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  1. Health Coaching for the Underserved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Twelve individuals (four homeless, two formerly homeless, and six low-income) received 12 weeks of free health coaching, an intervention normally undertaken by clients who pay $40 to $200 out of pocket for coaching services. The health coaching relationships were conducted with protocols developed for managing executive health at a Fortune 100 firm. This experimental model was constructed to explore what happens when coaching conversations for change and possibility are delivered to marginalized and underserved communities that typically undergo vastly different interactions with authorities in law, healthcare, and social services. Phase 1 of the project recruited the homeless individuals from street sites throughout San Francisco, California, and a temporary shelter. Phase 2 of the project worked with low-income and formerly homeless individuals who occupied a subsidized housing complex. Of the coaching recipients, three were black, five were Hispanic, three were of mixed race, and one declined to disclose his ethnicity. Half were Spanish speaking; immigrant status was recent for five of the 12. None had ever talked with a health coach before; only three knew how to utilize low-cost public health clinics. This case report illustrates how the motivational power of coaching conversations was a modestly useful methodology in breaking through the social isolation and loneliness of street-dwelling adults with chronic health problems. It also was a useful methodology for developing capacity for accomplishing short-term goals that were self-identified. Additionally, health coaching presented an opportunity for transitioning poverty-level individuals from passive recipients using public health sector services to more empowered actors with first-stage awareness who initiated preventive health actions. PMID:24416675

  2. Health Coaching: A Developing Field within Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The health promotion and health education literature has references to health counselling. Yet, beyond the field of health, coaching has become a popular method to enhance and facilitate individual and group performance in business, sports, and personal areas of life. This paper focuses on the recent development of health coaching by practitioners…

  3. Complexity and Health Coaching: Synergies in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gail J.; Wong, Winnie; Rush, Danica

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in this paper addresses the complexities and ambiguities for persons living with chronic illness in order to provide person-centered care and support that are unique and responsive to the context of persons' lives. Informed by complexity thinking and relational inquiry, the RN health coach is an emergent innovation of creative action with community and groups that support persons as they shape their health and patterns of living. PMID:24102025

  4. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  5. The Study of Health Coaching: The Ithaca Coaching Project, Research Design, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Health coaching (HC) is a process holding tremendous potential as a complementary medical intervention to shape healthy behavior change and affect rates of chronic lifestyle diseases. Empirical knowledge of effectiveness for the HC process, however, is lacking. The purposes of this paper are to present the study protocol for the Ithaca Coaching Project while also addressing research design, methodological issues, and directions for HC research. This is one of the first large-scale, randomized control trials of HC for primary prevention examining impact on physical and emotional health status in an employee population. An additional intent for the project is to investigate self-determination theory as a theoretical framework for the coaching process. Participants (n=300) are recruited as part of a campus-wide wellness initiative and randomly assigned to one of three levels of client-centered HC or a control with standard wellness program care. Repeated measures analyses of covariance will be used to examine coaching effectiveness while path analyses will be used to examine relationships between coaching processes, self-determination variables, and health outcomes. There is a great need for well-designed HC studies that define coaching best practices, examine intervention effectiveness, provide cost:benefit analysis, and address scope of practice. This information will allow a clearer definition of HC to emerge and determination of if, and how, HC fits in modern-day healthcare. This is an exciting but critical time for HC research and for the practice of HC. PMID:24416673

  6. Evaluation of Telephone Health Coaching of German Health Insurants with Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Härter, Martin; Dwinger, Sarah; Seebauer, Laura; Simon, Daniela; Herbarth, Lutz; Siegmund-Schultze, Elisabeth; Temmert, Daniel; Bermejo, Isaac; Dirmaier, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate how patients with chronic conditions evaluate telephone health coaching provided by their health insurance company. Methods: A retrospective survey was conducted among coaching participants ("n" = 834). Outcomes included the general evaluation of the coaching, the evaluation of process and…

  7. Effective Tobacco Cessation via Health Coaching: An Institutional Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Miranda; Ayers, Gale D.; Talbert, Betina; Hill, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tobacco abuse is a well-recognized scourge on health and healthcare costs. Attempts to facilitate tobacco cessation are rarely better than marginally effective. Primary Objective: To describe an observational trial of an existing and highly successful tobacco cessation program featuring health coaching as the primary intervention. Core components of program design and data are presented and may serve as a model for other public health settings. Methods: Health coaching and three complementary program components (auriculotherapy, alpha-electrical stimulation, and relaxation techniques) are presented. Quit rates at 6 months for 161 patients over 3 years are provided featuring 30-day point prevalence smoke free and intent-to-treat values. Comparisons for telephonic vs in-clinic health coaching, free choice vs mandated participation, and program costs are provided. Results: Point prevalence quit rate was 88.7% while the more conservative intent-to-treat quit rate was 51.6%. Telephonic and in-clinic health coaching were not significantly different at any time point. Smoke-free rates at 6 and 12 months were 76.9% and 63.2%, respectively. Conclusions: Two cost-effective smoking cessation models featuring health coaching are presented. Point prevalence (30-day) above 80% and an enduring effect was seen. Personal and societal burdens (health and financial) of tobacco use might be greatly impacted if such programs were successfully implemented on a larger scale. PMID:25568823

  8. Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  9. Health Coaching Education: A Conversation With Pioneers in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

  10. Health coaching education: a conversation with pioneers in the field.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

  11. 76 FR 52377 - Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ...COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach...current and accurate information concerning the securities of Diamond Home Services, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  12. Home Health Services

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicare doesn't pay for: 24-hour-a-day care at home Meals delivered to your home Homemaker ... get home health care if you attend adult day care. Note: Home health services may also include medical ...

  13. Health coaching for glaucoma care: a pilot study using mixed methods

    PubMed Central

    Vin, Anita; Schneider, Suzanne; Muir, Kelly W; Rosdahl, Jullia A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to glaucoma medications is essential for successful treatment of the disease but is complex and difficult for many of our patients. Health coaching has been used successfully in the treatment of other chronic diseases. This pilot study explores the use of health coaching for glaucoma care. Methods A mixed methods study design was used to assess the health coaching intervention for glaucoma patients. The health coaching intervention consisted of four to six health coaching sessions with a certified health coach via telephone. Quantitative measures included demographic and health information, adherence to glaucoma medications (using the visual analog adherence scale and medication event monitoring system), and an exit survey rating the experience. Qualitative measures included a precoaching health questionnaire, notes made by the coach during the intervention, and an exit interview with the subjects at the end of the study. Results Four glaucoma patients participated in the study; all derived benefits from the health coaching. Study subjects demonstrated increased glaucoma drop adherence in response to the coaching intervention, in both visual analog scale and medication event monitoring system. Study subjects’ qualitative feedback reflected a perceived improvement in both eye and general health self-care. The subjects stated that they would recommend health coaching to friends or family members. Conclusion Health coaching was helpful to the glaucoma patients in this study; it has the potential to improve glaucoma care and overall health. PMID:26604666

  14. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  15. Home health care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  16. Virtual Training and Coaching of Health Behavior: Example from Mindfulness Meditation Training

    PubMed Central

    Hudlicka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Objective Computer-based virtual coaches are increasingly being explored for patient education, counseling, and health behavior training and coaching. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Virtual Mindfulness Coach for training and coaching in mindfulness meditation. Method The coach was implemented as an embodied conversational character, providing mindfulness training and coaching via mixed initiative, text-based, natural language dialogue with the student, and emphasizing affect-adaptive interaction. (The term ‘mixed initiative dialog’ refers to a human-machine dialogue where either can initiate a conversation or a change in the conversation topic.) Results Findings from a pilot evaluation study indicate that the coach-based training is more effective in helping students establish a regular practice than self-administered training using written and audio materials. The coached group also appeared to be in more advanced stages of change in terms of the transtheoretical model, and have a higher sense of self-efficacy regarding establishment of a regular mindfulness practice. Conclusion These results suggest that virtual coach-based training of mindfulness is both feasible, and potentially more effective, than a self-administered program. Of particular interest is the identification of the specific coach features that contribute to its effectiveness. Practice Implications Virtual coaches could provide easily-accessible and cost-effective customized training for a range of health behaviors. The affect-adaptive aspect of these coaches is particularly relevant for helping patients establish long-term behavior changes. PMID:23809167

  17. mHealth in the Wild: Using Novel Data to Examine the Reach, Use, and Impact of PTSD Coach

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Beth K; Kuhn, Eric; Makin-Byrd, Kerry N; Ramsey, Kelly M; Hoffman, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Background A majority of Americans (58%) now use smartphones, making it possible for mobile mental health apps to reach large numbers of those who are living with untreated, or under-treated, mental health symptoms. Although early trials suggest positive effects for mobile health (mHealth) interventions, little is known about the potential public health impact of mobile mental health apps. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize reach, use, and impact of “PTSD Coach”, a free, broadly disseminated mental health app for managing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Methods Using a mixed-methods approach, aggregate mobile analytics data from 153,834 downloads of PTSD Coach were analyzed in conjunction with 156 user reviews. Results Over 60% of users engaged with PTSD Coach on multiple occasions (mean=6.3 sessions). User reviews reflected gratitude for the availability of the app and being able to use the app specifically during moments of need. PTSD Coach users reported relatively high levels of trauma symptoms (mean PTSD Checklist Score=57.2, SD=15.7). For users who chose to use a symptom management tool, distress declined significantly for both first-time users (mean=1.6 points, SD=2.6 on the 10-point distress thermometer) and return-visit users (mean=2.0, SD=2.3). Analysis of app session data identified common points of attrition, with only 80% of first-time users reaching the app’s home screen and 37% accessing one of the app’s primary content areas. Conclusions These findings suggest that PTSD Coach has achieved substantial and sustained reach in the population, is being used as intended, and has been favorably received. PTSD Coach is a unique platform for the delivery of mobile mental health education and treatment, and continuing evaluation and improvement of the app could further strengthen its public health impact. PMID:26543913

  18. 76 FR 52377 - Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach, Inc... that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Diamond...

  19. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-01-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

  20. Home Health Aides

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ventilators, which help clients breathe. <- Summary Work Environment -> Work Environment About this section Most aides work in ... to work and stay engaged in their communities. Work Schedules Most home health aides worked full time ...

  1. Integrating big data and actionable health coaching to optimize wellness.

    PubMed

    Hood, Leroy; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Price, Nathan D

    2015-01-01

    The Hundred Person Wellness Project (HPWP) is a 10-month pilot study of 100 'well' individuals where integrated data from whole-genome sequencing, gut microbiome, clinical laboratory tests and quantified self measures from each individual are used to provide actionable results for health coaching with the goal of optimizing wellness and minimizing disease. In a commentary in BMC Medicine, Diamandis argues that HPWP and similar projects will likely result in 'unnecessary and potential harmful over-testing'. We argue that this new approach will ultimately lead to lower costs, better healthcare, innovation and economic growth. The central points of the HPWP are: 1) it is focused on optimizing wellness through longitudinal data collection, integration and mining of individual data clouds, enabling development of predictive models of wellness and disease that will reveal actionable possibilities; and 2) by extending this study to 100,000 well people, we will establish multiparameter, quantifiable wellness metrics and identify markers for wellness to early disease transitions for most common diseases, which will ultimately allow earlier disease intervention, eventually transitioning the individual early on from a disease back to a wellness trajectory. PMID:25575752

  2. The survive and thrive program: encouraging coaching, mentoring, and peer learning among new local health officials.

    PubMed

    Henry, Vonna; Sarpy, Sue Ann; Green, Rachel; Kaplan, Seth; Bonzon, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for programs tailored to train the approximately 300 new local health officials (LHOs) who emerge each year with the knowledge and skills needed to build, maintain, and enhance public health capacity and infrastructure. The Survive and Thrive program incorporates a curriculum that is designed to address the challenges faced by a new LHO. The Survive and Thrive program seeks to address these issues by leveraging the expertise of the current generation of local public health leadership by incorporating experienced LHOs as coaches. Coaching, mentoring, and peer assistance by seasoned LHOs is critical to these new learning opportunities. This article highlights aspects of the coaching component of Survive and Thrive program. Actual examples of its relevance to the professional growth and development of new LHOs and the coaches themselves are presented. The article also describes the novel approach of including coaches in evaluating program effectiveness. The Survive and Thrive program's coaching component can serve as a template for other public health leadership programs and related workforce development initiatives as well as a model to help facilitate lifelong learning of LHOs. PMID:20150793

  3. Increasing patient participation in reproductive health consultations: an evaluation of "Smart Patient" coaching in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Mi; Putjuk, Fitri; Basuki, Endang; Kols, Adrienne

    2003-06-01

    Paternalistic models of health care, social distance between patients and providers, and cultural norms discourage patients from playing an active role in health consultations. This study tested whether individual coaching can give family planning patients the confidence and communication skills to talk more openly and more vigorously with providers. Educators met with 384 Indonesian women in clinic waiting rooms and coached them on asking questions, expressing concerns, and seeking clarification. An analysis of audiotaped consultations found that patients who received coaching articulated significantly more questions and concerns than others. Coaching narrowed differentials in active communication by patient type, age, and assertiveness, but it widened differentials by patient education and socioeconomic class. The discontinuation rate at 8 months was lower in the intervention than the control condition, but the difference was only marginally significant. PMID:12781926

  4. Can life coaching improve health outcomes? – A systematic review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, coaching has received special attention as a method to improve healthy lifestyle behaviours. The fact that coaching has found its way into healthcare and may provide new ways of engaging the patients and making them accountable for their health, justifies the need for an overview of the evidence regarding coaching interventions used in patient care, the effect of the interventions, and the quality of the studies published. However, in order to provide a clear definition of the coaching interventions selected for this review, we have found it necessary to distinguish between health coaching and life coaching. In this review, we will only focus on the latter method and on that basis assess the health related outcomes of life coaching. Methods Intervention studies using quantitative or qualitative methods to evaluate the outcome of the life coach interventions were identified through systematic literature searches in PubMed, Embase, Psycinfo, and CINAHL. The quality of the methodology was independently assessed by three of the authors using a criteria list. Results A total of 4359 citations were identified in the electronic search and five studies were included; two of them were randomized controlled trials and met all quality criteria. The two studies investigating objective health outcomes (HbA1c) showed mixed but promising results, especially concerning the patient group that usually does not benefit from intensified interventions. Conclusion Because of the very limited number of solid studies, this review can only present tendencies for patient outcomes and a preliminary description of an effective life coaching intervention. The coaching method used in these studies aims to improve self-efficacy and self-empowerment. This may explain why the studies including disadvantaged patients showed the most convincing results. The findings also indicate that some patients benefit from being met with an alternative approach and a different type of communication than they are used to from health care personnel. In order to get a closer look at what is in the ‘black box’, we suggest that the description and categorisation of the coaching methods are described more comprehensively, and that research into this area is supplemented by a more qualitative approach. PMID:24148189

  5. Clinician perspectives on working with health coaches: A mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Kate; Willard-Grace, Rachel; O'Connell, Brendon; DeVore, Denise; Prado, Camille; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Hessler, Danielle; Thom, David H

    2015-09-01

    We sought to understand how health coaches affect the work of primary care clinicians and influence their perception of patient care. As a mixed methods hypothesis-generating study, we administered a structured post-visit survey and conducted in-depth individual interviews with primary care clinicians who worked with health coaches at two urban community health centers. Survey responses were compared using t tests. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using Atlas.ti software and modified grounded theory. Surveys were completed by 15 of 17 clinicians for 61% of eligible patient visits (269/441). Compared to usual care patients, clinicians rated visits with health-coached patients as less demanding (2.44 vs. 3.06, p < .001) and were more likely to feel that they had adequate time with their patient (3.96 vs. 3.57, p < .001). Qualitative findings expanded upon these results and uncovered four key health coach activities thought to improve patient care. Through developing a rapport with patients over time and working with patients between medical visits, health coaches (a) empower patients by offering self-management support, (b) bridge communication gaps between clinicians and patients, (c) assist patients in navigating the health care system, and (d) act as a point of contact for patients. PMID:25751177

  6. Evaluation of a personal mobile coaching service for health tracking.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Fabiana; Brivio, Eleonora; Galimberti, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Yukendu is a personal mobile coaching service that supports people in reaching good levels of psychological and physical well-being. The aim of this contribution is to describe the peculiarities of Yukendu and its multi-step evaluation process. PMID:23792864

  7. Experience with Health Coach-Mediated Physician Referral in an Employed Insured Population

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sowmya R.; Rogers, Robert S.; Mailhot, Johanna R.; Galvin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Given increasing interest in helping consumers choose high-performing (higher quality, lower cost) physicians, one approach chosen by several large employers is to provide assistance in the form of a telephonic “health coach” — a registered nurse who assists with identifying appropriate and available providers. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the health coach’s influence on provider choice and the quality of the user experience in the early introduction of this service. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey of 3490 employees and covered dependents of a large national firm that offered health coach services to all employees and covered dependents. The survey began in September 2007 with proportionate stratified sampling of 1750 employees and covered dependents who used the services between October 2007 and February 2008, and 1740 non-users. PARTICIPANTS Insured adults (ages 21–64) employed by a large national firm or covered dependents of employees. MEASUREMENTS Awareness of the service, reason for using service, visits to providers recommended by service, use of health advice provided by service, user satisfaction. MAIN RESULTS The primary reason for using the service was to obtain provider referrals (73%). Fifty-two percent of users sought a specialist referral, 33% a PCP referral and 9% a hospital referral. Eighty-nine percent of users seeking a provider referral were referred in-network; 81% of those referred visited the referred provider. Measures of satisfaction with both the service and the care delivered by recommended providers were over 70%. CONCLUSIONS Customers largely follow the provider recommendation of the health coach. Users express general satisfaction with existing health coach services, but differences in performance between vendors highlight the need for the services to be well implemented. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-010-1428-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20556533

  8. Coaching vs Psychotherapy in health and Wellness: Overlap, Dissimilarities, and the Potential for Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Health coaches and psychotherapists both work with the art and science of facilitating change in their patients and clients. While the evolving field of health coaching and the established disciplines of clinical or counseling psychology share major areas of overlap, there are also significant distinctions between the two fields. This article outlines those similarities and dissimilarities with the intention of fostering a cooperative and mutually enriching stance between the two helping professions for the benefit of the respective professionals and the countless clients and patients they serve. PMID:24416682

  9. A randomized controlled pilot study testing three types of health coaches for obesity treatment: Professional, Peer, and Mentor

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Wing, Rena R.

    2012-01-01

    Despite their popularity, empirical support for health coaches is limited. This study examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of 3 types of coaching models for obesity treatment. Participants (N=44) were randomized to 6 months of reduced intensity group behavioral weight loss (rBWL) plus 1 of 3 types of health coaches: a) Professional (rBWL interventionist); b) Peer (group members randomly paired and coached one another); or c) Mentor (successful weight loser). Groups met weekly for the first 6-weeks, biweekly for the next 6-weeks, and monthly thereafter, for a total of 12 meetings. During weeks that group did not meet, participants emailed their weight loss information to their coach and received feedback. Coaches were trained on appropriate coaching strategies and feedback delivery. Retention was 95%. Participants emailed their progress to their coach 10.8±1.9 out of the 12 weeks that there were no group meetings. Coaches responded with feedback 94% of the time. Percent weight losses at 6-months were 9.6±8.1, 9.1±5.0, and 5.7±5.6 for the Professional, Peer, and Mentor conditions, respectively. More participants in the Professional and Peer conditions lost 10% of their initial body weight (Professional: 56%; Peer: 50%; Mentor: 17%), with a statistically significant difference between the Professional and Mentor conditions (p=0.03). These preliminary data suggest that combining a reduced intensity BWL program with health coaching may hold significant promise as a cost-effective obesity treatment paradigm. Larger trials are needed to conclusively determine whether adding coaches improves weight loss outcomes in reduced intensity treatments and to examine which type of coach is most effective. PMID:23784896

  10. Evaluating the Treatment Fidelity of Parents Who Conduct In-Home Functional Communication Training with Coaching via Telehealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suess, Alyssa N.; Romani, Patrick W.; Wacker, David P.; Dyson, Shannon M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Lee, John F.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Waldron, Debra B.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective, descriptive evaluation of the fidelity with which parents of three children with autism spectrum disorders conducted functional communication training (FCT) in their homes. All training was provided to the parents via telehealth by a behavior consultant in a tertiary-level hospital setting. FCT trials coached by the…

  11. Health Benefits Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health care enrollment each year. Learn more » Veterans Financial Assessment VA Removes Annual Income Reporting Requirement Eliminates ... Means Test Frequently Asked Questions(FAQ) CONNECT Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social ...

  12. Coaches' Perceptions of French Sports Clubs: Health-Promotion Activities, Aims and Coach Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoye, Aurélie; Sarrazin, Philippe; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Kokko, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the benefits of participating in sport, sports clubs have been recognised as health promoting organizations. To examine health-promotion activities in Finnish sports clubs, Kokko et al. developed a set of standards for health-promoting sports clubs (HPSC). Objective: The present study extends this line of research, by (1)…

  13. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Health and Wellness Coaching: Defining a Key Behavioral intervention in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Sforzo, Gary A.; Dill, Diana; Kaye, Miranda; Bechard, Elizabeth M.; Southard, Mary Elaine; Kennedy, Mary; Vosloo, Justine; Yang, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Primary Objective: Review the operational definitions of health and wellness coaching as published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. Background: As global rates of preventable chronic diseases have reached epidemic proportions, there has been an increased focus on strategies to improve health behaviors and associated outcomes. One such strategy, health and wellness coaching, has been inconsistently defined and shown mixed results. Methods: A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)—guided systematic review of the medical literature on health and wellness coaching allowed for compilation of data on specific features of the coaching interventions and background and training of coaches. Results: Eight hundred abstracts were initially identified through PubMed, with 284 full-text articles ultimately included. The majority (76%) were empirical articles. The literature operationalized health and wellness coaching as a process that is fully or partially patient-centered (86% of articles), included patient-determined goals (71%), incorporated self-discovery and active learning processes (63%) (vs more passive receipt of advice), encouraged accountability for behaviors (86%), and provided some type of education to patients along with using coaching processes (91%). Additionally, 78% of articles indicated that the coaching occurs in the context of a consistent, ongoing relationship with a human coach who is trained in specific behavior change, communication, and motivational skills. Conclusions: Despite disparities in how health and wellness coaching have been operationalized previously, this systematic review observes an emerging consensus in what is referred to as health and wellness coaching; namely, a patient-centered process that is based upon behavior change theory and is delivered by health professionals with diverse backgrounds. The actual coaching process entails goal-setting determined by the patient, encourages self-discovery in addition to content education, and incorporates mechanisms for developing accountability in health behaviors. With a clear definition for health and wellness coaching, robust research can more accurately assess the effectiveness of the approach in bringing about changes in health behaviors, health outcomes and associated costs that are targeted to reduce the global burden of chronic disease. PMID:24416684

  14. Teacher Consultation and Coaching within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method: Thirty-six classrooms within 5 urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to…

  15. Marketing home health care.

    PubMed

    Kolatch, A

    1991-11-01

    This case study focuses on the physician as an important customer for home care services. The author describes how Visiting Nurse Service of New York developed and implemented a direct sales strategy to increase the number of referrals from physicians. Five of the direct sales consultants were registered nurses. The tactics used to increase the percentage of cases referred directly by physicians are discussed. PMID:1941173

  16. Coaching without a Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbacher-Reed, Christina; Powers, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Ironically, at a time when coaching seems to have come into its own as a way to improve teacher practice, school districts across the United States are experiencing funding cuts and eliminating coaching positions. The threats that budget woes pose to established school coaching programs led the authors to ask themselves what practices schools and…

  17. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Mothe, Dolores; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as homemakers/home health aides and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following competencies…

  18. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Managing Home Health Care KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Caring for a Seriously ... Types of Medical Equipment Support for Parents Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care ...

  19. Impact of Peer Health Coaching on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Patients With Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Thom, David H.; Ghorob, Amireh; Hessler, Danielle; De Vore, Diana; Chen, Ellen; Bodenheimer, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Peer health coaches offer a potential model for extending the capacity of primary care practices to provide self-management support for patients with diabetes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to test whether clinic-based peer health coaching, compared with usual care, improves glycemic control for low-income patients who have poorly controlled diabetes. METHOD We undertook a randomized controlled trial enrolling patients from 6 public health clinics in San Francisco. Twenty-three patients with a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) level of less than 8.5%, who completed a 36-hour health coach training class, acted as peer coaches. Patients from the same clinics with HbA1C levels of 8.0% or more were recruited and randomized to receive health coaching (n = 148) or usual care (n = 151). The primary outcome was the difference in change in HbA1C levels at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were proportion of patients with a decrease in HbA1C level of 1.0% or more and proportion of patients with an HbA1C level of less than 7.5% at 6 months. Data were analyzed using a linear mixed model with and without adjustment for differences in baseline variables. RESULTS At 6 months, HbA1C levels had decreased by 1.07% in the coached group and 0.3% in the usual care group, a difference of 0.77% in favor of coaching (P = .01, adjusted). HbA1C levels decreased 1.0% or more in 49.6% of coached patients vs 31.5% of usual care patients (P = .001, adjusted), and levels at 6 months were less than 7.5% for 22.0% of coached vs 14.9% of usual care patients (P = .04, adjusted). CONCLUSIONS Peer health coaching significantly improved diabetes control in this group of low-income primary care patients. PMID:23508600

  20. The Happy Life Club™ study protocol: A cluster randomised controlled trial of a type 2 diabetes health coach intervention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Happy Life Club™ is an intervention that utilises health coaches trained in behavioural change and motivational interviewing techniques to assist with the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care settings in China. Health coaches will support participants to improve modifiable risk factors and adhere to effective self-management treatments associated with T2DM. Methods/Design A cluster randomised controlled trial involving 22 Community Health Centres (CHCs) in Fengtai District of Beijing, China. CHCs will be randomised into a control or intervention group, facilitating recruitment of at least 1320 individual participants with T2DM into the study. Participants in the intervention group will receive a combination of both telephone and face-to-face health coaching over 18 months, in addition to usual care received by the control group. Health coaching will be performed by CHC doctors and nurses certified in coach-assisted chronic disease management. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline and again at 6, 12 and 18 months by means of a clinical health check and self-administered questionnaire. The primary outcome measure is HbA1c level. Secondary outcomes include metabolic, physiological and psychological variables. Discussion This cluster RCT has been developed to suit the Chinese health care system and will contribute to the evidence base for the management of patients with T2DM. With a strong focus on self-management and health coach support, the study has the potential to be adapted to other chronic diseases, as well as other regions of China. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN01010526 PMID:21303564

  1. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  2. Mindfulness: An effective coaching tool for improving physical and mental health

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Jo Lynne W.; Kiken, Laura; Holt, Melissa; McCain, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides an overview of the mechanisms of action, evidence base, and practice of mindfulness, with an emphasis on how to easily incorporate this valuable skill into practice. Data sources: PubMed, CINAHL, PsychInfo Databases. Conclusions: Conscious attention to the present moment in a receptive way is known as mindfulness. A growing body of research indicates that mindfulness can be taught and cultivated to improve physical and mental health. Implications for practice: Accordingly, as part of the coaching competency, mindfulness can be practiced and taught by advanced practice nurses to support lifestyle and behavioral changes, decrease perceived stress, enhance quality of life, and, ultimately, improve health and health outcomes. PMID:24259186

  3. Patient Satisfaction and Perceived Success with a Telephonic Health Coaching Program: The Natural Experiments for Translation in Diabetes (NEXT-D) Study, Northern California, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Goler, Nancy C.; Sanna, Rashel S.; Boccio, Mindy; Bellamy, David J.; Brown, Susan D.; Neugebauer, Romain S.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Wiley, Deanne M.; Schmittdiel, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Health coaching can improve lifestyle behaviors known to prevent or manage chronic conditions such as diabetes. However, little is known about the patient experience with telephonic coaching programs in real-world care settings. We examined patient satisfaction, patient’s perceived success in achieving program goals, and the patient-level correlates of these outcomes in a voluntary telephonic coaching program at a large integrated health care delivery system in northern California. Methods Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients who participated in a telephonic coaching program in 2011 were sent a cross-sectional survey about their satisfaction with health coaching and perceived success with program goals. We examined associations with patient characteristics. Results The survey response rate was 34%; analyses were based on the 32% who completed the survey. Of those who had completed 2 or more sessions (n = 232 [52%]), most reported being satisfied (70%) or neutral (20%) with the program, and 71% would recommend health coaching. Healthy weight, healthful eating, and physical activity were the most common topics discussed (88%). Adjusting for demographic characteristics, 73% of those who had 2 or more sessions reported that health coaching helped achieve their weight-related goal. Outcomes were positively correlated with patient activation but not consistently correlated with patient demographic characteristics. Conclusion Levels of satisfaction and perceived success with telephonic health coaching provided by a health plan were high and positively correlated with the number of sessions completed and patient activation. Voluntary telephonic health coaching programs should promote retention and assess patients’ activation levels. PMID:24176083

  4. Executive Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardini, Priscilla

    2003-01-01

    Describes executive coaching services for public school administrators, especially superintendents. The purpose of coaching is to help an administrator professionally and personally. Coaches differs from consultants in that coaches do not offer solutions to problems, nor do they give advice and offer solutions as do mentors. Includes descriptions…

  5. [Endometriosis coaching].

    PubMed

    Audebert, A

    2006-04-01

    Coaching is a well-known terminology and an approach currently used, particularly in the worlds of company management and sport, but its use in the medical field appeared only recently. In the latter field, coaching bears behavioral and psychological aspects. It can not only be intended to a medical team, but also the practionner himself, for a better management of any disease, his patient for a better treatment effect and compliance and an optimal coping with the disease. In the case of endometriosis, a chronic disease, two key aspects are briefly reviewed to illustrate the benefits of coaching and to sensitize health providers to this approach. Thus, an appropriate diagnostic strategy should allow to reduce the delay in the diagnosis, so frequently blamed, and to identify other associated painful diseases. Also, management should be improved as well, not only by applying appropriate therapeutic recommandations, and alternative measures, but also by a better multidisciplinary support towards patient expectations with long-term guidance. PMID:16574460

  6. Home Health Care: Services and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Geraldine; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Findings from a study of home care services in one New York district document the value and relatively modest costs of home health care for the chronically ill and dependent elderly. Professional nurses coordinated the care, but most of the direct services were provided by home health aides and housekeepers. (MF)

  7. Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

  8. Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommelje, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores how coaching equips managers and supervisors to be successful in the 21st-century workplace. Coaching has benefited these professionals by providing them with viable tools to enhance the leadership and managerial tools they already possess.

  9. Understanding hospital referrals to home health agencies.

    PubMed

    Dansky, K H; Milliron, M; Gamm, L

    1996-01-01

    Using resource dependency theory and transaction-cost economics theory, we examined the simultaneous effects of a vertical integration strategy and environmental complexity on home health agency (HHA) referrals by hospitals. Discharge data for calendar year 1990 from 61 Pennsylvania hospitals were analyzed. Using hospital ownership of home health agencies and urban versus rural location as the primary independent variables, a logistic regression model calculated the probability of HHA referral, after controlling for long-term care beds and patient characteristics. Results showed that HHA ownership was a significant predictor of home health referrals for both rural and urban hospitals, although the effect was greater for urban hospitals. These results suggest that hospitals are actively using referrals to home healthcare in response to environmental pressures. As these pressures increase, hospitals will benefit from tight linkages with home health providers. PMID:10159995

  10. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  11. SPORT COACH Professional Organizations

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    Football Coaches Association (AFCA) National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) Women's Basketball's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) publications Soccer Journal American Volleyball Coaches Association Association (NFCA) Facebook National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) Twitter Women's Basketball

  12. Navigating the thin-ideal in an athletic world: influence of coach communication on female athletes' body image and health choices.

