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1

A socialization intervention in remote health coaching for older adults in the home.  

PubMed

Previous studies have shown that social ties enhance both physical and mental health, and that social isolation has been linked to increased cognitive decline. As part of our cognitive training platform, we created a socialization intervention to address these issues. The intervention is designed to improve social contact time of older adults with remote family members and friends using a variety of technologies, including Web cameras, Skype software, email and phone. We used usability testing, surveys, interviews and system usage monitoring to develop design guidance for socialization protocols that were appropriate for older adults living independently in their homes. Our early results with this intervention show increased number of social contacts, total communication time (we measure email, phone, and Skype usage) and significant participant satisfaction with the intervention. PMID:24111362

Jimison, Holly B; Klein, Krystal A; Marcoe, Jennifer L

2013-01-01

2

Health Coaching for the Underserved  

PubMed Central

Twelve individuals (four homeless, two formerly homeless, and six low-income) received 12 weeks of free health coaching, an intervention normally undertaken by clients who pay $40 to $200 out of pocket for coaching services. The health coaching relationships were conducted with protocols developed for managing executive health at a Fortune 100 firm. This experimental model was constructed to explore what happens when coaching conversations for change and possibility are delivered to marginalized and underserved communities that typically undergo vastly different interactions with authorities in law, healthcare, and social services. Phase 1 of the project recruited the homeless individuals from street sites throughout San Francisco, California, and a temporary shelter. Phase 2 of the project worked with low-income and formerly homeless individuals who occupied a subsidized housing complex. Of the coaching recipients, three were black, five were Hispanic, three were of mixed race, and one declined to disclose his ethnicity. Half were Spanish speaking; immigrant status was recent for five of the 12. None had ever talked with a health coach before; only three knew how to utilize low-cost public health clinics. This case report illustrates how the motivational power of coaching conversations was a modestly useful methodology in breaking through the social isolation and loneliness of street-dwelling adults with chronic health problems. It also was a useful methodology for developing capacity for accomplishing short-term goals that were self-identified. Additionally, health coaching presented an opportunity for transitioning poverty-level individuals from passive recipients using public health sector services to more empowered actors with first-stage awareness who initiated preventive health actions. PMID:24416675

2013-01-01

3

Health coaching for the underserved.  

PubMed

Twelve individuals (four homeless, two formerly homeless, and six low-income) received 12 weeks of free health coaching, an intervention normally undertaken by clients who pay $40 to $200 out of pocket for coaching services. The health coaching relationships were conducted with protocols developed for managing executive health at a Fortune 100 firm. This experimental model was constructed to explore what happens when coaching conversations for change and possibility are delivered to marginalized and underserved communities that typically undergo vastly different interactions with authorities in law, healthcare, and social services. Phase 1 of the project recruited the homeless individuals from street sites throughout San Francisco, California, and a temporary shelter. Phase 2 of the project worked with low-income and formerly homeless individuals who occupied a subsidized housing complex. Of the coaching recipients, three were black, five were Hispanic, three were of mixed race, and one declined to disclose his ethnicity. Half were Spanish speaking; immigrant status was recent for five of the 12. None had ever talked with a health coach before; only three knew how to utilize low-cost public health clinics. This case report illustrates how the motivational power of coaching conversations was a modestly useful methodology in breaking through the social isolation and loneliness of street-dwelling adults with chronic health problems. It also was a useful methodology for developing capacity for accomplishing short-term goals that were self-identified. Additionally, health coaching presented an opportunity for transitioning poverty-level individuals from passive recipients using public health sector services to more empowered actors with first-stage awareness who initiated preventive health actions. PMID:24416675

Jordan, Meg

2013-05-01

4

Health Coaching Available Starting November 20th  

E-print Network

Health Coaching Available Starting November 20th ! If you've completed your health survey and printed your report, which explains what you are doing well and what you can do better, health coaches are now available. . Our health coaches can work with you to help you take your health to the next level

Marsh, David

5

The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

2012-01-01

6

Voice and vocal health in elite sports coaching: considerations for elite football coaching staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundWhile voice is integral to sports coaching, currently there is a dearth of research considering coaches' occupational vocal health.ObjectiveTo investigate football coaches' occupational voice use and vocal health (including the role of voice in coaching and the identification and management of workplace risk factors).DesignA mixed-methodological approach (interviews, a questionnaire and acoustic voice measurement) using descriptive statistics and thematic analyses.SettingOn-site at

K Buckley; P OHalloran; J Oates

2011-01-01

7

Health coaching: a new and exciting technique to enhance patient self-management and improve outcomes.  

PubMed

Health coaching is quickly emerging as a new approach of partnering with patients to enhance self-management strategies for the purpose of preventing exacerbations of chronic illness and supporting lifestyle change. Medicare is now pilot testing this approach for patients with congestive heart failure and diabetes. With acute care hospitalization an outcome of great interest to us all, health coaching is an exciting technique worthy of consideration by home health providers. PMID:17426499

Huffman, Melinda

2007-04-01

8

Home Health Services  

MedlinePLUS

... Medicare doesn't pay for: 24-hour-a-day care at home Meals delivered to your home Homemaker ... get home health care if you attend adult day care. Note: Home health services may also include medical ...

9

COACHE Survey Results Council of Health Science Deans  

E-print Network

satisfaction � Look at differences in experience by rank and gender � Identify impact of policies and processesCOACHE Survey Results Council of Health Science Deans April 1, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey

Toronto, University of

10

Complexity and Health Coaching: Synergies in Nursing  

PubMed Central

Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in this paper addresses the complexities and ambiguities for persons living with chronic illness in order to provide person-centered care and support that are unique and responsive to the context of persons' lives. Informed by complexity thinking and relational inquiry, the RN health coach is an emergent innovation of creative action with community and groups that support persons as they shape their health and patterns of living. PMID:24102025

Mitchell, Gail J.; Wong, Winnie; Rush, Danica

2013-01-01

11

Group Health Coaching: Strengths, Challenges, and Next Steps  

PubMed Central

There is great need for cost effective approaches to increase patient engagement and improve health and well-being. Health and wellness coaching has recently demonstrated great promise, but the majority of studies to date have focused on individual coaching (ie, one coach with one client). Newer initiatives are bringing a group coaching model from corporate leadership development and educational settings into the healthcare arena. A group approach potentially increases cost-effective access to a larger number of clients and brings the possible additional benefit of group support. This article highlights some of the group coaching approaches currently being conducted across the United States. The group coaching interventions included in this overview are offered by a variety of academic and private sector institutions, use both telephonic and in-person coaching, and are facilitated by professionally trained health and wellness coaches as well as trained peer coaches. Strengths and challenges experienced in these efforts are summarized, as are recommendations to address those challenges. A working definition of “Group Health and Wellness Coaching” is proposed, and important next steps for research and for the training of group coaches are presented. PMID:24416678

Wolever, Ruth Q.; Manning, Linda; Elam, Roy; Moore, Margaret; Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Duskey, Heidi; Anderson, Chelsea; Curtis, Rebecca L.; Masemer, Susan; Lawson, Karen

2013-01-01

12

Australian rural football club leaders as mental health advocates: an investigation of the impact of the Coach the Coach project  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Mental ill health, especially depression, is recognised as an important health concern, potentially with greater impact in rural communities. This paper reports on a project, Coach the Coach, in which Australian rural football clubs were the setting and football coaches the leaders in providing greater mental health awareness and capacity to support early help seeking behaviour among young males

David Pierce; Siaw-Teng Liaw; Jennifer Dobell; Rosemary Anderson

2010-01-01

13

Home health care  

MedlinePLUS

... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

14

The study of health coaching: the ithaca coaching project, research design, and future directions.  

PubMed

Health coaching (HC) is a process holding tremendous potential as a complementary medical intervention to shape healthy behavior change and affect rates of chronic lifestyle diseases. Empirical knowledge of effectiveness for the HC process, however, is lacking. The purposes of this paper are to present the study protocol for the Ithaca Coaching Project while also addressing research design, methodological issues, and directions for HC research. This is one of the first large-scale, randomized control trials of HC for primary prevention examining impact on physical and emotional health status in an employee population. An additional intent for the project is to investigate self-determination theory as a theoretical framework for the coaching process. Participants (n=300) are recruited as part of a campus-wide wellness initiative and randomly assigned to one of three levels of client-centered HC or a control with standard wellness program care. Repeated measures analyses of covariance will be used to examine coaching effectiveness while path analyses will be used to examine relationships between coaching processes, self-determination variables, and health outcomes. There is a great need for well-designed HC studies that define coaching best practices, examine intervention effectiveness, provide cost:benefit analysis, and address scope of practice. This information will allow a clearer definition of HC to emerge and determination of if, and how, HC fits in modern-day healthcare. This is an exciting but critical time for HC research and for the practice of HC. PMID:24416673

Sforzo, Gary A

2013-05-01

15

Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.  

PubMed

To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management. PMID:24070747

Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

2013-02-01

16

The effectiveness of coach turnover and the effect on home team advantage, team quality and team ranking  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of coach turnover on team performance is widely discussed in the literature due to the indirect impact of a team's performance on a club's revenues. This study examines the effect of coach turnover within a competition season by focusing on the change in team quality and the change in home team advantage under the new coach. The change

Anne-Line Balduck; Anita Prinzie; Marc Buelens

2010-01-01

17

Health Coaching Education: A Conversation With Pioneers in the Field  

PubMed Central

In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

Snyder, Suzanne

2013-01-01

18

Health coaching education: a conversation with pioneers in the field.  

PubMed

In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

Snyder, Suzanne

2013-05-01

19

Effect of Motivational Interviewing-Based Health Coaching on Employees' Physical and Mental Health Status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivational Interviewing (MI) based health coaching is a relatively new behavioral intervention that has gained popularity in public health because of its ability to address multiple behaviors, health risks, and illness self-management. In this study, 276 employees at a medical center self-selected to participate in either a 3-month health coaching intervention or control group. The treatment group showed significant improvement

Susan Butterworth; Ariel Linden; Wende McClay; Michael C. Leo

2006-01-01

20

The impacts of using community health volunteers to coach medication safety behaviors among rural elders with chronic illnesses.  

PubMed

It is a challenge for rural health professionals to promote medication safety among older adults taking multiple medications. A volunteer coaching program to promote medication safety among rural elders with chronic illnesses was designed and evaluated. A community-based interventional study randomly assigned 62 rural elders with at least two chronic illnesses to routine care plus volunteer coaching or routine care alone. The volunteer coaching group received a medication safety program, including a coach and reminders by well-trained volunteers, as well as three home visits and five telephone calls over a two-month period. All the subjects received routine medication safety instructions for their chronic illnesses. The program was evaluated using pre- and post-tests of knowledge, attitude and behaviors with regard to medication safety. Results show the volunteer coaching group improved their knowledge of medication safety, but there was no change in attitude after the two-month study period. Moreover, the group demonstrated three improved medication safety behaviors compared to the routine care group. The volunteer coaching program and instructions with pictorial aids can provide a reference for community health professionals who wish to improve the medication safety of chronically ill elders. PMID:23414637

Wang, Chi-Jane; Fetzer, Susan J; Yang, Yi-Ching; Wang, Jing-Jy

2013-01-01

21

Unobtrusive monitoring of divided attention in a cognitive health coaching intervention for the elderly.  

PubMed

Assessment of cognitive functionality is an important aspect of care for elders. Unfortunately, few tools exist to measure divided attention, the ability to allocate attention to different aspects of tasks. An accurate determination of divided attention would allow inference of generalized cognitive decline, as well as providing a quantifiable indicator of an important component of driving skill. We propose a new method for determining relative divided attention ability through unobtrusive monitoring of computer use. Specifically, we measure performance on a dual-task cognitive computer exercise as part of a health coaching intervention. This metric indicates whether the user has the ability to pay attention to both tasks at once, or is primarily attending to one task at a time (sacrificing optimal performance). The monitoring of divided attention in a home environment is a key component of both the early detection of cognitive problems and for assessing the efficacy of coaching interventions. PMID:21347030

McKanna, James A; Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly

2010-01-01

22

The Essential Components of Coach Training for Mental Health Professionals: A Delphi Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to discover how coach training experts define coaching and what they would identify to be the essential components of a coach training program for mental health professionals. Methods. A panel of nine experts, through an iterative Delphi process of responding to three rounds of questionnaires, provided…

Moriarity, Marlene Therese

2010-01-01

23

Using motivational interviewing: through evidence-based health coaching.  

PubMed

To enhance compliance and achieve better outcomes, providers must actively engage their patients and caregivers in different ways than in the past. One strategy that has gained national attention is motivational interviewing through evidence-based health coaching. A closer look at this exciting new clinical skill reveals what it is, how it works, why it is so successful, and why our traditional patient approach has fallen short. PMID:25268529

Huffman, Melinda

2014-10-01

24

Approach to Antihypertensive Adherence: A Feasibility Study on the Use of Student Health Coaches for Uninsured Hypertensive Adults  

PubMed Central

Background Despite pharmacologic advances, medication non-adherence continues to challenge primary care providers in blood pressure (BP) management. Methods Medical, nursing and pharmacy students (n = 11) were recruited and trained as health coaches for uninsured, hypertensive patients (n = 25) of a free clinic in an uncontrolled open trial. Pre-post analysis was conducted on BP, medication adherence, frequency of home BP monitoring, and healthy behavior (e.g., diet, exercise). Patient satisfaction and feasibility of a student coach model was qualitatively evaluated. Results In the 12 patients who completed the intervention, an increase in medication adherence as measured by the Brief Medication Questionnaire was observed (P < 0.01), with a 11 mmHg reduction in systolic BP (P = 0.03). Qualitative data showed patient satisfaction with the intervention and other healthy behavior change. Conclusions This feasibility study shows use of student health coaches to combat medication non-adherence in uninsured, hypertensive adults is promising. PMID:22356599

Leung, Lucinda B.; Busch, Andrew M.; Nottage, Sarah L.; Arellano, Naira; Glieberman, Eva; Busch, Nicholas J.; Smith, Stephen R.

2012-01-01

25

Towards a Psychology of Coaching: The Impact of Coaching on Metacognition, Mental Health and Goal Attainment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A theoretical framework for a psychology of coaching was developed. First, the literature on cognitive approaches to coaching, behavioral approaches to coaching, and combinations of the cognitive and behavioral approaches was reviewed. Next, two studies examined the development and validation of a new measure of private self-consciousness called…

Grant, Anthony M.

26

Effect of motivational interviewing-based health coaching on employees' physical and mental health status.  

PubMed

Motivational Interviewing (MI) based health coaching is a relatively new behavioral intervention that has gained popularity in public health because of its ability to address multiple behaviors, health risks, and illness self-management. In this study, 276 employees at a medical center self-selected to participate in either a 3-month health coaching intervention or control group. The treatment group showed significant improvement in both SF-12 physical (p = .035) and mental (p = .0001) health status compared to controls. Because of concerns of selection bias, a matched case-control analysis was also performed, eliciting similar results. These findings suggest that MI-based health coaching is effective in improving both physical and mental health status in an occupational setting. PMID:17059299

Butterworth, Susan; Linden, Ariel; McClay, Wende; Leo, Michael C

2006-10-01

27

The impact of Telephonic Health Coaching on Health Outcomes in a High-risk Population  

PubMed Central

Background: Health coaching is a client-centric process to increase motivation and self-efficacy that supports sustainable lifestyle behavior changes and active management of health conditions. This study describes an intervention offered as a benefit to health plan members and examines health and behavioral outcomes of participants. Methods: High-risk health plan enrollees were invited to participate in a telephonic health coaching intervention addressing the whole person and focusing on motivating health behavior changes. Outcomes of self-reported lifestyle behaviors, perceived health, stress levels, quality of life, readiness to make changes, and patient activation levels were reported at baseline and upon program completion. Retrospectively, these data were extracted from administrative and health coaching records of participants during the first 2 full years of the program. Results: Less than 7% of the 114 615 potential candidates self-selected to actively participate in health coaching, those with the highest chronic disease load being the most likely to participate. Of 6940 active participants, 1082 fully completed health inventories, with 570 completing Patient Activation Measure (PAM). The conditions most often represented in the active participants were depression, congestive heart failure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, osteoporosis, asthma, and low back pain. In 6 months or less, 89% of participants met at least one goal. Significant improvements occurred in stress levels, healthy eating, exercise levels, and physical and emotional health, as well as in readiness to make change and PAM scores. Discussion: The types of client-selected goals most often met were physical activity, eating habits, stress management, emotional health, sleep, and pain management, resulting in improved overall quality of life regardless of condition. Positive shifts in activation levels and readiness to change suggest that health coaching is an intervention deserving of future prospective research studies to assess the utilization, efficacy, and potential cost-effectiveness of health coaching programs for a range of populations. PMID:24416671

Jonk, Yvonne; O'Connor, Heidi; Riise, Kirsten Sundgaard; Eisenberg, David M.; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

2013-01-01

28

FastStats: Home Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... and Territorial Data NCHS Home FastStats Home Home Health Care Data are for the U.S. Number of current ... diabetes, 11 percent of discharges (2007) Source: Home Health Care and Discharged Hospice Care Patients: United States, 2000 ...

29

Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model  

PubMed Central

Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

2014-01-01

30

Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model.  

PubMed

Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

2014-04-01

31

MentalHealth Issues and Challenging Clients in Executive Coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coaching is emerging as one of the major forms of personal and profes- sional development used by executives. Organisations and individuals use coaching to develop skills, enhance performance, develop leadership and personal functioning, and to remediate unhelpful patterns of behaviour. As such, coaching and therapy share some ground and some techniques. It is often said that one of the key

Michael Cavanagh

32

Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care at home after they have been in the hospital ... dolls to help you practice different procedures. Home Health Care Assistance The hospital social worker can help families ...

33

Training meals on wheels volunteers as health literacy coaches for older adults.  

PubMed

Homebound older adults constitute a "hardly reached" population with respect to health communication. Older adults also typically suffer from health literacy challenges, which put them at increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Suboptimal interactions with providers are one such challenge. Interventions to improve interactive health literacy focus on training consumers/patients in question preparation and asking. Meals on Wheels volunteers are uniquely suited to coach their clients in such interaction strategies. Seventy-three Meals on Wheels volunteers participated in workshops to train as health literacy coaches. The 3- to 4-hour workshops included units on communicating with older adults, on the nature of health literacy, and on the process of interactive health literacy coaching. Participants viewed and discussed videos that modeled the targeted communication behaviors for older adult patients interacting with physicians. They role-played the coaching process. After 9 months, coaches participated in a "booster" session that included videos of ideal coaching practices. Evaluation questionnaires revealed that participants had favorable reactions to the workshops with respect to utility and interest. They especially appreciated learning communication skills and seeing realistic videos. A measure of knowledge about the workshop material revealed a significant increment at posttest. Fidelity of coaching practices with respect to workshop curriculum was confirmed. This training in interactive health literacy for community-based lay volunteers constitutes one way to implement the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy for one "hardly reached" population. An online tool kit containing all workshop materials is available. PMID:23877229

Rubin, Donald L; Freimuth, Vicki S; Johnson, Sharon D; Kaley, Terry; Parmer, John

2014-05-01

34

Building competency in the novice allied health professional through peer coaching.  

PubMed

The development of competence is an ongoing journey, and one that is particularly punctuated in the early part of a health professional's career. These novice practitioners need to recognize that the challenges inherent in building competency might be resolved more readily by engaging with peers. This paper outlines what it means to be a novice practitioner, and how peer coaching can be used to support professional development in the allied health sciences. An overview of the reasoning process and how peer coaching and experiential learning can be used to build competence is described. A structured and formal approach to peer coaching is outlined in this paper. Novices who embrace this professional development strategy will find the model of coaching practice and underlying strategies described in this paper beneficial to their experience. The importance of formalizing the process and the underlying communication skills needed for coaching are described in detail with accompanying examples to illustrate the model in practice. PMID:20539925

Ladyshewsky, Richard K

2010-01-01

35

Integrative Health Coaching and Motivational interviewing: Synergistic Approaches to Behavior Change in Healthcare  

PubMed Central

As rates of preventable chronic diseases and associated costs continue to rise, there has been increasing focus on strategies to support behavior change in healthcare. Health coaching and motivational interviewing are synergistic but distinct approaches that can be effectively employed to achieve this end. However, there is some confusion in the literature about the relationship between these two approaches. The purpose of this review is to describe a specific style of health coaching—integrative health coaching—and motivational interviewing, including their origins, the processes and strategies employed, and the ways in which they are similar and different. We also provide a case example of how integrative health coaching and motivational interviewing might be employed to demonstrate how these approaches are synergistic but distinct from each other in practice. This information may be useful for both researchers and clinicians interested in investigating or using behavior change interventions to improve health and cost outcomes in chronic disease. PMID:24416683

Wolever, Ruth Q.

2013-01-01

36

Evaluating the Treatment Fidelity of Parents Who Conduct In-Home Functional Communication Training with Coaching via Telehealth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We conducted a retrospective, descriptive evaluation of the fidelity with which parents of three children with autism spectrum disorders conducted functional communication training (FCT) in their homes. All training was provided to the parents via telehealth by a behavior consultant in a tertiary-level hospital setting. FCT trials coached by the…

Suess, Alyssa N.; Romani, Patrick W.; Wacker, David P.; Dyson, Shannon M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Lee, John F.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Waldron, Debra B.

2014-01-01

37

Increasing patient participation in reproductive health consultations: an evaluation of "Smart Patient" coaching in Indonesia.  

PubMed

Paternalistic models of health care, social distance between patients and providers, and cultural norms discourage patients from playing an active role in health consultations. This study tested whether individual coaching can give family planning patients the confidence and communication skills to talk more openly and more vigorously with providers. Educators met with 384 Indonesian women in clinic waiting rooms and coached them on asking questions, expressing concerns, and seeking clarification. An analysis of audiotaped consultations found that patients who received coaching articulated significantly more questions and concerns than others. Coaching narrowed differentials in active communication by patient type, age, and assertiveness, but it widened differentials by patient education and socioeconomic class. The discontinuation rate at 8 months was lower in the intervention than the control condition, but the difference was only marginally significant. PMID:12781926

Kim, Young Mi; Putjuk, Fitri; Basuki, Endang; Kols, Adrienne

2003-06-01

38

Telephone-based health coaching for chronically ill patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background The rising prevalence of chronic conditions constitutes a major burden for patients and healthcare systems and is predicted to increase in the upcoming decades. Improving the self-management skills of patients is a strategy to steer against this burden. This could lead to better outcomes and lower healthcare costs. Health coaching is one method for enhancing the self-management of patients and can be delivered by phone. The effects of telephone-based health coaching are promising, but still inconclusive. Economic evaluations and studies examining the transferability of effects to different healthcare systems are still rare. Aim of this study is to evaluate telephone-based health coaching for chronically ill patients in Germany. Methods/Design The study is a prospective randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of telephone-based health coaching with usual care during a 4-year time period. Data are collected at baseline and after 12, 24 and 36 months. Patients are selected based on one of the following chronic conditions: diabetes, coronary artery disease, asthma, hypertension, heart failure, COPD, chronic depression or schizophrenia. The health coaching intervention is carried out by trained nurses employed by a German statutory health insurance. The frequency and the topics of the health coaching are manual-based but tailored to the patients’ needs and medical condition, following the concepts of motivational interviewing, shared decision-making and evidence-based-medicine. Approximately 12,000 insurants will be enrolled and randomized into intervention and control groups. Primary outcome is the time until hospital readmission within two years after enrolling in the health coaching, assessed by routine data. Secondary outcomes are patient-reported outcomes like changes in quality of life, depression and anxiety and clinical values assessed with questionnaires. Additional secondary outcomes are further economic evaluations like health service use as well as costs and hospital readmission rates. The statistical analyses includes intention-to-treat and as-treated principles. The recruitment will be completed in September 2014. Discussion This study will provide evidence regarding economic and clinical effects of telephone-delivered health coaching. Additionally, this study will show whether health coaching is an adequate option for the German healthcare system to address the growing burden of chronic diseases. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien; DRKS) DRKS00000584. PMID:24135027

2013-01-01

39

Evaluation of a personal mobile coaching service for health tracking.  

PubMed

Yukendu is a personal mobile coaching service that supports people in reaching good levels of psychological and physical well-being. The aim of this contribution is to describe the peculiarities of Yukendu and its multi-step evaluation process. PMID:23792864

Gatti, Fabiana; Brivio, Eleonora; Galimberti, Carlo

2013-01-01

40

Coaching vs Psychotherapy in health and Wellness: Overlap, Dissimilarities, and the Potential for Collaboration  

PubMed Central

Health coaches and psychotherapists both work with the art and science of facilitating change in their patients and clients. While the evolving field of health coaching and the established disciplines of clinical or counseling psychology share major areas of overlap, there are also significant distinctions between the two fields. This article outlines those similarities and dissimilarities with the intention of fostering a cooperative and mutually enriching stance between the two helping professions for the benefit of the respective professionals and the countless clients and patients they serve. PMID:24416682

Livingstone, John B.

2013-01-01

41

Behavioral health coaching for rural veterans with diabetes and depression: a patient randomized effectiveness implementation trial  

PubMed Central

Background Depression and diabetes cause significant burden for patients and the healthcare system and, when co-occurring, result in poorer self-care behaviors and worse glycemic control than for either condition alone. However, the clinical management of these comorbid conditions is complicated by a host of patient, provider, and system-level barriers that are especially problematic for patients in rural locations. Patient-centered medical homes provide an opportunity to integrate mental and physical health care to address the multifaceted needs of complex comorbid conditions. Presently, there is a need to not only develop robust clinical interventions for complex medically ill patients but also to find feasible ways to embed these interventions into the frontlines of existing primary care practices. Methods/design This randomized controlled trial uses a hybrid effectiveness-implementation design to evaluate the Healthy Outcomes through Patient Empowerment (HOPE) intervention, which seeks to simultaneously address diabetes and depression for rural veterans in Southeast Texas. A total of 242 Veterans with uncontrolled diabetes and comorbid symptoms of depression will be recruited and randomized to either the HOPE intervention or to a usual-care arm. Participants will be evaluated on a host of diabetes and depression-related measures at baseline and 6- and 12-month follow-up. The trial has two primary goals: 1) to examine the effectiveness of the intervention on both physical (diabetes) and emotional health (depression) outcomes and 2) to simultaneously pilot test a multifaceted implementation strategy designed to increase fidelity and utilization of the intervention by coaches interfacing within the primary care setting. Discussion This ongoing blended effectiveness-implementation design holds the potential to advance the science and practice of caring for complex medically ill patients within the constraints of a busy patient-centered medical home. Trial registration Behavioral Activation Therapy for Rural Veterans with Diabetes and Depression: NCT01572389. PMID:24774351

2014-01-01

42

Teacher Consultation and Coaching within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method Thirty-six classrooms within five urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to intervention (training + consultation/coaching) and control (training only) conditions. Classroom and child outcomes (n = 364; 43% girls) were assessed in the fall and spring. Results Random effects regression models showed main effects of intervention on teacher-student relationship closeness, academic self-concept, and peer victimization. Results of multiple regression models showed levels of observed teacher emotional support in the fall moderated intervention impact on emotional support at the end of the school year. Conclusions Results suggest teacher consultation and coaching can be integrated within existing mental health activities in urban schools and impact classroom effectiveness and child adaptation across multiple domains. PMID:22428941

Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

2012-01-01

43

A randomized controlled pilot study testing three types of health coaches for obesity treatment: Professional, Peer, and Mentor  

PubMed Central

Despite their popularity, empirical support for health coaches is limited. This study examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of 3 types of coaching models for obesity treatment. Participants (N=44) were randomized to 6 months of reduced intensity group behavioral weight loss (rBWL) plus 1 of 3 types of health coaches: a) Professional (rBWL interventionist); b) Peer (group members randomly paired and coached one another); or c) Mentor (successful weight loser). Groups met weekly for the first 6-weeks, biweekly for the next 6-weeks, and monthly thereafter, for a total of 12 meetings. During weeks that group did not meet, participants emailed their weight loss information to their coach and received feedback. Coaches were trained on appropriate coaching strategies and feedback delivery. Retention was 95%. Participants emailed their progress to their coach 10.8±1.9 out of the 12 weeks that there were no group meetings. Coaches responded with feedback 94% of the time. Percent weight losses at 6-months were 9.6±8.1, 9.1±5.0, and 5.7±5.6 for the Professional, Peer, and Mentor conditions, respectively. More participants in the Professional and Peer conditions lost 10% of their initial body weight (Professional: 56%; Peer: 50%; Mentor: 17%), with a statistically significant difference between the Professional and Mentor conditions (p=0.03). These preliminary data suggest that combining a reduced intensity BWL program with health coaching may hold significant promise as a cost-effective obesity treatment paradigm. Larger trials are needed to conclusively determine whether adding coaches improves weight loss outcomes in reduced intensity treatments and to examine which type of coach is most effective. PMID:23784896

Leahey, Tricia M.; Wing, Rena R.

2012-01-01

44

Teaching Home Environmental Health to Resident Physicians  

PubMed Central

Healthy Homes programs seek to integrate the evaluation and management of a multitude of health and safety risks in households. The education of physicians in the identification, evaluation, and management of these home health and safety issues continues to be deficient. Healthy Homes programs represent a unique opportunity to educate physicians in the home environment and stimulate ongoing, specific patient-physician discussions and more general learning about home environmental health. The Case Healthy Homes and Patients Program addresses these deficiencies in physician training while providing direct services to high-risk households. Pediatric and family practice resident physicians participate in healthy home inspections and interventions for their primary care patients and follow up on identified risks during health maintenance and acute illness visits. PMID:21563707

Zickafoose, Joseph S.; Greenberg, Stuart; Dearborn, Dorr G.

2011-01-01

45

Improving Health Care with a Virtual Human Sleep Coach Technical Report CS-2011-10  

E-print Network

effective way of motivating a college or university student to have healthier sleep habits, such as sleepingImproving Health Care with a Virtual Human Sleep Coach Technical Report CS-2011-10 Cristina Ribeiro, Gaurav Mehrotra, Gregory Vey, Areej Alhothali, Chrysanne DiMarco Computer Science, University of Waterloo

Waterloo, University of

46

Teacher Consultation and Coaching within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method: Thirty-six classrooms within 5 urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to…

Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

2012-01-01

47

A Systematic Review of the Literature on Health and Wellness Coaching: Defining a Key Behavioral intervention in Healthcare  

PubMed Central

Primary Objective: Review the operational definitions of health and wellness coaching as published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. Background: As global rates of preventable chronic diseases have reached epidemic proportions, there has been an increased focus on strategies to improve health behaviors and associated outcomes. One such strategy, health and wellness coaching, has been inconsistently defined and shown mixed results. Methods: A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)—guided systematic review of the medical literature on health and wellness coaching allowed for compilation of data on specific features of the coaching interventions and background and training of coaches. Results: Eight hundred abstracts were initially identified through PubMed, with 284 full-text articles ultimately included. The majority (76%) were empirical articles. The literature operationalized health and wellness coaching as a process that is fully or partially patient-centered (86% of articles), included patient-determined goals (71%), incorporated self-discovery and active learning processes (63%) (vs more passive receipt of advice), encouraged accountability for behaviors (86%), and provided some type of education to patients along with using coaching processes (91%). Additionally, 78% of articles indicated that the coaching occurs in the context of a consistent, ongoing relationship with a human coach who is trained in specific behavior change, communication, and motivational skills. Conclusions: Despite disparities in how health and wellness coaching have been operationalized previously, this systematic review observes an emerging consensus in what is referred to as health and wellness coaching; namely, a patient-centered process that is based upon behavior change theory and is delivered by health professionals with diverse backgrounds. The actual coaching process entails goal-setting determined by the patient, encourages self-discovery in addition to content education, and incorporates mechanisms for developing accountability in health behaviors. With a clear definition for health and wellness coaching, robust research can more accurately assess the effectiveness of the approach in bringing about changes in health behaviors, health outcomes and associated costs that are targeted to reduce the global burden of chronic disease. PMID:24416684

Simmons, Leigh Ann; Sforzo, Gary A.; Dill, Diana; Kaye, Miranda; Bechard, Elizabeth M.; Southard, Mary Elaine; Kennedy, Mary; Vosloo, Justine; Yang, Nancy

2013-01-01

48

Personalized Health Planning With Integrative Health Coaching to Reduce Obesity Risk Among Women Gaining Excess Weight During Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women. PMID:24278848

Yang, Nancy Y.; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva

2013-01-01

49

Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations  

PubMed Central

Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

2014-01-01

50

Health Insurance & Patient-Centered Medical Homes  

E-print Network

is health care directed by primary care providers offering family centered, culturally effective careHealth Insurance & Patient- Centered Medical Homes Office of Rural Health Area Health Education Center Advisory Board Meeting June 8, 2012 #12;2 Montana Commissioner of Securities and Insurance

Maxwell, Bruce D.

51

Coping Skills Training in a Telephone Health Coaching Program for Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Introduction The purpose of this paper is to describe components of a health coaching intervention based on coping skills training delivered via telephone. This intervention was provided to urban adolescents at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reinforcing a school-based curriculum designed to promote a healthy lifestyle and prevent T2DM. Method Health coaching via telephone was provided to at-risk, urban youth enrolled in a study of an intervention to reduce risk for T2DM. Vignettes are used to describe the use of several coping skills in this high risk youth population. Results A variety of vignettes illustrate how telephone health coaching reinforced lifestyle changes in students by incorporating coping skills training. Discussion Given the benefits and the challenges of the telephone health coaching intervention, several suggestions for others who plan to use a similar method are described. PMID:21514490

Jefferson, Vanessa; Jaser, Sarah S.; Lindemann, Evie; Galasso, Pamela; Beale, Alison; Holl, Marita G.; Grey, Margaret

2010-01-01

52

The Happy Life Club™ study protocol: A cluster randomised controlled trial of a type 2 diabetes health coach intervention  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Happy Life Club™ is an intervention that utilises health coaches trained in behavioural change and motivational interviewing techniques to assist with the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care settings in China. Health coaches will support participants to improve modifiable risk factors and adhere to effective self-management treatments associated with T2DM. METHODS\\/DESIGN: A cluster randomised

Colette Browning; Anna Chapman; Sean Cowlishaw; Zhixin Li; Shane A Thomas; Hui Yang; Tuohong Zhang

2011-01-01

53

Environmental Health Formaldehyde Exposure in Homes  

E-print Network

with phenol-formaldehyde products (commonly known as exterior grade products). Phenol-formaldehyde productsEnvironmental Health Formaldehyde Exposure in Homes: A Reference for State Officials to Use in Decision-making Background The issue of formaldehyde exposure in homes is long-standing and has been

54

Home Health and Informal Care Utilization  

E-print Network

and Sano also are supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Address correspondence to: Carolyn W. Zhu, PhD, Health Economist, GeriatricHome Health and Informal Care Utilization and Costs Over Time in Alzheimer's Disease Carolyn W. Zhu

55

Job satisfaction of home health nurses.  

PubMed

Job satisfaction is a key to the retention of quality nurses. To promote staff retention and reduce costs, nursing administrators need current research on job satisfaction of home health nurses. In a study of job satisfaction of 66 home health nurses, research indicates that the most satisfying aspects of home care nursing include autonomy and independence, close nurse-client relationships, work hours, flexibility in scheduling hours, and satisfaction with peers and supervisors. When nursing administrators capitalize on these job satisfiers, staff turnover is reduced and costs are contained. PMID:7960880

Lynch, S A

1994-01-01

56

Collaboration and Synergy in the Field of Health and Wellness Coaching: Na?ve or Necessary?  

