Sample records for health information focused

  1. Needs and Preferences for Receiving Mental Health Information in an African American Focus Group Sample

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shiraz I. Mishra; Alicia Lucksted; Deborah Gioia; Beth Barnet; Claudia R. Baquet

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand the mental health\\/illness information and service delivery preferences among\\u000a African American residents of Baltimore. We conducted four focus groups (n = 42) among African American adults currently unconnected with the mental health system. Participants expressed fear of stigma\\u000a and perceptions of racism as major barriers to seeking information and\\/or services and discussed some

  2. Needs and Preferences for Receiving Mental Health Information in an African American Focus Group Sample

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Lucksted, Alicia; Gioia, Deborah; Barnet, Beth; Baquet, Claudia R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand the mental health/illness information and service delivery preferences among African American residents of Baltimore. We conducted four focus groups (n=42) among African American adults currently unconnected with the mental health system. Participants expressed fear of stigma and perceptions of racism as major barriers to seeking information and/or services and discussed some normalizing strategies to address these barriers. African Americans harbor cultural and traditional beliefs regarding mental illness which could also act as barriers. Findings have implications for imparting acceptable and culturally-sensitive mental health education and service delivery programs in community settings. PMID:18633704

  3. Genetic information: Special or not? Responses from focus groups with members of a health maintenance organization.

    PubMed

    Diergaarde, Brenda; Bowen, Deborah J; Ludman, Evette J; Culver, Julie O; Press, Nancy; Burke, Wylie

    2007-03-15

    Genetic information is used increasingly in health care. Some experts have argued that genetic information is qualitatively different from other medical information and, therefore, raises unique social issues. This view, called "genetic exceptionalism," has importantly influenced recent policy efforts. Others have argued that genetic information is like other medical information and that treating it differently may actually result in unintended disparities. Little is known about how the general public views genetic information. To identify opinions about implications of genetic and other medical information among the general population, we conducted a series of focus groups in Seattle, WA. Participants were women and men between ages 18 and 74, living within 30 miles of Seattle and members of the Group Health Cooperative. A structured discussion guide was used to ensure coverage of all predetermined topics. Sessions lasted approximately 2 hr; were audio taped and transcribed. The transcripts formed the basis of the current analysis. Key findings included the theme that genetic information was much like other medical information and that all sensitive medical information should be well protected. Personal choice (i.e., the right to choose whether to know health risk information and to control who else knows) was reported to be of crucial importance. Participants had an understanding of the tensions involved in protecting privacy versus sharing medical information to help another person. These data may guide future research and policy concerning the use and protection of medical information, including genetic information. PMID:17318844

  4. Focus Issue: Women's Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    L. Bryan Ray (American Association for the Advancement of Science; Editor of Science's STKE and Senior Editor of Science REV)

    2005-06-14

    This week’s issues of Science and Science’s STKE concern health-related issues that are specifically pertinent to women. Topics at STKE include cell signaling pathways through which human papillomaviruses promote the development of cervical cancer and the role of membrane-associated signaling pathways in the anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen and the beneficial actions of estrogen on cardiovascular function.

  5. Using focus groups to discover health professionals' information needs: a regional marketing study.

    PubMed Central

    Mullaly-Quijas, P; Ward, D H; Woelfl, N

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the use of focus groups as a data-gathering tool, in both theoretical and practical terms. Calder's discussion of focus groups is presented as the basis of the theory, and the marketing study conducted by the Midcontinental Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine serves as the backdrop to highlight some of the practical aspects of using this qualitative data-gathering method. Results of the marketing study are presented to illustrate the types of data that can be gathered using this methodology and the types of plans for future activities that can be developed based on the data gathered. PMID:7920341

  6. Information needs of health care workers in developing countries: a literature review with a focus on Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pakenham-Walsh, Neil; Bukachi, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Health care workers in developing countries continue to lack access to basic, practical information to enable them to deliver safe, effective care. This paper provides the first phase of a broader literature review of the information and learning needs of health care providers in developing countries. A Medline search revealed 1762 papers, of which 149 were identified as potentially relevant to the review. Thirty-five of these were found to be highly relevant. Eight of the 35 studies looked at information needs as perceived by health workers, patients and family/community members; 14 studies assessed the knowledge of health workers; and 8 looked at health care practice. The studies suggest a gross lack of knowledge about the basics on how to diagnose and manage common diseases, going right across the health workforce and often associated with suboptimal, ineffective and dangerous health care practices. If this level of knowledge and practice is representative, as it appears to be, it indicates that modern medicine, even at a basic level, has largely failed the majority of the world's population. The information and learning needs of family caregivers and primary and district health workers have been ignored for too long. Improving the availability and use of relevant, reliable health care information has enormous potential to radically improve health care worldwide. PMID:19356239

  7. Evaluating Health Information

    MedlinePLUS

    Millions of consumers get health information from magazines, TV or the Internet. Some of the information is reliable and up to date; some is not. ... a branch of the government, a university, a health organization, a hospital or a business? Focus on ...

  8. Connecting for health literacy: health information partners.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Karyn L; Muhammad, Abdul-Ali; Downey, Stacey; Kind, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a community-based health information partnership to address health literacy and health information inequalities in marginalized communities. Public health, medical, literacy, and library practitioners promote health literacy through outreach, training, and professional development activities in community settings. They create learning environments for people to develop the necessary knowledge and skills to better understand health information and health policy so they can make decisions concerning personal and community health. Outreach activities focus on visits to neighborhood health centers, health fairs, health exhibits at union meetings and conferences; training programs involve hands-on, peer-led computer classes for people living with HIV and for the general public; and professional development programs connect librarians, health providers, public health workers, and literacy teachers in joint planning and learning. Several learners currently participate in and lead community health education programs and HIV advocacy. The coalition's strength develops from strongly shared objectives, an absence of territoriality, and a core active leadership group. PMID:18544664

  9. Your Health Information Rights

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to access your health information Right to an accounting of disclosures of your health information Right to ... Yes. You have a right to receive an "accounting of disclosures," which is a list of certain ...

  10. Connecting for Health Literacy: Health Information Partners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karyn L. Pomerantz; Abdul-Ali Muhammad; Stacey Downey; Terry Kind

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a community-based health information partnership to address health literacy and health information inequalities in marginalized communities. Public health, medical, literacy, and library practitioners promote health literacy through outreach, training, and professional development activities in community settings. They create learning environments for people to develop the necessary knowledge and skills to better understand health information and health policy

  11. Focusing on reproductive health for adolescents.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    JOICFP is producing a still photo video consisting of three segments from photos shot in Bangladesh (April 22 - May 2), Thailand (May 2-15), and Mexico (June 29 - July 7) in 1995. The first segment highlights the daily life of a husband, aged 20, and his wife, Moni, aged 14. Moni married at age 13, before the onset of menstruation, and now serves and feeds her husband's large extended family. The Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB), the local implementing agent of the Sustainable Community-based Family Planning/Maternal and Child Health (FP/MCH) Project with Special Focus on Women, which is supported by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and executed by JOICFP, introduced Moni to the concept of reproductive health and encouraged her to join other women in activities designed to improve their health and raise their economic status. The second segment depicts the life of a former commercial sex worker who is undergoing occupational skill development training promoted by the Population and Community Development Association. The girl is now a leader of teenagers in her village; she works to change attitudes that sent her to work as a prostitute with an estimated 150,000 other poor rural teenage women. The third segment focuses on teen pregnancy and the efforts of the Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM) in the areas of health care and education for adolescents. PMID:12289887

  12. Identifying Information Focuses in Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hong-yan

    2011-01-01

    The study explains the process of learners' listening comprehension within Halliday's information theory in functional grammar, including the skills of identifying focuses while listening in college English teaching. Identifying information focuses in listening is proved to improve the students' communicative listening ability by the means of a…

  13. PRIVACY OF HEALTH INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    PRIVACY OF HEALTH INFORMATION #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS HIPAA standards, it became necessary to adopt standards for securing the storage of that information................................................................................1 THE TRANSACTION & CODE SETS AND SECURITY REGULATIONS......................1 DIFFERENCES BETWEEN

  14. Accuracy of Information Processing under Focused Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    This paper reports the results of an experiment on the accuracy of information processing during attention focused arousal under two conditions: single estimation and double estimation. The attention of 187 college students was focused by a task requiring high level competition for a monetary prize ($10) under severely limited time conditions. The…

  15. Exploring barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice in psychiatry to inform health policy: a focus group based study.

    PubMed

    Hannes, Karin; Pieters, Guido; Goedhuys, Jo; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2010-10-01

    This study aims to explore the obstacles to Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) experienced by Belgian Dutch-speaking psychiatrists. We used an inductive, qualitative research strategy. Thirty-nine psychiatrists participated in five focus groups organised between September 2004 and September 2006. Data-analysis was guided by a 'grounded theory approach'. Three major themes emerged from the data: (1) Characteristics of evidence, including the lack of (use of) evidence and the applicability of evidence; (2) Characteristics of other partners in mental health care, including government, patients and drug companies and (3) Discipline-related barriers, including the complexity of diagnoses, the importance of the therapeutic relationship and personal experience, and the different schools of thoughts. A problem tree was developed, linking all obstacles. Although context-specific, the problem tree can assist policy makers working in health care systems with similar characteristics in formulating objectives and developing strategies that facilitate EBP in the field of psychiatric care. PMID:19888653

  16. Women's Health Informational Handout

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    Women's Health Informational Handout 9-19-13 Next Choice One Dose Request Form Students may now normal. Return to Women's Health for a pregnancy test if you do not get a NORMAL period in 3 weeks transmitted infection testing in Women's Health in 10-14 days Condoms must be used for the rest of the month

  17. Connecting for Health Literacy: Health Information Partners

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karyn L. Pomerantz; Abdul-Ali Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a community-based health informa- tion partnership to address health literacy and health information inequalities in marginalized communities. Public health, medical, literacy, and library practitioners promote health literacy through outreach, training, and professional development activities in community set- tings. They create learning environments for people to develop the necessary knowledge and skills to better understand health information and

  18. Security of Health Information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gordon Gibby; Keith J. Ruskin

    Electronic generation, transmission, and storage of health data have transformed patient care by making it easy to acquire,\\u000a search, manipulate, and distribute large amounts of information. An electronic workflow facilitates direct patient care and\\u000a can be used for purposes such as quality assurance and submission of health insurance claims. Information in the health record\\u000a is also used for purposes not

  19. Communicating health information to disadvantaged populations.

    PubMed

    Beacom, Amanda M; Newman, Sandra J

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the communication of health information among disadvantaged populations has increased in recent years with the shift from a model of patient-provider communication to one of a more empowered healthcare consumer; with the use of new communication technologies that increase the number of channels through which health information may be accessed; and with the steadily increasing number of people without health insurance. Three separate research literatures contribute to our current understanding of this issue. In the medicine and public health literature, disparities in health access and outcomes among socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial groups are now well documented. In the information sciences literature, scholars note that on a continuum of health information behaviors, ranging from information avoidance and nonseeking to active seeking, nonseeking behaviors are associated with disadvantaged populations. In the communication literature, enthusiasm over the technology-driven growth of online health information seeking is tempered by evidence supporting the knowledge gap hypothesis, which indicates that as potential access to health information increases, systematic gaps in health knowledge also increase as groups with higher socioeconomic status acquire this information at a faster rate than those with lower socioeconomic status. A number of diverse strategies show promise in reducing information and health disparities, including those that focus on technology, such as programs to increase computer and Internet access, skills, and comprehension; those that focus on interpersonal communication, such as the community health worker model; and those that focus on mass media channels, such as entertainment education. PMID:20216358

  20. Oil companies focus on health care for remote operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1996-01-01

    Oil companies are taking a hard look at the effects of employee health on overall corporate standing. Of special interest is the health of workers stationed in remote locations, such as offshore production platforms, where access to health care is limited. A healthy work force not only saves money, but also increases productivity. Health issues were a major focus at

  1. Personalized Health Information Retrieval System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunli; Liu, Zhenkai