    PubMed

    Beckner, Brittany N; Record, Rachael A

    2016-03-01

    This study sought to investigate how interpersonal communication between coaches and female athletes influences the female athletes' perceptions of body image and health choices. Much of the current literature has focused on the fact that female athletes are at risk for disordered eating and a distorted body image due to susceptibility to the feminine "thin-ideal" while maintaining the fitness levels necessary to compete in their sport. However, very little research has examined how interpersonal interaction plays a role in female athletes' body image perceptions and health behaviors. Utilizing the Communication Theory of Identity (CTI) as a lens to examine communication between female athletes and their coaches, the researchers analyzed transcripts from in-depth interviews with 28 female athletes and identified themes within the personal, relational, enacted, and communal layers of identity. Coach communication with their female athletes was found to be influential to the athletes' body images and health choices. PMID:26361233

  13. Pragmatic Replication Trial of Health Promotion Coaching for Obesity in Serious Mental Illness and Maintenance of Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Barre, Laura K.; Naslund, John A.; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Xie, Haiyi; McHugo, Gregory J.; Jimenez, Daniel E.; Jue, Ken; Feldman, James; Bird, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few studies targeting obesity in serious mental illness report clinically significant risk reduction, and none have been replicated within community settings or have demonstrated sustained outcomes after intervention withdrawal. This pragmatic clinical trial aims to replicate positive health outcomes demonstrated in a prior randomized effectiveness study of the In SHAPE program across urban community mental health organizations serving an ethnically diverse population. Methods Persons with serious mental illness and BMI>25 receiving services in three community mental health organizations were randomized to the 12-month In SHAPE program (health promotion coach and membership to a public fitness club) or to fitness club membership alone. Primary outcomes were weight and cardiorespiratory fitness (measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test) collected at baseline, 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, and 18-months. Results Participants (N=210) were ethnically diverse (46% non-White) with mean baseline BMI=36.8±8.2. At 12-months In SHAPE (n=104) compared to a fitness club membership alone (n=106) contributed to greater reduction in weight and improved fitness. Primary outcomes were maintained at 18-months follow-up. Approximately half of In SHAPE participants (51% at 12-month program completion and 46% at 18-month follow-up) achieved clinically significant cardiovascular risk reduction (?5% weight loss or >50 meter increase on the 6-Minute Walk Test). Conclusions Sustained weight loss and improved fitness can be achieved by community mental health organizations providing health promotion coaching and access to fitness facilities. Health promotion should be integrated into mental health services for persons with serious mental illness at risk for cardiovascular disease and early mortality. PMID:25827032

  14. Instructional Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The number of school districts using instructional coaches is growing at a staggering rate. Coaching is becoming popular, in part, because many educational leaders recognize the old form of professional development, built around traditional in-service sessions for teachers, simply does not affect student achievement. By offering support, feedback,…

  15. The Early Childhood Coaching Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Dathan D.; Shelden, M'Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based and highly effective, "coaching" helps early childhood practitioners support other professionals and families as they enhance existing knowledge, develop new skills, and promote healthy development of young children. This hands-on guide shows professionals how to conduct skillful coaching in any setting--home, school, or community.…

  16. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  17. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health...

  18. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health...

  19. Health Coaching by Medical Assistants to Improve Control of Diabetes, Hypertension, and Hyperlipidemia in Low-Income Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Willard-Grace, Rachel; Chen, Ellen H.; Hessler, Danielle; DeVore, Denise; Prado, Camille; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Thom, David H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Health coaching by medical assistants could be a financially viable model for providing self-management support in primary care if its effectiveness were demonstrated. We investigated whether in-clinic health coaching by medical assistants improves control of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors when compared with usual care. METHODS We conducted a 12-month randomized controlled trial of 441 patients at 2 safety net primary care clinics in San Francisco, California. The primary outcome was a composite measure of being at or below goal at 12 months for at least 1 of 3 uncontrolled conditions at baseline as defined by hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Secondary outcomes were meeting all 3 goals and meeting individual goals. Data were analyzed using ?2 tests and linear regression models. RESULTS Participants in the coaching arm were more likely to achieve both the primary composite measure of 1 of the clinical goals (46.4% vs 34.3%, P = .02) and the secondary composite measure of reaching all clinical goals (34.0% vs 24.7%, P = .05). Almost twice as many coached patients achieved the hemoglobin A1c goal (48.6% vs 27.6%, P = .01). At the larger study site, coached patients were more likely to achieve the LDL cholesterol goal (41.8% vs 25.4%, P = .04). The proportion of patients meeting the systolic blood pressure goal did not differ significantly. CONCLUSIONS Medical assistants serving as in-clinic health coaches improved control of hemoglobin A1c and LDL levels, but not blood pressure, compared with usual care. Our results highlight the need to understand the relationship between patients’ clinical conditions, interventions, and the contextual features of implementation. PMID:25755034

  20. Reading Coaching Discourse: Exploring Coaching Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineke, Sally Frances

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the discourse of elementary school reading coaches and teachers during coaching interactions in four Alabama schools. Coach/teacher dyads recorded naturally occurring coaching dialogue over periods of 3 to 6 weeks. Each participant shared her views on coaching and commented on the recorded discourse during post-interviews…

  1. Behavioral Coaching

    PubMed Central

    Seniuk, Holly A.; Witts, Benjamin N.; Williams, W. Larry.; Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis. PMID:25729141

  2. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are here: Plan of care Share What’s home health care & what should I expect? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  3. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  4. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  5. Telemonitoring and Mobile Phone-Based Health Coaching Among Finnish Diabetic and Heart Disease Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Karhula, Tuula; Rääpysjärvi, Katja; Pakanen, Mira; Itkonen, Pentti; Tepponen, Merja; Junno, Ulla-Maija; Jokinen, Tapio; van Gils, Mark; Lähteenmäki, Jaakko; Kohtamäki, Kari; Saranummi, Niilo

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a strong will and need to find alternative models of health care delivery driven by the ever-increasing burden of chronic diseases. Objective The purpose of this 1-year trial was to study whether a structured mobile phone-based health coaching program, which was supported by a remote monitoring system, could be used to improve the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and/or the clinical measures of type 2 diabetes and heart disease patients. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted among type 2 diabetes patients and heart disease patients of the South Karelia Social and Health Care District. Patients were recruited by sending invitations to randomly selected patients using the electronic health records system. Health coaches called patients every 4 to 6 weeks and patients were encouraged to self-monitor their weight, blood pressure, blood glucose (diabetics), and steps (heart disease patients) once per week. The primary outcome was HRQL measured by the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among diabetic patients. The clinical measures assessed were blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, and lipid levels. Results A total of 267 heart patients and 250 diabetes patients started in the trial, of which 246 and 225 patients concluded the end-point assessments, respectively. Withdrawal from the study was associated with the patients’ unfamiliarity with mobile phones—of the 41 dropouts, 85% (11/13) of the heart disease patients and 88% (14/16) of the diabetes patients were familiar with mobile phones, whereas the corresponding percentages were 97.1% (231/238) and 98.6% (208/211), respectively, among the rest of the patients (P=.02 and P=.004). Withdrawal was also associated with heart disease patients’ comorbidities—40% (8/20) of the dropouts had at least one comorbidity, whereas the corresponding percentage was 18.9% (47/249) among the rest of the patients (P=.02). The intervention showed no statistically significant benefits over the current practice with regard to health-related quality of life—heart disease patients: beta=0.730 (P=.36) for the physical component score and beta=-0.608 (P=.62) for the mental component score; diabetes patients: beta=0.875 (P=.85) for the physical component score and beta=-0.770 (P=.52) for the mental component score. There was a significant difference in waist circumference in the type 2 diabetes group (beta=-1.711, P=.01). There were no differences in any other outcome variables. Conclusions A health coaching program supported with telemonitoring did not improve heart disease patients' or diabetes patients' quality of life or their clinical condition. There were indications that the intervention had a differential effect on heart patients and diabetes patients. Diabetes patients may be more prone to benefit from this kind of intervention. This should not be neglected when developing new ways for self-management of chronic diseases. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01310491; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01310491 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Z8l5FwAM). PMID:26084979

  6. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  7. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  8. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  9. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  10. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  11. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  13. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  14. The effectiveness of medical assistant health coaching for low-income patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia: protocol for a randomized controlled trial and baseline characteristics of the study population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic disease do not reach goals for management of their conditions. Self-management support provided by medical assistant health coaches within the clinical setting may help to improve clinical outcomes, but most studies to date lack statistical power or methodological rigor. Barriers to large scale implementation of the medical assistant coach model include lack of clinician buy-in and the absence of a business model that will make medical assistant health coaching sustainable. This study will add to the evidence base by determining the effectiveness of health coaching by medical assistants on clinical outcomes and patient self-management, by assessing the impact of health coaching on the clinician experience, and by examining the costs and potential savings of health coaching. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effectiveness of clinic-based medical assistant health coaches to improve clinical outcomes and self-management skills among low-income patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia. A total of 441 patients from two San Francisco primary care clinics have been enrolled and randomized to receive a health coach (n?=?224) or usual care (n?=?217). Patients participating in the health coaching group will receive coaching for 12 months from medical assistants trained as health coaches. The primary outcome is a change in hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, or LDL cholesterol among patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, respectively. Self-management behaviors, perceptions of the health care team and clinician, BMI, and chronic disease self-efficacy will be measured at baseline and after 12 months. Clinician experience is being assessed through surveys and qualitative interviews. Cost and utilization data will be analyzed through cost-predictive models. Discussion Medical assistants are an untapped resource to provide self-management support for patients with uncontrolled chronic disease. Having successfully completed recruitment, this study is uniquely poised to assess the effectiveness of the medical assistant health coaching model, to describe barriers and facilitators to implementation, and to develop a business case for sustainability. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT-01220336 PMID:23433349

  15. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services. (a) “Home health services” means the services in paragraph (b) of this section that are provided to...

  16. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this subchapter, a State plan must provide that— (a) Home health services include, as a minimum— (1) Nursing...

  17. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  18. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  19. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  20. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  1. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  2. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  3. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  4. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  5. Children in Foster Homes Need Better Health Care

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 154859.html Children in Foster Homes Need Better Health Care American Academy of Pediatrics says kids may be ... do a better job of providing consistent, quality health care to children living in foster homes, a new ...

  6. Curbstone Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cover, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Bridging the gap between the classroom and on-the-job application has been a growing concern to the sales training profession and of sales managers. "Curbstone Coaching," an on-the-job program in which sales managers train their sales representatives in selling skills is a possible solution. (JOW)

  7. Athletic coaches as violence prevention advocates.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L; Tancredi, Daniel J; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Decker, Michele R; Silverman, Jay G; O'Connor, Brian; Stetkevich, Nicholas; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) is a significant public health problem. Coaching Boys Into Men (CBIM) is an evidence-based ARA prevention program that trains coaches to deliver violence prevention messages to male athletes. Assessing acceptability and impact of CBIM on coaches may inform prevention efforts that involve these important adults in health promotion among youth. As part of a two-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial of CBIM in 16 high schools in Northern California, coaches completed baseline and postseason surveys (n = 176) to assess their attitudes and confidence delivering the program. Coaches in the intervention arm also participated in interviews (n = 36) that explored program acceptability, feasibility, and impact. Relative to controls, intervention coaches showed increases in confidence intervening when witnessing abusive behaviors among their athletes, greater bystander intervention, and greater frequency of violence-related discussions with athletes and other coaches. Coaches reported the program was easy to implement and valuable for their athletes. Findings illustrate the value of exploring attitudinal and behavioral changes among ARA prevention implementers, and suggest that coaches can gain confidence and enact behaviors to discourage ARA among male athletes. Coaches found the program to be feasible and valuable, which suggests potential for long-term uptake and sustainability. PMID:25015237

  8. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...APPLICABLE TO SPECIFIC SERVICES General Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect...

  9. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...APPLICABLE TO SPECIFIC SERVICES General Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect...

  10. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  11. What Good Coaches Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching guru Jim Knight suggests that how we think about coaching can enhance or interfere with our success as a coach. He suggests that coaches take a partnership approach to collaboration and adopt seven principles that define how coaches interact with collaborating teachers: equality, choice, voice, reflection, dialogue, praxis,…

  12. Does "Word Coach" Coach Words?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Tom; Horst, Marlise

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the design and testing of an integrated suite of vocabulary training games for Nintendo[TM] collectively designated "My Word Coach" (Ubisoft, 2008). The games' design is based on a wide range of learning research, from classic studies on recycling patterns to frequency studies of modern corpora. Its general usage and learning…

  13. Can Low-Cost Support Programmes with Coaching Accelerate Doctoral Completion in Health Science Faculty Academics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Hilary; Bentley, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Career development for full-time Health Sciences academics through to doctoral studies is a monumental task. Many academics have difficulty completing their studies in the minimum time as well as publishing after obtaining their degree. As this problem is particularly acute in the Health Sciences, the PhD Acceleration Programme in Health Sciences…

  14. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01... (4) Physical therapy, occupational therapy, or speech pathology...retarded, except for home health services in an intermediate...mentally retarded during an acute illness to avoid the recipient's...facility. (d) “Home health agency” means a...

  15. Homemaker/Home Health Aide Services in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trager, Brahna

    Defining the role of the homemaker/home health aide, the volume presents a comprehensive treatment of the principles and procedures for recruiting, training, and directing the activities of these essential health workers. In addition to providing an analysis of the contribution that the homemaker/home health aide can make to patient care, the book…

  16. Lived Experience and Community Sport Coaching: A Phenomenological Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Colum; Armour, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Coaching in the participation domain is the act of coaching participants that are less intensely engaged in sport than performance orientated athletes. This form of coaching is a popular activity occurring in community settings such as schools or sport clubs, and it is often undertaken with a broad range of social and health outcomes in mind. The…

  17. There's an "App" for That: Tips for Preparing Nurses for Roles in Mobile Health.

    PubMed

    Billings, Diane M

    2015-09-01

    As health care services shift to being provided in the home and in the community, nurses must be prepared to use mobile health applications for diagnosis, monitoring, managing transitions of care, and health coaching. PMID:26352040

  18. Predictors of Home-Based Child Care Providers' Participation in Professional Development Workshops and Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura B.; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith; Arthun, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about factors that influence home-based child care providers' participation in professional development. Factors that predict participation in activities that are designed to promote the utilization and maintenance of skills taught are of particular interest. Objective: Our aim was to examine factors in the…

  19. Leadership Coaching: Coaching Competencies and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Donald; Hammack, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Leadership coaching is now seen as a valuable tool to assist school leaders. Through a survey of school principals, this study identified specific coaching competencies used by leadership coaches that were perceived by principals to influence key best practices for schools. These best practices have in turn been correlated to increased student…

  20. Coaching Behavior of Girls Youth Softball Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupnow, Allan; Stotlar, David

    A study examined coaches' behavior and classified the types and rates of coaches' behavior by time of athletic season (early or late), win/loss record, and throughout the time frame within a single contest. Subjects included all the volunteer coaches in a 13 team, softball program for 10-12 year old girls. The season consisted of a double…

  1. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) CONDITIONS FOR MEDICARE PAYMENT Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for...

  2. Considering Student Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, James P.

    2014-01-01

    What does student coaching involve and what considerations make sense in deciding to engage an outside contractor to provide personal coaching? The author explores coaching in light of his own professional experience and uses this reflection as a platform from which to consider the pros and cons of student coaching when deciding whether to choose…

  3. Coaching for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin; Ratey, Nancy; Maynard, Sandy; Sussman, Susan; Wright, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite limited scientific study on ADHD coaching as an intervention for adults with ADHD, the field of ADHD coaching has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years. ADHD coaching is becoming a bona fide profession where one must advance through a rigorous training process, in order to be certified as a professional ADHD coach.…

  4. Are ADNs Prepared to Be Home Health Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Monahan, Frances D.

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 132 of 350 home health nurses identified techniques and skills associate degree nurses (ADNs) should acquire to work for home health agencies. Accredited ADN programs reported that only 24 of the techniques are taught in all programs and 55 of the skills are taught in 90% of the programs. (SK)

  5. Recovery Coaches and Substance Exposed Births: An Experiment in Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph P.; Choi, Sam; Hong, Jun Sung; Hernandez, Pedro; Larrison, Christopher R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Substance exposed infants present a major challenge to child welfare and public health systems. Prenatal substance exposure and continued substance abuse in the home are associated with a wide range of adverse social, emotional, and developmental outcomes. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the use of recovery coaches in…

  6. Hospitalization Among Medicare-Reimbursed Skilled Home Health Recipients

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a summary and critique of the published empirical evidence between the years 2002 and 2011 regarding rehospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health recipients. The knowledge gained will be applied to a discussion regarding ACH among geriatric home health recipients and areas for future research. The referenced literature in MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane databases was searched using combinations of the following search terms: home care and home health and Medicare combined with acute care hospitalization, rehospitalization, hospitalization, and adverse events and limited to studies conducted in the United States. Twenty-five research studies published in the last eight years investigated hospitalization among patients receiving Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health. Empirical findings indicate telehomecare can reduce hospitalizations and emergency room use. The identification of risk factors for hospitalization relate to an elder’s sociodemographic, clinical and functional status that can be identified upon admission and interventions taken in order to reduce hospitalizations. Disease management, frontloading nurse visits, the structure of home health services and OBQI are also among the interventions identified to reduce hospitalizations. However, the body of evidence is limited by a paucity of research and the over reliance on small sample sizes. Few published studies have explored methods that effectively reduce hospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed skilled home health recipients. Further research is needed to clarify the most effective ways to structure home health services to maximize benefits and reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill geriatric population.

  7. MyCoach: In Situ User Evaluation of a Virtual and Physical Coach for Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemans, Margit; Haaker, Timber; Szwajcer, Ellen

    Running is an enjoyable exercise for many people today. Trainers help people to reach running goals. However, today’s busy and nomadic people are not always able to attend running classes. A combination of a virtual and physical coach should be useful. A virtual coach (MyCoach) was designed to provide this support. MyCoach consists of a mobile phone (real time) and a web application, with a focus on improving health and well-being. A randomised controlled trial was performed to evaluate MyCoach. The results indicate that the runners value the tangible aspects on monitoring and capturing their exercise and analysing progress. The system could be improved by incorporating running schedules provided by the physical trainer and by improving its usability. Extensions of the system should focus on the real-time aspects of information sharing and “physical” coaching at a distance.

  8. Perspectives on Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven; Lundh, Erik; Davies, Rachel; Eckstein, Jutta; Larsen, Diana; Vilkki, Kati

    There are many perspectives to agile coaching including: growing coaching expertise, selecting the appropriate coach for your context; and eva luating value. A coach is often an itinerant who may observe, mentor, negotiate, influence, lead, and/or architect everything from team organization to system architecture. With roots in diverse fields ranging from technology to sociology coaches have differing motivations and experience bases. This panel will bring together coaches to debate and discuss various perspectives on agile coaching. Some of the questions to be addressed will include: What are the skills required for effective coaching? What should be the expectations for teams or individu als being coached? Should coaches be: a corporate resource (internal team of consultants working with multiple internal teams); an integral part of a specific team; or external contractors? How should coaches exercise influence and au thority? How should management assess the value of a coaching engagement? Do you have what it takes to be a coach? - This panel will bring together sea soned agile coaches to offer their experience and advice on how to be the best you can be!

  9. The home health workforce: a distinction between worker categories.

    PubMed

    Stone, Robyn; Sutton, Janet P; Bryant, Natasha; Adams, Annelise; Squillace, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The demand for home health aides is expected to rise, despite concerns about the sustainability of this workforce. Home health workers receive low wages and little training and have high turnover. It is difficult to recruit and retain workers to improve clinical outcomes. This study presents national estimates to examine how home health workers and the subgroup of workers differ in terms of sociodemographic characteristics, compensation, benefits, satisfaction, and retention. Hospice aides fare better than other categories of workers and are less likely to leave their job. Policymakers should consider strategies to increase the quality and stability of this workforce. PMID:24372475

  10. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality. PMID:24497648

  11. Health@Home - An e-Service Model for Disease Prevention and Healthcare in the Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Milon; Chotard, Laure; Ingþórsson, Ólafur; Bastos, João; Borges, Isabel

    The ageing of the population, the growth of chronic diseases, and the explosion of healthcare costs jeopardise the sustainability of healthcare systems in many European countries. This opens opportunities for innovative prevention and healthcare services supported by information and communication technologies (ICT). The natural focus for providing such services is the home. However, the e-health services provided in the home so far are limited in scope and fragmented. This paper suggests a comprehensive service model for home-based e-health services in Europe, which aims to overcome the current service fragmentation. The Health@Home model integrates disease prevention and healthcare for different groups of citizens at different stages on the health scale. The technical challenge of this model is the national and Europe-wide integration of heterogeneous systems and services in a way that makes them reliable and easy to use for all citizens, particularly those with low technical abilities and severe impairments.

  12. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  13. Home Diuretic Protocol for Heart Failure: Partnering with Home Health to Improve Outcomes and Reduce Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Richard P; Wight, Joseph N; Cannon, Ann; Whalen, Moira; Bachman, David

    2014-01-01

    Context: The management of heart failure (HF) is challenging, with high rates of readmission and no single solution. MaineHealth, a health care system serving southern Maine, has shown initial success with home health nurses partnering with physicians in the management of complex patients with HF using the MaineHealth Home Diuretic Protocol (HDP). Objective: To demonstrate that augmented diuretic therapy, both oral and intravenous, an evidence-based treatment for care of patients with HF experiencing fluid retention, can be delivered safely in the home setting using the HDP and can improve outcomes for recently hospitalized patients with HF. Design: In late 2011, the MaineHealth HDP was implemented in two hospitals and in the home health agency serving those hospitals. The patient population included recently hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of advanced HF, eligible for home health services and telemonitoring. Main Outcome Measures: Home health nurses reported data on the patients managed using the protocol, including interventions made, physical findings, lab values, and patient disposition after each episode of care. Questionnaires were used to determine patient and clinician satisfaction. Results: Sixty patients meeting the criteria above were enrolled between November 2011 and January 2014. The protocol was initiated 84 times for 30 of these patients. Sixteen patients had multiple activations. The readmission rate was 10% and no adverse outcomes were observed. Clinician and patient satisfaction was 97% or greater. Conclusion: The MaineHealth HDP can be delivered effectively and safely to improve outcomes, reducing readmissions and allowing patients to remain at home. PMID:25102518

  14. Home health care agencies struggle with new federal rules.

    PubMed

    Lumsdon, K

    1991-11-20

    The rules governing home health care are confusing, contradictory and expensive, say providers, and they're getting more so. But that doesn't mean the rules should be made lax, they argue. Some even look forward to quality enhancement as a by-product of new "outcome-oriented" Medicare surveys. Inevitably, home health care administrators agree, increased federal scrutiny has likely been spurred by the massive growth in the field in the past 15 years. PMID:1937447

  15. Literacy Coaching for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blachowicz, Camille L. Z.; Obrochta, Connie; Fogelberg, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    An urban school district was able to improve its students' reading achievement substantially by implementing a variety of literary coaching models. The six literary coaching process strategies used by schools are discussed.

  16. Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors

    E-print Network

    Stratton, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors www.besafenet.com/pvc/documents/bad_news_comes_in_threes.pdf www.abag.ca.gov/bayarea/dioxin/health risk to workers or homeowners. However, the creation of harmful substances – such as dioxins –

  17. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  18. Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

  19. Mental health service use by the elderly in nursing homes.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, B J; Wagner, H R; Taube, J E; Magaziner, J; Permutt, T; Landerman, L R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Because current Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations influence the disposition of US nursing home residents who have mental illness, National Nursing Home Survey (1985) data are analyzed for predictors of mental health service use. METHODS. Elderly residents' rates of mental health service use are presented. Logistic regression yielded odds ratios for treatment by both mental health specialists and general practitioners for client and service system variables. RESULTS. Among the two thirds of elderly residents with a mental disorder (including dementia), only 4.5% receive any mental health treatment in a 1-month period. The ratio of specialist to general practitioner care is approximately 1:1. Patients seen by a specialist are likely to be younger (aged 65 to 74); live in the Northeast; and have a diagnosis of schizophrenia (13:1), dementia (3:1), or other mental disorders (5:1). Prior residence in a psychiatric hospital predicts care by both health professional types. Rural location, nonproprietary ownership of the nursing home, and aggressive behavior point to general physician care. CONCLUSIONS. Our findings indicate significant neglect of the mental health needs of older nursing home residents and underscore the importance of monitoring the regulations for screening and treatment of mental disorders under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. PMID:8438968

  20. Coaches and Coaching in Reading First Schools: A Reality Check

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Rita M.; Draper, Jason A.; Hall, Virginia; Vandermolen, Jill; Zigmond, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    The current article investigates the work of 20 Reading First coaches to determine how coaches distribute their time and the rationale they give for their work. Teachers' responses to coaches and the relationships between what coaches do and student achievement are also analyzed. There was great variability among coaches in how they allocated…

  1. Behavioral Characteristics of "Favorite" Coaches: Implications for Coach Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig; Owens, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to use athletes' and former athletes' memories of their favorite coach to improve coach education curriculum. Player preferences of coaching behavior can affect both their attitudes toward their sport experiences and team performance. By identifying positive coaching behaviors as recalled by athletes, coach educators…

  2. Medicare and Medicaid Programs; CY 2016 Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update; Home Health Value-Based Purchasing Model; and Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    This final rule will update Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective for episodes ending on or after January 1, 2016. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule implements the 3rd year of the 4-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates. This rule updates the HH PPS case-mix weights using the most current, complete data available at the time of rulemaking and provides a clarification regarding the use of the "initial encounter'' seventh character applicable to certain ICD-10-CM code categories. This final rule will also finalize reductions to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rate in CY 2016, CY 2017, and CY 2018 of 0.97 percent in each year to account for estimated case-mix growth unrelated to increases in patient acuity (nominal case-mix growth) between CY 2012 and CY 2014. In addition, this rule implements a HH value-based purchasing (HHVBP) model, beginning January 1, 2016, in which all Medicare-certified HHAs in selected states will be required to participate. Finally, this rule finalizes minor changes to the home health quality reporting program and minor technical regulations text changes. PMID:26552111

  3. The Coach and the Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Bob; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation and coaching should not be linked, these authors argue. Although it's tempting for evaluators to identify deficiencies and then specify coaching as a remediation strategy, doing so turns coaching into a consequence of a poor evaluation and termination into a consequence of failed coaching. Another mistake is to use coaching as a data…

  4. For Immediate Release --Thursday, September 26, 2013 University of Lethbridge Pronghorn Athletics coaches Go

    E-print Network

    Morris, Joy

    spaces and equipment for children's education and development. At home their competitive season, women's head coach Erin McAleenan and assistant coach Claire that uses the transformative power of play to educate and empower children facing

  5. Providing Coaching and Cotinine Results to Preteens to Reduce Their Secondhand Smoke Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wahlgren, Dennis R.; Liles, Sandy; Jones, Jennifer A.; Hughes, Suzanne C.; Matt, Georg E.; Ji, Ming; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Swan, Gary E.; Chatfield, Dale; Ding, Ding

    2011-01-01

    Background: Secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) poses health risks to children living with smokers. Most interventions to protect children from SHSe have coached adult smokers. This trial determined whether coaching and cotinine feedback provided to preteens can reduce their SHSe. Methods: Two hundred one predominantly low-income families with a resident smoker and a child aged 8 to 13 years who was exposed to two or more cigarettes per day or had a urine cotinine concentration ? 2.0 ng/mL were randomized to control or SHSe reduction coaching groups. During eight in-home sessions over 5 months, coaches presented to the child graphic charts of cotinine assay results as performance feedback and provided differential praise and incentives for cotinine reductions. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the differential change in SHSe over time by group. Results: For the baseline to posttest period, the coaching group had a greater decrease in both urine cotinine concentration (P = .039) and reported child SHSe in the number of cigarettes exposed per day (child report, P = .003; parent report, P = .078). For posttest to month 12 follow-up, no group or group by time differences were obtained, and both groups returned toward baseline. Conclusions: Coaching preteens can reduce their SHSe, although reductions may not be sustained without ongoing counseling, feedback, and incentives. Unlike interventions that coach adults to reduce child SHSe, programs that increase child avoidance of SHSe have the potential to reduce SHSe in all settings in which the child is exposed, without requiring a change in adult smoking behavior. PMID:21474574

  6. Hurricane emergency planning by home health providers serving the poor.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Dahlia V; Bryan, Marguerite

    2007-05-01

    Five agencies providing home health care to indigent populations in New Orleans, Louisiana were evaluated in terms of emergency planning and implementation. This was to help improve response to community disasters for indigent populations. Preparation for Hurricane Katrina was examined looking at interaction with local and state departments of health. It was found that the state dept of health provided leadership in making the emergency plans, but not in implementation. Local departments of health appeared to have very little responsibility in emergency planning. Although every agency had a plan, when it came to implementation there was lack of coordination and breakdown in communication at all government levels. Recommendations for future policy include: 1) early evacuation of special needs patients; 2) improved training of staff to include practice drills; 3) improve communication systems; and, 4) increased funding of state and local departments of health to provide training. PMID:17483559

  7. Patient Engagement and Coaching for Health: The PEACH study – a cluster randomised controlled trial using the telephone to coach people with type 2 diabetes to engage with their GPs to improve diabetes care: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Young, Doris; Furler, John; Vale, Margarite; Walker, Christine; Segal, Leonie; Dunning, Patricia; Best, James; Blackberry, Irene; Audehm, Ralph; Sulaiman, Nabil; Dunbar, James; Chondros, Patty

    2007-01-01

    Background The PEACH study is based on an innovative 'telephone coaching' program that has been used effectively in a post cardiac event trial. This intervention will be tested in a General Practice setting in a pragmatic trial using existing Practice Nurses (PN) as coaches for people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Actual clinical care often fails to achieve standards, that are based on evidence that self-management interventions (educational and psychological) and intensive pharmacotherapy improve diabetes control. Telephone coaching in our study focuses on both. This paper describes our study protocol, which aims to test whether goal focused telephone coaching in T2D can improve diabetes control and reduce the treatment gap between guideline based standards and actual clinical practice. Methods/design In a cluster randomised controlled trial, general practices employing Practice Nurses (PNs) are randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. We aim to recruit 546 patients with poorly controlled T2D (HbA1c >7.5%) from 42 General Practices that employ PNs in Melbourne, Australia. PNs from General Practices allocated to the intervention group will be trained in diabetes telephone coaching focusing on biochemical targets addressing both patient self-management and engaging patients to work with their General Practitioners (GPs) to intensify pharmacological treatment according to the study clinical protocol. Patients of intervention group practices will receive 8 telephone coaching sessions and one face-to-face coaching session from existing PNs over 18 months plus usual care and outcomes will be compared to the control group, who will only receive only usual care from their GPs. The primary outcome is HbA1c levels and secondary outcomes include cardiovascular disease risk factors, behavioral risk factors and process of care measures. Discussion Understanding how to achieve comprehensive treatment of T2D in a General Practice setting is the focus of the PEACH study. This study explores the potential role for PNs to help reduce the treatment and outcomes gap in people with T2D by using telephone coaching. The intervention, if found to be effective, has potential to be sustained and embedded within real world General Practice. PMID:17428318

  8. Supporting Patient Autonomy: Decision Making in Home Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.; Kaye, Lenard W.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the policies and procedures that home health care agencies have developed to handle incapacitated patients and life-sustaining treatment decisions. Although most directors, staff, and patients agree that patients know their legal rights, only 67% of agencies reported having existing policies on advance directives, and only 41.5% had…

  9. 42 CFR 484.245 - Accelerated payments for home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accelerated payments for home health agencies. 484... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies § 484.245 Accelerated payments for home health agencies. (a) General...