PubMed Central

The rise of health and wellness coaching holds significant promise for facilitating sustainable behavior change to help legions of individuals prevent and manage chronic disease. We all know the threats associated with the staggering epidemic of chronic disease and associated unhealthy lifestyles. But did we get here through a failure of personal responsibility? A failure of family units to support appropriate health behaviors? A failure of educational systems to teach healthy behaviors? A failure of medicine to cultivate health behaviors in patients? A failure of municipalities from an urban planning perspective? A failure of the social sciences to apply the latest in adult learning theory, psychology, and behavioral economics to health behaviors? A failure of government to incentivize or reinforce health behaviors? A failure of industry to prioritize health over capital? A failure of society to integrate all of the above? Or is this just the perfect time to synergize all that we know from numerous disciplines to conquer the challenge of unhealthy behavior that creates chronic disease? From my perspective as a health psychologist, understanding the origins of the problems will help us draft the solution. But from my perspective as a coach, how we got here is much less important than how we get out of here. PMID:24416680

2013-01-01

57

Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect  

MedlinePLUS

... You are here: Plan of care Share Home health care: what it is and what to expect What is home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... agency listed. What should you expect from home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

58

The Four Pillars of Health Coaching: Preserving the Heart of a Movement  

PubMed Central

In this special themed issue of Global Advances in Health and Medicine and in articles published on the journal's website (www.gahmj.com), you will read all about this new and maturing approach to health behavior change and the social and cultural conditions in modern medicine that have called this practice into being. You will learn about its inception and history,1 the philosophic constructs of its application,2,3 and its proposed mechanism of action.4 There are multiple case reports5–7 and clinical studies8–10 expanding our scientific understanding of coaching in health and wellness and descriptions about how to educate professionals to provide this new service.11,12 A review of existing literature in the field demonstrates the rapidly growing reported demonstration of its impact.13 I believe coaching is poised to have a major transformative impact on health and healthcare internationally; it also is at risk of being usurped and thereby deformed by the power of the existing paradigm of Western disease care and reductionistic scientific thought. That is the issue I wish to raise: How do we ensure the integrity of this new approach so that it can serve as a bridge from a broken system to a new horizon of holistic health and well-being? PMID:24416668

2013-01-01

59

Health promotion profile of youth sports clubs in Finland: club officials' and coaches' perceptions  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The purpose of this article is to examine the current health promotion orientation of youth sports clubs in Finland in view of the standards created previously for the health promoting sports club (HPSC). Ninety-seven youth sports clubs participated, and 273 sports club officials and 240 coaches answered the questionnaires. To describe clubs health promotion orientations, an HPSC index was created. The HPSC index was formulated on sub-indices by factor analysis. The sub-indices were: policy, ideology, practice and environment indexes. The results indicate that youth sports clubs are fairly health promoting in general. On average, the clubs fulfilled 12 standards for HPSC out of 22. Every fourth club was categorized as higher health promoting (? 15 fulfilled standards), and every third as lower health promoting (<11 fulfilled standards). The variation between clubs was wide. The clubs that had been recognized as exemplary and hence certified by the Young Finland Association were more likely to recognize health promotion than non-certified clubs (OR = 2.36, p = 0.016). The sports club officials were twice as likely to evaluate their clubs as higher health promoting than the coaches (OR = 2.04, p = 0.041). Under the sub-indices, ideologies were recognized best, others less. These findings indicate that minority of the youth sports clubs have realized health promotion comprehensively as a part of their activities. There is a lot of need for development, especially in the area of health promotion policies and practices. The instruments used proved valid and reliable and can therefore be recommended for international use. PMID:19136676

Kokko, Sami; Kannas, Lasse; Villberg, Jari

2009-01-01

60

[Coaching and diabetes].  

PubMed

Coaching is a process of change to achieve goals. The patient coaching focuses on the health goals: to implement preventive or chronic treatment [1]. It is with the patient to create a space that facilitates the exchange of thoughts, attitudes, behavior... In short, achieve improvements in a more rapid and efficient if not practiced. Further explanation can be found in the author's book entitled "Coaching and health". PMID:21776937

Roca, Jaci Molins

2011-05-01

61

Effect of telephone health coaching (Birmingham OwnHealth) on hospital use and associated costs: cohort study with matched controls  

PubMed Central

Objectives To test the effect of a telephone health coaching service (Birmingham OwnHealth) on hospital use and associated costs. Design Analysis of person level administrative data. Difference-in-difference analysis was done relative to matched controls. Setting Community based intervention operating in a large English city with industry. Participants 2698 patients recruited from local general practices before 2009 with heart failure, coronary heart disease, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and a history of inpatient or outpatient hospital use. These individuals were matched on a 1:1 basis to control patients from similar areas of England with respect to demographics, diagnoses of health conditions, previous hospital use, and a predictive risk score. Intervention Telephone health coaching involved a personalised care plan and a series of outbound calls usually scheduled monthly. Median length of time enrolled on the service was 25.5 months. Control participants received usual healthcare in their areas, which did not include telephone health coaching. Main outcome measures Number of emergency hospital admissions per head over 12 months after enrolment. Secondary metrics calculated over 12 months were: hospital bed days, elective hospital admissions, outpatient attendances, and secondary care costs. Results In relation to diagnoses of health conditions and other baseline variables, matched controls and intervention patients were similar before the date of enrolment. After this point, emergency admissions increased more quickly among intervention participants than matched controls (difference 0.05 admissions per head, 95% confidence interval 0.00 to 0.09, P=0.046). Outpatient attendances also increased more quickly in the intervention group (difference 0.37 attendances per head, 0.16 to 0.58, P<0.001), as did secondary care costs (difference £175 per head, £22 to £328, P=0.025). Checks showed that we were unlikely to have missed reductions in emergency admissions because of unobserved differences between intervention and matched control groups. Conclusions The Birmingham OwnHealth telephone health coaching intervention did not lead to the expected reductions in hospital admissions or secondary care costs over 12 months, and could have led to increases. PMID:23920348

2013-01-01

62

Home-grown health plan.  

PubMed

Most companies in Sullivan County, N.H., employ fewer than five people, so a decade of economic decline meant many could't afford to offer health benefits. Valley Regional Healthcare saw its chance to help out the community, launching an HMO-style plan that keeps control--and spending--local. PMID:9582903

Huff, C

1998-04-01

63

Mindfulness: An effective coaching tool for improving physical and mental health  

PubMed Central

Purpose: This article provides an overview of the mechanisms of action, evidence base, and practice of mindfulness, with an emphasis on how to easily incorporate this valuable skill into practice. Data sources: PubMed, CINAHL, PsychInfo Databases. Conclusions: Conscious attention to the present moment in a receptive way is known as mindfulness. A growing body of research indicates that mindfulness can be taught and cultivated to improve physical and mental health. Implications for practice: Accordingly, as part of the coaching competency, mindfulness can be practiced and taught by advanced practice nurses to support lifestyle and behavioral changes, decrease perceived stress, enhance quality of life, and, ultimately, improve health and health outcomes. PMID:24259186

Robins, Jo Lynne W.; Kiken, Laura; Holt, Melissa; McCain, Nancy L.

2014-01-01

64

New trends in health smart homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of Health Smart House aims at giving an autonomous life, in their own home, to people who would normally be placed in institutions: patients suffering from a chronic disease, handicapped people, and also fragile elderly. We propose an overview of the researches on the concept. It then presents the main trends in each the technological fields of concern-Information

Norbert Noury; Gilles Virone; Pierre Barralon; Jingchun Ye; Vincent Rialle; Jacques Demongeot

2003-01-01

65

The Rehabilitation Nurse in the Home Health Care Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary goals of home health care nursing and rehabilitation nursing are strikingly similar. Rehabilitation nursing principles should guide home health care nurses as they formulate and deliver quality patient care. Home health care agencies eager to keep up with the emerging trends in health care delivery are encouraged to recruit and hire rehabilitation nurses. This article discusses the principles

Leslie Jean Neal

1996-01-01

66

The "Health Coaching" programme: a new patient-centred and visually supported approach for health behaviour change in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Health related behaviour is an important determinant of chronic disease, with a high impact on public health. Motivating and assisting people to change their unfavourable health behaviour is thus a major challenge for health professionals. The objective of the study was to develop a structured programme of counselling in primary care practice, and to test its feasibility and acceptance among general practitioners (GPs) and their patients. Methods Our new concept integrates change of roles, shared responsibility, patient-centredness, and modern communication techniques—such as motivational interviewing. A new colour-coded visual communication tool is used for the purpose of leading through the 4-step counselling process. As doctors’ communication skills are crucial, communication training is a mandatory part of the programme. We tested the feasibility and acceptance of the “Health Coaching” programme with 20 GPs and 1045 patients, using questionnaires and semistructured interviewing techniques. The main outcomes were participation rates; the duration of counselling; patients’ self-rated behavioural change in their areas of choice; and ratings of motivational, conceptual, acceptance, and feasibility issues. Results In total, 37% (n=350) of the patients enrolled in step 1 completed the entire 4-Step counselling process, with each step taking 8–22 minutes. 50% of ratings (n=303) improved by one or two categories in the three-colour circle, and the proportion of favourable health behaviour ratings increased from 9% to 39%. The ratings for motivation, concept, acceptance, and feasibility of the “Health Coaching” programme were consistently high. Conclusions Our innovative, patient-centred counselling programme for health behaviour change was well accepted and feasible among patients and physicians in a primary care setting. Randomised controlled studies will have to establish cost-effectiveness and promote dissemination. PMID:23865509

2013-01-01

67

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes: different-cameras). · Context ­ pervasive watching systems for Health Smart Homes ­ detection of neuro-degenerative diseases (e ­ model of elderly persons activity in Health Smart Homes ­ evaluation of actimetric perseveration

Fouquet, Yannick

68

Major Depression in Elderly Home Health Care Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Despite the growth of geriat- ric home health services, little is known about the mental health needs of geriat- ric patients seen in their homes. The au- thors report the distribution, correlates, and treatment status of DSM-IV major de- pression in a random sample of elderly patients receiving home health care for medical or surgical problems. Method: Geriatric patients

Martha L. Bruce; M. P. H. Gail; J. McAvay; M. S. Patrick; J. Raue; Ellen L. Brown; Barnett S. Meyers; Denis J. Keohane; M. S. David; R. Jagoda; Carol Weber

2002-01-01

69

42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

2011-10-01

70

42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.  

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

2014-10-01

71

42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.  

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

2014-10-01

72

42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

2013-10-01

73

42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

2012-10-01

74

42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

2010-10-01

75

Patient Satisfaction and Perceived Success with a Telephonic Health Coaching Program: The Natural Experiments for Translation in Diabetes (NEXT-D) Study, Northern California, 2011  

PubMed Central

Introduction Health coaching can improve lifestyle behaviors known to prevent or manage chronic conditions such as diabetes. However, little is known about the patient experience with telephonic coaching programs in real-world care settings. We examined patient satisfaction, patient’s perceived success in achieving program goals, and the patient-level correlates of these outcomes in a voluntary telephonic coaching program at a large integrated health care delivery system in northern California. Methods Kaiser Permanente Northern California patients who participated in a telephonic coaching program in 2011 were sent a cross-sectional survey about their satisfaction with health coaching and perceived success with program goals. We examined associations with patient characteristics. Results The survey response rate was 34%; analyses were based on the 32% who completed the survey. Of those who had completed 2 or more sessions (n = 232 [52%]), most reported being satisfied (70%) or neutral (20%) with the program, and 71% would recommend health coaching. Healthy weight, healthful eating, and physical activity were the most common topics discussed (88%). Adjusting for demographic characteristics, 73% of those who had 2 or more sessions reported that health coaching helped achieve their weight-related goal. Outcomes were positively correlated with patient activation but not consistently correlated with patient demographic characteristics. Conclusion Levels of satisfaction and perceived success with telephonic health coaching provided by a health plan were high and positively correlated with the number of sessions completed and patient activation. Voluntary telephonic health coaching programs should promote retention and assess patients’ activation levels. PMID:24176083

Goler, Nancy C.; Sanna, Rashel S.; Boccio, Mindy; Bellamy, David J.; Brown, Susan D.; Neugebauer, Romain S.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Wiley, Deanne M.; Schmittdiel, Julie A.

2013-01-01

76

How Coaches Manage Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents stress management strategies for coaches, focusing on what stress is, how it affects the body, and what to do to minimize the effects of stress on health. The article explains on- and off-the-job stress factors so coaches can recognize potential stress situations and handle them as they occur. (SM)

Ruder, M. Karen

1991-01-01

77

Mental health consultation in a nursing home.  

PubMed

As the world's population ages, increasing numbers of people can anticipate spending their latter years in long-term care settings. Many of these nursing home residents will also present psychiatric illnesses as primary or secondary diagnoses. The resulting behavioral problems may present challenges to nursing staff that they are ill-prepared to meet. This article illustrates the application of the Blake and Mouton consultation model to a Veterans Administration (VA) nursing home situation by a team of psychiatric mental health nurse specialists. The consultation is described and interpreted in terms of the Blake and Mouton model. The focal conflicts addressed in the consultation included issues of morale/cohesion, power/authority, and norms/standards. Interventions used were acceptant, prescriptive, confrontation, and theories/principles. The model provided a useful structure for conceptualizing and organizing assessment and intervention in the consultation situation. PMID:11855442

Kennedy, B; Covington, K; Evans, T; Williams, C A

2000-11-01

78

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes Yannick Fouquet (arrows) for localizing dependent people in a health smart home (left) & pressure sensors (right: FSA Seat integrated smart home (HsH). In general, the underlying principle of the HsH consists in continuously

Fouquet, Yannick

79

Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): a quality improvement collaborative for weight management programs.  

PubMed

Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians' Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians' Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs. PMID:23727964

Wilkes, Abigail E; John, Priya M; Vable, Anusha M; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L

2013-01-01

80

Behavioral health and health care reform models: patient-centered medical home, health home, and accountable care organization.  

PubMed

Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient-Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools-accountability measures and payment designs-to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P; Pincus, Harold Alan

2013-01-01

81

Health in occupants of energy efficient new homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective telephone-administered questionnaire study in new home occupants compared general and respiratory health at occupancy and 1 year later in two groups. The test group or cases, was 52 R-2000 TM homes (128 occupants) built to preset and certified criteria for energy efficient ventilation and construction practices. The control group were 53 new homes (149 occupants) built in the

J. A. Leech; M. Raizenne; J. Gusdorf

2004-01-01

82

Marketing considerations in home health care.  

PubMed

Methods for conducting a comprehensive analysis of the potential for strategic entry or expansion in the home health-care (HHC) market are discussed. By conducting a comprehensive analysis of the HHC market, hospital pharmacists can evaluate the feasibility of developing and implementing a hospital-based HHC service. A comprehensive market analysis should include an initial assessment of potential product-line offerings, development of strengths-and-weaknesses and opportunities-and-threats profiles, evaluations of competing providers of HHC and regulatory issues, and formulation of a business plan. The potential impact of program structure, operations management, product pricing, advertising and promotion, and marketing controls should also be considered. The hospital pharmacist has a unique opportunity to further the organizational objectives of the hospital by participating in the provision of HHC; a comprehensive market analysis represents a useful method of assessing the benefits and costs associated with providing integrated HHC services. PMID:3909810

Tanner, D J

1985-12-01

83

Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

Davitt, Joan K.

2014-01-01

84

Healing at Home: 100 Years of Public Health Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes "Now More than Ever" (Fahy); "Healing at Home" (photo essay); "Amelia Greenwald: Pioneer in International Public Health Nursing" (Mayer); "Alaska's Watched Pot" (Nord); and "Gertrude Weld Peabody: Unsung Patron of Public Health Nursing Education" (Doona). (JOW)

Fahy, Ellen T.; And Others

1994-01-01

85

Are ADNs Prepared to Be Home Health Nurses?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 132 of 350 home health nurses identified techniques and skills associate degree nurses (ADNs) should acquire to work for home health agencies. Accredited ADN programs reported that only 24 of the techniques are taught in all programs and 55 of the skills are taught in 90% of the programs. (SK)

Neighbors, Marianne; Monahan, Frances D.

1997-01-01

86

77 FR 72904 - In the Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc., House of Taylor Jewelry...and accurate information concerning the securities of Home Theater Products International, Inc. because it has not filed...

2012-12-06

87

Will drivers for home energy efficiency harm occupant health?  

PubMed

The U.K. government has committed to an 80% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, with housing accounting for 27% of total current emissions. There are several drivers both to reduce emissions from homes and to reduce fuel poverty, promoting a range of building and behavioural measures in homes. The health benefits of warmer homes in winter have been described, but there has been less consideration of the potential negative impacts of some of these measures. We examine the changes in U.K. homes, and the possible consequences for health. The main concerns for health surround the potential for poor indoor air quality if ventilation is insufficient and the possible risks of overheating in heatwave conditions. This paper notes a limited evidence base and the need for further research on the health effects of energy-efficient homes, particularly with regard to ventilation. PMID:21086820

Bone, Angie; Murray, Virginia; Myers, Isabella; Dengel, Andy; Crump, Derrick

2010-09-01

88

Pre-exercise screening and health coaching in CHD secondary prevention: a qualitative study of the patient experience.  

PubMed

Secondary prevention programmes can be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD). In particular, UK guidelines, including those from the Department of Health, emphasize physical activity. However, the effects of secondary prevention programmes with an exercise component are moderate and uptake is highly variable. In order to explore patients' experiences of a pre-exercise screening and health coaching programme (involving one-to-one consultations to support exercise behaviour change), semi-structured telephone interviews were undertaken with 84 CHD patients recruited from primary care. The interviews focused on patients' experiences of the intervention including referral and any recommendations for improvement. A thematic analysis of transcribed interviews showed that the majority of patients were positive about referral. However, patients also identified a number of barriers to attending and completing the programme, including a belief they were sufficiently active already, the existence of other health problems, feeling unsupported in community-based exercise classes and competing demands. Our findings highlight important issues around the choice of an appropriate point of intervention for programmes of this kind as well as the importance of appropriate patient selection, suggesting that the effectiveness of health coaching may be under-reported as a result of including patients who are not yet ready to change their behaviours. PMID:22313621

Shaw, R; Gillies, M; Barber, J; MacIntyre, K; Harkins, C; Findlay, I N; McCloy, K; Gillie, A; Scoular, A; MacIntyre, P D

2012-06-01

89

75 FR 76293 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices; Correction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare...Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices'' final rule (75 FR 70372). DATES...Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices'' final rule. Accordingly, the...

2010-12-08

90

75 FR 81138 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices'' final rule (75 FR 70372). DATES...Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices'' final [[Page 81139

2010-12-27

91

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. 415...of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. (a...are furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health agency are...

2012-10-01

92

42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. 415...of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies. (a...are furnished by a skilled nursing facility or home health agency are...

2013-10-01

93

Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

2011-01-01

94

Home Health Care Nurses' Perceptions of Empowerment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study involved the triangulation of qualitative (interview and observation) and quantitative methods (Psychological Empowerment Instrument). This study examined the individual home care nurses' perception of empowerment and how it influences decisions in the home clinical setting. Fifteen nurses were self-selected to participate. All completed an interview, and were observed and given Likert Instrument to complete. A framework analysis

Kathleen M. Williamson

2007-01-01

95

Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

2010-01-01

96

Clinical community health workers: linchpin of the medical home.  

PubMed

The emerging clinical community health worker model integrates community health workers as integral members of primary care teams inside a medical home. This evaluation documents the case management services provided by 2 clinical community health worker programs at La Clínica del Cariño in Hood River, Oregon, and how they affected the care team's ability to deliver efficient, effective primary care. Clinical community health workers have the potential to make a significant impact on clinical efficiency and effectiveness as ambulatory primary care clinics strive to transform into high-quality, patient-centered medical homes and become linchpins in accountable care organizations. PMID:21673521

Volkmann, Kelly; Castañares, Tina

2011-01-01

97

Recovery coaches and substance exposed births: An experiment in child welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesSubstance exposed infants present a major challenge to child welfare and public health systems. Prenatal substance exposure and continued substance abuse in the home are associated with a wide range of adverse social, emotional, and developmental outcomes. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the use of recovery coaches in child welfare.

Joseph P. Ryan; Sam Choi; Jun Sung Hong; Pedro Hernandez; Christopher R. Larrison

2008-01-01

98

Mental Health: Principles and Training Techniques in Nursing Home Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Material developed for a national conference of leaders in the applied and theoretical sectors of gerontology, mental health, and nursing home administration is provided in these proceedings. The purposes of the conference were to: develop priorities for populations for whom training would be offered; identify mental health content that is…

National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

99

Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

2008-01-01

100

Children, Art, and Home Health Care: The Universal Language  

Microsoft Academic Search

Communication with culturally diverse children is challenging for home health care professionals. Art is an integral part of every culture and this article advocates that health care professionals engage children and elicit their perspectives and experiences with art. Specific techniques highlight art interventions that enhance communication and understanding for all children.

Erika E. Leeuwenburgh

2000-01-01

101

Predictors of Home-Based Child Care Providers' Participation in Professional Development Workshops and Coaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Little is known about factors that influence home-based child care providers' participation in professional development. Factors that predict participation in activities that are designed to promote the utilization and maintenance of skills taught are of particular interest. Objective: Our aim was to examine factors in the…

Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura B.; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith; Arthun, Chris

2013-01-01

102

Mental health service use by the elderly in nursing homes.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. Because current Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations influence the disposition of US nursing home residents who have mental illness, National Nursing Home Survey (1985) data are analyzed for predictors of mental health service use. METHODS. Elderly residents' rates of mental health service use are presented. Logistic regression yielded odds ratios for treatment by both mental health specialists and general practitioners for client and service system variables. RESULTS. Among the two thirds of elderly residents with a mental disorder (including dementia), only 4.5% receive any mental health treatment in a 1-month period. The ratio of specialist to general practitioner care is approximately 1:1. Patients seen by a specialist are likely to be younger (aged 65 to 74); live in the Northeast; and have a diagnosis of schizophrenia (13:1), dementia (3:1), or other mental disorders (5:1). Prior residence in a psychiatric hospital predicts care by both health professional types. Rural location, nonproprietary ownership of the nursing home, and aggressive behavior point to general physician care. CONCLUSIONS. Our findings indicate significant neglect of the mental health needs of older nursing home residents and underscore the importance of monitoring the regulations for screening and treatment of mental disorders under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. PMID:8438968

Burns, B J; Wagner, H R; Taube, J E; Magaziner, J; Permutt, T; Landerman, L R

1993-01-01

103

76 FR 9502 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...RIN 0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update...in Certification Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices; Correction...

2011-02-18

104

76 FR 40987 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification...use ICD-9-CM codes. Home Health Agencies report ICD-9-CM...Grouper software to assign a Health Insurance Prospective Payment...receiving Medicare's home health benefit. The HH PPS...

2011-07-12

105

Coping with reduced cost limits for home health agencies.  

PubMed

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, together with cost-limit reductions and wage-index changes published in the Federal Register, have resulted in a substantial reduction in Medicare cost limits, particularly as they apply to hospital-based home health agencies. This article examines specific changes in home health agency cost limits, reviews strategies to identify the bottom-line impact of the Medicare cost-limit reductions, and discusses methods that may be applied to minimize the negative impact of the reduced cost limits. PMID:10146080

Cooper, J R; Fogel, L A

1994-10-01

106

Home-Sweet-Home Health Care [and] Drugs Manufacturing: A Prescription for Jobs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lower costs, new technology, and expanded Medicare benefits are some of the reasons for the rapid increase in employment in home health services. Employment in the drugs manufacturing industry has increased despite recessions and structural changes in the economy. (Author/JOW)

Freeman, Laura; Heffler, Stephen

1995-01-01

107

Supporting Patient Autonomy: Decision Making in Home Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the policies and procedures that home health care agencies have developed to handle incapacitated patients and life-sustaining treatment decisions. Although most directors, staff, and patients agree that patients know their legal rights, only 67% of agencies reported having existing policies on advance directives, and only 41.5% had…

Davitt, Joan K.; Kaye, Lenard W.

1996-01-01

108

Mental Health Problems among Child Welfare Clients Living at Home  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The great majority of children receiving intervention from child welfare and protection services (CWS) in Norway live at home. The purpose of this study was to assess mental health problems among these children. Data stem from a population-based study, the Bergen child study, conducted in 2006. Of a sample consisting of 4,162 children in the fifth…

Iversen, Anette Christine; Jakobsen, Reidar; Havik, Toril; Hysing, Mari; Stormark, Kjell Morten

2007-01-01

109

Youth Sport Coaches' Qualities for Successful Coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to identify the most important qualities that youth sport coaches need for successful coaching. It used the Delphi Technique among 67 of the 93 youth sport coaches from Daejon Sport Council in South Korea. In the first Delphi round, 52 items suggested by the coaches were divided into seven categories by a panel of professors: (a)

Dae-Woo Choi; Min-Haeng Cho; Young-Kum Kim

2005-01-01

110

Curbstone Coaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bridging the gap between the classroom and on-the-job application has been a growing concern to the sales training profession and of sales managers. "Curbstone Coaching," an on-the-job program in which sales managers train their sales representatives in selling skills is a possible solution. (JOW)

Cover, William H.

1980-01-01

111

Harvard@Home: Reproductive Health in the 21st Century  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From Harvard@Home, this website presents more than seven hours of video clips from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study's third-annual conference on women, gender, and society held in October of 2004. Titled _Reproductive Health in the 21st Century_, the "conference examines a broad array of issues surrounding reproductive health and features panels of distinguished physicians, scholars, and health policy advocates discussing the scientific, ethical, and social dimensions of medical and technological advances in the field and their global implications." Conference topics include The Politics and Ethics of Bodily Integrity; In Vitro Fertilization in the Muslim Middle East; Women Workers as Reproducers; and The Moral Issue of Sex Selection, to name a few. In addition to the video clips, the website contains topic summaries, short biographies of the numerous panelists, a feedback survey form, and links to related Harvard@Home programs. This site is also reviewed in the February 4, 2005_NSDL Life Sciences Report_.

112

Nurses, community health workers, and home carers: gendered human resources compensating for skewed health systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review examines the experiences of nurses, community health workers, and home carers in health systems from a gender analysis. With respect to nursing, current discussions around delegation take place over layers of historical struggle that mark the evolution of nursing as a profession. Female community health workers also struggle to be recognized as skilled workers, in addition to defending

A. George

2008-01-01

113

What Good Coaches Do  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Instructional coaching guru Jim Knight suggests that how we think about coaching can enhance or interfere with our success as a coach. He suggests that coaches take a partnership approach to collaboration and adopt seven principles that define how coaches interact with collaborating teachers: equality, choice, voice, reflection, dialogue, praxis,…

Knight, Jim

2011-01-01

114

Does "Word Coach" Coach Words?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports on the design and testing of an integrated suite of vocabulary training games for Nintendo[TM] collectively designated "My Word Coach" (Ubisoft, 2008). The games' design is based on a wide range of learning research, from classic studies on recycling patterns to frequency studies of modern corpora. Its general usage and learning…

Cobb, Tom; Horst, Marlise

2011-01-01

115

Can Low-Cost Support Programmes with Coaching Accelerate Doctoral Completion in Health Science Faculty Academics?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Career development for full-time Health Sciences academics through to doctoral studies is a monumental task. Many academics have difficulty completing their studies in the minimum time as well as publishing after obtaining their degree. As this problem is particularly acute in the Health Sciences, the PhD Acceleration Programme in Health Sciences…

Geber, Hilary; Bentley, Alison

2012-01-01

116

Preventive home visits and health - experiences among very old people  

PubMed Central

Background As more people reach older age, there is a growing interest in improving old person’s health, activity, independence and social participation, thereby adding quality to the extended years. Preventive home visits (PHV) programs for old people have received much attention in recent decades. A large body of research shows mixed effects, and argues that a home visit is a complex social process influenced by numerous factors. To evaluate the impact of PHV, as well as making decisions on whether, how, and to whom the service should be provided, requires a deeper understanding of PHV than we have now. Consequently, the aim of the study was to describe the variations in older people’s (80+) experiences of a single preventive home visit and its consequences for health. Methods Seventeen participants between 80 and 92 years of age who had all received a structured PHV were interviewed in their own homes. The interviews were analyzed using the phenomenographic method, looking at the variations in the participants’ experiences. Results The interviews revealed four categories: “The PHV made me visible and proved my human value”; “The PHV brought a feeling of security”; “The PHV gave an incentive to action”; and “The PHV was not for me”. Conclusions The experiences of a PHV were twofold. On one hand, the positive experiences indicate that one structured PHV was able to empower the participants and strengthen their self-esteem, making them feel in control over their situation and more aware of the importance of keeping several steps ahead. Together this could motivate them to take measures and engage in health-promoting activities. On the other hand, the PHV was experienced as being of no value by a few. These findings may partly explain the positive results from PHV interventions and emphasize that one challenge for health care professionals is to motivate older people who are healthy and independent to engage in health-promoting and disease-preventive activities. PMID:23617420

2013-01-01

117

Early home oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in primary health care.  

PubMed

This is a detailed account and comparison of use of 3 types of home-prepared oral rehydration solution versus no early treatment in 4 Thai villages from March 1983 to February 1984. The solutions, prepared with boiling water in a standard 750 ml fish sauce bottle contained: 2 spoons sugar and 2 spoon handle tips salt; 2 spoons sugar and 2 spoon tips tea; or 2 spoon tips salt in rice water as opposed to boiling water. Amounts dispensed were specified by number of watery stools and age of sufferer. All treatment was followed by breast feeding or soft diet within 2-4 hours. There were 0.05 episodes of diarrhea per person yearly, 0.10 per child, 9.5% in infants under 1 year, and 20.1% per child aged 1-4. Recovery rates ranged from 91-99% with home treatment, the highest with the tea mixture. Acceptability was good except for the rice water mixture: rice water is used for pig and dog food in this culture. In the test villages, 6.6% of diarrhea episodes required rehydration at the health center, while the control village needed treatment for 25.9% of episodes at the local health center, provincial hospital or private clinics. The estimated cost of therapy for each diarrheal episode was over $2.00 US for purchased medication, or 30 times the expense of home mixed solution. Medicines used were oral rehydration solutions, sulfa, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, kaolin, loperamide, or herbs. Analysis of some home mixed solutions is reported. The tea mixture contained virtually no electrolytes, but was effective because it was used earlier than solution requiring mealtime rice water, for example. In this trial, where treatment was under control of villagers and fully integrated into the primary health care system, early home treatment was more effective than later care in the center. PMID:3805938

Varavithya, W; Pichaipat, V; Mangklasiri, R; Thanomsingh, P; Pavabutara, P

1986-10-01

118

Supporting frail seniors through a family physician and Home Health integrated care model in Fraser Health  

PubMed Central

Background A major effort is underway to integrate primary and community care in Canada's western province of British Columbia and in Fraser Health, its largest health authority. Integrated care is a critical component of Fraser Health's planning, to meet the challenges of caring for a growing, elderly population that is presenting more complex and chronic medical conditions. Description of integrated practice An integrated care model partners family physicians with community-based home health case managers to support frail elderly patients who live at home. It is resulting in faster response times to patient needs, more informed assessments of a patient's state of health and pro-active identification of emerging patient issues. Early results The model is intended to improve the quality of patient care and maintain the patients’ health status, to help them live at home confidently and safely, as long as possible. Preliminary pilot data measuring changes in home care services is showing positive trends when it comes to extending the length of a person's survival/tenure in the community (living in their home vs. admitted to residential care or deceased). Conclusion Fraser Health's case manager–general practitioner partnership model is showing promising results including higher quality, appropriate, coordinated and efficient care; improved patient, caregiver and physician interactions with the system; improved health and prevention of acute care visits by senior adult patients. PMID:24648834

Park, Grace; Miller, Diane; Tien, George; Sheppard, Irene; Bernard, Michael

2014-01-01

119

Correlates of Suicide among Home Health Care Utilizers Who Died by Suicide and Community Controls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Home health care patients often have several late-life risk factors for suicide and constitute a high risk group for suicidal behaviors. In this study, we examined the characteristics of 14 older adult home health care utilizers who died by suicide and four community controls who used similar services. Both groups of home health care utilizers had…

Rowe, Jennifer L.; Bruce, Martha L.; Conwell, Yeates

2006-01-01

120

Patient Expectations and Satisfaction With Home Health Nutritional Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the nutritional care provided by home health nurses using patient satisfaction as an outcome measure of quality of care. Instrumentation for the study included a self-reported patient satisfaction survey and a medical record audit. The mean age of the sample (n=153) was 74.5. The mean number of diagnoses was 2.77, and the mean number of prescribed dietary

Marcia Cauley Costello

1995-01-01

121

Home monitoring and personal health management services in a regional health telematics network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes the architectural considerations of HYGEIAnet (the Regional Health Telematics Network of Crete), the R&D issues involved in the design, development and implementation of a modular and configurable Home Care Platform that supports different health and social care domains, and the results of the clinical pilots to evaluate the platform and the service. In addition, the R&D issues that must

A. Traganitis; D. Trypakis; M. Spanakis; S. Condos; T. Stamkopoulos; M. Tsiknakis; S. C. Orphanoudakis

2001-01-01

122

Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

123

Wireless Health Data Exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems  

PubMed Central

Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema. PMID:22319296

Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.

2010-01-01

124

Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

2012-01-01

125

Leadership Coaching: Coaching Competencies and Best Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Leadership coaching is now seen as a valuable tool to assist school leaders. Through a survey of school principals, this study identified specific coaching competencies used by leadership coaches that were perceived by principals to influence key best practices for schools. These best practices have in turn been correlated to increased student…

Wise, Donald; Hammack, Marc

2011-01-01

126

Coaching Behavior of Girls Youth Softball Coaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined coaches' behavior and classified the types and rates of coaches' behavior by time of athletic season (early or late), win/loss record, and throughout the time frame within a single contest. Subjects included all the volunteer coaches in a 13 team, softball program for 10-12 year old girls. The season consisted of a double…

Rupnow, Allan; Stotlar, David

127

Supervised Classification of Activities of Daily Living in Health Smart Homes using SVM  

E-print Network

Supervised Classification of Activities of Daily Living in Health Smart Homes using SVM Anthony) on real data. Index Terms--Support vector machines, Activities of Daily Living, Health Smart Homes, Sensor smart homes to achieve this goal [1]. Several solutions are stud- ied by laboratories and companies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

128

Home Health Care Utilization: A Review of the Research for Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author reviewed the literature to identify the variables associated with home health care utilization using the Andersen-Newman model as a framework for analysis. Sixty-four studies published between 1985 and 2000 were identified through PUBMED, Sociofile, and PsycINFO databases. Home health care was defined as in-home skilled nursing,…

Kadushin, Goldie

2004-01-01

129

Early intervention in elderly clients' health problems identified by home helps  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To study the effect of early intervention in health problems identified by home helps. Design: Open study with quasi-experimental design. Randomization took place at the level of the organizational units of home helps. Setting: Community health services and a hospital-based general practice. Subjects: Home help clients, 75 years or older, 113 in the intervention group and 161 in the

Anette Hylen Ranhoff

1998-01-01

130

Smartphone-Enabled Health Coach Intervention for People With Diabetes From a Modest Socioeconomic Strata Community: Single-Arm Longitudinal Feasibility Study  

PubMed Central

Background Lower socioeconomic strata (SES) populations have higher chronic disease risks. Smartphone-based interventions can support adoption of health behaviors that may, in turn, reduce the risks of type 2 diabetes-related complications, overcoming the obstacles that some patients may have with regular clinical contact (eg, shiftwork, travel difficulties, miscommunication). Objective The intent of the study was to develop and test a smartphone-assisted intervention that improves behavioral management of type 2 diabetes in an ethnically diverse, lower SES population within an urban community health setting. Methods This single-arm pilot study assessed a smartphone application developed with investigator assistance and delivered by health coaches. Participants were recruited from the Black Creek Community Health Centre in Toronto and had minimal prior experience with smartphones. Results A total of 21 subjects consented and 19 participants completed the 6-month trial; 12 had baseline glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels >7.0% and these subjects demonstrated a mean reduction of 0.43% (SD 0.63) (P<.05) with minimal changes in medication. Conclusions This project supported the feasibility of smartphone-based health coaching for individuals from lower SES with minimal prior smartphone experience. PMID:24907918

2014-01-01

131

A Case–Control Study of Home Foreclosure, Health Conditions, and Health Care Utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Though rates of foreclosure are at a historic high, relatively little is known about the link between foreclosure and health.\\u000a We performed a case–control study to examine health conditions and health care utilization in the time period prior to foreclosure.\\u000a Homeowners who received a home foreclosure notice from 2005 to 2008 were matched (by name and address) to a university

Craig Evan Pollack; Shanu K. Kurd; Alice Livshits; Mark Weiner; Julia Lynch

132

Coaching for ADHD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite limited scientific study on ADHD coaching as an intervention for adults with ADHD, the field of ADHD coaching has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years. ADHD coaching is becoming a bona fide profession where one must advance through a rigorous training process, in order to be certified as a professional ADHD coach.…

Murphy, Kevin; Ratey, Nancy; Maynard, Sandy; Sussman, Susan; Wright, Sarah D.