    2005-01-01

    Consumers face barriers when seeking health information on the Internet. A Personalized Health Information Retrieval System (PHIRS) is proposed to recommend health information for consumers. The system consists of four modules: (1) User modeling module captures user inverted exclamation mark s preference and health interests; (2) Automatic quality filtering module identifies high quality health information; (3) Automatic text difficulty rating module classifies health information into professional or patient educational materials; and (4) User profile matching module tailors health information for individuals. The initial results show that PHIRS could assist consumers with simple search strategies. PMID:16779435

  2. and Practices HEALTH INFORMATION ACT

    E-print Network

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Guidelines and Practices Manual HEALTH INFORMATION ACT March 2011 #12;This publication is a practical reference tool for the application of Alberta's Health Information Act (HIA). It is designed-2011 Government of Alberta 1Health and Wellness Health Information Act GUIDELINES AND PRACTICES MANUAL TABLE

  3. Health information technology in US emergency departments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Pallin; Ashley F. Sullivan; Rainu Kaushal; Carlos A. Camargo Jr

    2010-01-01

    Background  Information technology may improve patient safety, and is a focus of health care reform. A minority of emergency departments\\u000a (EDs) in Massachusetts, and in academic EDs throughout the US, have electronic health records.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aims  Assess health information technology adoption in a nationwide sample of EDs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We surveyed 69 US EDs, asking site investigators about the availability of health information technology in

  4. Health and Young Children. Focus on Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, David

    2006-01-01

    How much "junk food" is too much? This question is difficult to answer, because it depends on the health and weight status of the child. If the child already has a weight problem, then this type of snack should be more restricted than for a child without weight issues. In this article, Dr. Ludwig states that, as a general rule, parents should not…

  5. FOCUS Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    FOCUS Medical Student Fellowship in Women's Health Research Website: www and 5 awards annually ­ Range of study in women's health, defined broadly; 1 award may be specific to CV completing 3rd year- some flexibility · Funding for 6 months of mentored, intensive women's health research

  6. National Institutes of Health: Health Information

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Health Information portion of the National Institutes of Health website covers a wide range of topics. This consumer-oriented site includes Quick Links, on the left side of the page, to such topics as "Child & Teen Health", "Men's Health", "Minority Health", and "Seniors' Health". To browse health categories, the visitor can browse several different ways. They can browse under "Body Location/Systems", "Conditions/Diseases", "Procedures", and "Health and Wellness". On the left side of the page the visitor can also choose to search for Health Topics alphabetically and for those more inclined toward audio learning, visitors can listen to NIH Radio by clicking on "MP3 audio reports" on the right side of the page. The Research in Action feature in the top middle of the page offers insight into how humans hear. Just click on the picture above Research in Action to be taken to the article. For visitors who just can't find what they need on the Health Information site, there are a slew of Related Links near the bottom of the page, including Health Information on the Web, Health Newsletters, Health Databases, and Federal Health Agencies.

  7. The focus group method: Insights from focus group interviews on sexual health with adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abbey Hyde; Etaoine Howlett; Dympna Brady; Jonathan Drennan

    2005-01-01

    This article concerns the manner in which group interaction during focus groups impacted upon the data generated in a study of adolescent sexual health. Twenty-nine group interviews were conducted with secondary school pupils in Ireland, and data were subjected to a qualitative analysis. In exploring the relationship between method and theory generation, we begin by focusing on the ethnographic potential

  8. Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid

    E-print Network

    Wilcock, William

    Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid Hydrofluoric acid (HF eye damage. HF vapors can seriously damage the lungs. Pulmonary edema (flooding of the lungs characterized by weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, and general ill health. Safe use If possible, avoid working

  9. Developing a Health Care Intermediary-Delivered Intervention to Promote an Online Health Information Resource: Results from Formative Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiang Li; Jeff Quinn; Cassandra L. Rico; Amaris C. Noguera; Christie Silbajoris; Jane D. Brown; Diana McDuffee

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the development of a health care intermediary-delivered intervention to promote an existing state-based health information Web site (NC Health Info) originally designed by health science librarians. Two focus groups and six key informant interviews were conducted with 17 health care intermediaries (HCIs) to: (1) identify key trends in HCIs' use of and attitudes toward online health information;

  10. How Does Health Information Influence African American Men’s Health Behavior?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek M. Griffith; Katrina R. Ellis; Julie Ober Allen

    2012-01-01

    Few researchers have examined where African American men obtain, process, and use health information. A thematic analysis of data from eighteen exploratory focus groups conducted with 154 urban African American men aged 32 years and older revealed that men received health information from a variety of sources, including health professionals, media, and members of their social networks. At times, information

  11. Health Information for Older People

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH) — the website draws from the Library of Medicine, NIH, other government ... for finding reliable health information online, Healthfinder.gov draws on more than 1,600 government and non- ...

  12. Adaptive Visualization for Focused Personalized Information Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Jae-wook

    2010-01-01

    The new trend on the Web has totally changed today's information access environment. The traditional information overload problem has evolved into the qualitative level beyond the quantitative growth. The mode of producing and consuming information is changing and we need a new paradigm for accessing information. Personalized search is one of…

  13. Focused Monitoring. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2005

    2005-01-01

    During this era of increased accountability and enhanced educational expectations for infants, toddlers and students with disabilities, the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) is using a new compliance and technical assistance model- focused monitoring. Focused monitoring is part of the Continuous Improvement…

  14. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Don E Detmer

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential

  15. American Health Information Management Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Forward AHIMA’s primary goal is to provide the knowledge, resources and tools to advance health information professional ... and timely information you need. HIM Body of Knowledge™ Searchable articles, briefs, statements and more Engage Communities ...

  16. PSST… privacy, safety, security, and trust in health information websites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamman W. Samuel; Osmar R. Zaiane

    2012-01-01

    Various newsworthy incidents typically include breaches of security, invasion of privacy, and harm caused by false information. In the e-health domain, there has been a lot of focus on ethical issues when dealing with electronic health records (EHRs) and patient medical records (PMRs). However, equally important are the myriad of health information websites that are being used to formally or

  17. Health information privacy and health information technology in the US correctional setting.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Melissa M

    2014-05-01

    Electronic health records and electronic health information exchange are essential to improving quality of care, reducing medical errors and health disparities, and advancing the delivery of patient-centered medical care. In the US correctional setting, these goals are critical because of the high numbers of Americans affected, yet the use of health information technology is quite limited. In this article, I describe the legal environment surrounding health information sharing in corrections by focusing on 2 key federal privacy laws: the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 and the federal Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records laws. In addition, I review stakeholder concerns and describe possible ways forward that enable electronic exchange while ensuring protection of inmate information and legal compliance. PMID:24625160

  18. Self-rated health and ethnicity: focus on indigenous populations

    PubMed Central

    Bombak, Andrea E.; Bruce, Sharon G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Self-rated health (SRH) is a commonly used measure in surveys to assess general health status or health-related quality of life. Differences have been detected in how different ethnic groups and nationalities interpret the SRH measure and assess their health. This review summarizes the research conducted on SRH within and between ethnic groups, with a focus on indigenous groups. Study design and methods A search of published academic literature on SRH and ethnicity, including a comprehensive review of all relevant indigenous research, was conducted using PubMed and summarized. Results A wide variety of research on SRH within ethnic groups has been undertaken. SRH typically serves as an outcome measure. Minority respondents generally rated their health worse than the dominant population. Numerous culturally-specific determinants of SRH have been identified. Cross-national and cross-ethnicity comparisons of the associations of SRH have been conducted to assess the validity of SRH. While SRH is a valid measure within a variety of ethnicities, differences in how SRH is assessed by ethnicities have been detected. Research in indigenous groups remains generally under-represented in the SRH literature. Conclusions These results suggest that different ethnic groups and nationalities vary in SRH evaluations, interpretation of the SRH measure, and referents employed in rating health. To effectively assess and redress health disparities and establish culturally-relevant and effective health interventions, a greater understanding of SRH is required, particularly among indigenous groups, in which little research has been conducted. PMID:22663937

  19. What's Health Got to Do with It? Forum Focus. Volume 3, Issue 2, May-Jun 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yohalem, Nicole; Judd, Becky; Davis, Kalisha

    2005-01-01

    For youth workers and youth-serving organizations, making a commitment to improve adolescent health outcomes can be complex. Given the data on gaps in access to health information and services, however, it is important for youth workers to have some concrete ways to respond. In Forum Focus: What's Health Got to Do With It?, we attempt to examine…

  20. Frambu Health Centre: Promoting Family Focused Care for Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storhaug, Kari; Vandvik, Inger Helene

    1983-01-01

    The article describes services of the Frambu Health Centre in Norway, which has evolved during the past 30 years from a summer camp for children with poliomyelitis to a modern information and treatment center for families with disabled members, and offers fortnightly courses for patients with rare congenital and/or hereditary disorders. (Author/MC)

  1. Older Inmates’ Pursuit of Good Health: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Steffensmeier, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of intersecting factors including the graying of the broader society, a paradigm shift away from rehabilitation, fewer opportunities for parole, and retrospective prosecutions contribute to an exponential increase in number of geriatric inmates. Elderly prisoners are likely to live in small tight quarters with other inmates, have two or more chronic health conditions, and encounter multiple barriers impeding health promotion while incarcerated. The purpose of this study was to identify perceived challenges to the health of older male inmates and to explore their self-care strategies. Focus group methodology was used. Data were collected from 42 male inmates age 50 and over who were aging in place and living with comorbidity. Cost issues, prison personnel and policies, food concerns, fellow inmates, and personal barriers all challenged older inmates’ abilities to maintain their health in prison. However, these older inmates engaged in a variety of self-care strategies, including: accessing resources and support; staying positive; managing diet and weight; engaging in physical activity; and protecting self. A key motivator for pursuing good health was to be respected and perceived as healthy and strong by fellow inmates. Looking to the future, development and testing of programs to enhance inmates' self-management of chronic conditions and to facilitate health promotion are in order. PMID:20795581

  2. Global public health and the information superhighway.

    PubMed

    LaPorte, R E

    1994-06-25

    Applications of networking to health care have focused on the potential of networking to transmit data and to reduce the cost of health care. In the early 198Os networks began forming among academic institutions; one of them was Bitnet. During the 1980s Internet evolved, which joined diverse networks, including those of governments and industry. The first step is to connect public health organizations such as ministries of health, the World Health Organization, the Pan-American Health Organization, and the United Nations. Computer-based telecommunication will vastly increase effective transmission of information. Networking public health workers in local health departments, academia, governments, industry, and private agencies, will bring great benefits. One is global disease telemonitoring: with new epidemiological techniques such as capture-recapture, accurate estimates of incidences of important communicable and non-communicable diseases can now be obtained. Currently all countries in the Americas except Haiti are connected through Internet. No systematic integration of telecommunication and public health systems across countries has occurred yet. On-line vital statistics could be usable almost instantaneously to facilitate monitoring and forecasting of population growth and the health needs of mothers and children. Linking global disease telemonitoring (morbidity data for non-communicable diseases) with environmental data systems would considerably improve understanding of the environmental determinants of disease. Internet is already linked to the National Library of Medicine through Bitnis. Computer based distance education is rapidly improving through E-mail searches. Reading materials, video, pictures, and sound could be transmitted across huge distances for low costs. Hundreds of schools are already networked together. On-line electronic journals and books have the potential for instantaneous dissemination of free information through gopher servers. Global public health needs to plan for a public health communication system that can reach all the public health workers in the world. PMID:7826426

  3. Health Information in Russian (???????): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ??????? (Russian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Tooth Disorders Toothache ?????? ???? - ??????? (Russian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Scan ???????????????????? - ??????? (Russian) Bilingual ...