  10. Orientation to Health Aide Careers Mini-Course & Home Health Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Kathy; And Others

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for home health aides, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines are presented on eight topics: your career as a health aide; maintaining health; recognizing illness; positioning and…

  11. Effectiveness of general practice based, practice nurse led telephone coaching on glycaemic control of type 2 diabetes: the Patient Engagement And Coaching for Health (PEACH) pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of goal focused telephone coaching by practice nurses in improving glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes in Australia. Design Prospective, cluster randomised controlled trial, with general practices as the unit of randomisation. Setting General practices in Victoria, Australia. Participants 59 of 69 general practices that agreed to participate recruited sufficient patients and were randomised. Of 829 patients with type 2 diabetes (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) >7.5% in the past 12 months) who were assessed for eligibility, 473 (236 from 30 intervention practices and 237 from 29 control practices) agreed to participate. Intervention Practice nurses from intervention practices received two days of training in a telephone coaching programme, which aimed to deliver eight telephone and one face to face coaching episodes per patient. Main outcome measures The primary end point was mean absolute change in HbA1c between baseline and 18 months in the intervention group compared with the control group. Results The intervention and control patients were similar at baseline. None of the practices dropped out over the study period; however, patient attrition rates were 5% in each group (11/236 and 11/237 in the intervention and control group, respectively). The median number of coaching sessions received by the 236 intervention patients was 3 (interquartile range 1-5), of which 25% (58/236) did not receive any coaching sessions. At 18 months’ follow-up the effect on glycaemic control did not differ significantly (mean difference 0.02, 95% confidence interval ?0.20 to 0.24, P=0.84) between the intervention and control groups, adjusted for HbA1c measured at baseline and the clustering. Other biochemical and clinical outcomes were similar in both groups. Conclusions A practice nurse led telephone coaching intervention implemented in the real world primary care setting produced comparable outcomes to usual primary care in Australia. The addition of a goal focused coaching role onto the ongoing generalist role of a practice nurse without prescribing rights was found to be ineffective. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN50662837. PMID:24048296

  12. Client satisfaction with telehealth services in home health care agencies.

    PubMed

    Grant, Leslie A; Rockwood, Todd; Stennes, Leif

    2015-03-01

    We assessed client satisfaction with the home telemonitoring service provided by 14 home health care agencies in five US states. Clients were randomised to two groups. Telehealth services (health monitoring and patient safety) were provided to 450 experimental subjects. Control subjects (n?=?409) received usual care. Clients were asked to rate their satisfaction with their service providers on 25 items, at baseline, 6 months post-discharge (to home) and 12 months post-discharge. The mean age of the clients was 78 years. Out of the initial 859 subjects, 490 had dropped out of the study by the 12-month follow-up, an overall attrition rate of 57%. There were similar proportions of clients reporting high satisfaction with external systems at baseline and at 6 months; at 12 months, there were significantly more clients in the experimental group who reported high satisfaction (P?=?0.049). There were similar proportions of clients reporting high satisfaction with internal systems at baseline and at 12 months; at 6 months, there were significantly more clients in the experimental group who reported high satisfaction (P?=?0.031). Clients with home monitoring were more satisfied with health-related and medical services post-discharge than those receiving usual care over a 6-12 month period. PMID:25586811

  13. Coaching the Multiplicity of Mind: A Strengths-based Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Professional health and wellness coaches are passionate about helping people learn, change, and grow. We are lifelong students of what enables humans to perform at our best. The phrase coaching the whole person is common coaching parlance; full engagement in self-care often requires that clients shift a spectrum of beliefs, motives, and perspectives in order to make changes that are sustainable. Just as important is the need for coaches to fully engage in their own self-care in order to best serve their clients. PMID:24416685

  14. Parent involvement with children's health promotion: the Minnesota Home Team.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, C L; Luepker, R V; Murray, D M; Kurth, C; Mullis, R; Crockett, S; Jacobs, D R

    1988-01-01

    This study compares the efficacy of a school-based program to an equivalent home-based program with 2,250 third grade students in 31 urban schools in Minnesota in order to detect changes in dietary fat and sodium consumption. The school-based program, Hearty Heart and Friends, involved 15 sessions over five weeks in the third grade classrooms. The home-based program, the Home Team, involved a five-week correspondence course with the third graders, where parental involvement was necessary in order to complete the activities. Outcome measures included anthropometric, psychosocial and behavioral assessments at school, and dietary recall, food shelf inventories, and urinary sodium data collected in the students' homes. Participation rates for all aspects of the study were notably high. Eighty-six per cent of the parents participated in the Home Team and 71 per cent (nearly 1,000 families) completed the five-week course. Students in the school-based program had gained more knowledge at posttest than students in the home-based program or controls. Students in the home-based program, however, reported more behavior change, had reduced the total fat, saturated fat, and monounsaturated fat in their diets, and had more of the encouraged foods on their food shelves. The data converge to suggest the feasibility and importance of parental involvement for health behavior changes with children of this age. PMID:3407811

  15. The nurse manager: change agent, change coach?

    PubMed

    Stefancyk, Amanda; Hancock, Beverly; Meadows, Mary T

    2013-01-01

    Change in today's health care landscape is a daily, if not hourly, reality. The nurse manager must have strong leadership skills to navigate through change with a focus on the patient and the provision of safe and reliable care. The historical term for those leading change is "change agent." In this article, the authors introduce the idea of a change coach, building on the nurse manager foundational skill of coaching and weaving this concept into the manager's role in change. A change coach uses the coaching behaviors including guidance, facilitation, and inspiration to inspire others toward change, altering human capabilities, and supporting and influencing others toward change. An exemplar of the nurse manager's role as a change coach in practice is provided using American Organization of Nurse Executives' Care Innovation and Transformation initiative. It is the agile manager that is able to successfully move between the roles of change agent and change coach to continuously transform the environment and how care is delivered. PMID:23222749

  16. Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Chris; Walker, Iain S.

    2012-02-15

    This report is intended to provide home performance contractor trainers with a resource to keep both their workers and home residents safe and healthy. This document is an attempt to describe what we currently believe is safe, what we believe is unsafe, and what we’re unsure about. It is intended to identify health and safety issues and provide historical context and current understanding of both risks and mitigation strategies. In addition, it provides links to more in-depth resources for each issue. When we tighten the thermal envelope of a house to improve comfort and reduce energy use, we have to be sure that we are not compromising the indoor air quality of the home. This means identifying and mitigating or eliminating pollution sources before and after you make changes to the home. These sources can include materials and finishes in the home, exhaust gasses from combustion appliances, soil gasses such as radon, and moisture from a bathroom, kitchen, or unvented clothes dryer. Our first responsibility is to do no harm — this applies both to our clients and to our employees. Currently, there are many new products that are widely used but whose health effects are not well understood. Our in ability to have perfect information means the directive to do no harm can be difficult to obey. Each home is a little bit different, and in the face of a situation you’ve never encountered, it’s important to have a solid grasp of the fundamental concepts of building science when the hard and fast rules don’t apply . The home performance industry is gaining momentum, and has the potential to expand greatly as energy costs continue to rise. It is imperative that we remain vigilant about protecting the health and safety of our workers and our customers. It only takes a few news stories about a family that got sick after their home was tightened by a home performance contractor to scare off potential customers and taint the reputation of the entire industry. Good reputations take time to build, but can be quickly damaged.

  17. A Home Health Care System for Family Doctor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, Ryuji; Taketa, Norihiro

    We propose a constitution technique of small-scale Home Health Care system for family doctor that has been developed by applying various API of JAVA. One function is vital data transmission which allows a family doctor to check the data of elderly persons with ease via Internet. Vital data is encrypted and transmitted for the purpose of security. The other function is telecommunication with voice and face image for care consulting.

  18. A Coaching Psychology Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008), John Radford considers "what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education". In this article, the author looks at the possible inclusion of coaching psychology within undergraduate psychology programmes. Coaching psychology as an applied area of psychology…

  19. Learning Developmental Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, James M.; Weintraub, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an educational intervention designed to promote the ability and willingness of MBA students to lead through coaching. MBA leadership students are trained to serve as coaches for undergraduate business students in a developmental assessment center. In this compelling context, their main source of influence is the ability to…

  20. Lesson Study: Beyond Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca; Foster, David; Hurd, Jacqueline; Fisher, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The authors assert that lesson study--a collaborative, teacher-led approach to learning from practice--offers a deeper, broader, more sustainable method of improving teacher practice than one-on-one coaching does. In lesson study, teachers and coaches of all levels of experience can work together, each bringing his or her own professional…

  1. Measuring depression and pain with home health monitors.

    PubMed

    Dobscha, Steven K; Corson, Kathryn; Pruitt, Stephanie; Crutchfield, Megan; Gerrity, Martha S

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of using home health monitors to administer standardized measures for depression and pain in a Veterans Affairs (VA) patient population. Five patients were recruited from a larger study of collaborative depression care, and were asked to use Viterion 100 Telehealth monitors to transmit depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9) and pain severity (SF36-V bodily pain items) scores on a weekly basis for 24 weeks. Information was received and reviewed by a nurse care manager, who recommended treatment changes as appropriate. The care manager occasionally followed up reports of changes in symptom severity with phone calls; in one case, she called to inquire why a patient was not submitting data. Overall, four patients were able to use the monitors successfully and frequently. Patient satisfaction was high: 5 of 5 reported that they would use monitors again, and 3 of 5 preferred monitors to phone or mail for completing questionnaires. Patients expressed no concerns about privacy. The data allowed tracking of the longitudinal interrelationship between depression and pain severity. However, the monitors were limited in their ability to display questionnaire items, and the system could neither directly compute measure scores nor transfer data to patient medical records. These results suggest that with modifications, home health monitoring shows promise for monitoring symptom severity for a variety of medical and mental health conditions, for either clinical or research purposes. PMID:17250493

  2. The use of mental health measures in nursing home research.

    PubMed

    Rabins, P V; Rovner, B W; Larson, D B; Burns, B J; Prescott, C; Beardsley, R S

    1987-05-01

    To examine the quality of mental health research in nursing homes, 130 articles published in six geriatric specialty and health care delivery journals were reviewed. Thirty-nine (30%) articles used a mental health measure. Measures of cognitive function were most common, being used in 32 (25%) of the articles reviewed. Twenty-three (18%) studies measured abnormal mental experiences and 17 (13%) articles measured behavioral disorder. Many articles used measures or determinations with no established reliability. Twenty-six of the articles which used a mental health measure also used a measure of activities of daily living or physical function. Retrospective and prospective studies were similar in number. A minority of articles used control groups, random samples, or prepost measures while a majority (64%) identified an outcome measure. We conclude that nursing home research can be improved by the increased use of reliable measures of cognition and abnormal mental experiences and by the development of reliable measures of behavioral disorder. Study design can be improved by identifying a priori hypotheses and by the increased use of random sampling and control/comparison groups. PMID:3553282

  3. Home Foreclosure, Health, and Mental Health: A Systematic Review of Individual, Aggregate, and Contextual Associations

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The U.S. foreclosure crisis intensified markedly during the Great Recession of 2007-09, and currently an estimated five percent of U.S. residential properties are more than 90 days past due or in the process of foreclosure. Yet there has been no systematic assessment of the effects of foreclosure on health and mental health. Methods and Findings I applied systematic search terms to PubMed and PsycINFO to identify quantitative or qualitative studies about the relationship between home foreclosure and health or mental health. After screening the titles and abstracts of 930 publications and reviewing the full text of 76 articles, dissertations, and other reports, I identified 42 publications representing 35 unique studies about foreclosure, health, and mental health. The majority of studies (32 [91%]) concluded that foreclosure had adverse effects on health or mental health, while three studies yielded null or mixed findings. Only two studies examined the extent to which foreclosure may have disproportionate impacts on ethnic or racial minority populations. Conclusions Home foreclosure adversely affects health and mental health through channels operating at multiple levels: at the individual level, the stress of personally experiencing foreclosure was associated with worsened mental health and adverse health behaviors, which were in turn linked to poorer health status; at the community level, increasing degradation of the neighborhood environment had indirect, cross-level adverse effects on health and mental health. Early intervention may be able to prevent acute economic shocks from eventually developing into the chronic stress of foreclosure, with all of the attendant benefits this implies for health and mental health status. Programs designed to encourage early return of foreclosed properties back into productive use may have similar health and mental health benefits. PMID:25849962

  4. Association of Discharge Home with Home Health Care and 30-day Readmission after Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Dominic E; Olsen, Margaret A; Bommarito, Kerry M; Shah, Manish; Fields, Ryan C; Hawkins, William G; Jaques, David P; Linehan, David C

    2014-01-01

    Background We sought to determine if discharge home with home health care (HHC) is an independent predictor of increased readmission following pancreatectomy. Study Design We examined 30-day readmissions in patients undergoing pancreatectomy using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Database for California from 2009 to 2011. Readmissions were categorized as severe or non-severe using the Modified Accordion Severity Grading System. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the association of discharge home with HHC and 30-day readmission using discharge home without HHC as the reference group. Propensity score matching was used as an additional analysis to compare the rate of 30-day readmission between patients discharged home with HHC to patients discharged home without HHC. Results 3,573 patients underwent pancreatectomy and 752 (21.0%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. In a multivariable logistic regression model, discharge home with HHC was an independent predictor of increased 30-day readmission (OR=1.37; 95%CI=1.11-1.69, p=0.004). Using propensity score matching, patients who received HHC had a significantly increased rate of 30-day readmission compared to patients discharged home without HHC (24.3% vs 19.8%, p<0.001). Patients discharged home with HHC had a significantly increased rate of non-severe readmission compared to those discharged home without HHC by univariate comparison (19.2% vs 13.9%, p<0.001), but not severe readmission (6.4% vs 4.7%, p= 0.08). In multivariable logistic regression models, excluding patients discharged to facilities, discharge home with HHC was an independent predictor of increased non-severe readmissions (OR=1.41; 95%CI=1.11-1.79, p=0.005), but not severe readmissions (OR=1.31; 95%CI=0.88-1.93, p=0.18). Conclusions Discharge home with HHC following pancreatectomy is an independent predictor of increased 30-day readmission; specifically, these services are associated with increased non-severe readmissions, but not severe readmissions. PMID:25440026

  5. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  6. The home as a framework for health care.

    PubMed

    Mann, K J

    1997-04-01

    The past two or three decades have witnessed a steep rise in the cost of health and social services. It is anticipated that this uphill climb will continue and bring these systems to a complete collapse within a few decades. The prevention of this crisis depends on the elimination of some of the causes of the rise: (a) we do not want to save costs by sacrificing the quality of our services; (b) we have no control over the quantity of clients utilizing these services, or the seriousness of their problems; (c) we can, however, replace part of the expensive institutional care by the more natural and cost-effective home care, supplied by volunteers, strengthened by human and technological services. These principles guided an Israeli organization called Yad Sarah, whose leadership in the supply of home and community care enables thousands of ill, elderly and disabled people to remain at home and thus save the high cost of institutionalization. PMID:9158927

  7. Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health

    PubMed Central

    Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

  8. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach. PMID:25105087

  9. 76 FR 40987 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Occupational Therapy OMB Office of Management and Budget PAC-PRD Post-Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration..., Proposed Requirements and Outcome Measure Change d. Home Health Care CAHPS Survey (HHCAHPS) 3. Home Health... Clarification F. Home Health Face-to-Face Encounter G. Payment Reform: Home Health Study and Report...

  10. The Fundamentals of Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandvold, Amy; Baxter, Maelou

    2008-01-01

    This book contains strategies for effective literacy coaching of teachers in districts and schools. Whether it's your job to start a literacy coaching initiative or to be an effective literacy coach to your colleagues, this guide has all the steps and strategies you need: (1) Roles and responsibilities of literacy coaches; (2) Keys to building…

  11. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  12. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  13. Health Coaching and Genomics—Potential Avenues to Elicit Behavior Change in Those at Risk for Chronic Disease: Protocol for Personalized Medicine Effectiveness Study in Air Force Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Vorderstrasse, Allison A.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Kraus, William E.; Maldonado, Maj Carlos J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD) are prevalent chronic diseases from which military personnel are not exempt. While many genetic markers for these diseases have been identified, the clinical utility of genetic risk testing for multifactorial diseases such as these has not been established. The need for a behavioral intervention such as health coaching following a risk counseling intervention for T2D or CHD also has not been explored. Here we present the rationale, design, and protocol for evaluating the clinical utility of genetic risk testing and health coaching for active duty US Air Force (AF) retirees and beneficiaries. Primary Study Objectives: Determine the direct and interactive effects of health coaching and providing genetic risk information when added to standard risk counseling for CHD and T2D on health behaviors and clinical risk markers. Design: Four-group (2 X 2 factorial) randomized controlled trial. Setting: Two AF primary care clinical settings on the west coast of the United States. Participants: Adult AF primary care patients. Intervention: All participants will have a risk counseling visit with a clinic provider to discuss personal risk factors for T2D and CHD. Half of the participants (two groups) will also learn of their genetic risk testing results for T2D and CHD in this risk counseling session. Participants randomized to the two groups receiving health coaching will then receive telephonic health coaching over 6 months. Main Outcome Measures: Behavioral measures (self-reported dietary intake, physical activity, smoking cessation, medication adherence); clinical outcomes (AF composite fitness scores, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipids, T2D/CHD risk scores) and psychosocial measures (self-efficacy, worry, perceived risk) will be collected at baseline and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months. Conclusion: This study tests novel strategies deployed within existing AF primary care to increase adherence to evidence-based diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and medication recommendations for CHD and T2D risk reduction through methods of patient engagement and self-management support. PMID:24416670

  14. Use and cost of home health agency services under Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Ruther, Martin; Helbing, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Presented are 1986 data and trend data (1974-86) on the use and cost of home health agency services rendered to aged and disabled Medicare beneficiaries. Since 1974, reimbursements for these services have grown more rapidly than overall Medicare expenditures. From 1974 to 1986, Medicare expenditures for these services increased from $141 million to $1.8 billion, an average annual rate of 24 percent. HHA reimbursements, however, continue to represent only a small proportion (3.6 percent in 1986) of all Medicare expenditures. PMID:10312817

  15. Home health, long-term care, and other compliance activities.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T D; Sadoff, J W

    1999-04-01

    The Federal government continues to crack down on fraud and abuse in the healthcare industry with such initiatives and tools as Operation Restore Trust and intermediate tax sanctions. Home health and long-term care organizations are the latest entities under study by the Office of Inspector General, and the result of these studies likely will be more antifraud and abuse measures being taken against these entities. All healthcare organizations should pay particular attention to their tax risk exposure. Healthcare organizations that put effective compliance programs in place should be able to reduce the overall risk of challenges to their financial practices. PMID:10557979

  16. 42 CFR 413.125 - Payment for home health agency services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for home health agency services. 413.125... Categories of Costs § 413.125 Payment for home health agency services. (a) For additional rules on the allowability of certain costs incurred by home health agencies, see §§ 409.46 and 409.49(b) of this chapter....

  17. Coaching Youth Livestock Projects 

    E-print Network

    Merten, Kyle J.; Boleman, Chris

    2008-07-10

    healthybodiesforouryoungpeople?sfuturewhile webuildcharacterintheshowring. ?Itdoesn?tmatterwhatplaceyoungcompetitorsget attheendoftheshow;iftheyhavelearnedsome- thingnew,theyhavewonfirstplaceanyway. CoachingYouth Livestock Projects Kyle J. Merten and ChrisT. Boleman... youthshavelearnedandhowtheyhavegrownthrough- outtheprojectyear.Evaluatingwhattheyknowatthe beginningoftheprojectyearcanhelpyouinthere- search,planning,andimplementationphasesofyour teachingandcoaching.Postprojectevaluationwillhelp determinewhethertheyouthsachievedtheirgoalsand...

  18. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Home health aide services. 484.36 Section 484.36 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing...

  19. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Home health aide services. 484.36 Section 484.36 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing...

  20. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Home health aide services. 484.36 Section 484.36 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing...

  1. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Home health aide services. 484.36 Section 484.36 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing...

  2. Coaching in Northern Canadian Communities: Reflections of Elite Coaches

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Alain P.; Schinke, Robert J.; Pickard, Pat

    2005-01-01

    This study addressed geographical uniqueness in relation to elite coaching. The study explores the complexities associated to coaching in northern Canadian communities, and how unique geographical surroundings can affect coaching success. The views of fourteen National and International elite coaches from different northern Canadian communities are included within the study. The respondents were from 9 different sport backgrounds and averaged 17.1 years of coaching experience (range: 8-30 years). Data were gathered using a structured open-ended questionnaire, a focus group, and a follow-up in-depth semi-structured interview. Content was analyzed to uncover emergent themes. Based on the respondents’ views, there is indication that despite numerous adversities, rural coaches experience advantages that are unavailable in larger urban centers. Precisely, there is evidence that northern Canadian coaches acquire unique skills while responding to the demands placed on them within their unique communities. Generalizations in regards to coaching development strategies across physical locations are questioned following the findings of the current study. Key Points The study explores the complexities associated with coaching in northern Canadian communities and how unique geographical surroundings can affect coaching success. From the respondents’ views, there is indication that northern Canadian elite coaches are subject to numerous adversities. Despite numerous adversities, northern Canadian elite coaches experience advantages that are unavailable in larger urban centers. Including context specificity within the elite coaching literature could help to better understand this profession. PMID:24431968

  3. Environmental Health and Safety Hazards Experienced by Home Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Polivka, Barbara J.; Wills, Celia E.; Darragh, Amy; Lavender, Steven; Sommerich, Carolyn; Stredney, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The number of personnel providing in-home health care services is increasing substantially. The unique configuration of environmental hazards in individual client homes has a significant impact on the safety and health of home health care providers (HHPs). This mixed-methods study used data from a standardized questionnaire, focus groups, and individual interviews to explore environmental health and safety hazards encountered by HHPs in client homes. The participant sample (N = 68) included nurses, aides, therapists, and owners/managers from a variety of geographic locations. The most often-reported hazards were trip/slip/lift hazards, biohazards, and hazards from poor air quality, allergens, pests and rodents, and fire and burns. Frequency of identified key hazards varied by room, that is, kitchen (e.g., throw rugs, water on floor), bathroom (e.g., tight spaces for client handling), bedroom (e.g., bed too low), living room (e.g., animal waste), and hallway (e.g., clutter). Findings indicate the need for broader training to enable HHPs to identify and address hazards they encounter in client homes. PMID:26268486

  4. Developing a Coaching Portfolio: Enhancing Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubball, Harry; Robertson, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A portfolio is a well-organized document containing critical analyses and evidence related to a coach's background, context(s) of coaching, approach to coaching, coaching accomplishments, and goals for further development. Here, the authors describe different types of coaching portfolios as well as strategies for developing a coaching portfolio.…

  5. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...170 Section 410.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY... § 410.170 Payment for home health services, for medical and...

  6. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...170 Section 410.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY... § 410.170 Payment for home health services, for medical and...

  7. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...170 Section 410.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY... § 410.170 Payment for home health services, for medical and...

  8. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...170 Section 410.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY... § 410.170 Payment for home health services, for medical and...

  9. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...170 Section 410.170 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY... § 410.170 Payment for home health services, for medical and...

  10. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  11. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  12. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  13. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  14. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies...specified requirements: (1) Skilled nursing facility. Payment to a...

  15. Pre-Exercise Screening and Health Coaching in CHD Secondary Prevention: A Qualitative Study of the Patient Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, R.; Gillies, M.; Barber, J.; MacIntyre, K.; Harkins, C.; Findlay, I. N.; McCloy, K.; Gillie, A.; Scoular, A.; MacIntyre, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention programmes can be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD). In particular, UK guidelines, including those from the Department of Health, emphasize physical activity. However, the effects of secondary prevention programmes with an exercise component are moderate and uptake is highly…

  16. Job Title Medical -Home Health Care Social Worker One position now open: Galveston area.

    E-print Network

    Paulsen, Vern

    Job Title Medical - Home Health Care Social Worker ­ One position now open: Galveston area evaluations to Medicare/Medicare- HMO or Private Insurance clients on medical home health care services OR HOME HEALTH CARE EXPERIENCE. THIS POSITION IS ONLY FOR COVERAGE IN: Galveston area Must have fax

  17. 42 CFR 441.16 - Home health agency requirements for surety bonds; Prohibition on FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 441.16 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...APPLICABLE TO SPECIFIC SERVICES General Provisions § 441.16 Home health agency requirements for...

  18. 42 CFR 441.16 - Home health agency requirements for surety bonds; Prohibition on FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 441.16 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...APPLICABLE TO SPECIFIC SERVICES General Provisions § 441.16 Home health agency requirements for...

  19. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable...methodology for in- and outpatient health care professional services provided...FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care [T]he...

  20. Gender and the Coaching Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoppers, Annelies

    1987-01-01

    This article investigates male domination of coaching using a model which assumes that the structure of the workplace shapes the worker. The effects of three structural determinants on the number of females who enter and leave coaching are explored. Suggestions to improve the workplace for women coaches are made. (Author/MT)

  1. The Principal as Formative Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nidus, Gabrielle; Sadder, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Formative coaching, an approach that uses student work as the foundation for mentoring and professional development, can help principals become more effective instructional leaders. In formative coaching, teaches and coaches analyze student work to determine next steps for instruction. This article shows how a principal can use the steps of the…

  2. The Power of Virtual Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

  3. A Holistic Approach to Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Bette L.

    1982-01-01

    To integrate psychological factors with traditional training programs, the athletic coach needs to develop special skills. The coach must develop appropriate strategies for coping with athletes' anxiety, fear, or lack of self-confidence by integrating practice and game behaviors and by individualizing coaching practices. (JN)

  4. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  5. Antecedents of perceived coach interpersonal behaviors: the coaching environment and coach psychological well- and ill-being.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Juliette; Taylor, Ian M; Spray, Christopher M; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2012-08-01

    Embedded in the self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) framework, we obtained self-report data from 418 paid and voluntary coaches from a variety of sports and competitive levels with the aim of exploring potential antecedents of coaches' perceived autonomy supportive and controlling behaviors. Controlling for socially desirable responses, structural equation modeling revealed that greater job security and opportunities for professional development, and lower work-life conflict were associated with psychological need satisfaction, which, in turn, was related to an adaptive process of psychological well-being and perceived autonomy support toward athletes. In contrast, higher work-life conflict and fewer opportunities for development were associated with a distinct maladaptive process of thwarted psychological needs, psychological ill-being, and perceived controlling interpersonal behavior. The results highlight how the coaching context may impact upon coaches' psychological health and their interpersonal behavior toward athletes. Moreover, evidence is provided for the independence of adaptive and maladaptive processes within the self-determination theory paradigm. PMID:22889690

  6. My Home Planet Earth: My Health My World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World series which explores environmental health issues. It includes (1) an activities guide for teachers, which focuses on physical science, life science, and environment and health, presenting activity based lessons that entice students to discover concepts in science,…

  7. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    PubMed

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches. PMID:6525751

  8. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  9. The impact of home-prepared diets and home oral hygiene on oral health in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Colyer, Alison; Skrzywanek, Michal; Jodkowska, Katarzyna; Kurski, Grzegorz; Gawor, Jerzy; Ceregrzyn, Michal

    2011-10-01

    Many factors influence the oral health status of cats and dogs. The present study aimed to elucidate the influence of feeding home-prepared (HP) food v. commercial pet food on oral health parameters in these animals and to investigate the effect of home oral hygiene on oral health. The study surveyed 17,184 dogs and 6371 cats visiting over 700 Polish veterinary surgeries in 2006-7 during a Pet Smile activity organised by the Polish Small Animal Veterinary Association. All animals underwent conscious examinations to assess dental deposits, size of mandibular lymph nodes and gingival health. An oral health index (OHI) ranging from 0 to 8 was calculated for each animal by combining examination scores, where 0 indicates good oral health and 8 indicates poorest oral health. Information was collected on age, diet and home oral hygiene regimens. There was a significant effect of diet on the OHI (P < 0.001) whereby feeding the HP diet increased the probability of an oral health problem in both cats and dogs. There was a significant beneficial effect of feeding only commercial pet food compared with the HP diet when at least part of the diet was composed of dry pet food. Daily tooth brushing or the offering of daily dental treats were both effective in significantly reducing the OHI in both cats and dogs compared with those receiving sporadic or no home oral hygiene. Feeding only a dry diet was beneficial for oral health in cats and dogs. Tooth brushing and the offering of dental treats were very effective in maintaining oral health, provided they were practised daily. PMID:22005407

  10. Exploring the activity profile of health care assistants and nurses in home nursing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip

    2015-12-01

    Are home nurses (also known as community nurses) ready for their changing role in primary care? A quantitative study was performed in home nursing in Flanders, Belgium, to explore the activity profile of home nurses and health care assistants, using the 24-hour recall instrument for home nursing. Seven dates were determined, covering each day of the week and the weekend, on which data collection would take place. All the home nurses and health care assistants from the participating organisations across Flanders were invited to participate in the study. All data were measured at nominal level. A total of 2478 home nurses and 277 health care assistants registered 336 128 (47 977 patients) and 36 905 (4558 patients) activities, respectively. Home nurses and health care assistants mainly perform 'self-care facilitation' activities in combination with 'psychosocial care' activities. Health care assistants also support home nurses in the 'selfcare facilitation' of patients who do not have a specific nursing indication. PMID:26636895

  11. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...governing payments for certain non-VA health care, 38 CFR 17.56, applicable to...rule, we estimate that each home health care and hospice provider that does...negotiated contracts offer home health care or hospice care to veterans...

  12. Home Health News New Sensors Stick To Organs To Monitor Health What is this? EMAIL PRINT RSS

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    Home Health News New Sensors Stick To Organs To Monitor Health Share What is this? EMAIL PRINT RSS New Sensors Stick to Organs to Monitor Health Pliable electronic devices already tracking heart function in pigs, scientists say Buzz Digg Facebook More... WEDNESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new

  13. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility (CORF) services: Conditions. 410.170 Section 410.170 Public Health...

  14. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility (CORF) services: Conditions. 410.170 Section 410.170 Public Health...

  15. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility (CORF) services: Conditions. 410.170 Section 410.170 Public Health...

  16. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility (CORF) services: Conditions. 410.170 Section 410.170 Public Health...

  17. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility (CORF) services: Conditions. 410.170 Section 410.170 Public Health...

  18. Levels of Engagement in Establishing Coaching Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGatha, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    Case studies of two coaches that examine the levels of engagement of each coach as they worked to establish effective coaching relationships were examined in this study. Data were collected during a seven-month period and included: (a) the coaches' reflective journals; (b) pre- and post-surveys from each coach and teacher; (c) audio-recorded…

  19. Nutritional knowledge of UK coaches.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

    2014-04-01

    Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05). In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice. PMID:24727434

  20. Social Networks and Health: Impact on Returning Home after Entry into Residential Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, Mary

    1990-01-01

    Extended study of social network analysis and labeling theories into residential care homes (RCHs). Findings suggest that, when members of intense social networks decide to move elderly persons into RCHs, placement is needed and that, although likelihood of returning home from RCHs is affected by sociocultural characteristics, functional and…

  1. Understanding Challenges in the Front Lines of Home Health Care: A Human-Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Jenay M.; McBride, Sara E.; Mitzner, Tracy L.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    A human-systems perspective is a fruitful approach to understanding home health care because it emphasizes major individual components of the system – persons, equipment/technology, tasks, and environments –as well as the interaction between these components. The goal of this research was to apply a human-system perspective to consider the capabilities and limitations of the persons, in relation to the demands of the tasks and equipment/technology in home health care. Identification of challenges and mismatches between the person(s) capabilities and the demands of providing care provide guidance for human factors interventions. A qualitative study was conducted with 8 home health Certified Nursing Assistants and 8 home health Registered Nurses interviewed about challenges they encounter in their jobs. A systematic categorization of the challenges the care providers reported was conducted and human factors recommendations were proposed in response, to improve home health. The challenges inform a human-systems model of home health care. PMID:24958610

  2. Understanding challenges in the front lines of home health care: a human-systems approach.

    PubMed

    Beer, Jenay M; McBride, Sara E; Mitzner, Tracy L; Rogers, Wendy A

    2014-11-01

    A human-systems perspective is a fruitful approach to understanding home health care because it emphasizes major individual components of the system - persons, equipment/technology, tasks, and environments - as well as the interaction between these components. The goal of this research was to apply a human-system perspective to consider the capabilities and limitations of the persons, in relation to the demands of the tasks and equipment/technology in home health care. Identification of challenges and mismatches between the person(s) capabilities and the demands of providing care provide guidance for human factors interventions. A qualitative study was conducted with 8 home health Certified Nursing Assistants and 8 home health Registered Nurses interviewed about challenges they encounter in their jobs. A systematic categorization of the challenges the care providers reported was conducted and human factors recommendations were proposed in response, to improve home health. The challenges inform a human-systems model of home health care. PMID:24958610

  3. Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over

    MedlinePLUS

    ... April 18, 2012 Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over ... and Roberto Valverde, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Abstract Objective —This report presents national estimates ...

