, use of these apps is growing, as more than 50% of smartphone users surveyed responded that they have used their device to gather health information, and almost 20% of this population has at least one health care app on their device. PMID:24512160

  18. Wellness Coaching for Obesity: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    D.S. presented to a medical and surgical weight-loss program to initiate bariatric surgery. He had made numerous attempts at weight loss to no avail and was taking steps toward bariatric surgery as a last viable option. D.S.'s health insurance provider required 3 months of supervised weight loss prior to approval for surgery, and this was initiated with a board-certified bariatrician (MD) and a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN)/wellness coach. D.S. presented with a body mass index (BMI) >40 and was classified as morbidly obese with comorbidities of high cholesterol and hyperglycemia and degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the knees. D.S. began the process outlined by his insurance company, meeting with the MD and RDN/wellness coach monthly. A plan was developed by D.S. and his RDN/wellness coach that alligned with his wellness vision, values, and lifestyle. D.S. ate meals and snacks at regular intervals throughout the day, consumed little to no red meat, increased his consumption of fruits and vegetables, and spent 1 hour daily in a swimming pool—walking, swimming, or both. By the end of the 3-month period required by the insurance provider, D.S. had lost more than 30 lbs, improved his exercise capacity, no longer used a cane, and chose to continue with coaching rather than undergo bariatric surgery. D.S. continued to meet with the MD and RDN monthly for 1 year and averaged a 10-lb weight loss per month for a total of 120 lbs, normalizing his blood panels and improving his joint mobility. D.S. continued to meet with the RDN/wellness coach for a total of 10 visits during year 2 and quarterly visits through year 3. D.S. lost a total of 240 lbs, maintained the weight loss over the 3-year period, and achieved these results solely through lifestyle interventions. Although bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for class 2 and 3 obesity, many patients pursue this treatment option without the help of medical and commercial weight loss personnel to improve the likelihood of weight loss sustainability. The investment of lifestyle intervention in this circumstance was less than $5000 (exculsive of blood panels) compared with the $20 000 cost of bariatric surgery at the time of intervention. PMID:24278847

  19. Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

  20. A randomized controlled study about the use of eHealth in the home health care of premature infants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One area where the use of information and communication technology (ICT), or eHealth, could be developed is the home health care of premature infants. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to investigate whether the use of video conferencing or a web application improves parents’ satisfaction in taking care of a premature infant at home and decreases the need of home visits. In addition, nurses’ attitudes regarding the use of these tools were examined. Method Thirty-four families were randomized to one of three groups before their premature infant was discharged from the hospital to home health care: a control group receiving standard home health care (13 families); a web group receiving home health care supplemented with the use of a web application (12 families); a video group with home health care supplemented with video conferencing using Skype (9 families). Families and nursing staff answered questionnaires about the usefulness of ICT. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 families. Results All the parents in the web group found the web application easy to use. 83% of the families thought it was good to have access to their child’s data through the application. All the families in the video group found Skype easy to use and were satisfied with the video calls. 88% of the families thought that video calls were better than ordinary phone calls. 33% of the families in the web group and 75% of those in the video group thought the need for home visits was decreased by the web application or Skype. 50% of the families in the web group and 100% of those in the video group thought the web application or the video calls had helped them feel more confident in caring for their child. Most of the nurses were motivated to use ICT but some were reluctant and avoided using the web application and video conferencing. Conclusion The families were satisfied with both the web application and video conferencing. The families readily embraced the use of ICT, whereas motivating some of the nurses to accept and use ICT was a major challenge. PMID:23394465

  1. A remote data access architecture for home-monitoring health-care applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Hung; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Kuo, Te-Son

    2007-03-01

    With the aging of the population and the increasing patient preference for receiving care in their own homes, remote home care is one of the fastest growing areas of health care in Taiwan and many other countries. Many remote home-monitoring applications have been developed and implemented to enable both formal and informal caregivers to have remote access to patient data so that they can respond instantly to any abnormalities of in-home patients. The aim of this technology is to give both patients and relatives better control of the health care, reduce the burden on informal caregivers and reduce visits to hospitals and thus result in a better quality of life for both the patient and his/her family. To facilitate their widespread adoption, remote home-monitoring systems take advantage of the low-cost features and popularity of the Internet and PCs, but are inherently exposed to several security risks, such as virus and denial-of-service (DoS) attacks. These security threats exist as long as the in-home PC is directly accessible by remote-monitoring users over the Internet. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to improve the security of such systems, with the proposed architecture aimed at increasing the system availability and confidentiality of patient information. A broker server is introduced between the remote-monitoring devices and the in-home PCs. This topology removes direct access to the in-home PC, and a firewall can be configured to deny all inbound connections while the remote home-monitoring application is operating. This architecture helps to transfer the security risks from the in-home PC to the managed broker server, on which more advanced security measures can be implemented. The pros and cons of this novel architecture design are also discussed and summarized. PMID:16621655

  2. An Instrument to Assess the Oral Health Status of Nursing Home Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayser-Jones, Jeanie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents data from the development and testing of an instrument created to evaluate the oral health of nursing home residents by nursing personnel. Examination of 100 residents by dentists and 3 categories of trained nurses established statistically significant interrater reliability, suggesting that nursing staff can be taught to evaluate the…

  3. The development of joint principles: integrating behavioral health care into the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    2014-06-01

    This article describes the development of the Joint Principles of The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) by the Working Party Group on Integrated Behavioral Healthcare. The Joint Principles establish the primacy of integrated behavioral health care as a core principle of the PCMH. PMID:24955690

  4. Securing the Communications of Home Health Care Systems Based on RFID Sensor Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wiem Tounsi; Joaquķn Garcķa-Alfaro; Nora Cuppens-Boulahia; Frédéric Cuppens

    2010-01-01

    We address security solutions to protect the communication of the wireless components of a home health care system. We analyze especially the problem of exchanging secrets to satisfy authentication of entities. We outline some impor- tant aspects that must be guaranteed given the existence of low-cost and resource-constrained RFID components. Ap- propriate solutions must, therefore, enable several nodes, with different

  5. A game-based strategy for the staff development of home health care nurses.

    PubMed

    Popil, Inna; Dillard-Thompson, Darlene

    2015-05-01

    This article describes gaming, an interactive teaching strategy that promotes active learning. An evaluation study conducted with home health care nurses tested the use of a game as a teaching tool. The study evaluated learning outcomes and learners' level of engagement and satisfaction with an educational game as a teaching method. PMID:25955422

  6. Integration of Smart Home Technologies in a Health Monitoring System for the Elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amaya Arcelus; Megan Howell Jones; Rafik Goubran; Frank Knoefel

    2007-01-01

    Among older adults, the challenges of maintaining mobility and cognitive function make it increasingly difficult to remain living alone independently. As a result, many older adults are forced to seek residence in costly clinical institutions where they can receive constant medical supervision. A home-based automated system that monitors their health and well- being while remaining unobtrusive would provide them with

  7. Postflood Disaster Management and the Home Health Nurse: Using Theory to Guide Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan M. Hunter Revell; Mary K. McCurry

    2010-01-01

    Few frameworks exist to guide home health nurses during the response and recovery phases of disasters such as flooding. The Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation is offered as an example of a guiding framework for nurses in postflood management. Phases of the model are linked to the nursing process, and management strategies are applied to individuals and families living

  8. Design of remote home environment monitoring and health care monitoring system based on data confusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi Zhang; Peng Xiong; Yuan Luo; Lin Li

    2011-01-01

    Base on the ZigBee technology, a wireless sensor networks for remote home environment monitoring and health care monitoring was built in this paper, and the applications of data fusion algorithms in system of front & back end data processing were deeply discussed. The experiment is proved that the applications of data fusion algorithm, which is a combination of Bayesian estimation

  9. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  10. Developing multimodal intelligent affective interfaces for tele-home health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine L. Lisetti; Fatma Nasoz; Cynthia Lerouge; Onur Ozyer; Kaye Alvarez

    2003-01-01

    Accounting for a patient's emotional state is integral in medical care. Telehealth research attests to the challenge clinicians must overcome in assessing patient emotional state when modalities are limited (Pettinari and Jessopp, 2001). The extra effort involved in addressing this challenge requires attention, skill, and time. Large caseloads may not afford tele-home health care clinicians the time and focus necessary

  11. Medicare-Certified Home Health Care: Urban-Rural Differences in Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Lacey; Jarosek, Stephanie L.; Virnig, Beth A.; Durham, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Context: Availability of Medicare-certified home health care (HHC) to rural elders can prevent more expensive institutional care. To date, utilization of HHC by rural elders has not been studied in detail. Purpose: To examine urban-rural differences in Medicare HHC utilization. Methods: The 2002 100% Medicare HHC claims and denominator files were…

  12. 76 FR 9502 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ...Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including: The national standardized...hereinafter referred to as the CY 2011 HH PPS final rule), there was a technical error...Regulations Text On page 70464 of the CY 2011 HH PPS final rule, we made a technical error...

  13. Impact of a Statewide Home Visiting Program on Parenting and on Child Health and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldera, Debra; Burrell, Lori; Rodriguez, Kira; Crowne, Sarah Shea; Rohde, Charles; Duggan, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a voluntary, paraprofessional home visiting program on promoting child health and development and maternal parenting knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Methods: This collaborative, experimental study of 6 Healthy Families Alaska (HFAK) programs enrolled 325 families from 1/00 to 7/01, randomly assigned them to…

  14. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  15. An Elderly Health Care System Using Wireless Sensor Networks at Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongwei Huo; Youzhi Xu; Hairong Yan; S. Mubeen; Hongke Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to integrate the technologies of wireless sensor networks and public communication networks to construct a healthcare system for senior citizens at home without interfering their daily activities. This system provides 4 main functionalities, including indoor monitoring, outdoor monitoring, activity and health state decision, emergency decision and alarm. JTH has developed a prototype of wireless

  16. Health/Home Economics Classroom Activities for Secondary Schools. Schools in an Aging Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    As the fastest-growing segment of society, older adults can be valuable resources for schools. The intent of this guide is to promote education for, with, and about older adults; to confront stereotypic images; and to present an accurate and balanced view of aging. The manual consists of 21 lesson plans for secondary teachers of health and home

  17. Sun-Sentinel Home care, tele-medicine cut health costs

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    -like insurance system. #12;"Reducing hospital readmissions will not only save the Medicare program billionsSun-Sentinel Home care, tele-medicine cut health costs Florida programs reduce unnecessary hospital of which are falsely positive, and is admitted unnecessarily to the hospital, where she gets acute

  18. Public health and English local government: historical perspectives on the impact of ‘returning home

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Martin; Lock, Karen; Hogarth, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This article uses history to stimulate reflection on the present opportunities and challenges for public health practice in English local government. Its motivation is the paradox that despite Department of Health policy-makers’ allusions to ‘a long and proud history’ and ‘returning public health home’ there has been no serious discussion of that past local government experience and what we might learn from it. The article begins with a short resumé of the achievements of Victorian public health in its municipal location, and then considers the extensive responsibilities that it developed for environmental, preventive and health services by the mid-twentieth century. The main section discusses the early NHS, explaining why historians see the era as one of decline for the speciality of public health, leading to the reform of 1974, which saw the removal from local government and the abolition of the Medical Officer of Health role. Our discussion focuses on challenges faced before 1974 which raise organizational and political issues relevant to local councils today as they embed new public health teams. These include the themes of leadership, funding, integrated service delivery, communication and above all the need for a coherent vision and rationale for public health action in local authorities. PMID:24472776

  19. The Management of Osteoporosis among Home Health and Long Term Care Patients with a Prior Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Warriner, AH; Outman, RC; Saag, KG; Berry, SD; Colón-Emeric, C; Flood, KL; Lyles, KW; Tanner, SB; Watts, NB; Curtis, JR

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a growing health concern as the number of senior adults continues to increase worldwide. Falls and fractures are very common among frail older adults requiring home health and long-term care. Preventative strategies for reducing falls have been identified and many therapies (both prescription and non-prescription) with proven efficacy for reducing fracture risk are available. However, many practitioners overlook the fact that a fragility fracture is diagnostic for osteoporosis even without knowledge of bone mineral density testing. As a result, osteoporosis is infrequently diagnosed and treated in the elderly after a fracture. Based on existing literature, we have developed an algorithm for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis among persons with known prior fracture(s) living in long-term care facilities or receiving home health care. PMID:19279529

  20. Implementation of a Coaching Program for School Principals: Evaluating Coaches' Strategies and the Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Jason; Preston, Courtney; Goldring, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-phase coaching model that was implemented to help principals improve their instructional leadership practices. We then discuss a rubric based on this coaching model that we used to evaluate coaches' implementation of key model phases and to identify principals' responses to the coaching. After presenting the leadership…

  1. Exploring Coaching Actions Based on Developed Values: A Case Study of a Female Hockey Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callary, Bettina; Werthner, Penny; Trudel, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    There are few empirical studies that demonstrate how values are developed and how they are linked to coaching actions. There can be a discrepancy between the statement of coaches' values and their actual coaching actions. In order to examine how coaching actions are influenced by values that are developed over a lifetime, the purpose of this…

  2. Informal Math Coaching by Instant Messaging: Two Case Studies of How University Students Coach K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Edman, Anneli; Andersson, Fredrik; Kawnine, Tanvir; Soames, Carol-Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and explore how instant messaging (IM) can be used to support informal math coaching. We have studied two projects where university students use IM to coach K-12 students in mathematics. The coaches were interviewed with a focus on how informal coaching works by examining coaching challenges, how coaching can…

  3. An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sherry L. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)], E-mail: sdixon@nchh.org; Fowler, Cecile [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Martinez, Yolanda [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Jacobs, David E. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

  4. Home Care

    MedlinePLUS

    Home Care Basic Facts & Information Role of Health Care Professionals in Home Care Your physician is the leader of an interdisciplinary ... travel to see the healthcare team. Is Home Care Right for You? Home care is especially useful ...

  5. Medicare and Medicaid Home Health and Medicaid Waiver Services for Dually Eligible Older Adults: Risk Factors for Use and Correlates of Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Fenster, Juliane R.; Judge, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to, among frail dually eligible older adults, determine risk factors for the likelihood of using Medicare home health and Medicaid home health services and to, among service users, determine correlates of Medicare home health, Medicaid home health, and Medicaid waiver service expenditures. Design and Methods:…

  6. Towards a Framework for Leadership Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Donald; Jacobo, Amber

    2010-01-01

    Today's school principals face unprecedented challenges. This article proposes a school-based outline framework in which the principal is the primary agent of change aided by an external coach. In this framework, the principal receives coaching and guides the change process at the school through a variety of coaching practices involving the…

  7. COACHE Survey Results Department of Earth Sciences,

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Computing and IT support Lab/Studio Space #12;Next Steps #12;Resources for Chairs COACHE results withCOACHE Survey Results Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Arts & Science March 7, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey · Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education · Online survey to assess faculty

  8. Analyzing Teacher Participation in Literacy Coaching Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atteberry, Allison; Bryk, Anthony S.

    2011-01-01

    Many major urban districts have committed large investments to school-based professional development anchored in the work of literacy coaches. At base is a shared belief that instructional coaches are key levers for improvement. Yet, clinical accounts of the role of an instructional coach suggest that this is a complex practice to implement well.…

  9. Psychiatric home health nursing: A new role in community mental health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fern Richie; Karen Lusky

    1987-01-01

    Psychiatric care provided in the home setting has been described in the literature for chronic schizophrenia (Pai & Nagarajaiah, 1982), crisis intervention with chronic clients presenting with dangerous behavior {Hatch & Sr 1980; West, Litwok, Oberlander & Martin, 1980; Soreff, 1985), intervention with the elderly (Hirschfeld, 1983; Wasson, Ripeckyj, Lazarus, Kupferer, Barry, & Force, 1984), and the provision of primary

  10. Getting Home Safe and Sound: Occupational Safety and Health Administration at 38

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHAct) declared that every worker is entitled to safe and healthful working conditions, and that employers are responsible for work being free from all recognized hazards. Thirty-eight years after these assurances, however, it is difficult to find anyone who believes the promise of the OSHAct has been met. The persistence of preventable, life-threatening hazards at work is a failure to keep a national promise. I review the history of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and propose measures to better ensure that those who go to work every day return home safe and sound. These measures fall into 6 areas: leverage and accountability, safety and health systems, employee rights, equal protection, framing, and infrastructure. PMID:18235060

  11. Food, home and health: the meanings of food amongst Bengali Women in London

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores the nature of food and plants and their meanings in a British Bengali urban context. It focuses on the nature of plants and food in terms of their role in home making, transnational connections, generational change and concepts of health. Methods An ethnographic approach to the research was taken, specific methods included participant observation, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. Thirty women of Bengali origin were mostly composed of “mother” and “daughter” pairs. The mothers were over 45 years old and had migrated from Bangladesh as adults and their grown-up daughters grew up in the UK. Results Food and plants play an important role in the construction of home “here” (London) while continuing to connect people to home “there” (Sylhet). This role, however, changes and is re-defined across generations. Looking at perceptions of “healthy” and “unhealthy” food, particularly in the context of Bengali food, multiple views of what constitutes “healthy” food exist. However, there appeared to be little two-way dialogue about this concept between the research participants and health professionals. This seems to be based on “cultural” and power differences that need to be addressed for a meaningful dialogue to occur. Conclusion In summary, this paper argues that while food is critical to the familial spaces of home (both locally and globally), it is defined by a complex interplay of actors and wider meanings as illustrated by concepts of health and what constitutes Bengali food. Therefore, we call for greater dialogue between health professionals and those they interact with, to allow for an enhanced appreciation of the dynamic nature of food and plants and the diverse perceptions of the role that they play in promoting health. PMID:24886061

  12. Evaluation of social problem-solving abilities in rural home health visitors and visiting nurses.

    PubMed

    Jessee, P O; Cecil, C E

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies have shown the value of using home health visitors and visiting nurses in intervention outreach programs designed to provide pre- and postnatal care for low-income women. The purpose of this study was to compare the abilities of a selected sample of professionally trained nurses and nonprofessionally trained home health visitors to suggest and prioritize solutions to a medical dilemma. Data were gathered by the use of a Practical Solutions Test and a Ranking Solutions Procedure. The subjects for the study were 77 females residing in rural counties in West Alabama. The four study groups were comprised of: (a) trained home visitors with 0 to 6 months of experience, (b) trained home visitors with more than 6 months of experience, (c) professionally trained nurses, and, (d) a control group of women with no training or experience. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The findings suggest that all of the trained groups were able to generate more solutions to a typical client medical dilemma than could the control group: F(3.76) = 11.79; p = .0001. Faced with the same medical dilemma, the nursing group was more likely to suggest medical options over socioemotional solutions than were the home visitors: chi 2(3.76) = 9.41; p = .02. The nurses also prioritized the solutions differently by ranking them in a different sequence. PMID:1287369

  13. Experiences of Nursing Personnel Using PDAs in Home Health Care Services in Norwegian Municipalities.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Linda M; Fossum, Mariann; Söderhamn, Olle; Fruhling, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Although nursing personnel have used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to support home health care services for the past ten years, little is known about their experiences. This study was conducted to examine experiences of nursing personnel using a specialized home health care computer software application called Gerica. In addition, this research analyzed how well this application aligned with the workflow of the nursing personnel in their daily care of patients. The evaluation methods included user observations and learnability testing. Nursing personnel from two different municipalities were observed while performing real tasks in natural settings. This study shows that the nursing personnel were satisfied with the PDA user interface and the Gerica software; however, they identified areas for improvement. For example, the nursing personnel were concerned about trusting the reliability of the PDA in order to eliminate the need for handwritten documentation. Solutions to meet these shortcomings for nursing managers and vendors are discussed. PMID:24199073

  14. Daily life or diagnosis? Dual perspectives on perinatal depression within maternal and child health home visiting.

    PubMed

    Price, Sarah Kye; Cohen-Filipic, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a qualitative inquiry-informing program development in a maternal and child home visiting program. Low-income women's perceptions of the meaning and experiences of depression were ascertained through focus groups and interviews. Simultaneously, the study examines staff member perceptions and roles related to depression. Specific findings from clients and staff reveal culturally situated beliefs about depression and stressful life events; comparing and contrasting these beliefs offers a novel perspective on identification and intervention for maternal depression. This study offers a foundation for a translational research agenda that will be used for program and policy development to enhance mental health services situated within maternal and child health home visiting programs. PMID:23944165

  15. Readings in Homemaker Services; Selected Papers Presenting the Background, Uses and Practices of Homemaker-Home Health Aide Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council for Homemaker-Home Health Aide Services, New York, NY.