  4. Information Security Health Check

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petrunel Gerber

    2002-01-01

    Abstract:,Organization’s dependency,on information systems and the related resources has led to an increased vulnerability to computer crime and abuse. It is therefore of the utmost importance that senior management,are aware of the importance of information security because they are ultimately accountable for the organization’s success. Unfortunately, no effective, easy to use tool is available to diagnose an organization’s current information

  5. Evolving public health nursing roles: focus on community participatory health promotion and prevention.

    PubMed

    Kulbok, Pamela A; Thatcher, Esther; Park, Eunhee; Meszaros, Peggy

    2012-05-01

    Public health nursing (PHN) practice is population-focused and requires unique knowledge, competencies, and skills. Early public health nursing roles extended beyond sick care to encompass advocacy, community organizing, health education, and political and social reform. Likewise, contemporary public health nurses practice in collaboration with agencies and community members. The purpose of this article is to examine evolving PHN roles that address complex, multi-causal, community problems. A brief background and history of this role introduces an explanation of the community participation health promotion model. A community-based participatory research project, Youth Substance Use Prevention in a Rural County provides an exemplar for description of evolving PHN roles focused on community health promotion and prevention. Also included is discussion about specific competencies for PHNs in community participatory health promoting roles and the contemporary PHN role. PMID:22686109

  6. Preparing for and responding to public health emergencies in China: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Rao, Keqin; Hu, Ming; Sur, Zhenqiu

    2007-07-01

    To gather information that would assist China's central government and local governments in public health emergency management, we conducted focus groups to identify current problems. In three provinces, selected to reflect differing economic and social status, we met with two groups each, composed of public health officials and practitioners. Sampling to achieve a mix and for convenience, we followed a guide to cover five topics. Eleven common problems emerged. China's central government and local governments should take immediate action to solve these remaining problems in public health emergency management. PMID:17585319

  7. Visual information foraging in a focus + context visualization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Pirolli; Stuart K. Card; Mija M. Van Der Wege

    2001-01-01

    Eye tracking studies of the Hyperbolic Tree browser [10] suggest that visual search in focus+context displays is highly affected by information scent (i.e., local cues, such as text summaries, used to assess and navigate toward distal information sources). When users detected a strong information scent, they were able to reach their goal faster with the Hyperbolic Tree browser than with

  8. The Knowledge-Behavior Gap in Use of Health Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sligo, F. X.; Jameson, Anna M.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of access to and use of health information focuses on a study that reported perceived barriers among New Zealand Pacific Island immigrant women to the use of cervical screening. Considers cultural topic avoidance, modesty, religion, information sources, education, ethnicity, implications for health professionals, and future research…

  9. 77 FR 70444 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ...of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee: Request for Comment...Health Records (EHRs) AGENCY: Health Information Technology (HIT) Policy Committee, Office of...

  10. Designing a bone health and soy focus group discussion guide based on the health belief model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focus groups were used to assess the knowledge and skills of women in order to support curricula development. The Health Belief Model was applied to the discussion guide to enhance focus group findings and applications. Constructs related to perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers...

  11. Identifying Barriers to Healthcare to Reduce Health Disparity in Zuni Indians Using Focus Group Conducted by Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vallabh O.; Ghahate, Donica M; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Newman, Sara; Helitzer, Deborah L.; Faber, Thomas; Zager, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The Zuni Pueblo is home to an economically disadvantaged population, which faces a public health challenge from the interrelated epidemics of obesity, diabetes and kidney disease. Efforts to decrease the impact of these epidemics have been complicated by historical, economic and cultural barriers, which may limit health-care utilization. The NIH supported Zuni Health Initiative (ZHI) conducted a study to identify barriers to heath care in the Zuni Pueblo. Community health representatives (CHRs) led 14 one-hour focus group sessions at which a total of 112 people participated posed unique questions that took into account the Zuni culture to elicit information on perceived barriers to health care. Audiotapes were translated and transcribed by bilingual ZHI staff. We reduced the text to thematic categories, constructed a coding dictionary and inserted the text into NVivo 9 program. We identified nine themes emerged regarding the barriers experienced in receiving health care and adhering to medical advice. These included distance; transportation; embarrassment; relating to healthcare professionals; navigating the medical system; awareness of available resources; waiting times; adhering to medication; and incentives in health promotion. In conclusion the implementation of culturally appropriate community based health promotion programs and preventive screening techniques will improve access to health care and diminish health disparities. PMID:24528897

  12. Health Information in Ukrainian (??????????): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ?????????? (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Motor Vehicle Safety Safety with Car Seats and Booster Seats ... Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Scan ??????????????????? - ?????????? (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  13. Health Information in Japanese (???): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ??? (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Motor Vehicle Safety Safety with Car Seats and Booster Seats ... Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Scan ??????? - ??? (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  14. Focus on transformation: a public health model of mental health for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Power, A Kathryn

    2009-05-01

    In 2003 the President's New Freedom Commission called for the transformation of the public mental health system to one that is person centered, recovery focused, evidence based, and quality driven. In this column the director of the Center for Mental Health Services describes progress made by the center over the past five years as well as challenges and opportunities. She presents a strategic forecast, based on stakeholder input, to guide policy formulation and resource allocation. Central to the forecast is the concept of a public health model of mental health that takes a community approach to prevention, treatment, and promotion of well-being. PMID:19411342

  15. Low Health Literacy and Evaluation of Online Health Information: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Putte, Bas; Giani, Stefano; van Weert, Julia CM

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumer online health information seeking. The quality of online health information, however, remains questionable. The issue of information evaluation has become a hot topic, leading to the development of guidelines and checklists to design high-quality online health information. However, little attention has been devoted to how consumers, in particular people with low health literacy, evaluate online health information. Objective The main aim of this study was to review existing evidence on the association between low health literacy and (1) people’s ability to evaluate online health information, (2) perceived quality of online health information, (3) trust in online health information, and (4) use of evaluation criteria for online health information. Methods Five academic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Communication and Mass-media Complete) were systematically searched. We included peer-reviewed publications investigating differences in the evaluation of online information between people with different health literacy levels. Results After abstract and full-text screening, 38 articles were included in the review. Only four studies investigated the specific role of low health literacy in the evaluation of online health information. The other studies examined the association between educational level or other skills-based proxies for health literacy, such as general literacy, and outcomes. Results indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) are negatively related to the ability to evaluate online health information and trust in online health information. Evidence on the association with perceived quality of online health information and use of evaluation criteria is inconclusive. Conclusions The findings indicate that low health literacy (and related skills) play a role in the evaluation of online health information. This topic is therefore worth more scholarly attention. Based on the results of this review, future research in this field should (1) specifically focus on health literacy, (2) devote more attention to the identification of the different criteria people use to evaluate online health information, (3) develop shared definitions and measures for the most commonly used outcomes in the field of evaluation of online health information, and (4) assess the relationship between the different evaluative dimensions and the role played by health literacy in shaping their interplay. PMID:25953147

  16. OUR LEGAL DUTYTO PROTECT HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUTYOU

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    14 OUR LEGAL DUTYTO PROTECT HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUTYOU We understand your health information of your care generated by UF Health Shands and/or the UFHSC, whether made by hospital personnel your health information,and provides examples where necessary.This Notice also describes your rights

  17. Health information systems - past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Haux, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    In 1984, Peter Reichertz gave a lecture on the past, present and future of hospital information systems. In the meantime, there has been a tremendous progress in medicine as well as in informatics. One important benefit of this progress is that our life expectancy is nowadays significantly higher than it would have been even some few decades ago. This progress, leading to aging societies, is of influence to the organization of health care and to the future development of its information systems. Twenty years later, referring to Peter Reichertz' lecture, but now considering health information systems (HIS), two questions are discussed: which were lines of development in health information systems from the past until today? What are consequences for health information systems in the future? The following lines of development for HIS were considered as important: (1) the shift from paper-based to computer-based processing and storage, as well as the increase of data in health care settings; (2) the shift from institution-centered departmental and, later, hospital information systems towards regional and global HIS; (3) the inclusion of patients and health consumers as HIS users, besides health care professionals and administrators; (4) the use of HIS data not only for patient care and administrative purposes, but also for health care planning as well as clinical and epidemiological research; (5) the shift from focusing mainly on technical HIS problems to those of change management as well as of strategic information management; (6) the shift from mainly alpha-numeric data in HIS to images and now also to data on the molecular level; (7) the steady increase of new technologies to be included, now starting to include ubiquitous computing environments and sensor-based technologies for health monitoring. As consequences for HIS in the future, first the need for institutional and (inter-) national HIS-strategies is seen, second the need to explore new (transinstitutional) HIS architectural styles, third the need for education in health informatics and/or biomedical informatics, including appropriate knowledge and skills on HIS. As these new HIS are urgently needed for reorganizing health care in an aging society, as last consequence the need for research around HIS is seen. Research should include the development and investigation of appropriate transinstitutional information system architectures, of adequate methods for strategic information management, of methods for modeling and evaluating HIS, the development and investigation of comprehensive electronic patient records, providing appropriate access for health care professionals as well as for patients, in the broad sense as described here, e.g. including home care and health monitoring facilities. Comparing the world in 1984 and in 2004, we have to recognize that we imperceptibly, stepwise arrived at a new world. HIS have become one of the most challenging and promising fields of research, education and practice for medical informatics, with significant benefits to medicine and health care in general. PMID:16169771

  18. The Environment and Health endorsed option focuses on physical and

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    protection, health promotion, health education, urban development, resource management, health policy population, the history and current structure of the New Zealand health system and health workforce, current of population health must take into account the physical and social environments within which people live

  19. Users of Internet Health Information: Differences by Health Status

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas K Houston; Jeroan J Allison

    2002-01-01

    Background: Millions of consumers have accessed health information online. However, little is known about their health status. Objective: To explore use of Internet health information among those who were sicker (fair\\/poor general health status) compared with those reported being healthier. Methods: A national, random-digit telephone survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project identified 521 Internet users who go

  20. Interoperability design of personal health information import service.

    PubMed

    Tuomainen, Mika; Mykkänen, Juha

    2012-01-01

    Availability of personal health information for individual use from professional patient records is an important success factor for personal health information management (PHIM) solutions such as personal health records. In this paper we focus on this crucial part of personal wellbeing information management splutions and report the interoperability design of personal information import service. Key requirements as well as design factors for interfaces between PHRs and EPRs are discussed. Open standards, low implementation threshold and the acknowledgement of local market and conventions are emphasized in the design. PMID:22874233

  1. A Conceptual Model for Health Care Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nadell, Avrom P.; Ronis, Norman

    1978-01-01

    The health care delivery system both needs and generates information in the course of providing service to its beneficiaries. The heightened interest of groups peripheral to the patient-provider relationship has resulted in ever increasing requests for information and serve to focus attention on the need for uniform data. This paper describes initial efforts to identify and define a core grouping of health-care-related information which is expected to be of maximum use both to members of the health care team and external oversight agencies. To explore the concept of maximum utility, a model of the health care information system was postulated, and functional information categories identified. Application of other criteria resulted in identification of discrete items of information. Definitions and codes, where appropriate, are being developed. The potential usefulness of the concepts to the health care community at large are also discussed.

  2. Using information to guide managed behavioral health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Tompkins; Jennifer Perloff

    2004-01-01

    This evaluation of substance abuse and mental health treatment services in Arizona discusses and illustrates the use of data already collected by the State to manage and monitor the public behavioral health sector. The authors utilize a framework that focuses on rate-setting and financial incentives; provider profiling and education; and monitoring of data quality and system-wide performance. Information and analysis

  3. HealthFinland —Finnish Health Information on the Semantic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvönen, Eero; Viljanen, Kim; Suominen, Osma

    This paper shows how semantic web techniques can be applied to solving problems of distributed content creation, discovery, linking, aggregation, and reuse in health information portals, both from end-users' and content publishers' viewpoints. As a case study, the national semantic health portal HealthFinland is presented. It provides citizens with intelligent searching and browsing services to reliable and up-to-date health information created by various health organizations in Finland. The system is based on a shared semantic metadata schema, ontologies, and ontology services. The content includes metadata about thousands of web documents such as web pages, articles, reports, campaign information, news, services, and other information related to health.