2010-01-01

133

Sales Management Coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of all the things sales managers do to develop salespeople, many people believe the most important one is coaching. Coaching is defined as using skills, experience, and direction to help someone improve their performance. Coaching consists primarily of giving people feedback to reinforce what they do well while suggesting ways and means to improve. Coaching implies that everybody can improve

Tony Carter

2006-01-01

134

Considering Student Coaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What does student coaching involve and what considerations make sense in deciding to engage an outside contractor to provide personal coaching? The author explores coaching in light of his own professional experience and uses this reflection as a platform from which to consider the pros and cons of student coaching when deciding whether to choose…

Keen, James P.

2014-01-01

135

76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable...methodology for in- and outpatient health care professional services provided...FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care [T]he...

2011-11-21

136

Racial\\/Ethnic Disparities in Home Health Care: Charting a Course for Future Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Racial\\/ethnic disparities in health have been well-documented. However, we know little about the existence of or mechanisms that contribute to disparities in home health care. This article proposes a conceptual framework, based on a comprehensive review of the literature, to guide research to understand whether and how disparities emerge in home health care. The framework outlines the patient, agency, practice,

Joan K. Davitt

2012-01-01

137

A Privacy Framework for Mobile Health and Home-Care Systems  

E-print Network

A Privacy Framework for Mobile Health and Home-Care Systems David Kotz Computer Science; ISTS Keywords privacy framework, medicine, electronic health record, home healthcare, mobile healthcare, mhealth specifically examine the role of mobile computing and communications technologies. Such mHealth technology [25

Kotz, David

138

78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...governing payments for certain non-VA health care, 38 CFR 17.56, applicable to...rule, we estimate that each home health care and hospice provider that does...negotiated contracts offer home health care or hospice care to veterans...

2013-05-06

139

75 FR 43235 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...procedures in accordance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability...conduct on-site visits and/or conference calls. The HHCAHPS Survey...October 21, 2011 to the Home Health CAHPS Data Center. We also...January 21, 2012 to the Home Health CAHPS Data Center. We...

2010-07-23

140

75 FR 70371 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...accordance with the Health Insurance Portability...on-site visits and/or conference calls. The HHCAHPS...include the CAHPS Home Health Care (HHCAHPS) Survey...discussed on the CMS Home Health and Hospice Open Door...requirements for CY 2012 at conferences with the National...

2010-11-17

141

Effectiveness of public health nurse home visits to primarous mothers and their infants.  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of public health nurse postpartum home visits by comparing the health outcomes of 67 randomly selected mother-infant pairs who had received such services with 43 randomly selected mother-infant pairs who had not received them. Health outcome variables were mother's health and health services utilization, infant's health and health services utilization, and mother's parenting practices. Data were collected from birth certificates, health service records, and by home interviews and observations at six months postpartum. No significant differences were noted between home-visited and not-home-visited mother-infant pairs for the majority of health outcome variables. Major, differential health assets and liabilities between groups of Black and White mother-infant pairs were observed. PMID:6837823

Barkauskas, V H

1983-01-01

142

ASSESSMENT: Coaching Efficacy As Indicators Of Coach Education Program Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to identify the level of coaching efficacy among a group of high school coaches so as to gain an insight for planning future coach preparation programs. In this study, the Coaching Efficacy Scale was used to assess the efficacy of high school coaches in four dimensions: Motivating Athletes, Strategy Use, Coaching Techniques, and Character

Lena Fung

2003-01-01

143

Framing the evidence for health smart homes and home-based consumer health technologies as a public health intervention for independent aging: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Introduction There is a critical need for public health interventions to support the independence of older adults as the world’s population ages. Health smart homes (HSH) and home-based consumer health (HCH) technologies may play a role in these interventions. Methods We conducted a systematic review of HSH and HCH literature from indexed repositories for health care and technology disciplines (e.g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore) and classified included studies according to an evidence-based public health (EBPH) typology. Results One thousand, six hundred and thirty nine candidate articles were identified. Thirty-one studies from the years 1998–2011 were included. Twenty-one included studies were classified as emerging, 10 as promising and 3 as effective (first tier). Conclusion The majority of included studies were published in the period beginning in the year 2005. All 3 effective (first tier) studies and 9 of 10 of promising studies were published during this period. Almost all studies included an activity sensing component and most of these used passive infrared motion sensors. The three effective (first tier) studies all used a multicomponent technology approach that included activity sensing, reminders and other technologies tailored to individual preferences. Future research should explore the use of technology for self-management of health by older adults, social support and self-reported health measures incorporated into personal health records, electronic medical records, and community health registries. PMID:23639263

Reeder, Blaine; Meyer, Ellen; Lazar, Amanda; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

2013-01-01

144

76 FR 41032 - Medicaid Program; Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare...Face-to-Face Requirements for Home Health Services; Policy Changes and Clarifications Related to Home Health AGENCY: Centers for Medicare &...

2011-07-12

145

Health Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home by Activity Prediction  

E-print Network

Health Monitoring in an Agent-Based Smart Home by Activity Prediction Sajal K. Das and Diane J objective of this paper is to investigate techniques for using agent-based smart home technologies-based smart home project funded by NSF. 1 Introduction and Motivation We live in an increasingly connected

Cook, Diane J.

146

Providing Coaching and Cotinine Results to Preteens to Reduce Their Secondhand Smoke Exposure  

PubMed Central

Background: Secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) poses health risks to children living with smokers. Most interventions to protect children from SHSe have coached adult smokers. This trial determined whether coaching and cotinine feedback provided to preteens can reduce their SHSe. Methods: Two hundred one predominantly low-income families with a resident smoker and a child aged 8 to 13 years who was exposed to two or more cigarettes per day or had a urine cotinine concentration ? 2.0 ng/mL were randomized to control or SHSe reduction coaching groups. During eight in-home sessions over 5 months, coaches presented to the child graphic charts of cotinine assay results as performance feedback and provided differential praise and incentives for cotinine reductions. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the differential change in SHSe over time by group. Results: For the baseline to posttest period, the coaching group had a greater decrease in both urine cotinine concentration (P = .039) and reported child SHSe in the number of cigarettes exposed per day (child report, P = .003; parent report, P = .078). For posttest to month 12 follow-up, no group or group by time differences were obtained, and both groups returned toward baseline. Conclusions: Coaching preteens can reduce their SHSe, although reductions may not be sustained without ongoing counseling, feedback, and incentives. Unlike interventions that coach adults to reduce child SHSe, programs that increase child avoidance of SHSe have the potential to reduce SHSe in all settings in which the child is exposed, without requiring a change in adult smoking behavior. PMID:21474574

Wahlgren, Dennis R.; Liles, Sandy; Jones, Jennifer A.; Hughes, Suzanne C.; Matt, Georg E.; Ji, Ming; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Swan, Gary E.; Chatfield, Dale; Ding, Ding

2011-01-01

147

CHARTER COMPANIES FOR MOTOR COACHES, SCHOOL BUSES AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION  

E-print Network

CHARTER COMPANIES FOR MOTOR COACHES, SCHOOL BUSES AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION Contract Pricing Beginning.00/mile #12;CHARTER COMPANIES FOR MOTOR COACHES, SCHOOL BUSES AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION Contract Pricing if vehicle is one that parks on campus vs. travels from NEC's home garage. CHARTER BUS SERVICES FOR UNH

New Hampshire, University of

148

Of Coaches and Researchers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research information in sports physiology must be compiled in usable form, and coaches must incorporate the results into their coaching tactics and methods if American athletes are to be able to compete on equal terms in foreign competition. (MB)

Groves, Richard

1977-01-01

149

Anthroposophic health care--different and home-like.  

PubMed

Anthroposophic health care is rooted in the work of Steiner and Wegman in Switzerland during the 1920s. The Swedish hospital in this study offers integrated conventional and anthroposophic health care therapies which are conceptualized as an extended and integrative variant of health care and not as CAM. In anthroposophic care, health is viewed as a matter of body, soul and spirit in balance. Therapeutic resources include nursing care, therapeutic conduct (art and body therapies) and medicines based on natural remedies. This study aims to deepen the understanding of what constitutes good care from a patient's perspective to alleviate patients' suffering and to identify clinical markers for good care. As anthroposophic care is associated with theory and holistic ideas, this study aims at exploring whether or not anthroposophic care has a beneficial effect. A qualitative method was used, and the analysis was conducted with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Sixteen former patients, of whom nine were diagnosed with various kinds of cancer and seven with burnout syndrome, were interviewed regarding their experience of anthroposophic care. Patients especially noted the benefits of the holistic caring environment; the empathetic approach and true caring offered, as well as the peaceful atmosphere and rest. A turning point or shift in perspectives, implying a home coming in relation to inner aspects was discussed as an outcome. Although patients in general were overwhelmingly impressed and positive they were also ambivalent. One interpretation is that there is a gap between the anthroposophic and conventional paradigm that affects patients negatively. As mutual scepticism still prevents any real integration between integrative and conventional care, the onus appears to be on the patient to take the risk and act as bridge-builder. From a caring science perspective, the study shows that appropriation of specific values and theory makes it possible to create a true caring culture. PMID:18840219

Arman, Maria; Ranheim, Albertine; Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Wode, Kathrin

2008-09-01

150

Architecture of an automated coaching system for elderly population.  

PubMed

We present an automated coaching system for elderly population living in assisted homes. The system guides its users through a sequence of exercises and tests. Each exercise is demonstrated by a pre-recorded video of a coach, checked for correct execution and qualitatively evaluated. Automatic coaching advices are generated in order to improve the execution. Performance measurements are shown as an immediate feedback to the user, and stored and evaluated over time. The system is designed to allow for a remote interaction with a coach, and, to bolster social aspect of the exercise, for concurrent exercise of two (or eventually multiple) remote users. PMID:23400176

Obdržálek, St?pán; Kurillo, Gregorij; Seto, Edmund; Bajcsy, R?žena

2013-01-01

151

Exploring workplace violence among home care workers in a consumer-driven home health care program.  

PubMed

Nominal research has examined sexual harassment and workplace violence against home care workers within consumer-driven home care models such as those offered in Oregon. This study examined home care workers' experiences of violence while providing care to consumer employers, the patients who hire and manage home care workers. Focus groups and interviews were conducted in Oregon with 83 home care workers, 99 Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) employees, and 11 consumer employers. Home care workers reported incidents of workplace physical violence (44%), psychological abuse (65%), sexual harassment (41%), and sexual violence (14%). Further, three themes were identified that may increase the risk of workplace violence: (1) real and perceived barriers to reporting violence; (2) tolerance of violence; and (3) limited training to prevent violence. To ensure worker safety while maintaining quality care, safety policies and training for consumer employers, state DHS employees, and home care workers must be developed. PMID:24053217

Nakaishi, Lindsay; Moss, Helen; Weinstein, Marc; Perrin, Nancy; Rose, Linda; Anger, W Kent; Hanson, Ginger C; Christian, Mervyn; Glass, Nancy

2013-10-01

152

Rochester's Healthy Home: A community-based innovation to promote environmental health action  

PubMed Central

Environmental hazards in the home can contribute significantly to disease. These hazards disproportionately affect low income, urban, and minority children. Childhood lead poisoning and asthma are prime examples of health concerns to which poor housing conditions may contribute significantly. A community-academic partnership in Rochester, New York created a model Healthy Home, an interactive museum in a typical city home, to help residents, property owners, contractors, and community groups reduce environmental hazards. The Healthy Home project educates visitors about home environmental health hazards, demonstrates low-cost methods for reducing home hazards, and helps visitors develop individualized strategies for action. In its first year of operation, over 700 people visited the Healthy Home. Evaluation surveys indicate that the Healthy Home experience motivated visitors to take action to reduce environmental hazards in their homes. Follow-up phone interviews indicate that most visitors took some action to reduce home environmental hazards. The Healthy Home has established a diverse Advisory Council to share its messages more broadly, invite input into future directions, and recruit visitors. This paper presents experiences from the Healthy Home’s first year, highlighting the partnership principles that guided its development and lessons learned from the process. PMID:20634943

Kuholski, Kate

2010-01-01

153

Changing communications within hospital and home health care.  

PubMed

Over the last decade, new hospitals are integrating Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in their facilities. Although e-health is a relatively recent term for healthcare practice supported by electronic processes, ubiquitous healthcare monitoring, also known as m-health, is already an emerging research area. Patient monitoring in diverse environments, such as nursing homes or assisted living, are gaining importance. Traditional methods present some problems, as they don't allow enough patient mobility. In this situation, real time transmission of multiple medical data, wearable computing, wireless access in ubiquitous systems and wearable devices for pervasive healthcare can meet the needs of these environments. However, the software and infrastructure deployed in hospitals is not easy to migrate to wireless systems. In some cases, the migration to new technologies can be costly. This paper focuses on the design of a modular, scalable and economical framework to improve the monitoring and checking of patients in different contexts. The challenge is to produce a system to transmit the patient's biomedical data directly to a hospital for monitoring or diagnosis using new communication modules. The modular designed adopted is intended to provide a future-proofed system, whose functionality may be upgraded by modifying the hardware or software. The modules have been validated in different contexts to prove their versatility. PMID:23367314

Torrado-Carvajal, Angel; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Maria Cristina; Rodriguez-Moreno, Alberto; Borromeo, Susana; Garro-Gomez, Cesar; Hernandez-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Luaces, Maria

2012-01-01

154

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes : From Language Model to Location Model  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes : From Language. Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes : From Language Model, this approach seems to be a good way of location modelling. Index Terms--smart flats for elderly people

Fouquet, Yannick

155

The Computer as Coach: An Athletic Paradigm for Intellectual Education  

E-print Network

Over the next five years, computer games will find their way into a vast number of American homes, creating a unique educational opportunity: the development of "computer coaches" for the serious intellectual skills ...

Goldstein, Ira

1976-12-01

156

The impact of home-prepared diets and home oral hygiene on oral health in cats and dogs.  

PubMed

Many factors influence the oral health status of cats and dogs. The present study aimed to elucidate the influence of feeding home-prepared (HP) food v. commercial pet food on oral health parameters in these animals and to investigate the effect of home oral hygiene on oral health. The study surveyed 17,184 dogs and 6371 cats visiting over 700 Polish veterinary surgeries in 2006-7 during a Pet Smile activity organised by the Polish Small Animal Veterinary Association. All animals underwent conscious examinations to assess dental deposits, size of mandibular lymph nodes and gingival health. An oral health index (OHI) ranging from 0 to 8 was calculated for each animal by combining examination scores, where 0 indicates good oral health and 8 indicates poorest oral health. Information was collected on age, diet and home oral hygiene regimens. There was a significant effect of diet on the OHI (P < 0.001) whereby feeding the HP diet increased the probability of an oral health problem in both cats and dogs. There was a significant beneficial effect of feeding only commercial pet food compared with the HP diet when at least part of the diet was composed of dry pet food. Daily tooth brushing or the offering of daily dental treats were both effective in significantly reducing the OHI in both cats and dogs compared with those receiving sporadic or no home oral hygiene. Feeding only a dry diet was beneficial for oral health in cats and dogs. Tooth brushing and the offering of dental treats were very effective in maintaining oral health, provided they were practised daily. PMID:22005407

Buckley, Catherine; Colyer, Alison; Skrzywanek, Michal; Jodkowska, Katarzyna; Kurski, Grzegorz; Gawor, Jerzy; Ceregrzyn, Michal

2011-10-01

157

The past, present, and future of skilled home health agency care.  

PubMed

This article reviews the past history of home health agency care from its beginnings to the present day, evidence regarding the effect of recent changes in financing on these services, the state of skilled home health care in 2008, and a discussion of future directions. Home health care serves several million patients per year, many of whom are recuperating from acute illness episodes. Due to illness burden and Medicare funding, a large proportion of care that home health agencies deliver is geriatric care. However, home health care plays an important role for patients of all ages with significant acute and chronic illnesses. Medicare home health care suffered a significant downturn following the 1997 Balanced Budget Act and is recovering under Prospective Payment. Like most sectors of care, home health care has often operated in a "silo" but there is increasing recognition of the need to bridge care settings and provide care continuity for sick, chronically ill individuals. This is an important challenge for the future. Agencies that have strong information technology infrastructure and chronic care management systems along with a seasoned clinical workforce will be well positioned for key roles in home health care in decades to come. Home health care serves several million patients each year, many of whom are recuperating from acute illness episodes. Due to the burden of illness and Medicare funding, a large proportion of care that home health agencies deliver is geriatric care. However, home health care plays an important role for patients of all ages with significant acute and chronic illnesses. Medicare home health care suffered a significant downturn following the 1997 Balanced Budget Act (BBA) and is recovering under prospective payment. Like most sectors of care, home health care has often operated in a "silo," but there is increasing recognition of the need to bridge care settings and provide care continuity for sick, chronically ill individuals. This is an important challenge for the future. Agencies that have strong information technology infrastructure and chronic care management systems along with a seasoned clinical workforce will be well positioned for key roles in home health care in the decades to come. PMID:19217489

Murkofsky, Rachel L; Alston, Karen

2009-02-01

158

Health consumption as work: the home pregnancy test as a domesticated health tool.  

PubMed

A growing array of biomedical goods and services has become central to the North American experience of navigating illness and pursuing good health. Yet despite the utility of consumption as an analytical framework within the social sciences, the selection, purchase, and use of biomedical goods and services has been understudied. By using the home pregnancy test as a case study, we suggest new approaches to thinking about the consumption of these goods and services. We chose the home pregnancy test because it is the best-known example of a mass-produced diagnostic tool used by consumers. We draw on two sources of data for this qualitative analysis: a set of stories submitted between 2003 and 2005 by women and men to an online exhibit mounted by the National Institutes of Health called "A Thin Blue Line: The History of the Pregnancy Test Kit," which we analysed between 2006 and 2007; and web sampling conducted in 2009 and 2010 of personal web and video logs of women and men who have posted stories and opinions about their experiences with contemporary home pregnancy testing products. We adapt the term "domestication" from Science and Technology Studies scholarship to describe the movement of diagnostic devices into homes for use by consumers. Specifically, we propose that the consumption of domesticated biomedical devices, goods, and services should be theorized as work performed by consumers, in two senses: as a form of tool use that allows non-experts to produce diagnostic knowledge about their own bodies and health; and as the ongoing biopolitical work that is expected of citizens to produce healthy bodies. Our paper draws attention to these understudied phenomena, while suggesting new approaches to theorizing the social and cultural elements of goods and services for health. PMID:23608088

Childerhose, Janet E; Macdonald, Margaret E

2013-06-01

159

Coaching May Help Diabetics Battle Depression, Disease Better  

MedlinePLUS

... please enable JavaScript. Coaching May Help Diabetics Battle Depression, Disease Better Study found mental health sessions allowed ... Preidt Wednesday, August 6, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Depression Diabetes Mental Health WEDNESDAY, Aug. 6, 2014 (HealthDay ...

160

Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

2006-01-01

161

Association of Language Spoken at Home with Health and School Issues among Asian American Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the relationship between language spoken at home and school and health risks and behaviors of Asian American adolescents. Data from the World Health Organization Study of Health Behavior in School Children indicated increased risk for physical, psychosocial, and school health problems among these students. The risks were greater for the…

Yu, Stella M.; Huang, Zhihuan J.; Schwalberg, Renee H.; Overpeck, Mary D.; Kogan, Michael D.

2002-01-01

162

[The role of home palliative care by health insurance pharmacy].  

PubMed

Our Pharmacy has been practicing pharmaceutical management guidance for 69 homecare patients in the last 13 years. After we started a home parenteral nutrition service, an opportunity to work with the end-stage cancer patient was increased. To contribute to the patient and community health team, we have practiced pharmaceutical management guidance for homecare patient based on the medical and pharmacology point of view with other area of occupational people. We distributed a pain diary and medical usage of drug guidance to the end-stage cancer outpatients. We also made a drug instructional manual and provided a proper prescription to the patient. Because of our efforts, we believe that we had good consistent results from the end-stage cancer outpatients. On the other hand, we have a lot of problems that have to be resolved. They are associated with medical treatment fee, drug dispensing fee, pharmacy management pressure felt from a low dispensing fee, poor quality stocked narcotic drugs and a low recognition of the pharmacist from the patients and regional community medical team. We believe that we can contribute more to the patients, if we can overcome these problems. PMID:22189320

Kato, Taneko

2011-12-01

163

Coaches and Coaching in Reading First Schools: A Reality Check  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current article investigates the work of 20 Reading First coaches to determine how coaches distribute their time and the rationale they give for their work. Teachers' responses to coaches and the relationships between what coaches do and student achievement are also analyzed. There was great variability among coaches in how they allocated…

Bean, Rita M.; Draper, Jason A.; Hall, Virginia; Vandermolen, Jill; Zigmond, Naomi

2010-01-01

164

Behavioral Characteristics of "Favorite" Coaches: Implications for Coach Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper was to use athletes' and former athletes' memories of their favorite coach to improve coach education curriculum. Player preferences of coaching behavior can affect both their attitudes toward their sport experiences and team performance. By identifying positive coaching behaviors as recalled by athletes, coach educators…

Stewart, Craig; Owens, Lynn

2011-01-01

165

Medicare home health payment reform may jeopardize access for clinically complex and socially vulnerable patients.  

PubMed

The Affordable Care Act directed Medicare to update its home health prospective payment system to reflect more recent data on costs and use of services-an exercise known as rebasing. As a result, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will reduce home health payments 3.5 percent per year in the period 2014-17. To determine the impact that these reductions could have on beneficiaries using home health care, we examined the Medicare reimbursement margins and the use of services in a national sample of 96,621 episodes of care provided by twenty-six not-for-profit home health agencies in 2011. We found that patients with clinically complex conditions and social vulnerability factors, such as living alone, had substantially higher service delivery costs than other home health patients. Thus, the socially vulnerable patients with complex conditions represent less profit-lower-to-negative Medicare margins-for home health agencies. This financial disincentive could reduce such patients' access to care as Medicare payments decline. Policy makers should consider the unique characteristics of these patients and ensure their continued access to Medicare's home health services when planning rebasing and future adjustments to the prospective payment system. PMID:24889943

Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David; Peng, Timothy; Brickner, Carlin; Kurowski, Daniel; Christopher, Mary Ann; Sheehan, Kathleen M

2014-06-01

166

Problems controlling fraud and abuse in the home health care field : Voices of fraud control unit directors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of the current study is to assess the efforts to control fraud in the home health care industry in the USA by examining the problems that criminal justice officials confronted in their attempts to control home health care fraud and abuse. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Attention is given to the history of the home health care industry in

Brian K. Payne

2006-01-01

167

Merging home and health via contemporary care delivery: program management insights on a home telehealth project.  

PubMed

This article discusses a home telehealth program that uses innovative informatics and telemedicine technologies to meet the needs of a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We provide background information for the program inclusive of descriptions for the decision support system, patient selection process, and selected home telehealth technologies. Lessons learned based on interview data collected from the project team highlight issues regarding implementation and management of the program. Our goal is to provide useful information to other healthcare systems considering home telehealth as a contemporary option for care delivery. PMID:18769182

Abraham, Chon; Rosenthal, David A

2008-01-01

168

Japan's experience in long-term home health care of the elderly.  

PubMed

Due to increasing national health expenditure and an aging society, Japan in the 1980s started to reinforce home health care, going beyond her long-time investment in institutional care. Since 1983, a sequence of policies was issued focused mainly on frail elderly care. In support of this governmental approach, a variety of enterprises and charity activities have flourished. Now, however, in the midst of a worldwide recession, rationing as health policy is under reconsideration and has an influence on health care for minorities, including the elderly. In Japan, home health care is under review and a new service system was initiated in April 1992. In this article, the newly inaugurated community-based home visiting nursing scheme is introduced together with a short history of elderly care and related business activities in Japan. Feasibility of the new scheme is discussed and compared with the previous version of home visiting nursing, which had its base in hospitals. PMID:10129424

Imamura, K

1993-01-01

169

Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

2010-01-01

170

A Home-Based Infant Mental Health Intervention: The Centrality of Relationships in Reflective Supervision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the essential relationship needs and capacities of infants, parents, practitioners, and supervisors in a story about reflective practice. The author shares her experience supervising a home visitor who is a trainee in an infant mental health intervention program. The home visitor's relationship with her supervisor was a…

Weatherston, Deborah

2007-01-01

171

Why Mental Health Centers Should Not Do Home-Based Family Centered Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Home Based Family Centered (HBFC) services give primary responsibility for evaluation, service planning, and counseling to the direct service in-home family therapist. In the mental health center (MHC), the psychiatrist may see a child once in the office and make a diagnosis and recommendation for the child, and sometimes for the parents. Also in…

Leverington, John J.; Bryce, Marvin

172

Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

2010-01-01

173

Prediction Models for a Smart Home based Health Care System Vikramaditya R. Jakkula1  

E-print Network

-assisted smart health care system would enable elderly people to lead their independent lifestyle away from Science, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. Abstract -- Technology holds great potential for improvements health care. Smart health care systems at home can be used to provide such solutions. A technology

Cook, Diane J.

174

UC Santa Barbara Home: Administrative Services/Environmental Health and Safety  

E-print Network

UC Santa Barbara Home: Administrative Services/Environmental Health and Safety Use of Pesticides and structures shall be reviewed by Environmental Health and Safety and the IPM Committee for consistency with the specific authorization of Environmental Health and Safety. Use of approved baits is allowed in buildings. A

Bigelow, Stephen

175

76 FR 68525 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...finalized our policies for the Health Insurance and Portability Accountability...Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification...use ICD-9-CM codes. Home health agencies report ICD-9-CM...Grouper software to assign a Health Insurance Prospective...

2011-11-04

176

Home and Health in the Third Age -- Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings  

PubMed Central

Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens. PMID:25019267

Kylen, Maya; Ekstrom, Henrik; Haak, Maria; Elmstahl, Solve; Iwarsson, Susanne

2014-01-01

177

77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Services Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health...of Noncompetitive Program Expansion Supplements to Develop, Implement, and Evaluate...offer noncompetitive program expansion supplements of $100,000 to 10 Nursing...

2012-10-02

178

Register Connect Health People Food Beaches Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Education  

E-print Network

Register Connect Health People Food Beaches Puzzles Family Fashion Home & Garden Travel Comics More Education TRAVEL Does Las Vegas have some Super Bowl options? You bet SPORTS Simers: Athletes say nothing

Loudon, Catherine

179

Nurse and client perceptions of home health wound care effectiveness after a change in Medicare reimbursement.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to begin to explore client and nurse perceptions related to how a change in a Medicare reimbursement, Prospective Payment System (PPS), affects home health care. The target population included home health clients with stage III or greater decubitus ulcers, age 65 years or older. Six Virginia home health agencies were randomly selected. From those sites, all 39 charts that met population criteria were accessed and analyzed, and then 16 care recipients were purposely selected. In addition, 26 home health nurses with pre- and post-PPS experience were purposefully selected. Semistructured, audiotaped interviews were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Results demonstrated PPS adaptive behavior and an increase in use of education and family caregivers related to wound care. Themes that emerged included professional competence, caregiver as key, and sense of support. Perceptions emphasize the necessity for resource management, collaboration, and patient advocacy. PMID:16443983

Eaton, Melody K

2005-11-01

180

Home environmental and health-related factors among home fallers and recurrent fallers in community dwelling older Korean women.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to determine home environmental and health-related factors among home fallers and recurrent fallers in community dwelling older Korean women. The study population included 438 older women aged 65 years and over. Measures included a checklist of home environments and health-related items. Risk indicators for accidental falls and recurrent falling were analysed using logistic regression. Logistic regression analysis revealed that chronic disease (odds ratio (OR) = 2.02, P = 0.007), poor night light (OR = 1.97, P = 0.032) and obstacle of door sill (OR = 1.76, P = 0.021) were predictors of accidental falls, and physical inactivity (OR = 2.34, P = 0.018) and slippery floor in the bathroom (OR = 0.41, P = 0.034) were predictors of recurrent falling. The findings have implications for strategies and suggest the need to modify home environmental context in systematic and consistent ways and the need to maintain physical activities to prevent falls and recurrent falling. PMID:23009377

Lim, Young Mi; Sung, Mi Hae

2012-10-01

181

Coaching the Multiplicity of Mind: A Strengths-based Model  

PubMed Central

Professional health and wellness coaches are passionate about helping people learn, change, and grow. We are lifelong students of what enables humans to perform at our best. The phrase coaching the whole person is common coaching parlance; full engagement in self-care often requires that clients shift a spectrum of beliefs, motives, and perspectives in order to make changes that are sustainable. Just as important is the need for coaches to fully engage in their own self-care in order to best serve their clients. PMID:24416685

2013-01-01

182

Coaching the Multiplicity of Mind: A Strengths-based Model.  

PubMed

Professional health and wellness coaches are passionate about helping people learn, change, and grow. We are lifelong students of what enables humans to perform at our best. The phrase coaching the whole person is common coaching parlance; full engagement in self-care often requires that clients shift a spectrum of beliefs, motives, and perspectives in order to make changes that are sustainable. Just as important is the need for coaches to fully engage in their own self-care in order to best serve their clients. PMID:24416685

Moore, Margaret

2013-07-01

183

Search: Search Home Top News Science Business Entertainment Sports Health Quirks Newspictures Emerging Threats Energy Resources Security Industry  

E-print Network

- Compare Electric Companies in Texas - home care - home health care - PC Games - prom dresses - PromSearch: » Search My Account Home Top News Science Business Entertainment Sports Health Quirks visits North Korea Official, four others, killed in Iraq McCain, Obama ahead in Georgia Democratic race

Rogers, John A.

184

Private nursing homes: contribution to long stay care of the elderly in the Brighton Health District.  

PubMed Central

Two surveys of private nursing homes, designated geriatric wards, and a sample of social service part III homes were carried out in the Brighton Health District using questionnaires supplemented (in the second survey) by some interviews. The dependency of old people in the private nursing homes was more like that of long stay hospital patients rather than that of residents in social services homes. In the private nursing homes, however, a smaller proportion of patients were in the medium to heavy nursing category (178 (31%) compared with 158 (63%) in the hospital long stay wards) and a larger proportion in the heavy nursing category (170 (30%) compared with 44 (17%) in the long stay wards). Of the patients in private nursing homes, 401 (82%) were local residents, 488 (86%) were long stay, and 459 (88%) were women; their mean age was 88 years. Two thirds of the patients were over 80. There were no significant differences between the private nursing homes and the wards in nursing workloads or staffing, except for a slightly higher provision of state registered nurses in the private sector. In the private nursing homes 348 (63%) of the patients had fees paid by private funds, 26 (5%) were in contract beds paid for by the National Health Service, and 176 (32%) were subsidized by the Department of Health and Social Security. Private nursing homes make a substantial contribution to the care of the elderly in the Brighton Health District, and the health authority should develop a more active partnership with this sector. PMID:3094690

Bennett, J

1986-01-01

185

Professional Preparation in Physical Education and Coaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is the product of a conference of the American Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, the purpose of which was to revise professional preparation quidelines in dance, physical education, recreation education, and health and safety education. This report includes sections on physical education and coaching and on…

American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

186

Photo: Gijs van Ouwerkerk A VIRTUAL COACH  

E-print Network

11 Photo: Gijs van Ouwerkerk A VIRTUAL COACH FOR MENTAL HEALTH When I started out in the discipline of eHealth, it was largely wide open, says Kelders. Some things had been developed, but people hadn Nutrition Centre to help people in developing healthy diet and exercise habits. I learned a lot from it

187

A Coaching Psychology Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Psychology in its place" (2008), John Radford considers "what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education". In this article, the author looks at the possible inclusion of coaching psychology within undergraduate psychology programmes. Coaching psychology as an applied area of psychology…

Palmer, Stephen

2008-01-01

188

Coaches as System Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of school leadership--of principals and coaches--must be played out on a systems level to get widespread and sustainable improvement. Successful, whole-system education reform relies on capacity building, teamwork, pedagogy, and systemic reform. The strategies of good coaches and the right drivers for whole-system reform go hand in hand.…

Fullan, Michael; Knight, Jim

2011-01-01

189

Psychological Aspects of Coaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a review of concepts based upon scientific evidence and observation that may prove helpful to the athletic coach of any age group, any skill level, either sex, and in any environment. It is written with the belief that athletics should exist for athletes and that the coach should be the person who assists the athlete to gain individual…

Poindexter, Hally B. W.

190

Coaching Youth Livestock Projects  

E-print Network

?sfuturewhile webuildcharacterintheshowring. ?Itdoesn?tmatterwhatplaceyoungcompetitorsget attheendoftheshow;iftheyhavelearnedsome- thingnew,theyhavewonfirstplaceanyway. CoachingYouth Livestock Projects Kyle J. Merten and ChrisT. Boleman * * ExtensionAssociate for Program Development...?sfuturewhile webuildcharacterintheshowring. ?Itdoesn?tmatterwhatplaceyoungcompetitorsget attheendoftheshow;iftheyhavelearnedsome- thingnew,theyhavewonfirstplaceanyway. CoachingYouth Livestock Projects Kyle J. Merten and ChrisT. Boleman * * ExtensionAssociate for Program Development...

Merten, Kyle J.; Boleman, Chris

2008-07-10

191

Coaching Certification. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest focuses on coaching certification, its importance, its current status, and types of certification programs currently in existence. The discussion also covers the status of women coaches and the issue of national certification requirements. The list of addresses of certification programs given includes commercial agencies state…

Schweitzer, Cathie

192

The Student Success Coach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An innovative position, a Student Success Coach, was created in response to a newly developed undergraduate-degree program on the recently established University of Minnesota Rochester campus. Student Success Coaches serve as the link between the academic and student affairs sides of the campus. They interact closely with students and faculty to…

Neuhauser, Claudia; Weber, Kendra

2011-01-01

193

Learning Developmental Coaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes an educational intervention designed to promote the ability and willingness of MBA students to lead through coaching. MBA leadership students are trained to serve as coaches for undergraduate business students in a developmental assessment center. In this compelling context, their main source of influence is the ability to…

Hunt, James M.; Weintraub, Joseph R.