    Prepared by the National Council for Homemaker Services for those concerned with homemaker programs, this document contains selected papers which summarize the developments of the homemaker-home health aide service. Sections are: (1) The Philosophy and Goals of Homemaker-Home Health Aide Service, with papers by Elizabeth G. Watkins and Ellen…

  16. Technology, health and the home: eHealth and the community nurse.

    PubMed

    Peate, Ian

    2013-05-01

    Twenty-first century methods of communication are changing. Technology and the way it is used has the potential to revolutionise health care. In the same way information technology (IT) has had a massive impact on commerce and industry, it is also having a substantial impact on the practice of community nurses and the ways in which care is delivered. In order for the impact of IT to be a positive one, community nurses and other health professionals will have to learn and develop a range of new skills. Nurses can and should be directing and becoming involved in the ways in which the IT revolution unfolds. Nurses working with systems development teams also need to make known their needs making clear what information the various IT systems have to contain and how these will fit in with their nursing practice. PMID:23752321

  17. A Body Sensor Network Platform for In-home Health Monitoring Application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yunfeng Wang; Lei Li; Bo Wang; Lei Wang

    2009-01-01

    A specially-designed wireless BSN (body sensor network) platform was proposed for in-home health monitoring applications. The BSN platform was composed of BSN nodes and a base-station. The BSN nodes with advantages of small size and low power consumption were attached on human body to collect physiological data, and transmit wirelessly to the base-station which served as a master node within

  18. Medicare program; home health prospective payment system; rate update for calendar year 2010. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-11-10

    This final rule sets forth an update to the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates; the national standardized 60-day episode rates, the national per-visit rates, the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factors, and the low utilization payment amount (LUPA) add-on payment amounts, under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies effective January 1, 2010. This rule also updates the wage index used under the HH PPS. In addition, this rule changes the HH PPS outlier policy, requires the submission of OASIS data as a condition for payment under the HH PPS, implements a revised Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS-C) for episodes beginning on or after January 1, 2010, and implements a Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Home Health Care Survey (HHCAHPS) affecting payment to HHAs beginning in CY 2012. Also, this rule makes payment safeguards that will improve our enrollment process, improve the quality of care that Medicare beneficiaries receive from HHAs, and reduce the Medicare program's vulnerability to fraud. This rule also adds clarifying language to the "skilled services" section and Conditions of Participation (CoP) section of our regulations. This rule also clarifies the coverage of routine medical supplies under the HH PPS. PMID:20166278

  19. Respiratory Health among Korean Pupils in Relation to Home, School and Outdoor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Elfman, Lena; Wieslander, Gunilla; Ferm, Martin; Torén, Kjell; Norbäck, Dan

    2011-01-01

    There are few studies about school-environment in relation to pupils' respiratory health, and Korean school-environment has not been characterized. All pupils in 4th grade in 12 selected schools in three urban cities in Korea received a questionnaire (n = 2,453), 96% participated. Gaseous pollutants and ultrafine particles (UFPs) were measured indoors (n = 34) and outdoors (n = 12) during winter, 2004. Indoor dampness at home was investigated by the questionnaire. To evaluate associations between respiratory health and environment, multiple logistic- and multi-level regression models were applied adjusting for potential confounders. The mean age of pupils was 10 yr and 49% were boys. No school had mechanical ventilation and CO2-levels exceeded 1,000 ppm in all except one of the classrooms. The indoor mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3 and formaldehyde were 0.6 µg/m3, 19 µg/m3, 8 µg/m3 and 28 µg/m3, respectively. The average level of UFPs was 18,230 pt/cm3 in the classrooms and 16,480 pt/cm3 outdoors. There were positive associations between wheeze and outdoor NO2, and between current asthma and outdoor UFPs. With dampness at home, pupils had more wheeze. In conclusion, outdoor UFPs and even low levels of NO2 may adversely contribute to respiratory health in children. High CO2-levels in classrooms and indoor dampness/mold at home should be reduced. PMID:21286005

  20. The Policy Implications of the Cost Structure of Home Health Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Mukamel, Dana B; Fortinsky, Richard H; White, Alan; Harrington, Charlene; White, Laura M; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the cost structure of home health agencies by estimating an empirical cost function for those that are Medicare-certified, ten years following the implementation of prospective payment. Design and Methods 2010 national Medicare cost report data for certified home health agencies were merged with case-mix information from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS). We estimated a fully interacted (by tax status) hybrid cost function for 7,064 agencies and calculated marginal costs as percent of total costs for all variables. Results The home health industry is dominated by for-profit agencies, which tend to be newer than the non-profit agencies and to have higher average costs per patient but lower costs per visit. For-profit agencies tend to have smaller scale operations and different cost structures, and are less likely to be affiliated with chains. Our estimates suggest diseconomies of scale, zero marginal cost for contracting with therapy workers, and a positive marginal cost for contracting with nurses, when controlling for quality. Implications Our findings suggest that efficiencies may be achieved by promoting non-profit, smaller agencies, with fewer contract nursing staff. This conclusion should be tested further in future studies that address some of the limitations of our study. PMID:24949224

  1. The home health care routing and scheduling problem with interdependent services.

    PubMed

    Mankowska, Dorota Slawa; Meisel, Frank; Bierwirth, Christian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a model for the daily planning of health care services carried out at patients' homes by staff members of a home care company. The planning takes into account individual service requirements of the patients, individual qualifications of the staff and possible interdependencies between different service operations. Interdependencies of services can include, for example, a temporal separation of two services as is required if drugs have to be administered a certain time before providing a meal. Other services like handling a disabled patient may require two staff members working together at a patient's home. The time preferences of patients are included in terms of given time windows. In this paper, we propose a planning approach for the described problem, which can be used for optimizing economical and service oriented measures of performance. A mathematical model formulation is proposed together with a powerful heuristic based on a sophisticated solution representation. PMID:23780750

  2. Variables affecting athletes' retention of coaches' feedback.

    PubMed

    Januįrio, Nuno M S; Rosado, Antonio F; Mesquita, Isabel

    2013-10-01

    Athletes' retention of information conveyed in coaches' feedback during training was examined, considering the nature of the information transmitted by each coach (extensions, total number of ideas transmitted, and total number of repeated ideas), athletes' characteristics, (ages, genders, school levels, and practice levels), and athletes' perceptions (relevance and acceptance of coaches' information, task motivational levels, and athletes' attention levels). Participants were 193 athletes (79 boys, 114 girls; 9 to 13 years of age) and 6 coaches. Feedback was both audio and video recorded and all athletes were interviewed. All coaches' feedback and athletes' recollections were subjected to content analysis. Information was completely retained in 31.60% of feedback episodes. Athletes' mean per-episode information retention was 63.0%. Three variables appeared to b e predictiveathletes' retention: athletes' practice levels (p = -.25), attention to coaches' provision of feedback (P = .17), and the number of different ideas transmitted by each coach (P = -.90). PMID:24611244

  3. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot’s model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia’s five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer.

  4. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  5. Coaching for the PISA Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Martin; Artelt, Cordula; Krauss, Steffan; Baumert, Jurgen

    2007-01-01

    Coaching is known to improve student performance on tests with high personal relevance ("high-stakes tests"). We investigate whether the same holds for a test that has no personal relevance for the students taking it ("low-stakes test"). More specifically, we explore whether student performance on the reading and mathematics assessments of the…

  6. Bodies Matter in Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasudevan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Reading the implicit invitation in new literacies scholarship to reimagine pedagogy that leans into the lives of youth, Vasudevan reminds readers how the teacher's body is central to the meaning making of students in literacy classrooms. She extends this notion of embodiment to the work of the literacy coach and reiterates Skinner, Hagood,…

  7. How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Janet; McKinlay, Eileen; Keeling, Sally; Levack, William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of family carers who manage technical health procedures at home and describe their learning process. Design A qualitative study using grounded theory. Participants New Zealand family carers (21 women, 5 men) who managed technical health procedures such as enteral feeding, peritoneal dialysis, tracheostomy care, a central venous line or urinary catheter. In addition, 15 health professionals involved in teaching carers were interviewed. Methods Semistructured interviews were coded soon after completion and preliminary analysis influenced subsequent interviews. Additional data were compared with existing material and as analysis proceeded, initial codes were grouped into higher order concepts until a core concept was described. Interviewing continued until no new ideas emerged and concepts were well defined. Results The response of carers to the role of managing technical health procedures in the home is presented in terms of five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These dispositions were not static and carers commonly changed between them. Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a ‘technical’ solution; practical management; and an emotional response. Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient. It may also be driven by a lack of alternatives. Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it. Carers need adequate support to avoid becoming overwhelmed, and there are times when it is appropriate to encourage them to relinquish care for the sake of their own needs. Conclusions The concept of embracing care encourages health professionals to extend their attention beyond simply the practical aspects of technical procedures to assessing and addressing carers’ emotional and behavioural responses to health technology during the training process. PMID:26150143

  8. Does Playing Experience Improve Coaching? An Exploratory Study of Perceptual-Cognitive Skill in Soccer Coaches

    PubMed Central

    Gründel, Anna; Schorer, Jörg; Strauss, Bernd; Baker, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In many sports, it is common for top coaching positions to be held by former players; however, despite the natural progression in many sports for skilled players to become high level coaches, we have little understanding of how playing may develop useful skills for coaching. In this study we considered perceptual-cognitive skill across groups of high and low-skilled soccer players and soccer coaches. A range of perceptual-cognitive variables was measured in an attempt to capture the diverse skills related to expertise in sport and coaching. Generally, results highlighted similarities between coaches and players on some tasks and differences on others. PMID:23518523

  9. Home care delivery through the mobile telecommunications platform: the Citizen Health System (CHS) perspective.

    PubMed

    Maglaveras, N; Koutkias, V; Chouvarda, I; Goulis, D G; Avramides, A; Adamidis, D; Louridas, G; Balas, E A

    2002-12-18

    Health delivery practices are shifting towards home care. The reasons are the better possibilities for managing chronic care, controlling health delivery costs, increasing quality of life and quality of health services and the distinct possibility of predicting and thus avoiding serious complications. For the above goals to become routine, new telemedicine and information technology (IT) solutions need to be implemented and integrated in the health delivery scene, and these solutions need to be assessed through evidence-based medicine in order to provide solid proof for their usefulness. Thus, the concept of contact or call centers has emerged as a new and viable reality in the field of IT for health and telemedicine. In this paper we describe a generic contact center that was designed in the context of an EU funded IST for health project with acronym Citizen Health System (CHS). Since the generic contact center is composed by a number of modules, we shall concentrate in the modules dealing with the communication between the patient and the contact center using mobile telecommunications solutions, which can act as link between the internet and the classical computer telephony communication means. We further elaborate on the development tools of such solutions, the interface problems we face, and on the means to convey information from and to the patient in an efficient and medically acceptable way. This application proves the usefulness of wireless technology in providing health care services all around the clock and everywhere the citizen is located, it proves the necessity for restructuring the medical knowledge for education delivery to the patient, and it shows the virtue of interactivity by means of using the limited, yet useful browsing capabilities of the wireless application protocol (WAP) technology. PMID:12467795

  10. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  11. Reasons rural Laotians choose home deliveries over delivery at health facilities: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality among poor rural women in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is among the highest in Southeast Asia, in part because only 15% give birth at health facilities. This study explored why women and their families prefer home deliveries to deliveries at health facilities. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from December 2008 to February 2009 in two provinces of Lao PDR. Data was collected through eight focus group discussions (FGD) as well as through in-depth interviews with 12 mothers who delivered at home during the last year, eight husbands and eight grandmothers, involving a total of 71 respondents. Content analysis was used to analyze the FGD and interview transcripts. Results Obstacles to giving birth at health facilities included: (1) Distance to the health facilities and difficulties and costs of getting there; (2) Attitudes, quality of care, and care practices at the health facilities, including a horizontal birth position, episiotomies, lack of privacy, and the presence of male staff; (3) The wish to have family members nearby and the need for women to be close to their other children and the housework; and (4) The wish to follow traditional birth practices such as giving birth in a squatting position and lying on a “hot bed” after delivery. The decision about where to give birth was commonly made by the woman’s husband, mother, mother-in-law or other relatives in consultation with the woman herself. Conclusion This study suggests that the preference in rural Laos for giving birth at home is due to convenience, cost, comfort and tradition. In order to assure safer births and reduce rural Lao PDR’s high maternal mortality rate, health centers could consider accommodating the wishes and traditional practices of many rural Laotians: allowing family in the birthing rooms; allowing traditional practices; and improving attitudes among staff. Traditional birth attendants, women, and their families could be taught and encouraged to recognize the signs of at-risk pregnancies so as to be able to reach health facilities on time. PMID:22925107

  12. Reading Coach Quality: Findings from Florida Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Julie A.; McCombs, Jennifer Sloan; Martorell, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on a statewide study of Florida middle-school reading coaches, this article examines what constitutes, contributes to, and is associated with high-quality coaches and coaching. Authors find that coaches generally held many of the qualifications recommended by state and national experts and principals and teachers rated their coaches highly…

  13. Case Study: eCoaching in a Corporate Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri L. C.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative particularistic case study was an exploration and evaluation of an online, asynchronous, non-human coaching system called an "eCoaching system." Developed by the researcher, the eCoaching system combined performance coaching with the latest technologies in eLearning. The coaching was based on the appreciative inquiry approach, and…

  14. Implementing the IT Infrastructure for Health Reform: Adoption of Health IT among Patient-Centered Medical Home Practices

    PubMed Central

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Cohen, Genna R.

    2013-01-01

    While health IT is thought to be critical to the success of new models of care delivery, we know little about the extent to which those pursuing these models are relying on HIT. We studied a large patient-centered medical home (PCMH) demonstration project, a new model of care delivery that has received substantial policy attention, in order to assess which types of HIT were most widely used, and how adoption rates changed over time as PCMH practices matured. We found that clinically-focused HIT tools were both widely adopted, and increasingly adopted, in PCMH practices compared to non-PCMH practices. In contrast, HIT that supports patient-engagement, patient portals and personal health records, was neither in widespread use nor more likely to be adopted over time by PCMH practices compared to other practices. This suggests that these tools may not yet support the types of patient engagement and interactions that PCMH practices seek. PMID:24551318

  15. A Water-Damaged Home and Health of Occupants: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R.; Kilburn, Kaye H.; Dennis, Donald P.; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings. PMID:22220187

  16. A water-damaged home and health of occupants: a case study.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R; Kilburn, Kaye H; Dennis, Donald P; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings. PMID:22220187

  17. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePLUS

    Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed dramatically over the past several decades. These changes ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  18. Health Care Savings with the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Community Care of North Carolina's Experience

    PubMed Central

    DuBard, C. Annette; Ritter, Grant A.; Jackson, Carlos T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the financial impact of integrating a systemic care management intervention program (Community Care of North Carolina) with person-centered medical homes throughout North Carolina for non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities during almost 5 years of program history. It examined Medicaid claims for 169,676 non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities from January 2007 through third quarter 2011. Two models were used to estimate the program's impact on cost, within each year. The first employed a mixed model comparing member experiences in enrolled versus unenrolled months, accounting for regional differences as fixed effects and within physician group experience as random effects. The second was a pre-post, intervention/comparison group, difference-in-differences mixed model, which directly matched cohort samples of enrolled and unenrolled members on strata of preenrollment pharmacy use, race, age, year, months in pre-post periods, health status, and behavioral health history. The study team found significant cost avoidance associated with program enrollment for the non-elderly disabled population after the first years, savings that increased with length of time in the program. The impact of the program was greater in persons with multiple chronic disease conditions. By providing targeted care management interventions, aligned with person-centered medical homes, the Community Care of North Carolina program achieved significant savings for a high-risk population in the North Carolina Medicaid program. (Population Health Management 2013;17:141–148) PMID:24053757

  19. Home and community care services: a major opportunity for preventive health care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Australia, the Home and Community Care (HACC) program provides services in the community to frail elderly living at home and their carers. Surprisingly little is known about the health of people who use these services. In this study we sought to describe health-related factors associated with use of HACC services, and to identify potential opportunities for targeting preventive services to those at high risk. Methods We obtained questionnaire data from the 45 and Up Study for 103,041 men and women aged 45 years and over, sampled from the general population of New South Wales, Australia in 2006-2007, and linked this with administrative data about HACC service use. We compared the characteristics of HACC clients and non-clients according to a range of variables from the 45 and Up Study questionnaire, and estimated crude and adjusted relative risks for HACC use with generalized linear models. Results 4,978 (4.8%) participants used HACC services in the year prior to completing the questionnaire. Increasing age, female sex, lower pre-tax household income, not having a partner, not being in paid work, Indigenous background and living in a regional or remote location were strongly associated with HACC use. Overseas-born people and those speaking languages other than English at home were significantly less likely to use HACC services. People who were underweight, obese, sedentary, who reported falling in the past year, who were current smokers, or who ate little fruit or vegetables were significantly more likely to use HACC services. HACC service use increased with decreasing levels of physical functioning, higher levels of psychological distress, and poorer self-ratings of health, eyesight and memory. HACC clients were more likely to report chronic health conditions, in particular diabetes, stroke, Parkinson's disease, anxiety and depression, cancer, heart attack or angina, blood clotting problems, asthma and osteoarthritis. Conclusions HACC clients have high rates of modifiable lifestyle risk factors and health conditions that are amenable to primary and secondary prevention, presenting the potential for implementing preventive health care programs in the HACC service setting. PMID:20492704

  20. Home care for ventilator-assisted children: implications for the children, their families, and health policy.

    PubMed

    Aday, L A; Wegener, D H

    1988-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national study of home care programs for ventilator-assisted children conducted between 1984 and 1987 by the Center for Health Administration Studies at The University of Chicago. These findings point to the issues that need to be addressed in the development of policies surrounding both the delivery and the financing of services for these children and their families: (a) ventilator-assisted children are a widely varying group with diverse needs; (b) most families report that though they are glad to bring their child home, many difficult adjustments are required to do so; (c) full-time nursing care offers support to families but also intrudes on their privacy; (d) both families and children need social and psychological support once the child is home; (e) the needs of the child and the family may change over time; and (f) the financial burden of having a child on a ventilator at home can be a big stress on the family. PMID:10290557

  1. Supervised classification of Activities of Daily Living in Health Smart Homes using SVM.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Anthony; Noury, Norbert; Vacher, Michel

    2009-01-01

    By 2050, about a third of the French population will be over 65. To face this modification of the population, the current studies of our laboratory focus on the monitoring of elderly people at home. This aims at detect, as early as possible, a loss of autonomy by objectivizing criterions such as the international ADL or the French AGGIR scales implementing automatic classification of the different Activities of Daily Living. A Health Smart Home is used to achieve this goal. This flat includes different sensors. The data from the various sensors were used to classify each temporal frame into one of the activities of daily living that has been previously learnt (seven activities: hygiene, toilets, eating, resting, sleeping, communication and dressing/undressing). This is done using Support Vector Machines. We performed an experimentation with 13 young and healthy subjects to learn the model of activities and then we tested the classification algorithm (cross-validation) on real data. PMID:19965259

  2. Effects of coach leadership and coach-athlete relationship on collective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hampson, R; Jowett, S

    2014-04-01

    The study examined the independent and combined effects of coach leadership and coaching relationships on team efficacy. A total of 150 sport performers from football teams across a range of competitive levels completed a multisection self-report instrument to assess their individual perceptions of the level of collective efficacy, the type of coach leadership, and the quality of the coach-athlete relationship. Multiple regression analyses revealed that perceptions of both coach leadership and the coach-athlete relationship predicted variance in team efficacy. Overall, the findings suggest that the quality of coach-athlete relationships added to the prediction of individuals' collective efficacy beyond what was predicted by coaches' behaviors of leadership alone. Limitations and future research directions are discussed. PMID:22966768

  3. 77 FR 72904 - In the Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ...Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc., House of Taylor Jewelry, Inc. (n/ k/a Global Jewelry Concepts, Inc...and accurate information concerning the securities of House of Taylor Jewelry, Inc. (n/k/a Global Jewelry Concepts,...

  4. Helping families raise children with special health care needs at home.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chris Plauché; Kastner, Theodore A

    2005-02-01

    One goal of Healthy People 2010 is to reduce the number of people with disabilities in congregate care facilities, consistent with permanency-planning principles, to 0 by 2010 for persons aged 21 years and under (objective 6-7). Congregate care, in this regard, is defined as any setting in which 4 or more persons with disabilities reside, regardless of whether the residence is located in the community, such as a school, group home, nursing facility, or institution. Although this particular public health objective may reflect an unfamiliar concept for some pediatricians, the American Academy of Pediatrics supports the goals and objectives of Healthy People 2010 as well as the medical home and the provision of community-based, culturally effective, coordinated, and comprehensive care for children with special health care needs and their families. To advise families caring for children with special health care needs effectively, the pediatrician should be familiar with the principles of permanency planning and well informed of local family-support services. The pediatrician should also work with the family to identify the range of long-term supports and services available for their child. These supports may include respite for biological families as well as various additional parenting models such as shared parenting, foster care, alternate parents, and adoption. Although family-based supports are preferable, families may consider other out-of-home placements including group homes, placement in a nursing facility, or other forms of institutional care when sufficient family-based services are not available. Once all the options are understood, issues regarding quality of care can be individualized and judged by the parent or guardian, in close collaboration with the pediatrician and other professionals with expertise in permanency planning and long-term supports and services. The purpose of this clinical report is to educate physicians on the philosophy of providing a permanent family environment (permanency planning) for all children, including those with special health care needs, and the importance of adequate and accessible community services to support and maintain the well-being of all family members. PMID:15687462

  5. Handball Coaches’ Perceptions About the Value of Working Competences According to Their Coaching Background

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Isabel; Borges, Mario; Rosado, Antonio; Souza, Adriano De

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value attributed to given working competences, by Portuguese handball coaches according to their coaching background, certification level, coaching experience, and level of education. A sample of 207 handball coaches responded to a questionnaire which included demographic characteristics and a scale focused on perceptions of the level of importance attributed to working competences. Data analysis included an exploratory factorial analysis applying Maximum Likelihood Factoring (MLF) and Oblimin rotation. These factors were submitted to a One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc multiple comparisons to analyse coaches’ perceptions according to their coaching background. A six factor solution was found where three major domains of competences were highlighted; the first one related to training and competition (e.g. planning and conducting the training, team administration in competition, annual and multi-annual planning, and coaching methodology); the second one related to social and cultural issues and management (e.g. implementation of youth sport development projects, team leadership and coach education) and the third one related to the cognitive background (meta-cognitive competences). The importance ascribed to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level. Highly experienced and qualified coaches perceived competences of everyday practice, social, cultural and management issues related to training and competition as more important than the other coaches. This study suggests the need to consider some working competences, until now not explicitly present in the Portuguese coaching education curriculum which could enable coaches to choose the best way to practice/work in a manner that will foster and support their professional development. Key points Three major domains of competences were highlighted by Portuguese handball coaches. The first one related to training and competition, the second one related to social and cultural issues and management and the third one related to the cognitive background. The importance ascribed by Portuguese handball coaches to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level, as high experienced coaches and coaches with higher certification levels perceived competences related to training and competition of the everyday practice and social, cultural issues and management as more important. The value attributed by Portuguese handball coaches to working competences did not vary according to the coaches’ academic education level. Portuguese handball coaches valued the meta-cognitive competences, the competences to implement sport development project and related to annual and multi-annual planning independently of their coaching background. PMID:24149314

  6. MyCoach: In Situ User Evaluation of a Virtual and Physical Coach for Running

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margit Biemans; Timber Haaker; Ellen Szwajcer

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Running is an enjoyable exercise for many people today. Trainers help people to reach running goals. However, today’s busy\\u000a and nomadic people are not always able to attend running classes. A combination of a virtual and physical coach should be\\u000a useful. A virtual coach (MyCoach) was designed to provide this support. MyCoach consists of a mobile phone (real time) and

  7. Coaching Soccer Effectively. The American Coaching Effectiveness Program. Level 1 Soccer Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Christopher A.; Davis, Michael S.