  4. Patient satisfaction and quality in home health care of elderly islanders.

    PubMed

    Nadarevi?-Stefanec, Vesna; Malatestini?, Dulija; Mataija-Redzovi?, Andrea; Nadarevi?, Tin

    2011-09-01

    Patient satisfaction has been a widely investigated subject in health care research. Quality of care from the patient perspective, especially in home health care, however has been investigated only very recently. Home health care is a system of care provided by skilled practitioners to patients in their homes under the direction of a physician. Multidisciplinary nature of home health care services present challenges to quality measurement that differ from those found in a more traditional hospital settings. The aim of the study was to investigate the satisfaction of elderly patients living on islands with home health care. Participants receiving skilled nursing care in their homes, for any diagnosis, who met selection criteria, were surveyed about their perception of the quality of health care. The research was conducted during the year 2010 among the residents of Kvarnerian islands (Krk, Cres and Mali Losinj) under the authority of Croatian Institute for Health Insurance that approved the protocols employed in the investigation. Most older patients (96.2%) reported high levels of satisfaction with health services delivery. Common leading diagnosis among home health care patient include diseases of circulatory system (28.9% of patients), nutritional and metabolic disease (14.5%), malignant diseases (13.2%), musculoskeletal and connective tissue disease (11.8%), diseases of the nervous system (9.2%), followed by injury and poisoning (7.9%). Provision of home health care was well received by elderly patients. Home health care providers seek to provide high quality, safe care in ways that honour patient autonomy and accommodate the individual characteristics of each patients home and family. The demographics of an aging society will sustain the trend towards home-based care. Therefore, research on effective practices, conducted in home health care settings, is necessary to support excellent and evidence-based care. PMID:22220438

  5. Health Profile of Aging Family Caregivers Supporting Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaki, Kiyoshi; Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    The health status of 206 female caregivers supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at home was investigated using objective (i.e., presence of chronic health conditions and activity limitations) and subjective (i.e., self-perceived health status) health measures compared with those of women in the general population in 2…

  6. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... endanger the health and safety of the HHA's patients and has had a temporary management appointed to... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Home health aide services. 484.36 Section 484.36 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

  7. With Home Testing, Consumers Take Charge of Their Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... what it means." Nichols, who directs the clinical chemistry laboratory at Vanderbilt University's School of Medicine, says ... Health Professionals ©2001 - by American Association for Clinical Chemistry • Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy We comply ...

  8. Coaching the toxic leader.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Manfred F R Kets

    2014-04-01

    In his work as an executive coach, psychotherapist Kets de Vries sometimes comes across bosses with mental demons. The four kinds he encounters most frequently are pathological narcissists, who are selfish and entitled, have grandiose fantasies, and pursue power at all costs; manic-depressives, who can leave a trail of emotional blazes behind them; passive-aggressives, who shy away from confrontation but are obstructive and under-handed; and the emotionally disconnected--literal-minded people who cannot describe or even recognize their feelings. Left unchecked, these personalities can warp the interactions, plans, and systems of entire organizations. But with appropriate coaching, toxic bosses can learn to manage their conditions and become effective mentors and leaders. This article describes how to recognize each pathology and, step by step, guide people who suffer from it toward healthier and more-productive interactions. PMID:24830286

  9. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...50 Section 409.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital...

  10. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...50 Section 409.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital...

  11. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...50 Section 409.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital...

  12. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...50 Section 409.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital...

  13. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...50 Section 409.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital...

  14. Overview of Home Health Aides: United States, 2007

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for us? Addressing the long-term care workforce crisis. Urban Institute and American Association of Homes and ... may include surrounding counties if there are strong economic ties between the counties, based on commuting patterns. ...

  15. [Organization of the health system from the perspective of home care professionals].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Angélica Mônica; Brito, Maria José Menezes; Silva, Kênia Lara; Montenegro, Lívia Cozer; Caçador, Beatriz Santana; Freitas, Letícia Fernanda de Cota

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this qualitative case study is to analyze how the health system is organized from the perspective of homecare professionals. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews with seven professionals that provide home healthcare services. Content analysis revealed the following empirical categories: Perception of home care professionals in relation to their work and the health system; Difficulties in articulating the Home Care Program with other services of the health system; and, Opportunities to articulate the various health services with the Home Care Program. Results indicate that the work conducted in the Home Care Program significantly interfaces with other health service programs, and is considered important to implement principles of the National Health Service. PMID:24015469

  16. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  17. Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

  18. Training of Home Health Aides and Nurse Aides: Findings from National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Manisha; Ejaz, Farida K.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the…

  19. 77 FR 67067 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ...-PRD Post-Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration PEP Partial Episode Payment Adjustment PT Physical...-Face Encounter E. Therapy Coverage and Reassessments F. Payment Reform: Home Health Study and Report G... Home Assessment Validation and Entry System HCC Hierarchical Condition Categories HCIS Health...

  20. 75 FR 70371 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in... Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in... Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including: the national standardized 60-day episode rates,...

  1. 77 FR 67067 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... 42 CFR Parts 409, 424, 484, et al. Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate...; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2013, Hospice Quality Reporting... Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national standardized 60-day episode rates,...

  2. How the Iranian Football Coaches and Players Know About Doping?

    PubMed Central

    Seif Barghi, Tohid; Halabchi, Farzin; Dvorak, Jiri; Hosseinnejad, Heydar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, doping is an intricate dilemma. Football is the nationally popular sport in Iran. On the other hand, doping is a serious health hazard sport faces today. Studies dealing with athletes’ knowledge, attitudes and behavior concerning doping in football are scarce. Objectives: Therefore, we aimed to investigate the knowledge and attitudes toward doping among the football coaches and players. Patients and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 375 participants (239 football players and 136 coaches) were studied. A specially made questionnaire was applied. In this study, football teams of different provinces of the country were selected by randomized clustered sampling and questionnaires were distributed among coaches and players. Results: Knowledge of football coaches and players in three categories of doping definitions, recognition of prohibited drugs and side effects of anabolic steroids was poor or moderate in 45.3%, 88.5% and 96.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Football players and coaches have poor knowledge about doping in Iran. Moreover, they believe in some inappropriate myths without any scientific or rational basis.It seems necessary to design a comprehensive educational program for all of the athletes and coaches in Iran. PMID:26448840

  3. 76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

  4. Coaches, Sexual Harassment and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Kari; Brackenridge, Celia

    2009-01-01

    Sexual harassment in sport has become an active research field within the past decade yet we know relatively little about the characteristics of the harassing coach. How are harassing coaches characterised by their victims, that is, the athletes themselves? Do they demonstrate specific kinds of behaviours? One purpose of this article is to address…

  5. Coaching Schools to Sustain Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostin, Mark; Haeger, Jean

    2006-01-01

    High schools have traditionally worked on improvement in isolation, but a growing number have broken the barriers of isolation by working with a school improvement coach. An outside school coach, properly prepared and sensitive to individual and whole-school concerns, can provide a balance of pressure and support to initiate and sustain meaningful…

  6. More Than Mentors: Principal Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Gary; Castagna, Claire; Warren, Betsy

    2003-01-01

    A professional development program for leadership, Coaching Leaders to Attain Student Success (CLASS), prepares individuals to coach new and experienced school principals. The program is the product of collaboration between the New Teacher Center at University of California Santa Cruz and the Association of California School Administrators. (MLF)

  7. Relational Demography in Coaching Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagas, Michael; Paetzold, Ramona; Ashley, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The decline in the proportion of female head coaches in the intercollegiate ranks is one of the most significant issues in the realm of women's sports today. To extend the body of research that has studied this topic, we investigated the impact relational demographic effects on the work attitudes of coaches, which differs from previous research…

  8. Health effects of common home, lawn, and garden pesticides.

    PubMed

    Karr, Catherine J; Solomon, Gina M; Brock-Utne, Alice C

    2007-02-01

    Children encounter pesticide products and their residues where they live and play and in the food supply. Pesticide exposure affects pediatric health both acutely and chronically; effects range from mild and subtle to severe. Pediatricians play an important role in identifying and reducing significant pesticide exposure in their patients by taking an exposure history to clarify the extent and types of exposures that may have occurred during acute care and preventive care visits. Developing knowledge about the toxicity of various chemicals, identifying reliable resources for pesticide information, and providing a common-sense approach toward recommending the safest practical alternatives is necessary. PMID:17306684

  9. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  10. Understanding How Ontario High School Teacher-Coaches Learn to Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Geoff; Culver, Diane; Camiré, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are approximately 52,000 teacher-coaches coaching 750,000 high school student-athletes in Canada. Despite this large population, Canadian high school teacher-coaches remain relatively unstudied. High school coaches in Canada are often asked to coach sports with which they are unfamiliar, and because they are not required to…

  11. Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-11-01

    The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program. PMID:24662895

  12. Reflective Coaching Conversations: A Missing Piece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Debra S.; Taylor, Barbara M.; Burnham, Bobbie; Schock, Rynell

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to document and describe coaching conversations between literacy coaches and teachers in elementary schools that were seeing gains in students' reading achievement. Participants were drawn from literacy coaches in twenty-four Reading First schools in Minnesota. Detailed notes of the coaching conversations were…

  13. Failure to Rehire: Why Coaches Get Fired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify reasons coaches were not rehired in public school coaching positions. The intent was to use this information for content modification of courses in coach education. At the entry level, coaches are too often concerned only with their particular sport and how to develop successful athletes or winning teams.…

  14. Home

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) in August 2011. CPTAC is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows. The overarching goal of CPTAC is to improve our ability to diagnose, treat and prevent cancer. Read more.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-05-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

  16. Athletes' evaluations of their head coach's coaching competency.

    PubMed

    Myers, Nicholas D; Feltz, Deborah L; Maier, Kimberly S; Wolfe, Edward W; Reckase, Mark D

    2006-03-01

    This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional internal model was retained in which motivation, game strategy, technique, and character building comprised the dimensions of coaching competency. Some redundancy among the dimensions was observed. Internal reliabilities ranged from very good to excellent. Practical recommendations for the CCS are given in the Discussion section. PMID:16646358

  17. Effects of Medicare Payment Reform: Evidence from the Home Health Interim and Prospective Payment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Sood, Neeraj; Escarce, José J; Grabowski, David C; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Medicare continues to implement payment reforms that shift reimbursement from fee-for-service towards episode-based payment, affecting average and marginal payment. We contrast the effects of two reforms for home health agencies. The Home Health Interim Payment System in 1997 lowered both types of payment; our conceptual model predicts a decline in the likelihood of use and costs, both of which we find. The Home Health Prospective Payment System in 2000 raised average but lowered marginal payment with theoretically ambiguous effects; we find a modest increase in use and costs. We find little substantive effect of either policy on readmissions or mortality. PMID:24395018

  18. The role of coach education in the development of expertise in coaching 

    E-print Network

    Nash, Christine Scott

    The coach has a crucial role to play in the furtherance of sporting performance however, unlike the athlete, scant attention has been paid to the development of the expert coach. This thesis investigated methods of coach ...

  19. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service. 409.50 Section 409.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance §...

  20. Medicare and Medicaid programs; CY 2015 Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update; Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements; and survey and enforcement requirements for home health agencies. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    This final rule updates Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective for episodes ending on or after January 1, 2015. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule implements the second year of the four-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates. This rule provides information on our efforts to monitor the potential impacts of the rebasing adjustments and the Affordable Care Act mandated face-to-face encounter requirement. This rule also implements: Changes to simplify the face-to-face encounter regulatory requirements; changes to the HH PPS case-mix weights; changes to the home health quality reporting program requirements; changes to simplify the therapy reassessment timeframes; a revision to the Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) personnel qualifications; minor technical regulations text changes; and limitations on the reviewability of the civil monetary penalty provisions. Finally, this rule also discusses Medicare coverage of insulin injections under the HH PPS, the delay in the implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), and a HH value-based purchasing (HH VBP) model. PMID:25376056

  1. Health care policies for children in out-of-home care.

    PubMed

    Risley-Curtiss, C; Kronenfeld, J J

    2001-01-01

    Placement in out-of-home care is one intervention used to protect children from abuse and neglect. While children are in such care, it is the child welfare agency's responsibility to ensure that their health needs are met. The study reported here examined health care policies and services for children in 46 state child welfare agencies. Virtually all states had some sort of written policies regarding health care for children in out-of-home care. Half, however, reported having no information management system to record health care data, and only six of the 23 had computerized systems. Most states fell short of meeting the standards set by the Child Welfare League of America for the health care of children in out-of-home care. PMID:11380045

  2. Home and Health in the Third Age — Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kylén, Maya; Ekström, Henrik; Haak, Maria; Elmståhl, Sölve; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens. PMID:25019267

  3. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  4. Five Years of HHS Home Health Care Evaluations: Using Evaluation to Change National Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Grob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, American Evaluation Association member George Grob, now retired from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and currently President of the Center for Public Program Evaluation, made a testimony on Medicare home health care fraud and abuse before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. The occasion was to announce the…

  5. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing... Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to develop, implement, and evaluate... Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX 79601, T51HP20702...

  6. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  7. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  8. Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

  9. Health perceptions of home-grown tobacco (chop-chop) smokers.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Campbell; Fry, Tim R L; Grahlmann, Linda; Masters, Tristan

    2008-03-01

    We present results from a qualitative study of smokers of home-grown tobacco (chop-chop). In particular, we focused on participants' perceptions of the health effects of smoking chop-chop relative to legal tobacco. Consistent with previous work, we found that smokers of chop-chop believe that relatively less chemical treatment of chop-chop tobacco meant lower health risks than with legal products, although many believed the ultimate difference in effect on health was negligible. PMID:18324558

  10. 76 FR 9502 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ...: Randy Throndset, (410) 786-0131. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2010-27778 (75 FR... SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 424 RIN 0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home... Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices; Correction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  11. The Relation of Patient Dependence to Home Health Aide Use in Alzheimer's Disease

    E-print Network

    The Relation of Patient Dependence to Home Health Aide Use in Alzheimer's Disease Rachel K. Scherer Cognitive Neuroscience Division of the Taub Institute for Research in Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging to understanding the predictors of nursing home placement (NHP) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients

  12. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multi-Family Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore multiple family members’ perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home. Design Ten multi-family focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting Community setting. Participants Primarily Black and White families. Family members (n = 103) were between the ages of 8–61 years. Analysis A grounded hermeneutic approach. Phenomenon of Interest Risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home environment. Results Ten major themes were identified by family members related to health behaviors in the home environment, including: (a) accessibility to healthy foods and activity, (b) time constraints, (c) stage of youth development, (d) individual investment in health behaviors, (e) family investment in health behaviors, (f) family meals and shared activities, (g) parent modeling, (h) making health behaviors fun, (i) making health behaviors part of the family lifestyle, and (j) community investment in family health behaviors. Conclusions and Implications This study identified the importance of the family system and the reciprocal influences within the home environment on health behaviors. In addition, individual and community-level suggestions were identified. Insights from the families provide leads for future research and ideas for the prevention of youth obesity. PMID:22192951

  13. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment Using Smart Home Monitoring of Complex Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the automated assessment of resident well-being. We hypothesize that the functional health of individuals, or ability of individuals to perform activities independently without assistance, can be estimated by tracking their activities using smart home technologies. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for assessing activity quality in smart homes. To validate our approach we quantify activity quality for 179 volunteer participants who performed a complex, interweaved set of activities in our smart home apartment. We observed a statistically significant correlation (r=0.79) between automated assessment of task quality and direct observation scores. Using machine learning techniques to predict the cognitive health of the participants based on task quality is accomplished with an AUC value of 0.64. We believe that this capability is an important step in understanding everyday functional health of individuals in their home environments. PMID:25530925

  14. Catching the Bug: How Virtual Coaching Improves Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Megan

    2014-01-01

    In this article the author describes virtual coaching and why it is so effective. The following six points of virtual coaching are explained: (1) Also known as bug-in-ear coaching, virtual coaching is not new; (2) Virtual coaching can save money and time; (3) Bug-in-ear coaching increases the frequency of observations for novice teachers; (4) It…

  15. A systematic review of integrated working between care homes and health care services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the UK there are almost three times as many beds in care homes as in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Care homes rely on primary health care for access to medical care and specialist services. Repeated policy documents and government reviews register concern about how health care works with independent providers, and the need to increase the equity, continuity and quality of medical care for care homes. Despite multiple initiatives, it is not known if some approaches to service delivery are more effective in promoting integrated working between the NHS and care homes. This study aims to evaluate the different integrated approaches to health care services supporting older people in care homes, and identify barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Methods A systematic review was conducted using Medline (PubMed), CINAHL, BNI, EMBASE, PsycInfo, DH Data, Kings Fund, Web of Science (WoS incl. SCI, SSCI, HCI) and the Cochrane Library incl. DARE. Studies were included if they evaluated the effectiveness of integrated working between primary health care professionals and care homes, or identified barriers and facilitators to integrated working. Studies were quality assessed; data was extracted on health, service use, cost and process related outcomes. A modified narrative synthesis approach was used to compare and contrast integration using the principles of framework analysis. Results Seventeen studies were included; 10 quantitative studies, two process evaluations, one mixed methods study and four qualitative. The majority were carried out in nursing homes. They were characterised by heterogeneity of topic, interventions, methodology and outcomes. Most quantitative studies reported limited effects of the intervention; there was insufficient information to evaluate cost. Facilitators to integrated working included care home managers' support and protected time for staff training. Studies with the potential for integrated working were longer in duration. Conclusions Despite evidence about what inhibits and facilitates integrated working there was limited evidence about what the outcomes of different approaches to integrated care between health service and care homes might be. The majority of studies only achieved integrated working at the patient level of care and the focus on health service defined problems and outcome measures did not incorporate the priorities of residents or acknowledge the skills of care home staff. There is a need for more research to understand how integrated working is achieved and to test the effect of different approaches on cost, staff satisfaction and resident outcomes. PMID:22115126

  16. Environmental Health and Safety Hazards Experienced by Home Health Care Providers: A Room-by-Room Analysis.

    PubMed

    Polivka, Barbara J; Wills, Celia E; Darragh, Amy; Lavender, Steven; Sommerich, Carolyn; Stredney, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The number of personnel providing in-home health care services is increasing substantially. The unique configuration of environmental hazards in individual client homes has a significant impact on the safety and health of home health care providers (HHPs). This mixed-methods study used data from a standardized questionnaire, focus groups, and individual interviews to explore environmental health and safety hazards encountered by HHPs in client homes. The participant sample (N = 68) included nurses, aides, therapists, and owners/managers from a variety of geographic locations. The most often-reported hazards were trip/slip/lift hazards, biohazards, and hazards from poor air quality, allergens, pests and rodents, and fire and burns. Frequency of identified key hazards varied by room, that is, kitchen (e.g., throw rugs, water on floor), bathroom (e.g., tight spaces for client handling), bedroom (e.g., bed too low), living room (e.g., animal waste), and hallway (e.g., clutter). Findings indicate the need for broader training to enable HHPs to identify and address hazards they encounter in client homes. PMID:26268486

  17. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Patients' Experience With Skilled Home Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura M; Anderson, Wayne L; Kenyon, Anne; Kinyara, Elizabeth; With, Sarah K; Teichman, Lori; Dean-Whittaker, Debra; Goldstein, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities are found in many health care settings; however, there is little prior research on such disparities among patients receiving home health care services. This study used 2012 Home Health Care CAHPS(®) data to identify any overall patient-level disparities in self-reported experience of care and to decompose these disparities according to whether they result from within-agency versus between-agency differences. Although patient experience of care ratings were high across all groups, the study identified consistently lower ratings for all minority groups on two of three Home Health Care CAHPS measures, with Asians reporting the greatest disparities. Three quarters of disparities were found to be within-agency disparities, which were primarily related to care processes and provider/patient communications rather than to specific health care services received. Despite high ratings in general, home health agencies may need to focus on cultural competency initiatives to address racial and ethnic disparities within their agencies. PMID:26238122

  18. The political economy of a public health case management program's transition into medical homes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Cilenti, Dorothy; Issel, L Michele

    2015-11-01

    Throughout the United States, public health leaders are experimenting with how best to integrate services for individuals with complex needs. To that end, North Carolina implemented a policy incorporating both local public health departments and other providers into medical homes for low income pregnant women and young children at risk of developmental delays. To understand how this transition occurred within local communities, a pre-post comparative case study was conducted. A total of 42 people in four local health departments across the state were interviewed immediately before the 2011 policy change and six months later: 32 professionals (24 twice) and 10 pregnant women receiving case management at the time of the policy implementation. We used constant comparative analysis of interview and supplemental data to identify three key consequences of the policy implementation. One, having medical homes increased the centrality of other providers relative to local health departments. Two, a shift from focusing on personal relationships toward medical efficiency diverged in some respects from both case managers' and mothers' goals. Three, health department staff re-interpreted state policies to fit their public health values. Using a political economy perspective, these changes are interpreted as reflecting shifts in public health's broader ideological environment. To a large extent, the state successfully induced more connection between health department-based case managers and external providers. However, limited provider engagement may constrain the implementation of the envisioned medical homes. The increased focus on medical risk may also undermine health departments' role in supporting health over time by attenuating staff relationships with mothers. This study helps clarify how state public health policy innovations unfold at local levels, and why front line practice may in some respects diverge from policy intent. PMID:26460509

  19. Informal Math Coaching by Instant Messaging: Two Case Studies of How University Students Coach K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Edman, Anneli; Andersson, Fredrik; Kawnine, Tanvir; Soames, Carol-Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and explore how instant messaging (IM) can be used to support informal math coaching. We have studied two projects where university students use IM to coach K-12 students in mathematics. The coaches were interviewed with a focus on how informal coaching works by examining coaching challenges, how coaching can…

  20. Coaching Conversations in Early Childhood Programs: The Contributions of Coach and Coachee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Marvin, Christine; Knoche, Lisa; Bainter, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Studies to date have linked early childhood (EC) coaching to child, family, and teacher outcomes but have not investigated "what" is happening in a coaching conversation. This exploratory study specifically unpacks nuances associated with the coaching conversation process and associations between the EC coaches' behaviors and coachees'…

  1. The First Step: Assessing the Coaching Philosophies of Pre-Service Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Karen; Barber, Heather; Moore, Kristina; Laws, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Coaches are influential in creating positive and achievement-oriented sport environments and the development of a sound philosophy is the key to successful coaching (Martens, 2004). Yet, few coaches spend significant time early in their careers developing and modifying their philosophical beliefs (Wilcox & Trudel, 1998). While coaching educators…

  2. 2014 COACHE Survey Results: Tenure and Promotion

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    institutions on satisfaction with four aspects of promotion and tenure 2014 COACHE Survey Results: Tenure and Promotion Overview FSU faculty who participated in the 2014 COACHE survey rated tenure and promotion more

  3. mHealth tools for the pediatric patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Slaper, Michael R; Conkol, Kimberly

    2014-02-01

    The concept of the pediatric patient-centered medical home (PCMH) as a theory has been evolving since it was initially conceived more than 40 years ago. When the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) Council on Pediatric Practice first wrote about this model, "medical home" was defined solely as the central location of a pediatric patient's medical records. Approximately two decades later, the AAP published its inaugural policy statement on this topic. Through this policy statement, the medical home was defined as a place where care for pediatric patients would be accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family-centered, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective. Although the lack of access to providers, especially in rural communities, may inhibit the adoption of the PCMH or chronic care models, technology has evolved to the point where many of the gaps in care can be bridged. mHealth, defined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as the use of mobile and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, health care services, and health research, can be one specific example of how technology can address these issues. One early study has shown that patients who use mHealth tools are more likely to adhere to self-monitoring requirements and, in turn, have significantly improved outcomes. A rapidly evolving and scalable mHealth technology that has the ability to address these issues are self-management mobile applications, or apps. It has been estimated that there are currently more than 40,000 health care-related apps available. Furthermore, use of these apps is growing, as more than 50% of smartphone users surveyed responded that they have used their device to gather health information, and almost 20% of this population has at least one health care app on their device. PMID:24512160

  4. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home-based system will interact.

  5. Nursing homes as a clinical site for training geriatric health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Mathy; Mitty, Ethel; Burger, Sarah G

    2009-03-01

    Nursing homes can be ideal clinical teaching and learning environments for acquiring geriatric specialty and interdisciplinary team skills, particularly those regarding assessment, care planning, management, monitoring, and collaborating in an interdisciplinary milieu. Little is known as to how geriatric specialty training programs use nursing homes to meet expected specialty competencies, or the types of clinical experiences in nursing homes required by academic geriatric training programs. This article describes the expectations of 5 clinical health care disciplines (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work) and nursing home administration regarding desirable nursing home characteristics that support gaining geriatric competencies. The issues involved in using nursing homes as supportive educational environments in geriatric education are discussed. PMID:19233060

  6. 41 CFR 301-10.123 - When may I use other than coach-class airline accommodations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to: (i) Use of coach-class accommodations would endanger your life or Government property; (ii) You... coach-class accommodations would endanger your life or Government property; (ii) You are an agent on... sanitation or health standards; (4) Regularly scheduled flights between origin/destination points...

  7. Educating Coaches about Concussion in Sports: Evaluation of the CDC's "Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports" Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covassin, Tracey; Elbin, R. J.; Sarmiento, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concussions remain a serious public health concern. It is important that persons involved in youth sports, particularly coaches, be made aware and educated on the signs and symptoms of concussion. This study assessed the perceptions of youth sport coaches who have received the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's…

  8. Dealing with Differences: A Coach's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    Coaches have always needed to respond to differences in sport and have always been concerned with finding hard-working kids who mesh well as a team. While coaches still try to build team cohesiveness, today's coaches must respond to complex issues related to diversity and are expected to be politically correct. The purpose of this article is to…

  9. Challenges of Literacy Coaching in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study examined a state-run, foundation-funded initiative to introduce literacy coaching in a medium-sized urban high school district over a period of two years. Data analyses revealed the complex development and multiple understandings of the process of literacy coaching on the secondary level. The role of the coaches

  10. Toward a Theory of Coaching Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple tensions exist as part of the coaching process. How a coach responds to these tensions is a fundamental determinant of an athlete or team's fate. In today's highly competitive, socially demanding, and ever-changing sports environment, and as the expectations on coaches become more complex, the paradox becomes a critical lens to…

  11. Assessing the Cost of Instructional Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, David S.

    2012-01-01

    School-based instructional coaching is an increasingly popular approach to professional development used to support in-service learning for teachers. However, little is known about the cost of coaching. The following study aims to fill this gap. First, the study describes a framework for measuring the cost of an instructional coaching program;…

  12. Academic Coaching for the Gifted Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansinger, Stuart

    A school psychologist briefly describes the use of academic coaching with gifted students who are underperforming possibly because of a disability such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Coaches are urged to first, review the student's assessment data; second, determine the student's ability to benefit from coaching; third, determine…

  13. Differentiated Coaching: Fostering Reflection with Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Katie; Kissel, Brian; Haag, Karen; Shoniker, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Literacy coaches inspire teacher reflection and promote a culture of ongoing professional learning. This article illustrates the role of literacy coaches, describes how coaches differentiate support for a diverse group of teachers, and explains how teacher reflection can be a catalyst for change and professional growth. The authors, current and…

  14. Coach-Parent Relations in Youth Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Chris; Jeffries, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    When coaches establish an effective working relationship with parents, the quality of the athlete's, coach's, and parent's experience improves. This article outlines techniques for coaches to gain the confidence and support of parents, to help parents formulate wholesome expectations, and to enlist parents' aid in developing skill and…

  15. Instructional Coaching: Leadership Styles and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Maurisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Principals are traditionally the instructional leaders of a school. However, instructional coaching moves the emphasis from principals to instructional coaches by charging instructional coaches with improving the effectiveness of teachers who are critical to ensuring the successful education of a student. This research analyzed the leadership…

  16. Towards a Framework for Leadership Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Donald; Jacobo, Amber

    2010-01-01

    Today's school principals face unprecedented challenges. This article proposes a school-based outline framework in which the principal is the primary agent of change aided by an external coach. In this framework, the principal receives coaching and guides the change process at the school through a variety of coaching practices involving the…

  17. Coaching: A Tool for Extension Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Coaching as an approach to improving people's lives is based on a positive relationship and the philosophy that the learner is responsible for their own change. In a coach approach, the educator serves as a coach; a person to help the client succeed by "challenging and supporting a person or a team to develop ways of thinking, ways of…

  18. Coaching a High School Science Olympiad Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the nature of coaching a high school science olympiad team. The author interviewed nine science teachers about the rewards and challenges of coaching, competition and cooperation, and the relationship between coaching and teaching. Findings include the importance of the social interactions between students and the emphasis on…

  19. Coach Education Online: The Montana Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2006-01-01

    Coach education is important, but expensive--both in cost and time to public and private athletic programs. To provide basic coach education to coaches, new, innovative, inexpensive approaches must be developed. Joint efforts between state high school associations and colleges and universities can meet those needs. The "Montana approach" is one…

  20. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, R.L.; Warren, S.

    1999-04-20

    This editorial paper presents a vision for intelligent health care in the home of the future, focusing on technologies with the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. A secure, plug-and-play information framework provides the starting point for identifying technologies that must be developed before home-based devices can know their context and assimilate information to support care decisions.

  1. Oral health status of older people living in care homes in Wales.

    PubMed

    Karki, A J; Monaghan, N; Morgan, M

    2015-10-01

    Background UK adult dental health surveys (ADHS) exclude care home residents from sampling. Aim To understand oral health status of care home residents in Wales using ADHS criteria.Method Cross sectional survey of care home residents in Wales using a questionnaire and oral examination contemporaneous with, and paralleling, the ADHS 2009. 708 randomly selected participants from 213 randomly selected care homes participated including individuals with and without capacity.Results 72.8% of residents had tooth decay. Compared to older adults examined in the ADHS, residents are less likely to brush teeth/dentures twice a day (37% vs 63%), more likely to only attend a dentist when they have a problem (63% vs 26%), have more teeth with active decay (3.1 vs 0.9), more have current dental pain (13% vs 5%) and other morbidity (open pulp, ulceration, fistulae, abscess 27% vs 10%). High decay is present in both recently admitted and longer term residents. There was some regional variation in levels of oral hygiene.Conclusion Oral health status of older people resident in care homes in Wales is poor. Findings suggest more could be done to improve preventive care both before and after admission to the care home. PMID:26450249

  2. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM): A Home Care Case-Mix Model for Children Facing Special Health Care Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Case-mix classification and payment systems help assure that persons with similar needs receive similar amounts of care resources, which is a major equity concern for consumers, providers, and programs. Although health service programs for adults regularly use case-mix payment systems, programs providing health services to children and youth rarely use such models. This research utilized Medicaid home care expenditures and assessment data on 2,578 children receiving home care in one large state in the USA. Using classification and regression tree analyses, a case-mix model for long-term pediatric home care was developed. The Pediatric Home Care/Expenditure Classification Model (P/ECM) grouped children and youth in the study sample into 24 groups, explaining 41% of the variance in annual home care expenditures. The P/ECM creates the possibility of a more equitable, and potentially more effective, allocation of home care resources among children and youth facing serious health care challenges.