2004-01-01

194

Executive Coaching for Seafarers  

Microsoft Academic Search

If he is indeed wise he does not bid you enter the house of wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold of your own mind'. (Gibran, 1991). Executive coaching, as a form of developmental intervention aptly reflects the wise words above of the Lebanese philosopher Khalil Gibran. However while coaching may be becoming widespread in some sectors, its application

Christopher J Haughton

195

The nurse manager: change agent, change coach?  

PubMed

Change in today's health care landscape is a daily, if not hourly, reality. The nurse manager must have strong leadership skills to navigate through change with a focus on the patient and the provision of safe and reliable care. The historical term for those leading change is "change agent." In this article, the authors introduce the idea of a change coach, building on the nurse manager foundational skill of coaching and weaving this concept into the manager's role in change. A change coach uses the coaching behaviors including guidance, facilitation, and inspiration to inspire others toward change, altering human capabilities, and supporting and influencing others toward change. An exemplar of the nurse manager's role as a change coach in practice is provided using American Organization of Nurse Executives' Care Innovation and Transformation initiative. It is the agile manager that is able to successfully move between the roles of change agent and change coach to continuously transform the environment and how care is delivered. PMID:23222749

Stefancyk, Amanda; Hancock, Beverly; Meadows, Mary T

2013-01-01

196

Effectiveness of home visits by public health nurses in maternal and child health: an empirical review.  

PubMed Central

The effectiveness of public health nursing in promoting maternal and child health through home visits is summarized from empirical studies published between 1960 and 1984. Eight reports identified through a comprehensive reference search were first classified according to the components of nursing service studied (assessment, teaching, counseling or support, referral, and clinical services). The results of each study were then analyzed for study population characteristics, the research design and statistical methods employed, the reliability of the measures used, significant treatment effects, sample size, and statistical power. The research is evenly divided among studies employing an experimental design, a quasi-experimental design, and samples of low-income and middle-income mothers. The reliability of the measures was, with one exception, not reported. All but one study had final sample sizes for treatment and control or comparison groups of fewer than 100 subjects. Four of the studies thus had sample sizes sufficiently large to detect a medium treatment effect; power calculations showed that none could measure a small treatment impact. Within the methodological limitations of these studies, our review found that under certain circumstances public health nurses can effectively impart health knowledge to high-risk mothers and can effect positive change in maternal attitudes and parenting practices that in turn can be associated with positive changes in infant health and development. Cumulative knowledge from this body of research suggests that a priority for future evaluations of public health nursing is development of theoretical frameworks that maximize the fit between the needs of the population served and the services provided and between the outcomes measured and the nursing services being assessed. PMID:3931163

Combs-Orme, T; Reis, J; Ward, L D

1985-01-01

197

Home Environmental Health Risks of People With Developmental Disabilities Living in Community-Based Residential Settings: Implications for Community-Health Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic, long-term exposure to indoor air pollutants is increasingly being recognized as a threat to health. Vulnerable populations, such as those with cognitive disabilities, the elderly, and children, are frequently at increased risk from these hazards. This study assessed home environmental health hazards, home characteristics, and household practices that create risk in a sample of community-based group homes. A survey

Allison Del Bene Davis

2009-01-01

198

Home accidents in older people: role of primary health care team.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES--To determine the incidence and nature of unreported and reported home accidents in older people and to investigate associated environmental factors. DESIGN--Postal questionnaire requesting information on home accidents in the preceding month. SETTING--Inner London general practice. SUBJECTS--All registered patients aged over 65 years (n = 1662), of whom 120 were inappropriately registered and 1293 responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Circumstances and consequences of accidents in the home. RESULTS--108 accidents were recorded in 100 patients, giving a home accident rate of 84/1000 patients, equivalent to an annual rate of 1002/1000. 73 accidents were falls, and 83 were unreported. Of the 25 reported accidents, 19 were reported to general practice and six to accident and emergency departments (5.6% of all events). Rates of home accidents increased with age and were higher in women than men (79/819 upsilon 29/474; chi 2 = 4.5, df = 1, p less than 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--The incidence of home accidents in people aged over 65 years was high but few events were reported to medical services. General practice provided the main contact for patients who reported home accidents, and primary care workers have important opportunities for advising elderly patients on home accident prevention. Improved publicity on home safety targeted at older people and their carers would support the primary health care team in this role. PMID:1638198

Graham, H. J.; Firth, J.

1992-01-01

199

78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Director of Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, 3773 Cherry Creek Drive North...hospice care and home health services by the Veterans Health Administration's Office of Geriatrics and...

2013-11-14

200

A systematic review of the medical home for children without special health care needs.  

PubMed

To conduct a systematic review of the evidence associating the medical home with beneficial health outcomes in healthy children. The English-language pediatric literature 1975-2011 was searched via PubMed, Embase and CINAHL. Inclusion criteria (the medical home as an independent variable, individual-level quantitative analysis, outpatient setting in the US, healthy children) and exclusion criteria (age >18, medical home operationalized with only one American Academy of Pediatrics component) were determined a priori. Presence of a medical home was examined in relation to three outcome measures: primary care services, health care utilization, and child well-being. Of 4,856 unique citations, 9 studies were included in the final systematic review, amassing 290,180 children from 6 data sources. Two drew on prospective cohort data; the remainder, on cross-sectional design. Children with a medical home were more likely to receive preventive medical care (2 studies), anticipatory guidance (1 study), and developmental screening (1 study); to have higher health-related quality of life (1 study); and were less likely to seek care in the emergency department (2 studies). The medical home was associated with full immunization status in only 1 of 4 studies examining this outcome. No protective effect of the medical home was found with regard to preventable hospitalization (1 study). The medical home is associated with beneficial health outcomes among healthy children. However, the evidence is limited in comparison with that for children with special health care needs. As healthy children represent the majority of the pediatric population, this lack of evidence represents a significant knowledge gap. PMID:23784614

Hadland, Scott E; Long, Webb E

2014-05-01

201

Medicare and Medicaid programs; CY 2015 Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update; Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements; and survey and enforcement requirements for home health agencies. Final rule.  

PubMed

This final rule updates Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective for episodes ending on or after January 1, 2015. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule implements the second year of the four-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates. This rule provides information on our efforts to monitor the potential impacts of the rebasing adjustments and the Affordable Care Act mandated face-to-face encounter requirement. This rule also implements: Changes to simplify the face-to-face encounter regulatory requirements; changes to the HH PPS case-mix weights; changes to the home health quality reporting program requirements; changes to simplify the therapy reassessment timeframes; a revision to the Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) personnel qualifications; minor technical regulations text changes; and limitations on the reviewability of the civil monetary penalty provisions. Finally, this rule also discusses Medicare coverage of insulin injections under the HH PPS, the delay in the implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), and a HH value-based purchasing (HH VBP) model. PMID:25376056

2014-11-01

202

School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

2010-01-01

203

Five Years of HHS Home Health Care Evaluations: Using Evaluation to Change National Policy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1997, American Evaluation Association member George Grob, now retired from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and currently President of the Center for Public Program Evaluation, made a testimony on Medicare home health care fraud and abuse before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. The occasion was to announce the…

Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Grob, George F.

2012-01-01

204

Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

205

Mental Health Care Deficiency Citations in Nursing Homes and Caregiver Staffing  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we examine the association between caregiver staffing levels and mental health outcomes in approximately 17,000 U.S. nursing homes. As outcomes, we focus on deficiency citations available in the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Online Survey, Certification, And Recording data. We examine nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, registered nurse, and mental health provider staffing. Our results show

Nicholas G. Castle; Sarah Myers

2006-01-01

206

Transcultural Nursing In Home Health Care: Learning To Be Culturally Sensitive  

Microsoft Academic Search

The culturally diverse backgrounds of our American society is reflected in the home health care nursing environment. Realizing that health and illness are both strongly influenced by the client's cultural background is the primary step in becoming culturally sensitive. Madeline Leininger coined the term “transcultural nursing” and developed the “Sunrise Model” to depict the theory of cultural care diversity and

Joyce A. Hahn

1997-01-01

207

Mental Health Outcomes of Children and Youth Accessing Residential Programs or a Home-Based Alternative  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Ontario, Canada, a wide range of services has been developed to support children and youth with severe mental health problems. After services have ended, many of these children continue to live with emotional and behavioral challenges. However, the clinical outcomes of children discharged from residential mental health centers and home-based alternatives are not well known. The purpose of this

Michèle Preyde; Karen Frensch; Gary Cameron; Lirondel Hazineh; Priscilla Burnham Riosa

2010-01-01

208

Executive coaching enhances goal attainment, resilience and workplace well-being: a randomised controlled study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a randomised controlled study, 41 executives in a public health agency received 360-degree feedback, a half-day leadership workshop, and four individual coaching sessions over 10 weeks. The coaching used a cognitive-behavioural solution-focused approach. Quantitative and qualitative measures were taken. This is the first published randomised controlled study in which coaching was conducted by professional executive coaches external to the

Anthony M. Grant; Linley Curtayne; Geraldine Burton

2009-01-01

209

Building a seamless system of hospital-home health services.  

PubMed

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital is committed to expanding the continuum of care. To this end, 2 task forces were developed simultaneously. One was created to streamline the discharge transition planning process and produce a more efficient and effective system. The other focused specifically on the coronary artery bypass graft population, with the objective of reducing length of stay without compromising quality of care. This article describes the process from the perspective of the Home Care Department's involvement. Computerization, standardization of physician orders and nursing care plans, and testing patients' knowledge regarding nutrition and medications after discharge from the hospital are described in detail. Including home care in the planning process is the key to achieving a seamless continuum of care. PMID:11075185

Herbermann, M

2000-03-01

210

Determinants of the use of specialist mental health services by nursing home residents.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE. This study examines the effects of resident and facility characteristics on the probability of nursing home residents receiving treatment by mental health professionals. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study uses data from the Institutional Population Component of the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, a secondary data source containing data on 3,350 nursing home residents living in 810 nursing homes as of January 1, 1987. STUDY DESIGN. Andersen's health services use model (1968) is used to estimate a multivariate logistic equation for the effects of independent variables on the probability that a resident has received services from mental health professionals. Important variables include resident race, sex, and age; presence of several behaviors and reported mental illnesses; and facility ownership, facility size, and facility certification. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data on 188 residents were excluded from the sample because information was missing on several important variables. For some additional variables residents who had missing information were coded as negative responses. This left 3,162 observations for analysis in the logistic regressions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Older residents and residents with more ADL limitations are much less likely than other residents to have received treatment from a mental health professional. Residents with reported depression, schizophrenia, or psychoses, and residents who are agitated or hallucinating are more likely to have received treatment. Residents in government nursing homes, homes run by chains, and homes with low levels of certification are less likely to have received treatment. CONCLUSIONS. Few residents receive treatment from mental health professionals despite need. Older, physically disabled residents need special attention. Care in certain types of facilities requires further study. New regulations mandating treatment for mentally ill residents will demand increased attention from nursing home administrators and mental health professionals. PMID:8005788

Shea, D G; Streit, A; Smyer, M A

1994-01-01

211

Office Home Care Workers' Occupational Health: Associations with Workplace Flexibility and Worker Insecurity  

PubMed Central

Office home care workers provide support to visiting staff, although their work tends to be invisible in many respects. This paper focuses on managers, supervisors, coor dinators, case managers and office administrative staff in home care. We examine the effects of workplace flexibility and worker insecurity on office home care workers' occupational health, particularly their self-reported stress and musculoskeletal disorders. Data come from our survey of 300 home care office staff in a mid-sized city in Ontario. Results show that workers' perceptions of insecurity are positively associated with musculoskeletal disorders but not workplace flexibility measures. We recommend that managers and other decision-makers in the home care field pay attention to the perceptions of workers' insecurity in initiating workplace flexibility measures. PMID:20436813

Zeytinoglu, Isik U.; Denton, Margaret; Davies, Sharon; Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen

2009-01-01

212

Office home care workers' occupational health: associations with workplace flexibility and worker insecurity.  

PubMed

Office home care workers provide support to visiting staff, although their work tends to be invisible in many respects. This paper focuses on managers, supervisors, coor dinators, case managers and office administrative staff in home care. We examine the effects of workplace flexibility and worker insecurity on office home care workers' occupational health, particularly their self-reported stress and musculoskeletal disorders. Data come from our survey of 300 home care office staff in a mid-sized city in Ontario. Results show that workers' perceptions of insecurity are positively associated with musculoskeletal disorders but not workplace flexibility measures. We recommend that managers and other decision-makers in the home care field pay attention to the perceptions of workers' insecurity in initiating workplace flexibility measures. PMID:20436813

Zeytinoglu, Isik U; Denton, Margaret; Davies, Sharon; Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen

2009-05-01

213

Health Coaching and Genomics--Potential Avenues to Elicit Behavior Change in Those at Risk for Chronic Disease: Protocol for Personalized Medicine Effectiveness Study in Air Force Primary Care  

PubMed Central

Background: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and coronary heart disease (CHD) are prevalent chronic diseases from which military personnel are not exempt. While many genetic markers for these diseases have been identified, the clinical utility of genetic risk testing for multifactorial diseases such as these has not been established. The need for a behavioral intervention such as health coaching following a risk counseling intervention for T2D or CHD also has not been explored. Here we present the rationale, design, and protocol for evaluating the clinical utility of genetic risk testing and health coaching for active duty US Air Force (AF) retirees and beneficiaries. Primary Study Objectives: Determine the direct and interactive effects of health coaching and providing genetic risk information when added to standard risk counseling for CHD and T2D on health behaviors and clinical risk markers. Design: Four-group (2 X 2 factorial) randomized controlled trial. Setting: Two AF primary care clinical settings on the west coast of the United States. Participants: Adult AF primary care patients. Intervention: All participants will have a risk counseling visit with a clinic provider to discuss personal risk factors for T2D and CHD. Half of the participants (two groups) will also learn of their genetic risk testing results for T2D and CHD in this risk counseling session. Participants randomized to the two groups receiving health coaching will then receive telephonic health coaching over 6 months. Main Outcome Measures: Behavioral measures (self-reported dietary intake, physical activity, smoking cessation, medication adherence); clinical outcomes (AF composite fitness scores, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipids, T2D/CHD risk scores) and psychosocial measures (self-efficacy, worry, perceived risk) will be collected at baseline and 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months. Conclusion: This study tests novel strategies deployed within existing AF primary care to increase adherence to evidence-based diet, physical activity, smoking cessation, and medication recommendations for CHD and T2D risk reduction through methods of patient engagement and self-management support. PMID:24416670

Vorderstrasse, Allison A.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Kraus, William E.; Maldonado, Maj Carlos J.

2013-01-01

214

An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families  

SciTech Connect

We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

Dixon, Sherry L. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)], E-mail: sdixon@nchh.org; Fowler, Cecile [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Martinez, Yolanda [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Jacobs, David E. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)

2009-01-15

215

Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multi-Family Focus Groups  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore multiple family members’ perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home. Design Ten multi-family focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting Community setting. Participants Primarily Black and White families. Family members (n = 103) were between the ages of 8–61 years. Analysis A grounded hermeneutic approach. Phenomenon of Interest Risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home environment. Results Ten major themes were identified by family members related to health behaviors in the home environment, including: (a) accessibility to healthy foods and activity, (b) time constraints, (c) stage of youth development, (d) individual investment in health behaviors, (e) family investment in health behaviors, (f) family meals and shared activities, (g) parent modeling, (h) making health behaviors fun, (i) making health behaviors part of the family lifestyle, and (j) community investment in family health behaviors. Conclusions and Implications This study identified the importance of the family system and the reciprocal influences within the home environment on health behaviors. In addition, individual and community-level suggestions were identified. Insights from the families provide leads for future research and ideas for the prevention of youth obesity. PMID:22192951

Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

2012-01-01

216

Home environmental health risks of people with developmental disabilities living in community-based residential settings: implications for community-health nurses.  

PubMed

Chronic, long-term exposure to indoor air pollutants is increasingly being recognized as a threat to health. Vulnerable populations, such as those with cognitive disabilities, the elderly, and children, are frequently at increased risk from these hazards. This study assessed home environmental health hazards, home characteristics, and household practices that create risk in a sample of community-based group homes. A survey and a home environmental assessment of each home were used to assess the presence of neurotoxicants, such as lead, mercury, and pesticides, in the home and use of protective measures such as carbon monoxide detectors and radon testing. PMID:19866386

Del Bene Davis, Allison

2009-10-01

217

Huddle-coaching: a dynamic intervention for trainees and staff to support team-based care.  

PubMed

Many outpatient clinics where health professionals train will transition to a team-based medical home model over the next several years. Therefore, training programs need innovative approaches to prepare and incorporate trainees into team-based delivery systems. To address this need, educators at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center included trainees in preclinic team "huddles," or briefing meetings to facilitate care coordination, and developed an interprofessional huddle-coaching program for nurse practitioner students and internal medicine residents who function as primary providers for patient panels in VA outpatient primary care clinics. The program aimed to support trainees' partnerships with staff and full participation in the VA's Patient Aligned Care Teams. The huddle-coaching program focuses on structuring the huddle process via scheduling, checklists, and designated huddle coaches; building relationships among team members through team-building activities; and teaching core skills to support collaborative practice. A multifaceted evaluation of the program showed positive results. Participants rated training sessions and team-building activities favorably. In interviews, trainees valued their team members and identified improvements in efficiency and quality of patient care as a result of the team-based approach. Huddle checklists and scores on the Team Development Measure indicated progress in team processes and relationships as the year progressed. These findings suggest that the huddle-coaching program was a worthwhile investment in trainee development that also supported the clinic's larger mission to deliver team-based, patient-aligned care. As more training sites shift to team-based care, the huddle-coaching program offers a strategy for successfully incorporating trainees. PMID:24362383

Shunk, Rebecca; Dulay, Maya; Chou, Calvin L; Janson, Susan; O'Brien, Bridget C

2014-02-01

218

Team-level flexibility, work-home spillover, and health behavior  

PubMed Central

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

219

The home-based maternal record: a tool for family involvement in health care.  

PubMed

The home-based maternal record offers an opportunity for family involvement in health care. Home-based records of maternal health have been used in several developing countries, and have led to increased detection and monitoring of women at high risk for complications during pregnancy. Home-based cards that include menstrual information remind health workers to educate and motivate women for family planning, and serve as a source of health statistics. Records that use pictures and symbols have been used by illiterate traditional birth attendants, and had an accurate completion rate of over 90%. The WHO has prepared a prototype record and guidelines for local adaptation. The objectives were to provide continuity of care throughout pregnancy, ensure recognition of at-risk women, encourage family participation in health care, an provide data on maternal health, breastfeeding, and family planning. The guidelines have been evaluated and results show that the records have improved the coverage, acceptability, and quality of MCH/FP care. The records have also led to an increase in diagnosis and referral of at-risk women and newborns, and the use of family planning and tetanus toxoid immunization has increased in the 13 centers where the reports are being used. Focus group discussions have shown that mothers, community members, primary health workers, and doctors and nurses liked the records. It is important to adapt criteria for high-risk conditions to the local areas where the records will be used to ensure the relevance of risk diagnosis. The evidence shows that home-based maternal and child records can be an important tool in the promotion of self-reliance and family participation in health care. In addition, home-based records can be used for the implementation of primary health care at the local level, and serve as a resource for data collection. PMID:12315434

Shah, P M; Shah, K P; Belsey, M A

1988-04-01

220

The Dilemma of Mental Health Paraprofessionals at Home.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although delivery of health and mental health services to American Indian communities is improved by use of community-based paraprofessionals, these workers face conflicts related to kinship obligations. Discusses the role of family networks in Coast Salish community dynamics, and consequent influences on counselor effectiveness and the access of…

Miller, Bruce G.; Pylypa, Jen

1995-01-01

221

Math Coach's Corner  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Math coach Donna Boucher's blog provides inspiration, strategies, and activities for K-5 teachers on a wide range of math topics. She offers many free downloadable activities and games for developing elementary concepts and skills.

2103-01-01

222

Tips for labor coaches  

MedlinePLUS

Go to childbirth classes. Labor coaches should go to childbirth classes with the mom-to-be before her due date. They ... birth. A tour may be part of the childbirth classes. Talk with the staff on the labor ...

223

Tools: Successful Coaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage contains tools for math coaches and math specialists to utilize before, during, and after teacher observations. These tools are built upon NCSM's PRIME Leadership Framework to enable math specialists and coaches to build relationships and encourage leadership in others and created by The Robert Noyce Foundation in conjunction with Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative (SMVI). Each tool can be previewed on the left by clicking the name of the tool and can be viewed in full by clicking beneath the tool name.

Initiative, Silicon V.; Foster, David; Foundation, The R.

2013-01-01

224

Participatory health research: celebrating smoke-free homes.  

PubMed

For community engagement to be successful, the interests of the community must be taken into account and researchers must become facilitators. Patience is required. Meaningful and sustainable relationships that have been developed over time promote mutual learning and capacity building among the partners (Elders, community members, health care providers, and researchers). In addition, community engagement leads to the sharing of available resources (eg, human, time, and financial) and to a sustained commitment by the partners. This mutual commitment makes future projects easier to develop and complete. Thus, authentic transformative health development, informed by participatory health research, becomes an ongoing process. PMID:24029518

Ramsden, Vivian R; McKay, Shari; Bighead, Shirley; Boucher, Gail; Bourassa, Carrie; Butt, Peter; Clinton, Andrea; Crowe, Jackie; Felix, Fred; Jorgenson, Derek; LaRocque, Karen; McKee, Nora; Nketia, Irene; Rabbitskin, Norma; Thunderchild, Ella; Troupe, Cheryl; Turner, Tara

2013-09-01

225

Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future  

SciTech Connect

The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home-based system will interact.

Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

1999-04-07

226

Home  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, announced the launch of a Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) in August 2011. CPTAC is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of robust, quantitative, proteomic technologies and workflows. Read more.

227

Psychology in academic health centers: a true healthcare home.  

PubMed

This article is based on the invited presentation by the author at the American Psychological Association's Annual Convention, August 4-7, 2011, upon his receipt of the Joseph D. Matarazzo Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in Academic Health Centers presented by the Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers. This article relates the history, roles, and responsibilities of psychologists in academic health centers to the ultimate survival and success of professional psychology. It describes implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on the institutional practice of psychology including how psychology's place in academic health centers positions the field well for the future of healthcare reform. The article provides several recommendations to help professional psychology prepare for that future of integrated, interprofessional healthcare. PMID:22592297

Rozensky, Ronald H

2012-12-01

228

Development of a model home health nurse internship program for new graduates: key lessons learned.  

PubMed

A nursing shortage, the aging baby boomer population, an escalating need for home health care, and limited availability of health care dollars are threatening to undermine the quality of health care in the United States. The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects a deficit of 275,000 full-time equivalents by 2010 (-12%) and a deficit of 800,000 by 2020 (-29%). This article focuses on one home health agency's strategy to support nurse graduates transitioning from student to professional nurse. Based on Benner's (1984) hallmark theory from novice to expert, the goals of this program are to enhance job satisfaction and social integration, facilitate autonomy, increase critical thinking and psychomotor skills, and develop additional competencies. Eleven key lessons learned are outlined. PMID:20839661

Shur Coyle, Joanne

2011-05-01

229

The influence of social environmental factors on rehospitalization among patients receiving home health care services.  

PubMed

Guided by Orem's theory, this study examined the influence of social environmental factors on rehospitalization among home health care patients. Living arrangement, frequency of caregiving, and type of primary informal care were found to be related to functional ability. Measurable differences in clinical status and functional ability were related to the duration that patients received home health care services until rehospitalization, with the likelihood of rehospitalization increasing proportionately to the magnitude of the differences. Social environmental factors contributed to rehospitalization (self-care deficit) through functional ability (self-care agency) by altering the balance between self-care demand (clinical status) and self-care agency. PMID:23107991

Tao, Hong; Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Chen, Jie; Zhan, Lin; Dalton, Joanne

2012-01-01

230

The effectiveness of health coaching, home blood pressure monitoring, and home-titration in controlling hypertension among low-income patients: protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Despite the many antihypertensive medications available, two-thirds of patients with hypertension do not achieve blood pressure control. This is thought to be due to a combination of poor patient education, poor medication adherence, and \\

Heather Bennett; Kelsey Laird; David Margolius; Victoria Ngo; David H Thom; Thomas Bodenheimer

2009-01-01

231

Tool used to assess how well community health centers function as medical homes may be flawed.  

PubMed

The patient-centered medical home model holds the potential for reducing disease complications and improving health, and the federal government is now promoting the adoption of the model within federally qualified community health centers. In a group of Los Angeles community health centers, we found that all would have qualified as patient-centered medical homes under a widely used assessment tool developed by the National Committee for Quality Assurance and endorsed by the federal government for the community health center program. However, we also found that there was no significant relationship between how well these centers performed on the assessment and whether they achieved a range of process or outcome measures for diabetes care. These findings suggest that the federal government is promoting medical home redesign that may not be sensitive to, or inclusive of, services that will actually improve diabetes care for low-income patients. Therefore, additional methods are required for measuring and improving the capabilities of community health centers to function as medical homes and to deliver the scope of services that impoverished patients genuinely need. PMID:22345663

Clarke, Robin M A; Tseng, Chi-hong; Brook, Robert H; Brown, Arleen F

2012-03-01

232

Beliefs About the Health Effects of "Thirdhand" Smoke and Home Smoking Bans  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke. Thirdhand smoke is residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Children are uniquely susceptible to thirdhand smoke exposure. The objective of this study was to assess health beliefs of adults regarding thirdhand smoke exposure of children and whether smokers and nonsmokers differ in those beliefs. We hypothesized that beliefs about thirdhand smoke would be associated with household smoking bans. METHODS Data were collected by a national random-digit-dial telephone survey from September to November 2005. The sample was weighted by race and gender within Census region on the basis of US Census data. The study questions assessed the level of agreement with statements that breathing air in a room today where people smoked yesterday can harm the health of children. RESULTS Of 2000 eligible respondents contacted, 1510 (87%) completed surveys, 1478 (97.9%) answered all questions pertinent to this analysis, and 273 (18.9%) were smokers. Overall, 95.4% of nonsmokers versus 84.1% of smokers agreed that secondhand smoke harms the health of children, and 65.2% of nonsmokers versus 43.3% of smokers agreed that thirdhand smoke harms children. Strict rules prohibiting smoking in the home were more prevalent among nonsmokers: 88.4% vs 26.7%. In multivariate logistic regression, after controlling for certain variables, belief that thirdhand smoke harms the health of children remained independently associated with rules prohibiting smoking in the home. Belief that secondhand smoke harms the health of children was not independently associated with rules prohibiting smoking in the home and car. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that beliefs about the health effects of thirdhand smoke are independently associated with home smoking bans. Emphasizing that thirdhand smoke harms the health of children may be an important element in encouraging home smoking bans. PMID:19117850

Winickoff, Jonathan P.; Friebely, Joan; Tanski, Susanne E.; Sherrod, Cheryl; Matt, Georg E.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; McMillen, Robert C.

2013-01-01

233

Multimodal Intervention to Improve Osteoporosis Care in Home Health Settings: Results from a Cluster Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

Purpose To test an evidence-implementation intervention to improve the quality of care in the home health care setting for patients at high risk for fractures. Methods We conducted a cluster randomized trial of a multimodal intervention targeted at home care for high-risk patients (prior fracture or physician-diagnosed osteoporosis) receiving care in a statewide home health agency in Alabama. Offices throughout the state were randomized to receive the intervention or to usual care. The primary outcome was the proportion of high-risk home health patients treated with osteoporosis medications. A t-test of difference in proportions was conducted between intervention and control arms and constituted the primary analysis. Secondary analyses included logistic regression estimating the effect of individual patients being treated in an intervention arm office on the likelihood of a patient receiving osteoporosis medications. A follow-on analysis examined the effect of an automated alert built into the electronic medical record that prompted the home health care nurses to deploy the intervention for high risk patients using a pre-post design. Results Among the offices in the intervention arm the average proportion of eligible patients receiving osteoporosis medications post-intervention was 19.1%, compared with 15.7% in the usual care arm (difference in proportions 3.4%, 95% CI: ?2.6 ?9.5%). The overall rates of osteoporosis medication use increased from 14.8% prior to activation of the automated alert to 17.6% afterward, a non-significant difference. Conclusions The home health intervention did not result in a significant improvement in use of osteoporosis medications in high risk patients. PMID:23536256

Kilgore, Meredith L.; Outman, Ryan; Locher, Julie L.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Mudano, Amy; Kitchin, Beth; Saag, Kenneth G.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.

2014-01-01

234

A randomized controlled study about the use of eHealth in the home health care of premature infants  

PubMed Central

Background One area where the use of information and communication technology (ICT), or eHealth, could be developed is the home health care of premature infants. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to investigate whether the use of video conferencing or a web application improves parents’ satisfaction in taking care of a premature infant at home and decreases the need of home visits. In addition, nurses’ attitudes regarding the use of these tools were examined. Method Thirty-four families were randomized to one of three groups before their premature infant was discharged from the hospital to home health care: a control group receiving standard home health care (13 families); a web group receiving home health care supplemented with the use of a web application (12 families); a video group with home health care supplemented with video conferencing using Skype (9 families). Families and nursing staff answered questionnaires about the usefulness of ICT. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 families. Results All the parents in the web group found the web application easy to use. 83% of the families thought it was good to have access to their child’s data through the application. All the families in the video group found Skype easy to use and were satisfied with the video calls. 88% of the families thought that video calls were better than ordinary phone calls. 33% of the families in the web group and 75% of those in the video group thought the need for home visits was decreased by the web application or Skype. 50% of the families in the web group and 100% of those in the video group thought the web application or the video calls had helped them feel more confident in caring for their child. Most of the nurses were motivated to use ICT but some were reluctant and avoided using the web application and video conferencing. Conclusion The families were satisfied with both the web application and video conferencing. The families readily embraced the use of ICT, whereas motivating some of the nurses to accept and use ICT was a major challenge. PMID:23394465

2013-01-01

235

Assessment of Airborne Exposures and Health in Flooded Homes Undergoing Renovation  

PubMed Central

In June 2008, the Cedar River crested flooding more than 5,000 Cedar Rapids homes. Residents whose homes were flooded were invited to participate in this study. Household assessments and resident interviews were conducted between November 2008 and April 2009. We characterized exposures and symptoms experienced by individuals inhabiting 73 flood-damaged homes. Active air sampling and passive electrostatic dust collectors were used to assess exposures to: culturable mold, culturable bacteria, fungal spores, inhalable particulate matter (iPM), endotoxin, glucans, allergens, lead, asbestos, radon, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Wall moisture levels and relative humidity were also measured. Exposures and questionnaire-based health assessments were compared at two levels of remediation, in-progress and completed. Homes with remediation in-progress (n=24), as compared to the completed homes (n=49), had significantly higher airborne concentrations of mold, bacteria, iPM, endotoxin and glucan. Residents of in-progress homes had a significantly higher prevalence of doctor diagnosed allergies (adjusted OR=3.08; 95%CI: 1.05–9.02) and all residents had elevated prevalence of self-reported wheeze (adjusted OR=3.77; 95%CI: 2.06–6.92) and prescription medication use for breathing problems (adjusted OR=1.38; 95%CI: 1.01–1.88) after the flood as compared to before. Proper post-flood remediation led to improved air quality and lower exposures among residents living in flooded homes. PMID:22519834

Hoppe, Kimberly A.; Metwali, Nervana; Perry, Sarah Spencer; Hart, Tom; Kostle, Pamela A.; Thorne, Peter S.

2012-01-01

236

Pre-Exercise Screening and Health Coaching in CHD Secondary Prevention: A Qualitative Study of the Patient Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Secondary prevention programmes can be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD). In particular, UK guidelines, including those from the Department of Health, emphasize physical activity. However, the effects of secondary prevention programmes with an exercise component are moderate and uptake is highly…

Shaw, R.; Gillies, M.; Barber, J.; MacIntyre, K.; Harkins, C.; Findlay, I. N.; McCloy, K.; Gillie, A.; Scoular, A.; MacIntyre, P. D.

2012-01-01

237

Enabling Occupational Performance of Children through Coaching Parents: Three Case Reports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the use of occupational performance coaching (OPC) with three parent-child dyads using descriptive case study methodology. OPC is a parent-directed intervention in which parents are coached to improve their own or their children's performance in home and community contexts. In this study, parent and child performance was…

Graham, Fiona; Rodger, Sylvia; Ziviani, Jenny

2010-01-01

238

Ethnic Differences in the Production of Informal Home Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used national data to examine family choices in production of informal care for elderly family members among African-, German-, Irish-, and English-Americans. Findings suggest unique factors associated with each ethnic group's decision to provide care. Health care service provision and policy research that ignores ethnic diversity will be less…

White-Means, Shelley I.; Thornton, Michael C.

1990-01-01

239

Home visits by community health workers to prevent neonatal deaths in developing countries: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To determine whether home visits for neonatal care by community health workers can reduce infant and neonatal deaths and stillbirths in resource-limited settings. Methods We conducted a systematic review up to 2008 of controlled trials comparing various intervention packages, one of them being home visits for neonatal care by community health workers. We performed meta-analysis to calculate the pooled risk of outcomes. Findings Five trials, all from south Asia, satisfied the inclusion criteria. The intervention packages included in them comprised antenatal home visits (all trials), home visits during the neonatal period (all trials), home-based treatment for illness (3 trials) and community mobilization efforts (4 trials). Meta-analysis showed a reduced risk of neonatal death (relative risk, RR: 0.62; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.44–0.87) and stillbirth (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.65–0.89), and a significant improvement in antenatal and neonatal practice indicators (>?1 antenatal check-up, 2 doses of maternal tetanus toxoid, clean umbilical cord care, early breastfeeding and delayed bathing). Only one trial recorded infant deaths (RR: 0.41; 0.30–0.57). Subgroup analyses suggested a greater survival benefit when home visit coverage was ??50% (P?Home visits for antenatal and neonatal care, together with community mobilization activities, are associated with reduced neonatal mortality and stillbirths in southern Asian settings with high neonatal mortality and poor access to facility-based health care. PMID:20865070

Gogia, Siddhartha

2010-01-01

240

Distributed personal health information management system for dermatology at the homes for senior citizens.  

PubMed

A distributed personal health information management system (D-PHIMS) has been tested at a nursing home for the senior citizens (NHSC) in Singapore. The personal health information management system (PHIMS) from the University of Washington was customized to Singapore's context for teledermatology. A clinical trial commenced in October 2005 is ongoing and the survey results obtained indicate that the participants are satisfied with the D-PHIMS system. The diagnosis and treatment recommendations made by the dermatologists using the D-PHIMS diagnosis module were effective in most cases based on feedback from the nursing staff at the elderly nursing home. The results suggest that a teledermatology system could become a useful tool for the nursing homes and to control increasing healthcare costs for elderly care. PMID:17945953

Lavanya, J; Goh, K W; Leow, Y H; Chio, M T W; Prabaharan, K; Kim, E; Kim, Y; Soh, C B

2006-01-01

241

Health-related profile and quality of life among nursing home residents: does pain matter?  