  4. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E

    2003-01-01

    Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries). The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security) framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin PMID:12525262

  5. Using Health Information Exchange to Improve Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Mostashari, Farzad; Hripcsak, George; Soulakis, Nicholas; Kuperman, Gilad

    2011-01-01

    Public health relies on data reported by health care partners, and information technology makes such reporting easier than ever. However, data are often structured according to a variety of different terminologies and formats, making data interfaces complex and costly. As one strategy to address these challenges, health information organizations (HIOs) have been established to allow secure, integrated sharing of clinical information among numerous stakeholders, including clinical partners and public health, through health information exchange (HIE). We give detailed descriptions of 11 typical cases in which HIOs can be used for public health purposes. We believe that HIOs, and HIE in general, can improve the efficiency and quality of public health reporting, facilitate public health investigation, improve emergency response, and enable public health to communicate information to the clinical community. PMID:21330598

  6. HealthShare: Achieving secure and privacy-preserving health information sharing through health social networks

    E-print Network

    Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

    HealthShare: Achieving secure and privacy-preserving health information sharing through health-oriented authentication and transmission schemes for secure and privacy-preserving health information sharing in health/her health information into a ciphertext bonded with a customized access policy. The access policy is defined

  7. IPPF focuses on advocacy. Advocacy for reproductive health: worldwide.

    PubMed

    Puri, S; Ketting, E

    1996-01-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation has been advocating human rights since its establishment in 1952. Since the adoption of its global strategic plan, Vision 2000, it has dealt with advocacy in a more systematic manner. Advocacy aims to gain broader support for a cause. In family planning and reproductive health, advocacy is important in counteracting conservative opposition movements. Its most effective tool is high-quality information and services for meeting people's needs. Its target groups are women's groups, youth organizations, parliamentarians, media representatives, and religious leaders. Information, education, and communication (IEC) campaigns differ from advocacy, because the latter is deliberately persuasive and campaign-oriented. An Advocacy Working Group was convened by IPPF and an Advocacy Guide was produced in 1995. Advocacy is needed for the promotion of sexual and reproductive health in the face of opposition from traditional and cultural forces represented by small, vocal, well-financed and organized groups. In 1984 they succeeded in halting funding for IPPF by the United States. This made IPPF resolute in strategic planning and setting goals as contained in Vision 2000. The goals include advocacy for family planning, the prevention of unsafe abortion, women's empowerment, the involvement of youth, the responsibility of men for family life, and the improvement of the status of the female child. The IPPF's 1985 Central Council discussed new initiatives and an Issues Manual was published. The 1989 Members' Assembly held a seminar on critical issues in advocating family planning. A further 1993 resolution urged support for advocacy initiatives. A Public Response Guide was published in 1991 and Language Guidelines were also produced for correct family planning terminology. In addition, an Interregional Training Workshop was held in London in 1995 on the use of the Advocacy Guide. Recommendations were also submitted by participants for advocacy programs and for future training. PMID:12291095

  8. Health Information in Korean (???): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ??? (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Motor Vehicle Safety Safety with Car Seats and Booster Seats ... Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Scan ? ?? - ??? (Korean) Bilingual PDF ...

  9. Health Information in Hindi (??????): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ???? (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Motor Vehicle Safety Safety with Car Seats and Booster Seats ... Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Wounds and Injuries Incision Care: No Dressing ?????? (Hindi) Bilingual ...

  10. Issues in Consumer Health Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, Catherine Suyak; Salisbury, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Examines two issues to determine how they affect delivery of consumer health information: (1) Who is responsible for disseminating consumer health information, and what role should public and health science libraries play? (2) Should librarians (public or health science) provide medical reference works for general public? Thirty-five references…

  11. Information Technology for Health Care in Mozambique

    E-print Network

    Monteiro, Eric

    /AIDS. The country's 435 physicians and 1200 health facilities are hard-pressed to serve the population of about 20.hisp.org) aiming at improving health information management within the primary health care sector. The aim of HISP is, by furthering more effective health information management, to encourage more decentralized

  12. Health Literacy, Information Seeking, and Trust in Information in Haitians

    PubMed Central

    Lubetkin, Erica I.; Zabor, Emily C.; Isaac, Kathleen; Brennessel, Debra; Kemeny, M. Margaret; Hay, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess heath literacy, health information seeking, and trust in health-related information among Haitian immigrants seen in primary care. Methods Health literacy was measured by the Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS); items on health information use were from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. Results BHLS scores differed according to age, education, and survey language. Participants with lower levels of health literacy tended to be more likely to place “a lot” or “some” trust in family and friends and religious organizations and leaders as sources of information about health or medical topics. Conclusions Constructing a culturally-tailored and appropriate intervention regarding health promotion requires understanding how the population accesses and conveys health information. PMID:25741688

  13. The Nationalization of Health Information Privacy Protections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence O. Gostin; Hodge James G. Jr; Lauren Marks

    2002-01-01

    In Part II, this article examines the justifications for implementing comprehensive national health information privacy regulations, including the personal nature of health information and the increasing threats to personal privacy from the shift to an electronic health information infrastructure. In doing so, it looks at historical attempts by federal and state officials to regulate the use and disclosure of personal

  14. Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen’s (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido’s (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care. PMID:22247795

  15. Identifying barriers to healthcare to reduce health disparity in Zuni Indians using focus group conducted by community health workers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vallabh O; Ghahate, Donica M; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Newman, Sara; Helitzer, Deborah L; Faber, Thomas; Zager, Philip

    2014-02-01

    The Zuni Pueblo is home to an economically disadvantaged population, which faces a public health challenge from the interrelated epidemics of obesity, diabetes and kidney disease. Efforts to decrease the impact of these epidemics have been complicated by historical, economic and cultural barriers, which may limit healthcare utilization. The NIH supported Zuni Health Initiative (ZHI) conducted a study to identify barriers to healthcare in the Zuni Pueblo. Community health representatives (CHRs) led 14 one-hour focus group sessions at which a total of 112 people participated posed unique questions that took into account the Zuni culture to elicit information on perceived barriers to healthcare. Audiotapes were translated and transcribed by bilingual ZHI staff. We reduced the text to thematic categories, constructed a coding dictionary and inserted the text into NVivo 9 program. We identified nine themes emerged regarding the barriers experienced in receiving healthcare and adhering to medical advice. These included distance; transportation; embarrassment; relating to healthcare professionals; navigating the medical system; awareness of available resources; waiting times; adhering to medication; and incentives in health promotion. In conclusion the implementation of culturally appropriate community-based health promotion programs and preventive screening techniques will improve access to healthcare and diminish health disparities. PMID:24528897

  16. Health information imperatives for Third World countries.

    PubMed

    Osiobe, S A

    1989-01-01

    The role of health information in the health delivery services of a nation is stressed with examples from the advanced nations. Factors responsible for the poor state of health information systems in the Third World and the effects on health delivery services are identified. probable factors that may Lead to the development of health information systems in the Third World in the future are posited. Recommendations for the establishment of health information systems based on funding, staffing, functions and networking are made. PMID:2928817

  17. Committee opinion no. 621: Patient safety and health information technology.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The advantages of health information technology (IT) include facilitating communication between health care providers; improving medication safety, tracking, and reporting; and promoting quality of care through optimized access to and adherence to guidelines. Health IT systems permit the collection of data for use for quality management, outcome reporting, and public health disease surveillance and reporting. However, improvement is needed with all health IT, especially regarding design, implementation, and integration between platforms within the work environment. Robust interoperability is critical for safe care, but this goal has proved elusive. Significant patient safety concerns already have been recognized; it is important to keep patient safety and quality as the primary focus. PMID:25560146

  18. Advancing personalized health care through health information technology: an update from the American Health Information Community's Personalized Health Care Workgroup.

    PubMed

    Glaser, John; Henley, Douglas E; Downing, Gregory; Brinner, Kristin M

    2008-01-01

    The Personalized Health Care Workgroup of the American Health Information Community was formed to determine what is needed to promote standard reporting and incorporation of medical genetic/genomic tests and family health history data in electronic health records. The Workgroup has examined and clarified a range of issues related to this information, including interoperability standards and requirements for confidentiality, privacy, and security, in the course of developing recommendations to facilitate its capture, storage, transmission, and use in clinical decision support. The Workgroup is one of several appointed by the American Health Information Community to study high-priority issues related to the implementation of interoperable electronic health records in the United States. It is also a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Personalized Health Care Initiative, which is designed to create a foundation upon which information technology that supports personalized, predictive, and pre-emptive health care can be built. PMID:18436899

  19. Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research

    E-print Network

    Detmer, Don E

    2003-01-06

    by evidence of effectiveness. [5,6] Practice patterns differ across institutions and regions, re- sulting in varying health outcomes and costs of care. [7] Patients trying to make informed health decisions often encounter conflicting information with varying... on patientPage 5 of 12 (page number not for citation purposes) widely. Although an increasing number of institutions rely on an information infrastructure to practice evidence- and citizen access to ICT, health care professionals willing to interact...

  20. What young people want from health-related online resources: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Fergie, Gillian; Hunt, Kate; Hilton, Shona

    2012-01-01

    The growth of the Internet as an information source about health, particularly amongst young people, is well established. The aim of this study was to explore young people's perceptions and experiences of engaging with health-related online content, particularly through social media websites. Between February and July 2011 nine focus groups were facilitated across Scotland with young people aged between 14 and 18 years. Health-related user-generated content seems to be appreciated by young people as a useful, if not always trustworthy, source of accounts of other people's experiences. The reliability and quality of both user-generated content and official factual content about health appear to be concerns for young people, and they employ specialised strategies for negotiating both areas of the online environment. Young people's engagement with health online is a dynamic area for research. Their perceptions and experiences of health-related content seem based on their wider familiarity with the online environment and, as the online environment develops, so too do young people's strategies and conventions for accessing it. PMID:24748849

  1. Current Challenge in Consumer Health Informatics: Bridging the Gap between Access to Information and Information Understanding.

    PubMed

    Alpay, Laurence; Verhoef, John; Xie, Bo; Te'eni, Dov; Zwetsloot-Schonk, J H M

    2009-01-01

    The number of health-related websites has proliferated over the past few years. Health information consumers confront a myriad of health related resources on the internet that have varying levels of quality and are not always easy to comprehend. There is thus a need to help health information consumers to bridge the gap between access to information and information understanding-i.e. to help consumers understand health related web-based resources so that they can act upon it. At the same time health information consumers are becoming not only more involved in their own health care but also more information technology minded. One way to address this issue is to provide consumers with tailored information that is contextualized and personalized e.g. directly relevant and easily comprehensible to the person's own health situation. This paper presents a current trend in Consumer Health Informatics which focuses on theory-based design and development of contextualized and personalized tools to allow the evolving consumer with varying backgrounds and interests to use online health information efficiently. The proposed approach uses a theoretical framework of communication in order to support the consumer's capacity to understand health-related web-based resources. PMID:20419038

  2. Focus Group Interview: An Underutilized Research Technique for Improving Theory and Practice in Health Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles E. Basch

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to increase awareness about and stimulate interest in using focus group interviews, a qualitative research technique, to advance the state-of- the-art of education and learning about health. After a brief discussion of small group process in health education, features of focus group interviews are presented, and a theoretical framework for planning a focus group

  3. Michigan State University Health Information Technology

    E-print Network

    Michigan State University Health Information Technology Privacy Statement Revised 12 for Information Technology Resources. Although this Site has security measures in place to protect personal This Site collects information automatically through the use of cookies, third party tracking technologies

  4. Bridging Organizational Divides in Health Care: An Ecological View of Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kevin B; Gadd, Cynthia S; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Background The fragmented nature of health care delivery in the United States leads to fragmented health information and impedes patient care continuity and safety. Technologies to support interorganizational health information exchange (HIE) are becoming more available. Understanding how HIE technology changes health care delivery and affects people and organizations is crucial to long-term successful implementation. Objective Our study investigated the impacts of HIE technology on organizations, health care providers, and patients through a new, context-aware perspective, the Regional Health Information Ecology. Methods We conducted more than 180 hours of direct observation, informal interviews during observation, and 9 formal semi-structured interviews. Data collection focused on workflow and information flow among health care team members and patients and on health care provider use of HIE technology. Results We structured the data analysis around five primary information ecology components: system, locality, diversity, keystone species, and coevolution. Our study identified three main roles, or keystone species, involved in HIE: information consumers, information exchange facilitators, and information repositories. The HIE technology impacted patient care by allowing providers direct access to health information, reducing time to obtain health information, and increasing provider awareness of patient interactions with the health care system. Developing the infrastructure needed to support HIE technology also improved connections among information technology support groups at different health care organizations. Despite the potential of this type of technology to improve continuity of patient care, HIE technology adoption by health care providers was limited. Conclusions To successfully build a HIE network, organizations had to shift perspectives from an ownership view of health data to a continuity of care perspective. To successfully integrate external health information into clinical work practices, health care providers had to move toward understanding potential contributions of external health information. Our study provides a foundation for future context-aware development and implementation of HIE technology. Integrating concepts from the Regional Health Information Ecology into design and implementation may lead to wider diffusion and adoption of HIE technology into clinical work. PMID:25600166