    This handbook presents practical advice for the soccer coach. The first section contains an explanation of soccer and how to teach individual offensive and defensive skills. The coaching points, teaching progressions, illustrations, and practice activities are designed to help the coach understand and plan how to teach and develop those skills.…

  8. The Coach-of-Coaches Model for Preparing Rural Special Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegelka, Patricia Thomas; Fitch, Suzanne; Alvarado, Jose Luis

    San Diego State University (California) has developed a coach-of-coaches model of providing support, assistance, and supervision to intern-teachers in its rural special education alternative credential program. Coaches, who are fully credentialed teachers with supervisory skills, make a minimum of nine direct and indirect (video analysis)…

  9. The Art and Practice of Leadership Coaching: 50 Top Executive Coaches Reveal Their Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Howard, Ed.; Harkins, Phil, Ed.; Goldsmith, Marshall, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Leadership coaching has become vitally important to today's most successful businesses. This book is a landmark resource that presents a variety of perspectives and best practices from today's top executive coaches. It provides valuable guidance on exactly what the best coaches are now doing to get the most out of leaders, for now and into the…

  10. Home mechanical ventilation and specialised health care in the community: Between a rock and a hard place

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Knut Dybwik; Erik W Nielsen; Berit S Brinchmann

    2011-01-01

    Background  Home mechanical ventilation probably represents the most advanced and complicated type of medical treatment provisioned outside\\u000a a hospital setting. The aim of this study was both to explore the challenges experienced by health care professionals in community\\u000a health care services when caring for patients dependent on home mechanical ventilation, continual care and highly advanced\\u000a technology, and their proposed solutions to

  11. Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common and costly chronic musculoskeletal conditions world-wide and is associated with substantial pain and disability. Many people with knee OA also experience co-morbidities that further add to the OA burden. Uptake of and adherence to physical activity recommendations is suboptimal in this patient population, leading to poorer OA outcomes and greater impact of associated co-morbidities. This pragmatic randomised controlled trial will investigate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of adding telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention for people with knee OA. Methods/Design 168 people with clinically diagnosed knee OA will be recruited from the community in metropolitan and regional areas and randomly allocated to physiotherapy only, or physiotherapy plus nurse-delivered telephone coaching. Physiotherapy involves five treatment sessions over 6 months, incorporating a home exercise program of 4–6 exercises (targeting knee extensor and hip abductor strength) and advice to increase daily physical activity. Telephone coaching comprises 6–12 telephone calls over 6 months by health practitioners trained in applying the Health Change Australia (HCA) Model of Health Change to provide behaviour change support. The telephone coaching intervention aims to maximise adherence to the physiotherapy program, as well as facilitate increased levels of participation in general physical activity. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include physical activity levels, quality-of-life, and potential moderators and mediators of outcomes including self-efficacy, pain coping and depression. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow-up assessments will also occur at 12 and 18 months. Discussion The findings will help determine whether the addition of telephone coaching sessions can improve sustainability of outcomes from a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention in people with knee OA. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12612000308897 PMID:23231928

  12. Designing the Home to Meet the Needs of Tomorrow … Today: Smart technology, health and well-being

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Dewsbury

    This paper considers the role of smart home technology in relation to current housing design principles within the field of health and well being. The concepts of barrier free 'lifetime homes' and universal design1 are considered and UK community care and Building Regulations are investigated in relation to the design process. It is contended that the current role of assistive

  13. Newborn care practices at home and in health facilities in 4 regions of Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethiopia is one of the ten countries with the highest number of neonatal deaths globally, and only 1 in 10 women deliver with a skilled attendant. Promotion of essential newborn care practices is one strategy for improving newborn health outcomes that can be delivered in communities as well as facilities. This article describes newborn care practices reported by recently-delivered women (RDWs) in four regions of Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a household survey with two-stage cluster sampling to assess newborn care practices among women who delivered a live baby in the period 1 to 7 months prior to data collection. Results The majority of women made one antenatal care (ANC) visit to a health facility, although less than half made four or more visits and women were most likely to deliver their babies at home. About one-fifth of RDWs in this survey had contact with Health Extension Workers (HEWS) during ANC, but nurse/midwives were the most common providers, and few women had postnatal contact with any health provider. Common beneficial newborn care practices included exclusive breastfeeding (87.6%), wrapping the baby before delivery of the placenta (82.3%), and dry cord care (65.2%). Practices contrary to WHO recommendations that were reported in this population of recent mothers include bathing during the first 24 hours of life (74.7%), application of butter and other substances to the cord (19.9%), and discarding of colostrum milk (44.5%). The results suggest that there are not large differences for most essential newborn care indicators between facility and home deliveries, with the exception of delayed bathing and skin-to-skin care. Conclusions Improving newborn care and newborn health outcomes in Ethiopia will likely require a multifaceted approach. Given low facility delivery rates, community-based promotion of preventive newborn care practices, which has been effective in other settings, is an important strategy. For this strategy to be successful, the coverage of counseling delivered by HEWs and other community volunteers should be increased. PMID:24289501

  14. Indoor fungal contamination: health risks and measurement methods in hospitals, homes and workplaces.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Delphine; Le Cann, Pierre; Reboux, Gabriel; Millon, Laurence; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Indoor fungal contamination has been associated with a wide range of adverse health effects, including infectious diseases, toxic effects and allergies. The diversity of fungi contributes to the complex role that they play in indoor environments and human diseases. Molds have a major impact on public health, and can cause different consequences in hospitals, homes and workplaces. This review presents the methods used to assess fungal contamination in these various environments, and discusses advantages and disadvantages for each method in consideration with different health risks. Air, dust and surface sampling strategies are compared, as well as the limits of various methods are used to detect and quantify fungal particles and fungal compounds. In addition to conventional microscopic and culture approaches, more recent chemical, immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods are described. This article also identifies common needs for future multidisciplinary research and development projects in this field, with specific interests on viable fungi and fungal fragment detections. The determination of fungal load and the detection of species in environmental samples greatly depend on the strategy of sampling and analysis. Quantitative PCR was found useful to identify associations between specific fungi and common diseases. The next-generation sequencing methods may afford new perspectives in this area. PMID:23586944

  15. Pre-Travel Health Care of Immigrants Returning Home to Visit Friends and Relatives

    PubMed Central

    LaRocque, Regina C.; Deshpande, Bhushan R.; Rao, Sowmya R.; Brunette, Gary W.; Sotir, Mark J.; Jentes, Emily S.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Immigrants returning home to visit friends and relatives (VFR travelers) are at higher risk of travel-associated illness than other international travelers. We evaluated 3,707 VFR and 17,507 non-VFR travelers seen for pre-travel consultation in Global TravEpiNet during 2009–2011; all were traveling to resource-poor destinations. VFR travelers more commonly visited urban destinations than non-VFR travelers (42% versus 30%, P < 0.0001); 54% of VFR travelers were female, and 18% of VFR travelers were under 6 years old. VFR travelers sought health advice closer to their departure than non-VFR travelers (median days before departure was 17 versus 26, P < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, being a VFR traveler was an independent predictor of declining a recommended vaccine. Missed opportunities for vaccination could be addressed by improving the timing of pre-travel health care and increasing the acceptance of vaccines. Making pre-travel health care available in primary care settings may be one step to this goal. PMID:23149585

  16. Bargaining with patriarchy: former female coaches' experiences and their decision to leave collegiate coaching.

    PubMed

    Kamphoff, Cindra S

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the experiences of former female coaches and their decision to terminate their careers. A feminist perspective and mixed-methods (surveys and interviews) were used to allow for a richer understanding of their experiences. The survey findings, which included 121 former female coaches, suggest that time and family commitments were the main reasons they left coaching. Also, a small number (18%) left coaching for reasons such as opportunity for promotion. Six women from the survey sample were individually interviewed. Through a descriptive analytic strategy and indexing process (Creswell, 1998), three general themes emerged: (a) gender disparities in women's work, (b) technical demands of coaching, and (c) college coaching and normalized sexualities. Overall, the interview findings confirmed the open-ended responses on the survey and described gender discrimination, the centrality of male coaches, and rampant homophobia in U.S. collegiate coaching. In addition, some female coaches discussed perceptions of conflict between working as a coach and motherhood, or women with children as being "distracted" by motherhood. Collectively, the survey and interview results revealed that women have multiple, complex, and overlapping reasons for leaving collegiate coaching. PMID:20949856

  17. Limited english proficiency, primary language at home, and disparities in children's health care: how language barriers are measured matters.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Glenn; Abreu, Milagros; Tomany-Korman, Sandra C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 3.5 million U.S. schoolchildren are limited in English proficiency (LEP). Disparities in children's health and health care are associated with both LEP and speaking a language other than English at home, but prior research has not examined which of these two measures of language barriers is most useful in examining health care disparities. OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to compare primary language spoken at home vs. parental LEP and their associations with health status, access to care, and use of health services in children. METHODS: We surveyed parents at urban community sites in Boston, asking 74 questions on children's health status, access to health care, and use of health services. RESULTS: Some 98% of the 1,100 participating children and families were of non-white race/ethnicity, 72% of parents were LEP, and 13 different primary languages were spoken at home. "Dose-response" relationships were observed between parental English proficiency and several child and parental sociodemographic features, including children's insurance coverage, parental educational attainment, citizenship and employment, and family income. Similar "dose-response" relationships were noted between the primary language spoken at home and many but not all of the same sociodemographic features. In multivariate analyses, LEP parents were associated with triple the odds of a child having fair/poor health status, double the odds of the child spending at least one day in bed for illness in the past year, and significantly greater odds of children not being brought in for needed medical care for six of nine access barriers to care. None of these findings were observed in analyses of the primary language spoken at home. Individual parental LEP categories were associated with different risks of adverse health status and outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Parental LEP is superior to the primary language spoken at home as a measure of the impact of language barriers on children's health and health care. Individual parental LEP categories are associated with different risks of adverse outcomes in children's health and health care. Consistent data collection on parental English proficiency and referral of LEP parents to English classes by pediatric providers have the potential to contribute toward reduction and elimination of health care disparities for children of LEP parents. PMID:16025722

  18. Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Blacks in Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Fitzgerald

    2004-01-01

    During the 2003 football season, African Americans were employed as head coaches at five of the 117 NCAA Division I-A colleges and universities. At the conclusion of the 2003 season, there were 13 head coaching vacancies at Division I-A football programs; one African American was hired. Today, five African Americans have the responsibility of…

  19. Instructional Coaches Make Progress through Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Teachers don't resist change, the author suggests, they resist programs that call for change without support. This Topeka, Kan., program added full-time instructional coaches to middle schools and found that teachers, with the coaches' support and time, adopted new practices that affected student learning.

  20. Coaching Behaviors To Create a Positive Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillwell, Belinda E.

    2002-01-01

    Coaching behaviors can be modified to improve the coach-athlete relationship. Systematic observation can provide positive feedback to athletes/physical education students. Seven steps in the process of systematic observation include deciding what behaviors to observe, defining those behaviors, selecting appropriate coding techniques, determining…

  1. New Principal Coaching as a Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celoria, Davide; Roberson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    This study examines new principal coaching as an induction process and explores the emotional dimensions of educational leadership. Twelve principal coaches and new principals--six of each--participated in this qualitative study that employed emergent coding (Creswell, 2008; Denzin, 2005; Glaser & Strauss, 1998; Spradley, 1979). The major…

  2. "Safeguarding" Sports Coaching: Foucault, Genealogy and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a genealogical account of safeguarding in sport. Drawing specifically on Foucault's work, it examines the "politics of touch" in relation to the social and historical formation of child protection policy in sports coaching. While the analysis has some resonance with the context of coaching as a whole, for…

  3. Coaches' Contracts Are Fertile Ground for Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby; Fain, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Billy Gillispie, like many college basketball coaches, was hired--and fired--in a hurry. But the contract negotiations that dragged on for nearly two years while he coached the University of Kentucky's men's basketball team showed little of the same urgency that defined his entrance and exit. Mr. Gillispie worked for Kentucky under a memorandum of…

  4. COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Art & Science

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Art & Science March 19, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey · Collaborative;Highlights · Overall Satisfaction · Autonomy · Departmental Culture · Areas for Improvement #12;Overall=80 Humanities n=103 Phys Sci n=52 Bio Sci n=27 A&S n=299 #12;Autonomy #12;Arts & Science: 95.3% #12

  5. COACHE Survey Results UTFA Council Presentation

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    COACHE Survey Results UTFA Council Presentation February 25, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey ­ Bloomington ­ State University of New York ­ Stony Brook #12;Overview Overall Satisfaction Autonomy PEER MEAN #12;Autonomy #12;4.51 TOP PEER MEAN #12;4.53 TOP PEER MEAN #12;Compensation #12;3.31 TOP MEAN

  6. Leadership Development Using Online Group Executive Coaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard L. Brookes

    2009-01-01

    Leadership development initiatives in work settings or in executive MBA programs can use online technology to make executive coaching available to a large number of managers. Previously, the integration of classroom training and challenging work assignments into expanded leadership capability has been facilitated by individual executive coaching or mentoring. This limited the number of potential participants who could access these

  7. Enhancing "OJT" Internships with Interactive Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoho, Alan R.; Barnett, Bruce G.; Martinez, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to examine how the best type of internship, i.e., the full-time, job-embedded model can be enhanced using coaching. Before illustrating an exemplary internship program with coaching, this paper describes what an exemplary full-time, job-embedded internship experiences looks like and expounds on the importance of…

  8. Integral Leadership Coaching: A Partner in Sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lloyd Raines

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the shifting and expanding role of leadership and leadership coaching for the early part of the 21st century. With increasing instabilities from global trends and environmental factors like global warming, leaders (and the coaches who serve them) are challenged with designing strategies that are more integrated in terms of social, environmental, and economic goals. Drawing on the

  9. Al Roy: The First Modern Strength Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Terry

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a historical perspective through the story of Alvin Roy, the first modern strength coach. Roy went against the common belief in the 1950s that weight lifting made athletes slow and bulky. When the football coaches at Istrouma High School in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, allowed him to set up and supervise a weight-training program,…

  10. Literacy Coaching: Coming Out of the Corner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buly, Marsha Riddle; Coskie, Tracy; Robinson, LeAnne; Egawa, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    Being a literacy coach is demanding and can meet with resistance and challenge when a clear understanding of the job's purpose, approach, and need for ongoing support are not clearly defined and understood by all parties. Ideally, a literacy coach listens and observes, then asks just the right questions to help a classroom teacher or inexperienced…

  11. Exploring Biographical Learning in Elite Soccer Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Qualified and skilled sport coaches are vital to the development of sport in general and of elite sport in particular. Research suggests that the development of coaching expertise in elite sport is a complex matter involving mediated, unmediated and internal learning situations. However, it is less clear to what extent and in which ways these…

  12. SearchHome Video News Images Health Education Topics Blogs Mobile Space Science Technology Health General Sci-Fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Education Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity

    E-print Network

    Nieh, James

    SearchHome Video News Images Health Education Topics Blogs Mobile Space Science Technology Health Intruders That A Food Source Will Be Defended July 8, 2014 5 Image Credit: matsilvan/Thinkstock.com [ Watch? This is the situation bees find themselves in quite often. Scientists believe that many animals, faced

  13. Health Care Disparities and Language Use at Home among Latino, Asian American, and American Indian Adolescents: Findings from the California Health Interview Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Lahiff, Maureen; Barreto, Rose M.; Shin, Sunny; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Using the 2001 California Health Interview Survey, this study compared health status, medical insurance, and having a usual source of care for 2,230 ethnic minority adolescents based on language use at home: Group 1, English only; Group 2, both English and another language; and Group 3, exclusively another language. Adjusting for demographic…

  14. Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

  15. Innovation in Diabetes Care: Improving Consumption of Healthy Food Through a “Chef Coaching” Program: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J.; Pojednic, Rachele M.; Phillips, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation. PMID:25568831

  16. Innovation in diabetes care: improving consumption of healthy food through a "chef coaching" program: a case report.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J; Pojednic, Rachele M; Phillips, Edward M

    2014-11-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation. PMID:25568831

  17. Incorporating INTERACT II Clinical Decision Support Tools into Nursing Home Health Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Handler, Steven M.; Sharkey, Siobhan S.; Hudak, Sandra; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    A substantial reduction in hospitalization rates has been associated with the implementation of the Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) quality improvement intervention using the accompanying paper-based clinical practice tools (INTERACT II). There is significant potential to further increase the impact of INTERACT by integrating INTERACT II tools into nursing home (NH) health information technology (HIT) via standalone or integrated clinical decision support (CDS) systems. This article highlights the process of translating INTERACT II tools from paper to NH HIT. The authors believe that widespread dissemination and integration of INTERACT II CDS tools into various NH HIT products could lead to sustainable improvement in resident and clinician process and outcome measures, including enhanced interclinician communication and a reduction in potentially avoidable hospitalizations. PMID:22267955

  18. Secure, obligated and coordinated collaboration in health care for the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Berhe, Solomon; Demurjian, Steve; Saripalle, Rishi; Agresta, Thomas; Liu, Jing; Cusano, Antonio; Fequiere, Andal; Gedarovich, Jim

    2010-01-01

    In the patient-centered medical home, PCMH, patient care is overseen by a primary care physician leading a team of health care providers, who collaborate to optimize treatment. To facilitate interactions in PCMH, secure collaboration will be needed to: control access to information; dictate who can do what when; and promote sharing and concurrent access. This contrasts approaches such as the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) role-based access control (RBAC), where the emphasis is on controlling access and separating responsibilities. This paper investigates secure collaboration within an application such as PCMH, through: a futuristic scenario for patient care; proposed collaboration extensions to the NIST RBAC standard with a fine-grained obligated mechanism and workflow; and a prototype of PCMH via the Google Wave real-time collaboration platform. PMID:21346936

  19. Secure, Obligated and Coordinated Collaboration in Health Care for the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Berhe, Solomon; Demurjian, Steve; Saripalle, Rishi; Agresta, Thomas; Liu, Jing; Cusano, Antonio; Fequiere, Andal; Gedarovich, Jim

    2010-01-01

    In the patient-centered medical home, PCMH, patient care is overseen by a primary care physician leading a team of health care providers, who collaborate to optimize treatment. To facilitate interactions in PCMH, secure collaboration will be needed to: control access to information; dictate who can do what when; and promote sharing and concurrent access. This contrasts approaches such as the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) role-based access control (RBAC), where the emphasis is on controlling access and separating responsibilities. This paper investigates secure collaboration within an application such as PCMH, through: a futuristic scenario for patient care; proposed collaboration extensions to the NIST RBAC standard with a fine-grained obligated mechanism and workflow; and a prototype of PCMH via the Google Wave real-time collaboration platform. PMID:21346936

  20. Role of Health Information Technologies in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    A national effort to reform primary care, known as the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), requires fulfillment of six standards determined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance to (1) enhance access and continuity, (2) identify and manage patient populations, (3) plan and manage care, (4) provide self-care and community support, (5) track and coordinate care, and (6) measure and improve performance. Information technologies play a vital role in the support of most, if not all, of these standards. However, given the newness of the PCMH, little is known on how health information technologies (HITs) have been employed to accomplish these objectives. This article will review the role of HITs, including electronic health records, web-based patient portals, telemedicine, and patient registries, with a focus on diabetes care, and how these technologies have been engaged in the establishment of the PCMH. In addition, we will discuss the benefits and potential risks and barriers to employing these technologies, including privacy and security concerns, as well as describe next steps for future work in this important area. PMID:24124967

  1. Relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca

    2014-02-01

    Employee turnover is a large and expensive problem in the long-term care environment. Stated intention to leave is a reliable indicator of likely turnover, but actual predictors, especially for nursing assistants, have been incompletely investigated. This quantitative study identifies the relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,589 employees in 18 for-profit nursing homes. A working condition index for the number of beneficial job features was constructed. Poisson regression modeling found that employees who reported four positive features were 77% less likely to state strong intention to leave (PR = 0.23, p < .001). The strength of relationship between working conditions and intention to leave was slightly mediated by employee mental health. Effective workplace intervention programs must address work organization features to reduce employee intention to leave. Healthy workplaces should build better interpersonal relationships, show respect for employee work, and involve employees in decision-making processes. PMID:24652941

  2. Improving Our Nation's Health Care System: Inclusion of Chiropractic in Patient-Centered Medical Homes and Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, William C.; Watkins, R.W.; Kranz, Karl C.; Munsterman, Scott D.; Johnson, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective This report summarizes the closing plenary session of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference—Research Agenda Conference 2014. The purpose of this session was to examine patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations from various speakers’ viewpoints and to discuss how chiropractic could possibly work within, and successfully contribute to, the changing health care environment. Discussion The speakers addressed the complex topic of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations and provided suggestions for what leadership strategies the chiropractic profession may need to enhance chiropractic participation and contribution to improving our nation’s health. Conclusion There are many factors involved in the complex topic of chiropractic inclusion in health care models. Major themes resulting from this panel included the importance of building relationships with other professionals, demonstrating data and evidence for what is done in chiropractic practice, improving quality of care, improving health of populations, and reducing costs of health care. PMID:25431542