PubMed

The purpose of this exploratory cross-sectional study was to explore the health-related profile and quality of life among older persons living with and without pain in nursing homes. Ten nursing homes were approached, and 535 older persons were invited to join the study from 2009 to 2011. The nursing home residents' demographic information and information regarding their pain situation and the use of oral analgesic drug and nondrug therapy among the older residents with chronic pain were also collected. Residents' physical health (using the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Elderly Mobility Scores); psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, depression, and loneliness (using the Happiness Scale, the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale); and quality of life were investigated. Among the 535 nursing home residents, 396 (74%) of them suffered from pain, with mean pain scores of 4.09 ± 2.19, indicating medium pain intensity a remaining 139 (26%) reported no pain. The location of pain was mainly in the knees, back and shoulders. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of the no-pain group (p < .05), nursing home residents' pain affected both their psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, and depression, and their physical quality of life. Nevertheless, only one-half of the older persons with pain used oral analgesic drug or nondrug therapy to relieve their pain. Pain had a significant impact on their mobility and ADL, was positively correlated with happiness and life satisfaction, and was negatively correlated with loneliness and depression. Pain management is a high priority in elderly care; as such, innovative and interdisciplinary strategies are necessary to enhance quality of life particularly for older persons living in nursing homes. PMID:24315270

Tse, Mimi M Y; Wan, Vanessa T C; Vong, Sinfia K S

2013-12-01

242

Long-Term Care, Formal Home Health Care, and Informal Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use the 1993 wave of the AHEAD data set to estimate a game- theoretic model of families' decisions concerning time spent caring for elderly individuals and Þnancial transfers for home health care. The out- come is a Nash equilibrium where each family member jointly determines his or her consumption, transfers for formal care, and time allocation — informal care,

David Byrne; Michelle S. Goeree; Bridget Hiedemann; Steven Stern

243

Integration of Smart Home Technologies in a Health Monitoring System for the Elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among older adults, the challenges of maintaining mobility and cognitive function make it increasingly difficult to remain living alone independently. As a result, many older adults are forced to seek residence in costly clinical institutions where they can receive constant medical supervision. A home-based automated system that monitors their health and well- being while remaining unobtrusive would provide them with

Amaya Arcelus; Megan Howell Jones; Rafik Goubran; Frank Knoefel

2007-01-01

244

MultiStage Real Time Health Monitoring via ZigBee in Smart Homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a framework for a wireless health monitoring system within a smart home using ZigBee technology. Vital signals are collected and processed using a 3-tiered architecture. The first stage is the mobile device carried on the body that runs a number of wired and wireless probes. This device is also designed to perform some basic processing such as the

S. Dagtas; G. Pekhteryev; Zafer Sahinoglu

2007-01-01

245

Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

Behkami, Nima A.

2012-01-01

246

Health/Home Economics Classroom Activities for Secondary Schools. Schools in an Aging Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the fastest-growing segment of society, older adults can be valuable resources for schools. The intent of this guide is to promote education for, with, and about older adults; to confront stereotypic images; and to present an accurate and balanced view of aging. The manual consists of 21 lesson plans for secondary teachers of health and home

Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

247

The Financial Impact of Interim and Prospective Payment Systems on Home Health Providers in Rural Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the study was to examine the financial impact of the interim payment system and prospective payment system (PPS) on home health agencies (HHAs) in rural communities. Data sources used included a survey of administrators in all rural HHAs in Pennsylvania and financial and utilization data provided by 10 rural HHAs in Northwest Pennsylvania. The results of survey

Chyongchiou Jeng Lin; Joan K. Davitt; Michael Meit; Myron Schwartz; Jonas Marainen; Lisa Davis; Joel Leon

2005-01-01

248

Postflood Disaster Management and the Home Health Nurse: Using Theory to Guide Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few frameworks exist to guide home health nurses during the response and recovery phases of disasters such as flooding. The Double ABCX Model of Family Adaptation is offered as an example of a guiding framework for nurses in postflood management. Phases of the model are linked to the nursing process, and management strategies are applied to individuals and families living

Susan M. Hunter Revell; Mary K. McCurry

2010-01-01

249

Sun-Sentinel Home care, tele-medicine cut health costs  

E-print Network

. These Florida initiatives are tackling one of the biggest problems facing Congress and the nation: how and advises thousands of nursing homes across the country about ways to detect problems and treat patients without always resorting to the emergency room. Farther north, Orlando Health is using physician

Fernandez, Eduardo

250

The Nontoxic Home. Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Everyday Toxics and Health Hazards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document maintains that the world is filled with health hazards and the best a person can do is to assess the danger of individual products, learn the risks, weigh the risks against the benefits, and decide whether or not to personally take these risks or to subject family members to them. This perspective begins in the home. This book…

Dadd, Debra Lynn

251

Sharps Injuries and Other Blood and Body Fluid Exposures Among Home Health Care Nurses and Aides  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We quantified risks of sharp medical device (sharps) injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures among home health care nurses and aides, identified risk factors, assessed the use of sharps with safety features, and evaluated underreporting in workplace-based surveillance. Methods. We conducted a questionnaire survey and workplace-based surveillance, collaborating with 9 home health care agencies and 2 labor unions from 2006 to 2007. Results. Approximately 35% of nurses and 6.4% of aides had experienced at least 1 sharps injury during their home health care career; corresponding figures for other blood and body fluid exposures were 15.1% and 6.7%, respectively. Annual sharps injuries incidence rates were 5.1 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) nurses and 1.0 per 100 FTE aides. Medical procedures contributing to sharps injuries were injecting medications, administering fingersticks and heelsticks, and drawing blood. Other contributing factors were sharps disposal, contact with waste, and patient handling. Sharps with safety features frequently were not used. Underreporting of sharps injuries to the workplace-based surveillance system was estimated to be about 50%. Conclusions. Sharps injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures are serious hazards for home health care nurses and aides. Improvements in hazard intervention are needed. PMID:19890177

Markkanen, Pia K.; Galligan, Catherine J.; Kriebel, David; Chalupka, Stephanie M.; Kim, Hyun; Gore, Rebecca J.; Sama, Susan R.; Laramie, Angela K.; Davis, Letitia

2009-01-01

252

Smart Home-based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients  

E-print Network

. The architecture can be used to monitor the activity, diet, and exercise compliance of diabetes patients plan and exercise program, losing excess weight, and taking oral medication. Many people with diabetesSmart Home-based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients

Cook, Diane J.

253

Initial reliability of the coaching isomorphism questionnaire for NCAA coaches.  

PubMed

Isomorphic change is the process by which organizations facing similar environmental conditions will come to resemble one another. Isomorphic pressures may affect coaching behavior as well. The Coaching Isomorphism Questionnaire was developed to assess the isomorphic mechanisms exerted upon coaches. Content and face validity were established as well as acceptable but low reliability estimates. PMID:11351867

Cunningham, G B; Keiper, P E; Sagas, M; Ashley, F B

2001-04-01

254

Manager Coaching Skills: What Makes a Good Coach?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the concept of managers as coaches and summarizes a study that was conducted to evaluate coaching skills among sales managers by using telephone interviews with employees to collect data regarding managers' effectiveness in eight coaching skills. Behaviors associated with high and low rankings are identified. (Contains 26 references.)…

Graham, Steven; And Others

1994-01-01

255

Community Sport Coaching and Citizenship Education: educating the coaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper explores design considerations for a Foundation Degree in Community Sports Coaching with a focus on cricket. We view coaching as social practice and explore the potential for seeing Community Sports Coaches as 'agents of Citizenship Education'. Cricket's position is historically ironic in post-colonial Britain, being both the game of the colonial elite yet also woven into the habitus

David Blundell; Peter Cunningham

256

Self-rated health as a predictor of hospital admission and nursing home placement in elderly public housing tenants.  

PubMed Central

We assessed the validity of self-rated health in a one-year prospective study of 155 elderly public housing tenants. Compared to studies of elderly community residents, tenants had poorer self-rated health, and higher hospital admission and nursing home placement rates. Poor self-rated health was a risk factor for both outcomes. We conclude that self-rated health may be useful in identifying persons at increased risk for hospital admission and nursing home placement. PMID:3953926

Weinberger, M; Darnell, J C; Tierney, W M; Martz, B L; Hiner, S L; Barker, J; Neill, P J

1986-01-01

257

Improving osteoporosis care in high-risk home health patients through a high intensity intervention  

PubMed Central

Purpose We developed and tested a multi-modal intervention, delivered in the home health care setting, aimed at increasing osteoporosis treatment rates to prevent fractures. Material and Methods The intervention focused on home health nurses. Key components included: nursing education; development of a nursing care plan; patient teaching materials and creation of physician materials. Nursing education consisted of a lecture covering osteoporosis, fracture risks and prevention, and the effectiveness of anti-osteoporosis treatment options. Patients received education materials concerning osteoporosis and anti-osteoporosis medications. A pocket-sized treatment algorithm card and standardized order sets were prepared for physicians. Focus groups of physicians and nurses were conducted to obtain feedback on the materials and methods to facilitate effective nurse-physician communication. Successful application required nurses to identify patients with a fracture history, initiate the care plan, prompt physicians on risk status, and provide patient education. The intervention was piloted in one field office. Results In the year prior to the intervention, home health patients (n=92) with a fracture history were identified in the pilot field office and only 20 (22%) received osteoporosis prescription therapy. In the three months following the intervention, 21 newly enrolled patients were identified and 9 (43%) had received osteoporosis prescription medications. Conclusions Home health care provides a venue where patients and physicians can be informed by nurses about osteoporosis and fracture risks and, consequently, initiate appropriate therapy. This multi-modal intervention is easily transportable to other home health agencies and adaptable to other medical conditions and settings. PMID:22005175

Outman, Ryan C.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Locher, Julie L.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Saag, Kenneth G.; Kilgore, Meredith L.

2014-01-01

258

Home front: post-deployment mental health and divorces.  

PubMed

Since 2003, about 14 % of U.S. Army soldiers have reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following deployments. In this article, we examine how post-deployment symptoms of PTSD and of other mental health conditions are related to the probability of divorce among married active-duty U.S. Army soldiers. For this purpose, we combine Army administrative individual-level longitudinal data on soldiers' deployments, marital history, and sociodemographic characteristics with their self-reported post-deployment health information. Our estimates indicate that time spent in deployment increases the divorce risk among Army enlisted personnel and that PTSD symptoms are associated with further increases in the odds of divorce. Although officers are generally less likely to screen positive for PTSD than enlisted personnel, we find a stronger relationship between PTSD symptoms and divorces among Army officers who are PTSD-symptomatic than among enlisted personnel. We estimate a larger impact of deployments on the divorce risk among female soldiers, but we do not find a differential impact of PTSD symptoms by gender. Also, we find that most of the effect of PTSD symptoms occurs early in the career of soldiers who deploy multiple times. PMID:24781649

Negrusa, Brighita; Negrusa, Sebastian

2014-06-01

259

The Power of Virtual Coaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

2011-01-01

260

Literacy Coaching for School Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors explore which conditions support the success of literacy coaches. Because the literacy coach position is a relatively new one, this article examines some of the questions related to designing and implementing the position of the literacy coach, and the potential influence of the position on student achievement. The…

Taylor, Rosemarye T.; Moxley, Dale; Boulware, Don

2007-01-01

261

The School Principal as Coach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the preliminary findings of a training program to develop skills of Dutch primary school principals in coaching teachers for improved teaching. The major research questions addressed whether the 28 school principals who participated in the training program implemented the target coaching skills whether teachers coached by the…

Veenman, Simon

262

Letters of Appointment Assistant Coach  

E-print Network

media, alumni and civic groups. Work to integrate sports into the whole spectrum of academic life Coach, you will report to the Head Tennis Coach. Your performance will be evaluated annually by the Head' academic requirements are met, including the development and implementation of a Coach's Academic Plan (CAP

Su, Xiao

263

Handbook for Youth Sports Coaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook was generated by a survey of the specific needs of the coaching community serving young children as athletic coaches. The survey revealed a need for information that addresses the needs of beginning level volunteer coaches. The first section discusses the benefits of competitive sports for children and youth and the role of the youth…

Seefeldt, Vern, Ed.

264

For Immediate Release --Thursday, September 26, 2013 University of Lethbridge Pronghorn Athletics coaches Go  

E-print Network

spaces and equipment for children's education and development. At home will coach without shoes on Saturday, Sept.28 as their team takes on the Mount:15 p.m. at the University Community Sports Stadium. Get the team update

Seldin, Jonathan P.

265

Pesticide assessment: Protecting public health on the home turf  

PubMed Central

Pesticide regulation is examined in the context of Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency’s assessment of the chlorophenoxy herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) for turf. 2,4-D is the most common herbicide used to kill weeds in grass. The medical literature does not uniformly indicate harms from herbicides. However, the balance of epidemiological research suggests that 2,4-D can be persuasively linked to cancers, neurological impairment and reproductive problems. These may arise from 2,4-D itself, from breakdown products or dioxin contamination, or from a combination of chemicals. Regulators rely largely on toxicology, but experiments may not replicate exposures from 2,4-D application to lawns because environmental breakdown products (eg, 2,4-dichlorophenol) may not accumulate and selected herbicides are possibly less contaminated. Dioxins are bioaccumulative chemicals that may cause cancer, harm neurological development, impair reproduction, disrupt the endocrine system and alter immune function. No dioxin analyses were submitted to the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, and the principal contaminants of 2,4-D are not among the 17 congeners covered in pesticide regulation. Independent assessment of all dioxins is needed, in tissues and in the environment. The 2,4-D assessment does not approach standards for ethics, rigour or transparency in medical research. Canada needs a stronger regulator for pesticides. Potentially toxic chemicals should not be registered when more benign solutions exist, risks are not clearly quantifiable or potential risks outweigh benefits. Until landscaping pesticides are curtailed nationally, local bylaws and Quebec’s Pesticide Code are prudent measures to protect public health. Physicians have a role in public education regarding pesticides. PMID:19030278

Sears, Meg; Walker, C Robin; van der Jagt, Richard HC; Claman, Paul

2006-01-01

266

Coaching under pressure: a study of Olympic coaches.  

PubMed

The Olympic environment has been identified as particularly stressful and unlike any other in terms of the media attention and focus placed on the competition. While the potential negative consequences of stress for coaches and their athletes have been explored, relatively little is known about the factors underpinning successful Olympic coaching performance. We explored elite coaches' perceptions of the factors that enable them to coach in a stressful Olympic environment. Eight coaches from one of Great Britain's most successful Olympic teams (i.e. consistent medal winners in the previous three Olympics) were interviewed. Inductive content analysis indicated that psychological attributes (e.g. emotional control), preparation (e.g. strategic approach), and coping at the event (e.g. team support) were factors that coaches perceived as important for successful Olympic coaching. In addition, coaches offered specific suggestions for training and development. Key themes included coach interaction (e.g. mentoring, formalizing contact) and simulating Olympic pressure. These findings offer suggestions for the education of developing coaches on the pathway to elite sports coaching. PMID:22168369

Olusoga, Peter; Maynard, Ian; Hays, Kate; Butt, Joanne

2012-01-01

267

A new kind of homelessness for individuals with serious mental illness? The need for a "mental health home".  

PubMed

Individuals with serious mental illness often are unable to access consumer- and family-oriented community care, resulting in repeated hospitalizations, incarceration, and homelessness. The "medical home" concept was developed in primary care to provide accessible and accountable services for individuals with chronic medical conditions. Building on the work done in primary care, the authors propose a "mental health home." The model of care incorporates medical home characteristics, such as access to and coordination of services, integration of primary and preventive care, adoption of recovery orientation and evidence-based practices, and family and community outreach. Barriers to and strategies for implementation of mental health homes are discussed. PMID:19339329

Smith, Thomas E; Sederer, Lloyd I

2009-04-01

268

The home health care routing and scheduling problem with interdependent services.  

PubMed

This paper presents a model for the daily planning of health care services carried out at patients' homes by staff members of a home care company. The planning takes into account individual service requirements of the patients, individual qualifications of the staff and possible interdependencies between different service operations. Interdependencies of services can include, for example, a temporal separation of two services as is required if drugs have to be administered a certain time before providing a meal. Other services like handling a disabled patient may require two staff members working together at a patient's home. The time preferences of patients are included in terms of given time windows. In this paper, we propose a planning approach for the described problem, which can be used for optimizing economical and service oriented measures of performance. A mathematical model formulation is proposed together with a powerful heuristic based on a sophisticated solution representation. PMID:23780750

Mankowska, Dorota Slawa; Meisel, Frank; Bierwirth, Christian

2014-03-01

269

Coaching: the art of creating exceptional results.  

PubMed

Functioning as a Coach is a key role for a manager and, in fact, distinguishes the manager as a leader. Coaching focuses on two distinct areas: 1) coaching to orient employees to new situations, and 2) coaching for performance with employees who are showing marginal performance, who are meeting expectations, or who are showing high performance. This article describes coaching for orientation and for performance, identifies coaching skills, and provides a coaching self-assessment. PMID:10165559

Schack, M L

1997-01-01

270

Reasons for Unmet Need for Child and Family Health Services among Children with Special Health Care Needs with and without Medical Homes  

PubMed Central

Objectives Medical homes, an important component of U.S. health reform, were first developed to help families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) find and coordinate services, and reduce their children’s unmet need for health services. We hypothesize that CSHCN lacking medical homes are more likely than those with medical homes to report health system delivery or coverage problems as the specific reasons for unmet need. Methods Data are from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), a national, population-based survey of 40,723 CSHCN. We studied whether lacking a medical home was associated with 9 specific reasons for unmet need for 11 types of medical services, controlling for health insurance, child’s health, and sociodemographic characteristics. Results Weighted to the national population, 17% of CSHCN reported at least one unmet health service need in the previous year. CSHCN without medical homes were 2 to 3 times as likely to report unmet need for child or family health services, and more likely to report no referral (OR= 3.3), dissatisfaction with provider (OR=2.5), service not available in area (OR= 2.1), can’t find provider who accepts insurance (OR=1.8), and health plan problems (OR=1.4) as reasons for unmet need (all p<0.05). Conclusions CSHCN without medical homes were more likely than those with medical homes to report health system delivery or coverage reasons for unmet child health service needs. Attributable risk estimates suggest that if the 50% of CSHCN who lacked medical homes had one, overall unmet need for child health services could be reduced by as much as 35% and unmet need for family health services by 40%. PMID:24340042

Miller, Jane E.; Nugent, Colleen N.; Gaboda, Dorothy; Russell, Louise B.

2013-01-01

271

Sociodemographic and health profile of inmates of old age homes in and around Belgaum city, Karnataka.  

PubMed

A new trend of admitting more and more senior citizens hailing from the Indian middle class background to old age homes is being observed in recent times. The objectives of this study were to study sociodemographic dimensions and common health problems of inmates of old age homes and to know various reasons for their admissions and their leisure time activities in old age homes. The present cross-sectional study was conducted during March and April 2010 in 4 different old age homes in and around Belgaum city, North Karnataka, by interviewing the inmates of old age homes using predesigned, pretested, structured questionnaire followed by thorough clinical examination and haemoglobin estimation by Sahli's method. The collected data was compiled and analysed using SPSS software version 14. Out of 73 elderly, 54 were females (74.0%). Majority were in the age group of 61-70 years (50.7%) and 56 were belonging to nuclear family (76.7%). Thirty-nine inmates were widow/widower (53.4%) and 42 were having no children (57.5%). Forty-seven inmates were admitted as there was nobody to take care of them (64.4%). Common health problems observed were locomotive/joint and muscle disorders (35.6%), hypertension (34.2%), diabetes mellitus (26.0%), respiratory disorders (23.3%), hearing loss (21.9%) etc. Forty-nine were having normal body mass index (67.1%) while 19.2% were underweight. Majority were having haemoglobin levels between 10-12 g/dl (58.9%). Old age homes definitely will enable the elderly to remain sociopsychologically healthy and lead active lives if effective medical and emotional support is given. PMID:24968497

Viveki, R G; Halappanavar, A B; Joshi, A V; Pujar, Kirankumar; Patil, Sandhya

2013-10-01

272

Smart Home-Based Health Platform for Behavioral Monitoring and Alteration of Diabetes Patients  

PubMed Central

Background Researchers and medical practitioners have long sought the ability to continuously and automatically monitor patients beyond the confines of a doctor's office. We describe a smart home monitoring and analysis platform that facilitates the automatic gathering of rich databases of behavioral information in a manner that is transparent to the patient. Collected information will be automatically or manually analyzed and reported to the caregivers and may be interpreted for behavioral modification in the patient. Method Our health platform consists of five technology layers. The architecture is designed to be flexible, extensible, and transparent, to support plug-and-play operation of new devices and components, and to provide remote monitoring and programming opportunities. Results The smart home-based health platform technologies have been tested in two physical smart environments. Data that are collected in these implemented physical layers are processed and analyzed by our activity recognition and chewing classification algorithms. All of these components have yielded accurate analyses for subjects in the smart environment test beds. Conclusions This work represents an important first step in the field of smart environment-based health monitoring and assistance. The architecture can be used to monitor the activity, diet, and exercise compliance of diabetes patients and evaluate the effects of alternative medicine and behavior regimens. We believe these technologies are essential for providing accessible, low-cost health assistance in an individual's own home and for providing the best possible quality of life for individuals with diabetes. PMID:20046657

Helal, Abdelsalam; Cook, Diane J.; Schmalz, Mark

2009-01-01

273

Cancer Health Empowerment for Living without Pain (Ca-HELP): study design and rationale for a tailored education and coaching intervention to enhance care of cancer-related pain  

PubMed Central

Background Cancer-related pain is common and under-treated. This article describes a study designed to test the effectiveness of a theory-driven, patient-centered coaching intervention to improve cancer pain processes and outcomes. Methods/Design The Cancer Health Empowerment for Living without Pain (Ca-HELP) Study is an American Cancer Society sponsored randomized trial conducted in Sacramento, California. A total of 265 cancer patients with at least moderate pain severity (Worst Pain Numerical Analog Score >=4 out of 10) or pain-related impairment (Likert score >= 3 out of 5) were randomly assigned to receive tailored education and coaching (TEC) or educationally-enhanced usual care (EUC); 258 received at least one follow-up assessment. The TEC intervention is based on social-cognitive theory and consists of 6 components (assess, correct, teach, prepare, rehearse, portray). Both interventions were delivered over approximately 30 minutes just prior to a scheduled oncology visit. The majority of visits (56%) were audio-recorded for later communication coding. Follow-up data including outcomes related to pain severity and impairment, self-efficacy for pain control and for patient-physician communication, functional status and well-being, and anxiety were collected at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. Discussion Building on social cognitive theory and pilot work, this study aims to test the hypothesis that a brief, tailored patient activation intervention will promote better cancer pain care and outcomes. Analyses will focus on the effects of the experimental intervention on pain severity and impairment (primary outcomes); self-efficacy and quality of life (secondary outcomes); and relationships among processes and outcomes of cancer pain care. If this model of coaching by lay health educators proves successful, it could potentially be implemented widely at modest cost. Trial Registration [Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT00283166] PMID:19737424

2009-01-01

274

Job Description Head Coach  

E-print Network

. Commitment to the retention and academic success of student athletes. Demonstrated coaching and recruiting success, experience in organizing and motivating student athletes to maximum performance ~ Ability to work Athletic Conference. Candidate must address the needs of a student population of great diversity - in age

Su, Xiao

275

Drugs and the Coach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume is based on the premise that professional preparation for coaching should include viable experiences in drug education, with particular reference to coping with drug-related problems. The first section provides general information on the purposes and effects of drugs, controls, and concepts of doping. The second section deals with four…

Clarke, Kenneth S., Ed.

276

Coaching Adolescent Athletes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coaching adolescent athletes can be challenging because of their varying degrees of physical, emotional, and social development and/or maturity. How much and how well each athlete develops tactically, psychologically, emotionally, and physically is directly influenced by these factors. This article discusses that the main reasons athletes…

VonMeter, Kerby

2004-01-01

277

From Teaching to Coaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the course of transitioning from classroom teacher to math instructional coach, Tara Zuspan identified critical themes and lessons she had learned. She focused her efforts on building relationships, partnering with the principal, understanding the process of change, and providing teachers with opportunities to collaborate. These intentional…

Zuspan, Tara

2013-01-01

278

Executive Coach Certification Program  

E-print Network

Certification Program (ECCP) will empower you as a coaching professional and provide the skills, structures and tools to deliver long term outcomes for your business. Workshop overview Globally recognised for its and creating sustainable transformation in a turbulent and demanding business environment. The ability

Liley, David

279

Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation  

PubMed Central

Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

Hess, Darlene

2013-01-01

280

Readiness for Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology and Patient Centered Medical Home Recognition Survey Results  

PubMed Central

Objective Determine the factors that impact HIT use and MU readiness for community health centers (CHCs). Background The HITECH Act allocates funds to Medicaid and Medicare providers to encourage the adoption of electronic health records (EHR), in an effort to improve health care quality and patient outcomes, and to reduce health care costs. Methods We surveyed CHCs on their Readiness for Meaningful Use (MU) of Health Information Technology (HIT) and Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Recognition, then we combined responses with 2009 Uniform Data System data to determine which factors impact use of HIT and MU readiness. Results Nearly 70% of CHCs had full or partial EHR adoption at the time of survey. Results are presented for centers with EHR adoption, by the length of time that their EHR systems have been in operation. PMID:24834365

Shin, Peter; Sharac, Jessica

2013-01-01

281

Proceedings of Student/Faculty Research Day, CSIS, Pace University, May 5th Usability Field Study of Home Health Monitoring Devices  

E-print Network

shrinks. There is a growing need for easy to use, mobile home-based health monitoring of the aged, and telehealth success. While the study of mobile home health device usability testing, in the healthcare domain Field Study of Home Health Monitoring Devices Used by Older Adults Rita Hubert School of Computer

Tappert, Charles

282

Respiratory Health among Korean Pupils in Relation to Home, School and Outdoor Environment  

PubMed Central

There are few studies about school-environment in relation to pupils' respiratory health, and Korean school-environment has not been characterized. All pupils in 4th grade in 12 selected schools in three urban cities in Korea received a questionnaire (n = 2,453), 96% participated. Gaseous pollutants and ultrafine particles (UFPs) were measured indoors (n = 34) and outdoors (n = 12) during winter, 2004. Indoor dampness at home was investigated by the questionnaire. To evaluate associations between respiratory health and environment, multiple logistic- and multi-level regression models were applied adjusting for potential confounders. The mean age of pupils was 10 yr and 49% were boys. No school had mechanical ventilation and CO2-levels exceeded 1,000 ppm in all except one of the classrooms. The indoor mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3 and formaldehyde were 0.6 µg/m3, 19 µg/m3, 8 µg/m3 and 28 µg/m3, respectively. The average level of UFPs was 18,230 pt/cm3 in the classrooms and 16,480 pt/cm3 outdoors. There were positive associations between wheeze and outdoor NO2, and between current asthma and outdoor UFPs. With dampness at home, pupils had more wheeze. In conclusion, outdoor UFPs and even low levels of NO2 may adversely contribute to respiratory health in children. High CO2-levels in classrooms and indoor dampness/mold at home should be reduced. PMID:21286005

Elfman, Lena; Wieslander, Gunilla; Ferm, Martin; Toren, Kjell; Norback, Dan

2011-01-01

283

Coaching as a profession: Ethical concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian Professional Coaching Association (CPCA) recently developed a code of ethics for coaches that was based on the Canadian Psychological Association's ethical code. Because the CPCA did not use coaches' actual experiences to develop their code, we solicited sport-related ethical concerns from coaches to determine the comprehensiveness of the code. Twelve male and seven female coaches from both individual

Colleen J. Haney; Bonita C. Long; Gail Howell-jones

1998-01-01

284

Levels of Engagement in Establishing Coaching Relationships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Case studies of two coaches that examine the levels of engagement of each coach as they worked to establish effective coaching relationships were examined in this study. Data were collected during a seven-month period and included: (a) the coaches' reflective journals; (b) pre- and post-surveys from each coach and teacher; (c) audio-recorded…

McGatha, Maggie

2008-01-01

285

Nutritional knowledge of UK coaches.  

PubMed

Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05). In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice. PMID:24727434

Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

2014-04-01

286

Public health and English local government: historical perspectives on the impact of ‘returning home  

PubMed Central

This article uses history to stimulate reflection on the present opportunities and challenges for public health practice in English local government. Its motivation is the paradox that despite Department of Health policy-makers’ allusions to ‘a long and proud history’ and ‘returning public health home’ there has been no serious discussion of that past local government experience and what we might learn from it. The article begins with a short resumé of the achievements of Victorian public health in its municipal location, and then considers the extensive responsibilities that it developed for environmental, preventive and health services by the mid-twentieth century. The main section discusses the early NHS, explaining why historians see the era as one of decline for the speciality of public health, leading to the reform of 1974, which saw the removal from local government and the abolition of the Medical Officer of Health role. Our discussion focuses on challenges faced before 1974 which raise organizational and political issues relevant to local councils today as they embed new public health teams. These include the themes of leadership, funding, integrated service delivery, communication and above all the need for a coherent vision and rationale for public health action in local authorities. PMID:24472776

Gorsky, Martin; Lock, Karen; Hogarth, Sue

2014-01-01

287

Paraprofessional Home Visitors' Perspectives on Addressing Poor Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research was conducted to understand paraprofessional home visitors' perceptions of their training in addressing poor mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence, and their actions in working with families in addressing these issues. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 paraprofessional home visitors. Three main…

Tandon, S. Darius; Mercer, Constance D.; Saylor, Elizabeth L.; Duggan, Anne K.

2008-01-01

288

Multi-sensors acquisition, data fusion, knowledge mining and alarm triggering in health smart homes for elderly people  

Microsoft Academic Search

We deal in this paper with the concept of health smart home (HSH) designed to follow dependent people at home in order to avoid the hospitalisation, limiting hospital sojourns to short acute care or fast specific diagnostic investigations. For elderly people the project of such a HSH has been called AISLE (Apartment with Intelligent Sensors for Longevity Effectiveness). For this

Jacques Demongeot; Gilles Virone; Florence Duchêne; Gila Benchetrit; Thierry Hervé; Norbert Noury; Vincent Rialle

2002-01-01

289

Staff responses to age?related health changes in people with an intellectual disability in group homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore how supervisors in group homes caring for people with intellectual disability responded to the development of age?related health changes in their residents. Ten group home supervisors working in the disability sector were interviewed once. Data were analysed using Dimensional Analysis. The study identified several factors related to whether a resident could stay

Ruth Webber; Barbara Bowers

2010-01-01

290

Ecosystem and population health: the role of Canadian physicians at home and abroad.  

PubMed Central

Seemingly intractable problems of overpopulation, ecologic degradation, diminishing resources and regional warfare are having a profound effect on global population health. Canadian physicians can assist in ameliorating these problems by helping to modify the overconsumption of natural resources at home and by participating in international health projects focused at the community level, where the health of individuals and that of their environment intersect. The author describes the work of the Canadian Hunger Foundation in Vietnam and Sri Lanka, where a team of professionals worked with local farmers to improve the local water supply, decrease soil erosion and increase food production. The team observed changes in the physical health of communities that resulted in part from interventions that empowered them to address their own problems. PMID:7553520

Woollard, R F

1995-01-01

291

Home National World Business Sports Cricket Entertainment Health Science Bollywood Celebs Geekwerks Now, 'artificial nose' to sniff out bacterial infections!  

E-print Network

Search Home National World Business Sports Cricket Entertainment Health Science Bollywood Celebs/DailyIndia.com Currently trending: Cricket, Charlie Sheen, Shahid Afridi, Lindsay Lohan, Kerala, Lady Gaga, Mumbai, Sachin

Suslick, Kenneth S.

292

Family Involvement in School-Based Health Promotion: Bringing Nutrition Information Home.  

PubMed

Family-school collaboration related to children's physical development has become increasingly important as childhood obesity rates continue to rise. The present study described the development and implementation of a literacy-based, family component of a school-based health education program and investigated its viability, acceptability, and effectiveness. Interactive children's books were the mechanism by which students, parents, and teachers received consistent messages at home and school regarding nutrition information. The home-school intervention served to bridge home and school cultures in an urban population. Preliminary process evaluation results indicated that the interactive children's books were feasible to implement in the school context. Parents, children, and teachers had positive perceptions of the books. Parents who received the books demonstrated increased knowledge of 5 a Day, the primary nutrition message communicated in the program. Although not statistically significant, after the first and second years of intervention, parents in the experimental group reported that their children were eating 0.54 and 0.36 additional servings of fruit and vegetables per day compared with children in the control group. The program did not seem to impact the availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables at home. PMID:19633724

Blom-Hoffman, Jessica; Wilcox, Kaila R; Dunn, Liam; Leff, Stephen S; Power, Thomas J

2008-12-01

293

Performance Evaluation Assistant Coach  

E-print Network

--__________________________________-.__,-__~--~~r_~r_~----------------__, Sport_---I/~!i!fjl:;v,~~.~~::..... f::Q; 1;> "'f "" ll1o/.,Jo/.,J'""-I / :::; 't;j '1-/ :: 0 'r-t AREAS. Knowledge of and adherence to rules and regulations i . Cooperation and communication with the administration j. Sports promotion k. Student advisement 4. The Coach's Knowledge of the Sport a. Skills

Su, Xiao

294

Coaching the alpha male.  

PubMed

Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization. PMID:15146736

Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

2004-05-01

295

"Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.  

PubMed

While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image. PMID:24056750

Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

2014-06-01

296

Guidelines for Environmental Health Management in Children's Homes in Sub-Sahara Africa  

PubMed Central

The field of environmental health focuses on the relationships between human health and well being and the influence of the physical, social and societal environments. Our understanding of the environment–health interface has progressed because of two relatively recent insights: First, the recognition that the unprecedented environmental changes of the last half-century are affecting global population health. Secondly, the recognition that children have greater vulnerability to environmental hazards and are inadequately protected by current regulatory standards. Efforts to redress this situation have shaped the current thrust in environmental health research toward preventing further harm to children’s health. The disproportionate vulnerability of children to environmental hazards can be explained by several reasons. Children are not “little adults.” It is known that children have greater risk of exposure and greater risk of harm compared to adults for many reasons that are unique to each developmental stage. Their behaviour and activity patterns bring them into greater contact with toxins. Children have important biological differences. Immature developing organs and tissues are more vulnerable to harm from toxic exposures. Immature metabolic and physiological systems less effectively protect the child from toxic exposure and effects. In addition, children have additional pathways of exposure that are not applicable to adults, e.g., in utero, via breast milk and via products such as toys, clothing, etc. Children also have a longer “shelf life.” They have much more of their life ahead of them during which time they will be exposed and may develop health problems as a result. Finally, children are more often involuntarily exposed and unable to avoid exposures of their own accord [1]. Due to the AIDS catastrophe in Sub-Saharan Africa, the numbers of children in difficult circumstances have increased. To mitigate the effects of the catastrophe, charitable organizations have sprung up to establish homes for such children, especially those orphaned by AIDS or those infected with HIV. It is important to ensure that environmental health hazards and risks are minimized in these children’s homes. By use of a conceptual synthesis approach, the authors attempt to generate guidelines from literature for environmental health management in children’s homes in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18180543

Muruka, Charles; Muruka, Andrew

2007-01-01

297

Philani Plus (+): A Mentor Mother Community Health Worker Home Visiting Program to Improve Maternal and Infants’ Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pregnant mothers in South African townships face multiple health risks for themselves and their babies. Existing clinic-based\\u000a services face barriers to access, utilization, and human resource capacities. Home visiting by community health workers (CHW)\\u000a can mitigate such barriers. The Philani Plus (+) Intervention Program builds upon the original Philani CHW home-visiting intervention\\u000a program for maternal and child nutrition by integrating

Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus; Ingrid M. le Roux; Mark Tomlinson; Nokwanele Mbewu; W. Scott Comulada; Karl le Roux; Jacqueline Stewart; Mary J. O’Connor; Mary Hartley; Kate Desmond; Erin Greco; Carol M. Worthman; Faith Idemundia; Dallas Swendeman

298

Elements of an Art - Agile Coaching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This tutorial gives you a lead on becoming or redefining yourself as an Agile Coach. Introduction to elements and dimensions of state-of-the-art Agile Coaching. How to position the agile coach to be effective in a larger setting. Making the agile transition - from a single team to thousands of people. How to support multiple teams as a coach. How to build a coaches network in your company. Challenges when the agile coach is a consultant and the organization is large.