  5. A qualitative study of health information technology in the Canadian public health system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the adoption of health information technology (HIT) has advanced in Canada over the past decade, considerable challenges remain in supporting the development, broad adoption, and effective use of HIT in the public health system. Policy makers and practitioners have long recognized that improvements in HIT infrastructure are necessary to support effective and efficient public health practice. The objective of this study was to identify aspects of health information technology (HIT) policy related to public health in Canada that have succeeded, to identify remaining challenges, and to suggest future directions to improve the adoption and use of HIT in the public health system. Methods A qualitative case study was performed with 24 key stakeholders representing national and provincial organizations responsible for establishing policy and strategic direction for health information technology. Results Identified benefits of HIT in public health included improved communication among jurisdictions, increased awareness of the need for interoperable systems, and improvement in data standardization. Identified barriers included a lack of national vision and leadership, insufficient investment, and poor conceptualization of the priority areas for implementing HIT in public health. Conclusions The application of HIT in public health should focus on automating core processes and identifying innovative applications of HIT to advance public health outcomes. The Public Health Agency of Canada should develop the expertise to lead public health HIT policy and should establish a mechanism for coordinating public health stakeholder input on HIT policy. PMID:23705692

  6. A Security Architecture for Health Information Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajashekar Kailar; Vinod Muralidhar

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today's healthcare enterprise. Recent work on 'nationwide health information net- work' architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communica- tion between

  7. Protecting health information on mobile devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Musheer Ahmed; Mustaque Ahamad

    2012-01-01

    Mobile applications running on devices such as smart phones and tablets will be increasingly used to provide convenient access to health information to health professionals and patients. Also, patients will use these devices to transmit health information captured by sensing devices in settings like the home to remote repositories. As mobile devices become targets of security threats, we must address

  8. Job Loss -- Important Information Workers Need to Know to Protect Their Health Coverage and Retirement Benefits

    MedlinePLUS

    Fact Sheet Job Loss - Important Information Workers Need To Know To Protect Their Health Coverage and Retirement Benefits Printer Friendly Version ... Accountability Act (HIPAA). This fact sheet focuses on job loss and its effect on workers’ health benefits ...

  9. Improving Access to Public Health Information: A Study of Information Needs in a State Health Department

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Hatheway Simpson; Nancy R. LaPelle; Elaine Russo Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Public health challenges can be better addressed if credible information about health risks and effective public health practices is readily available. The need for improved access to evidence-based public health information has been recognized by public health practitioners, researchers, policy makers, and librarians.\\u000aObjective: To understand the information needs of the public health workforce and to improve access to

  10. Newborn Screening Information Supports Public Health More than Informed Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Katrina; Stewart, Ruth; Oliver, Sandy

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To appraise information resources on newborn blood spot screening currently available for parents and health professionals internationally. Method: Health information on newborn blood spot screening was sourced internationally through the internet and, in the United Kingdom, through health service providers and support organisations. An…

  11. The Teen Health Information Network (THINK).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzel, Judith; Erickson, Su

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Teen Health Information Network (THINK), a grant-funded partnership of Aurora, Illinois, public libraries, schools, and community agencies to provide materials, information, and programming on issues related to teen health. Seven appendixes provide detailed information on survey results, collection evaluation and development,…

  12. Health Information System Grid Based on WSRF

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han Ping; Wang Xin-Lei

    2010-01-01

    To build a distributed, integrated data environment to achieve information sharing and efficient health information system, a health information system grid model based on Web service resource framework is proposed. In this grid model, Web service resource is used to do unified description and packaging for the various heterogeneous data resources, and WSRF framework is applied to solve the integration

  13. Meeting Basic Health Information Needs in Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helga Patrikios

    1995-01-01

    Based on a paper presented at a meeting held on 15 July 1994 at BMA House, London: Getting health information from the developed to the developing world. Discusses problems faced by the University of Zimbabwe Medical Library (UZML) in meeting health information needs of academics and students. These include: lack of books, journals and experienced staff. Factors enabling information delivery

  14. Users of Internet Health Information: Differences by Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Jeroan J

    2002-01-01

    Background Millions of consumers have accessed health information online. However, little is known about their health status. Objective To explore use of Internet health information among those who were sicker (fair/poor general health status) compared with those reported being healthier. Methods A national, random-digit telephone survey by the Pew Internet & American Life Project identified 521 Internet users who go online for health care information. Our primary independent variable was general health status rated as excellent, good, fair, or poor. Patterns of Internet use, and types of information searched were assessed. Results Among the 521 users, 64% were female, most (87%) were white, and median age was 42 years. Most individuals indicated that they learned something new online (81%) and indicated that they believe most information on the Internet (52%). Compared with those with excellent/good health, those with fair/poor health (N = 59) were relative newcomers to the Internet but tended to use the Internet more frequently, were more likely to use online chats, were less likely to search for someone other than themselves, and were more likely to talk about the new information with their physician (odds ratio 3.3 [95% confidence interval 1.8-6.3]), after adjustment for age, education and income. Conclusions Health care professionals should be aware that their sicker patients are more likely to ask them about information they found online. Physicians, public health professionals, and eHealth developers should work together to educate patients about searching for health information online and to provide tools for them to navigate to the highest quality information. PMID:12554554

  15. Mission-Driven Priorities: Public Health in Health Information Exchange

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry Nangle; Wu Xu; David N. Sundwall

    Developing state- and nationwide health information exchange (HIE) is one of the health priorities defined in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. States are expected to take leadership in statewide planning and implementation. To balance limited resources among mandated responsibilities and emerging HIE accountability, we maintain that state public health practitioners must integrate HIE into our mission- driven practice in

  16. Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation

    E-print Network

    Sahay, Sundeep

    Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems care, especially in the context of developing countries, a very challenging task. An important step

  17. National health information privacy: regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

    PubMed

    Gostin, L O

    2001-06-20

    Health information privacy is important in US society, but existing federal and state law does not offer adequate protection. The Department of Health and Human Services, under powers granted by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, recently issued a final rule providing systematic, nationwide health information privacy protection. The rule is extensive in its scope, applying to health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers (hospitals, clinics, and health departments) who conduct financial transactions electronically ("covered entities"). The rule applies to personally identifiable information in any form, whether communicated electronically, on paper, or orally. The rule does not preempt state law that affords more stringent privacy protection; thus, the health care industry will have to comply with multiple layers of federal and state law. The rule affords patients rights to education about privacy safeguards, access to their medical records, and a process for correction of records. It also requires the patient's permission for disclosures of personal information. While privacy is an important value, it may conflict with public responsibilities to use data for social goods. The rule has special provisions for disclosure of health information for research, public health, law enforcement, and commercial marketing. The privacy debate will continue in Congress and within the president's administration. The primary focus will be on the costs and burdens on health care providers, the ability of health care professionals to use and share full medical information when treating patients, the provision of patient care in a timely and efficient manner, and parents' access to information about the health of their children. PMID:11410101

  18. 041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Page 1

    E-print Network

    Whitton, Mary C.

    041510v1Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Information Technology Services Transmission of Protected Health Information and Personal Identifying Information Policy Policy Statement Protected Health Information (PHI) and Personal Identifying Information

  19. HIPAA Policy 5026 Reporting Protected Health Information (PHI) Compliance Issues

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    HIPAA Policy 5026 Reporting Protected Health Information (PHI) Compliance Issues Responsible Office). Policy Statement As a general matter, questions or concerns about protected health information (PHI individually identifiable health information, including genetic information and demographic information

  20. Welcome to health information science and systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchun

    2013-01-01

    Health Information Science and Systems is an exciting, new, multidisciplinary journal that aims to use technologies in computer science to assist in disease diagnoses, treatment, prediction and monitoring through the modeling, design, development, visualization, integration and management of health related information. These computer-science technologies include such as information systems, web technologies, data mining, image processing, user interaction and interface, sensors and wireless networking and are applicable to a wide range of health related information including medical data, biomedical data, bioinformatics data, public health data. PMID:25825653

  1. Health indicators and information systems for the year 2000.

    PubMed

    Murnaghan, J H

    1981-01-01

    Report focus is on the general problem of designing and developing information systems equal to the task of promoting and monitoring "Health for All by the Year 2000." Attempting to bridge the gap between theory and practice, this 2-part report proposes some priorities and guidelines for organizing and focusing the efforts of the many agencies, groups, and individuals working on health statistics worldwide; and concentrates on the situation in less developed countries where health information networks in support of the decision making process continue to be very weak and their content and organization need reappraisal. An illustrative set of health indicators for national health planning in a developing country is used to take stock of available concepts of measurement, to test their relevance and feasibility, and to consider the steps necessary to translate these concepts into operational health information systems. There are numerous advantages in concentrating on what are commonly termed "health indicators" and using them as a point of departure for collecting data and building information networks. Indicators define the content of data systems, a step that should logically precede decisions regarding data series, methods, staffing, and organizations. If properly designed to reflect the primary objectives of national or community health policy, a set of indicators serves as the minimum specifications of the information support system and describes its overall task. Health indicators are also an excellent way to promote statistical comparability within and among health care systems. Health indicators in the model presented are defined as statistics selected from the larger pool because they have the power to summarize, to represent a larger body of statistics, or to serve as indirect or proxy measures for information that is lacking. It would be both self-defeating and contrary to World Health Organization (WHO) goals to adopt a narrow perspective on health indicators and information systems. Those working on health indicators need to be in close touch with developments in the social indicators field. The following are among the major points made in the review and evaluation of some of the concepts and methods available to developing countries in designing health information systems for the year 2000: utility of proposed indicators, primarily for planning, monitoring, and evaluation at the national level, but also to some extent at the community level; state of readiness; validity, reliability, specificity, sensitivity, and economy or efficiency of proposed measures; feasibility, i.e., have practical and affordable methods of data acquisition been demonstrated; basic subcategories and disaggregations; compatibility with socioeconomic concerns and indicators; comparability with concepts of measurement used in more developed countries; and principal areas in need of further research and development. PMID:7348555

  2. Information, decision-making and health

    E-print Network

    Abaluck, Jason T

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of three essays on information, decision-making and health. All three concern the relationship between the choices consumers would make if they were "fully informed" in an appropriate sense and the ...

  3. AUTHORIZATION FOR RELEASE OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Wang, David

    AUTHORIZATION FOR RELEASE OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION I hereby authorize Washington University Physicians to transfer, release or obtain information on: ____________________________________________ __________________ _______-_______-_______ (Name of Patient) (Date of Birth) (Social Security Number) OBTAIN FROM: SEND OR FAX TO

  4. Health & Nutrition Information for Pregnant & Breastfeeding Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Food Intolerances Food Safety For More Information Pregnancy & Breastfeeding Health & Nutrition Information When you are pregnant or ... Healthy Weight Gain Tips for Pregnant Moms For Breastfeeding Moms: Nutritional Needs Healthy Weight Loss Tips for ...

  5. Using Usability Evaluation to Inform Alberta's Personal Health Record Design.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan; Bellwood, Paule; Davies, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Alberta Health is deploying the Personal Health Portal (PHP) (MyHealth.Alberta.ca) to all people in the province of Alberta, Canada. The PHP will include several components such as a Personal Health Record (PHR) where users can enter and access their own health data. For the first PHR of its kind in Canada, Alberta Health asked the University of Victoria's eHealth Observatory to evaluate the PHP, including the PHR. The evaluation includes pre-design, design, and adoption evaluation. This paper focuses on early usability evaluations of the PHR software. Persona-based usability inspection was combined with usability testing sessions using think aloud. These evaluations found that while people were familiar with the web-based technology, several aspects of the PHR information architecture, content, and presentation could be improved to better support and provide value to the users. The findings could be helpful to others designing and implementing similar PHR software. PMID:25676994

  6. 75 FR 76986 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ...Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Report Entitled...of Health Information Technology To Improve Healthcare for Americans: The Path...of Health Information Technology To Improve Healthcare for Americans: The...