  3. Creating Healthy Communities, Healthy Homes, Healthy People: Initiating a Research Agenda on the Built Environment and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shobha; O’Fallon, Liam R.; Dearry, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests physical and mental health problems relate to the built environment, including human-modified places such as homes, schools, workplaces, parks, industrial areas, farms, roads and highways. The public health relevance of the built environment requires examination. Preliminary research demonstrates the health benefits of sustainable communities. However, the impact of mediating and moderating factors within the built environment on health must be explored further. Given the complexity of the built environment, understanding its influence on human health requires a community-based, multilevel, interdisciplinary research approach. The authors offer recommendations, based upon a recent conference sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), for research and policy approaches, and suggest interagency research alliances for greater public health impact. PMID:12948961

  4. Professional Preparation of High School Coaches: The Problem Continues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, C. Craig; Sweet, LaWana

    1992-01-01

    Montana high school coaches were surveyed regarding coaching, playing and teaching experience, education, current knowledge, and situation. Only half had physical education degrees, few had current coursework, most had more playing than coaching experience, only 31 percent taught physical education, and most coached because they loved it. (SM)

  5. Coaching and Knowledge Transfer. Symposium 8. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This document contains three papers on coaching and knowledge transfer. "The Role of the Learning Coach in Action Learning" (Judy O'Neil) reviews the literature on action learning and learning coaches, explores the role of learning coaches in action learning, and demonstrates the existence of external and internal influences that shape the…

  6. Being a Leadership Development Coach: A Multi-Faceted Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Christine; McMahon, Margery; Gronn, Peter; Martin, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The use of coaching as a developmental methodology has been instituted as a way to develop leadership in schools in Scotland as elsewhere in the UK. While there are studies that examine the skills and impact of coaching, there is only limited discussion of the process of coaching and the role and experiences of the coaches. This article examines…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions of the Coaching Role in Secondary Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelaar, Evelien; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Boshuizen, Henny P. A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a study on teachers' perceptions of the coaching role in innovative secondary vocational education (SVE) in the Netherlands. Data from 109 teachers were collected by means of an online questionnaire, asking for their associations with the coaching role, goals concerning the coaching role, and typical coaching activities.…

  8. Charting the Research on the Policies and Politics of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Facing relentless pressure to improve student achievement, many states and districts are using coaching as a policy lever to promote changes in practice. This special issue centers on the policies and politics of coaching, and this editorial commentary highlights what we know about the role of coaches and coaching in the field of education. Then I…

  9. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  10. Mentoring and Coaching in Schools: Professional Learning through Collaborative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Suzanne; Pomphrey, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Can mentoring and coaching really improve professional practice? How can research and inquiry improve mentoring and coaching practice? "Mentoring and Coaching in Schools" explores the ways in which mentoring and coaching can be used as a dynamic collaborative process for effective professional learning. It demonstrates how the use of practitioner…

  11. A Look inside Mathematics Coaching: Roles, Content, and Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudzimiri, Rejoice; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Sutton, John; Yopp, David

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics classroom coaching is used across the United States as a means for improving instruction, with the ultimate goal of improving student learning. The job assignments of coaches can vary widely across schools and districts. Regardless of the various forms that coaching can take, there is the consistent expectation that a coach's…

  12. The coach–athlete relationship: a motivational model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Genevie Ve A. Mageau; Robert J. Vallerand

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a motivational model of the coach–athlete relationship that describes how coaches may influence athletes' motivation. In line with cognitive evaluation theory (Deci and Ryan, 1980, 1985) and the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (Vallerand, 1997, 2000), a motivational sequence is proposed where coaches' personal orientation towards coaching, the context within

  13. The Rhetoric and Realities of Literacy Coaching: An Autoethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerall, Sara Hellen

    2012-01-01

    I became a literacy coach eight years ago. After working at one school for five years with four different principals and reading everything I could find about being a literacy coach, I was keenly aware of the gap between the rhetoric of literacy coaching and the realities I faced in this role. The available literature around literacy coaching did…

  14. Excellence in Coaching: The Art and Skill of Elite Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Christine S.; Sproule, John; Horton, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During this study, 10 expert coaches were interviewed to examine their views on aspects of their individual coaching practice. Four themes emerged from the interviews: (a) the long-term approach, (b) the authentic coaching environment, (c) creating a learning environment, and (d) the quality and quantity of training sessions. These coaches were…

  15. Evidence-Based Practice: A Potential Approach for Effective Coaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dianne R. Stober; David Drake

    As coaching develops as an emerging profession, it is vital for coaches to begin integrating evidence from both coaching-specific research and related disciplines, their own expertise, and an understanding of the uniqueness of each client. Evidence-based practice (EBP) encompasses these three endeavors in designing interventions aimed at positive growth and change for their recipients. While coaching does not have an

  16. Instructional Coaching: Teachers' Perceptions of Practice and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Jason Brock

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate K-12 teachers' perceptions of instructional coaching. Specifically, this researcher assessed the perception of instructional coaching as a whole, support for hiring practices for instructional coaches, the value of instructional coaching for improving teaching practices, the value of…

  17. Coaching Strategies for Helping Adolescent Athletes Cope with Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jenelle N.; Gilbert, Wade; Morawski, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the various sources of athlete stress and the strategies that coaches can use to help young athletes cope with it. The information is based on a study with a competitive adolescent soccer team and its two coaches, and a review of the coaching and sport psychology literature. The suggested coaching strategies can help to…

  18. Medical home access among American Indian and Alaska Native children in 7 states: National Survey of Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Barradas, Danielle T; Kroelinger, Charlan D; Kogan, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    To describe the prevalence of medical home among American Indian and Alaska Native children (AIAN) compared to non-Hispanic white (NHW) children and identify areas for improvement in the provision of care within a medical home. Prevalence of medical home, defined as family-centered, comprehensive, coordinated, compassionate, culturally effective care, including a personal doctor or nurse and usual care location, was estimated using 2007 National Survey of Children's Health data. Analyses included 1-17 year-olds in states reporting AIAN race as a distinct category (Alaska, Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota, n = 9,764). Associations between medical home and demographic (child's age, household education and income, and state) and health-related [child's insurance status, special health care need status, and past year Indian Health Service (IHS) utilization] characteristics were assessed among AIAN children. Overall, the prevalence of medical home was 27 % lower among AIAN children (42.6, 95 % CI = 34.4-50.8) than NHW children (58.3, 95 % CI = 56.2-60.4). Child's age (adjusted OR [aOR] = 2.7, 95 % CI = 1.3-5.6) was significantly associated with medical home. IHS utilization was associated with medical home among AIAN children with private insurance (aOR = 0.2, 95 % CI = 0.1-0.4), but not among uninsured or publicly insured children. Care coordination and family-centered care were noted areas for improvement among AIAN children. Less than half of AIAN children had a medical home. Future studies should further examine the intersection between insurance and IHS to determine if enhanced coordination is needed for this population, which is often served by multiple federally-funded health-related programs. PMID:22466686

  19. Home Page

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Home Page Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  20. Nutritional and health status among nursing home residents in Lebanon: comparison across gender in a national cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study described the differences between elderly men and women living in Lebanese long-term care nursing homes on socio-economic, health and nutritional status. Methods This study used a cross-sectional design. Field researchers obtained data from 221 residents; 148 (67%) women and 73 (33%) men, living in 36 nursing homes. Data on health conditions; nutritional, psychological, and functional status; socio-demographic characteristics, as well as social relations were collected. The analysis used both chi-square and t-test tests. Results The majority of elderly had low socio-economic and poor health status. In comparison to men, women were significantly less educated, had lower occupational status, had no partner, relied financially on their children and relatives, and enjoyed better social relations and health behaviours. Furthermore, the prevalence of both; malnutrition, and at risk of malnutrition, were at 3.2% and 27.6% respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between women and men on Mini Nutritional Assessment, Activities of Daily Living, Geriatric Depression Scale, Body Mass Index, and chronic diseases. While women reported “good” health status compared to men, they continued to have higher prevalence of diseases and chronic pain. Conclusions This study explored the socio-demographic, health, and nutritional status of elderly residing in Lebanese nursing homes and compared these characteristics across gender. The results indicated the need of health support and institutional interventions for elderly women residents. PMID:24950594

  1. How the Framing of Instructional Coaching as a Lever for Systemic or Individual Reform Influences the Enactment of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Dunsmore, KaiLonnie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Instructional coaching is framed as both a means for systemic and individual reform. These competing conceptualizations of coaching as a mechanism for change have not been systematically examined, and therefore, we know little about how the framing of instructional coaching initiatives affects the enactment of coaching. In response to…

  2. Effects of water-damaged homes after flooding: health status of the residents and the environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kenichi; Ikeda, Koichi; Kagi, Naoki; Yanagi, U; Hasegawa, Kenichi; Osawa, Haruki

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated the health status of residents and the environmental risk factors of housing after flooding. Questionnaires were distributed to 595 selected households (one adult resident per household) in six areas in Japan which were severely flooded between 2004 and 2010. A total of 379 responses were obtained. Indoor dampness and visible mold growth significantly increased in homes with greater flood damage. The incidence of respiratory, dermal, ocular, and nasal symptoms one week after flooding was significantly higher in flooded homes compared with non-flooded homes, the incidence of psychological disorders was significantly high for six months after flooding, and the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder was significantly high six months after flooding. Significant risk factors for respiratory and nasal symptoms included proximity to industrial and waste incineration plants. Our results suggest that rapid action should be taken after flooding to ensure adequate public health and environmental hygiene in the water-damaged homes. PMID:23802658

  3. Facilitating Out-of-Home Caregiving Through Health Information Technology: Survey of Informal Caregivers’ Current Practices, Interests, and Perceived Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D; Jenchura, Emily C; Asch, Steven M; Rosland, Ann-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic conditions are supported by out-of-home informal caregivers—family members, friends, and other individuals who provide care and support without pay—who, if armed with effective consumer health information technology, could inexpensively facilitate their care. Objective We sought to understand caregivers’ use of, interest in, and perceived barriers to health information technology for out-of-home caregiving. Methods We conducted 2 sequential Web-based surveys with a national sample of individuals who provide out-of-home caregiving to an adult family member or friend with a chronic illness. We queried respondents about their use of health information technology for out-of-home caregiving and used multivariable regression to investigate caregiver and care-recipient characteristics associated with caregivers’ technology use for caregiving. Results Among 316 out-of-home caregiver respondents, 34.5% (109/316) reported using health information technology for caregiving activities. The likelihood of a caregiver using technology increased significantly with intensity of caregiving (as measured by number of out-of-home caregiving activities). Compared with very low intensity caregivers, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of technology use was 1.88 (95% CI 1.01-3.50) for low intensity caregivers, 2.39 (95% CI 1.11-5.15) for moderate intensity caregivers, and 3.70 (95% CI 1.62-8.45) for high intensity caregivers. Over 70% (149/207) of technology nonusers reported interest in using technology in the future to support caregiving. The most commonly cited barriers to technology use for caregiving were health system privacy rules that restrict access to care-recipients’ health information and lack of familiarity with programs or websites that facilitate out-of-home caregiving. Conclusions Health information technology use for out-of-home caregiving is common, especially among individuals who provide more intense caregiving. Health care systems can address the mismatch between caregivers’ interest in and use of technology by modifying privacy policies that impede information exchange. PMID:23841987

  4. Management commitment to safety and health in residential construction: HomeSafe spending trends 1991-1999.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, David P; Keefe, Thomas J; Hautaluoma, Jacob E; Bigelow, Philip L; Herron, Robert E; Stanley, Sheila A

    2003-01-01

    The support of good management is fundamental to the success of any safety and health program. Residential construction is a high-risk industry requiring significant commitment by management to impact day-to-day safety and health challenges. Investigators have evaluated management practices and spending trends in a cohort of 228 residential homebuilders in the Denver metro area of Colorado. Findings suggest that companies significantly increased dollars allocated to support safety and health practices between 1991 and 1999. In addition, the HomeSafe Pilot Program has positively impacted financial commitments of partner companies. Resource allocations were significantly greater for specific expense categories when comparing pre to post HomeSafe intervention. This paper presents data on the use of written safety and health programs, safety committees, and workers compensation premium cost containment certification, as well as allocations to safety incentive programs (SIP), personal protective equipment (PPE), other safety equipment (OSE), and safety training (ST). PMID:12632001

  5. Health Care Proxy Grief Symptoms Before the Death of Nursing Home Residents With Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kiely, Dan K.; Prigerson, Holly; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The loss experienced by family members of dementia patients before their actual death is known as “predeath grief.” This study’s objectives were to identify and describe factors associated predeath grief symptoms among health care proxies (HCPs) of nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia, and distinguish grief symptoms from those of depression. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Twenty-one Boston-area NHs. Participants Three hundred fifteen NH residents with advanced dementia and their HCPs. Measurements Factor analysis was used to distinguish predeath grief and depression symptoms. Multivariate regression analyses identified factors associated with greater predeath grief measured on a 10-item summary scale of grief symptoms. Independent variables included sociodemographic information and health status of HCPs and residents, and depressive symptoms, physician communication, preparedness for death, and satisfaction with care of HCPs. Results Predeath grief symptoms were distinct from depressive symptoms. The mean predeath grief scores was 15.0 ± 5.6 (range, 10–49), suggesting relatively low levels of overall grief. Yearning (i.e., separation distress) was the most frequently experienced grief symptom (sometimes, 27%; often, 18%; or always, 15%). Variables associated with greater predeath grief included HCPs whose primary language was not English, HCPs who lived with a resident before institutionalization, more depressive symptoms of HCPs, less satisfaction with care of HCPs, and younger resident age. Conclusions Family members of NH residents with advanced dementia experience predeath grief symptoms, particularly separation distress. Predeath grief symptoms are associated with, but distinct from, those of depression. Several factors identified HCPs at higher risk for predeath grief and who may benefit from early interventions to reduce suffering. PMID:18669945

  6. Scheduled telephone visits in the veterans health administration patient-centered medical home

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient-centered medical home model, Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT), includes telephone visits to improve care access and efficiency. Scheduled telephone visits can replace in-person care for some focused issues, and more information is needed to understand how this mode can best work for primary care. We conducted a study at the beginning of PACT implementation to elicit stakeholder views on this mode of healthcare delivery, including potential facilitators and barriers. Methods We conducted focus groups with primary care patients (n?=?3 groups), providers (n?=?2 groups) and staff (n?=?2 groups). Questions were informed by Donabedian’s framework to evaluate and improve healthcare quality. Content analysis and theme matrix techniques were used to explore themes. Content was assigned a positive or negative valuation to indicate whether it was a facilitator or barrier. PACT principles were used as an organizing framework to present stakeholder responses within the context of the VHA patient-centered medical home program. Results Scheduled telephone visits could potentially improve care quality and efficiency, but stakeholders were cautious. Themes were identified relating to the following PACT principles: comprehensiveness, patient-centeredness, and continuity of care. In sum, scheduled telephone visits were viewed as potentially beneficial for routine care not requiring physical examination, and patients and providers suggested using them to evaluate need for in-person care; however, visits would need to be individualized, with patients able to discontinue if not satisfied. Patients and staff asserted that providers would need to be kept in the loop for continuity of care. Additionally, providers and staff emphasized needing protected time for these calls. Conclusion These findings inform development of scheduled telephone visits as part of patient-centered medical homes by providing evidence about areas that may be leveraged to most effectively implement this mode of care. Presenting this service as enhanced care, with ability to triage need for in-person clinic visits and consequently provide more frequent contact, may most adequately meet different stakeholder expectations. In this way, scheduled telephone visits may serve as both a substitute for in-person care for certain situations and a supplement to in-person interaction. PMID:24690086

  7. The Role of Specialty Mental Health Care in Predicting Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Out-of-Home Placements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Glisson; Philip Green

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal, prospective study examines the role of specialty mental health care as provided by community-based, usual-care practice settings in predicting out-of-home placements among children served by a child welfare and juvenile justice system. Method: The mental health needs of 1,249 children from 22 counties in Tennessee were assessed when the children were referred for child welfare and juvenile

  8. Health Care Policies for Children in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risley-Curtiss, Christina; Kronenfeld, Jennie Jacobs

    2001-01-01

    Examined health care policies and services for children under 46 state welfare agencies. Found that most states had written policies regarding health care for foster children, but half had no management system to record health care data. Most states did not meet standards set by the Child Welfare League of America for health care of these…

  9. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support

    PubMed Central

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers’ 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients’ homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants’ strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues’ and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future. PMID:23706410

  10. Delivering at home or in a health facility? health-seeking behaviour of women and the role of traditional birth attendants in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional birth attendants retain an important role in reproductive and maternal health in Tanzania. The Tanzanian Government promotes TBAs in order to provide maternal and neonatal health counselling and initiating timely referral, however, their role officially does not include delivery attendance. Yet, experience illustrates that most TBAs still often handle complicated deliveries. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to describe (1) women’s health-seeking behaviour and experiences regarding their use of antenatal (ANC) and postnatal care (PNC); (2) their rationale behind the choice of place and delivery; and to learn (3) about the use of traditional practices and resources applied by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) and how they can be linked to the bio-medical health system. Methods Qualitative and quantitative interviews were conducted with over 270 individuals in Masasi District, Mtwara Region and Ilala Municipality, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Results The results from the urban site show that significant achievements have been made in terms of promoting pregnancy- and delivery-related services through skilled health workers. Pregnant women have a high level of awareness and clearly prefer to deliver at a health facility. The scenario is different in the rural site (Masasi District), where an adequately trained health workforce and well-equipped health facilities are not yet a reality, resulting in home deliveries with the assistance of either a TBA or a relative. Conclusions Instead of focusing on the traditional sector, it is argued that more attention should be paid towards (1) improving access to as well as strengthening the health system to guarantee delivery by skilled health personnel; and (2) bridging the gaps between communities and the formal health sector through community-based counselling and health education, which is provided by well-trained and supervised village health workers who inform villagers about promotive and preventive health services, including maternal and neonatal health. PMID:23448583

  11. Health Status and Type of Out-of-Home Placement: Informal Kinship Care in an Investigated Sample

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ruth E. K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Heneghan, Amy M.; Zhang, Jinjin; Rolls-Reutz, Jennifer; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the sociodemographic, health, and mental health of children in different types of out-of-home placements after investigation by child welfare agencies; to determine whether there are systematic differences in the children and their caregivers by type of out-of-home placements; and to provide the first description of these characteristics in a nationally representative sample for children in informal kinship care after child welfare involvement. Methods Using data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAWII), we compared children (0–17.5 years) in formal nonkinship foster care, formal kinship foster care, and informal kinship care shortly after a child welfare investigation. All analyses were weighted to reflect the sampling design. Results Children in informal kinship care are at comparable risk of having chronic health conditions and poorer health but are less likely to receive school-based services. All children in kinship care (formal and informal) are less likely to be reported to have mental health problems and are more likely to live with older caregivers whose educational level is low and whose health is reportedly poorer. Conclusions Although children in kinship care have health problems similar to children in nonkinship foster care, they are likely to live in families with fewer economic and educational resources. This mismatch between need and access has implications for the long-term well-being of the children who are living in informal kinship arrangements without system-level support of formal foster care. PMID:25439154

  12. The treatment of infectious waste arising from home health and medical care services: Present situation in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Motonobu Miyazaki; Takuya Imatoh; Hiroshi Une

    2007-01-01

    The management of waste materials arising from home health and medical care services (HHMC wastes) in Japan is now receiving greater attention from governmental workers dealing with general household waste materials. In general, HHMC waste materials are collected in a mixed form, transported and disposed of along with municipal solid wastes. As a result, municipal workers are suffering needle stick

  13. Placement and Permanency Outcomes for Children in Out-of-Home Care by Prior Inpatient Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung Min; Ryan, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal study followed 5,978 children in out-of-home care to examine whether placement and permanency outcomes differ between children with and without a history of inpatient mental health treatment. Method: Data were drawn from child welfare and Medicaid records from the state of Illinois. Logistic regression and survival…

  14. An Innovative Approach to Home Health Education: The Critical Path to Self-Care for Adults with Diabetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn K. Watson; Janet L. McDaniel; Mary Hope Gibson

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective chart audit of home health care clients with the primary diagnosis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) revealed that the average number of visits for care exceeded the average number of visits for teaching. Using Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing, a critical pathway was designed to extend the number of visits incorporating teaching and to sequence teaching so

  15. The learning, physical, and emotional environment of the home in the context of poverty: The infant health and development program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanne Brooks-Gunn; Pamela Kato Klebanov; Fong-ruey Liaw

    1995-01-01

    The impact of individual environmental and biological risks and the number of risks on the home environment of 3-year-olds is examined in a sample of low birth weight, premature infants enrolled in the Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP). The IHDP is a large clinical trial designed to test the efficacy of early intervention services. The effects of 13 risk

  16. Policy Changes in Medicare Home Health Care: Challenges to Providing Family-Centered, Community-Based Care for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) established new reimbursement systems in the Medicare home health fee-for-service benefit. Reimbursements were reduced to 1993 levels and per-beneficiary capitated limits were introduced for the first time. This article analyzes the impact of these changes on chronically ill older adults and their families.…

  17. Transmission of HIV and hepatitis C virus from a nursing home patient to a health care worker

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elise M. Beltrami; Anne Kozak; Ian T. Williams; Ae M. Saekhou; Marcia L. Kalish; Omana V. Nainan; Susan L. Stramer; Mei-Chen H. Fucci; Debra Frederickson; Denise M. Cardo

    2003-01-01

    Background: We report a case of simultaneous HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission from a nursing home patient to a health care worker (HCW) whose HIV and HCV infections were diagnosed during routine blood donor screening. Methods: Detailed information about the HCW, possible occupational and nonoccupational blood and body fluid exposures, and possible source patient was collected. Blood samples

  18. Home Health Care Agency Staffing Patterns before and after the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, by Rural and Urban Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, William J.; Spector, William; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Context: The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 and other recent policies have led to reduced Medicare funding for home health agencies (HHAs) and visits per beneficiary. Purpose: We examine the staffing characteristics of stable Medicare-certified HHAs across rural and urban counties from 1996 to 2002, a period encompassing the changes associated…

  19. Carer Reports of Health Status among Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in Taiwan Living at Home and in Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, K.-Y.; Hsieh, K.; Heller, T.; Davidson, P. W.; Janicki, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the health status of a cohort of adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) residing in family homes or institutions in Taiwan and to examine whether morbidity varied with age, sex, existing diagnosis [Down syndrome (DS), seizures, cerebral palsy (CP), intellectual disability…

  20. The impact of smoking in the home on the health outcomes of non-smoker occupants in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Smoking in the home remains a key source of exposure to secondhand smoke for non-smokers, particularly since the UK public smoking ban in 2007. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify all UK evidence on the impact of secondhand smoke exposure in the home on health and behavioural outcomes in non-smoker occupants. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify all relevant UK empirical studies from 2000 to June 2011. A qualitative overview of the evidence is presented. Exposure to secondhand smoke in UK homes was found to be associated with serious negative health effects in non-smokers, including significantly increased risk of meningococcal carriage (p?home and several serious health conditions. This finding highlights the importance of educating current smokers on the consequences of non-smoker exposure to smoking in the home. PMID:23360643

  1. A Coach's Guide to Identifying and Helping Athletes with Eating Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine L. B. Selby; Justine J. Reel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to help coaches identify eating disorders among athletes and to recommend strategies for helping athletes return to peak performance health. Specifically we address why some athletes may be more vulnerable to developing eating disorders and how to detect signs and symptoms of eating disorders. Because this article is geared toward individuals who may be

  2. Socially Assistive Robot Exercise Coach: Motivating Older Adults to Engage in Physical

    E-print Network

    Mataric, Maja J.