Lundh, Erik

299

[The home health care experience in a model chronic, degenerative, genetic pathology: Huntington's disease].  

PubMed

Home assistance has recently received wide approval among the facilities provided to the individuals suffering from chronic-degenerative diseases. This mode of caring seems to offer both the opportunities to reduce costs and to allow the affected individual to live in a familiar environment. The increasing relevance of genetic diseases in the context of the National Health Service suggested the authors to analyze, by means of an ad hoc questionnaire, the experience of home assistance in a group of families with Huntington's Disease (HD). HD is a chronic, degenerative, genetic disease characterized by neurological and/or mental symptoms. The article underlines the peculiar and complex needs of individuals affected by genetic diseases and of their families. PMID:11293303

Jacopini, A G; Zinzi, P; Frustaci, A; Salmaso, D

2000-01-01

300

Assessment of the oral health condition of nursing home residents by primary care nurses.  

PubMed

We interviewed 36 primary care nurses in three Dutch nursing homes regarding the functional oral health and dental treatment needs of 331 care-dependent residents (average age 77.8 years). The nurses assessed the residents' oral health condition as good (8.3 on a scale of 0 to 10). Edentulous residents wearing dentures were considered to have better functional oral health than dentate residents wearing partial dentures and edentulous residents not wearing dentures. According to the nurses, only 9% of the residents required dental treatment. This finding is in contrast with an intraoral study of the same population, in which dentists determined that 73% of the residents needed dental treatment. PMID:25353656

Gerritsen, P F M; Schrijvers, A J P; Cune, M S; van der Bilt, A; de Putter, C

2014-11-01

301

Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

2006-01-01

302

Advocating for Coaching Education with the New "National Coaching Report"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is much variability in coach preparation across the United States. No one model of coach development seems to fit the needs of all levels of sport competition or the wide variety of consumers. Moreover, there are many entities involved in prescribing requirements such as national governing bodies, state legislatures and boards of education,…

Bodey, Kimberly J.; Brylinsky, Jody; Kuhlman, Jolynn

2008-01-01

303

Coaches' Experiences of Formal Coach Education: A Critical Sociological Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to recent academic reviews, formal coach education courses are rarely considered important or useful events in a broader coach learning process. At present, there is insufficient research to define the nature and extent of this problem which is likely to become more important under the prevailing governing rationalities of modernisation…

Piggott, David

2012-01-01

304

What Great Coaches Do Differently: 11 Elements of Effective Coaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why do some athletic coaches succeed every season while others suffer loss after loss? This book describes the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes of great athletic coaches. Where do they focus their attention? How do they spend their time and energy? And how can others gain the same advantages? Here, Rob Haworth and Todd Whitaker describe the…

Haworth, Rob; Whitaker, Todd

2010-01-01

305

Building successful leadership coaching relationships : Examining impact of matching criteria in a leadership coaching program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to employ a conceptual model to examine the relationship processes and mediating role of client-coach relationship between client-coach match criteria and coaching outcomes to advance the understanding of client-coach relationship's impact on leadership coaching. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Data collected from 74 client-coach pairs participating in a voluntary leadership coaching program at a military service academy during

Lisa A. Boyce; R. Jeffrey Jackson; Laura J. Neal

2010-01-01

306

Health Care Savings with the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Community Care of North Carolina's Experience  

PubMed Central

Abstract This study evaluated the financial impact of integrating a systemic care management intervention program (Community Care of North Carolina) with person-centered medical homes throughout North Carolina for non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities during almost 5 years of program history. It examined Medicaid claims for 169,676 non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities from January 2007 through third quarter 2011. Two models were used to estimate the program's impact on cost, within each year. The first employed a mixed model comparing member experiences in enrolled versus unenrolled months, accounting for regional differences as fixed effects and within physician group experience as random effects. The second was a pre-post, intervention/comparison group, difference-in-differences mixed model, which directly matched cohort samples of enrolled and unenrolled members on strata of preenrollment pharmacy use, race, age, year, months in pre-post periods, health status, and behavioral health history. The study team found significant cost avoidance associated with program enrollment for the non-elderly disabled population after the first years, savings that increased with length of time in the program. The impact of the program was greater in persons with multiple chronic disease conditions. By providing targeted care management interventions, aligned with person-centered medical homes, the Community Care of North Carolina program achieved significant savings for a high-risk population in the North Carolina Medicaid program. (Population Health Management 2013;17:141–148) PMID:24053757

DuBard, C. Annette; Ritter, Grant A.; Jackson, Carlos T.

2014-01-01

307

A motivational health companion in the home as part of an intelligent health monitoring sensor network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes our work in progress to develop a personal monitoring system that can monitor the physical and emotional condition of a patient by using contextual information from a sensor network, provide the patient with feedback concerning their health status and motivate the patient to adopt behavior with a positive health impact (such as exercising or taking medication at

Vanessa Evers; Sabine Wildvuur; Ben Kröse

2010-01-01

308

Bringing care home: how telemonitoring can expand population health management beyond the hospital.  

PubMed

With emerging technology, patients are able to access the health care system from settings such as their homes, long-term care facilities, and schools. Telemonitoring allows care teams to oversee patients' clinical data captured and transmitted by specialized devices, with minimal involvement or manual effort, on a near real-time basis. This review was undertaken to provide insight into the capacity of telemonitoring technology to improve population health. Despite the potential of telemonitoring, evidence for its clinical, economic, and patient-reported benefits is inconclusive. Much of the outcome variation seen in the literature may be due to the heterogeneity of the interventions' characteristics, with some telemonitoring programs more effectively integrating into standard practice, targeting patients, and utilizing technology. A particular challenge is the ability to comprehensively leverage data to improve health outcomes. To accomplish this, the mass data collected by the devices must be aggregated with data from other clinical systems and used to develop predictive algorithms that can be embedded across the continuum of care. Innovations such as the Healthe Intent cloud-based platform can support a population health strategy by integrating telemonitoring and electronic health record data. PMID:24569764

Aguilar, Kathleen M; Campbell, Rebecca S; Fiester, Angela; Simpson, Roy L; Hertel, Cheryl

2014-01-01

309

Cross-sectional study on health and social status of the oldest old patients at home care in Belgrade.  

PubMed

In the period of the last 50 years important changes in the age structure of the population in Serbia occurred. There was a very pronounced tendency of the total demographic aging of the population. The main aim of the Study is evaluation of basic health, functional and social status of the elderly patients (N = 645) admitted in Institute of Gerontology, Home Treatment and Care (IGHTC) Belgrade in 2001. Particular attention has been paid to the health and social status of the "oldest old" (90+ age) patients in comparing to the group of the "young old" (60-74 age). The purpose is to explore specific health and social need of the oldest old patients, which determine requirements for home care and could present risk factors for their institutionalization. Results can help in health promotion and preventive health care of the oldest old. The results show significantly smaller degree of utilization of health care services in the population of age 90+. We may raise the question of reason for this: the discrimination of the "oldest old" patients in the health security system, unavailability because of functional dependence and non-adjusted system of health care to the oldest patients. This fact confirms the importance of home care services. Home care services, not only contribute to the maintaining quality of life in the old age, but delay and/or prevent institutionalization of patients who are under greatest risk of this. This is for sure one step towards the rationalization of health care costs. PMID:19432214

Zikic, L; Jankelic, S; Milosevic, D; Despotovic, N; Erceg, P; Davidovic, M

2008-01-01

310

A mobile-health application to detect wandering patterns of elderly people in home environment.  

PubMed

Wandering is a common and risky behavior in people with dementia (PWD). In this paper, we present a mobile healthcare application to detect wandering patterns in indoor settings. The application harnesses consumer electronics devices including WiFi access points and mobile phones and has been tested successfully in a home environment. Experimental results show that the mobile-health application is able to detect wandering patterns including lapping, pacing and random in real-time. Once wandering is detected, an alert message is sent using SMS (Short Message Service) to attending caregivers or physicians for further examination and timely interventions. PMID:24111292

Vuong, N K; Goh, S G A; Chan, S; Lau, C T

2013-01-01

311

Persuasiveness of a Mobile Lifestyle Coaching Application Using Social Facilitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a field study we compared usage and acceptance of a mobile lifestyle coaching application with a traditional web application. The participants (N=40) documented health behaviour (activity and healthy nutrition) daily, trying to reach a defined goal. In addition, health questionnaires and social facilitation features were provided to enhance motivation. Acceptance of the system was high in both groups. The

Roland Gasser; Dominique Brodbeck; Markus Degen; Jürg Luthiger; Remo Wyss; Serge Reichlin

2006-01-01

312

More Than Mentors: Principal Coaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A professional development program for leadership, Coaching Leaders to Attain Student Success (CLASS), prepares individuals to coach new and experienced school principals. The program is the product of collaboration between the New Teacher Center at University of California Santa Cruz and the Association of California School Administrators. (MLF)

Bloom, Gary; Castagna, Claire; Warren, Betsy

2003-01-01

313

Appendix 14-Ia Coach's Employment  

E-print Network

Appendix 14-Ia Coach's Employment Non Institutional Camp/Clinic Revised August 2010 ATHLETICS STAFF MEMBERS' EMPLOYMENT AT A NON-WILLIAM & MARY CAMP/CLINIC Coach's Name: ______ Sport) No athletics department staff member may be employed (salary or volunteer) in any capacity by a camp or clinic

Swaddle, John

314

Coaches Guide to Sport Law.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide focuses on the legal responsibilities of coaches and physical educators, but much of the content is equally applicable to those who teach sports skills in other recreational settings. The guide presents the legal duties of the coach or teacher. The content is drawn from a review of sport lawsuits (or sports injury litigation) over the…

Nygaard, Gary; Boone, Thomas H.

315

Sports Psychology and the Coach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph documents the speeches presented at the 1988 Symposium on Sports Psychology and the Coach. Presentations ranged from empirical research studies to anecdotal methodologies for coping with problems of anxiety. The following presentations are included: (1) "The Coach as Psychologist: When and How" (Robert Rotella); (2) "Psychology for…

Cohen, Greta L., Ed.

316

Embracing Coaching as Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because the author and his colleagues at the Center for Leadership and Learning Communities believe that instructional coaching is one of the most exciting developments in education in a long time, they have examined the questions this new strategy has raised for education leaders: Should coaching replace some traditional forms of teacher…

Driscoll, Mark J.

2008-01-01

317

Relational Demography in Coaching Dyads  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The decline in the proportion of female head coaches in the intercollegiate ranks is one of the most significant issues in the realm of women's sports today. To extend the body of research that has studied this topic, we investigated the impact relational demographic effects on the work attitudes of coaches, which differs from previous research…

Sagas, Michael; Paetzold, Ramona; Ashley, Frank

2005-01-01

318

Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the get healthy information and coaching service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.  

PubMed

The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program. PMID:24662895

O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

2014-11-01

319

Assessment of Health Complaints among Pediatric Residents of FEMA-Supplied Trailers and Mobile Homes in Hancock County, Mississippi  

E-print Network

Assessment of Health Complaints among Pediatric Residents of FEMA-Supplied Trailers and Mobile visits for respiratory illnesses among children living in FEMA-supplied trailers and mobile homes in Hancock County, Mississippi, after Hurricane Katrina, the Mississippi State Department of Health requested

320

Health Facilities: New York State's Oversight of Nursing Homes and Hospitals. Report to the Honorable Bill Green, House of Representatives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the request of Congressman William Green, the General Accounting Office (GAO) evaluated the validity of allegations about deficiencies in the New York State Department of Health's nursing home and hospital inspection processes for certification for participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health Care Financing Administration and…

General Accounting Office, New York, NY. Regional Office.

321

What is the paradigm: hospital or home health care for pressure ulcers?  

PubMed

A home health care (HHC) referral should link the patient in a cost-effective fashion to the physician, home care, and instructions regarding ulcer management. Twenty-one patients (mean age, 74.6 years) had stage III pressure ulcers (<100 cm2) and an involved family member at home. Risk and contributing factors included cardiac disease (n = 9), hypertension (n = 14), end-stage renal disease (n = 7), smoking (n = 11), diabetes (n = 8), chronic brain syndrome (n = 14), cerebrovascular accident (n = 5), and above-the-knee amputation (n = 2). Treatment regimens included standard wound care, pressure relief and, where appropriate, culture-specific antibiotics, as well as a rehabilitation program. Home care progressively decreased the frequency of the nurse HHC and physician office visits. Resolution of the pressure ulcer varied from 6 to 32 weeks. Only two patients had progression of their wound and required hospital readmission. The billable fees included: 1) an office visit, $30.00 (medicare reimbursement, $14.00); 2) the HHC nurse visit, $159.00 (medicare reimbursement, $105.00); 3) supplies, $75.00 to $150.00/week (variable reimbursement); 4) hospitalization, $400.00 to $900.00/day; and 5) a chronic-care bed, $400.00 to $750.00/day. HHC, given a responsible support team and an involved family member, was more socially and financially acceptable than an inpatient facility. Intermittent physician visits with HHC proved safe and reliable, with 90 per cent successfully healing their wounds. PMID:10190350

O'Brien, S P; Gahtan, V; Wind, S; Kerstein, M D

1999-04-01

322

The Preventive Health Education and Medical Home Project: a predictive and contextual model for low-income families.  

PubMed

The Preventive Health Education and Medical Home Project (PHEMHP) is a predictive and contextual model intended to reduce low levels of health services utilization and improve preventive health techniques and disease self-management for low-income families in South Central Los Angeles, with the ultimate goal of attaching each child to a medical home. The model is designed to be implemented through educational and case management strategies. This paper presents the conceptual framework, critical intervention activities, and the different implementation variations the PHEMHP has already assumed. Implications for research, policy, and practice are discussed. PMID:19821189

Tataw, David B; James, Frederick; Bazargan, Shahrzad

2009-01-01

323

Health and nutritional status of boys aged 6 to 12 years in a children observation home.  

PubMed

One hundred and ninety two boys in the age group 6 to 12 years, living in a Children Observation Home in Delhi were studied for their nutritional status and morbidity profile. Body Mass Index (BMI), an age-independent index was used to grade the nutritional status according to which, 36.7% of the boys were found to be malnourished. Signs of specific nutritional deficiencies were observed in 13.5% of the boys. Morbidity in some form or the other was present in 148 (60%) boys. Skin disease was the commonest morbidity (31.7%), followed by diseases of the oral cavity (16.1%), acute respiratory infections (8.6%) and diseases of the ear (9.9%). Need for health promotional activities is stressed to reduce the morbidity and improve the health status of these children. PMID:9119431

Chhabra, P; Garg, S; Sharma, N; Bansal, R D

1996-01-01

324

Using vision to become viable: how rural hospital-based home health can thrive.  

PubMed

It's been the trend for some years that, with their own particular set of challenges and constraints, hospital-based home health agencies have struggled to maintain profitability and efficiency in their operations. That can especially be true for hospital-based agencies operating in more rural areas, even as such agencies have been shown to play an important--or even critical--role in ensuring individuals in the communities they serve have access to needed treatment and health care services. Two executives who've successfully led a rural hospital-based agency discuss how to engage employees, referral sources, and communities and instill the right core philosophy to help your business succeed and grow. PMID:20391656

2010-02-01

325

Learning How to Coach: The Different Learning Situations Reported by Youth Ice Hockey Coaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Large-scale coach education programs have been developed in many countries around the world to help prepare coaches for their important role. Coaches have said that they also learn to coach from experience, starting from when they were young athletes until their current coaching positions. Finally, in the last decade, Internet…

Wright, Trevor; Trudel, Pierre; Culver, Diane

2007-01-01

326

Enhancing the Provision of Coach Education: The Recommendations of UK Coaching Practitioners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Coach education has been identified as a key vehicle for raising the standard of coaching practice. However, the existing body of literature suggests that coach education has had a limited impact on the learning and development of coaching practitioners. In this respect, it has been contended that coach educations ills might be…

Nelson, Lee; Cushion, Christopher; Potrac, Paul

2013-01-01

327

Understanding How Ontario High School Teacher-Coaches Learn to Coach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: There are approximately 52,000 teacher-coaches coaching 750,000 high school student-athletes in Canada. Despite this large population, Canadian high school teacher-coaches remain relatively unstudied. High school coaches in Canada are often asked to coach sports with which they are unfamiliar, and because they are not required to…

Winchester, Geoff; Culver, Diane; Camiré, Martin

2013-01-01

328

Health care savings with the patient-centered medical home: Community Care of North Carolina's experience.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the financial impact of integrating a systemic care management intervention program (Community Care of North Carolina) with person-centered medical homes throughout North Carolina for non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities during almost 5 years of program history. It examined Medicaid claims for 169,676 non-elderly Medicaid recipients with disabilities from January 2007 through third quarter 2011. Two models were used to estimate the program's impact on cost, within each year. The first employed a mixed model comparing member experiences in enrolled versus unenrolled months, accounting for regional differences as fixed effects and within physician group experience as random effects. The second was a pre-post, intervention/comparison group, difference-in-differences mixed model, which directly matched cohort samples of enrolled and unenrolled members on strata of preenrollment pharmacy use, race, age, year, months in pre-post periods, health status, and behavioral health history. The study team found significant cost avoidance associated with program enrollment for the non-elderly disabled population after the first years, savings that increased with length of time in the program. The impact of the program was greater in persons with multiple chronic disease conditions. By providing targeted care management interventions, aligned with person-centered medical homes, the Community Care of North Carolina program achieved significant savings for a high-risk population in the North Carolina Medicaid program. PMID:24053757

Fillmore, Herbert; DuBard, C Annette; Ritter, Grant A; Jackson, Carlos T

2014-06-01

329

Evaluation: Your Key to Better Coaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Coaches Evaluation Instrument (CEI) is a simple form to help coaches, administrators, and athletes evaluate coaching performance. The instrument may be used to supplement existing evaluation procedures and to help coaches identify areas for improvement. A copy of the CEI and a sample score sheet are included. (IAH)

Docheff, Dennis

1989-01-01

330

Developing Female Coaches: Strategies from Women Themselves  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore strategies for the development of aspiring female coaches based on the ideas of existing high-performance female coaches. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with national-level female coaches in the United Kingdom, four recurrent ideas for developing female coaches in a male-dominated profession emerged.…

Norman, Leanne

2012-01-01

331

Coaching the Mentor: Facilitating Reflection and Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to explore the process of coaching a mentor of experienced teachers. In particular, we sought to determine if coaching would help a mentor to compare her espoused beliefs about mentoring to her mentoring behaviors and possibly resolve any dissonance. The mentor and coach (the co?researchers) participated in a platform conference, three coaching conferences, and

Stephen P. Gordon; Sonja R. Brobeck

2010-01-01

332

A Coach's Code of Conduct. Position Statement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coaches exert a profound impact on our youths; therefore, society sets high expectations for them. As such, whether coaches are compensated or work solely as volunteers, they are responsible for executing coaching as a professional. If we are to continue to enhance the cultural perceptions of coaching, we must strive to develop and master the…

Lyman, Linda; Ewing, Marty; Martino, Nan

2009-01-01

333

Coaching in Community Settings: A Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coaching is a means of instruction that combines elements of mentoring and tutoring in natural community environments. Coach and student characteristics, processes of coaching, and outcomes of coaching in varied community settings and across different developmental levels are examined. Programs utilizing adults and peers from the community in…

Nettles, Saundra Murray

334

Effects of water-damaged homes after flooding: health status of the residents and the environmental risk factors.  

PubMed

We evaluated the health status of residents and the environmental risk factors of housing after flooding. Questionnaires were distributed to 595 selected households (one adult resident per household) in six areas in Japan which were severely flooded between 2004 and 2010. A total of 379 responses were obtained. Indoor dampness and visible mold growth significantly increased in homes with greater flood damage. The incidence of respiratory, dermal, ocular, and nasal symptoms one week after flooding was significantly higher in flooded homes compared with non-flooded homes, the incidence of psychological disorders was significantly high for six months after flooding, and the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder was significantly high six months after flooding. Significant risk factors for respiratory and nasal symptoms included proximity to industrial and waste incineration plants. Our results suggest that rapid action should be taken after flooding to ensure adequate public health and environmental hygiene in the water-damaged homes. PMID:23802658

Azuma, Kenichi; Ikeda, Koichi; Kagi, Naoki; Yanagi, U; Hasegawa, Kenichi; Osawa, Haruki

2014-04-01

335

Determinants of self assessed health among Spanish older people living at home  

PubMed Central

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To identify the main determinants of self assessed health among community dwelling elderly. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: A representative sample of 677 people aged 65 and over of the city of Madrid, Spain. DESIGN: Cross sectional study. Information was collected through personal interviews at the homes of the selected subjects. The five category dependent variable was grouped into two categories: good and poor self assessed health. Age, sex, social class, use of physician services, number of chronic conditions, and functional capacity, were included as main explanatory factors. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated through multiple logistic regression models. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 49.5% of subjects rated their health as good or very good. Those aged 85 and over rated their health higher than those aged 65-74 (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 0.37; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.18, 0.77). The adjusted OR for an increase of three chronic conditions was 3.48 (95% CI: 2.49, 4.85). Functional capacity also showed a strong independent effect (OR: 3.64; 95% CI: 1.89, 7.02). Social class was one of the main determinants for the youngest group, with those in the upper class reporting a better health perception (OR: 3.28 95% CI: 1.70, 6.35), but showed no effect in the oldest old (OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 0.57, 1.96). CONCLUSIONS: Age, chronic conditions, and functional status were the main determinants of perceived health among Spanish elderly. The effect of social class on perceived health markedly decreases with age. This study may contribute to a better utilisation and interpretation of self ratings in research and in general practice.   PMID:10492734

Damian, J.; Ruigomez, A.; Pastor, V.; Martin-Moreno, J. M.

1999-01-01

336

Pairing HIV-positive prisoners with volunteer life coaches to maintain health-promoting behavior upon release: a mixed-methods needs analysis and pilot study.  

PubMed

Drawing on individuals who volunteer in US prisons to mentor HIV-infected inmates returning to the community may promote successful transitions. Evaluations published in the scientific literature of such community linkage programs are scant. Our quantitative and qualitative methods needs analysis and pilot study entailed interviewing convenience samples of 24 HIV-positive persons recently released from Georgia correctional facilities and 12 potential volunteer mentors. Both releasees and potential mentors were open to the establishment of a mentoring program. Releasees wanted nonjudgmental mentors. Releasees and volunteers had statistically significant differences in marital status, education, current employment, and possession of a driver's license but not in degree of religious involvement and attitudes toward condom use. A volunteer-staffed program, perhaps more aptly named "life coaching" than mentoring, to help HIV-infected persons to transition from prison to the community may be feasible. Success will require adequately trained volunteers and a straightforward program. PMID:20030499

Spaulding, Anne C; Sumbry, Anitra R; Brzozowski, Amanda K; Ramos, Kevin L; Perez, Sebastian D; Maggio, David M; Seals, Ryan M; Wingood, Gina M

2009-12-01

337

Leaving care and mental health: outcomes for children in out-of-home care during the transition to adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

There were 59,500 Children in out-of-home care in England in 2008. Research into this population points to poor health and quality of life outcomes over the transition to adult independence. This undesirable outcome applies to mental health, education and employment. This lack of wellbeing for the individual is a burden for health and social care services, suggesting limitations in the

Jane Akister; Matt Owens; Ian M Goodyer

2010-01-01

338

Career coaching: innovative academic-practice partnership for professional development.  

PubMed

This article describes an academic-practice partnership that uses career coaching to support the health care system's strategic plans to increase nurses' educational level. Nurses and other employees seek coaching to explore their career path and create an educational plan to accomplish their goal. Career coaching by nursing faculty provides a unique service as they have expert knowledge of various educational programs as well as methods for achieving academic success. The academic-practice partnership is a win-win-win; the health care system achieves advancement of professional nursing practice, employees are supported to advance their education and professional nursing practice, and faculty benefit from immersion in current professional concerns and issues. PMID:24779714

Fowler, Debra L

2014-05-01

339

Nutrition and eating in female college athletes: a survey of coaches.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to gather information from coaches regarding their monitoring/management of athlete eating and weight, knowledge of nutritional health issues, availability of prevention/intervention services for athletes at their school, experience with athletes exhibiting symptoms of eating and body image disturbances, and their attitudes toward eating and weight in the sport. A total of 303 coaches (51% response rate) involved in six sports (i.e., gymnastics, swimming, basketball, softball, track, and volleyball) at all levels of collegiate competition (NCAA Divisions I, II, III, and NAIA) completed a 40-item survey. Gender was found to be related to differential responding on only one of the 40 items, while sport and level of competition were related to responses on multiple items. Gymnastics coaches and NCAA Division I coaches differed significantly from coaches of other sports and divisions in that they reported more monitoring/management behaviors, had more experience with athletes exhibiting eating disturbances, and had more resources available for preventing and treating athletes with eating disorders. Gymnastics coaches also differed from other coaches on a number of items related to their attitudes toward eating and weight in the sport. Many coaches have encountered disturbed eating among their athletes, and some of their coaching attitudes and behaviors may inadvertently increase the risk for such disturbances. Implications for clinical and sport psychologists providing prevention or intervention services to intercollegiate athletes are discussed. PMID:16801252

Heffner, Jaimee L; Ogles, Benjamin M; Gold, Ellsa; Marsden, Kimberlyann; Johnson, Michael

2003-01-01

340

Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.  

PubMed

Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

2013-05-01

341

With the support of COACHES AND CONTEXT: DO COACHES ORCHESTRATE?  

E-print Network

quality coaches; Working with elite and developmental athletes. Ages between 35 and 52 years old is important is that athletes believe in what I say." Stakeholders have to believe in them and in their agendas

342

Newborn care practices at home and in health facilities in 4 regions of Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Ethiopia is one of the ten countries with the highest number of neonatal deaths globally, and only 1 in 10 women deliver with a skilled attendant. Promotion of essential newborn care practices is one strategy for improving newborn health outcomes that can be delivered in communities as well as facilities. This article describes newborn care practices reported by recently-delivered women (RDWs) in four regions of Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a household survey with two-stage cluster sampling to assess newborn care practices among women who delivered a live baby in the period 1 to 7 months prior to data collection. Results The majority of women made one antenatal care (ANC) visit to a health facility, although less than half made four or more visits and women were most likely to deliver their babies at home. About one-fifth of RDWs in this survey had contact with Health Extension Workers (HEWS) during ANC, but nurse/midwives were the most common providers, and few women had postnatal contact with any health provider. Common beneficial newborn care practices included exclusive breastfeeding (87.6%), wrapping the baby before delivery of the placenta (82.3%), and dry cord care (65.2%). Practices contrary to WHO recommendations that were reported in this population of recent mothers include bathing during the first 24 hours of life (74.7%), application of butter and other substances to the cord (19.9%), and discarding of colostrum milk (44.5%). The results suggest that there are not large differences for most essential newborn care indicators between facility and home deliveries, with the exception of delayed bathing and skin-to-skin care. Conclusions Improving newborn care and newborn health outcomes in Ethiopia will likely require a multifaceted approach. Given low facility delivery rates, community-based promotion of preventive newborn care practices, which has been effective in other settings, is an important strategy. For this strategy to be successful, the coverage of counseling delivered by HEWs and other community volunteers should be increased. PMID:24289501

2013-01-01

343

Facilitating Out-of-Home Caregiving Through Health Information Technology: Survey of Informal Caregivers' Current Practices, Interests, and Perceived Barriers  

PubMed Central

Background Many patients with chronic conditions are supported by out-of-home informal caregivers—family members, friends, and other individuals who provide care and support without pay—who, if armed with effective consumer health information technology, could inexpensively facilitate their care. Objective We sought to understand caregivers’ use of, interest in, and perceived barriers to health information technology for out-of-home caregiving. Methods We conducted 2 sequential Web-based surveys with a national sample of individuals who provide out-of-home caregiving to an adult family member or friend with a chronic illness. We queried respondents about their use of health information technology for out-of-home caregiving and used multivariable regression to investigate caregiver and care-recipient characteristics associated with caregivers’ technology use for caregiving. Results Among 316 out-of-home caregiver respondents, 34.5% (109/316) reported using health information technology for caregiving activities. The likelihood of a caregiver using technology increased significantly with intensity of caregiving (as measured by number of out-of-home caregiving activities). Compared with very low intensity caregivers, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of technology use was 1.88 (95% CI 1.01-3.50) for low intensity caregivers, 2.39 (95% CI 1.11-5.15) for moderate intensity caregivers, and 3.70 (95% CI 1.62-8.45) for high intensity caregivers. Over 70% (149/207) of technology nonusers reported interest in using technology in the future to support caregiving. The most commonly cited barriers to technology use for caregiving were health system privacy rules that restrict access to care-recipients’ health information and lack of familiarity with programs or websites that facilitate out-of-home caregiving. Conclusions Health information technology use for out-of-home caregiving is common, especially among individuals who provide more intense caregiving. Health care systems can address the mismatch between caregivers’ interest in and use of technology by modifying privacy policies that impede information exchange. PMID:23841987

Piette, John D; Jenchura, Emily C; Asch, Steven M; Rosland, Ann-Marie

2013-01-01

344

Case management insider. Home health care--a key component of discharge planning.  

PubMed

Home care is an important intervention to consider for virtually every patient you discharge to home. By using the strategies discussed above, you can increase your percentage of patients going home with this important service. Remember to assess every patient on admission and to reassess every patient daily. Standardize your assessment questions using a tool that includes social work and home care referral criteria. Finally, consider home care as one of the most important tools in your readmission reduction toolbox! PMID:25330706

Cesta, Toni

2014-11-01

345

Research on linguistic concept creation method applied to environmental comfort sensors in health smart home.  

PubMed

We endeavor to provide a novel tool to evaluate environmental comfort level in Health Smart Home (HSH). HSH is regarded a good alternative for the independent life of elders and people with disability. Numerous intelligent devices, installed within a home environment, can provide the resident with continuous monitoring and comfortable environment. In this paper, a novel method of evaluating environmental comfort level is provided. An intelligent sensor is a fuzzy comfort sensor that can measure and fusion the environmental parameters. Based upon the results, it will further give a linguistic description about the environmental comfort level, in the manner of an expert system. The core of the sensor is multi-parameter information fusion. Similar to human behavior, the sensor makes all the evaluation about the surrounding environment's comfort level based on the symbolic measurement theory. We applied chart representation theory in multivariate analysis in the biomedical engineering field to complete the human comfortable sensor's linguistic concept creation. We achieved better performance when using this method to complete multi-parameter fusion and fuzziness. It is our belief that this method can be used in both biology intelligent sensing and many other areas, where the quantitative and qualitative information transform is needed. PMID:17281642

Xin, Li; Wenxue, Hong; Jialin, Song; Jiannan, Kang

2005-01-01

346

Housing and Health in Ghana: The Psychosocial Impacts of Renting a Home  

PubMed Central

This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study investigating the impacts of renting a home on the psychosocial health of tenants in the Accra Metropolitan Area (AMA) in Ghana. In-depth interviews (n = 33) were conducted with private renters in Adabraka, Accra. The findings show that private renters in the AMA face serious problems in finding appropriate and affordable rental units, as well as a persistent threat of eviction by homeowners. These challenges tend to predispose renters to psychosocial distress and diminishing ontological security. Findings are relevant to a range of pluralistic policy options that emphasize both formal and informal housing provision, together with the reorganization and decentralization of the Rent Control Board to the district level to facilitate easy access by the citizenry. PMID:20616989

Luginaah, Isaac; Arku, Godwin; Baiden, Philip

2010-01-01

347

Risk Factors for Hospitalization in a National Sample of Medicare Home Health Care Patients  

PubMed Central

Acute care hospitalization during or immediately following a Medicare home health care (HHC) episode is a major adverse outcome, but little has been published about HHC patient-level risk factors for hospitalization. We determined risk factors at HHC admission associated with subsequent acute care hospitalization in a nationally representative Medicare patient sample (n=374,123). Hospitalization was measured using Medicare claims data; risk factors were measured using Outcome Assessment and Information Set data. Seventeen percent of sample members were hospitalized. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that the most influential risk factors (all p<.001) were: skin wound as primary HHC diagnosis; clinician-judged guarded rehabilitation prognosis; congestive heart failure as primary HHC diagnosis; presence of depressive symptoms; dyspnea severity; and Black, compared to White. HHC initiatives that minimize chronic condition exacerbations, and that actively treat depressive symptoms, might help reduce Medicare patient hospitalizations. Unmeasured reasons for higher hospitalization rates among Black HHC patients deserve further investigation. PMID:24781967

Fortinsky, Richard H.; Madigan, Elizabeth A.; Sheehan, T. Joseph; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Kleppinger, Alison

2012-01-01

348

Effects of out-of-home mental health treatment on probability of criminal charge during the transition to adulthood.  