  3. Readiness for Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology and Patient Centered Medical Home Recognition Survey Results

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Peter; Sharac, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine the factors that impact HIT use and MU readiness for community health centers (CHCs). Background The HITECH Act allocates funds to Medicaid and Medicare providers to encourage the adoption of electronic health records (EHR), in an effort to improve health care quality and patient outcomes, and to reduce health care costs. Methods We surveyed CHCs on their Readiness for Meaningful Use (MU) of Health Information Technology (HIT) and Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Recognition, then we combined responses with 2009 Uniform Data System data to determine which factors impact use of HIT and MU readiness. Results Nearly 70% of CHCs had full or partial EHR adoption at the time of survey. Results are presented for centers with EHR adoption, by the length of time that their EHR systems have been in operation. PMID:24834365

  4. Public health and English local government: historical perspectives on the impact of 'returning home'.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin; Lock, Karen; Hogarth, Sue

    2014-12-01

    This article uses history to stimulate reflection on the present opportunities and challenges for public health practice in English local government. Its motivation is the paradox that despite Department of Health policy-makers' allusions to 'a long and proud history' and 'returning public health home' there has been no serious discussion of that past local government experience and what we might learn from it. The article begins with a short resumé of the achievements of Victorian public health in its municipal location, and then considers the extensive responsibilities that it developed for environmental, preventive and health services by the mid-twentieth century. The main section discusses the early NHS, explaining why historians see the era as one of decline for the speciality of public health, leading to the reform of 1974, which saw the removal from local government and the abolition of the Medical Officer of Health role. Our discussion focuses on challenges faced before 1974 which raise organizational and political issues relevant to local councils today as they embed new public health teams. These include the themes of leadership, funding, integrated service delivery, communication and above all the need for a coherent vision and rationale for public health action in local authorities. PMID:24472776

  5. Public health and English local government: historical perspectives on the impact of ‘returning home

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Martin; Lock, Karen; Hogarth, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This article uses history to stimulate reflection on the present opportunities and challenges for public health practice in English local government. Its motivation is the paradox that despite Department of Health policy-makers’ allusions to ‘a long and proud history’ and ‘returning public health home’ there has been no serious discussion of that past local government experience and what we might learn from it. The article begins with a short resumé of the achievements of Victorian public health in its municipal location, and then considers the extensive responsibilities that it developed for environmental, preventive and health services by the mid-twentieth century. The main section discusses the early NHS, explaining why historians see the era as one of decline for the speciality of public health, leading to the reform of 1974, which saw the removal from local government and the abolition of the Medical Officer of Health role. Our discussion focuses on challenges faced before 1974 which raise organizational and political issues relevant to local councils today as they embed new public health teams. These include the themes of leadership, funding, integrated service delivery, communication and above all the need for a coherent vision and rationale for public health action in local authorities. PMID:24472776

  6. The Nontoxic Home. Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Everyday Toxics and Health Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadd, Debra Lynn

    The document maintains that the world is filled with health hazards and the best a person can do is to assess the danger of individual products, learn the risks, weigh the risks against the benefits, and decide whether or not to personally take these risks or to subject family members to them. This perspective begins in the home. This book…

  7. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by... amended Sec. 17.56. See 75 FR 7218 (Feb. 18, 2010); 75 FR 78901. We need not repeat them here. Indeed,...

  8. UC Santa Barbara Home: Administrative Services/Environmental Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    UC Santa Barbara Home: Administrative Services/Environmental Health and Safety Use of Pesticides, Title 3 California Food and Agriculture Code, Division 6 & 7 Business and Professional Code, Division 3 A pest is a plant or animal that is considered to be detrimental to humans or human concerns. C

  9. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  10. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  11. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  12. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  13. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  14. Medicare-Certified Home Health Care: Urban-Rural Differences in Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Lacey; Jarosek, Stephanie L.; Virnig, Beth A.; Durham, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Context: Availability of Medicare-certified home health care (HHC) to rural elders can prevent more expensive institutional care. To date, utilization of HHC by rural elders has not been studied in detail. Purpose: To examine urban-rural differences in Medicare HHC utilization. Methods: The 2002 100% Medicare HHC claims and denominator files were…

  15. Impact of a Statewide Home Visiting Program on Parenting and on Child Health and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldera, Debra; Burrell, Lori; Rodriguez, Kira; Crowne, Sarah Shea; Rohde, Charles; Duggan, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a voluntary, paraprofessional home visiting program on promoting child health and development and maternal parenting knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Methods: This collaborative, experimental study of 6 Healthy Families Alaska (HFAK) programs enrolled 325 families from 1/00 to 7/01, randomly assigned them to…

  16. Smart Home-based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients

    E-print Network

    Cook, Diane J.

    . The architecture can be used to monitor the activity, diet, and exercise compliance of diabetes patientsSmart Home-based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients the best possible quality of life for individuals with diabetes. #12;Introduction Medical researchers

  17. A game-based strategy for the staff development of home health care nurses.

    PubMed

    Popil, Inna; Dillard-Thompson, Darlene

    2015-05-01

    This article describes gaming, an interactive teaching strategy that promotes active learning. An evaluation study conducted with home health care nurses tested the use of a game as a teaching tool. The study evaluated learning outcomes and learners' level of engagement and satisfaction with an educational game as a teaching method. PMID:25955422

  18. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  19. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  20. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  1. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  2. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  3. Variations in levels of care between nursing home patients in a public health care system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the setting of a public health service we analyse the distribution of resources between individuals in nursing homes funded by global budgets. Three questions are pursued. Firstly, whether there are systematic variations between nursing homes in the level of care given to patients. Secondly, whether such variations can be explained by nursing home characteristics. And thirdly, how individual need-related variables are associated with differences in the level of care given. Methods The study included 1204 residents in 35 nursing homes and extra care sheltered housing facilities. Direct time spent with patients was recorded. In average each patient received 14.8 hours direct care each week. Multilevel regression analysis is used to analyse the relationship between individual characteristics, nursing home characteristics and time spent with patients in nursing homes. The study setting is the city of Trondheim, with a population of approximately 180 000. Results There are large variations between nursing homes in the total amount of individual care given to patients. As much as 24 percent of the variation of individual care between patients could be explained by variation between nursing homes. Adjusting for structural nursing home characteristics did not substantially reduce the variation between nursing homes. As expected a negative association was found between individual care and case-mix, implying that at nursing home level a more resource demanding case-mix is compensated by lowering the average amount of care. At individual level ADL-disability is the strongest predictor for use of resources in nursing homes. For the average user one point increase in ADL-disability increases the use of resources with 27 percent. Conclusion In a financial reimbursement model for nursing homes with no adjustment for case-mix, the amount of care patients receive does not solely depend on the patients’ own needs, but also on the needs of all the other residents. PMID:24597468

  4. Effect of Weatherization Combined With Community Health Worker In-Home Education on Asthma Control

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sherry; Gregory, Joel; Philby, Miriam; Jacobs, David E.; Krieger, James

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the benefits of adding weatherization-plus-health interventions to an in-home, community health worker (CHW) education program on asthma control. Methods. We used a quasi-experimental design to compare study group homes (n?=?34) receiving CHW education and weatherization-plus-health structural interventions with historical comparison group homes (n?=?68) receiving only education. Data were collected in King County, Washington, from October 2009 to September 2010. Results. Over the 1-year study period, the percentage of study group children with not-well-controlled or very poorly controlled asthma decreased more than the comparison group percentage (100% to 28.8% vs 100% to 51.6%; P?=?.04). Study group caregiver quality-of-life improvements exceeded comparison group improvements (P?=?.002) by 0.7 units, a clinically important difference. The decrease in study home asthma triggers (evidence of mold, water damage, pests, smoking) was marginally greater than the comparison group decrease (P?=?.089). Except for mouse allergen, the percentage of study group allergen floor dust samples at or above the detection limit decreased, although most reductions were not statistically significant. Conclusions. Combining weatherization and healthy home interventions (e.g., improved ventilation, moisture and mold reduction, carpet replacement, and plumbing repairs) with CHW asthma education significantly improves childhood asthma control. PMID:24228661

  5. The Utilization of Home Care by the Elderly in Brazil's Primary Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Wyshak, Grace; Campbell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the utilization of home care by the elderly in Brazil after implementation of the Family Health Strategy (FHS). Methods. Data were derived from a cross-sectional study in a southern city in Brazil. Using the ?2 test and a logistic regression with different levels of determination, we tested the hypothesis that the FHS increased the utilization of home care compared with utilization under the Traditional Primary Health Care (TPHC) system. Results. We interviewed 1593 residents aged 60 years and older. Home care utilization under the FHS was 2.7 times the rate of utilization under the TPHC (95% confidence interval = 1.5, 4.7; P = .001), and utilization increased among the older group, the less educated, those with history of hospitalization, and those with functional limitations. Conclusions. Improvement in access to care resulted in greater utilization of home care. Our findings have policy implications that include expanding the coverage of the FHS throughout big cities where coverage is limited. These findings are important because the population is aging and the family strategy operates in poorer areas; thus, it can promote equity in access to home health care among the elderly. PMID:20724683

  6. Effect of a Consumer-Directed Voucher and a Disease-Management-Health-Promotion Nurse Intervention on Home Care Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Mukamel, Dana; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the impact of two interventions, a consumer-directed voucher for in-home supportive services and a chronic disease self-management-health-promotion nurse intervention, on the probability of use of two types of home care-skilled home health care and personal assistance services-received by functionally impaired Medicare…

  7. The lifespan merger sucess story: combining resources to offer better home health services.

    PubMed

    2005-03-01

    In 1996, "Lifespan" was born when four home care agencies in Battle Creek, Michigan, merged to create a wholly owned subsidiary of the Battle Creek Health System (BCHS), a community health care delivery organization that provides acute care, long-term care, psychological services, outpatient care, home health care, and occupational and business services. By banding together to effect savings through joint contract purchasing and shared services, Lifespan and BCHS have formed a communal relationship that allows the two to offer a seamless continuum of care without establishing wholly discrete organizations. Lifespan has thus been free to independently make mutually beneficial partnerships with an information technology company to enhance patient care services to their clients. PMID:15875424

  8. Health-related profile and quality of life among nursing home residents: does pain matter?

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Wan, Vanessa T C; Vong, Sinfia K S

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this exploratory cross-sectional study was to explore the health-related profile and quality of life among older persons living with and without pain in nursing homes. Ten nursing homes were approached, and 535 older persons were invited to join the study from 2009 to 2011. The nursing home residents' demographic information and information regarding their pain situation and the use of oral analgesic drug and nondrug therapy among the older residents with chronic pain were also collected. Residents' physical health (using the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Elderly Mobility Scores); psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, depression, and loneliness (using the Happiness Scale, the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale); and quality of life were investigated. Among the 535 nursing home residents, 396 (74%) of them suffered from pain, with mean pain scores of 4.09 ± 2.19, indicating medium pain intensity a remaining 139 (26%) reported no pain. The location of pain was mainly in the knees, back and shoulders. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of the no-pain group (p < .05), nursing home residents' pain affected both their psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, and depression, and their physical quality of life. Nevertheless, only one-half of the older persons with pain used oral analgesic drug or nondrug therapy to relieve their pain. Pain had a significant impact on their mobility and ADL, was positively correlated with happiness and life satisfaction, and was negatively correlated with loneliness and depression. Pain management is a high priority in elderly care; as such, innovative and interdisciplinary strategies are necessary to enhance quality of life particularly for older persons living in nursing homes. PMID:24315270

  9. Technology, health and the home: eHealth and the community nurse.

    PubMed

    Peate, Ian

    2013-05-01

    Twenty-first century methods of communication are changing. Technology and the way it is used has the potential to revolutionise health care. In the same way information technology (IT) has had a massive impact on commerce and industry, it is also having a substantial impact on the practice of community nurses and the ways in which care is delivered. In order for the impact of IT to be a positive one, community nurses and other health professionals will have to learn and develop a range of new skills. Nurses can and should be directing and becoming involved in the ways in which the IT revolution unfolds. Nurses working with systems development teams also need to make known their needs making clear what information the various IT systems have to contain and how these will fit in with their nursing practice. PMID:23752321

  10. A Primer on Instructional Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The pressure to improve the quality of instruction in schools may be higher today than at any other time in the history of U.S. education. To respond to this urgent demand, schools across the nation are hiring instructional coaches (ICs), even though there is little published research that shows what works and what does not work when it comes to…

  11. Basketball for the New Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Dan; Rose, Jim

    This book is intended for beginning basketball coaches at either the school or agency level. The chapters contain information on simple team administration to the detailed planning and development of team strategy. In addition, the book contains chapters concerning the principles relating to basketball mechanics, conditioning the team, setting up…

  12. Appendix 14-Ia Coach's Employment

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    ) No athletics department staff member may be employed (salary or volunteer) in any capacity by a camp or clinicAppendix 14-Ia Coach's Employment Non Institutional Camp/Clinic Revised August 2010 ATHLETICS STAFF of Compliance Date NCAA Bylaw 13.12.2.3--Athletics Staff Members. A member institution's athletics staff member

  13. Embedded Instructional Coaching: What Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habegger, Shelly; Hodanbosi, Philip

    2011-01-01

    How are administrators leveraging the expertise and passion in their buildings? How do they inspire enthusiasm in their teachers and improve student achievement? How do they act as an agent for change? Those are the tasks the authors are given as instructional coaches. In the beginning, they were unsure how to tackle those tasks--or even if it was…

  14. Contesting Contained Bodily Coaching Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Through critical readings of several images and texts, including photographs and artifacts in this collected montage, my aim here is to use multiple interactional analyses (visual culture techniques and deconstructive techniques) to assist in the critique of these presented visual images that represent current coaching policies in the USA.

  15. Coaching Basketball; Ten Winning Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeremiah, Maryalyce

    Written primarily for coaches, this book is intended to help formulate a conceptual philosophy and approach to the game of basketball. The basic offensive, defensive, and transitioal fundamentals are stressed, and drills that simulate these fundamentals in a game are presented. The drills differ from most others in that they are designed so that…

  16. Bodies Matter in Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasudevan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Reading the implicit invitation in new literacies scholarship to reimagine pedagogy that leans into the lives of youth, Vasudevan reminds readers how the teacher's body is central to the meaning making of students in literacy classrooms. She extends this notion of embodiment to the work of the literacy coach and reiterates Skinner, Hagood,…

  17. Coaching for the PISA Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Martin; Artelt, Cordula; Krauss, Steffan; Baumert, Jurgen

    2007-01-01

    Coaching is known to improve student performance on tests with high personal relevance ("high-stakes tests"). We investigate whether the same holds for a test that has no personal relevance for the students taking it ("low-stakes test"). More specifically, we explore whether student performance on the reading and mathematics assessments of the…

  18. Getting Home Safe and Sound: Occupational Safety and Health Administration at 38

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHAct) declared that every worker is entitled to safe and healthful working conditions, and that employers are responsible for work being free from all recognized hazards. Thirty-eight years after these assurances, however, it is difficult to find anyone who believes the promise of the OSHAct has been met. The persistence of preventable, life-threatening hazards at work is a failure to keep a national promise. I review the history of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and propose measures to better ensure that those who go to work every day return home safe and sound. These measures fall into 6 areas: leverage and accountability, safety and health systems, employee rights, equal protection, framing, and infrastructure. PMID:18235060

  19. Ecosystem and population health: the role of Canadian physicians at home and abroad.

    PubMed Central

    Woollard, R F

    1995-01-01

    Seemingly intractable problems of overpopulation, ecologic degradation, diminishing resources and regional warfare are having a profound effect on global population health. Canadian physicians can assist in ameliorating these problems by helping to modify the overconsumption of natural resources at home and by participating in international health projects focused at the community level, where the health of individuals and that of their environment intersect. The author describes the work of the Canadian Hunger Foundation in Vietnam and Sri Lanka, where a team of professionals worked with local farmers to improve the local water supply, decrease soil erosion and increase food production. The team observed changes in the physical health of communities that resulted in part from interventions that empowered them to address their own problems. PMID:7553520

  20. Dwelling within political violence: Palestinian women's narratives of home, mental health, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cindy A; Kemp, Susan; El-Zuhairi, Mona

    2014-11-01

    Political violence is increasingly played out within everyday civilian environments, particularly family homes. Yet, within the literature on political violence and mental health, the role of threats to home remains under-explored. Using focus group data from 32 Palestinian women, this paper explores the implications of violations to the home within political violence. Threats to the privacy, control, and constancy of the family home - key dimensions of ontological security (Giddens, 1990) emerged as central themes in women's narratives. Surveillance, home invasions, and actual or threatened destruction of women's home environments provoked fear, anxiety, grief, humiliation, and helplessness, particularly as women struggled to protect their children. Women also described how they mobilized the home for economic, familial and cultural survival. Study findings illuminate the impact of threats to intimate environments on the well-being of women and their families living with chronic political violence, and underscore the importance of attention to violations of place and home in research on civilian experiences of and responses to political violence. PMID:25306419

  1. Medication Discrepancies and Associated Risk Factors Identified in Home Health patients.

    PubMed

    Hale, Jennifer; Neal, Erin B; Myers, Amy; Wright, Kelly H S; Triplett, Julia; Brown, Laura Beth; Kripalani, Sunil; Mixon, Amanda S

    2015-10-01

    Medication discrepancies can place patients at increased risk for adverse drug events. We sought to determine the frequency, type, and reason for medication discrepancies in patients receiving home healthcare following hospital discharge. We conducted a retrospective, observational study of adults discharged from an academic medical center who received home healthcare following hospital discharge from one affiliated home healthcare agency. Medication discrepancies were identified by comparing the hospital discharge medication list to what the patient was taking at the first home healthcare visit. Almost all patients (66/70, 94%) had at least one medication discrepancy. The median number of discrepancies per patient was 5. Nearly half of the discrepancies were omissions (46%), in which the patient was not taking a medication on the discharge medication list. Increased age was significantly associated with fewer medication discrepancies overall (IRR = 0.99, p < 0.05). Higher health literacy was associated with more omissions (IRR = 1.85, p < 0.05). PMID:26418109

  2. Effectiveness of Home Visits in Pregnancy as a Public Health Measure to Improve Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Kayoko; Fujiwara, Takeo; Nakayama, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Background Birth outcomes, such as preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW), and small for gestational age (SGA), are crucial indicators of child development and health. Purpose To evaluate whether home visits from public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women prevent adverse birth outcomes. Methods In this quasi-experimental cohort study in Kyoto city, Japan, high-risk pregnant women were defined as teenage girls (range 14–19 years old), women with a twin pregnancy, women who registered their pregnancy late, had a physical or mental illness, were of single marital status, non-Japanese women who were not fluent in Japanese, or elderly primiparas. We collected data from all high-risk pregnant women at pregnancy registration interviews held at a public health centers between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012, as well as birth outcomes when delivered from the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (N = 964), which is a record of prenatal check-ups, delivery, child development and vaccinations. Of these women, 622 women were selected based on the home-visit program propensity score-matched sample (pair of N = 311) and included in the analysis. Data were analyzed between January and June 2014. Results In the propensity score-matched sample, women who received the home-visit program had lower odds of preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.98) and showed a 0.55-week difference in gestational age (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.92) compared to the matched controlled sample. Although the program did not prevent LBW and SGA, children born to mothers who received the program showed an increase in birth weight by 107.8 g (95% CI: 27.0 to 188.5). Conclusion Home visits by public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women in Japan might be effective in preventing preterm birth, but not SGA. PMID:26348847

  3. Food, home and health: the meanings of food amongst Bengali Women in London

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores the nature of food and plants and their meanings in a British Bengali urban context. It focuses on the nature of plants and food in terms of their role in home making, transnational connections, generational change and concepts of health. Methods An ethnographic approach to the research was taken, specific methods included participant observation, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. Thirty women of Bengali origin were mostly composed of “mother” and “daughter” pairs. The mothers were over 45 years old and had migrated from Bangladesh as adults and their grown-up daughters grew up in the UK. Results Food and plants play an important role in the construction of home “here” (London) while continuing to connect people to home “there” (Sylhet). This role, however, changes and is re-defined across generations. Looking at perceptions of “healthy” and “unhealthy” food, particularly in the context of Bengali food, multiple views of what constitutes “healthy” food exist. However, there appeared to be little two-way dialogue about this concept between the research participants and health professionals. This seems to be based on “cultural” and power differences that need to be addressed for a meaningful dialogue to occur. Conclusion In summary, this paper argues that while food is critical to the familial spaces of home (both locally and globally), it is defined by a complex interplay of actors and wider meanings as illustrated by concepts of health and what constitutes Bengali food. Therefore, we call for greater dialogue between health professionals and those they interact with, to allow for an enhanced appreciation of the dynamic nature of food and plants and the diverse perceptions of the role that they play in promoting health. PMID:24886061

  4. Community health workers and home-based care programs for HIV clients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Becky A; Khanna, Sunil K

    2004-04-01

    In Nyanza Province, Kenya, estimated HIV prevalence is 22%. Given that more than 80% of the population resides in rural areas, the majority of individuals in Nyanza Province do not have access to medical facilities on a regular basis. In response to the growing demands the HIV epidemic has placed on the people and communities in this region, hundreds of lay individuals have been trained as community health workers to provide home-based care to sick or dying HIV/AIDS clients in rural areas. This paper discusses the role and impact of these community health workers in Nyanza Province, Kenya. It outlines the collaborative relationship between community health workers and the Ministry of Health, examining community health workers' use of extant biomedical structures at the district level to provide services that government-run health facilities lack the monetary resources or personnel to provide. Finally, it explores the role played by community health workers in providing HIV/AIDS education to individuals in an attempt to prevent further infections. PMID:15101670

  5. Tacit Knowledge in Expert Coaching: Science or Art?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Christine; Collins, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Effective coaching is a mixture of pedagogy and principles of sciences, e.g., motor skill acquisition, sociology, and physiology, often referred to as the science of coaching. Instinctive or intuitive coaching has often been incorrectly viewed as the art of coaching. More important should be how coaches develop knowledge, how they access that…

  6. Case Study: eCoaching in a Corporate Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri L. C.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative particularistic case study was an exploration and evaluation of an online, asynchronous, non-human coaching system called an "eCoaching system." Developed by the researcher, the eCoaching system combined performance coaching with the latest technologies in eLearning. The coaching was based on the appreciative inquiry approach, and…

  7. The Coaching Efficacy Scale II--High School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Chase, Melissa A.; Reckase, Mark D.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this validity study was to improve measurement of coaching efficacy, an important variable in models of coaching effectiveness. A revised version of the coaching efficacy scale (CES) was developed for head coaches of high school teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of 14 relevant high school sports (N = 799).…

  8. Coaching Discourse: Supporting Teachers' Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineke, Sally F.

    2013-01-01

    Although coaching is used in many schools to facilitate teachers' professional learning, few studies look closely at coaching discourse. Exploring how coaching facilitates teachers' professional development, this study used tape-recorded coaching sessions and individual post-interviews to examine the one-on-one coaching interactions of 4…

  9. E-Coaching Systems: Convenient, Anytime, Anywhere, and Nonhuman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Teri

    2012-01-01

    Technologies continue to evolve to provide more compelling and interactive learning opportunities. Coaching has traditionally been face-to-face or by email. By combining the new technologies with coaching, learning developers now have the opportunity to develop an asynchronous, online, nonhuman coaching system, or e-coaching system. An e-coaching

  10. Credentialed Chefs as Certified Wellness Coaches: Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Sforzo, Gary A; Dill, Diana; Phillips, Edward M; Moore, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Beneficial relationships exist between food preparation skills and improved dietary quality, and between times spent preparing food and mortality. Food shopping, meal planning, preparation and cooking skills are valuable in supporting good health. Thus experts are proposing nutritional counseling be expanded to include these beneficial behavioral skills. Educational programs delivered by chefs have recently emerged as a way to improve engagement with nutritional guidelines. It is reasonable to assume that a chef with behavior change knowledge and skills, such as coaching, may be more effective in facilitating behavior change. We encourage chefs who wish to be involved in promoting health-related behavior change to consider continuing education in coaching knowledge and skills. We also recommend culinary schools to consider offering these courses, to aspiring chefs. Such programming will not only benefit future clients but also offers a career- enriching professional opportunity to chefs. Credentialed chefs can make a positive health impact and should be included as professionals who are eligible for the impending national certification of health and wellness coaches. PMID:26172566

  11. An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sherry L. Fowler, Cecile; Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally; Martinez, Yolanda; Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice; Jacobs, David E.

    2009-01-15

    We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

  12. Assessment of Airborne Exposures and Health in Flooded Homes Undergoing Renovation

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Kimberly A.; Metwali, Nervana; Perry, Sarah Spencer; Hart, Tom; Kostle, Pamela A.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2008, the Cedar River crested flooding more than 5,000 Cedar Rapids homes. Residents whose homes were flooded were invited to participate in this study. Household assessments and resident interviews were conducted between November 2008 and April 2009. We characterized exposures and symptoms experienced by individuals inhabiting 73 flood-damaged homes. Active air sampling and passive electrostatic dust collectors were used to assess exposures to: culturable mold, culturable bacteria, fungal spores, inhalable particulate matter (iPM), endotoxin, glucans, allergens, lead, asbestos, radon, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Wall moisture levels and relative humidity were also measured. Exposures and questionnaire-based health assessments were compared at two levels of remediation, in-progress and completed. Homes with remediation in-progress (n=24), as compared to the completed homes (n=49), had significantly higher airborne concentrations of mold, bacteria, iPM, endotoxin and glucan. Residents of in-progress homes had a significantly higher prevalence of doctor diagnosed allergies (adjusted OR=3.08; 95%CI: 1.05–9.02) and all residents had elevated prevalence of self-reported wheeze (adjusted OR=3.77; 95%CI: 2.06–6.92) and prescription medication use for breathing problems (adjusted OR=1.38; 95%CI: 1.01–1.88) after the flood as compared to before. Proper post-flood remediation led to improved air quality and lower exposures among residents living in flooded homes. PMID:22519834

  13. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  14. Guidelines for Environmental Health Management in Children’s Homes in Sub-Sahara Africa

    PubMed Central

    Muruka, Charles; Muruka, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The field of environmental health focuses on the relationships between human health and well being and the influence of the physical, social and societal environments. Our understanding of the environment–health interface has progressed because of two relatively recent insights: First, the recognition that the unprecedented environmental changes of the last half-century are affecting global population health. Secondly, the recognition that children have greater vulnerability to environmental hazards and are inadequately protected by current regulatory standards. Efforts to redress this situation have shaped the current thrust in environmental health research toward preventing further harm to children’s health. The disproportionate vulnerability of children to environmental hazards can be explained by several reasons. Children are not “little adults.” It is known that children have greater risk of exposure and greater risk of harm compared to adults for many reasons that are unique to each developmental stage. Their behaviour and activity patterns bring them into greater contact with toxins. Children have important biological differences. Immature developing organs and tissues are more vulnerable to harm from toxic exposures. Immature metabolic and physiological systems less effectively protect the child from toxic exposure and effects. In addition, children have additional pathways of exposure that are not applicable to adults, e.g., in utero, via breast milk and via products such as toys, clothing, etc. Children also have a longer “shelf life.” They have much more of their life ahead of them during which time they will be exposed and may develop health problems as a result. Finally, children are more often involuntarily exposed and unable to avoid exposures of their own accord [1]. Due to the AIDS catastrophe in Sub-Saharan Africa, the numbers of children in difficult circumstances have increased. To mitigate the effects of the catastrophe, charitable organizations have sprung up to establish homes for such children, especially those orphaned by AIDS or those infected with HIV. It is important to ensure that environmental health hazards and risks are minimized in these children’s homes. By use of a conceptual synthesis approach, the authors attempt to generate guidelines from literature for environmental health management in children’s homes in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18180543

  15. Guidelines for environmental health management in children's homes in sub-Sahara Africa.

    PubMed

    Muruka, Charles; Muruka, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The field of environmental health focuses on the relationships between human health and well being and the influence of the physical, social and societal environments. Our understanding of the environment-health interface has progressed because of two relatively recent insights: First, the recognition that the unprecedented environmental changes of the last half-century are affecting global population health. Secondly, the recognition that children have greater vulnerability to environmental hazards and are inadequately protected by current regulatory standards. Efforts to redress this situation have shaped the current thrust in environmental health research toward preventing further harm to children's health. The disproportionate vulnerability of children to environmental hazards can be explained by several reasons. Children are not "little adults." It is known that children have greater risk of exposure and greater risk of harm compared to adults for many reasons that are unique to each developmental stage. Their behaviour and activity patterns bring them into greater contact with toxins. Children have important biological differences. Immature developing organs and tissues are more vulnerable to harm from toxic exposures. Immature metabolic and physiological systems less effectively protect the child from toxic exposure and effects. In addition, children have additional pathways of exposure that are not applicable to adults, e.g., in utero, via breast milk and via products such as toys, clothing, etc. Children also have a longer "shelf life." They have much more of their life ahead of them during which time they will be exposed and may develop health problems as a result. Finally, children are more often involuntarily exposed and unable to avoid exposures of their own accord [1]. Due to the AIDS catastrophe in Sub- Saharan Africa, the numbers of children in difficult circumstances have increased. To mitigate the effects of the catastrophe, charitable organizations have sprung up to establish homes for such children, especially those orphaned by AIDS or those infected with HIV. It is important to ensure that environmental health hazards and risks are minimized in these children's homes. By use of a conceptual synthesis approach, the authors attempt to generate guidelines from literature for environmental health management in children's homes in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18180543

  16. Daily Life or Diagnosis? Dual Perspectives on Perinatal Depression within Maternal and Child Health Home Visiting

    PubMed Central

    Price, Sarah Kye; Cohen-Filipic, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a qualitative inquiry–informing program development in a maternal and child home visiting program. Low-income women's perceptions of the meaning and experiences of depression were ascertained through focus groups and interviews. Simultaneously, the study examines staff member perceptions and roles related to depression. Specific findings from clients and staff reveal culturally situated beliefs about depression and stressful life events; comparing and contrasting these beliefs offers a novel perspective on identification and intervention for maternal depression. This study offers a foundation for a translational research agenda that will be used for program and policy development to enhance mental health services situated within maternal and child health home visiting programs. PMID:23944165

  17. Air quality of nursing homes and its effect on the lung health of elderly residents.

    PubMed

    Maio, S; Sarno, G; Baldacci, S; Annesi-Maesano, I; Viegi, G

    2015-12-01

    In industrialized countries the elderly spend most of their time indoors. The elderly may be at a higher risk of suffering from indoor air pollution-related diseases compared to the rest of the population, because of their increased exposure to potential indoor risk factors. This editorial aims to critically analyze the recent literature regarding this important topic. Results of studies performed on the elderly living in nursing homes clearly highlight that they are at risk of respiratory health impairment, even at moderate air pollutant concentrations, particularly if they are over 80 years of age and living in poorly ventilated nursing homes. The future epidemiological research on ageing and respiratory diseases should investigate the underlying biological and physiological mechanisms, in addition to the adverse health effects of potential indoor risk factors, in order to help defining effective strategies for healthy ageing. PMID:26535792

  18. Health Insurance Status and the Care of Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeld, Keith S.; Grabowski, David C.; Caudry, Daryl J.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Nursing home residents with advanced dementia commonly experience burdensome and costly hospitalizations that may not extend survival or improve the quality of life. Fragmentation in health care has contributed to poor coordination of care for acutely ill nursing home residents. Objective To compare patterns of care and quality outcomes for nursing home residents with advanced dementia covered by managed care to those covered by traditional fee-for-service Medicare. Design The Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life (CASCADE) study was a prospective cohort study that followed 323 nursing home residents over eighteen months to better understand the course of advanced dementia at or near the end of life. CASCADE and Medicare data were linked to determine the health insurance status of study participants. Setting Twenty-two nursing homes in the Boston area. Participants Nursing home residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies. Exposure The health insurance status of the resident, either managed care or traditional fee-for-service. Main Outcomes The outcomes included survival, symptoms related to comfort, treatment of pain and dyspnea, presence of pressure ulcers, presence of a DNH order, treatment for pneumonia, hospital transfer (hospitalization or emergency room visit) for an acute illness, hospice referral, primary care visits, and family satisfaction with care. Results Residents enrolled in managed care (n=133) were more likely to have do-not-hospitalize orders compared to those in traditional Medicare fee-for service (n=158) (64% vs. 51%, p-value < 0.05), were less likely to be transferred to the hospital for acute illness (4% vs. 16%, p-value < 0.05), had more primary care visits per 90 days (4.8±2.6 vs. 4.2±5.0, p-value < 0.05), and had more nurse practitioner visits (3.0±2.1 vs. 0.8±2.6, p-value < 0.05). Survival, comfort, and other treatment outcomes did not differ across groups. Conclusions and Relevance Medicare managed care programs may offer a promising approach to ensure that nursing homes are able to provide appropriate, less burdensome and affordable care, especially at the end-of-life. PMID:24061265

  19. Career coaches for nursing: a strategy for increasing your ROI.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    Career Coaches for Nursing was created as an innovative program for the nursing staff at a large, expanding Midwestern tertiary health care organization. In the 2-year start-up period, the new program met challenges and identified many system-wide, as well as local issues for improvement. A decrease in turnover and the associated cost savings from improved employee retention provided a positive return on investment within the first 2 years of the program's existence. PMID:17847663