  7. Management of Communication Channels for Health Information in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanvatanakul, Vasuton; Amado, Joao; Saowakontha, Sastri

    2007-01-01

    Object: To investigate channels for communication of health information to various groups in the community. Design: An exploratory cross sectional design was used, followed by focus groups of selected participants to confirm and clarify the findings. Setting: Five levels of sub-district administration organizations were selected from different…

  8. Health Disparities Information - Geographic Information Systems & Science

    Cancer.gov

    The identification and elimination of health disparities is an application area of growing importance at NCI. Tools to identify such disparities include mapping at the small area level and spatial analysis of health outcomes of sociodemographic subgroups. The links below describe major initiatives in this area.

  9. Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - WSSU

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, L. and W. Templin-Branner

    2010-11-10

    Environmental health focus with training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine HBCU ACCESS Project at Winston-Salem State University, NC on November 10, 2010.

  10. Data Mining in Health and Medical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bath, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to data mining (DM) in health and medical information: the potential of DM in health and medicine; statistical methods; evaluation of methods; DM tools for health and medicine; inductive learning of symbolic rules; application of DM tools in diagnosis and prognosis; and…

  11. Training Older Adults to Access Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertera, Elizabeth M.; Bertera, Robert L.; Morgan, Russell; Wuertz, Ellen; Attey, Alfred M. O.

    2007-01-01

    Many older adults do not use health information available on the Internet. Older adults residing in affordable housing were taught to use the NIHSeniorHealth.gov Web site. Participants were predominantly African American women with limited education and income (N = 42). Outcomes included changes in computer and health Web site navigation skills.…

  12. Home Health and Informal Care Utilization

    E-print Network

    and Sano also are supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Address correspondence to: Carolyn W. Zhu, PhD, Health Economist, GeriatricHome Health and Informal Care Utilization and Costs Over Time in Alzheimer's Disease Carolyn W. Zhu

  13. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  14. Employers and Health Information in the Workplace

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The Privacy Rule does not prevent your supervisor, human resources worker or others from asking you for a doctor’s note or other information about your health if your employer needs the information to ... Department of Health & Human Services · 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. · Washington, D.C. ...

  15. Consumer Health Information Seeking as Hypothesis Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALLA KESELMAN; ALLEN C. BROWNE; DAVID R. KAUFMAN

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Despite the proliferation of consumer health sites, lay individuals often experience difficulty finding health information online. The present study attempts to understand users' information seeking difficulties by drawing on a hypothesis testing explanatory framework. It also addresses the role of user competencies and their interaction with internet resources. Design: Twenty participants were interviewed about their understanding of a hypothetical

  16. Status of Oregon's Children: 1998 County Data Book. Special Focus: Children's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children First for Oregon, Portland.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Oregon's children, focusing on children's health care. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of well-being including: (1) children's insurance coverage; (2) health care access; (3) health outcomes, including immunization rates and early prenatal care; (4) juvenile…

  17. Therapist, Parent, and Youth Perspectives of Treatment Barriers to Family-Focused Community Outpatient Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Melissa M.; Haine-Schlagel, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study describes treatment barriers to receiving family-focused child mental health services for youths with disruptive behavior problems from multiple perspectives. Data were collected during a series of focus groups and interviews, including: 4 therapist focus groups, 3 parent focus groups, and 10 youth semi-structured interviews. Therapist, parent, and youth stakeholder participants discussed perceived barriers to effective treatment, the problems with current child outpatient therapy, and desired changes (i.e., policy, intervention, etc.) to improve mental health services. Results indicate similar themes around treatment barriers and dissatisfaction with services within and across multiple stakeholder groups, including inadequate support and lack of family involvement; however, parents and therapists, in particular, identified different contributing factors to these barriers. Overall, stakeholders reported much frustration and dissatisfaction with current community-based outpatient child therapy services. Study findings can inform service provision, intervention development, and future research. PMID:24019737

  18. Acknowledging adult bias: a focus-group approach to utilizing beauty salons as health-education portals for inner-city adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Alexis; Harris, Diana

    2007-04-01

    To assess the feasibility of using beauticians as health literacy agents and beauty salons as health-education portals for adolescent, inner-city, African American girls, the authors conducted focus groups with 25 women: salon clients, salon owners, and medical students. Facilitators to program development included (a) beautician-client relationships, (b) teens' access to health information, and (c) beauticians as information resources. Barriers included (a) adult opinions of teen behaviors, (b) teen mistrust of adults, and (c) low health literacy of beauticians. In developing a health-education program for this population, beauticians and salons may be excellent health information agents and portals if barriers including beautician poor health literacy, adolescent mistrust in adults, and adults' anti-adolescent bias are improved. Program implementation must not solely focus on teens but should also include adult salon users, with the goal of reaching the teens first through these adults and, with time and trust, reaching the teens directly. PMID:16980570

  19. Consumer Support for Health Information Exchange and Personal Health Records: A Regional Health Information Organization Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vaishali N. Patel; Rina V. Dhopeshwarkar; Alison Edwards; Yolanda Barrón; Jeffrey Sparenborg; Rainu Kaushal

    In order to characterize consumer support for electronic health information exchange (HIE) and personal health records (PHRs)\\u000a in a community where HIE is underway, we conducted a survey of English speaking adults who visited primary care practices\\u000a participating in a regional community-wide clinical data exchange, during August, 2008. Amongst the 117 respondents, a majority\\u000a supported physicians’ use of HIE (83%)

  20. Case studies in public-private-partnership in health with the focus of enhancing the accessibility of health interventions.

    PubMed

    Njau, R J A; Mosha, F W; De Savigny, D

    2009-10-01

    Various definitions have been framed for public-private partnerships (PPPs) in health depending on the desired relationship and the characteristics of the respective sectors. These relationships span from a continuum of loose relationships with narrow objectives, lack of a legal status and an absence of a formalized membership or governing body to high level institutionalization. The latter includes concrete objectives, the presence of a legal status and permanent multi-sectoral membership. The study used qualitative research methods including case studies, literature review and interview with key informants. The research undertakes an extensive literature review of various PPP models in health in scale and in scope which are aimed at advancing public health goals in developing countries. The major emphasis is on a qualitative description of some of the PPPs in the planning and implementation phases, including the challenges encountered. This background is used to analyse in-depth two case studies which are both health oriented; the first one is a national level NGO consortium with a focus on malaria and the second one is an international advocacy group with an overarching goal of protecting children against malaria through an innovative mechanism. The case study approach is used to analyze why the PPP approach was used to address malaria control and how it was implemented. Both PPPs demonstrated that relationships between the public and private sector may begin from very humble and loose beginnings. However, with perseverance from committed individuals, a vision and trustworthiness may become powerful advocates for meeting prescribed health agendas. In conclusion, three key themes (trust, sacrifice and championship) run vividly through the case studies and are significant for developing countries to emulate. PMID:20734704

  1. Consumer Health Information Seeking as Hypothesis Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alla Keselman; Allen C. Browne; David R. Kaufman

    Abstract Objective: Despite the proliferation of consumer health sites, lay individuals often experience difficulty finding health information,online. The present,study,attempts,to understand,users’ information,seeking difficulties by drawing,on a hypothesis,testing explanatory,framework.,It also addresses,the role of user competencies,and,their interaction with internet resources. Design: Twenty,participants,were,interviewed,about their understanding,of a hypothetical,scenario,about,a family member,suffering from,stable angina and,then searched,MedlinePlus, consumer,health information,portal for information,on the problem,presented,in the scenario. Participants’ understanding,of heart

  2. Shifts in the architecture of the Nationwide Health Information Network.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Leslie; Sundwall, David; Lenert, Michael Edward

    2012-01-01

    In the midst of a US $30 billion USD investment in the Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN) and electronic health records systems, a significant change in the architecture of the NwHIN is taking place. Prior to 2010, the focus of information exchange in the NwHIN was the Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO). Since 2010, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) has been sponsoring policies that promote an internet-like architecture that encourages point to-point information exchange and private health information exchange networks. The net effect of these activities is to undercut the limited business model for RHIOs, decreasing the likelihood of their success, while making the NwHIN dependent on nascent technologies for community level functions such as record locator services. These changes may impact the health of patients and communities. Independent, scientifically focused debate is needed on the wisdom of ONC's proposed changes in its strategy for the NwHIN. PMID:22268218

  3. Health Information Systems (HIS): Concept and Technology

    E-print Network

    Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2012-01-01

    A health information system (HIS) is the intersection of between healthcare's business process, and information systems to deliver better healthcare services. The nature of healthcare industry, which is highly influenced by economic, social, politic, and technological factors, has changed over time. This paper will address some important concepts of healthcare and related terminologies to provide a holistic view for HIS. Related technological milestones and major events are briefly summarized. The trends and rapid development of health information technologies are also discussed.

  4. Strengthening health information systems to address health equity challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Lexi Bambas; Braveman, Paula; Dachs, J. Norberto W.; Delgado, Iris; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Moser, Kath; Rolfe, Liz; Vega, Jeanette; Zarowsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Special studies and isolated initiatives over the past several decades in low-, middle- and high-income countries have consistently shown inequalities in health among socioeconomic groups and by gender, race or ethnicity, geographical area and other measures associated with social advantage. Significant health inequalities linked to social (dis)advantage rather than to inherent biological differences are generally considered unfair or inequitable. Such health inequities are the main object of health development efforts, including global targets such as the Millennium Development Goals, which require monitoring to evaluate progress. However, most national health information systems (HIS) lack key information needed to assess and address health inequities, namely, reliable, longitudinal and representative data linking measures of health with measures of social status or advantage at the individual or small-area level. Without empirical documentation and monitoring of such inequities, as well as country-level capacity to use this information for effective planning and monitoring of progress in response to interventions, movement towards equity is unlikely to occur. This paper reviews core information requirements and potential databases and proposes short-term and longer term strategies for strengthening the capabilities of HIS for the analysis of health equity and discusses HIS-related entry points for supporting a culture of equity-oriented decision-making and policy development. PMID:16184279

  5. The National Women's Health Information Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Designed to provide women with authoritative and timely knowledge of a host of womens health issues, the National Womens Health Information Center site (sponsored by the US Department of Health and Human Services) offers a reliable and thorough overview of hundreds of topics and current news briefs. Health topics on the site (which range from abstinence to yellow fever) are alphabetically listed or can also be located by entering keywords. Visitors to the site can also sign up here to receive weekly health tips via email. Along with featuring information on health topics, other issues affecting women are well-represented here, including domestic violence awareness and body image. Also helpful is the fact that the site is also available in Spanish, which will be useful to Spanish-speaking persons and health professionals working with Spanish speakers.

  6. 75 FR 76393 - Notice of Request for a New Information Collection (Public Health Information System)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ...a New Information Collection (Public Health Information System) AGENCY...collection concerning its Web-based Public Health Information System. DATES: Comments...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Public Health Information System...

  7. Assuring Equity Through Health and Health Care Reform Conference Registration Information (Type or Print)

    E-print Network

    Brown, Lucy L.