PubMed

Criminal justice-related outcomes for youth who have been served in out-of-home mental health settings such as residential treatment and inpatient hospitalization are unclear. This study longitudinally modeled the changing probability of being charged with a crime from age 16 to 25, including being served in out-of-home treatment and aging into adulthood, while controlling for person-level covariates such as gender, race, past criminal charges, and mental health diagnoses. Results indicated that out-of-home treatment was related to a decreased probability of being charged with a crime during treatment. However, the preventive effect was small; estimates indicated only one criminal charge avoided for every 4 years of out-of-home treatment. Out-of-home treatment had no relationship to posttreatment probability of charge. Other significant contributors to being charged included gender, a substance use diagnosis, and an offense record prior to age 16. Evidence indicated that out-of-home treatment was used as an alternative to detention and incarceration for both juveniles and adults. PMID:21729021

Pullmann, Michael D

2011-07-01

349

Mobile Web-Based Monitoring and Coaching: Feasibility in Chronic Migraine  

PubMed Central

Background The Internet can facilitate diary monitoring (experience sampling, ecological momentary assessment) and behavioral coaching. Online digital assistance (ODA) is a generic tool for mobile Web-based use, intended as an adjuvant to face-to-face or Internet-based cognitive behavioral treatment. A current ODA application was designed to support home-based training of behavioral attack prevention in chronic migraine, focusing on the identification of attack precursors and the support of preventive health behaviour. Objective The aim was to establish feasibility of the ODA approach in terms of technical problems and participant compliance, and ODA acceptability on the basis of ratings of user-friendliness, potential burden, and perceived support of the training for behavioral attack prevention in migraine. Methods ODA combines mobile electronic diary monitoring with direct human online coaching of health behavior according to the information from the diary. The diary contains three parts covering the following: (1) migraine headache and medication use, (2) attack precursors, and (3) self-relaxation and other preventive behavior; in addition, menstruation (assessed in the evening diary) and disturbed sleep (assessed in the morning diary) is monitored. The pilot study consisted of two runs conducted with a total of five women with chronic migraine without aura. ODA was tested for 8.5 days (range 4-12 days) per participant. The first test run with three participants tested 4-5 diary prompts per day. The second run with another three participants (including one subject who participated in both runs) tested a reduced prompting scheme (2-3 prompts per day) and minor adaptations to the diary. Online coaching was executed twice daily on workdays. Results ODA feasibility was established on the basis of acceptable data loss (1.2% due to the personal digital assistant; 5.6% due to failing Internet transmission) and good participant compliance (86.8% in the second run). Run 1 revealed some annoyance with the number of prompts per day. Overall ODA acceptability was evident by the positive participant responses concerning user-friendliness, absence of burden, and perceived support of migraine attack prevention. The software was adapted to further increase the flexibility of the application. Conclusions ODA is feasible and well accepted. Tolerability is a sensitive issue, and the balance between benefit and burden must be considered with care. ODA offers a generic tool to combine mobile coaching with diary monitoring,independently of time and space. ODA effects on improvement of migraine remain to be established. PMID:18166526

Mak, Sander B; Houtveen, Jan H; Kleiboer, Annet M; van Doornen, Lorenz JP

2007-01-01

350

Wellness Coaching for Obesity: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

D.S. presented to a medical and surgical weight-loss program to initiate bariatric surgery. He had made numerous attempts at weight loss to no avail and was taking steps toward bariatric surgery as a last viable option. D.S.'s health insurance provider required 3 months of supervised weight loss prior to approval for surgery, and this was initiated with a board-certified bariatrician (MD) and a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN)/wellness coach. D.S. presented with a body mass index (BMI) >40 and was classified as morbidly obese with comorbidities of high cholesterol and hyperglycemia and degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the knees. D.S. began the process outlined by his insurance company, meeting with the MD and RDN/wellness coach monthly. A plan was developed by D.S. and his RDN/wellness coach that alligned with his wellness vision, values, and lifestyle. D.S. ate meals and snacks at regular intervals throughout the day, consumed little to no red meat, increased his consumption of fruits and vegetables, and spent 1 hour daily in a swimming pool—walking, swimming, or both. By the end of the 3-month period required by the insurance provider, D.S. had lost more than 30 lbs, improved his exercise capacity, no longer used a cane, and chose to continue with coaching rather than undergo bariatric surgery. D.S. continued to meet with the MD and RDN monthly for 1 year and averaged a 10-lb weight loss per month for a total of 120 lbs, normalizing his blood panels and improving his joint mobility. D.S. continued to meet with the RDN/wellness coach for a total of 10 visits during year 2 and quarterly visits through year 3. D.S. lost a total of 240 lbs, maintained the weight loss over the 3-year period, and achieved these results solely through lifestyle interventions. Although bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for class 2 and 3 obesity, many patients pursue this treatment option without the help of medical and commercial weight loss personnel to improve the likelihood of weight loss sustainability. The investment of lifestyle intervention in this circumstance was less than $5000 (exculsive of blood panels) compared with the $20 000 cost of bariatric surgery at the time of intervention. PMID:24278847

2013-01-01

351

Wellness coaching for obesity: a case report.  

PubMed

D.S. presented to a medical and surgical weight-loss program to initiate bariatric surgery. He had made numerous attempts at weight loss to no avail and was taking steps toward bariatric surgery as a last viable option. D.S.'s health insurance provider required 3 months of supervised weight loss prior to approval for surgery, and this was initiated with a board-certified bariatrician (MD) and a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN)/wellness coach. D.S. presented with a body mass index (BMI) >40 and was classified as morbidly obese with comorbidities of high cholesterol and hyperglycemia and degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the knees. D.S. began the process outlined by his insurance company, meeting with the MD and RDN/wellness coach monthly. A plan was developed by D.S. and his RDN/wellness coach that alligned with his wellness vision, values, and lifestyle. D.S. ate meals and snacks at regular intervals throughout the day, consumed little to no red meat, increased his consumption of fruits and vegetables, and spent 1 hour daily in a swimming pool-walking, swimming, or both. By the end of the 3-month period required by the insurance provider, D.S. had lost more than 30 lbs, improved his exercise capacity, no longer used a cane, and chose to continue with coaching rather than undergo bariatric surgery. D.S. continued to meet with the MD and RDN monthly for 1 year and averaged a 10-lb weight loss per month for a total of 120 lbs, normalizing his blood panels and improving his joint mobility. D.S. continued to meet with the RDN/wellness coach for a total of 10 visits during year 2 and quarterly visits through year 3. D.S. lost a total of 240 lbs, maintained the weight loss over the 3-year period, and achieved these results solely through lifestyle interventions. Although bariatric surgery is a viable treatment option for class 2 and 3 obesity, many patients pursue this treatment option without the help of medical and commercial weight loss personnel to improve the likelihood of weight loss sustainability. The investment of lifestyle intervention in this circumstance was less than $5000 (exculsive of blood panels) compared with the $20 000 cost of bariatric surgery at the time of intervention. PMID:24278847

Schwartz, Julie

2013-07-01

352

Ethical considerations for the utilization of tele-health technologies in home and hospice care by the nursing profession.  

PubMed

Home care, including hospice care, is a growing component of the current healthcare system and pertains to care services that are provided to individuals, their family members, and caregivers in their own residence. Both domains face funding limitations as life expectancy and the segment of the population older than 65 years increase. Tele-health, defined as the use of advanced telecommunication technologies to enable communication between patients and healthcare providers separated by geographic distance, is perceived as a concept that can enhance both home and hospice care and address some of the current challenges. This article discusses ethical challenges associated with the utilization of tele-health technologies by the nursing profession in the home setting. These factors form a framework for the ethical considerations that result from the introduction of these technologies in nursing practice. Specifically, the article discusses the issue of privacy and confidentiality of patient data, informed consent, equity of access, promoting dependency versus independence, the lack of human touch and the impact of technology on the nurse-patient relationship, and the medicalization of the home environment. These issues constitute a road map both for nursing practitioners who are aiming to provide an efficient delivery of services in the home and for nursing administrators who are asked to make judgments about the use of tele-health technology as a supplement to traditional care and as a cost-saving tool. PMID:16449885

Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Courtney, Karen L

2006-01-01

353

Nutritional and health status among nursing home residents in Lebanon: comparison across gender in a national cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background This study described the differences between elderly men and women living in Lebanese long-term care nursing homes on socio-economic, health and nutritional status. Methods This study used a cross-sectional design. Field researchers obtained data from 221 residents; 148 (67%) women and 73 (33%) men, living in 36 nursing homes. Data on health conditions; nutritional, psychological, and functional status; socio-demographic characteristics, as well as social relations were collected. The analysis used both chi-square and t-test tests. Results The majority of elderly had low socio-economic and poor health status. In comparison to men, women were significantly less educated, had lower occupational status, had no partner, relied financially on their children and relatives, and enjoyed better social relations and health behaviours. Furthermore, the prevalence of both; malnutrition, and at risk of malnutrition, were at 3.2% and 27.6% respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between women and men on Mini Nutritional Assessment, Activities of Daily Living, Geriatric Depression Scale, Body Mass Index, and chronic diseases. While women reported “good” health status compared to men, they continued to have higher prevalence of diseases and chronic pain. Conclusions This study explored the socio-demographic, health, and nutritional status of elderly residing in Lebanese nursing homes and compared these characteristics across gender. The results indicated the need of health support and institutional interventions for elderly women residents. PMID:24950594

2014-01-01

354

Athletes Coaching Teens (ACT) for Substance Abuse Prevention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Athletes Coaching Teens (ACT) is a school-based prevention program for seventh grade students in Richmond, Virginia. The project is a collaborative effort between the Department of Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University and the Richmond City Public Schools. The ACT program is directed at preventing and changing health-compromising…

Danish, Steven J.

355

Implementation and Evaluation of the Personal Wellness Coach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design and evaluation of a wearable personal wellness coach system that supports a range of activities including health data collection, interpretation, feedback and self-monitoring. We implemented a wearable computing platform consisting of an array of sensors and application software to motivate users to reach fitness goals and prevent harm in a real-time environment. Evaluation and testing

Ramy Asselin; Guillermo Ortiz; Jonathan Pui; Asim Smailagic; Christian Kissling

2005-01-01

356

Formative Evaluation of Home Visitors' Role in Addressing Poor Mental Health, Domestic Violence, and Substance Abuse Among Low-Income Pregnant and Parenting Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: This research assessed home visitor effectiveness in communicating about and responding to poor mental health, domestic\\u000a violence, and substance abuse among pregnant and parenting women home visited as part of a comprehensive family support strategy\\u000a in seven urban communities. Methods: Cross-sectional studies were conducted with mothers (n = 189) actively engaged in home visitation programs and home visitors (n

S. Darius Tandon; Kathleen M. Parillo; Carrie Jenkins; Anne K. Duggan

2005-01-01

357

Building leadership capacity through peer career coaching: a case study.  

PubMed

Today's demanding healthcare environment requires resiliency, creativity and innovation in delivery of patient care and service. Hospitals must create a workplace where staff are supported to develop professionally as knowledge workers. In 2003, University Health Network (UHN) partnered with donnerwheeler, career planning and development consultants, to provide a program for its 2,700 registered nurses. One component of this project, a peer coaching program called Coach Mastery, is profiled in this case study, which describes how it was implemented and the successes, challenges and outcomes in building internal leadership capacity and supporting staff development through career planning and development. PMID:18448888

Sabo, Kathy; Duff, Margaret; Purdy, Brendan

2008-01-01

358

Meta-Analyses of the Associations of Respiratory Health Effectswith Dampness and Mold in Homes  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences recently completed a critical review of the scientific literature pertaining to the association of indoor dampness and mold contamination with adverse health effects. In this paper, we report the results of quantitative meta-analysis of the studies reviewed in the IOM report. We developed point estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) to summarize the association of several respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes with the presence of dampness and mold in homes. The odds ratios and confidence intervals from the original studies were transformed to the log scale and random effect models were applied to the log odds ratios and their variance. Models were constructed both accounting for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed and ignoring such potential correlation. Central estimates of ORs for the health outcomes ranged from 1.32 to 2.10, with most central estimates between 1.3 and 1.8. Confidence intervals (95%) excluded unity except in two of 28 instances, and in most cases the lower bound of the CI exceeded 1.2. In general, the two meta-analysis methods produced similar estimates for ORs and CIs. Based on the results of the meta-analyses, building dampness and mold are associated with approximately 30% to 80% increases in a variety of respiratory and asthma-related health outcomes. The results of these meta-analyses reinforce the IOM's recommendation that actions be taken to prevent and reduce building dampness problems.

Fisk, William J.; Lei-Gomez, Quanhong; Mendell, Mark J.

2006-01-01

359

[Incidence and prevalence of health problems in a group of nursing home patients with dementia. A comparison with family practice].  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to describe the health problems of a group dementia patients on admission and during residence in a Dutch nursing home and to compare these with figures of patients of 75 years and over from general practice. In 890 nursing home patients suffering from dementia prevalence of health problems on admission and the incidence during the residence were classified by means of the ICHPPC-2-defined. The differences between men and women were studied as was the influence of the season on the incidence during the stay. Results were compared with figures of patients of seventy five year and over from the continuous morbidity registration (CMR) from 'Nijmegen'. The most frequently occurring health problems on admission were: varicose veins of legs, acquired deformation of the spine, presbyacusis, hypertension, arthrosis, COPD, cerebrovascular disorders, heart murmur, cataract and chronic ischemic heart disease. During the residence the following health problems were frequently diagnosed: urinary tract infection, side effect of medicine, constipation, pneumonia, pressure sore, feeding problem, contusion, heart failure, cold and conjunctivitis. There were clear differences between men and women. Especially the incidence of intercurrent diseases showed great differences from the patterns in general practice. Prevalence of health problems on admission to the nursing home home agreed mor with figures from general practice. Respiratory tract infections frequently occurred in winter and urinary tract infections, pressure sores and conjunctivitis seemed to occur more in the summer. Nursing home patients with dementia have a lot of chronic and intercurrent health problems. They differ clearly from patients in general practice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7809916

Koopmans, R T; van den Hoogen, H J; van Weel, C

1994-12-01

360

Personal coaching as a positive intervention.  

PubMed

Personal coaching is a relatively new and unlicensed profession aimed at helping functioning individuals set and achieve goals, overcome obstacles, and maintain motivation. Coaching is increasingly merging with psychology as evidenced by new journals, academic programs, and research symposia. Although coaching has traditionally been used with non-clinical populations, it can be highly relevant to psychotherapy. Clinicians who develop a hybrid psychotherapy-coaching practice might be better protected from occupational stress and burnout. In addition, a number of coaching interventions and assessments might translate well to therapy and help clinicians innovate their practice. The synergy between personal coaching and psychotherapy are illustrated with a case example. PMID:19294747

Biswas-Diener, Robert

2009-05-01

361

Comparison of health of occupants and characteristics of houses among control homes and homes insulated with urea formaldehyde foam. I. Methodology  

SciTech Connect

The methodology of a study in which a comparison is made of the health and house characteristics of the occupants of 231 control homes and 571 houses containing urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) is described. All homes and occupants were examined on two occasions separated by an interval of 12 months, during which two-thirds of the UFFI houses performed remedial work. The occupants were examined using a health questionnaire and a series of objective tests including pulmonary function, nasal airway resistance, sense of smell, nasal surface cytology, and patch tests. The houses were assessed using a questionnaire and measurements of indoor formaldehyde and carbon dioxide levels. No obvious bias has been identified in this survey with respect to the representativeness of the population studied, the classification of the UFFI and control groups, and the input from both the respondents and observes. The symptom responses made by individuals within the same households were not correlated. Quality control assessment of the objective health tests and formaldehyde sampling and assays demonstrated that these procedures remained stable over the two phases of the study, with the exception of the expected decrease in the pulmonary flow rates over 1 year and a small unexpected increase in the forced vital capacity and the forced expiratory volume in 1 s.

Broder, I.; Corey, P.; Cole, P.; Lipa, M.; Mintz, S.; Nethercott, J.R. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1988-04-01

362

Guidelines for the Development and Utilization of Home Health Aide Services in the Community; A Supplement to A Guide for the Utilization of Personnel Supportive of Public Health Nursing Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This analysis is intended to assist public health nurses and others to apply the principles and standards of professional nursing conduct and practice to the development and utilization of home health aide services. Part I, "Development of a Home Health Aide Service" covers (1) agency organization and policies, including such topics as legal…

American Nurses' Association, New York, NY.

363

Healthy time, home production, and labor supply: The effect of health shocks on time allocation in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research Objective:In the absence of widespread social safety nets during China’s economic transition, households are often left to self-insure against this risk of adverse health events. This study documents how individuals’ time allocation decisions adjust to health shocks. Unlike previous studies, I investigate individual time contributions to home production activities—which are often overlooked but may have substantively important opportunity costs—in

Jenny Liu

2010-01-01

364

Routine PHQ-9 Depression Screening in Home Health Care: Depression Prevalence, Clinical and Treatment Characteristics, and Screening Implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to examine: the prevalence and correlates of depression among adults age 65 and over on admission to diverse home health care programs; nurse compliance with routine screening using the PHQ-9; and concordance between the number of depressed individuals identified by the PHQ-9 and Medicare-mandated nursing assessment following targeted nurse training in identifying depression among the elderly using

Kathleen Ell; Jurgen Unützer; Maria Aranda; Kathleen Sanchez; Pey-Jiuan Lee

2006-01-01

365

Alleged failure to treat a technology- dependent infant in the home health care setting: A risk management case study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an actual case history of a situation that was mismanaged and re sulted in a very large settlement for the patient who was severely impaired neurologically as a result of poor crisis intervention. The case study acts as a resource for pediatric home health care providers to develop standards from a risk management perspective. It also points

Judith M. Bulau

1993-01-01

366

Healthy Start Programa Madrina: A Promotora Home Visiting Outreach and Education Program to Improve Perinatal Health among Latina Pregnant Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of Healthy Start Programa Madrina (HSPM), a home visiting promotora outreach and education program for Latina pregnant women and to present the 10-year findings of the program (1996-2005). Perinatal health disparities continue to persist among low-income…

Bill, Debra E.; Hock-Long, Linda; Mesure, Maryann; Bryer, Pamela; Zambrano, Neydary

2009-01-01

367

Culture and home health care policy implementation: A comparative study of the United States and Puerto Rico  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines home health care programs formulated in an Anglo dominated American culture when they are implemented in two settings with distinct cultural traditions, Puerto Rico and Indiana. Puerto Rico is a predominantly Hispanic territory of the United States that is subject to American national laws, and Indiana is a Midwestern state that is immersed in American culture, mostly

Minerva Cruz

2008-01-01

368

Getting "Plugged in": A Network Analysis of Health-Information Seeking among "Stay-At-Home Moms."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines health-oriented conversations in informal, interpersonal networks. Investigates the network structure, nature of relationships, contents of interactions, and impact of support manifested in a "stay-at-home" mothers' toddlers' play group. Identifies members' roles, and characteristics of opinion leaders, and includes anecdotal evidence…

Tardy, Rebecca W.; Hale, Claudia L.

1998-01-01

369

Carer Reports of Health Status among Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities in Taiwan Living at Home and in Institutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the health status of a cohort of adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) residing in family homes or institutions in Taiwan and to examine whether morbidity varied with age, sex, existing diagnosis [Down syndrome (DS), seizures, cerebral palsy (CP), intellectual disability…

Wang, K.-Y.; Hsieh, K.; Heller, T.; Davidson, P. W.; Janicki, M. P.

2007-01-01

370

HOME NEWS SPORTS BUSINESS OPINIONS ENTERTAINMENT HEALTH TRAVEL INFO CLASSIFIED ADSLong Beach, CA, 12/21/2006 Advertisement  

E-print Network

HOME NEWS SPORTS BUSINESS OPINIONS ENTERTAINMENT HEALTH TRAVEL INFO CLASSIFIED ADSLong Beach, CA are emitted from sources like ships, trucks, trains and cargo equipment. Each fuel contains certain. By capturing particles in high-tech filters and studying them, experts can more accurately decide the best ways

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

371

Home Health Care Agency Staffing Patterns before and after the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, by Rural and Urban Location  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 and other recent policies have led to reduced Medicare funding for home health agencies (HHAs) and visits per beneficiary. Purpose: We examine the staffing characteristics of stable Medicare-certified HHAs across rural and urban counties from 1996 to 2002, a period encompassing the changes associated…

McAuley, William J.; Spector, William; Van Nostrand, Joan

2008-01-01

372

42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

This subpart implements sections 1821, 1861, 1861(e), 1861(m), 1861(y), 1861(ss) and 1861(aaa), 1869 and 1878 of the Act regarding Medicare payment for items and services provided in the home setting furnished to eligible beneficiaries by religious nonmedical health care institutions...

2010-10-01

373

Mechanical ventilation in recently built Dutch homes: technical shortcomings, possibilities for improvement, perceived indoor environment and health effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the results of a Dutch national study into performance of mechanical ventilation systems and its effect on the self-reported health and perceived indoor environmental quality of occupants. Ventilation systems with natural supply and mechanical exhaust ventilation (MEV) and balanced mechanical supply and exhaust systems with heat recovery (MVHR) were investigated. Surveys were performed in 299 homes, which

Jaap Balvers; Rik Bogers; Rob Jongeneel; Irene van Kamp; Atze Boerstra; Froukje van Dijken

2012-01-01

374

Influencing healthful food choices in school and home environments: results from the TEENS study. — Measures of the Food Environment  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

375

Evolutionary struggles of supply chain strategy in home-based health care delivery  

E-print Network

As the healthcare industry in United States continues to be constrained by increasing costs, new delivery channels are coming into practice. One such channel is home healthcare. Home healthcare presents challenges on the ...

Fowler, Katherine Szabo

2008-01-01

376

Health Needs and Opportunities in Home and Family Oriented Early Childhood Programs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Issues influencing the formation of home and family oriented early childhood development programs are examined. Early childhood programs formerly focused on work with the child alone in a central setting outside the home. Due to increased awareness of the...

B. L. Cordry, E. C. Curtis, A. Smith-Osborne, S. Pyne, M. Slatin

1979-01-01

377

3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified...Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified...families experiencing homelessness, and individuals living in public housing. There...any party against the United States, its...

2010-01-01

378

Role of Health Information Technologies in the Patient-Centered Medical Home  

PubMed Central

A national effort to reform primary care, known as the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), requires fulfillment of six standards determined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance to (1) enhance access and continuity, (2) identify and manage patient populations, (3) plan and manage care, (4) provide self-care and community support, (5) track and coordinate care, and (6) measure and improve performance. Information technologies play a vital role in the support of most, if not all, of these standards. However, given the newness of the PCMH, little is known on how health information technologies (HITs) have been employed to accomplish these objectives. This article will review the role of HITs, including electronic health records, web-based patient portals, telemedicine, and patient registries, with a focus on diabetes care, and how these technologies have been engaged in the establishment of the PCMH. In addition, we will discuss the benefits and potential risks and barriers to employing these technologies, including privacy and security concerns, as well as describe next steps for future work in this important area. PMID:24124967

Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Gabbay, Robert A.

2013-01-01

379

The web-rhetoric of companies offering home-based personal health monitoring.  

PubMed

In this paper I investigate the web-rhetoric of companies offering home-based personal health monitoring to patients and elderly people. Two main rhetorical methods are found, namely a reference to practical benefits and a use of prestige words like "quality of life" and "independence". I interpret the practical benefits in terms of instrumental values and the prestige words in terms of final values. I also reconstruct the arguments on the websites in terms of six different types of argument. Finally, I articulate a general critique of the arguments, namely that the websites neglect the context of use of personal health monitoring technologies. Whether or not a technology is good depends on the use of the technology by a particular individual in a particular context. The technology is not good-or bad-in itself. I support this critique with a number of more specific arguments such as the risk for reduced personal contact. For some elderly people social contact with care providers is more valuable than the independent living made possible by remote monitoring, for others independence is more important. PMID:21553006

Nordgren, Anders

2012-06-01

380

Educating Health and Social Service Professionals in the Detection and Management of Mistreated Nursing Home Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

A paucity of literature and educational materials addresses the mistreatment of nursing home residents. After serving as expert witnesses in the successful criminal prosecution of a nursing home corporation charged with involuntary manslaughter of two nursing home residents, the authors recognized the need to improve recognition and prevention of institutional mistreatment. This article will describe our involvement in post-trial advocacy

Elizabeth Capezuti; Eugenia L. Siegler

1997-01-01

381

Catching the Bug: How Virtual Coaching Improves Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article the author describes virtual coaching and why it is so effective. The following six points of virtual coaching are explained: (1) Also known as bug-in-ear coaching, virtual coaching is not new; (2) Virtual coaching can save money and time; (3) Bug-in-ear coaching increases the frequency of observations for novice teachers; (4) It…

Allen, Megan

2014-01-01

382

Executive Coaching Style: In Search of a Taxonomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study identifies words, terms, and phrases used by external executive coaches to describe their coaching style, and to develop a model for describing the coaching styles used by executive coaches. The researchers accessed archival records of the self-described coaching styles of study participants and conducted semi-structured interviews with external executive coaches. The results of this

John L. Bennett; John English

2011-01-01

383

TRICARE; sub-acute care program; uniform skilled nursing facility benefit; home health care benefit; adopting Medicare payment methods for skilled nursing facilities and home health care providers. Final rule.  

PubMed

This rule partially implements the TRICARE "sub-acute and long-term care program reform" enacted by Congress in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2002, specifically: Establishment of "an effective, efficient, and integrated sub-acute care benefits program," with skilled nursing facility (SNF) and home health care benefits modeled after those of the Medicare program; adoption of Medicare payment methods for skilled nursing facility, home health care, and certain other institutional health care providers; adoption of Medicare rules on balance billing of beneficiaries, prohibiting it by institutional providers and limiting it by non-institutional providers; and change in the statutory exclusion of coverage for custodial and domiciliary care. PMID:16250112

2005-10-24

384

The Coach-Coachee Relationship in Executive Coaching: A Field Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous authors have suggested that the working relationship between coach and coachee constitutes an essential condition to the success of executive coaching. This study empirically investigated the links between the coach-coachee relationship and the success of a coaching intervention in an organizational setting. Data were collected from two…

Baron, Louis; Morin, Lucie

2009-01-01

385

VALUES SENSITIVE COACHING: THE DELTA APPROACH TO COACHING CULTURALLY DIVERSE EXECUTIVES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Executive coaching is a popular intervention to improve the performance of middle and top level leaders. Globalization and the resulting cultural diversification of the workplace have also rapidly increased. Given these two trends, it is becoming increasingly important for executive coaches to understand how cultural values should affect their coaching. Recent research on coaching has suggested the need for a

Chris W. Coultas; Wendy L. Bedwell; C. Shawn Burke; Eduardo Salas

2011-01-01

386

Poor teaching by the coach: a phenomenological description from athletes' experience of poor coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Winning and losing have consistently been used as one criterion upon which to evaluate coaches. Since winning coaches have long been thought of as knowledgeable and effective at providing instruction, researchers have often studied coaches who have obtained a high winning percentage. While researchers know some about the behaviors and thought processes of winning and losing coaches, this research

Brian T. Gearity

2012-01-01

387

Poor teaching by the coach: a phenomenological description from athletes' experience of poor coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Winning and losing have consistently been used as one criterion upon which to evaluate coaches. Since winning coaches have long been thought of as knowledgeable and effective at providing instruction, researchers have often studied coaches who have obtained a high winning percentage. While researchers know some about the behaviors and thought processes of winning and losing coaches, this research

Brian T. Gearity

2011-01-01

388

Coaches’ Perceptions of a Coach Training Program designed to Promote Youth Developmental Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate coaches’ perceptions on the impact of a coach training program designed to promote youth developmental outcomes. Participants were coaches of youth sport teams. Multiple methods were used to collect data. Coaches reported many benefits for themselves, their athletes, and their teams. They reported an increase in knowledge and a better understanding of

William Ricardo Falcão; Gordon Bloom; Wade Gilbert

2012-01-01

389

Locating the coaching process in practice: models ‘for’ and ‘of’ coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Despite an increasing recognition of the existence of a process of coaching, and a resulting increase in research activity, there remains a lack of a clear conceptual base for sports coaching. This situation has left coaching without a clear set of concepts and principles that reflect coaching practice.Purpose: The aim of this paper is to critically examine current conceptualisations

Christopher J. Cushion; Kathleen M. Armour; Robyn L. Jones

2006-01-01

390

The Coach in Asian Society: Impact of social hierarchy on the coaching relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory case study explores how executive coaches across Asia adapt coaching, from the conventional (essentially Western) understanding, to make it culturally congruent for their clients. It presents how coaching is personalized to an Eastern ethos; thus, constructively challenging coaching concepts and practices that are believed to be universally applicable. The findings bring out how the deeply embedded concept of

Lina Nangalia

391

Coaching for Character: Development of the Sportsmanship Coaching Behaviors Scale (SCBS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extensive knowledge exists about how coaches influence youth sport participants' motivational outcomes, yet less is known about specific coaching behaviors that promote sportspersonship outcomes (Horn, 2008; Weiss, Smith, & Stuntz, 2008). The purpose of the present study was to create a measure of coaching behaviors that captures the ways in which coaches influence athletes' sportspersonship. A series of steps was

Nicole D. Bolter; Maureen R. Weiss

2012-01-01

392

The First Step: Assessing the Coaching Philosophies of Pre-Service Coaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coaches are influential in creating positive and achievement-oriented sport environments and the development of a sound philosophy is the key to successful coaching (Martens, 2004). Yet, few coaches spend significant time early in their careers developing and modifying their philosophical beliefs (Wilcox & Trudel, 1998). While coaching educators…

Collins, Karen; Barber, Heather; Moore, Kristina; Laws, Amanda

2011-01-01

393

Home and health in people ageing with Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a prospective longitudinal cohort survey study  

PubMed Central

Background With an increased life expectancy for the general population as well as for those ageing with chronic diseases, there are major challenges to the affected individuals and their families, but also to health care and societal planning. Most important, an increasing proportion of older people remain living in their ordinary homes despite health decline and disability. However, little is known about the home and health situation of people ageing with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and older people are often excluded from PD-research. Methods/design The overall aim of the present project is to generate knowledge on home and health dynamics in people with PD, with an explicit attention to PD-specific symptomatology. We will concentrate on aspects of home and health captured by state-of-the-art methodology from gerontology as well as PD-research, health science and rehabilitation. This study protocol describes a longitudinal cohort survey study that includes a baseline data collection and a 3-year follow-up. Both data collection waves include self-administered questionnaires, structured interviews, clinical assessments and observations during home visits effectuated by research staff with project-specific training. In order to arrive at a follow-up sample of N=160, 250 participants identified by PD specialist nurses are being recruited from three hospitals in southern Sweden. With no lower or upper age limit, only those diagnosed with PD since at least one year were included. The exclusion criteria were: difficulties in understanding or speaking Swedish and/or cognitive difficulties/other reasons making the individual unable to give informed consent or to take part in the majority of the data collection. The data collection targets environmental factors such as assistive devices, social support, physical environmental barriers, accessibility problems and perceived aspects of home. A broad variety of instruments tap PD-specific problems (e.g. freezing of gait, fear of falling) and health-related issues such as general self-efficacy, body functions, activities and participation. Discussion This project will produce knowledge to the benefit of the development of health care and societal planning that targets people ageing with PD, ultimately promoting activity and participation and an increase of the number of healthy life years for this sub-group of the population. PMID:24107116

2013-01-01

394

The Changing Mental Health Needs of Youth Admitted to Residential Group Home Care: Comparing Mental Health Status at Admission in 1995 and 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Youth entering residential care possess significant emotional and behavioral needs; yet, it is uncertain whether these needs have remained constant or are changing over time. This study examined mental health variables from the admission files of 1,047 youth entering residential group home care in 1995 and 2004. Sequential logistical regression…

Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Trout, Alexandra; Chmelka, M. Beth; Burns, Barbara J.; Epstein, Michael H.; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

2009-01-01

395

COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Applied Science &  

E-print Network

satisfaction � Look at differences in experience by rank and gender � Identify impact of policies and processesCOACHE Survey Results Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering April 2, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey

Toronto, University of

396

COACHE Survey Results University of Toronto -Scarborough  

E-print Network

satisfaction � Look at differences in experience by rank and gender � Identify impact of policies and processesCOACHE Survey Results University of Toronto - Scarborough May 9, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey

Toronto, University of

397

Rapid EHR development and implementation using web and cloud-based architecture in a large home health and hospice organization.  

PubMed

Health care organizations have long been limited to a small number of major vendors in their selection of an electronic health record (EHR) system in the national and international marketplace. These major EHR vendors have in common base systems that are decades old, are built in antiquated programming languages, use outdated server architecture, and are based on inflexible data models [1,2]. The option to upgrade their technology to keep pace with the power of new web-based architecture, programming tools and cloud servers is not easily undertaken due to large client bases, development costs and risk [3]. This paper presents the decade-long efforts of a large national provider of home health and hospice care to select an EHR product, failing that to build their own and failing that initiative to go back into the market in 2012. The decade time delay had allowed new technologies and more nimble vendors to enter the market. Partnering with a new start-up company doing web and cloud based architecture for the home health and hospice market, made it possible to build, test and implement an operational and point of care system in 264 home health locations across 40 states and three time zones in the United States. This option of "starting over" with the new web and cloud technologies may be posing a next generation of new EHR vendors that retells the Blackberry replacement by iPhone story in healthcare. PMID:24943570

Weaver, Charlotte A; Teenier, Pamela

2014-01-01

398

Indelible impressions of an authentic coach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article is about a coaching\\/mentoring style that was developed by an entrepreneur LaFay Davenport. Ms Davenport’s coaching strategy derived from the name of her business – Simply Raw Hair Designs. The name itself implies authenticity, wholesomeness. Ms Davenport has coached, mentored and led staff for over a quarter of a century using a coaching model called “sRAW” by the

Beverly Biggs

2003-01-01

399

Personal life coaching for coaches-in-training enhances goal attainment, insight and learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based approaches to coach training and education are vital if the coaching industry is to continue to mature. Drawing on past research on mandatory personal therapy for therapists-in-training, this paper reports a qualitative and quantitative within-subject exploration of the impact of compulsory participation in a personal life coaching program for coaches-in-training. Twenty-nine coaches-in-training set personal goals and completed a 10

Anthony M. Grant

2008-01-01

400

What Can Physical Educators Learn from Coaches?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nearly 20 year ago, Daryl Siedentop wrote that in good high school physical education programs, PE teachers rarely coached. His point was not that coaching developed bad teaching habits, but rather that it was difficult to successfully combine both jobs. The planning and preparation needed to effectively teach or successfully coach takes time.…

Jefferies, Stephen C.

2005-01-01

401

BYU Manager's Toolbox The Coaching Model  

E-print Network

, in that effective coaching requires commit- ment and buy-in from the employee to improve their performance. Coaching an employee what needs to change, proper coaching involves listening and giving feedback, involving em- ployees' ideas and motivation for change, and providing support for improvement without stepping in to do

Martinez, Tony R.

402

Differentiated Coaching: Fostering Reflection with Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Literacy coaches inspire teacher reflection and promote a culture of ongoing professional learning. This article illustrates the role of literacy coaches, describes how coaches differentiate support for a diverse group of teachers, and explains how teacher reflection can be a catalyst for change and professional growth. The authors, current and…

Stover, Katie; Kissel, Brian; Haag, Karen; Shoniker, Rebecca

2011-01-01

403

Coaching Redefined: An Everyday Pedagogical Endeavour  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following a brief introduction, in which the chosen format is discussed, this article comprises a dialogue between present-day coaching science (CS) and a critic, educational relationship (ER). ER disparages current conceptualisations of coaching as irrelevant and implores CS to redefine itself as an educational relationship between coach and…

Jones, Robyn

2007-01-01

404

Challenges of Literacy Coaching in High School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study examined a state-run, foundation-funded initiative to introduce literacy coaching in a medium-sized urban high school district over a period of two years. Data analyses revealed the complex development and multiple understandings of the process of literacy coaching on the secondary level. The role of the coaches

Gross, Patricia A.

2012-01-01

405

Coaching: A Tool for Extension Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coaching as an approach to improving people's lives is based on a positive relationship and the philosophy that the learner is responsible for their own change. In a coach approach, the educator serves as a coach; a person to help the client succeed by "challenging and supporting a person or a team to develop ways of thinking, ways of…

Allen, Kim

2013-01-01

406

Toward a Theory of Coaching Paradox  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multiple tensions exist as part of the coaching process. How a coach responds to these tensions is a fundamental determinant of an athlete or team's fate. In today's highly competitive, socially demanding, and ever-changing sports environment, and as the expectations on coaches become more complex, the paradox becomes a critical lens to…

Barnson, Steven C.

2014-01-01

407

Stressors in elite sport: A coach perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the varying performance and organizational stressors experienced by coaches who operate with elite athletes. Following interviews with eleven coaches, content analysis of the data revealed coaches to experience comparable numbers of performance and organizational stressors. Performance stressors were divided between their own performance and that of their athletes, while organizational stressors included environmental, leadership, personal, and team factors.