  20. The Policy Implications of the Cost Structure of Home Health Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Mukamel, Dana B; Fortinsky, Richard H; White, Alan; Harrington, Charlene; White, Laura M; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the cost structure of home health agencies by estimating an empirical cost function for those that are Medicare-certified, ten years following the implementation of prospective payment. Design and Methods 2010 national Medicare cost report data for certified home health agencies were merged with case-mix information from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS). We estimated a fully interacted (by tax status) hybrid cost function for 7,064 agencies and calculated marginal costs as percent of total costs for all variables. Results The home health industry is dominated by for-profit agencies, which tend to be newer than the non-profit agencies and to have higher average costs per patient but lower costs per visit. For-profit agencies tend to have smaller scale operations and different cost structures, and are less likely to be affiliated with chains. Our estimates suggest diseconomies of scale, zero marginal cost for contracting with therapy workers, and a positive marginal cost for contracting with nurses, when controlling for quality. Implications Our findings suggest that efficiencies may be achieved by promoting non-profit, smaller agencies, with fewer contract nursing staff. This conclusion should be tested further in future studies that address some of the limitations of our study. PMID:24949224

  1. Effects of coach leadership and coach-athlete relationship on collective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hampson, R; Jowett, S

    2014-04-01

    The study examined the independent and combined effects of coach leadership and coaching relationships on team efficacy. A total of 150 sport performers from football teams across a range of competitive levels completed a multisection self-report instrument to assess their individual perceptions of the level of collective efficacy, the type of coach leadership, and the quality of the coach-athlete relationship. Multiple regression analyses revealed that perceptions of both coach leadership and the coach-athlete relationship predicted variance in team efficacy. Overall, the findings suggest that the quality of coach-athlete relationships added to the prediction of individuals' collective efficacy beyond what was predicted by coaches' behaviors of leadership alone. Limitations and future research directions are discussed. PMID:22966768

  2. Parents’ perspectives of the transition to home when a child has complex technological health care needs

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Maria; Larkin, Philip J.; Hilliard, Carol; Cawley, Des; Howlin, Frances; Connolly, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is an increasing number of children with complex care needs, however, there is limited evidence of the experience of families during the process of transitioning to becoming their child's primary care giver. The aim of this study was to explore parents’ perspectives of the transition to home of a child with complex respiratory health care needs. Methods Parents of children with a tracheostomy with or without other methods of respiratory assistance, who had transitioned to home from a large children's hospital in the last 5 years, were invited to participate in the interviews. Voice-centred relational method of qualitative analysis was used to analyse parent responses. Results Four key themes emerged from the interviews including “stepping stones: negotiating the move to home”, “fighting and frustration”, “questioning competence” and “coping into the future”. Discussion There is a need for clear and equitable assessments and shared policies and protocols for the discharge of children with complex care needs. Direction and support are required at the level of health service policy and planning to redress these problems. This study provides evidence that the transition of children with complex care needs from hospital to home is a challenging dynamic in need of further improvement and greater negotiation between the parent and health service provider. There are tangible issues that could be addressed including the introduction of a standardised approach to assessment of the needs of the child and family in preparation for discharge and for clear timelines and criteria for reassessment of needs once at home. PMID:26528098

  3. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot's model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia's five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer. PMID:26078624

  4. Home Oxygen Program review: Regionalization in Vancouver Coastal Health and British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in the 1980s, the Home Oxygen Program in British Columbia was centrally managed by the Ministry of Health. Initially a small program with few clients across the province, it soon became a large program with many clients and increasing expenditures. A pilot program started in Victoria (British Columbia) in 1996 demonstrated that managing the program locally could offer better client care, better contract management and significant cost savings. In 2002, the pilot’s model and recommendations were implemented in British Columbia’s five health authorities. The present review details the experiences of regionalizing the program in the Vancouver Coastal Health authority. After fine adjustments to the model were developed and new contracts and criteria changes made, better care for clients was provided than the previous centralized model at a reduced cost to the taxpayer. PMID:26078624

  5. Handball Coaches’ Perceptions About the Value of Working Competences According to Their Coaching Background

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Isabel; Borges, Mario; Rosado, Antonio; Souza, Adriano De

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value attributed to given working competences, by Portuguese handball coaches according to their coaching background, certification level, coaching experience, and level of education. A sample of 207 handball coaches responded to a questionnaire which included demographic characteristics and a scale focused on perceptions of the level of importance attributed to working competences. Data analysis included an exploratory factorial analysis applying Maximum Likelihood Factoring (MLF) and Oblimin rotation. These factors were submitted to a One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc multiple comparisons to analyse coaches’ perceptions according to their coaching background. A six factor solution was found where three major domains of competences were highlighted; the first one related to training and competition (e.g. planning and conducting the training, team administration in competition, annual and multi-annual planning, and coaching methodology); the second one related to social and cultural issues and management (e.g. implementation of youth sport development projects, team leadership and coach education) and the third one related to the cognitive background (meta-cognitive competences). The importance ascribed to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level. Highly experienced and qualified coaches perceived competences of everyday practice, social, cultural and management issues related to training and competition as more important than the other coaches. This study suggests the need to consider some working competences, until now not explicitly present in the Portuguese coaching education curriculum which could enable coaches to choose the best way to practice/work in a manner that will foster and support their professional development. Key points Three major domains of competences were highlighted by Portuguese handball coaches. The first one related to training and competition, the second one related to social and cultural issues and management and the third one related to the cognitive background. The importance ascribed by Portuguese handball coaches to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level, as high experienced coaches and coaches with higher certification levels perceived competences related to training and competition of the everyday practice and social, cultural issues and management as more important. The value attributed by Portuguese handball coaches to working competences did not vary according to the coaches’ academic education level. Portuguese handball coaches valued the meta-cognitive competences, the competences to implement sport development project and related to annual and multi-annual planning independently of their coaching background. PMID:24149314

  6. Health Behaviors and Overweight in Nursing Home Employees: Contribution of Workplace Stressors and Implications for Worksite Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Helena; Gore, Rebecca J.; Boyer, Jon; Nobrega, Suzanne; Punnett, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background. Many worksite health promotion programs ignore the potential influence of working conditions on unhealthy behaviors. Methods. A study of nursing home employees (56% nursing aides) utilized a standardized questionnaire. We analyzed the cross-sectional associations between workplace stressors and obesity, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity. Results. Of 1506 respondents, 20% reported exposure to three or more workplace stressors (physical or organizational), such as lifting heavy loads, low decision latitude, low coworker support, regular night work, and physical assault. For each outcome, the prevalence ratio was between 1.5 and 2 for respondents with four or five job stressors. Individuals under age 40 had stronger associations between workplace stressors and smoking and obesity. Conclusions. Workplace stressors were strongly associated with smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity, even among the lowest-status workers. Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers. Although this study is cross-sectional, it has other strengths, including the broad range of work stressors studied. Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides. Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health. PMID:26380373

  7. How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Janet; McKinlay, Eileen; Keeling, Sally; Levack, William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of family carers who manage technical health procedures at home and describe their learning process. Design A qualitative study using grounded theory. Participants New Zealand family carers (21 women, 5 men) who managed technical health procedures such as enteral feeding, peritoneal dialysis, tracheostomy care, a central venous line or urinary catheter. In addition, 15 health professionals involved in teaching carers were interviewed. Methods Semistructured interviews were coded soon after completion and preliminary analysis influenced subsequent interviews. Additional data were compared with existing material and as analysis proceeded, initial codes were grouped into higher order concepts until a core concept was described. Interviewing continued until no new ideas emerged and concepts were well defined. Results The response of carers to the role of managing technical health procedures in the home is presented in terms of five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These dispositions were not static and carers commonly changed between them. Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a ‘technical’ solution; practical management; and an emotional response. Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient. It may also be driven by a lack of alternatives. Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it. Carers need adequate support to avoid becoming overwhelmed, and there are times when it is appropriate to encourage them to relinquish care for the sake of their own needs. Conclusions The concept of embracing care encourages health professionals to extend their attention beyond simply the practical aspects of technical procedures to assessing and addressing carers’ emotional and behavioural responses to health technology during the training process. PMID:26150143

  8. Unobtrusive In-Home Monitoring of Cognitive and Physical Health: Reactions and Perceptions of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Katherine; Boise, Linda; Lundell, Jay; Foucek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    While the potential benefits of unobtrusive in-home sensing technologies for maintaining health and independence of older adults have been highlighted in recent research, little is known about their views toward such technology. The aims of this project were to identify monitoring needs and expectations of community-residing elderly and their family members. Focus groups were presented with examples of in-home monitoring devices and data output; participants were asked to consider whether the data showed information that was meaningful to them, and how and to whom they would like to have such data disseminated. Content analysis of transcripts revealed four dominant themes: maintaining independence, detecting cognitive decline, sharing of information, and the tradeoff between privacy and usefulness of monitoring. The acceptance by elderly of unobtrusive in-home monitoring was closely tied to perceived utility of data generated by such systems. Privacy concerns appeared to be less of an issue than anticipated in this sample. PMID:19165352

  9. Medicare and Medicaid Home Health and Medicaid Waiver Services for Dually Eligible Older Adults: Risk Factors for Use and Correlates of Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Fenster, Juliane R.; Judge, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to, among frail dually eligible older adults, determine risk factors for the likelihood of using Medicare home health and Medicaid home health services and to, among service users, determine correlates of Medicare home health, Medicaid home health, and Medicaid waiver service expenditures. Design and Methods:…

  10. Interpretive Flexibility in Mobile Health: Lessons From a Government-Sponsored Home Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile technologies have emerged as important tools that health care personnel can use to gain easy access to client data anywhere. This is particularly useful for nurses and care workers in home health care as they provide services to clients in many different settings. Although a growing body of evidence supports the use of mobile technologies, the diverse implications of mobile health have yet to be fully documented. Objective Our objective was to examine a large-scale government-sponsored mobile health implementation program in the Danish home care sector and to understand how the technology was used differently across home care agencies. Methods We chose to perform a longitudinal case study with embedded units of analysis. We included multiple data sources, such as written materials, a survey to managers across all 98 Danish municipalities, and semistructured interviews with managers, care workers, and nurses in three selected home care agencies. We used process models of change to help analyze the overall implementation process from a longitudinal perspective and to identify antecedent conditions, key events, and practical outcomes. Results Strong collaboration between major stakeholders in the Danish home care sector (government bodies, vendors, consultants, interest organizations, and managers) helped initiate and energize the change process, and government funding supported quick and widespread technology adoption. However, although supported by the same government-sponsored program, mobile technology proved to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between agencies. What was first seen as a very promising innovation across the Danish home care sector subsequently became the topic of debate as technology use arrangements ran counter to existing norms and values in individual agencies. Conclusions Government-sponsored programs can have both positive and negative results, and managers need to be aware of this and the interpretive flexibility of mobile technology. Mobile technology implementation is a complex process that is best studied by combining organization-level analysis with features of the wider sociopolitical and interorganizational environment. PMID:24172852

  11. 76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... standards for health care industries, (65 FR 69432, November 17, 2000). Individuals and States are not... services to the categorically needy populations specified in the Act. Home health care for Medicaid... services as part of a written plan of care reviewed every 60 days. B. Summary of New Medicare Home...

  12. Peer Coaching and Technology Integration: An Evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann E.; Dawson, Kara; Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on an evaluation of the Microsoft Peer Coaching (MPC) program in Florida, USA. First, the design of the MPC materials was analyzed using characteristics of exemplary peer coaching and technology integration models. Second, facilitators (n = 14) and coaches (n = 46) who attended the MPC workshops in Florida were surveyed…

  13. Defining the Constructs of Expert Coaching: A Q-Methodological Study of Olympic Sport Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeese, Brad Heath

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the development of coaches for participation at International level competition through the improvement of coaching education programming. Although many studies have alluded to the benefit of various coaching education tactics, no study to date had set out to determine the constructs that define an expert…

  14. The NFL Coaching Network: Analysis of the Social Network Among Professional Football Coaches

    E-print Network

    Jensen, David

    The NFL Coaching Network: Analysis of the Social Network Among Professional Football Coaches Andrew afast@cs.umass.edu, jensen@cs.umass.edu Abstract The interactions of professional football coaches and teams in the National Football League (NFL) form a complex social network. This network provides a great

  15. Coaching Soccer Effectively. The American Coaching Effectiveness Program. Level 1 Soccer Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Christopher A.; Davis, Michael S.

    This handbook presents practical advice for the soccer coach. The first section contains an explanation of soccer and how to teach individual offensive and defensive skills. The coaching points, teaching progressions, illustrations, and practice activities are designed to help the coach understand and plan how to teach and develop those skills.…

  16. The Art and Practice of Leadership Coaching: 50 Top Executive Coaches Reveal Their Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Howard, Ed.; Harkins, Phil, Ed.; Goldsmith, Marshall, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Leadership coaching has become vitally important to today's most successful businesses. This book is a landmark resource that presents a variety of perspectives and best practices from today's top executive coaches. It provides valuable guidance on exactly what the best coaches are now doing to get the most out of leaders, for now and into the…

  17. Poor Teaching by the Coach: A Phenomenological Description from Athletes' Experience of Poor Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearity, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Winning and losing have consistently been used as one criterion upon which to evaluate coaches. Since winning coaches have long been thought of as knowledgeable and effective at providing instruction, researchers have often studied coaches who have obtained a high winning percentage. While researchers know some about the behaviors and…

  18. Sports Coaching through the Ages with an Empirical Study of Predictors of Rowing Coaching Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiosoglous, Cameron Michael

    2013-01-01

    Coaching effectiveness is a result of a coach getting the best out of the people and resources in their environment. For coaches, learning from experience is vital in a role that is a complex, dynamic and multifaceted process of balancing fun and winning where one cannot be sure if results will go according to plan. At the Olympic level, due to…

  19. Reasons rural Laotians choose home deliveries over delivery at health facilities: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality among poor rural women in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) is among the highest in Southeast Asia, in part because only 15% give birth at health facilities. This study explored why women and their families prefer home deliveries to deliveries at health facilities. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from December 2008 to February 2009 in two provinces of Lao PDR. Data was collected through eight focus group discussions (FGD) as well as through in-depth interviews with 12 mothers who delivered at home during the last year, eight husbands and eight grandmothers, involving a total of 71 respondents. Content analysis was used to analyze the FGD and interview transcripts. Results Obstacles to giving birth at health facilities included: (1) Distance to the health facilities and difficulties and costs of getting there; (2) Attitudes, quality of care, and care practices at the health facilities, including a horizontal birth position, episiotomies, lack of privacy, and the presence of male staff; (3) The wish to have family members nearby and the need for women to be close to their other children and the housework; and (4) The wish to follow traditional birth practices such as giving birth in a squatting position and lying on a “hot bed” after delivery. The decision about where to give birth was commonly made by the woman’s husband, mother, mother-in-law or other relatives in consultation with the woman herself. Conclusion This study suggests that the preference in rural Laos for giving birth at home is due to convenience, cost, comfort and tradition. In order to assure safer births and reduce rural Lao PDR’s high maternal mortality rate, health centers could consider accommodating the wishes and traditional practices of many rural Laotians: allowing family in the birthing rooms; allowing traditional practices; and improving attitudes among staff. Traditional birth attendants, women, and their families could be taught and encouraged to recognize the signs of at-risk pregnancies so as to be able to reach health facilities on time. PMID:22925107

  20. The impact of paraprofessional home visitors on infants' growth and health at 18 months.

    PubMed

    le Roux, Ingrid M; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Stein, Judith; Tomlinson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Paraprofessional home visitors trained to improve multiple outcomes (HIV, alcohol, infant health, and malnutrition) have been shown to benefit mothers and children over 18 months in a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT). These longitudinal analyses examine the mechanisms which influence child outcomes at 18 months post-birth in Cape Town, South Africa. The results were evaluated using structural equation modelling, specifically examining the mediating effects of prior maternal behaviours and a home visiting intervention post-birth. Twelve matched pairs of neighbourhoods were randomised within pairs to: 1) the control condition, receiving comprehensive healthcare at community primary health care clinics (n=12 neighbourhoods; n=594 pregnant women), or 2) the Philani Intervention Program, which provided home visits by trained, paraprofessional community health workers, here called Mentor Mothers, in addition to clinic care (n=12 neighbourhoods; n=644 pregnant women). Recruitment of all pregnant neighbourhood women was high (98%) with 88% reassessed at six months and 84% at 18 months. Infants' growth and diarrhoea episodes were examined at 18 months in response to the intervention condition, breastfeeding, alcohol use, social support, and low birth weight, controlling for HIV status and previous history of risk. We found that randomisation to the intervention was associated with a significantly lower number of recent diarrhoea episodes and increased rates and duration of breastfeeding. Across both the intervention and control conditions, mothers who used alcohol during pregnancy and had low birth weight infants were significantly less likely to have infants with normal growth patterns, whereas social support was associated with better growth. HIV-infection was significantly associated with poor growth and less breastfeeding. Women with more risk factors had significantly smaller social support networks. The relationships among initial and sustained maternal risk behaviours and the buffering impact of home visits and social support are demonstrated in these analyses. PMID:25342956

  1. Children's Health and Indoor Air Quality in Primary Schools and Homes in Portugal-Study Design.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Ramos, Elisabete; Barros, Henrique; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; Fernandes, Eduardo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the research project "On the Contribution of Schools to Children's Overall Indoor Air Exposure" is to study associations between adverse health effects, namely, allergy, asthma, and respiratory symptoms, and indoor air pollutants to which children are exposed to in primary schools and homes. Specifically, this investigation reports on the design of the study and methods used for data collection within the research project and discusses factors that need to be considered when designing such a study. Further, preliminary findings concerning descriptors of selected characteristics in schools and homes, the study population, and clinical examination are presented. The research project was designed in two phases. In the first phase, 20 public primary schools were selected and a detailed inspection and indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements including volatile organic compounds (VOC), aldehydes, particulate matter (PM2.5, PM10), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), bacteria, fungi, temperature, and relative humidity were conducted. A questionnaire survey of 1600 children of ages 8-9 years was undertaken and a lung function test, exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), and tear film stability testing were performed. The questionnaire focused on children's health and on the environment in their school and homes. One thousand and ninety-nine questionnaires were returned. In the second phase, a subsample of 68 children was enrolled for further studies, including a walk-through inspection and checklist and an extensive set of IAQ measurements in their homes. The acquired data are relevant to assess children's environmental exposures and health status. PMID:26167757

  2. HEALTH VIDEOS HEALTH TOPICS Like 17k Follow HOME US / WORLD CONSUMER NEWS POLICY / BIZ SCIENCE / TECH DRUGS HEALTHY LIVING CONDITIONS

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    in the West Kiang district of Gambia, including survival, fertility, and anthropometric data. Over the timeHEALTH VIDEOS HEALTH TOPICS Like 17k Follow HOME US / WORLD CONSUMER NEWS POLICY / BIZ SCIENCE Share This Story HOME > US/WORLD Step Aside! Birth Rates on the Rise Among Taller, Thinner Women Recent

  3. Abstract--This paper describes a prototype system for continual health monitoring at home. The system consists of an

    E-print Network

    Milenkovi, Aleksandar

    sensors monitor user's heart rate and locomotive activity and periodically upload time-stamped information for building unobtrusive, scalable, and robust wearable health monitoring systems. A WBAN for health monitoringAbstract--This paper describes a prototype system for continual health monitoring at home

  4. A Water-Damaged Home and Health of Occupants: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R.; Kilburn, Kaye H.; Dennis, Donald P.; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings. PMID:22220187

  5. A water-damaged home and health of occupants: a case study.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R; Kilburn, Kaye H; Dennis, Donald P; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings. PMID:22220187

  6. 77 FR 72904 - In the Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ...Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc., House of Taylor Jewelry, Inc. (n/ k/a Global Jewelry Concepts...current and accurate information concerning the securities of House of Taylor Jewelry, Inc. (n/k/a Global Jewelry...

  7. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  8. Returns to Local-Area Healthcare Spending: Evidence from Health Shocks to Patients Far From Home

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare spending varies widely across markets, and previous empirical studies find little evidence that higher spending translates into better health outcomes. The main innovation in this paper exploits this cross-sectional variation in hospital spending in a new way by considering patients who are exposed to healthcare systems not designed for them: patients far from home when a health emergency strikes. Visitors to Florida who become ill in high-spending areas have significantly lower mortality rates compared to visitors in lower-spending areas. The results are robust within groups of similar visitors and within groups of destinations that appear to be close demand substitutes—areas that likely attract similar visitors. PMID:23853699

  9. Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common and costly chronic musculoskeletal conditions world-wide and is associated with substantial pain and disability. Many people with knee OA also experience co-morbidities that further add to the OA burden. Uptake of and adherence to physical activity recommendations is suboptimal in this patient population, leading to poorer OA outcomes and greater impact of associated co-morbidities. This pragmatic randomised controlled trial will investigate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of adding telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention for people with knee OA. Methods/Design 168 people with clinically diagnosed knee OA will be recruited from the community in metropolitan and regional areas and randomly allocated to physiotherapy only, or physiotherapy plus nurse-delivered telephone coaching. Physiotherapy involves five treatment sessions over 6 months, incorporating a home exercise program of 4–6 exercises (targeting knee extensor and hip abductor strength) and advice to increase daily physical activity. Telephone coaching comprises 6–12 telephone calls over 6 months by health practitioners trained in applying the Health Change Australia (HCA) Model of Health Change to provide behaviour change support. The telephone coaching intervention aims to maximise adherence to the physiotherapy program, as well as facilitate increased levels of participation in general physical activity. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include physical activity levels, quality-of-life, and potential moderators and mediators of outcomes including self-efficacy, pain coping and depression. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow-up assessments will also occur at 12 and 18 months. Discussion The findings will help determine whether the addition of telephone coaching sessions can improve sustainability of outcomes from a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention in people with knee OA. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12612000308897 PMID:23231928

  10. A mobile-health application to detect wandering patterns of elderly people in home environment.

    PubMed

    Vuong, N K; Goh, S G A; Chan, S; Lau, C T

    2013-01-01

    Wandering is a common and risky behavior in people with dementia (PWD). In this paper, we present a mobile healthcare application to detect wandering patterns in indoor settings. The application harnesses consumer electronics devices including WiFi access points and mobile phones and has been tested successfully in a home environment. Experimental results show that the mobile-health application is able to detect wandering patterns including lapping, pacing and random in real-time. Once wandering is detected, an alert message is sent using SMS (Short Message Service) to attending caregivers or physicians for further examination and timely interventions. PMID:24111292

  11. Characteristics of Participants in Australia's Get Healthy Telephone-Based Lifestyle Information and Coaching Service: Reaching Disadvantaged Communities and Those Most at Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Blythe J.; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Venugopal, Kamalesh; Bauman, Adrian E.

    2011-01-01

    To address increasing rates of overweight and obesity, a population-based telephone intervention was introduced in New South Wales, Australia. The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service[R] (GHS) offered participants a 6-month coaching program or detailed self-help information. Determining the population reach of GHS is of public health

  12. Motivation, goal orientation, coaching, and training habits of women ultrarunners.

    PubMed

    Krouse, Rhonna Z; Ransdell, Lynda B; Lucas, Shelley M; Pritchard, Mary E

    2011-10-01

    Ultrarunners participate in running events that exceed the 26.2-mile marathon distance (e.g., 50k, 50-100 miles). Very little research exists on ultrarunners, especially women. This study is a descriptive study detailing the motivation, goal orientation, demographic characteristics (e.g., age, job demands, family structure), training habits (e.g., hours per week of training), and coach utilization of women ultrarunners. Participants (N = 344) were recruited via the Ultra List serve and 4 popular ultrarunning websites, and they completed a questionnaire on motivation, goal orientation, training, and coaching using Survey Monkey. General health orientation (mean ± SD) (4.71 ± 1.06) and psychological coping (4.71 ± 1.03) were the 2 strongest motivational factors. Participants were higher in task orientation (1.38 ± 0.68) (e.g., finishing the race or accomplishing various goals) than ego orientation (3.38 ± 1.01) (e.g., placing in the top 3 overall or beating an opponent). Women trained an average of 12.49 h·wk(-1) and spent 64% of their time training alone. Training information came from their own experience, blogs, websites, and the Ultra List Serve. Over three-fourths of the participants (80%) did not use a coach because of cost and a perceived lack of necessity. Women ultrarunners in this study were task oriented, internally motivated, health, and financially conscious individuals. With additional information about women ultrarunners, coaches will be better prepared to work with this population and ultrarunners can improve their performance by learning about current participants' practices. PMID:21946910

  13. Why Do Women Deliver at Home? Multilevel Modeling of Ethiopian National Demographic and Health Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Yebyo, Henock; Alemayehu, Mussie; Kahsay, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite of the existing intensive efforts to improve maternal health in Ethiopia, the proportion of birth delivered at home remains high and is still the top priority among the national health threats. Objective The study aimed to examine effects of individual women and community-level factors of women’s decision on place of delivery in Ethiopia. Methods Data were obtained from the nationally representative 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) which used a two-stage cluster sampling design with rural-urban and regions as strata. The EDHS collected data from a big sample size but our study focused on a sample of 7,908 women whose most recent birth was within five years preceding 2011 and 576 communities in which the women were living in. The data were analyzed using a two-level mixed-effects logistic regression to determine fixed-effects of individual- and community-level factors and random-intercept of between-cluster characteristics. Results In the current study, 6980 out of 7908 deliveries (88.3%) took place at home. Lower educational levels (OR=2.74, 95%CI:1.84,4.70; p<0.0001), making no or only a limited number of ANC visits (OR=3.72,95%CI:2.85, 4.83; p<0.0001), non-exposure to media (OR=1.51, 95%CI 1.13, 2.01; p=0.004), higher parity (OR=2.68, 95%CI:1.96,3.68; p<0.0001), and perceived distance problem to reach health facilities (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.022) were positively associated with home delivery. About 75% of the total variance in the odds of giving birth at home was accounted for the between-community differences of characteristics (ICC=0.75, p<0.0001). With regard to community-level characteristics, rural communities (OR=4.67, 95%CI:3.06,7.11; p<0.0001), pastoralist communities (OR=4.53, 95%CI:2.81,7.28; p<0.0001), communities with higher poverty levels (OR=1.49 95%CI:1.08,2.22; p=0.048), with lower levels of ANC utilization (OR=2.01, 95%CI:1.42,2.85; p<0.0001) and problem of distance to a health facility (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.004) had a positive influence on women to give birth at home. Conclusions Not only individual characteristics of women, but also community-level factors determine women’s decision to deliver at home. PMID:25874886

  14. Innovation in diabetes care: improving consumption of healthy food through a "chef coaching" program: a case report.

    PubMed

    Polak, Rani; Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J; Pojednic, Rachele M; Phillips, Edward M

    2014-11-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation. PMID:25568831

  15. Innovation in Diabetes Care: Improving Consumption of Healthy Food Through a “Chef Coaching” Program: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Diana; Abrahamson, Martin J.; Pojednic, Rachele M.; Phillips, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition therapy as part of lifestyle care is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes. However, most people with diabetes do not follow this guideline. Changing eating habits involves obtaining knowledge and building practical skills such as shopping, meal preparation, and food storage. Just as fitness coaches use their specific knowledge base in fitness to enhance the effectiveness of their coaching, credentialed chefs trained as health coaches might combine their culinary expertise with coaching in order to improve clients' food choices and lifestyles. This report documents the case of a 55-year-old white male physician, single and living alone, who was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and reported chronic stress, sedentary behavior, and unhealthy eating habits. He participated in a chef coaching program of 8 weekly one-on-one 30-minute coaching sessions via Skype delivered by a chef trained as a health coach. During the first five meetings, the patient's goals were primarily culinary; however, with his success in accomplishing these goals, the patient progressed and expanded his goals to include other lifestyle domains, specifically exercise and work-life balance. At the end of the program, the patient had improved both his nutritional and exercise habits, his confidence in further self-care improvement, and his health parameters such as HgA1c (8.8% to 6.7%; normal <6.5%). We conclude that chef coaching has the potential to help people with diabetes improve their practical culinary skills and implement them so that they eat better and, further, has the potential to help them improve their overall self-care. We intend to further develop chef coaching and assess its potential as we learn from its implementation. PMID:25568831

  16. Academic Coaching Produces More Effective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Harry; Wong, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    The most effective schools have coaches. They meet with the principal on a regular basis to assess the progress of every teacher and student. In an effective school, everyone functions as a team and there is a laser focus on student achievement. This article illustrates how academic coaching produces more effective teachers and how effective…

  17. Shattering the Glass Ceiling: Blacks in Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Fitzgerald

    2004-01-01

    During the 2003 football season, African Americans were employed as head coaches at five of the 117 NCAA Division I-A colleges and universities. At the conclusion of the 2003 season, there were 13 head coaching vacancies at Division I-A football programs; one African American was hired. Today, five African Americans have the responsibility of…

  18. Is Peer Coaching Changing Supervisory Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garmston, Robert J.

    To discover whether peer coaching is altering the teacher-supervisor relationship, teachers, supervisors, and staff developers in several states were surveyed concerning principals' attitudes and motivations concerning this innovative approach. For some teachers, peer coaching seems to stimulate transformations in self-perception and relations…

  19. Workplace Learning of High Performance Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Clifford J.; Tinning, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Australian coaching workplace (to be referred to as the State Institute of Sport; SIS) under consideration in this study employs significant numbers of full-time performance sport coaches and can be accurately characterized as a genuine workplace. Through a consideration of the interaction between what the workplace (SIS) affords the…

  20. Understanding Expertise from Elite Badminton Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Badminton is a growing sport with a limited amount of expertise both in players and coaches so attempts are being made to extend the expertise internationally. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of coaching expertise in badminton because such an understanding might have implications for a more general understanding of expertise,…

  1. Opening the Door to Coaching Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheliotes, Linda Gross; Reilly, Marceta Fleming

    2012-01-01

    A leader doesn't have to solve every problem personally to be effective. In fact, helping others learn to resolve issues and implement their own solutions is the key to sustainable leadership and an empowered staff. This companion and follow-up book to "Coaching Conversations" brings the coaching style of leadership to life with stories from the…

  2. "Safeguarding" Sports Coaching: Foucault, Genealogy and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garratt, Dean; Piper, Heather; Taylor, Bill

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a genealogical account of safeguarding in sport. Drawing specifically on Foucault's work, it examines the "politics of touch" in relation to the social and historical formation of child protection policy in sports coaching. While the analysis has some resonance with the context of coaching as a whole, for…

  3. New Principal Coaching as a Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celoria, Davide; Roberson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    This study examines new principal coaching as an induction process and explores the emotional dimensions of educational leadership. Twelve principal coaches and new principals--six of each--participated in this qualitative study that employed emergent coding (Creswell, 2008; Denzin, 2005; Glaser & Strauss, 1998; Spradley, 1979). The major…

  4. Exploring Biographical Learning in Elite Soccer Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Qualified and skilled sport coaches are vital to the development of sport in general and of elite sport in particular. Research suggests that the development of coaching expertise in elite sport is a complex matter involving mediated, unmediated and internal learning situations. However, it is less clear to what extent and in which ways these…

  5. See Me, Hear Me, Coach Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Gregg, Madeleine; Howard, Pamela W.; Ploessl, Donna M.; Maughn, Sharron; Gable, Robert A.; Zigmond, Naomi P.