    Research in Clinical and Translational Science Immigrant Health Caring for Veterans Children's HealthAssuring Equity Through Health and Health Care Reform Conference Registration Information (Type of Health Reform in the Pharmaceutical Industry Sustaining Community Health Workers Comparative

  8. Strategic approach to information security and assurance in health research.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Shunichi; Igarashi, Manabu; Sawa, Hirofumi; Tamashiro, Hiko

    2005-09-01

    Information security and assurance are an increasingly critical issue in health research. Whether health research be in genetics, new drugs, disease outbreaks, biochemistry, or effects of radiation, it deals with information that is highly sensitive and which could be targeted by rogue individuals or groups, corporations, national intelligence agencies, or terrorists, looking for financial, social, or political gains. The advents of the Internet and advances in recent information technologies have also dramatically increased opportunities for attackers to exploit sensitive and valuable information.Government agencies have deployed legislative measures to protect the privacy of health information and developed information security guidelines for epidemiological studies. However, risks are grossly underestimated and little effort has been made to strategically and comprehensively protect health research information by institutions, governments and international communities.There is a need to enforce a set of proactive measures to protect health research information locally and globally. Such measures should be deployed at all levels but will be successful only if research communities collaborate actively, governments enforce appropriate legislative measures at national level, and the international community develops quality standards, concluding treaties if necessary, at the global level.Proactive measures for the best information security and assurance would be achieved through rigorous management process with a cycle of "plan, do, check, and act". Each health research entity, such as hospitals, universities, institutions, or laboratories, should implement this cycle and establish an authoritative security and assurance organization, program and plan coordinated by a designatedChief Security Officer who will ensure implementation of the above process, putting appropriate security controls in place, with key focus areas such aspolicies and best practices, enforcement and certification, risk assessment and audit, monitoring and incident response, awareness and training, and modern protection method and architecture. Governments should enforce a comprehensive scheme, and international health research communities should adopt standardized innovative methods and approaches. PMID:21432132

  9. Gut barrier in health and disease: focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, D; Ianiro, G; Vanella, G; Bibbò, S; Bruno, G; Simeone, G; Mele, G

    2015-01-01

    The gut barrier is a functional unit, organized as a multi-layer system, made up of two main components: a physical barrier surface, which prevents bacterial adhesion and regulates paracellular diffusion to the host tissues, and a deep functional barrier, that is able to discriminate between pathogens and commensal microorganisms, organizing the immune tolerance and the immune response to pathogens. Other mechanisms, such as gastric juice and pancreatic enzymes (which both have antibacterial properties) participate in the luminal integrity of the gut barrier. From the outer layer to the inner layer, the physical barrier is composed of gut microbiota (that competes with pathogens to gain space and energy resources, processes the molecules necessary to mucosal integrity and modulates the immunological activity of deep barrier), mucus (which separates the intraluminal content from more internal layers and contains antimicrobial products and secretory IgA), epithelial cells (which form a physical and immunological barrier) and the innate and adaptive immune cells forming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (which is responsible for antigen sampling and immune responses). Disruption of the gut barrier has been associated with many gastrointestinal diseases, but also with extra-intestinal pathological condition, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, allergic diseases or autism spectrum disorders. The maintenance of a healthy intestinal barrier is therefore of paramount importance in children, for both health and economic reasons. Many drugs or compounds used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders act through the restoration of a normal intestinal permeability. Several studies have highlighted the role of probiotics in the modulation and reduction of intestinal permeability, considering the strong influence of gut microbiota in the modulation of the function and structure of gut barrier, but also on the immune response of the host. To date, available weapons for the maintenance and repair of gut barrier are however few, even if promising. Considerable efforts, including both a better understanding of the gut barrier features and mechanisms in health and disease, and the development of new pharmacological approaches for the modulation of gut barrier components, are needed for the prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal diseases associated with gut barrier impairment. PMID:25855935

  10. Patients’ Attitudes Toward Electronic Health Information Exchange: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J Stewart; Benjamin, Alison; Delano, David; Bates, David W

    2009-01-01

    Background In many countries, there has been substantial progress in establishing the electronic transmission of patients’ health information between health care providers, but little is known about how best to engage patients in the process. Objective We explored patients’ views about sharing of electronic health information and their preferences for learning about and participating in this process. Methods Patients in one Massachusetts community in the northeastern United States were recruited to participate in focus-group discussions. Prior to discussion, participants completed a written questionnaire that captured their reactions to draft educational materials and a consent form. The discussion moderator and two physicians analyzed the moderator’s detailed notes from each session and participants’ written comments, using an immersion-crystallization approach. Results Three dominant themes emerged: (1) concerns about privacy and security, (2) the potential benefit to a person’s health, and (3) the desire for more information about the consent process. On the pre-discussion questionnaire, 55 out of 62 participants (88%) indicated that they would provide consent for their information to be shared electronically among their health care providers, given the materials they had reviewed. Conclusions Patients are enthusiastic about electronic health information exchange, recognizing its capacity to improve the quality and safety of health care; however, they are also concerned about its potential to result in breached privacy and misuse of health data. As the exchange of electronic health information becomes more widespread, policy makers will need to ensure that patients have access to concise educational materials and opportunities to engage in conversations about the risks and benefits of participation. PMID:19674960

  11. Health information systems: the foundations of public health.

    PubMed Central

    AbouZahr, Carla; Boerma, Ties

    2005-01-01

    Public health decision-making is critically dependent on the timely availability of sound data. The role of health information systems is to generate, analyse and disseminate such data. In practice, health information systems rarely function systematically. The products of historical, social and economic forces, they are complex, fragmented and unresponsive to needs. International donors in health are largely responsible for the problem, having prioritized urgent needs for data over longer-term country capacity-building. The result is painfully apparent in the inability of most countries to generate the data needed to monitor progress towards the Millennium Development Goals. Solutions to the problem must be comprehensive; money alone is likely to be insufficient unless accompanied by sustained support to country systems development coupled with greater donor accountability and allocation of responsibilities. The Health Metrics Network, a global collaboration in the making, is intended to help bring such solutions to the countries most in need. PMID:16184276

  12. Health information technology: dispatches from the revolution.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ticia

    2009-01-01

    Countries around the world are increasingly employing health information technology (IT). These tools hold the promise of powerful health system breakthroughs from Johannesburg to Jakarta. While implementers multiply, a global e-health consensus framework is beginning to take shape among donors, governments, industries, researchers, and policymakers. As plans are formulated in the United States for substantial new federal investments in health IT, this paper details common threads in national and global health IT discourse. Among them are the need for strong stakeholder engagement, workable policy solutions, funding and donor coordination, and the imperative for adequately addressing standards and interoperability. PMID:19273816

  13. District health information systems in the public sector: health centres in Korea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dongwoon Han; Heejin Lee

    2003-01-01

    The public health sector in South Korea introduced district health information systems (DHIS) in health centres in the early 1990s. DHIS aimed to help health centres to provide comprehensive health care services and to achieve effective and efficient management of their works. District health information systems are still being implemented in health centres. Information generated and collected through the systems

  14. Entry Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Entry ­ Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Post-Graduate Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Certificate in Health Informatics and Information of Management 3 Personnel Administration/ Human Resources 3 English Composition and Literature 12 Social Science

  15. 78 FR 24749 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ...ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment...established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee to make...implementation of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure to the...

  16. 76 FR 4350 - Health Information Technology Extension Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ...AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Extension Program ACTION...announces changes to the Health Information Technology Extension Program, which...meaningful users of health information technology, as authorized under...

  17. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH SUBJECT: Release of Protected Health Information

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    and security of Protected Health Information created, received, obtained, maintained, used or transmittedUNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH POLICY SUBJECT: Release of Protected Health Information DATE: April 14 appropriate administrative guidelines to ensure the confidentiality of Protected Health Information (PHI). PHI

  18. Emerging Ethical Issues in Digital Health Information.

    PubMed

    Solomonides, Anthony E; Mackey, Tim Ken

    2015-07-01

    The problems of poor or biased information and of misleading health and well-being advice on the Internet have been extensively documented. The recent decision by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers to authorize a large number of new generic, top-level domains, including some with a clear connection to health or healthcare, presents an opportunity to bring some order to this chaotic situation. In the case of the most general of these domains, ".health," experts advance a compelling argument in favor of some degree of content oversight and control. On the opposing side, advocates for an unrestricted and open Internet counter that this taken-for-granted principle is too valuable to be compromised, and that, once lost, it may never be recovered. We advance and provide evidence for a proposal to bridge the credibility gap in online health information by providing provenance information for websites in the .health domain. PMID:26059957

  19. Threats to Health Information Security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ganthan Narayana Samy; Rabiah Ahmad; Zuraini Ismail

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the threats that exist in Healthcare Information Systems (HIS). The study has been carried out in three different departments namely, Information Technology Department (ITD), Medical Record Department (MRD) and X-Ray Department in one of the leading government supported hospital in Malaysia. The hospital was equipped with Total Hospital Information System (THIS) environment.

  20. Privacy and Your Health Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health insurers who are required to follow this law must comply with your right to • Ask to ... Protected By Federal Law Who must follow this law? • Most doctors, nurses, pharmacies, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, ...

  1. Pilot study in the development of an interactive multimedia learning environment for sexual health interventions: a focus group approach.

    PubMed

    Goold, P C; Bustard, S; Ferguson, E; Carlin, E M; Neal, K; Bowman, C A

    2006-02-01

    In the UK there are high rates of sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies amongst young people. There is limited and contradictory evidence that current sexual health education interventions are effective or that they improve access to appropriate sexual health services. This paper describes the outcome of focus group work with young people that was undertaken to inform the design of an Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment that incorporates message framing, intended for use in sexual health promotion. The focus group work addressed sexual attitudes, behaviour, risk perception, and knowledge of sexual health and sexual health services in Nottingham. The results provided new insights into young peoples' sexual behaviour, and their diversity of knowledge and beliefs. Common themes expressed regarding sexual health services included concerns about confidentiality, lack of confidence to access services and fear of the unknown. The results showed that while the adolescents are reasonably knowledgeable about infection, they do not know as much about the relevant services to treat it. This work emphasizes the need for user involvement throughout the design and development of a sexual health intervention, and will form the basis of the next part of the project. PMID:15972303

  2. RICE UNIVERSITY REQUEST TO INSPECT HEALTH INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    information such as medical records; billing records; enrollment, payment, claims adjudication and health plan case or medical management record systems; or records used to make decisions about individuals. I

  3. State Health Department Contacts for Hantavirus Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir State Health Department Contacts Click on a state for contact information, or ... address: Enter Email Address Submit Button What's this? Contact Us: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Viral ...

  4. Information for health and human development.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, G A

    1996-01-01

    Information is one of the most powerful instruments of change known to man. It can be used to relieve much pain and suffering, because the basic infrastructure of any successful enterprise is based not only on the management of the physical, financial, and human resources but also on information resources. This paper describes the relationship between health and human development and outlines the roles health sciences librarians might consider in managing information to ensure health, to assist not only medical scientists but also the powerful members of the community. No persons should be hampered in their ability to make decisions about health matters because they did not have access to information librarians have at their disposal. PMID:8938333

  5. Health Information in Arabic (???????): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Arabic) ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Motor Vehicle Safety Safety with Car Seats and Booster Seats ( ... ???????????? - ??????? Multimedia Patient Education Institute N Neck Injuries and Disorders Neck Exercises - English (Arabic) ?????? ?????? - ...

  6. Geographic Information Systems and travel health.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Irmgard L; Puotinen, Marji

    2002-01-01

    Questions dealing with space and/or location have always been integral to understanding and addressing health issues, such as charting the spread of a disease. Health researchers have traditionally used paper maps to explore the spatial dimensions of health. However, due to advances in technology, it is now possible to ask such questions using a suite of computer-based methods and tools that are collectively known as a Geographic Information System (GIS). PMID:12962585

  7. A community-based participatory health information needs assessment to help eliminate diabetes information disparities.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Barbara A; Neal, Diane; Magwood, Gayenell; Jenkins, Carolyn; King, Marilyn Givens; Hossler, Charles L

    2006-07-01

    This article describes the participatory research process, results, action plan, and implications of the community health information needs assessment conducted within the African American community in two South Carolina counties. The REACH 2010: Charleston and Georgetown Diabetes Coalition library program is a partnership among community organizations, public and health sciences libraries, and lay community health advisors. A planning committee studied digital divide issues related to health information, designed and implemented a survey, held focus groups, analyzed data, identified needs and assets, and formulated an action plan to increase the dissemination of diabetes information. Key survey findings show that older (older than 60) and less educated (fewer than 12 years of education) African Americans in Charleston and Georgetown counties lack skills to access Internet and library services and suffer disparities in health information. Based on assessment evidence, the community plans to increase Internet access points and provide a train-the-trainer program to teach people skills for using Internet and library resources to get high-quality information about diabetes and its complications. This process taps community resources, builds local capacities and technical skills, educates about health, and empowers participants as active partners in their own health and their community's health. PMID:16760247

  8. Health information technology: help or hindrance?

    PubMed

    Ketchersid, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The practice of medicine in general and nephrology in particular grows increasingly complex with each passing year. In parallel with this trend, the purchasers of health care are slowly shifting the reimbursement paradigm from one based on rewarding transactions, or work performed, to one that rewards value delivered. Within this context, the health-care value equation is broadly defined as quality divided by costs. Health information technology has been widely recognized as 1 of the foundations for delivering better care at lower costs. As the largest purchaser of health care in the world, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has deployed a series of interrelated programs designed to spur the adoption and utilization of health information technology. This review examines our known collective experience in the practice of nephrology to date with several of these programs and attempts to answer the following question: Is health information technology helping or hindering the delivery of value to the nation's health-care system? Through this review, it was concluded overall that the effect of health information technology appears positive; however, it cannot be objectively determined because of the infancy of its utilization in the practice of medicine. PMID:24969389