Richard C. Thelwell; Neil J. V. Weston; Iain A. Greenlees; Nicholas V. Hutchings

2008-01-01

408

Improving occupant safety in coach rollover  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coach rollover is one of the most hazardous accident type for coach occupants. Risk of fatalities in rollover is about five times higher than in any other coach accident types. This paper presents an analysis of the problem and countermeasures to reduce the severity of these accidents. First, some data regarding severity and type of injuries, based on ?in depth?

L. Martinez; F. Aparicio; A. Garcia; J. Paez; G. Ferichola

2003-01-01

409

Exploring the Everyday Realities of Coach Education  

E-print Network

). Evaluating and reflecting upon a coach education initiative: The CoDe of rugby. The Sport Psychologist, 20 in an advanced soccer coach education award. Sport, Education and Society, 15 (3), 299-314. Culver, D., & Trudel through interactions. In R.L. Jones (Ed.), The Sports Coach as Educator: Re-Conceptualising Sports

410

An Integrative Model for Executive Coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

Executive coaching has grown in popularity, but in spite of this growth, the use of sophisticated approaches appears limited. This article brings together a series of evidence-based approaches to build an integrated model for executive coaching, which can be described as integrative coaching.

Jonathan Passmore

2007-01-01

411

Power and the tale: coaching as storyselling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to propose, discuss and evaluate a four-stage model of storyselling and its accompanying power dynamics, which are at the heart of coaching in organisations. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper is informed by a social constructionist view of coaching. Findings – The conceptualisation of the coaching process as a series of storyselling activities highlights the power of

Stefanie C. Reissner; Angélique Du Toit

2011-01-01

412

Using Learning Styles Research in Coaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators are discovering the importance of understanding individual student learning styles to promote effective teaching. The article discusses the learning style approach in coaching, where learning preferences are matched to coaching methods. It describes how that approach helped one high school wrestling coach develop a winning team. (SM)

Brunner, Ronald; Hill, David

1992-01-01

413

An Integrated Approach to Coaching Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses an integrated approach to coaching athletes, which focuses on adapting coaching methods to individual learning style, and developing a tactical awareness of how to play the game alongside technique. An Integrated Coaching Model is proposed that links the cyclical model of experiential learning (Kolb, 1984), the 4MAT System (McCarthy, 1980), and TGfU (Bunker & Thorpe, 1982). Alternative

Andrew Martin

414

COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Art & Science  

E-print Network

� Look at differences in experience by rank and gender � Identify impact of policies and processesCOACHE Survey Results Faculty of Art & Science March 19, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey � Collaborative/Studio Space #12;Next Steps #12;Resources for Chairs COACHE results with: � Questions for Discussion

Toronto, University of

415

COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Dentistry  

E-print Network

� Look at differences in experience by rank and gender � Identify impact of policies and processesCOACHE Survey Results Faculty of Dentistry March 26, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey � Collaborative;Dentistry: 10% Dentistry: 63.6% #12;70% 60% 63.6% 60% #12;Next Steps #12;Resources for Chairs COACHE

Toronto, University of

416

COACHE Survey Results Faculty of Medicine  

E-print Network

� Look at differences in experience by rank and gender � Identify impact of policies and processesCOACHE Survey Results Faculty of Medicine March 19, 2014 #12;The COACHE Survey � Collaborative Computing and IT support Lab/Studio Space #12;Next Steps #12;Resources for Chairs COACHE results with

Toronto, University of

417

Investigating sports coaching pedagogies in games contexts  

E-print Network

and Garratt (2008) � Importance of pedagogy � Jones (2006) � Opaque practice � Light and Evans (2010Investigating sports coaching pedagogies in games contexts Don Vinson Ali Croad Simon Padley Abbe in further understanding pedagogic practice #12;Profile 1: Fred � Professional Coach � Coaching environment

418

Computer Problem-Solving Coaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computers might be able to play an important role in physics instruction by coaching students to develop good problem-solving skills. Building on previous research on student problem solving and on designing computer programs to teach cognitive skills, we are developing a prototype computer coach to provide students with guided practice in solving problems. In addition to helping students become better problem solvers, such programs can be useful in studying how students learn to solve problems and how and if problem-solving skills can be transferred from a computer to a pencil-and-paper environment.

Hsu, Leon; Heller, Kenneth

2005-09-01

419

Internet Protocol Television for Personalized Home-Based Health Information: Design-Based Research on a Diabetes Education System  

PubMed Central

Background The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV’s potential. Objective Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. Methods This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. Results The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described their experiences with the system in terms that bode well for its educational potential, and they suggested many constructive improvements to the system. Conclusions The integration of Web 2.0 and IPTV merits further technical development, business modeling, and health services and health outcomes research, as a solution to extend the reach and scale of home-based health care. PMID:24613862

Clarke, Ken; Kwong, Mabel; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

2014-01-01

420

Coach-to-Coach Mentoring: Raising the Bar  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As an alternative method of coaching education, with a focus on situated learning, mentoring has the potential to encourage "communities of practice," which are groups of people who share a common interest and engage in a process of collective learning that creates bonds between them. In addition, mentoring has the potential to overcome the…

Robertson, Scott; Hubball, Harry

2005-01-01

421

The Wild West of executive coaching.  

PubMed

Annual spending on executive coaching in the United States is estimated at 1 billion dollars. Yet information about coaching's effectiveness is scarce and unreliable. No one has yet demonstrated conclusively what qualifies an executive coach or what makes one approach to executive coaching better than another. Barriers to entry are nonexistent--many executive coaches know little about business, and some know little about coaching. The coaching certifications offered by various self-appointed bodies are difficult to assess, and methods of measuring return on investment are questionable. But strategic coaching can provide critical help both to individuals and to organizations. In this article, Stratford Sherman, a senior vice president of Executive Coaching Network, and Alyssa Freas, the founder and CEO, explore the popularity of executive coaching and investigate ways to make the most of the experience. They argue that coaching is inevitably a triangular relationship between the client, the "coachee," and the coach. Its purpose is to produce behavioral change and growth in the coachee for the economic benefit of the client. The best way to maximize the likelihood of good results is to qualify all the people involved. Even so, many triangular relationships continue to generate conflict among all three parties. At the most basic level, coaches serve as suppliers of candor, providing leaders with the objective feedback they need to nourish their growth. Coaching gets executives to slow down, gain awareness, and notice the effects of their words and actions. On a larger scale, the best coaching fosters cultural change for the benefit of the entire organization. It provides a disciplined way for businesses to deepen relationships with their most valued employees while also increasing their effectiveness. PMID:15559448

Sherman, Stratford; Freas, Alyssa

2004-11-01

422

[De-institutionalization of mental health and care practices in the context of home-based care].  

PubMed

In Brazil, the home-based care services (HCS) are considered strategic and essential in the de-institutionalization process of patients who passed years in psychiatric hospitals and lost their family and social links. However, this service faces a series of problems and challenges in the wider context of health care. This article seeks to analyze some of these problems and challenges based on the experience of the home-based care service in Natal RN and on the literature in this field. Proposed on the basis of the idea that the encounters between insanity and city are potent destructors of the ' asylum logic' , these home-based care services put in question the current healthcare model, claiming to destruct the rigid and hegemonic forms of residence and care. The aim of this article is to discuss this ' asylum logic' that surpasses the limits of the concrete insane asylum penetrating some daily practices of the substitute services, taking advantage of the weak articulation between the mental health services. The lack of a strong connection between the home-based care service and the psychosocial care center allows this logic to operate through day-by-day bio-political devices. Thus, we discuss the risks of this logic taking over and indicate some possibilities of avoiding this, defending a care model allowing for potent meetings with the city and for the construction of ' affectionate networks' producing life and liberty. PMID:19142324

Amorim, Ana Karenina de Melo Arraes; Dimenstein, Magda

2009-01-01

423

Effects of Out-of-Home Mental Health Treatment on Probability of Criminal Charge During the Transition to Adulthood  

PubMed Central

Criminal justice-related outcomes for youth who have been served in out-of-home mental health settings such as residential treatment and inpatient hospitalization are unclear. This study longitudinally modeled the changing probability of being charged with a crime from age 16 to 25, including being served in out-of-home treatment and aging into adulthood, while controlling for person-level covariates such as gender, race, past criminal charges, and mental health diagnoses. Results indicated that out-of-home treatment was related to a decreased probability of being charged with a crime during treatment, but it had no relationship to post-treatment probability. Longitudinal probability of being charged was moderated by gender; females did not experience a peak probability time whereas males peaked at age 19. Other significant contributors to being charged included having a substance use diagnosis and having an offense record prior to age 16. Evidence indicated that out-of-home treatment was used as an alternative to detention and incarceration for both juveniles and adults. PMID:21729021

Pullmann, Michael

2011-01-01

424

Analysing coach–athlete ‘talk in interaction’ within the delivery of video-based performance feedback in elite youth soccer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper was to explore coach–athlete ‘talk in action’ during performance analysis feedback sessions. Our goal was to examine how interactional tasks are accomplished through the use of talk. Coach–athlete interactions were recorded within six home match video-based feedback sessions, over the course of a 10-month English Premier League Academy season. Interactions within the sessions were recorded

Ryan Groom; Christopher J. Cushion; Lee J. Nelson

2012-01-01

425

An interprofessional nurse-led mental health promotion intervention for older home care clients with depressive symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Depressive symptoms in older home care clients are common but poorly recognized and treated, resulting in adverse health outcomes, premature institutionalization, and costly use of health services. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a new six-month interprofessional (IP) nurse-led mental health promotion intervention, and to explore its effects on reducing depressive symptoms in older home care clients (??70 years) using personal support services. Methods A prospective one-group pre-test/post-test study design was used. The intervention was a six-month evidence-based depression care management strategy led by a registered nurse that used an IP approach. Of 142 eligible consenting participants, 98 (69%) completed the six-month and 87 (61%) completed the one-year follow-up. Outcomes included depressive symptoms, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and the costs of use of all types of health services at baseline and six-month and one-year follow-up. An interpretive descriptive design was used to explore clients’, nurses’, and personal support workers’ perceptions about the intervention’s appropriateness, benefits, and barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results Of the 142 participants, 56% had clinically significant depressive symptoms, with 38% having moderate to severe symptoms. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to older home care clients with depressive symptoms. It was effective in reducing depressive symptoms and improving HRQoL at six-month follow-up, with small additional improvements six months after the intervention. The intervention also reduced anxiety at one year follow-up. Significant reductions were observed in the use of hospitalization, ambulance services, and emergency room visits over the study period. Conclusions Our findings provide initial evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, and sustained effects of the nurse-led mental health promotion intervention in improving client outcomes, reducing use of expensive health services, and improving clinical practice behaviours of home care providers. Future research should evaluate its efficacy using a randomized clinical trial design, in different settings, with an adequate sample of older home care recipients with depressive symptoms. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01407926. PMID:24886344

2014-01-01

426

Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common and costly chronic musculoskeletal conditions world-wide and is associated with substantial pain and disability. Many people with knee OA also experience co-morbidities that further add to the OA burden. Uptake of and adherence to physical activity recommendations is suboptimal in this patient population, leading to poorer OA outcomes and greater impact of associated co-morbidities. This pragmatic randomised controlled trial will investigate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of adding telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention for people with knee OA. Methods/Design 168 people with clinically diagnosed knee OA will be recruited from the community in metropolitan and regional areas and randomly allocated to physiotherapy only, or physiotherapy plus nurse-delivered telephone coaching. Physiotherapy involves five treatment sessions over 6 months, incorporating a home exercise program of 4–6 exercises (targeting knee extensor and hip abductor strength) and advice to increase daily physical activity. Telephone coaching comprises 6–12 telephone calls over 6 months by health practitioners trained in applying the Health Change Australia (HCA) Model of Health Change to provide behaviour change support. The telephone coaching intervention aims to maximise adherence to the physiotherapy program, as well as facilitate increased levels of participation in general physical activity. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include physical activity levels, quality-of-life, and potential moderators and mediators of outcomes including self-efficacy, pain coping and depression. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow-up assessments will also occur at 12 and 18 months. Discussion The findings will help determine whether the addition of telephone coaching sessions can improve sustainability of outcomes from a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention in people with knee OA. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12612000308897 PMID:23231928

2012-01-01

427

Variables affecting athletes' retention of coaches' feedback.  

PubMed

Athletes' retention of information conveyed in coaches' feedback during training was examined, considering the nature of the information transmitted by each coach (extensions, total number of ideas transmitted, and total number of repeated ideas), athletes' characteristics, (ages, genders, school levels, and practice levels), and athletes' perceptions (relevance and acceptance of coaches' information, task motivational levels, and athletes' attention levels). Participants were 193 athletes (79 boys, 114 girls; 9 to 13 years of age) and 6 coaches. Feedback was both audio and video recorded and all athletes were interviewed. All coaches' feedback and athletes' recollections were subjected to content analysis. Information was completely retained in 31.60% of feedback episodes. Athletes' mean per-episode information retention was 63.0%. Three variables appeared to b e predictiveathletes' retention: athletes' practice levels (p = -.25), attention to coaches' provision of feedback (P = .17), and the number of different ideas transmitted by each coach (P = -.90). PMID:24611244

Januário, Nuno M S; Rosado, Antonio F; Mesquita, Isabel

2013-10-01

428

The Association between Changes in Health Status and Nursing Home Resident Quality of Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Previous research on nursing home resident quality of life (QOL) has mainly been cross-sectional. This study examined the association between changes in QOL and changes in resident clinical factors. Design and Methods: A longitudinal study of resident QOL was conducted in two nursing homes. Self-report interviews using a multidimensional…

Degenholtz, Howard B.; Rosen, Jules; Castle, Nicholas; Mittal, Vikas; Liu, Darren

2008-01-01

429

A privacy framework for mobile health and home-care systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we consider the challenge of preserving patient privacy in the context of mobile healthcare and home-care systems, that is, the use of mobile computing and communications technologies in the delivery of healthcare or the provision of at-home medical care and assisted living. This paper makes three primary contributions. First, we compare existing privacy frameworks, identifying key differences

David Kotz; Sasikanth Avancha; Amit Baxi

2009-01-01

430

An Evaluation of Health and Safety Hazards in Family Based Day Care Homes in Philadelphia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Pennsylvania, Family Day Care Homes (FDCH) are private residences used to care for up to six children in a 24 h period. These homes are often times the most affordable alternative to day care centers parents have in low-income communities. The aims of this study were to evaluate FDCH providers' knowledge of hazards and their understanding of…

Perez, Hernando; Haynes, Sonia; Michael, Karen; Burstyn, Igor; Jandhyala, Malica; Palermo, Peter

2011-01-01

431

77 FR 37740 - Stagecoach Group plc and Coach USA, Inc., et al.-Acquisition of Control of Assets-American Coach...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Valley); Coach Leasing, Inc. (Coach Leasing); and CAM Leasing, LLC (CAM Leasing) \\3\\--(collectively, Applicants) filed...Coach USA. Coach USA Tours, TRT, Coach Leasing, and CAM Leasing are wholly-owned noncarrier subsidiaries...

2012-06-22

432

Coaching: an effective leadership intervention.  

PubMed

Organizations are transitioning from a management industrial era to a humanistic era. This transition will require a different set of leadership competencies. Competencies that reflect relationships, connections with employees, and having the skill to unleash the human capability at all levels of an organization are essential. Similar to when a sports team needs a different play book to be successful, leaders need a new play book. Coaches within the sports team are the ones who assist players in learning how to adapt to a different set of rules. They teach the players how to show up differently and how to implement different plays, with the overall goal of being a successful team. New competencies are being required to reflect a humanistic approach to leadership. It is critical that organizations offer coaching as an intervention to all levels of leadership. This actual case study demonstrates that coaching not only assisted leaders in learning a new way of leading but also improved overall organizational effectiveness. The results that have been accomplished through the use of implementing a 360-degree feedback system, with coaching, reaped overall organization improvement. PMID:20189542

Karsten, Margo A

2010-03-01

433

Contesting Contained Bodily Coaching Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through critical readings of several images and texts, including photographs and artifacts in this collected montage, my aim here is to use multiple interactional analyses (visual culture techniques and deconstructive techniques) to assist in the critique of these presented visual images that represent current coaching policies in the USA.

Johnson, Richard

2013-01-01

434

Youth sport volunteer coach motivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each year, over 20 million youth participate in sport (Ewing & Seefeldt, 2002). Public parks and recreation agencies are increasingly reliant on volunteers to deliver services (Silverberg, Backman, & Backman, 2000). These volunteers are especially vital to the delivery of youth recreation and sport programs (Twyam, Ferrell, & Johnston, 2002\\/2003). Volunteer positions in sport programs, especially coach positions, are difficult

James A. Busser; Cynthia P. Carruthers

2010-01-01

435

Coaching Basketball; Ten Winning Concepts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written primarily for coaches, this book is intended to help formulate a conceptual philosophy and approach to the game of basketball. The basic offensive, defensive, and transitioal fundamentals are stressed, and drills that simulate these fundamentals in a game are presented. The drills differ from most others in that they are designed so that…

Jeremiah, Maryalyce

436

7 Habits of Developmental Coaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors describe how coaches can apply principles of athlete growth and development to the learning and performance of motor skills. They present 7 habits that lead to well-rounded athletes who experience increased enjoyment, self-motivation, skill improvement, and ultimately more success on the playing field. (Contains 1…

Darden, Gibson; Shimon, Jane

2004-01-01

437

COACH/INSTRUCTOR APPOINTMENT FORM  

E-print Network

the Sport Clubs Program. 3. The club understands the hiring process and will abide by these guidelines. 4 semester the position is filled. 5. The club officers will consistently communicate their satisfaction and performance of the coach/instructor with the Sport Clubs Program. 6. The club officers will document

Amin, S. Massoud

438

Bodies Matter in Literacy Coaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reading the implicit invitation in new literacies scholarship to reimagine pedagogy that leans into the lives of youth, Vasudevan reminds readers how the teacher's body is central to the meaning making of students in literacy classrooms. She extends this notion of embodiment to the work of the literacy coach and reiterates Skinner, Hagood,…

Vasudevan, Lalitha

2014-01-01

439

Basketball for the New Coach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is intended for beginning basketball coaches at either the school or agency level. The chapters contain information on simple team administration to the detailed planning and development of team strategy. In addition, the book contains chapters concerning the principles relating to basketball mechanics, conditioning the team, setting up…

Pugliese, Dan; Rose, Jim

440

Volunteer youth sport coaches' perspectives of coaching education/certification and parental codes of conduct.  

PubMed

The vast majority of youth sport programs in the United States relies primarily on parent volunteers to serve as coaches. Unfortunately, most of these volunteer coaches have not received formal training to prepare them adequately for the role of youth sport coach. To exacerbate the issue, according to the popular media, parents and other adults can commit belligerent and even violent acts around, and often resulting from, poorly managed youth sport events. Although some efforts have been made to standardize curricula, provide training for coaches, and contain or prevent inappropriate parent behaviors, few efforts have been directed at investigating the self-described needs and concerns of the coaches from their perspectives. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the concerns and issues of youth sport coaches related to coaching and parental education. Five focus group interviews with 25 volunteer youth sport coaches were conducted to investigate these issues. Results were organized around four higher order themes that emerged from inductive content analyses: (a) coaching education content areas of need, (b) barriers and problems of offering coaching education, (c) coaching education format recommendations, and (d) efficacy of parental codes of conduct. Results were discussed in terms of the potential impact administrators, coaches, and parents could have in implementing formal coaching education programs and developing their coaching education practices. PMID:16270709

Wiersma, Lenny D; Sherman, Clay P

2005-09-01

441

Accountable care organizations, the patient-centered medical home, and health care reform: what does it all mean?  

PubMed

Medical care in the United States is plagued by extremely high costs, poor quality, and fragmented delivery. In response, new concepts of integrated health care delivery have developed, including patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations (ACOs). This article reviews these concepts and includes a detailed discussion of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' ACO and Shared Savings Proposed Rule. PMID:21885689

Longworth, David L

2011-09-01

442

A Comparison of Quality Measures Between For-Profit and Nonprofit Medicare-Certified Home Health Agencies in Michigan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study investigated the differences in the means of quality measures between for-profit and nonprofit Medicare-certified home health agencies in Michigan. The research question was: Do nonprofit agencies provide higher quality of care than for-profit agencies? Twelve publicly available quality measures were retrieved in May 2009 and used for analysis. Independent t tests found significant differences between for-profit and

Kathryn L. Haldiman; Huey-Ming Tzeng

2010-01-01

443

Philani Plus (+): A Mentor Mother Community Health Worker Home Visiting Program to Improve Maternal and Infants' Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Pregnant mothers in South African townships face multiple health risks for themselves and their babies. Existing clinic-based services face barriers to access, utilization, and human resource capacities. Home visiting by community health workers (CHW) can mitigate such barriers. The Philani Plus (+) Intervention Program builds upon the original Philani CHW home-visiting intervention program for maternal and child nutrition by integrating content and activities to address HIV, alcohol, and mental health. Pregnant Mothers at Risk (MAR) for HIV, alcohol, and/or nutrition problems in 24 neighborhoods in townships in Cape Town, South Africa (n=1,239) were randomly assigned by neighborhood to an intervention (Philani Plus (+), N=12 neighborhoods; n=645 MAR) or a standard-care control condition of neighborhood clinic-based services (N=12 neighborhoods; n=594 MAR). Positive peer deviant “Mentor Mother” CHWs are recruited from the township neighborhoods and trained to deliver four antenatal and four postnatal home visits that address HIV, alcohol, nutrition, depression, health care regimens for the family, caretaking and bonding, and securing government-provided child grants. The MAR and their babies are being monitored during pregnancy, 1 week post-birth, and 6 and 18 months later. Among the 1,239 MAR recruited: 26% were HIV-positive; 27% used alcohol during pregnancy; 17% previously had low-birthweight babies; 23% had at least one chronic condition (10% hypertension, 5% asthma, 2% diabetes); 93% had recent sexual partners with 10% known to be HIV+; and 17% had clinically significant prenatal depression and 42% had borderline depression. This paper presents the intervention protocol and baseline sample characteristics for the “Philani Plus (+)” CHW home-visiting intervention trial. PMID:21850488

le Roux, Ingrid M.; Tomlinson, Mark; Mbewu, Nokwanele; Comulada, W. Scott; le Roux, Karl; Stewart, Jacqueline; O'Connor, Mary J.; Hartley, Mary; Desmond, Kate; Greco, Erin; Worthman, Carol M.; Idemundia, Faith; Swendeman, Dallas

2013-01-01

444

Ethics and Dying at Home  

Microsoft Academic Search

Death at home has become increasingly common. End of life care at home creates ethical challenges that are very different from those encountered in the hospital or nursing home. Geographic disparities in rates of death at home raise ethical issues related to access to care. Home health agencies and communities make decisions, possibly ethically based, regarding investments in home-based end

Edward R. Ratner; John Y. Song

2003-01-01

445

Using an innovative approach to shorten coaching and assessment time when applying the Baldrige Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence in a substance abuse treatment setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on an innovative pilot project that implemented the Baldrige Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence in a substance abuse treatment programme, with the immediate goal of producing a Baldrige Feedback Report, and identifying 10 specific high-priority Opportunities For Improvement (OFI) action items from among the criteria categories. We have been unable to discover any other literature citations

Philip Chong; Luis Calingo; Grace Reynolds; Dennis Fisher

2003-01-01

446

Using an innovative approach to shorten coaching and assessment time when applying the Baldrige Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence in a substance abuse treatment setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on an innovative pilot project that implemented the Baldrige Health Care Criteria for Performance Excellence in a substance abuse treatment programme, with the immediate goal of producing a Baldrige Feedback Report, and identifying ten specific high-priority Opportunities For Improvement (OFI) action items from among the criteria categories. We have been unable to discover any other literature citations

Philip Chong; Luis Calingo; Grace Reynolds; Dennis Fisher

2003-01-01

447

Implementation of Home based management of malaria in children reduces the work load for peripheral health facilities in a rural district of Burkina Faso  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Home Management of Malaria (HMM) is one of the key strategies to reduce the burden of malaria for vulnerable population in endemic countries. It is based on the evidence that well-trained communities health workers can provide prompt and adequate care to patients close to their homes. The strategy has been shown to reduce malaria mortality and severe morbidity and

Alfred B Tiono; Youssouf Kaboré; Abdoulaye Traoré; Nathalie Convelbo; Franco Pagnoni; Sodiomon B Sirima

2008-01-01

448

A comparison of two coaching approaches to enhance implementation of a recovery-oriented service model.  

PubMed

Moving to recovery-oriented service provision in mental health may entail retraining existing staff, as well as training new staff. This represents a substantial burden on organisations, particularly since transfer of training into practice is often poor. Follow-up supervision and/or coaching have been found to improve the implementation and sustainment of new approaches. We compared the effect of two coaching conditions, skills-based and transformational coaching, on the implementation of a recovery-oriented model following training. Training followed by coaching led to significant sustained improvements in the quality of care planning in accordance with the new model over the 12-month study period. No interaction effect was observed between the two conditions. However, post hoc analyses suggest that transformational coaching warrants further exploration. The results support the provision of supervision in the form of coaching in the implementation of a recovery-oriented service model, and suggest the need to better elucidate the mechanisms within different coaching approaches that might contribute to improved care. PMID:23982458

Deane, Frank P; Andresen, Retta; Crowe, Trevor P; Oades, Lindsay G; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Williams, Virginia

2014-09-01

449

Conceptual and Meta Learning During Coached Problem Solving  

Microsoft Academic Search

. Coached problem solving is known to be effective for teachingcognitive skills. Simple forms of coached problem solving are usedin many ITS. This paper first considers how university physics can betaught via coached problem solving. It then discusses how coached problemsolving can be extended to support two other forms of learning:conceptual learning and meta learning.1 IntroductionCoached problem solving occurs when

Kurt Vanlehn

1996-01-01

450

Tacit Knowledge in Expert Coaching: Science or Art?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective coaching is a mixture of pedagogy and principles of sciences, e.g., motor skill acquisition, sociology, and physiology, often referred to as the science of coaching. Instinctive or intuitive coaching has often been incorrectly viewed as the art of coaching. More important should be how coaches develop knowledge, how they access that knowledge at the appropriate times and how this

Christine Nash; Dave Collins

2006-01-01

451

Developmental pathways of Singapore's high-performance basketball coaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the developmental pathways of high- performance basketball coaches in Singapore. Such information is useful in providing information about appropriate training and development programmes for high-performance coaches. Nine head coaches and assistant coaches from several senior and youth national basketball teams participated in structured retrospective quantitative interviews. All coaches had at least a

Koon Teck Koh; Clifford J. Mallett; Chee Keng John Wang

2011-01-01

452

Coaching to enhance quality of implementation in prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the topics covered by coaches assisting teachers implementing a research-based drug prevention program and explore how coaching affects student outcomes. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The All Stars drug prevention curriculum is implemented by 16 urban teachers who received four coaching sessions. Two coaches participated. Coaches are interviewed by investigators to assess topics

Linda Dusenbury; William B. Hansen; Julia Jackson-Newsom; Donna S. Pittman; Cicely V. Wilson; Kathleen Nelson-Simley; Chris Ringwalt; Melinda Pankratz; Steven M. Giles

2010-01-01

453

"Fighting the system": Families caring for ventilator-dependent children and adults with complex health care needs at home  

PubMed Central

Background An increasing number of individuals with complex health care needs now receive life-long and life-prolonging ventilatory support at home. Family members often take on the role of primary caregivers. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of families giving advanced care to family members dependent on home mechanical ventilation. Methods Using qualitative research methods, a Grounded Theory influenced approach was used to explore the families' experiences. A total of 15 family members with 11 ventilator-dependent individuals (three children and eight adults) were recruited for 10 in-depth interviews. Results The core category, "fighting the system," became the central theme as family members were asked to describe their experiences. In addition, we identified three subcategories, "lack of competence and continuity", "being indispensable" and "worth fighting for". This study revealed no major differences in the families' experiences that were dependent on whether the ventilator-dependent individual was a child or an adult. Conclusions These findings show that there is a large gap between family members' expectations and what the community health care services are able to provide, even when almost unlimited resources are available. A number of measures are needed to reduce the burden on these family members and to make hospital care at home possible. In the future, the gap between what the health care can potentially provide and what they can provide in real life will rapidly increase. New proposals to limit the extremely costly provision of home mechanical ventilation in Norway will trigger new ethical dilemmas that should be studied further. PMID:21726441

2011-01-01

454

Oral health status, dental treatment needs, and barriers to dental care of elderly care home residents in Lodz, Poland  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine oral health status, dental treatment needs, and to identify barriers that prevent easy access to dental care by elderly care home residents in Lodz. Background Studies in many countries show that oral health status of elderly care home residents is poor and there is an urgent need to improve it. Methods The study included 259 care home residents, aged 65 years and older. The oral examination was performed. In face-to-face interviews, subjects were asked about frequency of cleaning teeth and/or dentures, whether they needed assistance, and whether the assistance was available; they were also asked about the perceived dental needs, and about the time since their last visit to a dentist and the purpose of the visit. If they had not visited the dentist in the past 12 months, they were asked about reasons for failing to visit the dentist. Results Forty-six percent of the subjects were edentulous. Only 5.8% of all participants had a sufficient number of functional natural teeth. Dental treatment was found to be necessary in 59.8% of the respondents. One in four subjects reported reduced ability of correctly cleaning teeth and dentures themselves, of whom only one-third were helped by others. An insufficient level of hygiene was found in every other subject. About 42% of residents had not visited a dentist for over 5 years, mainly due to organizational reasons. Conclusion Expanding the current scope of medical care for the elderly care home residents to include dental care would improve their currently poor oral health status. PMID:25284997

Gaszynska, Ewelina; Szatko, Franciszek; Godala, Malgorzata; Gaszynski, Tomasz

2014-01-01

455

Emergency department naloxone distribution: a rhode island department of health, recovery community, and emergency department partnership to reduce opioid overdose deaths.  

PubMed

In response to increasing rates of opioid overdose deaths in Rhode Island (RI), the RI Department of Health, RI emergency physicians, and Anchor Community Recovery Center designed an emergency department (ED) naloxone distribution and peer-recovery coach program for people at risk of opioid overdose. ED patients at risk for overdose are offered a take home naloxone kit, patient education video, and, when available, an Anchor peer recovery coach to provide recovery support and referral to treatment. In August 2014, the program launched at Kent, Miriam, and Rhode Island Hospital Emergency Departments. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-10.asp, free with no login]. PMID:25271659

Samuels, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

456

How do Health professionals' Perceptions of the Roles of Occupational Therapists Affect Occupational Therapy Practice in Interprofessional Home Health Teams?.  

E-print Network

??Evidence shows that occupational therapists who work within interprofessional health teams sometimes have challenges delivering care to clients because other health professionals on the team… (more)

Cheung, Sze Kei Irene

2013-01-01

457

Trends in mental health admissions to nursing homes: 1999-2005  

PubMed Central

Objectives To measure trends and characteristics of first-time nursing home admissions for individuals with mental illness, dementia or both from 1999–2005. Methods The Minimum Data Set was used to estimate the number and percent of elderly residents newly admitted to nursing homes who had mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression or anxiety), dementia, or both from 1999–2005. In 2005, demographic factors, comorbidities, and treatments by mental illness status were compared. Results The number of individuals admitted with mental illness increased from 168,721 in 1999 to 187,478 in 2005 and currently exceeds by 50% the number admitted with dementia only (118,290 in 2005). This increase in mental illness is driven by depression, which increased from 128,566 to 154,262. Residents admitted with depression exhibited higher rates of comorbidities, high rates of antidepressant treatment, and high rates of receiving training in skills required to return to the community. Conclusions Over the past decade, the number of nursing home admissions for mental illness, in particular depression, has overtaken the number for dementia. These changes may be related to increased recognition of depression, changes in the availability of nursing home substitutes for residents with dementia, and the increased specialization of nursing homes in the care of post-acute, rehabilitation residents. In recognition of these changes, improving the resources of nursing homes to adequately treat residents with mental illness is critical to help facilitate reintegration into the community. PMID:19564228

Fullerton, Catherine Anne; McGuire, Thomas G.; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent; Grabowski, David C.

2009-01-01

458

Health reform's impact on federally qualified community health centers: the unintended consequence of increased Medicaid enrollment on the primary care medical home.  

PubMed

The impact of recently passed health reform legislation may cause substantial changes in community health center (CHC) operations. The new legislation provides federal funding for center expansion, increased Medicaid enrollment, enhanced Medicare payments, training to increase primary care providers, and incentives to develop CHCs as accountable care organizations. Health reform could place CHCs in a vulnerable financial situation. Newly insured patients may seek care at private providers, whereas CHCs are left caring only for the uninsured. Thus, CHCs are unable to benefit from enhanced insurance payments needed to offset care given to the uninsured. Conversely, if CHCs participate in developing comprehensive care networks for low-income populations by strengthening referral networks, developing primary medical care homes and accountable care organizations, and investing in infrastructure, then health center medical care will be a desired option for the newly insured, and a robust safety-net system may result. PMID:23629032

Kulesher, Robert R

2013-01-01

459

The mental health implications of maternal employment: Working versus at-home mothering identities The mental health implications of maternal employment: Working versus at-home mothering identities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Past research exploring the effect of employment on mothers' mental health has largely constructed maternal employment as a problem of identity and energy supply within the theory of multiple roles. Specifically, maternal employment has been investigated as either beneficial (role enhancement hypothesis) or detrimental (role strain hypothesis) to women's psychological wellbeing, with little consideration given towards a more complex

Karen Elgar; Andrea Chester

460

Handball Coaches' Perceptions About the Value of Working Competences According to Their Coaching Background  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to analyze the value attributed to given working competences, by Portuguese handball coaches according to their coaching background, certification level, coaching experience, and level of education. A sample of 207 handball coaches responded to a questionnaire which included demographic characteristics and a scale focused on perceptions of the level of importance attributed to working competences. Data analysis included an exploratory factorial analysis applying Maximum Likelihood Factoring (MLF) and Oblimin rotation. These factors were submitted to a One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc multiple comparisons to analyse coaches’ perceptions according to their coaching background. A six factor solution was found where three major domains of competences were highlighted; the first one related to training and competition (e.g. planning and conducting the training, team administration in competition, annual and multi-annual planning, and coaching methodology); the second one related to social and cultural issues and management (e.g. implementation of youth sport development projects, team leadership and coach education) and the third one related to the cognitive background (meta-cognitive competences). The importance ascribed to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level. Highly experienced and qualified coaches perceived competences of everyday practice, social, cultural and management issues related to training and competition as more important than the other coaches. This study suggests the need to consider some working competences, until now not explicitly present in the Portuguese coaching education curriculum which could enable coaches to choose the best way to practice/work in a manner that will foster and support their professional development. Key points Three major domains of competences were highlighted by Portuguese handball coaches. The first one related to training and competition, the second one related to social and cultural issues and management and the third one related to the cognitive background. The importance ascribed by Portuguese handball coaches to some working competences was influenced by their coaching experience and certification level, as high experienced coaches and coaches with higher certification levels perceived competences related to training and competition of the everyday practice and social, cultural issues and management as more important. The value attributed by Portuguese handball coaches to working competences did not vary according to the coaches’ academic education level. Portuguese handball coaches valued the meta-cognitive competences, the competences to implement sport development project and related to annual and multi-annual planning independently of their coaching background. PMID:24149314

Mesquita, Isabel; Borges, Mario; Rosado, Antonio; Souza, Adriano De

2011-01-01