    1 Socially Assistive Robot Exercise Coach: Motivating Older Adults to Engage in Physical Exercise evaluation of a socially assistive robot system designed to engage elderly users in physical exercise aimed at achieving health benefits and improving quality of life. We discuss our design methodology, which

  3. Evolutionary struggles of supply chain strategy in home-based health care delivery

    E-print Network

    Fowler, Katherine Szabo

    2008-01-01

    As the healthcare industry in United States continues to be constrained by increasing costs, new delivery channels are coming into practice. One such channel is home healthcare. Home healthcare presents challenges on the ...

  4. Patient-centered medical homes: will health care reform provide new options for rural communities and providers?

    PubMed

    Bolin, Jane N; Gamm, Larry; Vest, Joshua R; Edwardson, Nick; Miller, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Many are calling for the expansion of the patient-centered medical home model into rural and underserved populations as a transformative strategy to address issues of access, efficiency, quality, and sustainability in the delivery of health care. Patient-centered medical homes have been touted as a promising cost-saving model for comprehensive management of persons with chronic diseases and disabilities, but it is unclear how rural practitioners in medically underserved areas will implement the patient-centered medical home. This article examines how the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act of 2010 will enhance rural providers' ability to provide patient-centered care and services contemplated under the Act in a comprehensive, coordinated, cost-effective way despite leaner budgets and health workforce shortages. PMID:21378505

  5. Rapid EHR development and implementation using web and cloud-based architecture in a large home health and hospice organization.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Charlotte A; Teenier, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Health care organizations have long been limited to a small number of major vendors in their selection of an electronic health record (EHR) system in the national and international marketplace. These major EHR vendors have in common base systems that are decades old, are built in antiquated programming languages, use outdated server architecture, and are based on inflexible data models [1,2]. The option to upgrade their technology to keep pace with the power of new web-based architecture, programming tools and cloud servers is not easily undertaken due to large client bases, development costs and risk [3]. This paper presents the decade-long efforts of a large national provider of home health and hospice care to select an EHR product, failing that to build their own and failing that initiative to go back into the market in 2012. The decade time delay had allowed new technologies and more nimble vendors to enter the market. Partnering with a new start-up company doing web and cloud based architecture for the home health and hospice market, made it possible to build, test and implement an operational and point of care system in 264 home health locations across 40 states and three time zones in the United States. This option of "starting over" with the new web and cloud technologies may be posing a next generation of new EHR vendors that retells the Blackberry replacement by iPhone story in healthcare. PMID:24943570

  6. Hospital at home: what is its place in the health system?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Netta Bentur

    2001-01-01

    Given the expansion of hospital at home in Western countries, policymakers, providers and financial managers are exploring the causes for this and examining whether hospital at home is an alternative to hospitalization for reasons of cost containment and quality of care. The purpose of this paper is to describe hospital at home, discuss its development and examine its role in

  7. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: Health Care Fraud Enforcement Disguised as Reform and What It Means for Home Health and Hospice Providers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert W. Markette

    2011-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act presents new challenges to home health and hospice providers. This article discusses those challenges, along with the impacts that may result from this Act’s implementation. Compliance programs and disclosure are among the implications presented.

  8. The Changing Mental Health Needs of Youth Admitted to Residential Group Home Care: Comparing Mental Health Status at Admission in 1995 and 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Trout, Alexandra; Chmelka, M. Beth; Burns, Barbara J.; Epstein, Michael H.; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Youth entering residential care possess significant emotional and behavioral needs; yet, it is uncertain whether these needs have remained constant or are changing over time. This study examined mental health variables from the admission files of 1,047 youth entering residential group home care in 1995 and 2004. Sequential logistical regression…

  9. Perceived Leadership Behavior of Physical Education Teacher-Coaches: When They Teach vs. when They Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Hyungil Harry; Pyun, Do young; Kim, May

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to see whether a teacher-coach exhibits different types of leadership behavior when s/he teaches a PE class and coaches a group of athletes. The participants in this study were 17-18 year old second-year preuniversity students from two local junior colleges in Singapore. A total of 159 students of mixed gender…

  10. Understanding the coach's role in the development of mental toughness: Perspectives of elite Australian football coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel F. Gucciardi; Sandy Gordon; James A. Dimmock; Clifford J. Mallett

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore elite coaches' perceptions of how they can both facilitate and impede the development of key mental toughness characteristics in the context of Australian football. Eleven coaches from a previous study (Gucciardi, Gordon, & Dimmock, 2008) were re-interviewed and the transcribed verbatim data were analysed using grounded theory data analytical procedures (Strauss &

  11. How to Be a Wise Consumer of Coaching: Strategies Teachers Can Use to Maximize Coaching's Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Heidema, Clare; Mitchell, Arlene; Sutton, John

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching is gaining popularity as a school-based effort to increase teacher effectiveness and student achievement. A coach can be broadly defined as a person who works collaboratively with a teacher to improve that teacher's practice and content knowledge, with the ultimate goal of affecting student achievement. By its very nature,…

  12. Bargaining with Patriarchy: Former Female Coaches' Experiences and Their Decision to Leave Collegiate Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the experiences of former female coaches and their decision to terminate their careers. A feminist perspective and mixed-methods (surveys and interviews) were used to allow for a richer understanding of their experiences. The survey findings, which included 121 former female coaches, suggest that…

  13. Is the coaching fit for purpose? A typology of coaching and learning approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Brockbank

    2008-01-01

    The paper offers a typology of coaching based on social learning theory, giving four approaches: functionalist, engagement, revolutionary and evolutionary. Each approach adopts a view of reality, which is either subjective or objective, and each approach seeks a learning outcome that is typified by transformation or equilibrium. A range of coaching practices is inspected in relation to three of these

  14. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Australian Football Coaches' Experience with Game Sense Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a project framed as a strengths-based case study in the field of sport coaching. The aim of this research was twofold. First, the project trialled. Appreciate Inquiry (AI) for sport pedagogy research and explain how AI can be used in sport coaching research. Second, using an appreciative perspective, the aim of the research…

  15. The Effectiveness of Literacy Coaches as Perceived by School Administrators, Classroom Teachers, and Literacy Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Celeste Corbin Hester

    2010-01-01

    School districts are hiring literacy coaches to provide professional development and follow-up support for teachers as a means to improve teacher effectiveness and student achievement in reading. A paucity of research exists reflecting a clear analysis of the factors which can be used to determine the effectiveness of a coach. According to a…

  16. Lessons Learned Coaching Teachers in Behavior Management: The PBIS"plus" Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfeldt, Patricia A.; Pell, Karen; Sechrest, Richard; Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in coaching as a means of promoting professional development and the use of evidence-based practices in schools. This article describes the PBIS"plus" coaching model used to provide technical assistance for classroom- and school-wide behavior management to elementary schools over the course of 3 years. This Tier 2…

  17. 3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Health Centers Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services My Administration is committed to building...demonstration, pursuant to your statutory authority to conduct experiments and demonstrations on changes in payments and services...

  18. Returns to Local-Area Healthcare Spending: Using Health Shocks to Patients far from Home

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Joseph J.

    Health care spending varies widely across markets, and previous research finds little evidence that higher spending translates into better health outcomes. The main innovation in this paper exploits this cross-sectional ...

  19. School-Based Health Care and the District of Columbia Safety Net. Medical Homes DC Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    21st Century School Fund, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This report provides the results of research into the variety of health care services currently offered in the public schools in the District of Columbia, with a particular focus on school-based health centers. Also provided are the results of research into the practice of utilizing school-based health centers nationally in the U.S. The report is…

  20. Home visits to improve breast health knowledge and screening practices in a less privileged area in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer afflicting women in Jordan. This study aimed to assess the effects of an educational intervention through home visits, including offering free mammography screening vouchers, on changing women’s breast health knowledge and screening practices for early detection of breast cancer in a less privileged area in Jordan. Methods Two thousand four hundred breast health awareness home visits were conducted and 2363 women aged 20-79 years (median: 41) answered a pre-test interview-administrated questionnaire to assess their breast health knowledge and practices at the baseline. After a home-based educational session, 625 women aged 40 years or older were referred to free mammography screening. Five hundred and ninety six homes were revisited six months later and out of these 593 women participated in a post-test. The women’s retained breast health knowledge, the changes in their reported breast health practices and their usage of the free mammography voucher, were assessed. Results The mean knowledge score increased significantly (p?Home visits by local community outreach workers that incorporated education about breast cancer and breast health in addition to offering free mammography screening vouchers were effective in improving women’s breast health knowledge and practices in a less privileged area in Jordan. PMID:24885063

  1. An interprofessional nurse-led mental health promotion intervention for older home care clients with depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms in older home care clients are common but poorly recognized and treated, resulting in adverse health outcomes, premature institutionalization, and costly use of health services. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a new six-month interprofessional (IP) nurse-led mental health promotion intervention, and to explore its effects on reducing depressive symptoms in older home care clients (??70 years) using personal support services. Methods A prospective one-group pre-test/post-test study design was used. The intervention was a six-month evidence-based depression care management strategy led by a registered nurse that used an IP approach. Of 142 eligible consenting participants, 98 (69%) completed the six-month and 87 (61%) completed the one-year follow-up. Outcomes included depressive symptoms, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and the costs of use of all types of health services at baseline and six-month and one-year follow-up. An interpretive descriptive design was used to explore clients’, nurses’, and personal support workers’ perceptions about the intervention’s appropriateness, benefits, and barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results Of the 142 participants, 56% had clinically significant depressive symptoms, with 38% having moderate to severe symptoms. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to older home care clients with depressive symptoms. It was effective in reducing depressive symptoms and improving HRQoL at six-month follow-up, with small additional improvements six months after the intervention. The intervention also reduced anxiety at one year follow-up. Significant reductions were observed in the use of hospitalization, ambulance services, and emergency room visits over the study period. Conclusions Our findings provide initial evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, and sustained effects of the nurse-led mental health promotion intervention in improving client outcomes, reducing use of expensive health services, and improving clinical practice behaviours of home care providers. Future research should evaluate its efficacy using a randomized clinical trial design, in different settings, with an adequate sample of older home care recipients with depressive symptoms. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01407926. PMID:24886344

  2. An Evaluation of Health and Safety Hazards in Family Based Day Care Homes in Philadelphia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Hernando; Haynes, Sonia; Michael, Karen; Burstyn, Igor; Jandhyala, Malica; Palermo, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, Family Day Care Homes (FDCH) are private residences used to care for up to six children in a 24 h period. These homes are often times the most affordable alternative to day care centers parents have in low-income communities. The aims of this study were to evaluate FDCH providers' knowledge of hazards and their understanding of…

  3. The Association between Changes in Health Status and Nursing Home Resident Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degenholtz, Howard B.; Rosen, Jules; Castle, Nicholas; Mittal, Vikas; Liu, Darren

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research on nursing home resident quality of life (QOL) has mainly been cross-sectional. This study examined the association between changes in QOL and changes in resident clinical factors. Design and Methods: A longitudinal study of resident QOL was conducted in two nursing homes. Self-report interviews using a multidimensional…

  4. Club Sports Coach/Volunteer Code of Conduct

    E-print Network

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Club Sports Coach/Volunteer Code of Conduct Agreement Form I during the 2012-2013 academic year. Club Sport (write legibly) I understand in the Club Sports Handbook and will enforce them in my role as coach. · I

  5. Substance Use, Mental Disorders and Physical Health of Caribbeans at-Home Compared to Those Residing in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Krim K.; Powell Sears, Karen; Govia, Ishtar O.; Forsythe-Brown, Ivy; Matusko, Niki; Jackson, James S.

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the health conditions of domestic Caribbeans with those living in the United States to explore how national context and migration experiences might influence substance use (i.e., alcohol or drug) and other mental and physical health conditions. The study is based upon probability samples of non-institutionalized Caribbeans living in the United States (1621), Jamaica (1216) and Guyana (2068) 18 years of age and over. Employing descriptive statistics and multivariate analytic procedures, the results revealed that substance use and other physical health conditions and major depressive disorder and mania vary by national context, with higher rates among Caribbeans living in the United States. Context and generation status influenced health outcomes. Among first generation black Caribbeans, residing in the United States for a longer length of time is linked to poorer health outcomes. There were different socio-demographic correlates of health among at-home and abroad Caribbeans. The results of this study support the need for additional research to explain how national context, migratory experiences and generation status contribute to understanding substance use and mental disorders and physical health outcomes among Caribbean first generation and descendants within the United States, compared to those remaining in the Caribbean region. PMID:25590147

  6. Substance use, mental disorders and physical health of Caribbeans at-home compared to those residing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Krim K; Sears, Karen Powell; Govia, Ishtar O; Forsythe-Brown, Ivy; Matusko, Niki; Jackson, James S

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the health conditions of domestic Caribbeans with those living in the United States to explore how national context and migration experiences might influence substance use (i.e., alcohol or drug) and other mental and physical health conditions. The study is based upon probability samples of non-institutionalized Caribbeans living in the United States (1621), Jamaica (1216) and Guyana (2068) 18 years of age and over. Employing descriptive statistics and multivariate analytic procedures, the results revealed that substance use and other physical health conditions and major depressive disorder and mania vary by national context, with higher rates among Caribbeans living in the United States. Context and generation status influenced health outcomes. Among first generation black Caribbeans, residing in the United States for a longer length of time is linked to poorer health outcomes. There were different socio-demographic correlates of health among at-home and abroad Caribbeans. The results of this study support the need for additional research to explain how national context, migratory experiences and generation status contribute to understanding substance use and mental disorders and physical health outcomes among Caribbean first generation and descendants within the United States, compared to those remaining in the Caribbean region. PMID:25590147

  7. Model Formulation: Health@HomeThe Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Moen; Patricia Flatley Brennan

    2005-01-01

    ObjectiveContemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in

  8. Mentor functions in NCAA women's soccer coaching dyads

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eileen M. Narcotta; Jeffrey C. Petersen; Scott R. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – Team performance in sport is not limited to the players, but extends to the coaching staff and their relationships. This study aims to identify mentoring functions reported by NCAA Division I assistant women's soccer coaches within a head coach-assistant coach dyad and examine gender impact on these functions. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The Mentor Role Instrument questionnaire, completed by 39.7

  9. A Comparison of Quality Measures Between For-Profit and Nonprofit Medicare-Certified Home Health Agencies in Michigan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn L. Haldiman; Huey-Ming Tzeng

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the differences in the means of quality measures between for-profit and nonprofit Medicare-certified home health agencies in Michigan. The research question was: Do nonprofit agencies provide higher quality of care than for-profit agencies? Twelve publicly available quality measures were retrieved in May 2009 and used for analysis. Independent t tests found significant differences between for-profit and

  10. Philani Plus (+): A Mentor Mother Community Health Worker Home Visiting Program to Improve Maternal and Infants’ Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    le Roux, Ingrid M.; Tomlinson, Mark; Mbewu, Nokwanele; Comulada, W. Scott; le Roux, Karl; Stewart, Jacqueline; O’Connor, Mary J.; Hartley, Mary; Desmond, Kate; Greco, Erin; Worthman, Carol M.; Idemundia, Faith; Swendeman, Dallas

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant mothers in South African townships face multiple health risks for themselves and their babies. Existing clinic-based services face barriers to access, utilization, and human resource capacities. Home visiting by community health workers (CHW) can mitigate such barriers. The Philani Plus (+) Intervention Program builds upon the original Philani CHW home-visiting intervention program for maternal and child nutrition by integrating content and activities to address HIV, alcohol, and mental health. Pregnant Mothers at Risk (MAR) for HIV, alcohol, and/or nutrition problems in 24 neighborhoods in townships in Cape Town, South Africa (n=1,239) were randomly assigned by neighborhood to an intervention (Philani Plus (+), N=12 neighborhoods; n=645 MAR) or a standard-care control condition of neighborhood clinic-based services (N=12 neighborhoods; n=594 MAR). Positive peer deviant “Mentor Mother” CHWs are recruited from the township neighborhoods and trained to deliver four antenatal and four postnatal home visits that address HIV, alcohol, nutrition, depression, health care regimens for the family, caretaking and bonding, and securing government-provided child grants. The MAR and their babies are being monitored during pregnancy, 1 week post-birth, and 6 and 18 months later. Among the 1,239 MAR recruited: 26% were HIV-positive; 27% used alcohol during pregnancy; 17% previously had low-birthweight babies; 23% had at least one chronic condition (10% hypertension, 5% asthma, 2% diabetes); 93% had recent sexual partners with 10% known to be HIV+; and 17% had clinically significant prenatal depression and 42% had borderline depression. This paper presents the intervention protocol and baseline sample characteristics for the “Philani Plus (+)” CHW home-visiting intervention trial. PMID:21850488

  11. Using abm in managing territorial health services: the “home-care”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lino Cinquini; Milena Vainieri; Linda Marcacci; Giovanni Tiezzi

    2006-01-01

    In recent years in Italy, as in other European countries, profound changes have been introduced in health care at both the central and the regional levels. Most of them were oriented towards a shift from “hospital-centred” healthcare to healthcare based more on territorial services. This transition pursues two objectives: giving more effective responses to citizens’ needs and reducing public health

  12. Home on the Range--Health Literacy, Rural Elderly, Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, David; Weinert, Clarann; Spring, Amber

    2012-01-01

    The demographic and socioeconomic impacts of the baby boomer generation turning 65 in 2011 will be magnified in rural areas where elderly are already disproportionately represented. The overall goal of a collaborative, community-based project was to improve the health literacy, health outcomes, and overall well-being of rural elderly in four…

  13. Accessing Adolescents: A School-Recruited, Home-Based Approach to Conducting Media and Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    L'Engle, Kelly Ladin; Pardun, Carol J.; Brown, Jane D.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a protocol that was effective in collecting media-use pattern and sensitive health data from young adolescents. Students from three public school districts in the southeastern United States were recruited to participate in a study of the impact of the media on adolescents' sexual health. Using a 34-page mailed survey,…

  14. The College of Public Health (CPH) is home to four academic departments, three institutes, and one

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    HealthPromotionandBehavior,theInstitute for Disaster Management, the Institute of Gerontology, Institute for Evidence-Based Professions Education: Gerontology, Global Health, and Disaster Management. The MPH degree was developed to address the critical need. Students can choose one of the following concentrations: » Biostatistics » Disaster Management

  15. Humidifier Use in the Home Environment and Its Effects on Respiratory Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aparna K. Mohan; Charles E. Feigley; Caroline A. Macera

    1998-01-01

    This study sought to examine the association between household humidifier use and subsequent experiencing of adverse health symptoms. The analyses were based on a cross-sectional survey of 101 people residing in Chester County, South Carolina. Evaluation of the effect of exposure to different humidifier factors on the respiratory and general health of residents using humidifiers was achieved by univariate and

  16. Youth dietary intake and weight status: healthful neighborhood food environments enhance the protective role of supportive family home environments.