    2009-01-01

    Although the idea of educational coaching is not new, the way teachers-in-training across six west Alabama counties are receiving job-embedded support is far from routine. Educational consultants 764 miles away are pioneering the use of virtual coaching for professional development. From their offices at the Pennsylvania Training and Technical…

  6. Enhancing "OJT" Internships with Interactive Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoho, Alan R.; Barnett, Bruce G.; Martinez, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to examine how the best type of internship, i.e., the full-time, job-embedded model can be enhanced using coaching. Before illustrating an exemplary internship program with coaching, this paper describes what an exemplary full-time, job-embedded internship experiences looks like and expounds on the importance of…

  7. COACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey PROVOST'S REPORT

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    COACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey PROVOST'S REPORT Rochester Institute of Technology 2013 (COACHE) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education developed the Tenure-track Faculty Job Satisfaction Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey. After a successful pilot study with seven large research universities

  8. Coaching with Simplicity: Thoreau and Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochstetler, Doug

    2004-01-01

    Simplicity, as espoused by American philosopher Henry David Thoreau, is a method of removing unnecessary obstacles, a tangible means to attain a higher life, one of crystallization and transcendence. A complex profession such as coaching stands to greatly benefit from this concept. The purpose of this paper is to apply simplicity to coaching. A…

  9. Camp Features Excellent instruction by Wesmen coaching

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    coaches at a low player to coach ratio. They are tailored to each age group so everyone can have fun. Elite includes one hour of age appropriate strength and conditioning per day. D2 GIRLS VOLLEYBALL HITT that includes a reversible practice jersey, basketball, poster and certificate. D4 MULTI SPORT ALL DAY CAMP

  10. Indoor fungal contamination: health risks and measurement methods in hospitals, homes and workplaces.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Delphine; Le Cann, Pierre; Reboux, Gabriel; Millon, Laurence; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Indoor fungal contamination has been associated with a wide range of adverse health effects, including infectious diseases, toxic effects and allergies. The diversity of fungi contributes to the complex role that they play in indoor environments and human diseases. Molds have a major impact on public health, and can cause different consequences in hospitals, homes and workplaces. This review presents the methods used to assess fungal contamination in these various environments, and discusses advantages and disadvantages for each method in consideration with different health risks. Air, dust and surface sampling strategies are compared, as well as the limits of various methods are used to detect and quantify fungal particles and fungal compounds. In addition to conventional microscopic and culture approaches, more recent chemical, immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods are described. This article also identifies common needs for future multidisciplinary research and development projects in this field, with specific interests on viable fungi and fungal fragment detections. The determination of fungal load and the detection of species in environmental samples greatly depend on the strategy of sampling and analysis. Quantitative PCR was found useful to identify associations between specific fungi and common diseases. The next-generation sequencing methods may afford new perspectives in this area. PMID:23586944

  11. Adverse health effects among adults exposed to home dampness and molds.

    PubMed

    Dales, R E; Burnett, R; Zwanenburg, H

    1991-03-01

    To investigate the association between home dampness and mold and health, questionnaires were administered through the primary school system to parents of school-aged children in six regions of Canada. The present report focuses on the symptoms of the 14,799 adults at least 21 yr of age. The overall response rate was 83%, and missing values for individual variables ranged from 3 to 8%. The presence of home dampness and/or molds (that is, damp spots, visible mold or mildew, water damage, and flooding) was reported by 38% of respondents. The prevalence of lower respiratory symptoms (any cough, phlegm, wheeze, or wheeze with dyspnea) was increased among those reporting dampness or mold compared with those not reporting dampness or mold as follows: 38 versus 27% among current smokers, 21 versus 14% among exsmokers, and 19 versus 11% among nonsmokers (all p values less than 0.001). This association persisted after adjusting for several sociodemographic variables (including age, sex, and region) and several other exposure variables (including active and passive cigarette smoke, natural gas heating, and wood stoves). The odds ratio between symptoms and dampness was 1.62 (95% confidence interval, 1.48 to 1.78) in the final model chosen. This association persisted despite stratification by the presence of allergies or asthma. Exposure to home dampness and mold may be a risk factor for respiratory disease in the Canadian population. PMID:2001058

  12. Home health care nurse interactions with homebound geriatric patients with depression and disability.

    PubMed

    Liebel, Dianne V; Powers, Bethel Ann; Hauenstein, Emily J

    2015-01-01

    Building therapeutic nurse-patient relationships is pivotal to the provision of optimum nurse care management for geriatric home health care (HHC) patients. However, little is known about which strategies most effectively treat older adult HHC patients with concomitant depression and disability. This qualitative descriptive study was conducted in two parts to explore the issue further. The first part involved interviews regarding HHC nurse perceptions of geriatric depression and disability care management. The second part, which is the focus of the current analysis, describes HHC nurses' use of care management and therapeutic during home visits. Observation of nurse-patient interactions involved 25 nurses home visits to HHC patients 60 and older who had depression and disability. Drawing on clinical knowledge and interpersonal skills, nurses built relationships and fostered trust. However, despite their disabilities to make these connections, multiple missed opportunities occurred for nurses to engage in more productive interactions. Four training components to support improvement of nurse-patient therapeutic relationships are described and recommended. PMID:26042245

  13. High School Rugby Players' Perception of Coaching Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broodryk, Retief; van den Berg, Pieter Hendrick

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were firstly to determine the players' perceptions of their respective coaches' coaching effectiveness and secondly, determine the difference between big and small schools of the players' perceptions of their respective coaches' coaching effectiveness. Four hundred and seventy six players from 22 schools were asked to fill…

  14. Instructional Coaching: Teachers' Perceptions of Practice and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Jason Brock

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate K-12 teachers' perceptions of instructional coaching. Specifically, this researcher assessed the perception of instructional coaching as a whole, support for hiring practices for instructional coaches, the value of instructional coaching for improving teaching practices, the value of…

  15. Mentoring and Coaching in Schools: Professional Learning through Collaborative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Suzanne; Pomphrey, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Can mentoring and coaching really improve professional practice? How can research and inquiry improve mentoring and coaching practice? "Mentoring and Coaching in Schools" explores the ways in which mentoring and coaching can be used as a dynamic collaborative process for effective professional learning. It demonstrates how the use of practitioner…

  16. Being a Leadership Development Coach: A Multi-Faceted Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Christine; McMahon, Margery; Gronn, Peter; Martin, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The use of coaching as a developmental methodology has been instituted as a way to develop leadership in schools in Scotland as elsewhere in the UK. While there are studies that examine the skills and impact of coaching, there is only limited discussion of the process of coaching and the role and experiences of the coaches. This article examines…

  17. Teachers' Perceptions of the Coaching Role in Secondary Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelaar, Evelien; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe; Boshuizen, Henny P. A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a study on teachers' perceptions of the coaching role in innovative secondary vocational education (SVE) in the Netherlands. Data from 109 teachers were collected by means of an online questionnaire, asking for their associations with the coaching role, goals concerning the coaching role, and typical coaching activities.…

  18. A Look inside Mathematics Coaching: Roles, Content, and Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudzimiri, Rejoice; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Sutton, John; Yopp, David

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics classroom coaching is used across the United States as a means for improving instruction, with the ultimate goal of improving student learning. The job assignments of coaches can vary widely across schools and districts. Regardless of the various forms that coaching can take, there is the consistent expectation that a coach's…

  19. A Collaborative Professional Development Initiative Supporting Early Literacy Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mraz, Maryann; Kissel, Brian; Algozzine, Bob; Babb, Julie; Foxworth, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Many believe that the key to translating research into successful practice lies in providing teachers with continuous professional development and ongoing coaching support. In this article, we provide an overview of the relevant coaching literature and describe 4 critical features of an evidence-based preschool literacy coaching model: the coach

  20. Understanding the Work and Learning of High Performance Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Cliff J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The development of high performance sports coaches has been proposed as a major imperative in the professionalization of sports coaching. Accordingly, an increasing body of research is beginning to address the question of how coaches learn. While this is important work, an understanding of how coaches learn must be underpinned by an…

  1. Coaching Strategies for Helping Adolescent Athletes Cope with Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jenelle N.; Gilbert, Wade; Morawski, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the various sources of athlete stress and the strategies that coaches can use to help young athletes cope with it. The information is based on a study with a competitive adolescent soccer team and its two coaches, and a review of the coaching and sport psychology literature. The suggested coaching strategies can help to…

  2. Excellence in Coaching: The Art and Skill of Elite Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Christine S.; Sproule, John; Horton, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During this study, 10 expert coaches were interviewed to examine their views on aspects of their individual coaching practice. Four themes emerged from the interviews: (a) the long-term approach, (b) the authentic coaching environment, (c) creating a learning environment, and (d) the quality and quantity of training sessions. These coaches were…

  3. Salaries of Head Coaches Are Rising, Survey Shows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naughton, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Salaries of head coaches in college sports are rising, but a large salary gap remains between coaches of men's and women's teams. In a national ranking of institutions by salary averages, men's coaches at the median institution made 43% more than women's coaches. Some institutions provide more salary equity than others. The Justice Department is…

  4. Charting the Research on the Policies and Politics of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Facing relentless pressure to improve student achievement, many states and districts are using coaching as a policy lever to promote changes in practice. This special issue centers on the policies and politics of coaching, and this editorial commentary highlights what we know about the role of coaches and coaching in the field of education. Then I…

  5. Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

  6. The Effects of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 on Home Health and Hospice in Older Adult Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Meredith L.; Grabowski, David C.; Morrisey, Michael A.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Yun, Huifeng; Locher, Julie L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Home health and hospice services can constitute important elements in the continuum of care for older adults diagnosed with cancer. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) included provisions affecting those services. Objectives The first aim of this study is to assess the effect of the BBA of 1997 on home health and hospice service utilization in older cancer patients. The second aim is to estimate the effect of the BBA of 1997 on costs associated specifically with home health and hospice services and on total costs of care. The final aim is evaluate the effect of the BBA of 1997 on mortality in these patients. Research Design Longitudinal analysis using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare Database, covering a service area that includes 26% of the U.S. population. Participants Community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged 65+. Measures Utilization rates of home health and hospice services; costs associated with those services, and total costs of care; and mortality. Results Home health utilization rates dropped substantially and hospice utilization rates increased following the BBA. Medicare costs for home health services declined as did total Medicare costs, but hospice costs increased. There was no discernable effect on mortality rates. Conclusions The BBA was successful in containing the costs of home health services and resulted in savings in overall costs of care for older cancer patients. Reduction in utilization of home health services did not appear to negatively affect outcomes. The BBA may have contributed to the trend of increasing use of hospice care. PMID:19194333

  7. Job Satisfaction of NAIA Head Coaches at Small Faith-Based Colleges: The Teacher-Coach Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiemsma, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    The head coaches at smaller colleges usually have other job responsibilities that include teaching, along with the responsibilities of coaching, recruiting, scheduling, and other coaching-related jobs. There is often a dual role involved for these coaches who try to juggle two different jobs that sometimes require different skill sets and involve…

  8. Student-Student Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: An Exploratory Study from the Coach Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenbom, Stefan; Hrastinski, Stefan; Cleveland-Innes, Martha

    2012-01-01

    There are comparatively few studies on one-to-one tutoring in online settings, even though it has been found to be an effective model. This paper explores student-student online coaching from the coach perspective. The empirical case is the project Math Coach, where K-12 students are coached by teacher students using instant messaging. This…

  9. How the Framing of Instructional Coaching as a Lever for Systemic or Individual Reform Influences the Enactment of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangin, Melinda M.; Dunsmore, KaiLonnie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Instructional coaching is framed as both a means for systemic and individual reform. These competing conceptualizations of coaching as a mechanism for change have not been systematically examined, and therefore, we know little about how the framing of instructional coaching initiatives affects the enactment of coaching. In response to…

  10. Methodologic challenges of randomized controlled studies on in-home comprehensive geriatric assessment: the EIGER project. Evaluation of In-Home Geriatric Health Visits in Elderly Residents.

    PubMed

    Stuck, A E; Zwahlen, H G; Neuenschwander, B E; Meyer Schweizer, R A; Bauen, G; Beck, J C

    1995-06-01

    Previous controlled studies have shown that preventive home visits are a promising method for disability prevention in elderly persons; however, due to the lack of data on cost effectiveness and optimal intervention methods, there is still debate on their usefulness. Therefore, additional controlled studies must use new methods to resolve these unanswered issues. We present a novel approach used in the project EIGER (Evaluation of In-Home Geriatric Health Visits in Elderly Residents), an ongoing randomized controlled trial of preventive home visits in community-residing persons aged 75 years and older in Bern, Switzerland. The intervention consists of in-home visits with structured comprehensive geriatric assessment and follow-up by specially trained nurses who collaborate with geriatricians and an interdisciplinary team. Special methods were used to optimize the sample size, to improve the health care cost analysis, to minimize and explore refusal to participate, to apply stratified randomization for subgroup analysis, and to evaluate the intervention process with a tracer method. Selected baseline findings (N = 791, mean age 82 years, 73% female) include uncontrolled systolic hypertension (54%), balance/gait disorder (9%), cognitive impairment (7%), 6 or more medications (21%), depressive symptoms (10%), and impaired basic ADL (15%). Baseline findings demonstrate that this study is likely to contribute to some of the unresolved issues of in-home prevention for older persons. PMID:8547381

  11. Housing and health in Ghana: the psychosocial impacts of renting a home.

    PubMed

    Luginaah, Isaac; Arku, Godwin; Baiden, Philip

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study investigating the impacts of renting a home on the psychosocial health of tenants in the Accra Metropolitan Area (AMA) in Ghana. In-depth interviews (n = 33) were conducted with private renters in Adabraka, Accra. The findings show that private renters in the AMA face serious problems in finding appropriate and affordable rental units, as well as a persistent threat of eviction by homeowners. These challenges tend to predispose renters to psychosocial distress and diminishing ontological security. Findings are relevant to a range of pluralistic policy options that emphasize both formal and informal housing provision, together with the reorganization and decentralization of the Rent Control Board to the district level to facilitate easy access by the citizenry. PMID:20616989

  12. Housing and Health in Ghana: The Psychosocial Impacts of Renting a Home

    PubMed Central

    Luginaah, Isaac; Arku, Godwin; Baiden, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study investigating the impacts of renting a home on the psychosocial health of tenants in the Accra Metropolitan Area (AMA) in Ghana. In-depth interviews (n = 33) were conducted with private renters in Adabraka, Accra. The findings show that private renters in the AMA face serious problems in finding appropriate and affordable rental units, as well as a persistent threat of eviction by homeowners. These challenges tend to predispose renters to psychosocial distress and diminishing ontological security. Findings are relevant to a range of pluralistic policy options that emphasize both formal and informal housing provision, together with the reorganization and decentralization of the Rent Control Board to the district level to facilitate easy access by the citizenry. PMID:20616989

  13. Preventing Unintentional Injuries in the Home Using the Health Impact Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Karin A.; Liller, Karen D.; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-01-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social–environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden’s Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modifications of the social environment are being field-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social–environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. PMID:25829110

  14. Preventing unintentional injuries in the home using the Health Impact Pyramid.

    PubMed

    Mack, Karin A; Liller, Karen D; Baldwin, Grant; Sleet, David

    2015-04-01

    Injuries continue to be the leading cause of death for the first four decades of life. These injuries result from a confluence of behavioral, physical, structural, environmental, and social factors. Taken together, these illustrate the importance of taking a broad and multileveled approach to injury prevention. Using examples from fall, fire, scald, and poisoning-related injuries, this article illustrates the utility of an approach that incorporates a social-environmental perspective in identifying and selecting interventions to improve the health and safety of individuals. Injury prevention efforts to prevent home injuries benefit from multilevel modifications of behavior, public policy, laws and enforcement, the environment, consumer products and engineering standards, as demonstrated with Frieden's Health Impact Pyramid. A greater understanding, however, is needed to explain the associations between tiers. While interventions that include modi?cations of the social environment are being ?eld-tested, much more work needs to be done in measuring social-environmental change and in evaluating these programs to disentangle what works best. PMID:25829110

  15. Ontario pharmacists practicing in family health teams and the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, Lisa

    2012-04-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) approach continues to gather momentum in the United States and Canada as a broad approach to reform the delivery of the complete primary care system. The family health team (FHT) model implemented in Ontario, Canada, best mirrors the PCMH approach of the United States. The integration of pharmacists as key members of the health care team providing on-site, in-office coordinated care to FHT patients was included from the start of planning the FHT model and represents a substantial opportunity for pharmacists to realize their professional vision. Several research projects in Canada and elsewhere have contributed to providing evidence to support the integration of pharmacists into primary care practice sites. Two major research programs, the Seniors Medication Assessment Research Trial (SMART) cluster randomized controlled trial and the Integrating Family Medicine and Pharmacy to Advance Primary Care Therapeutics (IMPACT) multipronged demonstration project made substantial contributions to evidence-informed policy decisions supporting the integration of pharmacists into FHTs. These projects can provide useful information to support the integration of pharmacists into the PCMH and to encourage further research to better measure the effect of the pharmacist from the holistic patient-centered perspective. PMID:22499739

  16. Relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca

    2014-02-01

    Employee turnover is a large and expensive problem in the long-term care environment. Stated intention to leave is a reliable indicator of likely turnover, but actual predictors, especially for nursing assistants, have been incompletely investigated. This quantitative study identifies the relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,589 employees in 18 for-profit nursing homes. A working condition index for the number of beneficial job features was constructed. Poisson regression modeling found that employees who reported four positive features were 77% less likely to state strong intention to leave (PR = 0.23, p < .001). The strength of relationship between working conditions and intention to leave was slightly mediated by employee mental health. Effective workplace intervention programs must address work organization features to reduce employee intention to leave. Healthy workplaces should build better interpersonal relationships, show respect for employee work, and involve employees in decision-making processes. PMID:24652941

  17. Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

  18. Smartphone-based analysis of biochemical tests for health monitoring support at home

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ruben L.; van Scheltinga, Josien Terwisscha; Lucas, Peter J.F.; Spaanderman, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In the context of home-based healthcare monitoring systems, it is desirable that the results obtained from biochemical tests – tests of various body fluids such as blood and urine – are objective and automatically generated to reduce the number of man-made errors. The authors present the StripTest reader – an innovative smartphone-based interpreter of biochemical tests based on paper-based strip colour using image processing techniques. The working principles of the reader include image acquisition of the colour strip pads using the camera phone, analysing the images within the phone and comparing them with reference colours provided by the manufacturer to obtain the test result. The detection of kidney damage was used as a scenario to illustrate the application of, and test, the StripTest reader. An extensive evaluation using laboratory and human urine samples demonstrates the reader's accuracy and precision of detection, indicating the successful development of a cheap, mobile and smart reader for home-monitoring of kidney functioning, which can facilitate the early detection of health problems and a timely treatment intervention. PMID:26609385

  19. Smartphone-based analysis of biochemical tests for health monitoring support at home.

    PubMed

    Velikova, Marina; Smeets, Ruben L; van Scheltinga, Josien Terwisscha; Lucas, Peter J F; Spaanderman, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In the context of home-based healthcare monitoring systems, it is desirable that the results obtained from biochemical tests - tests of various body fluids such as blood and urine - are objective and automatically generated to reduce the number of man-made errors. The authors present the StripTest reader - an innovative smartphone-based interpreter of biochemical tests based on paper-based strip colour using image processing techniques. The working principles of the reader include image acquisition of the colour strip pads using the camera phone, analysing the images within the phone and comparing them with reference colours provided by the manufacturer to obtain the test result. The detection of kidney damage was used as a scenario to illustrate the application of, and test, the StripTest reader. An extensive evaluation using laboratory and human urine samples demonstrates the reader's accuracy and precision of detection, indicating the successful development of a cheap, mobile and smart reader for home-monitoring of kidney functioning, which can facilitate the early detection of health problems and a timely treatment intervention. PMID:26609385

  20. The Impact of Living in a Care Home on the Health and Wellbeing of Spinal Cord Injured People

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brett; Caddick, Nick

    2015-01-01

    In the UK, 20% of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) are discharged from rehabilitation into an elderly care home. Despite this, and knowledge that the home is central to health and wellbeing, little research has examined the impact of being in care homes on the health and wellbeing of people with SCI. The purpose of this study was to address this gap. Twenty adults who lived in care homes or had done so recently for over two years were interviewed in-depth. Qualitative data were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Analyses revealed that living in a care home environment severely damages quality of life, physical health and psychological wellbeing in the short and long-term. Reasons why quality of life, health, and wellbeing were damaged are identified. These included a lack of freedom, control, and flexibility, inability to participate in community life, inability to sustain relationships, safety problems, restricted participation in work and leisure time physical activity, lack of meaning, self-expression, and a future, loneliness, difficulties with the re-housing process, depression, and suicidal thoughts and actions. It is concluded that for people with SCI, the care home environment violates social dignity, is oppressive, and denies human rights. Implications for housing and health care policies are also offered. PMID:25884273

  1. Health effects of home energy efficiency interventions in England: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Milner, James; Chalabi, Zaid; Das, Payel; Jones, Benjamin; Shrubsole, Clive; Davies, Mike; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess potential public health impacts of changes to indoor air quality and temperature due to energy efficiency retrofits in English dwellings to meet 2030 carbon reduction targets. Design Health impact modelling study. Setting England. Participants English household population. Intervention Three retrofit scenarios were modelled: (1) fabric and ventilation retrofits installed assuming building regulations are met; (2) as with scenario (1) but with additional ventilation for homes at risk of poor ventilation; (3) as with scenario (1) but with no additional ventilation to illustrate the potential risk of weak regulations and non-compliance. Main outcome Primary outcomes were changes in quality adjusted life years (QALYs) over 50?years from cardiorespiratory diseases, lung cancer, asthma and common mental disorders due to changes in indoor air pollutants, including secondhand tobacco smoke, PM2.5 from indoor and outdoor sources, radon, mould, and indoor winter temperatures. Results The modelling study estimates showed that scenario (1) resulted in positive effects on net mortality and morbidity of 2241 (95% credible intervals (CI) 2085 to 2397) QALYs per 10?000 persons over 50?years follow-up due to improved temperatures and reduced exposure to indoor pollutants, despite an increase in exposure to outdoor-generated particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 ?m or less (PM2.5). Scenario (2) resulted in a negative impact of ?728 (95% CI ?864 to ?592) QALYs per 10?000 persons over 50?years due to an overall increase in indoor pollutant exposures. Scenario (3) resulted in ?539 (95% CI ?678 to -399) QALYs per 10?000 persons over 50?years follow-up due to an increase in indoor exposures despite the targeting of pollutants. Conclusions If properly implemented alongside ventilation, energy efficiency retrofits in housing can improve health by reducing exposure to cold and air pollutants. Maximising the health benefits requires careful understanding of the balance of changes in pollutant exposures, highlighting the importance of ventilation to mitigate the risk of poor indoor air quality. PMID:25916488

  2. Improving Our Nation's Health Care System: Inclusion of Chiropractic in Patient-Centered Medical Homes and Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, William C.; Watkins, R.W.; Kranz, Karl C.; Munsterman, Scott D.; Johnson, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective This report summarizes the closing plenary session of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges Educational Conference—Research Agenda Conference 2014. The purpose of this session was to examine patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations from various speakers’ viewpoints and to discuss how chiropractic could possibly work within, and successfully contribute to, the changing health care environment. Discussion The speakers addressed the complex topic of patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations and provided suggestions for what leadership strategies the chiropractic profession may need to enhance chiropractic participation and contribution to improving our nation’s health. Conclusion There are many factors involved in the complex topic of chiropractic inclusion in health care models. Major themes resulting from this panel included the importance of building relationships with other professionals, demonstrating data and evidence for what is done in chiropractic practice, improving quality of care, improving health of populations, and reducing costs of health care. PMID:25431542

  3. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bentayeb, Malek; Norback, Dan; Bednarek, Micha; Bernard, Alfred; Cai, Guihong; Cerrai, Sonia; Eleftheriou, Konstantinos Kostas; Gratziou, Christina; Holst, Gitte Juel; Lavaud, François; Nasilowski, Jacek; Sestini, Piersante; Sarno, Giuseppe; Sigsgaard, Torben; Wieslander, Gunilla; Zielinski, Jan; Viegi, Giovanni; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2015-05-01

    Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards. Forced expiratory volume in 1?s/forced vital capacity ratio was highly significantly related to elevated levels of particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of <0.1?µm (PM0.1) (adjusted OR 8.16, 95% CI 2.24-29.3) and nitrogen dioxide (aOR 3.74, 95% CI 1.06-13.1). Excess risks for usual breathlessness and cough were found with elevated PM10 (aOR 1.53 (95% CI 1.15-2.07) and aOR 1.73 (95% CI 1.17-10.3), respectively) and nitrogen dioxide (aOR 1.58 (95% CI 1.15-2.20) and aOR 1.56 (95% CI 1.03-2.41), respectively). Excess risks for wheeze in the past year were found with PM0.1 (aOR 2.82, 95% CI 1.15-7.02) and for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and exhaled carbon monoxide with formaldehyde (aOR 3.49 (95% CI 1.17-10.3) and aOR 1.25 (95% CI 1.02-1.55), respectively). Breathlessness and cough were associated with higher carbon dioxide. Relative humidity was inversely related to wheeze in the past year and usual cough. Elderly subjects aged ?80?years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were modulated by ventilation. PMID:25766977

  4. Can integrating health literacy into the patient-centered medical home help us weather the perfect storm?

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Jessica R; Larson, Eric B; Greene, Sarah M

    2012-05-01

    Improving health literacy is one key to buoying our nation's troubled health care system. As system-level health literacy improvement strategies take the stage among national priorities for health care, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of care emerges as a compelling avenue for their widespread implementation. With a shared focus on effective communication and team-based care organized around patient needs, health literacy principles and the PCMH are well aligned. However, their synergy has received little attention, even as PCMH demonstration projects and health literacy interventions spring up nationwide. While many health literacy interventions are limited by their focus on a single point along the continuum of care, creating a "room" for health literacy within the PCMH may finally provide a multi-dimensional, system-level approach to tackling the full range of health literacy challenges. Increasing uptake coupled with federal support and financial incentives further boosts the model's potential for advancing health literacy. On the journey toward a revitalized health care system, integrating health literacy into the PCMH presents a promising opportunity that deserves consideration. PMID:22215273

  5. Facilitators and barriers to self-management of nursing home residents: perspectives of health-care professionals in Korean nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Bang, Hwal Lan; Kim, Ga Hye; Ha, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore facilitators and barriers to self-management from the viewpoint of staff taking care of nursing home (NH) residents with chronic diseases in South Korea. Patients and methods A qualitative content analysis was done using the focus group interview method. A total of 23 health-care professionals (16 registered nurses and 7 social workers) were interviewed from three urban NHs, each with more than 100 beds. Results Five facilitators were identified: grouping the residents; the resident’s awareness of his/her current health status; the willingness of residents to engage in self-management; residence in the facility; and support from the staff. Additionally, seven barriers were identified: deterioration of the resident’s health; the dependency expectations of the resident; hesitation in asking for help; difference in expectations between the staff and the resident’s family; insufficient staffing and time; lack of standardized guidelines; and conservative tendencies of the staff due to rigid policies. Conclusion The findings of this study can help health-care professionals recognize the factors that influence self-management and provide direction for registered nurses and other health professionals involved in supporting self-management programs for NH residents. PMID:26491277

  6. HMO innovations. Video-enhanced medical advice; senior zoo walkers; Group Health Resource Line; enhancing health education programs through desktop publishing; home health beat; innovative school health partnership.

    PubMed

    Paperny, D M; Maeser, J D; Artz, K; Stroh, M J; Jackson, L; Cohen, K; Lancaster, M S; Heyer, A L; Clevenson, D S

    1991-01-01

    The editors of HMO PRACTICE asked clinicians and health educators in HMOs across the country to submit reports on their unique, successful patient education programs. The following HMO Innovations testify to the wide range of new technologies, enterprising partnerships, and creative ideas that are shaping health education in HMOs today. PMID:10115854

  7. Physician burnout: coaching a way out.

    PubMed

    Gazelle, Gail; Liebschutz, Jane M; Riess, Helen

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-five to sixty percent of physicians report burnout across all specialties. Changes in the healthcare environment have created marked and growing external pressures. In addition, physicians are predisposed to burnout due to internal traits such as compulsiveness, guilt, and self-denial, and a medical culture that emphasizes perfectionism, denial of personal vulnerability, and delayed gratification. Professional coaching, long utilized in the business world, provides a results-oriented and stigma-free method to address burnout, primarily by increasing one's internal locus of control. Coaching enhances self-awareness, drawing on individual strengths, questioning self-defeating thoughts and beliefs, examining new perspectives, and aligning personal values with professional duties. Coaching utilizes established techniques to increase one's sense of accomplishment, purpose, and engagement, all critical in ameliorating burnout. Coaching presumes that the client already possesses strengths and skills to handle life's challenges, but is not accessing them maximally. Although an evidence base is not yet established, the theoretical basis of coaching's efficacy derives from the fields of positive psychology, mindfulness, and self-determination theory. Using a case example, this article demonstrates the potential of professional coaching to address physician burnout. PMID:25527340

  8. Comparison of health of occupants and characteristics of houses among control homes and homes insulated with urea formaldehyde foam. I. Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, I.; Corey, P.; Cole, P.; Lipa, M.; Mintz, S.; Nethercott, J.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The methodology of a study in which a comparison is made of the health and house characteristics of the occupants of 231 control homes and 571 houses containing urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) is described. All homes and occupants were examined on two occasions separated by an interval of 12 months, during which two-thirds of the UFFI houses performed remedial work. The occupants were examined using a health questionnaire and a series of objective tests including pulmonary function, nasal airway resistance, sense of smell, nasal surface cytology, and patch tests. The houses were assessed using a questionnaire and measurements of indoor formaldehyde and carbon dioxide levels. No obvious bias has been identified in this survey with respect to the representativeness of the population studied, the classification of the UFFI and control groups, and the input from both the respondents and observes. The symptom responses made by individuals within the same households were not correlated. Quality control assessment of the objective health tests and formaldehyde sampling and assays demonstrated that these procedures remained stable over the two phases of the study, with the exception of the expected decrease in the pulmonary flow rates over 1 year and a small unexpected increase in the forced vital capacity and the forced expiratory volume in 1 s.