    PubMed

    Berge, Jerica M; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Forsyth, Ann; Bauer, Katherine W; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate individual and joint associations of the home environment and the neighborhood built environment with adolescent dietary patterns and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse adolescents (n=2682; 53.2% girls; mean age14.4 years) participating in the EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens) study completed height and weight measurements and surveys in Minnesota middle and high schools. Neighborhood variables were measured using Geographic Information Systems data. Multiple regressions of BMI z-score, fruit and vegetable intake, and fast food consumption were fit including home and neighborhood environmental variables as predictors and also including their interactions to test for effect modification. Supportive family environments (i.e., higher family functioning, frequent family meals, and parent modeling of healthful eating) were associated with higher adolescent fruit and vegetable intake, lower fast food consumption, and lower BMI z-score. Associations between the built environment and adolescent outcomes were fewer. Interaction results, although not all consistent, indicated that the relationship between a supportive family environment and adolescent fruit and vegetable intake and BMI was enhanced when the neighborhood was supportive of healthful behavior. Public health interventions that simultaneously improve both the home environment and the neighborhood environment of adolescents may have a greater impact on adolescent obesity prevention than interventions that address one of these environments alone. PMID:24378461

  17. TA Orientation 2007 Activity #6 Coaching During Discussion Sessions

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    TA Orientation 2007 Activity #6 Coaching During Discussion Sessions Activity 6 - Page 1 Coaching to these questions with your peers during TA Orientation. NOTE: These partial student solutions were actually taken. #12;TA Orientation 2007 Activity #6 Coaching During Discussion Sessions Activity 6 - Page 2 Problem

  18. TA Orientation 2006 Activity #6 Coaching During Discussion Sessions

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    TA Orientation 2006 Activity #6 Coaching During Discussion Sessions Activity 6 - Page 1 Coaching to these questions with your peers during TA Orientation. NOTE: These partial student solutions were actually taken. #12;TA Orientation 2006 Activity #6 Coaching During Discussion Sessions Activity 6 - Page 2 Problem

  19. Introducing Disability Issues into the Education of Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorogi, Laszlo; Bognar, Jozsef; Petrovics, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the knowledge of participants and their attitudes towards sport of the disabled, in the basic and intermediary coach education. Material and methods: A group of 20 instructors, running a coach education course organised by the Institute of Coaching and Sport Education (ICSE), Semmelweis University (Budapest), were…

  20. Masculinity Socialization in Sports: Influence of College Football Coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesse A. Steinfeldt; Brad D. Foltz; Jessica Mungro; Quentin L. Speight; Y. Joel Wong; Jake Blumberg

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated conceptualizations of masculinity endorsed by college football coaches and how masculinity messages are conveyed to players by coaches within the context of football. Using consensual qualitative research methodology, the research team analyzed transcripts of interviews conducted with 10 college football coaches to generate themes, categories, and domains within the data. Six domains emerged: (a) Being a man

  1. Courage to Love: Coaching Dialogically toward Teacher Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Heather; Palmer, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Instructional coaches continue to be an important part of school reform and professional development, and yet few studies have examined the impact of the language coaches use when working with teachers. The authors work to contribute towards filling this gap by describing a self-study examining their own language as instructional coaches and its…

  2. BUSINESS COACHING PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR LEADERS & MANAGERS 2009

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    BUSINESS COACHING PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR LEADERS & MANAGERS 2009 COACH YOUR WAY TO THE NEXT WINNING SEASON! Good coaching is an integral part of a productive and winning team. In business and goal setting · Managing progress and accountability WHAT WILL THIS PROGRAM DO FOR YOU? · Create

  3. The Learning Profiles of High School Teacher-Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Geoffrey; Culver, Diane; Camire, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Jarvis' (2006) theory of human learning framed the analysis of qualitative interviews conducted with 31 high school teacher-coaches. Using composite narratives, we present three profiles as an innovative way to explain the social context within which the teacher-coaches have developed and also, to provide insight into the needs of teacher-coaches

  4. Power, Conflict, and Cooperation: Toward a Micropolitics of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potrac, Paul; Jones, Robyn L.

    2009-01-01

    According to Jones, Wells, Peters, and Johnson (1993), being political is a necessary part of a coach's repertoire, because a coach's effectiveness and longevity may depend not only on a favorable win-loss record but also on an individual's ability to gain the approval of contextual power brokers (e.g., athletes, other coaches, or owners).…

  5. Five Key Points to Building a Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Hundreds of instructional coaches are being hired by schools to improve professional practice. Since coaches provide on-site professional learning, they can adapt their approach to meet the unique needs of the teachers and students in the schools where they work. Since coaches can provide professional development that addresses teachers' concerns…

  6. To Enter Stone, Be Water: Situating Literacy Coaching as Rhizomatic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Reilly leans on the metaphor of rhizomes to remind readers that the work of a coach is not linear or hierarchical, but fluid and dynamic. Reilly frames literacy coaches as rhizomatic agents in schools and urges coaches to appreciate resistance and interruptions as critical and necessary for transformative teaching and learning.

  7. Understanding Relationship: Maximizing the Effects of Science Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ruth; Feldman, Sue; Minstrell, Jim

    2014-01-01

    There is growing empirical evidence that instructional coaching can help teachers transfer their learning from professional trainings (e.g., new strategies) to classroom practice and that coaching promotes greater collaboration and reflection among teachers. At the same time, however, research on the effectiveness of particular coaching models and…

  8. Effects of Coaching on Teacher Use of Sociocultural Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teemant, Annela; Wink, Joan; Tyra, Serena

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates a performance-based instructional coaching model intended to improve teacher pedagogy and classroom organization for educating diverse student populations. Elementary teachers (N = 21) participated in a 30-h workshop and seven individual coaching sessions across an academic year. The coaching model promoted use of the…

  9. Coaching as Inquiry: The South Carolina Reading Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Diane; Mills, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Embedded within traditional notions of coaching are unstated expectations that (a) the coach is an expert and knows what it is that the other person should be doing and (b) based on his or her expertise, the coach should take actions to achieve his or her vision for the other person. Within the South Carolina Reading Initiative, however, literacy…

  10. Further Validation of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, J. Paige; Hall, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine select psychometric properties of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale (CIPS), including the reliability, factorial validity, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and predictive validity. Coaches (N = 338) who averaged 37 (SD = 12.27) years of age, had a mean of 13 (SD = 9.90) years of coaching experience,…

  11. An Investigation of the Leadership Style of Selected Basketball Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Dana

    A study sought to identify leadership styles of basketball coaches and to investigate the relationship between leadership style and criteria by which coaches select players. Thirty-seven elementary, high school, and college/professional coaches participated. Two instruments were used: the T-P Leadership questionnaire, which measures two dimensions…

  12. Developing Effective Peer Coaching Experiences for School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speck, Marsha; Krovetz, Martin

    1996-01-01

    In fall 1989, San Jose State University's educational administration program introduced a two-semester peer-coaching class as part of its Professional Administrative Services Credential requirement. All student-practitioners receive seven hours of instruction, modeling, and practice in peer coaching. Peer coaching reduced professional isolation,…

  13. Software and knowledge engineering aspects of smart homes applied to health.

    PubMed

    Augusto, Juan Carlos; Nugent, Chris; Martin, Suzanne; Olphert, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Smart Home technology offers a viable solution to the increasing needs of the elderly, special needs and home based-healthcare populations. The research to date has largely focused on the development of communication technologies, sensor technologies and intelligent user interfaces. We claim that this technological evolution has not been matched with a step of a similar size on the software counterpart. We particularly focus on the software that emphasizes the intelligent aspects of a Smart Home and the difficulties that arise from the computational analysis of the information collected from a Smart Home. The process of translating information into accurate diagnosis when using non-invasive technology is full of challenges, some of which have been considered in the literature to some extent but as yet without clear landmarks. PMID:16282666

  14. Coaching to vision versus coaching to improvement needs: a preliminary investigation on the differential impacts of fostering positive and negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Anita R.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on intentional change theory (ICT; Boyatzis, 2006), this study examined the differential impact of inducing coaching recipients’ vision/positive emotion versus improvement needs/negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions. A core aim of the study was to empirically test two central ICT propositions on the effects of using the coached person’s Positive Emotional Attractor (vision/PEA) versus Negative Emotional Attractor (improvement needs/NEA) as the anchoring framework of a onetime, one-on-one coaching session on appraisal of 360° feedback and discussion of possible change goals. Eighteen coaching recipients were randomly assigned to two coaching conditions, the coaching to vision/PEA condition and the coaching to improvement needs/NEA condition. Two main hypotheses were tested. Hypothesis1 predicted that participants in the vision/PEA condition would show higher levels of expressed positive emotion during appraisal of 360° feedback results and discussion of change goals than recipients in the improvement needs/NEA condition. Hypothesis2 predicted that vision/PEA participants would show lower levels of stress immediately after the coaching session than improvement needs/NEA participants. Findings showed that coaching to vision/the PEA fostered significantly lower levels of expressed negative emotion and anger during appraisal of 360° feedback results as compared to coaching to improvements needs/the NEA. Vision-focused coaching also fostered significantly greater exploration of personal passions and future desires, and more positive engagement during 360° feedback appraisal. No significant differences between the two conditions were found in emotional processing during discussion of change goals or levels of stress immediately after the coaching session. Current findings suggest that vision/PEA arousal versus improvement needs/NEA arousal impact the coaching process in quite different ways; that the coach’s initial framing of the session predominantly in the PEA (or, alternatively, predominantly in the NEA) fosters emotional processing that is driven by this initial framing; and that both the PEA (and associated positive emotions) and NEA (and associated negative emotions) play an important and recurrent role in shaping the change process. Further study on these outcomes will enable researchers to shed more light on the differential impact of the PEA versus NEA on intentional change, and how to leverage the benefits of both emotional attractors. Findings also suggest that coaches can benefit from better understanding the importance of tapping intrinsic motivation and personal passions through coaching to vision/the PEA. Coaches additionally may benefit from better understanding how to leverage the long-term advantages, and restorative benefits, of positive emotions during coaching engagements. The findings also highlight coaches’ need to appreciate the impact of timing effects on coaching intentional change, and how coaches can play a critical role in calibrating the pace and focus of work on intentional change. Early arousal of the coachee’s PEA, accompanied by recurrent PEA–NEA induction, may help coachees be/become more creative, optimistic, and resilient during a given change process. Overall, primary focus on vision/PEA and secondary focus on improvement needs/NEA may better equip coaches and coaching recipients to work together on building robust learning, development, and change. Keywords-133pt executive coaching, vision, improvement needs, positive emotion, negative emotion, emotional appraisal, intentional change, positive psychology PMID:25964768

  15. Proceedings of Student/Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 5th Usability Field Study of Home Health Monitoring Devices

    E-print Network

    Tappert, Charles

    .com Abstract The use of telecommunications and home-based medical monitoring devices can provide a `medical two automated home-based patient management systems usability. The first system is a computer Field Study of Home Health Monitoring Devices Used by Older Adults Rita Hubert School of Computer

  16. Impact of health care worker policy awareness on hand hygiene and urinary catheter care in nursing homes: Results of a self-reported survey

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Ana; Chen, Shu; Galecki, Andrzej; McNamara, Sara; Lansing, Bonnie; Mody, Lona

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a self-administered questionnaire in 440 health care workers (81% response rate), we evaluated the impact of health care workers policy awareness on hand hygiene and urinary catheter care in nursing homes. We show that health care workers aware of their nursing home policies are more likely to report wearing gloves and practicing hand hygiene as per evidence-based recommendations during urinary catheter care compared with those who are unaware of their facility policies. PMID:23726551

  17. "Coach" Can Mean Many Things: Five Categories of Literacy Coaches in Reading First. Issues & Answers. REL 2007-No. 005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deussen, Theresa; Coskie, Tracy; Robinson, LeAnne; Autio, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    One of the largest initiatives using coaching has been Reading First, a federal project whose purpose is to improve reading outcomes for students in low-performing K-3 schools. The present study addressed two questions: (1) Who becomes a reading coach, and what background, skills, and qualifications do coaches bring to their jobs? and (2) How do…

  18. UC Santa Barbara Home: Administrative Services/Environmental Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    , herbicides, fungicides, and growth regulators. II. Policy Page 1 of 35435 Use Of Pesticides 9/17/2007http with the specific authorization of Environmental Health and Safety. Use of approved baits is allowed in buildings. A

  19. Coming Home: Health Status and Homelessness Risk of Older Prerelease Prisoners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brie A. Williams; James McGuire; Rebecca G. Lindsay; Jacques Baillargeon; Irena Stijacic Cenzer; Sei J. Lee; Margot Kushel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND  Older adults comprise an increasing proportion of the prison and homeless populations. While older age is associated with\\u000a adverse post-release health events and incarceration is a risk factor for homelessness, the health status and homelessness\\u000a risk of older pre-release prisoners are unknown. Moreover, most post-release services are geared towards veterans; it is unknown\\u000a whether the needs of non-veterans differ from

  20. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  1. The Medical Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Keeping Kids Safe Concussions: What to Know The Medical Home KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Doctor & Hospital Visits > ... home" for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a ...

  2. Using an executive coach to increase leadership effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Patricia Reid; Gross, Anne Harvey; Galante, Andrea; Glazer, Greer

    2006-06-01

    Senior executive nursing roles demand excellence and rigor in both the technical and interpersonal domains of leadership. Many nurse leaders have begun seeking innovative self-development programs and practices to assist them as they strive to improve their effectiveness as leaders in complex organizations. One practice that has gained in popularity is that of engaging a leadership "coach." To understand this relatively new trend in healthcare leadership, the authors interviewed 4 coaches and 4 nurse leaders who had been coached. In this article, they present their overall findings about the effectiveness of coaching as a leadership development tool and offer recommendations for leaders who are interested in engaging a coach. PMID:16766912

  3. Parity of esteem begins at home: translating empirical psychiatric research into effective public mental health.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, J B; Jones, P B

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing recognition that parity of esteem between mental and physical health disorders is essential to improve the course, outcome and quality of life of individuals within different populations. Achieving this parity now underpins the objectives of several nations. Here, we argue that parity of esteem between mental and physical health can only be realized when parity of esteem also exists across mental health disorders, particularly in terms of service commissioning and planning. Using first-episode psychosis and early intervention in psychosis services as a motivating example, we demonstrate how carefully conducted psychiatric epidemiology can be translated to develop precise forecasts of the anticipated incidence of first-episode psychosis in different populations, based on an understanding of underlying local needs and inequalities. Open-access prediction tools such as PsyMaptic will allow commissioners of mental health services to more effectively allocate resources across services, based on empirical evidence and local need, thus reducing inequalities in access to mental health care. PMID:23931735

  4. The impact of perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity on mental health among older adults.

    PubMed

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this study. Structural equation modeling using LISREL 8.71 was performed to assess the effects of stress, support, and physical activity on mental health. The findings indicate that perceived stress predicted higher levels of depression, social support predicted lower levels of loneliness and fatigue, and physical activity predicted lower levels of fatigue among older adults. Social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health, except depression. In conclusion, the relative impacts of perceived stress, social support, and physical activity on types of mental health (e.g., fatigue, loneliness, and depression) were different. Furthermore, stress had direct and indirect effects on each construct of mental health (e.g., fatigue, loneliness, and depression). PMID:21639014

  5. Implementing a web-based home monitoring system within an academic health care network: barriers and facilitators to innovation diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Alexandra C; Jethwani, Kamal; Bello, Heather; Kvedar, Joseph; Grant, Richard W

    2011-01-01

    The practice of outpatient type 2 diabetes management is gradually moving from the traditional visit-based, fee-for-service model to a new, health information communication technology (ICT)-supported model that can enable non-visit-based diabetes care. To date, adoption of innovative health ICT tools for diabetes management has been slowed by numerous barriers, such as capital investment costs, lack of reliable reimbursement mechanisms, design defects that have made some systems time-consuming and inefficient to use, and the need to integrate new ICT tools into a system not primarily designed for their use. Effective implementation of innovative diabetes health ICT interventions must address local practice heterogeneity and the interaction of this heterogeneity with clinical care delivery. The Center for Connected Health at Partners Healthcare has implemented a new ICT intervention, Diabetes Connect (DC), a Web-based glucose home monitoring and clinical messaging system. Using the framework of the diffusion of innovation theory, we review the implementation and examine lessons learned as we continue to deploy DC across the health care network. PMID:21303622

  6. Health Care, Hospice, and Home Economists: A Programmatic Response to Demographic Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkwell, Carolyn; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Suggests ways that teams of home economists, integrating information from constituent fields of the discipline, may provide important services to hospices. Suggestions are included from the areas of human development and family relations, foods and nutrition, housing and interior design, clothing and textiles, and financial management and decision…

  7. A Correlational Pilot Study of Home Health Nurse Management of Heart Failure Patients and Hospital Readmissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary L. McCoy; Ruth Davidhizar; Deborah R. Gillum

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure is the leading cause of hospital admissions in patients more than 65 years old. The failure to provide carefully planned care to heart failure patients in the home setting predisposes patients to frequent hospital readmissions due to poor medication compliance, diet, and education of symptom management (Li, Marrow-Howell, & Proctor, 2004). The objective of this pilot study is

  8. Mental Health Correlates of Aggression in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Amann Talerico; Lois K. Evans; Neville E. Strumpf

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Aggression continues to challenge caregivers of persons with dementia, and identification of foci for effec- tive interventions is needed. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of (a) the resident characteristics of depression, communication, and cognition and (b) be- havior management strategies on aggression in a group of older nursing home residents ( N 5 405)

  9. SVM-based multimodal classification of activities of daily living in Health Smart Homes: sensors, algorithms, and first experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Anthony; Vacher, Michel; Noury, Norbert

    2010-03-01

    By 2050, about one third of the French population will be over 65. Our laboratory's current research focuses on the monitoring of elderly people at home, to detect a loss of autonomy as early as possible. Our aim is to quantify criteria such as the international activities of daily living (ADL) or the French Autonomie Gerontologie Groupes Iso-Ressources (AGGIR) scales, by automatically classifying the different ADL performed by the subject during the day. A Health Smart Home is used for this. Our Health Smart Home includes, in a real flat, infrared presence sensors (location), door contacts (to control the use of some facilities), temperature and hygrometry sensor in the bathroom, and microphones (sound classification and speech recognition). A wearable kinematic sensor also informs postural transitions (using pattern recognition) and walk periods (frequency analysis). This data collected from the various sensors are then used to classify each temporal frame into one of the ADL that was previously acquired (seven activities: hygiene, toilet use, eating, resting, sleeping, communication, and dressing/undressing). This is done using support vector machines. We performed a 1-h experimentation with 13 young and healthy subjects to determine the models of the different activities, and then we tested the classification algorithm (cross validation) with real data. PMID:20007037

  10. From outside the walls: a qualitative study of nurses who recently changed from hospital-based practice to home health care nursing.

    PubMed

    Murray, T A

    1998-01-01

    Acute care facilities are no longer viewed as the center of the health care network. Efforts to reduce hospital length of stay will continue to spur the growth of care delivered in homes. With the downsizing of many hospitals, the need for nurses in acute care settings will decline. Many acute care nurses are finding themselves seeking employment opportunities in home health care settings. The purpose of this study was to examine nurses' experiences when they change from hospital-based practice to home health care nursing. The qualitative mode of inquiry was used to conduct taped-recorded interviews of 25 baccalaureate-prepared nurses in a large metropolitan area. Stressors experienced by the nurses were identified as well as adaptations required to minimize role stress. Continuing education programs can provide information and skills needed to improve nurses' competencies to function in a health care system projected to be more community-based, which includes home health care. PMID:9582772

  11. Examination of coaches' self-efficacy: preliminary analysis of the coaching efficacy scale.

    PubMed

    Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Daroglou, Garifallia; Zahariadis, Panayotis; Grouios, George

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Coaching Efficacy Scale, which measures coaches' beliefs about their capacity to affect the learning and performance of their athletes on Game Strategy, Motivation, Teaching Technique, and Character Building. 230 Greek male team coaches (M = 37.6 yr. +/- 6.2) with 5.5 yr. (SD = 4.8) of experience completed the Greek translation of the scale. A first-order confirmatory factor analysis supported the basic factorial structure of the scale. Examination of a higher order model of an overall coaching efficacy factor showed satisfactory fit, using second-order confirmatory factor analysis. Moreover, the scale showed satisfactory Cronbach of of .82 and 30-day test-retest reliability of .73. Significant differences between experienced and less experienced coaches, defined by mean score, were found on Teaching Technique and overall self-efficacy factors, with more experienced coaches having significantly higher scores. Results supported the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the scale. PMID:15002874

  12. The Heart of the Matter: Health Status of Aged Care Clients Receiving Home- and Community-Based Care

    PubMed Central

    Yarmo-Roberts, Deborah; Freak-Poli, Rosanne Laura; Cooper, Brad; Noonan, Tim; Stolewinder, Just; Reid, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To determine the current health status of home based elderly clients receiving government funded aged care packages. Design. Prospective Observational study. Setting. Community based, home care program in Australia. Participants. Community-dwelling older adults receiving aged care packages. Measurements. A comprehensive test battery of physical, mental and social scales were completed including a Caregiver Strain Index where appropriate. Results. 37% of the 334 subjects were male and the mean age was 81 ± 8 years. Physical functioning was low compared to the Australian population. Depression was highly prevalent with 15.9% severely depressed and 38.7% mildly depressed. 26% of clients screened positive for dementia. Relatively good levels of social support were reported, however social networking activity levels were low. Sixty one percent of clients had caregivers, of whom 63.3% had high levels of strain. Strain was higher in caregivers of clients on higher levels of care (78.5% versus 50.6% highly strained). Conclusion. The data suggests that as a group there is a high degree of comorbidity, and depression, dementia and caregiver strain are highly prevalent. The findings may aid administrators and health policy planners in directing resources to key areas impacting on health outcomes in this group. PMID:21152197

  13. Coaches, Athletes and Nutrition: Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis; Mandali, Swarna; Conn, James

    2005-01-01

    Athletes often adjust their dietary routines to enhance sport performance, but problems can arise when athletes turn for guidance to coaches who may not be trained in the field of nutrition, or who, themselves, are poor examples when it comes to healthy eating habits. There are many myths regarding nutrition that are spread throughout the world of…

  14. Coaching Teachers to Help Students Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Bess

    2007-01-01

    When the Adams 12 school district introduced a new mathematics curriculum to elementary schools several years ago, leaders have turned to an idea both old and new to make the change a success. They created a position dubbed "student-achievement coach" that gives each school a skilled teacher ready to urge her colleagues forward in three areas:…

  15. The Good Coach Dr Jim Parry

    E-print Network

    ' of concepts. (We have to do better than just stipulate.) Why? Wittgenstein: in psychology, the existence to the development of the whole person (Sports) Coach - takes responsibility for improving sports performance application of knowledge: obs/anal/eval of performance implementation of effective interventions devt

  16. Dynamic Systems Theory and Team Sport Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gréhaigne, Jean-Francis; Godbout, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the theory of dynamic systems and its use in the domains of the study and coaching of team sports. The two teams involved in a match are looked at as two interacting systems in movement, where opposition is paramount. A key element for the observation of game play is the notion of configuration of play and its ever-changing…

  17. COACH syndrome associated with multifocal liver tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele I. Kirchner; Siegfried Wagner; Peer Flemming; Joerg S. Bleck; Michael Gebel; Ingolf Schedel; Andreas Schüler; Michael Galanski; Michael P. Manns

    2002-01-01

    Here, we describe a 20-yr-old woman with COACH syndome (hypoplasia of Cerebellar vermis, Oligophrenia, congenital Ataxia, Coloboma, and Hepatic fibrosis) developing multiple liver lesions. Epigastric and right upper abdominal pain and lack of appetite led to clinical evaluation. Liver function tests showed an increase in transaminases and cholestatic parameters; ?-fetoprotein was in the normal range. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

  18. The first Japanese case of COACH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Fukiko; Aikata, Hiroshi; Azakami, Takahiro; Katamura, Yoshio; Kimura, Takashi; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Saneto, Hiromi; Takaki, Shintaro; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Tsuge, Masataka; Waki, Koji; Hiramatsu, Akira; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Takahashi, Shoichi; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-03-01

    COACH syndrome is a disorder characterized by hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis, oligophrenia, congenital ataxia, coloboma and hepatic fibrosis, and 21 cases have been reported to date. Here we describe the first Japanese case of COACH syndrome, who was diagnosed at the age of 37 years and never progressed to liver failure. The patient was found to have delayed developmental milestones at the age of 5 months and mental retardation at the age of 7 years. She had been treated for hepatopathy of unknown origin from the age of 22 years. She was admitted to Hiroshima University Hospital at the age of 37 years after the identification of esophageal varices on a routine upper endoscopy. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed portal hypertension and splenomegaly, and liver biopsy showed liver fibrosis. In addition, she had coordination disorder and dysarthria. Brain magnetic resonance images revealed hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis. The final diagnosis was COACH syndrome. She underwent endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices. From that point until her death from ovarian cancer at the age of 41 years, the liver function tests were stable without an episode of hematemesis. Physicians should be aware of COACH syndrome when they examine young patients who present with hepatopathy, portal hypertension of unknown origin and cerebellar ataxia. PMID:19261004

  19. Teaching Psychological Skills to Athletes and Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danish, Steven J.; Hale, Bruce D.

    1983-01-01

    Applied sport psychology can be directed toward teaching psychological skills that enhance athletic performance. This process can take place at all levels of coaching and physical education. Methods for teaching goal setting, imagery, relaxation, and self-talk are described. (PP)

  20. Principals in Partnership with Math Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Catherine Miles; Davenport, Linda Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    One of the most promising developments in math education is the fact that many districts are hiring math coaches--also called math resource teachers, math facilitators, math lead teachers, or math specialists--to assist elementary-level teachers with math instruction. What must not be lost, however, is that principals play an essential role in…

  1. Adults’ Judgments of Children's Coached Reports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria Talwar; Kang Lee; Nicholas Bala; R. C. L. Lindsay

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated adults’ judgments of the honesty of children's coached true and fabricated mock testimony. Adults saw video clips of children testifying in a mock court about a true or fabricated event in their lives. They were asked to make an assessment of the truthfulness of the testimony, and respond to questions about their perception of children's credibility. Half

  2. Conceptualizing the Adventure-Sports Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Loel; Collins, Dave

    2012-01-01

    As a comparatively recent development, the adventure-sports coach struggles for a clear and distinct identity. The generic term "instructor" no longer characterizes the role and function of this subgroup of outdoor professionals. Indeed, although the fields of adventure/outdoor education and leadership are comparatively well researched, the…

  3. The Economic Cost of Instructional Coaching

    E-print Network

    Knight, David Stephen

    2010-12-17

    for the degree of Master of Arts. __________________________________________ Chairperson, Barbara J. Phipps, Ph.D __________________________________________ Donald D. Deshler, Ph.D __________________________________________ Joshua... ____________________________________________ Chairperson, Barbara J. Phipps, Ph.D Date approved: ________________ ! 3 Abstract: School-based instructional coaching is one of the fastest growing approaches to profesional development today; however, litle is known about the impact on student...

  4. High School Athletics: Coaches/Controversy/Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopiano, Donna A.

    The token gestures towards job equality for women in the fields of physical education and athletics coaching are symptomatic of the more serious problem of sexual equality present in American society. Cultural restrictions on the kind and degree of assertive behavior traditionally associated with the female role have left women ill-equipped to…

  5. Job Coaching in Supported Work Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadely, Diane C.

    This guide is intended to address the many roles and functions of job coaches in various employment settings. The guide was written to assist the following groups of service providers: (1) vocational rehabilitation personnel working in rehabilitation facilities, sheltered workshops, work activity centers, or other supported work-oriented programs;…

  6. Family Child Care Homes Need Health and Safety Training and an Emergency Rescue System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, Mary Ann

    1999-01-01

    Argues that current training in child safety, health, and emergency response are not adequate for family childcare providers. Concludes that preventing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), preventing injury, providing safe outdoor play areas, controlling the spread of illness, and being prepared for emergencies must be of major concern and ongoing…

  7. Home Make this your homepage Welcome: ART / ENTERTAIMENT | AUTOMOTIVE | BUSINESS | LIFESTYLE | HEALTH / MEDICAL | TECHNOLOGY |

    E-print Network

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    Mutational Analysis Available at Response Genetics www.ResponseGenetics.com BRCA 1 & 2 Genetic Tests is regulated by a gene linked to increased risk of breast cancer, BRCA2, it is also thought to play a role | HEALTH / MEDICAL | TECHNOLOGY | EDUCATION | News Guide Page: EDUCATION: Science KRAS Testing KRAS

  8. 64 FR 58134 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-10-28

    ...and control agencies in the change in average cost per visit...of the first year was one of change and competition, which continually...other health sectors created a climate in which agencies, both treatment...that agencies can make some changes to slow the rate of...

  9. Pesticides in the Homes of Farmworkers: Latino Mothers' Perceptions of Risk to Their Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Pamela; Quandt, Sara A.; Doran, Alicia M.; Snively, Beverly M.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Pesticide exposure has been linked with immediate and delayed health effects. Anyone who lives in a farmworker household may be exposed to pesticides. Studies with farmworkers have found generally low levels of awareness of pesticide exposure and prevention. Less is known about the perceptions of nonfarmworkers living with farmworkers. This…

  10. Family Involvement in School-Based Health Promotion: Bringing Nutrition Information Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blom-Hoffman, Jessica; Wilcox, Kaila R.; Dunn, Liam; Leff, Stephen S.; Power, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Family-school collaboration related to children's physical development has become increasingly important as childhood obesity rates continue to rise. The present study described the development and implementation of a literacy-based, family component of a school-based health education program and investigated its viability, acceptability, and…

  11. Remote monitoring of health status of the elderly at home in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuang-Hui; Yang, Yolande Y

    2010-01-01

    This case involves a B2B2C model (service provider to community to the elderly) of innovative tele-care services. The service provider under study is Chu-Shan Show-Chwan Hospital, a district hospital in Nantou County, Taiwan. The community comprises social welfare institutions such as temples, community care centers, and nursing homes. Finally, the elderly individuals who are the ultimate targets of the service are either community residents or residents of nursing homes. The community, as a service promoter, contributes to the increased acceptance of the newly introduced tele-care service compared with the traditional B2C model. Numerous communities under study and some social welfare organizations are extremely interested in providing healthcare services to the elderly and will support future operations provided satisfactory results are achieved. This project can help district hospitals extend their primary care function to communities, build trust, and improve relationships between physicians and patients. PMID:20575614

  12. Antecedents of perceived coach autonomy supportive and controlling behaviors: coach psychological need satisfaction and well-being.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Juliette; Taylor, Ian M; Spray, Christopher M

    2011-04-01

    Within the self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) framework, research has considered the consequences of coaches' autonomy supportive and controlling behaviors on various athlete outcomes (e.g., motivation and performance). The antecedents of such behaviors, however, have received little attention. Coaches (N = 443) from a variety of sports and competitive levels completed a self-report questionnaire to assess their psychological need satisfaction, well-being and perceived interpersonal behaviors toward their athletes. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that coaches' competence and autonomy need satisfaction positively predicted their levels of psychological well-being, as indexed by positive affect and subjective vitality. In turn, coaches' psychological well-being positively predicted their perceived autonomy support toward their athletes, and negatively predicted their perceived controlling behaviors. Overall, the results highlight the importance of coaching contexts that facilitate coaches' psychological need satisfaction and well-being, thereby increasing the likelihood of adaptive coach interpersonal behavior toward athletes. PMID:21558583

  13. Mobile Phone Based User Interface Concept for Health Data Acquisition at Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Günter Schreier; Alexander Kollmann; Martin Kramer; Jürgen Messmer; Andreas Hochgatterer; Peter Kastner

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a The availability of mobile information and communication technologies is increasing rapidly and provides huge opportunities\\u000a for home monitoring applications. This paper presents a new human-computer interface concept which is based on digital camera\\u000a enabled mobile phones. Only two keystrokes are necessary to take a photo of a medical measurement device, for example a blood\\u000a pressure meter, and to send the

  14. Health and functional status in elderly patients living in nursing homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mario Molaschi; Maria Ponzetto; Ermanno Ferrario; Carla Scarafiotti; Fabrizio Fabris

    1995-01-01

    Socio-economic background, functional status, multiple pathology and medical conditions requiring care have been evaluated in 506 elderly subjects living in nursing homes in Turin (Italy). In the sample 78.8% are women, mean age 84.2 years, only 21.2% are men, mean age 76.3 years. Particularly in the oldest age classes women are more represented than men. Most subjects (94.3%) require help

  15. The Re-contextualization of the Patient: What Home Health Care Can Teach Us About Medical Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Salter, Erica K

    2015-06-01

    This article examines the role of context in the development and deployment of standards of medical decision-making. First, it demonstrates that bioethics, and our dominant standards of medical decision-making, developed out of a specific historical and philosophical environment that prioritized technology over the person, standardization over particularity, individuality over relationship and rationality over other forms of knowing. These forces de-contextualize the patient and encourage decision-making that conforms to the unnatural and contrived environment of the hospital. The article then explores several important differences between the home health care and acute care settings. Finally, it argues that the personalized, embedded, relational and idiosyncratic nature of the home is actually a much more accurate reflection of the context in which real people make real decisions. Thus, we should work to "re-contextualize" patients, in order that they might be better equipped to make decisions that harmonize with their real lives. PMID:25643756

  16. Occupational Safety, Health, and Well-being Among Home-based Workers in the Informal Economy of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nankongnab, Noppanun; Silpasuwan, Pimpan; Markkanen, Pia; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Woskie, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a summary of the issues related to occupational safety and health and well-being among workers in the informal economy of Thailand, with a special emphasis on home-based workers. The reviewed literature includes documents and information sources developed by the International Labour Organization, the National Statistical Office of Thailand, peer-reviewed scientific publications, and master's theses conducted in Thailand. This work is part of a needs and opportunities analysis carried out by the Center for Work, Environment, Nutrition and Development-a partnership between Mahidol University and University of Massachusetts Lowell to identify the gaps in knowledge and research to support government policy development in the area of occupational and environmental health for workers in the informal economy. PMID:26059416

  17. Health Care Savings Attributable to Integrating Guidelines-based Asthma Care in the Pediatric Medical Home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roy Grant; Shawn K. Bowen; Matthew Neidell; Timothy Prinz; Irwin E. Redlener

    2010-01-01

    :Objective. To estimate savings to health care system of a best-practice asthma intervention in primary care for inner-city children. Methods. Data were analyzed from National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Guidelines-based initial (n=244) and follow-up (n=202) asthma assessments of patients who received enhanced treatment in primary care. Savings were calculated using cost-of-illness model and compared with program cost. Results.

  18. The health effects of emigration on those who remain at home

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Genc Burazeri; Artan Goda; Nertila Tavanxhi; Gerhard Sulo; Jonida Stefa; Jeremy D Kark

    2007-01-01

    Background The health effects of emigration on relatives staying behind has received little attention in the recent literature. Our aim was to assess the association of spouse and offspring emigration with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Albania, a country which is undergoing a particularly rapid socio-economic transition accompanied by intensive emigration. Methods A population-based case-control study, conducted in Tirana, Albania,

  19. A Home-Based Educational Intervention Improves Patient Activation Measures and Diabetes Health Indicators among Zuni Indians

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vallabh O.; Carroll, Casey; Mals, Ryan; Ghahate, Donica; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Colleran, Kathleen; Schrader, Ronald; Faber, Thomas; Burge, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction One in three people will be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050, and the proportion will likely be higher among Native Americans. Diabetes control is currently suboptimal in underserved populations despite a plethora of new therapies. Patient empowerment is a key determinant of diabetes control, but such empowerment can be difficult to achieve due to resource limitation and cultural, language and health literacy barriers. We describe a home-based educational intervention using Community Health Representatives (CHRs), leading to improvement in Patient Activation Measures scores and clinical indicators of diabetes control. Methods Sixty participants with type 2 diabetes (T2D) completed a baseline evaluation including physical exam, Point of Care (POC) testing, and the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) survey. Participants then underwent a one hour group didactic session led by Community Health Representatives (CHRs) who subsequently carried out monthly home-based educational interventions to encourage healthy lifestyles, including diet, exercise, and alcohol and cigarette avoidance until follow up at 6 months, when clinical phenotyping and the PAM survey were repeated. Results PAM scores were increased by at least one level in 35 (58%) participants, while 24 participants who started at higher baseline score did not change. Six months after intervention, mean levels of A1C decreased by 0.7 ± 1.2%; fasting blood glucose decreased by 24.0 ± 38.0 mg/dl; BMI decreased by 1.5 ± 2.1 kg/m2; total cholesterol decreased by 12.0± 28.0 mg/dl; and triglycerides decreased by 52.0 ± 71.0 mg/dl. All of these changes were statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion This six month, CHR led and community-oriented educational intervention helps inform standards of practice for the management of diabetes, engages diabetic populations in their own care, and reduces health disparities for the underserved population of Zuni Indians. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02339311 PMID:25954817

  20. Teaching Games for Understanding: the difficulties and challenges experienced by participation cricket coaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simon John Roberts

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recent changes in the structure and delivery of formalised coach education courses such as the United Kingdom Coaching Framework (UKCF) and the United Kingdom Coaching Certificate (UKCC) has manifested in an increased importance on sports coaches adopting holistic and player-centred coaching pedagogy. For one National Governing Body of sport (NGB) this has prompted a change in the content and

  1. A Systematic Observation of More and Less Successful High School Tennis Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the coaching behaviors of more and less successful high school boys' tennis coaches during practice sessions revealed that the more successful coaches asked players significantly more questions than did less successful coaches. All coaches generally demonstrated more instructional behaviors than any other type. (Author/CB)

  2. Learning a New Method: Teaching Games for Understanding in the Coaches' Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephen; Cushion, Christopher J.; Massa-Gonzalez, Ada N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Coaches' knowledge and actions are both the product and manifestation of a personally experienced involvement with the coaching process; they are linked to the coach's history and both are attributable to how they were learned. Changing established coaching practice can be problematic, particularly as coaching lacks a critical…

  3. Applying the ISO\\/IEEE 11073 Standards to Wearable Home Health Monitoring Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianchu Yao; Steve Warren

    2005-01-01

    Objective. The goal of this effort was to investigate the feasibility of applying the ISO\\/IEEE 11073 (a.k.a. X73) standards, originally\\u000a intended for bedside monitoring in hospital environments, to wearable, multi-sensor monitoring systems designed for home healthcare.\\u000a Methods. The X73 upper-layer sub-standards (i.e., nomenclature specification, domain information model, application profiles, and\\u000a vital sign device descriptions) were adopted and implemented on microcontroller-based

  4. Assessing Autonomy-Supportive Coaching Strategies in Youth Sport.

    PubMed

    Conroy, David E; Coatsworth, J Douglas

    2007-09-01

    OBJECTIVES: Autonomy support is a component of the motivational climate in youth sport that may promote youth's internalization of behaviors and attitudes. This study examined the psychometric properties of the Autonomy-Supportive Coaching Questionnaire (ASCQ), a measure of two forms of autonomy-supportive coaching perceived by young athletes. DESIGN: The study design was non-experimental. METHODS: Over a six-week season, youth (N = 165) participating in a recreational summer swim league completed measures of perceived coaching behavior (weeks 1 and 5), autonomy-supportive coaching (week 5) and psychological need satisfaction (weeks 1 and 6). RESULTS: Responses to the ASCQ could be reduced to two correlated factors representing an "interest in athlete's input" and "praise for autonomous behavior." These factors exhibited slightly different relations with perceived coaching behaviors and positively predicted coaching-associated contrasts in the satisfaction of all three basic psychological needs. CONCLUSIONS: The ASCQ appears to provide a valid assessment of young athlete's perceptions of autonomy-supportive coaching. Autonomy-supportive coaching should be evaluated as a potential source of motivational consequences of coaching and as a potential moderator of coaching effects on youth internalization. PMID:18769531

  5. Usual Primary Care Provider Characteristics of a Patient-Centered Medical Home and Mental Health Service Use

    E-print Network

    2015-01-01

    physical health functioning, geographic residence, education,physical health functioning, geographic residence, education,Physical health functioning Lowest quartile Middle quartiles Highest quartile Any physical health limitation Education

  6. Identifying comorbidities in home health care patients: does the Outcome and Assessment Information Set have incremental value to Medicare claims data?

    PubMed

    Koroukian, Siran M; Scharpf, Tanya; Bakaki, Paul M; Madigan, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    We compare the proportion of patients presenting with comorbid conditions among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure obtained by using (a) home health care claims data, (b) data from the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MedPAR), and (c) the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS), using a unique database developed by linking the records of Medicare administrative data and the OASIS. Data from the MedPAR yielded a higher proportion of patients with comorbid conditions compared to the OASIS or home health care claims data (77%, 51%, and 51%, respectively), leading us to conclude that non-home health care claims data must be used for risk adjustment in studies involving home health care patients. PMID:21328117

  7. DigiSwitch: A device to allow older adults to monitor and direct the collection and transmission of health information collected at home

    E-print Network

    Camp, L. Jean

    of health information collected at home Kelly E. Caine, Celine Y. Zimmerman, Zachary Schall-Zimmerman adult, Privacy. Reference: Caine, K. E., Zimmerman, C. Y., Schall-Zimmerman, Z., Hazlewood, W. R., Camp

  8. Undergoing Transformation to the Patient Centered Medical Home in Safety Net Health Centers: Perspectives from the Front Lines

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Michael T.; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Nocon, Robert S.; Lewis, Sarah E.; Vable, Anusha M.; Tang, Hui; Park, Seo-Young; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Huang, Elbert S.; Birnberg, Jonathan; Burnet, Deborah L.; Summerfelt, W. Thomas; Chin, Marshall H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Safety Net Health Centers (SNHCs), which include Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) provide primary care for underserved, minority and low income patients. SNHCs across the country are in the process of adopting the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model, based on promising early implementation data from demonstration projects. However, previous demonstration projects have not focused on the safety net and we know little about PCMH transformation in SNHCs. Design This qualitative study characterizes early PCMH adoption experiences at SNHCs. Setting and Participants We interviewed 98 staff,(administrators, providers, and clinical staff) at 20 of 65 SNHCs, from five states, who were participating in the first of a five-year PCMH collaborative, the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative. Main Measures We conducted 30-45 minute, semi-structured telephone interviews. Interview questions addressed benefits anticipated, obstacles encountered, and lessons learned in transition to PCMH. Results Anticipated benefits for participating in the PCMH included improved staff satisfaction and patient care and outcomes. Obstacles included staff resistance and lack of financial support for PCMH functions. Lessons learned included involving a range of staff, anticipating resistance, and using data as frequent feedback. Conclusions SNHCs encounter unique challenges to PCMH implementation, including staff turnover and providing care for patients with complex needs. Staff resistance and turnover may be ameliorated through improved healthcare delivery strategies associated with the PCMH. Creating predictable and continuous funding streams may be more fundamental challenges to PCMH transformation. PMID:23914423

  9. Bringing health home: householder and provider perspectives on the healthy housing programme in Auckland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Chris; Kearns, Robin A; Clinton, Janet; Laing, Patricia; Mahoney, Faith; McDuff, Ingrid

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the Healthy Housing Programme, an ongoing intervention initiated for New Zealand public housing tenants in 2000 and presents findings from an evaluation conducted over three consecutive years. The Programme aims to improve well-being by addressing the housing circumstances of families at high risk of infectious diseases, experiencing high levels of deprivation, and living in areas with high concentrations of low-income, and largely public, housing. This is achieved through improving the housing stock and better integrating housing, health and social services. The evaluation was based on Brinkerhoff's Success Case Methodology and sought to address the question: 'how have providers and householders responded to an intervention that addresses the dynamism of the physical and social aspects of housing?' Members of 30 households were interviewed, along with all available Programme providers (n=19). Thematic analysis reveals that in the households evaluated the Programme promotes participation in housing decisions and, indirectly, neighbourhood life more generally. Benefits include a larger stock of social housing units appropriate to residents' needs, increased co-ordination between sectors and organisations, strengthened community networks through referrals to helping agencies, and heightened insight by government officials into the housing conditions of tenants. We argue that a programme originally seeking only to address specific health problems and risk factors has been strengthened as it has evolved to adopt a more holistic approach to promoting household well-being. PMID:18191008

  10. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-84-043, HETA 84-425-1680, Montana log home residents, Kalispell, Montana. [Treated with pentachlorophenol preservatives

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    Environmental and urine sampling was conducted in 15 log homes in Montana previously treated with wood preservatives containing pentachlorophenol (PCP). The Montana Department of Health had requested assistance in evaluating exposures to PCP among state residents in PCP-treated log homes.