  9. Usability of a Virtual Coach System for Therapeutic Exercise for Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    E-print Network

    Simmons, Reid

    Usability of a Virtual Coach System for Therapeutic Exercise for Osteoarthritis of the Knee Judith to in-home exercise that complements outpatient physical therapy (PT) for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is less than ideal, with patients often performing exercises incorrectly or less frequently than

  10. Perceived Leadership Behavior of Physical Education Teacher-Coaches: When They Teach vs. when They Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Hyungil Harry; Pyun, Do young; Kim, May

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to see whether a teacher-coach exhibits different types of leadership behavior when s/he teaches a PE class and coaches a group of athletes. The participants in this study were 17-18 year old second-year preuniversity students from two local junior colleges in Singapore. A total of 159 students of mixed gender…

  11. Bargaining with Patriarchy: Former Female Coaches' Experiences and Their Decision to Leave Collegiate Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the experiences of former female coaches and their decision to terminate their careers. A feminist perspective and mixed-methods (surveys and interviews) were used to allow for a richer understanding of their experiences. The survey findings, which included 121 former female coaches, suggest that…

  12. Dispositions of Elite-Level Australian Rugby Coaches towards Game Sense: Characteristics of Their Coaching Habitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard L.; Evans, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Bourdieu's analytic concept of "habitus" has provided a valuable means of theorising coach development but is yet to be operationalised in empirical research. This article redresses this oversight by drawing on a larger study that inquired into how the "coaching 'habitus'" of elite-level Australian and New…

  13. Coaching Commitment and Turnover: A Comparison of Current and Former Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raedeke, Thomas D.; Warren, Anne H.; Granzyk, Tracy L.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed U.S. swimming coaches to assess commitment model constructs (coaching satisfaction, benefits, costs, investments, alternative options, social constraints, and commitment). Satisfaction and investments significantly related to commitment. The standardized path coefficients between benefits and costs and satisfaction were significant.…

  14. How to Be a Wise Consumer of Coaching: Strategies Teachers Can Use to Maximize Coaching's Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.; Luebeck, Jennifer; Heidema, Clare; Mitchell, Arlene; Sutton, John

    2011-01-01

    Instructional coaching is gaining popularity as a school-based effort to increase teacher effectiveness and student achievement. A coach can be broadly defined as a person who works collaboratively with a teacher to improve that teacher's practice and content knowledge, with the ultimate goal of affecting student achievement. By its very nature,…

  15. Coaching in Context: The Role of Relationships in the Work of Three Literacy Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenhaupt, Rebecca; McKinney, Sarah; Reeves, Todd

    2014-01-01

    In the United States and internationally, instructional coaching has been implemented as a mechanism to increase professional capacity, and in so doing improve student achievement. However, instructional coaches often face resistance from the teachers with whom they work; a manifestation of the egalitarian, isolated culture of teaching in many…

  16. Make the Case for Coaching: Bolster Support with Evidence That Coaching Makes a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Ellen; Medrich, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Policymakers want to see evidence that coaching makes a difference for teachers and students. To this group, making a difference means improving performance on standardized tests. In the current fiscal climate, leaders want to know not only that their investments are based on firm grounds theoretically, but also that instructional coaching works.…

  17. Lessons Learned Coaching Teachers in Behavior Management: The PBIS"plus" Coaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershfeldt, Patricia A.; Pell, Karen; Sechrest, Richard; Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in coaching as a means of promoting professional development and the use of evidence-based practices in schools. This article describes the PBIS"plus" coaching model used to provide technical assistance for classroom- and school-wide behavior management to elementary schools over the course of 3 years. This Tier 2…

  18. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Explore Australian Football Coaches' Experience with Game Sense Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pill, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a project framed as a strengths-based case study in the field of sport coaching. The aim of this research was twofold. First, the project trialled. Appreciate Inquiry (AI) for sport pedagogy research and explain how AI can be used in sport coaching research. Second, using an appreciative perspective, the aim of the research…

  19. Home C-ABPM for Preventive and Curative Health Care and Transdisciplinary Science

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Franz; Cornélissen, Germaine; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Singh, Ram B.; Revilla, Miguel; de la Peña, Salvador Sanchez; Gonzalez, Clicerio; Siegelova, Jarmila; Homolka, Pavel; Dusek, Jiri; Zeman, Michal; Singh, RK; Johnson, Dana; Fiser, Bohumil

    2011-01-01

    The clinical everyday management of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) can be greatly improved by the mapping of time structures in home ambulatory BP and HR assessment. Thereby, we change focus from the BP and the HR to the dynamics of these variables. This change is achieved by computer-implemented chronomics, the mapping of chronomes, consisting of cyclicities (our concern herein) along with chaos and trends, in the service of cardiologists, general health care providers, the educated public, and transdisciplinary science. We here further illustrate the yield of chronomics in research on long BP and HR series covering years, some several decades long, and on archives of human sudden cardiac death revealing magnetoperiodisms, e.g., “years” longer than a calendar year, i.e., transyears. In this case of cardiac arrest, what we do not see, the 16- to 20-month transyear is prominent, in the absence of any signature of the calendar year, and so can be a cis-half-year of about 5 months. PMID:21966282

  20. Developing a Successful Coaching Philosophy: A Step-by-Step Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mullem, Pete; Brunner, Dave

    2013-01-01

    The coaching profession demands a high level of accountability and responsibility for the coach. Challenged to achieve success on the scoreboard and promote the positive personal growth of the athlete, a coach seeks guidance from their coaching philosophy. A coaching philosophy is built on a set of standards by which a coach influences, teaches,…

  1. Facilitating Out-of-Home Caregiving Through Health Information Technology: Survey of Informal Caregivers’ Current Practices, Interests, and Perceived Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D; Jenchura, Emily C; Asch, Steven M; Rosland, Ann-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic conditions are supported by out-of-home informal caregivers—family members, friends, and other individuals who provide care and support without pay—who, if armed with effective consumer health information technology, could inexpensively facilitate their care. Objective We sought to understand caregivers’ use of, interest in, and perceived barriers to health information technology for out-of-home caregiving. Methods We conducted 2 sequential Web-based surveys with a national sample of individuals who provide out-of-home caregiving to an adult family member or friend with a chronic illness. We queried respondents about their use of health information technology for out-of-home caregiving and used multivariable regression to investigate caregiver and care-recipient characteristics associated with caregivers’ technology use for caregiving. Results Among 316 out-of-home caregiver respondents, 34.5% (109/316) reported using health information technology for caregiving activities. The likelihood of a caregiver using technology increased significantly with intensity of caregiving (as measured by number of out-of-home caregiving activities). Compared with very low intensity caregivers, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of technology use was 1.88 (95% CI 1.01-3.50) for low intensity caregivers, 2.39 (95% CI 1.11-5.15) for moderate intensity caregivers, and 3.70 (95% CI 1.62-8.45) for high intensity caregivers. Over 70% (149/207) of technology nonusers reported interest in using technology in the future to support caregiving. The most commonly cited barriers to technology use for caregiving were health system privacy rules that restrict access to care-recipients’ health information and lack of familiarity with programs or websites that facilitate out-of-home caregiving. Conclusions Health information technology use for out-of-home caregiving is common, especially among individuals who provide more intense caregiving. Health care systems can address the mismatch between caregivers’ interest in and use of technology by modifying privacy policies that impede information exchange. PMID:23841987

  2. Case management insider. Home health care--a key component of discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Cesta, Toni

    2014-11-01

    Home care is an important intervention to consider for virtually every patient you discharge to home. By using the strategies discussed above, you can increase your percentage of patients going home with this important service. Remember to assess every patient on admission and to reassess every patient daily. Standardize your assessment questions using a tool that includes social work and home care referral criteria. Finally, consider home care as one of the most important tools in your readmission reduction toolbox! PMID:25330706

  3. 3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...of health information technology and electronic health...emergency rooms and hospitals. Federally qualified...emergency and inpatient hospital care. Demonstration...any party against the United States, its...

  4. Returns to Local-Area Healthcare Spending: Using Health Shocks to Patients far from Home

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Joseph J.

    Health care spending varies widely across markets, and previous research finds little evidence that higher spending translates into better health outcomes. The main innovation in this paper exploits this cross-sectional ...

  5. Advanced Use of Electronic Health Records in Patient-Centered Medical Homes

    E-print Network

    Belz, Norbert Erik

    2015-08-31

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) offer the promise of improved health outcomes through care coordination, in particular for costly and difficult to manage chronic illness. Adoption levels of EHRs in primary care have increased significantly since...

  6. Coaching for recovery: a quality improvement project in mental healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Burhouse, Anna; Rowland, Madeleine; Marie Niman, Heather; Abraham, Daisy; Collins, Elizabeth; Matthews, Helen; Denney, Joanna; Ryland, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Approximately one in four adults in the UK will experience a mental health difficulty at some point in their life. This figure is approximately 400 million people worldwide.[1] Depression alone is currently estimated to cost the UK 1.7% of GDP and is one of the largest causes of ill health in the world.[2] For conditions like psychosis, evidence tells us that people have poorer quality of life outcomes, are more likely to die early, become obese, smoke, be unemployed, and have long term physical conditions than average.[3] People's social situation is also likely to be more complex, with housing needs, social isolation, stigma, and poverty.[4] All of these factors can make it hard for a person with a long-term mental health condition, or those supporting them, to hold onto a sense of hope that positive change is possible or that “recovery” towards a life that holds optimum meaning to them is achievable. An innovative “pop up” Recovery College model was co-produced, delivered, and evaluated by a team of people with lived experience of mental health difficulties, known as peer trainers. The Recovery College offered courses containing the best evidence-based knowledge about recovery in mental health, self-care and self-management. Each learning session included theory, personal testament from peer trainers, and volunteers and demonstrations of practical self-care skills and techniques. The courses were open to people experiencing mental health difficulties, their families, friends, and professionals. After the college course finished each student was offered up to three individual coaching sessions to help support putting the lessons learnt from the college into practice. The project aimed to test whether this innovative educational and coaching model could offer hope, knowledge and practical skills in self-management to support resilience and recovery. The project was underpinned by quality improvement methodologies to develop, deliver, and refine the model.

  7. Home Page

    Cancer.gov

    Close Window State Cancer Profiles Quick Reference Guides ? Quick Reference Guides Index Home Page Send to Printer Text description of this image. Site Home Policies Accessibility Viewing Files FOIA Contact Us U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  8. Executive Coaching For DEOs Lois J Geist, M.D.

    E-print Network

    Neiman, Maurine

    : interpersonal and communication skills professional ethics social responsibility ability to influence peers to adopt change administrative responsibility in healthcare #12;How coaching/mentoring helps Facilitate of the coach Improve facilitation skills administrative skills managerial skills Sounding board Receive

  9. Public Health, England and Wales: The Conduct of Nursing Homes Regulations 1963 

    E-print Network

    Powell, J. Enoch

    1963-01-01

    These regulations make provision governing the conduct of nursing homes. They require the managers (the person or persons registered in respect of a nursing home) to provide accommodation, care and staff of a satisfactory ...

  10. Evolutionary struggles of supply chain strategy in home-based health care delivery

    E-print Network

    Fowler, Katherine Szabo

    2008-01-01

    As the healthcare industry in United States continues to be constrained by increasing costs, new delivery channels are coming into practice. One such channel is home healthcare. Home healthcare presents challenges on the ...

  11. Internet Protocol Television for Personalized Home-Based Health Information: Design-Based Research on a Diabetes Education System

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Ken; Kwong, Mabel; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV’s potential. Objective Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. Methods This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. Results The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described their experiences with the system in terms that bode well for its educational potential, and they suggested many constructive improvements to the system. Conclusions The integration of Web 2.0 and IPTV merits further technical development, business modeling, and health services and health outcomes research, as a solution to extend the reach and scale of home-based health care. PMID:24613862

  12. Creating Healthful Home Food Environments: Results of a Study with Participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Smalling, Agueda Lara; Thompson, Debbe; Watson, Kathleen B.; Reed, Debra; Konzelmann, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a modified curriculum for the 6-session Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) promoting healthful home food environments and parenting skills related to obesity prevention. Design: Two-group randomized control trial; intervention versus usual EFNEP curriculum. Setting: Texas EFNEP classes. Participants:…

  13. Creating healthful home food environments: Results of a study with participants in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate a modified curriculum for the 6-session Texas Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), promoting healthful home food environments and parenting skills related to obesity prevention. We used a two-group randomized control trial: intervention versus usual EF...

  14. Carer Reports of Health Status among Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in Taiwan Living at Home and in Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, K.-Y.; Hsieh, K.; Heller, T.; Davidson, P. W.; Janicki, M. P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the health status of a cohort of adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) residing in family homes or institutions in Taiwan and to examine whether morbidity varied with age, sex, existing diagnosis [Down syndrome (DS), seizures, cerebral palsy (CP), intellectual disability…

  15. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... (78 FR 26250) a final rule to change the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health... for the final rule published May 6, 2013, at 78 FR 26250, is delayed from November 15, 2013, until... final rule published in the Federal Register on May 6, 2013 (78 FR 26250). The original effective...

  16. Influencing healthful food choices in school and home environments: results from the TEENS study. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  17. COM: A Method for Mining and Monitoring Human Activity Patterns in Home-based Health Monitoring Systems

    E-print Network

    Cook, Diane J.

    by 2030 [AOA 2011]. The increasing aging population will result in many new challenges and problems39 COM: A Method for Mining and Monitoring Human Activity Patterns in Home-based Health Monitoring Systems Parisa Rashidi, University of Florida Diane J. Cook, Washington State University The increasing

  18. Assessment of Health Complaints among Pediatric Residents of FEMA-Supplied Trailers and Mobile Homes in Hancock County, Mississippi

    E-print Network

    in Hancock County, Mississippi, after Hurricane Katrina, the Mississippi State Department of Health requested/guardians about trailer or mobile home occupancy after Hurricane Katrina and on place of primary residence to an indoor air quality (IAQ) issue before Hurricane Katrina (August 29, 2004, to August 28, 2005); and 3

  19. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  20. Healthy Start Programa Madrina: A Promotora Home Visiting Outreach and Education Program to Improve Perinatal Health among Latina Pregnant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill, Debra E.; Hock-Long, Linda; Mesure, Maryann; Bryer, Pamela; Zambrano, Neydary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of Healthy Start Programa Madrina (HSPM), a home visiting promotora outreach and education program for Latina pregnant women and to present the 10-year findings of the program (1996-2005). Perinatal health disparities continue to persist among low-income…

  1. 78 FR 40271 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... of survey expenses. Mollie Knight, (410) 786-7948, for information about the HH market basket... Grouper Refinements, Effective January 1, 2014 B. International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) Conversion and Diagnosis Reporting on Home Health Claims 1....

  2. Cumulative Risk Exposure and Mental Health Symptoms among Maltreated Youth Placed in Out-of-Home Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raviv, Tali; Taussig, Heather N.; Culhane, Sara E.; Garrido, Edward F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Maltreated children placed in out-of-home care are at high risk for exhibiting symptoms of psychopathology by virtue of their exposure to numerous risk factors. Research examining cumulative risk has consistently found that the accumulation of risk factors increases the likelihood of mental health problems. The goal of the current study…

  3. Policy Changes in Medicare Home Health Care: Challenges to Providing Family-Centered, Community-Based Care for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) established new reimbursement systems in the Medicare home health fee-for-service benefit. Reimbursements were reduced to 1993 levels and per-beneficiary capitated limits were introduced for the first time. This article analyzes the impact of these changes on chronically ill older adults and their families.…

  4. Rapid EHR development and implementation using web and cloud-based architecture in a large home health and hospice organization.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Charlotte A; Teenier, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Health care organizations have long been limited to a small number of major vendors in their selection of an electronic health record (EHR) system in the national and international marketplace. These major EHR vendors have in common base systems that are decades old, are built in antiquated programming languages, use outdated server architecture, and are based on inflexible data models [1,2]. The option to upgrade their technology to keep pace with the power of new web-based architecture, programming tools and cloud servers is not easily undertaken due to large client bases, development costs and risk [3]. This paper presents the decade-long efforts of a large national provider of home health and hospice care to select an EHR product, failing that to build their own and failing that initiative to go back into the market in 2012. The decade time delay had allowed new technologies and more nimble vendors to enter the market. Partnering with a new start-up company doing web and cloud based architecture for the home health and hospice market, made it possible to build, test and implement an operational and point of care system in 264 home health locations across 40 states and three time zones in the United States. This option of "starting over" with the new web and cloud technologies may be posing a next generation of new EHR vendors that retells the Blackberry replacement by iPhone story in healthcare. PMID:24943570

  5. Home and health in people ageing with Parkinson’s disease: study protocol for a prospective longitudinal cohort survey study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With an increased life expectancy for the general population as well as for those ageing with chronic diseases, there are major challenges to the affected individuals and their families, but also to health care and societal planning. Most important, an increasing proportion of older people remain living in their ordinary homes despite health decline and disability. However, little is known about the home and health situation of people ageing with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and older people are often excluded from PD-research. Methods/design The overall aim of the present project is to generate knowledge on home and health dynamics in people with PD, with an explicit attention to PD-specific symptomatology. We will concentrate on aspects of home and health captured by state-of-the-art methodology from gerontology as well as PD-research, health science and rehabilitation. This study protocol describes a longitudinal cohort survey study that includes a baseline data collection and a 3-year follow-up. Both data collection waves include self-administered questionnaires, structured interviews, clinical assessments and observations during home visits effectuated by research staff with project-specific training. In order to arrive at a follow-up sample of N=160, 250 participants identified by PD specialist nurses are being recruited from three hospitals in southern Sweden. With no lower or upper age limit, only those diagnosed with PD since at least one year were included. The exclusion criteria were: difficulties in understanding or speaking Swedish and/or cognitive difficulties/other reasons making the individual unable to give informed consent or to take part in the majority of the data collection. The data collection targets environmental factors such as assistive devices, social support, physical environmental barriers, accessibility problems and perceived aspects of home. A broad variety of instruments tap PD-specific problems (e.g. freezing of gait, fear of falling) and health-related issues such as general self-efficacy, body functions, activities and participation. Discussion This project will produce knowledge to the benefit of the development of health care and societal planning that targets people ageing with PD, ultimately promoting activity and participation and an increase of the number of healthy life years for this sub-group of the population. PMID:24107116

  6. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support

    PubMed Central

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers’ 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients’ homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants’ strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues’ and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future. PMID:23706410

  7. THE PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT INVENTORY-ADOLESCENT: DETECTION OF ADHD FEIGNING FACILITATED BY COACHING AND NON-COACHING INSTRUCTIONS 

    E-print Network

    Diaz De Tuesta, Jessica 1991-

    2012-04-06

    -A under coached or non-coached conditions of faking Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The three indicators were the Negative Impression (NIM) scale, the Malingering (MAL) Index, and the Rogers discriminant function (RDF). To validate...

  8. Understanding Relationship: Maximizing the Effects of Science Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ruth; Feldman, Sue; Minstrell, Jim

    2014-01-01

    There is growing empirical evidence that instructional coaching can help teachers transfer their learning from professional trainings (e.g., new strategies) to classroom practice and that coaching promotes greater collaboration and reflection among teachers. At the same time, however, research on the effectiveness of particular coaching models and…

  9. Exploring Student Perceptions of Academic Mentoring and Coaching Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    While there is an abundant amount of research relative to coaching and mentoring programs, there is little understanding about the interaction between coaches/mentors and students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate student perceptions of their academic coaching and mentoring experiences at two Southern California community…

  10. Coaching to Enhance Quality of Implementation in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusenbury, Linda; Hansen, William B.; Jackson-Newsom, Julia; Pittman, Donna S.; Wilson, Cicely V.; Nelson-Simley, Kathleen; Ringwalt, Chris; Pankratz, Melinda; Giles, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the topics covered by coaches assisting teachers implementing a research-based drug prevention program and explore how coaching affects student outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: The All Stars drug prevention curriculum is implemented by 16 urban teachers who received four coaching sessions.…

  11. Introducing Disability Issues into the Education of Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorogi, Laszlo; Bognar, Jozsef; Petrovics, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the knowledge of participants and their attitudes towards sport of the disabled, in the basic and intermediary coach education. Material and methods: A group of 20 instructors, running a coach education course organised by the Institute of Coaching and Sport Education (ICSE), Semmelweis University (Budapest), were…

  12. Program Orientation for High School Sport Coaches. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) believes that prior to the start of each season, all high school head coaches, assistant coaches, and volunteer coaches should be required to participate in a comprehensive orientation to the sport program. This orientation should be planned and conducted by the athletic director or…

  13. Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of Mathematics Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Kathleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Coaching has become an increasingly utilized professional development strategy to improve mathematics instruction at the elementary level. However, little research has been conducted on the nature of mathematics coaching and its effects. This study has examined factors that affected elementary teachers who participated in a specific coaching model…

  14. The Impact of Instructional Coaching on School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Since the inception of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, instructional coaching has increased in low-performing schools with limited research. Practices of instructional coaches have varied greatly and the impact on school improvement is unknown. This study analyzed daily log entries of instructional coaches serving 23 Title I and three School…

  15. Effects of Coaching on Teacher Use of Sociocultural Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teemant, Annela; Wink, Joan; Tyra, Serena

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates a performance-based instructional coaching model intended to improve teacher pedagogy and classroom organization for educating diverse student populations. Elementary teachers (N = 21) participated in a 30-h workshop and seven individual coaching sessions across an academic year. The coaching model promoted use of the…

  16. What Motivates the Motivators? An Examination of Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Kristy N.; Mallett, Clifford J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Motivation is central to successful performance. In the case of sports coaches, drive is a prerequisite to sustained successful engagement in a complex, dynamic, and turbulent work environment. What fuels these coaches' drive to pursue this vocational activity? Coach motivation has been underrepresented in previous research which has…

  17. Extending Validity Evidence for Multidimensional Measures of Coaching Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    This study extended validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS; Myers, Feltz, Maier, Wolfe, & Reckase, 2006) by examining use of the original rating scale structure and testing how measures related to satisfaction with the head coach within teams and between teams.…

  18. Understanding and Promoting Fun in Youth Sport: Coaches' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengoechea, Enrique Garcia; Strean, William B.; Williams, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the importance of fun in initiating and sustaining sport involvement, and despite the critical role that coaches play in the success of youth sport programs, few attempts have been made at exploring coaches' perceptions of fun in youth sport. Eighteen youth sport coaches participated in semi-structured interviews. The purposes of this…

  19. Power, Conflict, and Cooperation: Toward a Micropolitics of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potrac, Paul; Jones, Robyn L.

    2009-01-01

    According to Jones, Wells, Peters, and Johnson (1993), being political is a necessary part of a coach's repertoire, because a coach's effectiveness and longevity may depend not only on a favorable win-loss record but also on an individual's ability to gain the approval of contextual power brokers (e.g., athletes, other coaches, or owners).…

  20. Preparing Reading Specialists to Be Literacy Coaches: Principles, Practices, Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Literacy coaching is a very hot topic (Cassidy & Cassidy, 2007) that has been spurred on by two opposite belief systems. On one hand, the Reading First schools can receive federal funding to hire coaches to raise test scores. This has led some teachers to characterize coaches as "test-prep enforcers." On the other hand, Bean, Swan…

  1. To Enter Stone, Be Water: Situating Literacy Coaching as Rhizomatic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Reilly leans on the metaphor of rhizomes to remind readers that the work of a coach is not linear or hierarchical, but fluid and dynamic. Reilly frames literacy coaches as rhizomatic agents in schools and urges coaches to appreciate resistance and interruptions as critical and necessary for transformative teaching and learning.

  2. Initiating a National Coaching Curriculum: A Paradigmatic Shift?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Tania; Kidman, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Background: A number of countries have heavily invested in the provision of large scale coach education programmes, often framed by elaborate qualification frameworks. Despite this investment, scant research has been conducted on coach education programmes. Given the limited amount of literature on coach education, and the relatively recent…

  3. An Examination of Relationships between Managerial Coaching and Employee Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sohee; Yang, Baiyin; McLean, Gary N.

    2008-01-01

    Managerial coaching is popularized as a way of motivating, developing and retaining employees in organizations. Yet, there has been lack of empirical studies to examine the linkage between managerial coaching and its potential impact on employees. This study investigated the relationships among managerial coaching and employees' personal learning,…

  4. Further Validation of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, J. Paige; Hall, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine select psychometric properties of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale (CIPS), including the reliability, factorial validity, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and predictive validity. Coaches (N = 338) who averaged 37 (SD = 12.27) years of age, had a mean of 13 (SD = 9.90) years of coaching experience,…

  5. Courage to Love: Coaching Dialogically toward Teacher Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Heather; Palmer, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Instructional coaches continue to be an important part of school reform and professional development, and yet few studies have examined the impact of the language coaches use when working with teachers. The authors work to contribute towards filling this gap by describing a self-study examining their own language as instructional coaches and its…

  6. A Scrutiny of the Coaching Education Program Scholarship since 1995

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullick, Bryan; Schempp, Paul; Mason, Ilse; Foo, Cornell; Vickers, Brad; Connolly, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    The authors sought to identify and categorize completed coaching education program (CEP) scholarship published in a recent 13-year period to provide a framework regarding the process of how coaches are prepared and certified. Scholarship was defined as data-based investigations, reviews, and position papers focused on CEPs, coaching training, and…

  7. The Impact of Alignment Coaching on Christian Teachers' Worthy Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    "The Impact of Alignment Coaching on Christian Teachers' Worthy Performance" uses Human Performance Technology and "teleonomics" (Gilbert 2007) to document several intersecting vantage points as one performance improvement system of alignment coaching (AC). Coaching relationships and accomplishments of consistently (daily) reading the Bible,…

  8. Coaches' Use of Anticipatory and Counterfactual Regret Messages during Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turman, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    By focusing on coaches' use of anticipatory and counterfactual regret messages, this investigation examined video footage (i.e., pre-game, halftime, and post-game speeches) of high school football coaches' interaction with their athletes during competition. Participants were 17 high school football coaches who were found to use a combination of…

  9. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01...effectively with the demands of the job. They are closely supervised...Maintenance of a clean, safe, and healthy environment...developmental needs of and ways to work with the populations served...deficiencies that endanger the health and safety of the HHA's patients...the HHA and to ensure the health and......

  10. Integrated system to automatize information collecting for the primary health care at home.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edson N; Cainelli, Jean; Pinto, Maria Eugênia B; Cazella, Silvio C; Dahmer, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Data collected in a consistent manner is the basis for any decision making. This article presents a system that automates data collection by community-based health workers during their visits to the residences of users of the Brazilian Health Care System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS) The automated process will reduce the possibility of mistakes in the transcription of visit information and make information readily available to the Ministry of Health. Furthermore, the analysis of the information provided via this system can be useful in the implementation of health campaigns and in the control of outbreaks of epidemiological diseases. PMID:23920593

  11. Coaching to vision versus coaching to improvement needs: a preliminary investigation on the differential impacts of fostering positive and negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Anita R.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on intentional change theory (ICT; Boyatzis, 2006), this study examined the differential impact of inducing coaching recipients’ vision/positive emotion versus improvement needs/negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions. A core aim of the study was to empirically test two central ICT propositions on the effects of using the coached person’s Positive Emotional Attractor (vision/PEA) versus Negative Emotional Attractor (improvement needs/NEA) as the anchoring framework of a onetime, one-on-one coaching session on appraisal of 360° feedback and discussion of possible change goals. Eighteen coaching recipients were randomly assigned to two coaching conditions, the coaching to vision/PEA condition and the coaching to improvement needs/NEA condition. Two main hypotheses were tested. Hypothesis1 predicted that participants in the vision/PEA condition would show higher levels of expressed positive emotion during appraisal of 360° feedback results and discussion of change goals than recipients in the improvement needs/NEA condition. Hypothesis2 predicted that vision/PEA participants would show lower levels of stress immediately after the coaching session than improvement needs/NEA participants. Findings showed that coaching to vision/the PEA fostered significantly lower levels of expressed negative emotion and anger during appraisal of 360° feedback results as compared to coaching to improvements needs/the NEA. Vision-focused coaching also fostered significantly greater exploration of personal passions and future desires, and more positive engagement during 360° feedback appraisal. No significant differences between the two conditions were found in emotional processing during discussion of change goals or levels of stress immediately after the coaching session. Current findings suggest that vision/PEA arousal versus improvement needs/NEA arousal impact the coaching process in quite different ways; that the coach’s initial framing of the session predominantly in the PEA (or, alternatively, predominantly in the NEA) fosters emotional processing that is driven by this initial framing; and that both the PEA (and associated positive emotions) and NEA (and associated negative emotions) play an important and recurrent role in shaping the change process. Further study on these outcomes will enable researchers to shed more light on the differential impact of the PEA versus NEA on intentional change, and how to leverage the benefits of both emotional attractors. Findings also suggest that coaches can benefit from better understanding the importance of tapping intrinsic motivation and personal passions through coaching to vision/the PEA. Coaches additionally may benefit from better understanding how to leverage the long-term advantages, and restorative benefits, of positive emotions during coaching engagements. The findings also highlight coaches’ need to appreciate the impact of timing effects on coaching intentional change, and how coaches can play a critical role in calibrating the pace and focus of work on intentional change. Early arousal of the coachee’s PEA, accompanied by recurrent PEA–NEA induction, may help coachees be/become more creative, optimistic, and resilient during a given change process. Overall, primary focus on vision/PEA and secondary focus on improvement needs/NEA may better equip coaches and coaching recipients to work together on building robust learning, development, and change. Keywords-133pt executive coaching, vision, improvement needs, positive emotion, negative emotion, emotional appraisal, intentional change, positive psychology PMID:25964768

  12. Coaching the Adult Learner: A Framework for Engaging the Principles and Processes of Andragogy for Best Practices in Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubin, Melissa Maybury

    2013-01-01

    Coaching is an actionable way for adults to learn. For purposes of this study, learning was conceptualized by UNESCO's five pillars of learning to know, do, live together, be, and learning to transform oneself and society. The practice of coaching was defined as a social enterprise where, through a process of inquiry and reflection, coaches help…

  13. Mapping the Road to Instructional Coach Effectiveness: Exploring the Relationship between Instructional Coaching Efficacy, Practices, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrary, Marsha

    2011-01-01

    Despite the presence and potential impact of instructional coaches, many schools are not experiencing significant improvements in teachers' practices or student achievement. In gaining more insight into forces that impact instructional coach effectiveness, this study (a) explored the relationship between sources of instructional coaching efficacy…

  14. What Teachers Say They Changed Because of Their Coach and How They Think Their Coach Helped Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Michelle; Stephens, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Many articles and books have been written advocating for the use of literacy coaches in professional development and/or describing what literacy coaches should do. Some research has been conducted on the day-to-day practices of coaches, such as, how many hours they spend doing what (Alverman, Commeyras, Cramer, & Harnish, 2005; Deussen, Coskie,…

  15. Home hazards and falls in the elderly: the role of health and functional status.

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, M E; Nevitt, M C; Kelsey, J L; Link, B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study was undertaken to determine whether vigorous and frail older people who identify environmental hazards in their homes have an increased risk for falls. METHODS. A 1-year prospective study was conducted among 266 female and 59 male community-dwelling volunteers aged 60 to 93 years who had fallen at least once during the previous year. Composite measures of home safety and of frailty were derived using principal components analysis. Participants were divided into vigorous and frail groups, and associations between baseline home safety measures and falls at home over the follow-up year were compared between the two groups. RESULTS. Frail individuals were more than twice as likely as vigorous individuals to fall during follow-up (rate ratio [RR] = 2.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.54, 3.27). In the study group as a whole, falls were not strongly associated with the presence of home hazards. However, when compared with vigorous older persons living with fewer home hazards, vigorous older persons living with more home hazards were more likely to fall. The increased risk for falls among vigorous elderly was limited to falls where home hazards were present. By contrast, living with more home hazards was not associated with increased likelihood of falls among frail older persons. CONCLUSIONS. While frail older persons experience higher overall fall rates, vigorous older persons should not be overlooked in fall prevention projects. PMID:7702114

  16. 3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... served populations with limited access to health care, treating all patients regardless of ability to pay... changes in payments and services that may improve the quality and efficiency of services to beneficiaries. Health centers participating in this demonstration must have shown their ability to provide...

  17. Preventing Hospital and Home Malnutrition. Nutrition in Health Promotion Series, Number 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Roberta Smith

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  18. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  19. Supporting universal prevention programs: a two-phased coaching model.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kimberly D; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2013-06-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students' emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter et al. in Early Child Res Q 26:96-109, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter and Van Norman in Early Child Educ 38:279-288, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al. in School Psychol Rev 34:87-106, 2005; Stormont et al. 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker et al. 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports, whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  20. Coaching to vision versus coaching to improvement needs: a preliminary investigation on the differential impacts of fostering positive and negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions.

    PubMed

    Howard, Anita R

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on intentional change theory (ICT; Boyatzis, 2006), this study examined the differential impact of inducing coaching recipients' vision/positive emotion versus improvement needs/negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions. A core aim of the study was to empirically test two central ICT propositions on the effects of using the coached person's Positive Emotional Attractor (vision/PEA) versus Negative Emotional Attractor (improvement needs/NEA) as the anchoring framework of a onetime, one-on-one coaching session on appraisal of 360° feedback and discussion of possible change goals. Eighteen coaching recipients were randomly assigned to two coaching conditions, the coaching to vision/PEA condition and the coaching to improvement needs/NEA condition. Two main hypotheses were tested. Hypothesis1 predicted that participants in the vision/PEA condition would show higher levels of expressed positive emotion during appraisal of 360° feedback results and discussion of change goals than recipients in the improvement needs/NEA condition. Hypothesis2 predicted that vision/PEA participants would show lower levels of stress immediately after the coaching session than improvement needs/NEA participants. Findings showed that coaching to vision/the PEA fostered significantly lower levels of expressed negative emotion and anger during appraisal of 360° feedback results as compared to coaching to improvements needs/the NEA. Vision-focused coaching also fostered significantly greater exploration of personal passions and future desires, and more positive engagement during 360° feedback appraisal. No significant differences between the two conditions were found in emotional processing during discussion of change goals or levels of stress immediately after the coaching session. Current findings suggest that vision/PEA arousal versus improvement needs/NEA arousal impact the coaching process in quite different ways; that the coach's initial framing of the session predominantly in the PEA (or, alternatively, predominantly in the NEA) fosters emotional processing that is driven by this initial framing; and that both the PEA (and associated positive emotions) and NEA (and associated negative emotions) play an important and recurrent role in shaping the change process. Further study on these outcomes will enable researchers to shed more light on the differential impact of the PEA versus NEA on intentional change, and how to leverage the benefits of both emotional attractors. Findings also suggest that coaches can benefit from better understanding the importance of tapping intrinsic motivation and personal passions through coaching to vision/the PEA. Coaches additionally may benefit from better understanding how to leverage the long-term advantages, and restorative benefits, of positive emotions during coaching engagements. The findings also highlight coaches' need to appreciate the impact of timing effects on coaching intentional change, and how coaches can play a critical role in calibrating the pace and focus of work on intentional change. Early arousal of the coachee's PEA, accompanied by recurrent PEA-NEA induction, may help coachees be/become more creative, optimistic, and resilient during a given change process. Overall, primary focus on vision/PEA and secondary focus on improvement needs/NEA may better equip coaches and coaching recipients to work together on building robust learning, development, and change. Keywords-133pt executive coaching, vision, improvement needs, positive emotion, negative emotion, emotional appraisal, intentional change, positive psychology. PMID:25964768