  11. Sports Nutrition and Doping Factors in Synchronized Swimming: Parallel Analysis among Athletes and Coaches

    PubMed Central

    Furjan Mandic, Gordana; Peric, Mia; Krzelj, Lucijana; Stankovic, Sladana; Zenic, Natasa

    2013-01-01

    Although nutrition and doping are important factors in sports, neither is often investigated in synchronized swimming (Synchro).This study aimed to define and compare Synchro athletes and their coaches on their knowledge of sports nutrition (KSN)and knowledge of doping (KD); and to study factors related to KSN and KD in each of these groups. Additionally, the KSNand KD questionnaires were evaluated for their reliability and validity. Altogether, 82 athletes (17.2 ± 1.92 years of age) and 28 coaches (30.8 ± 5.26 years of age) from Croatia and Serbia were included in the study, with a 99% response rate. The testand retest correlations were 0.94 and 0.90 for the KD and KSN,respectively. Subjects responded equally to 91% queries of the KD and 89% queries of the KSN. Although most of the coache sare highly educated, they declared self-education as the primary source of information about doping and sport-nutrition. Coaches scored higher than their athletes on both questionnaires which defined appropriate discriminative validity of the questionnaires. Variables such as age, sports experience and formal education are positively correlated to KSN and KD scores among athletes. The athletes who scored better on the KD are less prone to doping behavior in the future. These data reinforce the need for systematic educational programs on doping and sports nutrition in synchronized swimming. Special attention should be placed on younger athletes. Key Points Although most of the synchro coaches are highly educated, self-education is declared as the primary source of information about doping and sportnutrition. The knowledge of doping and doping-health hazards are negatively related to potential doping behavior in the future among synchronized swimmers The data reinforce the need for systematic educational programs on doping and sports nutrition in synchronized swimming. We advocate improving the knowledge of sports nutrition among older coaches and the knowledge of doping among younger coaches, while among athletes,younger swimmers should be targeted PMID:24421736

  12. Patient-centered medical home initiative produced modest economic results for Veterans Health Administration, 2010-12.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Paul L; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Wong, Edwin S; Hernandez, Susan E; Batten, Adam; Lo, Sophie; Lemon, Jaclyn M; Conrad, Douglas A; Grembowski, David; Nelson, Karin; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-06-01

    In 2010 the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began a nationwide initiative called Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) that reorganized care at all VHA primary care clinics in accordance with the patient-centered medical home model. We analyzed data for fiscal years 2003-12 to assess how trends in health care use and costs changed after the implementation of PACT. We found that PACT was associated with modest increases in primary care visits and with modest decreases in both hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions and outpatient visits with mental health specialists. We estimated that these changes avoided $596 million in costs, compared to the investment in PACT of $774 million, for a potential net loss of $178 million in the study period. Although PACT has not generated a positive return, it is still maturing, and trends in costs and use are favorable. Adopting patient-centered care does not appear to have been a major financial risk for the VHA. PMID:24889947

  13. COACH syndrome associated with multifocal liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Gabriele I; Wagner, Siegfried; Flemming, Peer; Bleck, Joerg S; Gebel, Michael; Schedel, Ingolf; Schüler, Andreas; Galanski, Michael; Manns, Michael P

    2002-10-01

    Here, we describe a 20-yr-old woman with COACH syndome (hypoplasia of Cerebellar vermis, Oligophrenia, congenital Ataxia, Coloboma, and Hepatic fibrosis) developing multiple liver lesions. Epigastric and right upper abdominal pain and lack of appetite led to clinical evaluation. Liver function tests showed an increase in transaminases and cholestatic parameters; alpha-fetoprotein was in the normal range. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging examinations revealed multiple liver lesions. Histological examinations of ultrasonographically guided biopsies were consistent with regenerative hepatic nodules without features of malignant or dysplastic cells. The sizes of these tumors did not change over a period of 12 months. Our report presents the 10th case of COACH syndrome with a hitherto undescribed association with hepatic tumors. PMID:12385458

  14. 1 Sport Clubs Instructor/Coaching Agreement Club Name: ____________________________________________ Academic Year: _____________

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    1 Sport Clubs Instructor/Coaching Agreement Club Name: ____________________________________________ Academic Year: _____________ Instructor/Coach Name academic year (fall semester through spring semester) unless otherwise indicated below. All coaches must

  15. A Strengths-Based Approach to Coaching Mental Toughness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandy Gordon; Daniel F. Gucciardi

    2011-01-01

    Developing mental toughness has become a major focus for athletes, coaches, sport teams and organizations. Emerging research has supported a variety of influences (e.g., coaches, parents, self) and mechanisms (e.g., reflecting on our experiences, coach motivational climate) by which mental toughness development likely occurs. In this article we focus on a strengths-based approach to mental toughness development, which has received

  16. Building self-efficacy in tennis players: A coach's perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Weinberg; Allen Jackson

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the degree to which high school and age group tennis coaches use 13 strategies for influencing self-efficacy and their evaluation of the effectiveness of those strategies. Self-efficacy rating differences between categories of coaches (e.g., male versus female, successful versus less successful, more versus less experienced, physical education\\/coaching courses versus no courses)

  17. The coach-athlete relationship: a motivational model.

    PubMed

    Mageau, Genevičve A; Vallerand, Robert J

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a motivational model of the coach-athlete relationship that describes how coaches may influence athletes' motivation. In line with cognitive evaluation theory (Deci and Ryan, 1980, 1985) and the hierarchical model of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (Vallerand, 1997, 2000), a motivational sequence is proposed where coaches' personal orientation towards coaching, the context within which they operate, and their perceptions of their athletes' behaviour and motivation influence coaches' behaviours. Also, coaches' behaviours in the form of autonomy-supportive behaviours, provision of structure and involvement have a beneficial impact on athletes' needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness, which, in turn, nurture athletes' intrinsic motivation and self-determined types of extrinsic motivation. Here, we first review coaches' autonomy-supportive behaviours. We then describe the psychological processes through which coaching behaviours have a positive influence on athletes' intrinsic and self-determined extrinsic motivation. Finally, we identify social and personality processes that determine coaching behaviours. PMID:14626368

  18. User preferences and usability of iVitality: optimizing an innovative online research platform for home-based health monitoring

    PubMed Central

    van Osch, Mara; Rövekamp, AJM; Bergman-Agteres, Stephanie N; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Ooms, Sharon J; Mooijaart, Simon P; Vermeulen, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background The iVitality online research platform has been developed to gain insight into the relationship between early risk factors (ie, poorly controlled hypertension, physical or mental inactivity) and onset and possibly prevention of dementia. iVitality consists of a website, a smartphone application, and sensors that can monitor these indicators at home. Before iVitality can be implemented, it should fit the needs and preferences of users, ie, offspring of patients with dementia. This study aimed to explore users’ motivation to participate in home-based health monitoring research, to formulate requirements based on users’ preferences to optimize iVitality, and to test usability of the smartphone application of iVitality. Methods We recruited 13 participants (aged 42–64 years, 85% female), who were offspring of patients with dementia. A user-centered methodology consisting of four iterative phases was used. Three semistructured interviews provided insight into motivation and acceptance of using iVitality (phase 1). A focus group with six participants elaborated on expectations and preferences regarding iVitality (phase 2). Findings from phase 1 and 2 were triangulated by two semistructured interviews (phase 3). Four participants assessed the usability of the smartphone application (phase 4) using a think aloud procedure and a questionnaire measuring ease and efficiency of use (scale 1–7; higher scores indicated better usability). Results All participants were highly motivated to contribute to dementia research. However, the frequency of home-based health monitoring should not be too high. Participants preferred to receive feedback about their measurements and information regarding the relationship between these measurements and dementia. Despite minor technical errors, iVitality was considered easy and efficient to use (mean score 5.50, standard deviation 1.71). Conclusion Offspring of patients with dementia are motivated to contribute to home-based monitoring research by using iVitality and are able to use the smartphone application. The formulated requirements will be embedded to optimize iVitality. PMID:26170635

  19. Using integrated bio-physiotherapy informatics in home health-care settings: A qualitative analysis of a point-of-care decision support system.

    PubMed

    Canally, Culum; Doherty, Sean; Doran, Diane M; Goubran, Rafik A

    2015-06-01

    The growing need to gain efficiencies within a home care setting has prompted home care practitioners to focus on health informatics to address the needs of an aging clientele. The remote and heterogeneous nature of the home care environment necessitates the use of non-intrusive client monitoring and a portable, point-of-care graphical user interface. Using a grounded theory approach, this article examines the simulated use of a graphical user interface by practitioners in a home care setting to explore the salient features of monitoring the activity of home care clients. The results demonstrate the need for simple, interactive displays that can provide large amounts of geographical and temporal data relating to patient activity. Additional emerging themes from interviews indicate that home care professionals would use a graphical user interface of this type for patient education and goal setting as well as to assist in the decision-making process of home care practitioners. PMID:24835146

  20. Planning Patient-Centered Health Homes for Medicaid Psychiatric Patients at Greatest Risk for Intensive Service Use.

    PubMed

    West, Joyce C; Rae, Donald S; Mojtabai, Ramin; Duffy, Farifteh F; Kuramoto, Janet; Moscicki, Eve; Narrow, William E

    2015-07-01

    This study identified characteristics of Medicaid psychiatric patients at risk of hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits to identify their service delivery needs. A total of 4,866 psychiatrists were randomly selected from the AMA Physician Masterfile; 62 % responded, 32 % met eligibility criteria and reported on 1,625 Medicaid patients. Patients with schizophrenia, substance use disorders, suicidal and violent ideation/behavior, and psychotic, substance use, or manic symptoms were at high risk for intensive service use, along with homeless and incarcerated patients. Patients with schizophrenia or psychotic symptoms represented 37 % of patients, but used 73 % of all hospital days and 61 % of all ED visits. Patients with substance use problems comprised 21 % of patients, but used nearly half of all ED visits. Our findings highlight opportunities to enhance treatments and interventions, and inform the development of patient-centered health homes to address the needs of patients at high risk for intensive service use. PMID:25666205

  1. Geriatric study in Europe on health effects of air quality in nursing homes (GERIE study) profile: objectives, study protocol and descriptive data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Indoor air pollution (IAP) constitutes a major global public health problem requiring increasing efforts in research and policymaking that may have special significance for elderly that are likely to spend most of their day indoors and appear to be particularly susceptible to adverse effects of chemical pollutants and bio-contaminants. Yet, evidence existing on the effects of IAP in elderly is scanty. The Geriatric study in Europe on health effects of air quality in nursing homes (GERIE) study aimed to assess health effects of major indoor air pollutants and thermal conditions in elderly (> 70 years) living stably in nursing homes (NH) across Europe. Respiratory effects were particularly considered as airways and lung constitute the first target of air pollutants. Objectives We describe here the rationale and the methods of the GERIE Study. Methods 8 nursing homes were randomly selected in 7 European countries. Twenty individuals were randomly selected in each nursing home. Major indoor and outdoor air chemical pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, PM0.1, formaldehyde, NO2; O3, VOC, CO2) and bio-contaminants (moulds, allergens) were assessed objectively with standardized procedures. Major health status indicators were assessed through a standardized questionnaire, non-invasive clinical tests and blood and urine biomarkers as well as saliva for ADN. Results The GERIE study has given the opportunity to publish two reviews on respiratory health effects of indoor and outdoor air pollution in elderly. In addition it has provided the inventory of air quality and thermal conditions in 50 nursing homes across Europe and data on respiratory health status in 600 elderly aged 82 years in mean. Major future results will include the relationships between NH environment and health in elderly. Conclusions The main long-term purpose of the GERIE study is to improve the health of elderly who permanently reside in nursing homes or of those who are exposed to indoor air pollution because of reduced mobility. PMID:24262306

  2. Health, wellbeing and nutritional status of older people living in UK care homes: an exploratory evaluation of changes in food and drink provision

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Food and drink are important determinants of physical and social health in care home residents. This study explored whether a pragmatic methodology including routinely collected data was feasible in UK care homes, to describe the health, wellbeing and nutritional status of care home residents and assess effects of changed provision of food and drink at three care homes on residents' falls (primary outcome), anaemia, weight, dehydration, cognitive status, depression, lipids and satisfaction with food and drink provision. Methods We measured health, wellbeing and nutritional status of 120 of 213 residents of six care homes in Norfolk, UK. An intervention comprising improved dining atmosphere, greater food choice, extended restaurant hours, and readily available snacks and drinks machines was implemented in three care homes. Three control homes maintained their previous system. Outcomes were assessed in the year before and the year after the changes. Results Use of routinely collected data was partially successful, but loss to follow up and levels of missing data were high, limiting power to identify trends in the data. This was a frail older population (mean age 87, 71% female) with multiple varied health problems. During the first year 60% of residents had one or more falls, 40% a wound care visit, and 40% a urinary tract infection. 45% were on diuretics, 24% antidepressants, and 43% on psychotropic medication. There was a slight increase in falls from year 1 to year 2 in the intervention homes, and a much bigger increase in control homes, leading to a statistically non-significant 24% relative reduction in residents' rate of falls in intervention homes compared with control homes (adjusted rate ratio 0.76, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.02, p = 0.06). Conclusions Care home residents are frail and experience multiple health risks. This intervention to improve food and drink provision was well received by residents, but effects on health indicators (despite the relative reduction in falls rate) were inconclusive, partly due to problems with routine data collection and loss to follow up. Further research with more homes is needed to understand which, if any, components of the intervention may be successful. Trial registration Trial registration: ISRCTN86057119. PMID:20507560

  3. Improving medication management after a hospitalization with pharmacist home visits and electronic personal health records: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Stephen Jon; Goldstein, Elaina; Charbonneau, Camille; Jackson, Anita; Patry, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Background Substantial opportunity exists to improve medication management in the period following a hospital discharge. The objective of this study was to assess and improve medication management during care transitions through pharmacist home visits and the use of an electronic personal health record (ePHR) system. Methods Recently discharged patients aged 50 years or older and having a chronic medical condition were offered the opportunity to meet with a pharmacist in the home setting to review medication instructions and receive a demonstration of an ePHR system. Patients agreeable to using the ePHR system were offered pharmacist support with setting up the ePHR system, having emphasis on documenting and reviewing medication regimens. Medication-related problems identified by the pharmacist during the visit were categorized according to ePHR use and by other characteristics. Results Thirty recently discharged patients with chronic disease were visited by a pharmacist over a 6-month period. The percentage of medication-related problems identified by the pharmacist was greater among those patients who agreed to use the ePHR system, as compared with patients whose visit did not include use of the ePHR (75% versus 40%, respectively; P=0.06). Differing types of medication-related problems were identified, including therapy duplications, lack of use of clinically important therapies, and patient nonadherence. Conclusion For some patients, the home setting can be a suitable venue for medication review and education after discharge from hospital. Assisting patients with setting up the ePHR system may enhance pharmacists’ ability to identify and resolve medication-related problems that may lead to rehospitalization. PMID:24465136

  4. Predictors for Assessing Electronic Messaging Between Nurses and General Practitioners as a Useful Tool for Communication in Home Health Care Services: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofoss, Dag; Grimsmo, Anders; Hellesų, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Background Nurses providing home health care services are dependent on access to patient information and communicating with general practitioners (GPs) to deliver safe and effective health care to patients. Information and communication technology (ICT) systems are viewed as powerful tools for this purpose. In Norway, a standardized electronic messaging (e-messaging) system is currently being established in health care. Objective The aim of this study was to explore home health care nurses’ assessments of the utility of the e-messaging system for communicating with GPs and identify elements that influence the assessment of e-messaging as a useful communication tool. Methods The data were collected using a self-developed questionnaire based on variables identified by focus group interviews with home health care nurses (n=425) who used e-messaging and existing research. Data were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Results Over two-thirds (425/632, 67.2%) of the home health care nurses returned the questionnaire. A high proportion (388/399, 97.2%) of the home health care nurses who returned the questionnaire found the e-messaging system to be a useful tool for communication with GPs. The odds of reporting that e-messaging was a useful tool were over five times higher (OR 5.1, CI 2.489-10.631, P<.001) if the nurses agreed or strongly agreed that e-messaging was easy to use. The odds of finding e-messaging easy to use were nearly seven times higher (OR 6.9, CI 1.713-27.899, P=.007) if the nurses did not consider the system functionality poor. If the nurses had received training in the use of e-messaging, the odds were over six times higher (OR 6.6, CI 2.515-17.437, P<.001) that they would consider e-messaging easy to use. The odds that a home health care nurse would experience e-messaging as easy to use increased as the full-time equivalent percentage of the nurses increased (OR 1.032, CI 1.001-1.064, P=.045). Conclusions This study has shown that technical (ease of use and system functionality), organizational (training), and individual (full-time equivalent percentage) elements had an impact on home health care nurses’ assessments of using e-messaging to communicate with GPs. By identifying these elements, it is easier to determine which interventions are the most important for the development and implementation of ICT systems in home health care services. PMID:25691234

  5. Teaching Coaches to Coach Holistically: Can Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robyn L.; Turner, Poppy

    2006-01-01

    Background: Coaching, as related to improving others' sporting experience and/or performance, at any level is unquestionably a complex business. General agreement exists that the dynamic and intricate nature of the work in teaching, guiding and managing others in this regard precludes any paint-by-number plans that practitioners can easily follow.…

  6. Preschool Teachers' Insights about Web-Based Self-Coaching versus On-Site Expert Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Darbianne; Snyder, Patricia; McLaughlin, Tara

    2015-01-01

    Implementation science defines training and coaching as two important competency components to support fidelity of implementation of evidence-based practices. The present study explores the perspectives of 21 preschool teachers, located in the United States, about the professional development (PD) they received, which included training and…

  7. Pilot Testing a Cognitive-Behavioral Protocol on Psychosocial Predictors of Exercise, Nutrition, Weight, and Body Satisfaction Changes in a College-Level Health-Related Fitness Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annesi, James J.; Howton, Amy; Johnson, Ping H.; Porter, Kandice J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Small-scale pilot testing of supplementing a required college health-related fitness course with a cognitive-behavioral exercise-support protocol (The Coach Approach). Participants: Three classes were randomly assigned to Usual processes (n = 32), Coach Approach-supplemented: Mid-size Groups (n = 32), and Coach Approach-supplemented:…

  8. The Challenge of Coaching: Providing Cohesion among Multiple Reform Agendas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Rosann; Ouimette, Monique; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This study probes more deeply on defining the "reform agenda" and answering the question, "How do coaches balance pushing the reform agenda and meeting the immediate needs of school staff?" This study first teases apart what coaches mean by "reform agenda" and "immediate needs." The term "reform agenda" has multiple owners: the district reform…

  9. Athlete's retention of a coach's instruction before a judo competition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabel Mesquita; Antonio Rosado; Nuno Januįrio; Elsa Barroja

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the instruction of the Judo coach immediately before the competition, in the proc- ess of preparation for the fights, looking to (1) study the coher- ency between the information which the coach transmits and that which the athlete retains; (2) identify the correlation be- tween the coherency, the extension and the

  10. USA Track & Field Coaching Manual. USA Track & Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Track and Field, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    This book presents comprehensive, ready-to-apply information from 33 world-class coaches and experts about major track and field events for high school and college coaches. The volume features proven predictive testing procedures; detailed event-specific technique instruction; carefully crafted training programs; and preparation and performance…

  11. Seeing Is Believing: Using Imagery to Enhance Your Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Imagery is a powerful sport psychology tool easily accessible to coaches. These reminders can help coaches improve their athletes' images and performance: (1) Create vivid and controllable images; (2) Use polysensory images and instructional cues, delivered, ideally, in real time; (3) Use internal and external perspectives; (4) Use imagery during…

  12. Benefits of Coaching on Test Scores Seen as Negligible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Report on Education Research, 1983

    1983-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: A new study by a pair of Harvard University researchers discounts earlier findings that coaching can substantially improve student performance on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). "There is simply insufficient evidence that large score increases are a result of a coaching program," write Rebecca…

  13. Instructional Coach Job Satisfaction: An Exploration of Role Stressors

    E-print Network

    Debacker, Jeffrey

    INSTRUCTIONAL COACH JOB SATISFACTION: AN EXPLORATION OF ROLE STRESSORS BY JEFFREY PAUL DEBACKER Submitted to the graduate degree program in... conflict, role ambiguity, and role overload are likely to influence instructional coach job satisfaction without structures in place to moderate these roles. Through bivariate...

  14. The Character of a Coach: Success Depends on Trustworthiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psencik, Kay

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the role of coach as one that would nurture and build trust in their organization, allow others to see the coach as trustworthy, and build positive energy in the organization. The author offers some qualities that contribute to this trustworthy position, such as: self-awareness, honesty, sincerity, competence, reliability,…

  15. The Efficacy of Math Coaching: An Evaluative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbins, C. Neelie

    2010-01-01

    There is a lack of implementation of instructional strategies to assist middle school teachers in improving mathematics education for their students. Coaching is one solution to this problem, but its impact on student achievement is unclear. This case study evaluated the relationship between coaching and teacher efficacy and the impact of these…

  16. Coaches' views of mental toughness and how it is built

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Weinberg; Joanne Butt; Briana Culp

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore coaches' perceptions of mental toughness attributes as well as the strategies used to build mental toughness. Participants were 10 National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches from a variety of sports. In-depth interviews were conducted using standard qualitative methodology and content analyzed by three researchers. Based on raw data responses, lower and

  17. Master mentor and connoisseur coach: learn from the best!

    PubMed

    Nease, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Peer support can have a significant impact on nurse wellbeing and patient outcomes. Mentoring and coaching, elements of support, positively impact novice nurse development, staff satisfaction, and patient care. In this article, mentoring and coaching are explored and best practices identified from the ministries of Jesus and the Apostle Paul. PMID:20949872

  18. Heads Up: Concussion in High School Sports. Guide for Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guide provides general information to high school sports coaches about concussions. It focuses on the fact that coaches can play a key role in preventing concussions and managing them properly when they occur. The following sections are included: (1) The Facts; (2) Signs and Symptoms; (3) Prevention and Preparation; (4) When a Concussion…

  19. Mathematics Coaching: A New Kind of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obara, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    While millions of dollars are spent on traditional professional development each year in the USA, some school districts are trying other means to increase students' test scores. One strategy is hiring mathematics coaches as on-site professional developers. Whereas mathematics coaching is a newly investigated research area and many issues still…

  20. Intuition in Coaching: It's Not Magic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pierre, Peter; Smith, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Many coaches have been called instinctive for decisions they have made, whether in game situations, recruiting, or other aspects of their job. Coaches often report having "gut feelings" before making important decisions. The purpose of this article is to dispel the notion of intuition as a magical ability, and begin to look at it as an…