  9. A Parent-Focused Pilot Intervention to Increase Parent Health Literacy and Healthy Lifestyle Choices for Young Children and Families

    PubMed Central

    Heffer, Robert W.; McKyer, E. Lisako; Taylor, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Health literacy affects caregivers' ability to engage in preventive health care behaviors for themselves and their children. Studies suggest that health literacy among low-income families needs improvement, and this possibly contributes to disparities in preventive health care rates. Additionally, parents and caregivers may not be able to provide or seek preventive health care for their children because of lack of knowledge and skills to do so effectively. This study designed and piloted an intervention that delivered to parents of young children (1) health literacy information in an experiential manner and (2) practical skills to engage their families in healthy lifestyle choices. Specifically, the intervention focused on diet/nutrition, physical activity, sleep hygiene, parenting, and mental wellness. Postintervention improvements were noted for factual knowledge for diet/nutrition, physical activity, and sleep, beliefs about diet/nutrition, and the relationship between mental health and stress. Additionally, postintervention improvements were noted for general knowledge and beliefs about sleep, knowledge about the relationship between sleep and health, knowledge about common childhood sleep problems, and parents' bedtime interactions with children. The efficacy of the intervention should be evaluated on a larger, more diverse sample in the future with considerations for multiple health behavior change in the evaluation. PMID:24959570

  10. Effectively Addressing Mental Health Issues in Permanency-Focused Child Welfare Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornelas, Laura A.; Silverstein, Deborah N.; Tan, Sherylle

    2007-01-01

    Children and families built by adoption or relative caregiving have specialized needs. This paper proposes a rubric for the central elements of permanency-focused mental health services in child welfare practice. Kinship Center provides an innovative mental health service delivery system, weaving foster and adoptive placement programs, adoption…

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Information and Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisert, Jens; Plenio, Martin B.

    2010-02-01

    Quantum many-body models describing natural systems or materials and physical systems assembled piece by piece in the laboratory for the purpose of realizing quantum information processing share an important feature: intricate correlations that originate from the coherent interaction between a large number of constituents. In recent years it has become manifest that the cross-fertilization between research devoted to quantum information science and to quantum many-body physics leads to new ideas, methods, tools, and insights in both fields. Issues of criticality, quantum phase transitions, quantum order and magnetism that play a role in one field find relations to the classical simulation of quantum systems, to error correction and fault tolerance thresholds, to channel capacities and to topological quantum computation, to name but a few. The structural similarities of typical problems in both fields and the potential for pooling of ideas then become manifest. Notably, methods and ideas from quantum information have provided fresh approaches to long-standing problems in strongly correlated systems in the condensed matter context, including both numerical methods and conceptual insights. Focus on quantum information and many-body theory Contents TENSOR NETWORKS Homogeneous multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz tensor networks for quantum critical systems M Rizzi, S Montangero, P Silvi, V Giovannetti and Rosario Fazio Concatenated tensor network states R Hübener, V Nebendahl and W Dür Entanglement renormalization in free bosonic systems: real-space versus momentum-space renormalization group transforms G Evenbly and G Vidal Finite-size geometric entanglement from tensor network algorithms Qian-Qian Shi, Román Orús, John Ove Fjærestad and Huan-Qiang Zhou Characterizing symmetries in a projected entangled pair state D Pérez-García, M Sanz, C E González-Guillén, M M Wolf and J I Cirac Matrix product operator representations B Pirvu, V Murg, J I Cirac and F Verstraete SIMULATION AND DYNAMICS A quantum differentiation of k-SAT instances B Tamir and G Ortiz Classical Ising model test for quantum circuits Joseph Geraci and Daniel A Lidar Exact matrix product solutions in the Heisenberg picture of an open quantum spin chain S R Clark, J Prior, M J Hartmann, D Jaksch and M B Plenio Exact solution of Markovian master equations for quadratic Fermi systems: thermal baths, open XY spin chains and non-equilibrium phase transition Tomaž Prosen and Bojan Žunkovi? Quantum kinetic Ising models R Augusiak, F M Cucchietti, F Haake and M Lewenstein ENTANGLEMENT AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES Ground states of unfrustrated spin Hamiltonians satisfy an area law Niel de Beaudrap, Tobias J Osborne and Jens Eisert Correlation density matrices for one-dimensional quantum chains based on the density matrix renormalization group W Münder, A Weichselbaum, A Holzner, Jan von Delft and C L Henley The invariant-comb approach and its relation to the balancedness of multipartite entangled states Andreas Osterloh and Jens Siewert Entanglement scaling of fractional quantum Hall states through geometric deformations Andreas M Läuchli, Emil J Bergholtz and Masudul Haque Entanglement versus gap for one-dimensional spin systems Daniel Gottesman and M B Hastings Entanglement spectra of critical and near-critical systems in one dimension F Pollmann and J E Moore Macroscopic bound entanglement in thermal graph states D Cavalcanti, L Aolita, A Ferraro, A García-Saez and A Acín Entanglement at the quantum phase transition in a harmonic lattice Elisabeth Rieper, Janet Anders and Vlatko Vedral Multipartite entanglement and frustration P Facchi, G Florio, U Marzolino, G Parisi and S Pascazio Entropic uncertainty relations—a survey Stephanie Wehner and Andreas Winter Entanglement in a spin system with inverse square statistical interaction D Giuliano, A Sindona, G Falcone, F Plastina and L Amico APPLICATIONS Time-dependent currents of one-dimensional bosons in an optical lattice J Schachenmayer, G Pupillo and A J Daley Implementing quantum gates using t

  12. A Health Collaborative Network Focus on Self-care Processes in Personal Assistant Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente, Ma Victoria; Ros, Lorenzo

    Public health is oriented to the management of an adequate health atmosphere which acts directly on health, as well as health education work and the supervision of environmental health threats. The work presented in this paper aims to reduce inequality, and give disabled people the tools to be integrated more effectively, reducing social exclusion, removing obstacles and barriers, and facilitating mobility and the use of technology. The work is planned to design a special healthcare collaborative network as the best solution for addressing the needs of the disabled self-care and health care community through the creation and implementation of an interconnected, electronic information infrastructure and adoption of open data standards.

  13. Health Information in Somali (af Soomaali): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Tooth Disorders Toothache Ilkaxanuun - af Soomaali (Somali) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Scan Sawiridda Maskaxda - af Soomaali ( ...

  14. Acceptability of Delivering and Accessing Health Information Through Text Messaging Among Community Health Advisors

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Janice; Mohiuddin, Mohammed Omar; McNees, Patrick; Scarinci, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Background Communication technologies can play a significant role in decreasing communication inequalities and cancer disparities by promoting cancer control and enhancing population and individual health. Studies have shown that technology, such as the mobile phone short message service (SMS) or text messaging, can be an effective health communication strategy that influences individuals’ health-related decisions, behaviors, and outcomes. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore usage of communication technologies, assess the acceptability of mobile technology for delivery and access of health information, and identify cancer and health information needs among Deep South Network for Cancer Control trained Community Health Advisors as Research Partners (CHARPs). Methods A mixed-method design was used, and a triangulation protocol was followed to combine quantitative and qualitative data. Focus groups (4 focus groups; n=37) and self-administered surveys (n=77) were conducted to determine CHARPs mobile phone and text message usage. The objective was to include identification of barriers and facilitators to a mobile phone intervention. Results All participants were African American (37/37, 100%), 11/37 (89%) were women, and the mean age was 53.4 (SD 13.9; focus groups) and 59.9 (SD 8.7; survey). Nearly all (33/37, 89%) of focus group participants reported owning a mobile phone. Of those, 8/33 (24%) owned a smartphone, 22/33 (67%) had a text messaging plan, and 18/33 (55%) and 11/33 (33%) received and sent text messages several times a week or day, respectively. Similar responses were seen among the survey participants, with 75/77 (97%) reporting owning a mobile phone, and of those, 22/75 (30%) owned a smartphone, 39/75 (53%) had a text messaging plan, and 37/75 (50%) received and 27/75 (37%) sent text messages several times a week or day. The benefits of a text messaging system mentioned by focus group participants included alternative form of communication, quick method for disseminating information, and privacy of communication. The main barriers reported by both groups to using mobile technology to receive health information were cost and not knowing how to text message. Ways to overcome barriers were explored with focus group participants, and education was the most proposed solution. Majority of CHARPs were in favor of receiving a weekly text message that would provide cancer/health information. Conclusions The findings from this study indicate that CHARPs are receptive to receiving text messages focusing on cancer/health information and would be likely to engage in mobile health research. These findings represent the first step in the development of an interactive mobile health program designed to provide cancer/health information and a support network for the Deep South Network Community Health Advisors as Research Partners (DSN CHARPs). PMID:25099140

  15. Consumer support for health information exchange and personal health records: a regional health information organization survey.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaishali N; Dhopeshwarkar, Rina V; Edwards, Alison; Barrón, Yolanda; Sparenborg, Jeffrey; Kaushal, Rainu

    2012-06-01

    In order to characterize consumer support for electronic health information exchange (HIE) and personal health records (PHRs) in a community where HIE is underway, we conducted a survey of English speaking adults who visited primary care practices participating in a regional community-wide clinical data exchange, during August, 2008. Amongst the 117 respondents, a majority supported physicians' use of HIE (83%) or expressed interest in potentially using PHRs (76%). Consumers' comfort sending personal information electronically over the Internet and their perceptions regarding the potential benefits of HIE were independently associated with their support for HIE. Consumers' prior experience using the Internet to manage their healthcare, perceptions regarding the potential benefits of PHRs and college education were independently associated with potential PHR use. Bolstering consumer support for HIE and PHRs will require addressing privacy and security concerns, demonstrating clinical benefits, and reaching out to those who are less educated and computer literate. PMID:20703633

  16. Medical College of Wisconsin: Consumer Health Information

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Healthlink is a free, noncommercial health information service from the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW). One quite useful section of the website allows visitors to locate health-related articles by topic. Titled Browse By Topic, this alphabetized section offers a wide variety of categories to choose from such as Arthritis, Endocrine System, Preventative Medicine, and Women's Health, to name just a few. Each topical page presents the latest articles dealing with that subject and also allows visitors to view archived articles listed alphabetically or by date. Healthlink also provides articles written by MCW columnists, as well as reflective essays by MCW health professionals. Additional offerings include articles regarding health care information for consumers, and a free email newsletter from MCW.

  17. Panel: Trends in Health Care Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Grams, Stanley; Dvorak, Robert M.; Pryor, T. Allan; Childs, Bill W.

    1984-01-01

    The panel presents significant trends in demographic and economic forces that are driving healthcare delivery systems, how health care providers are responding to these driving forces, and how information systems are being developed using new technology to help health care providers and consumers. An aging population and rapidly increasing government and business health care expenditures are forcing hospitals and other health care providers to consolidate, compete, become more efficient, and diversify and market their services. Emerging computer technology will facilitate the development of information systems that utilize integrated data bases, communication networks, appropriate input/output devices, and cost effective computing power to provide the financial, management, and medical information required by these evolving provider systems.

  18. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices. PMID:24945363

  19. Health information-seeking behaviors among classically trained singers.

    PubMed

    Petty, Brian E

    2012-05-01

    Understanding health information-seeking behaviors (HISBs) within a particular patient demographic group is an important part of effective clinical outreach and education efforts. Although the community of classically trained singers has long been recognized by specialized health care providers, no studies have yet addressed the processes by which they search for voice-related health information, and little is known about how they use and access medical care. An electronic questionnaire focusing on HISB and voice-related health care issues was administered to 151 self-identified classically trained singers and 49 nonsinger controls. Outcomes of interest were tested for association with groups of singers and controls, followed by tests of association between demographic variables (age, gender, insurance status) with each outcome of interest. Results showed significant differences in specialty care access including point of first contact (P=0.0085), gender-associated delay of treatment initiation (P=0.0324), and use of home remedies for vocal problems (P?0.0001). Significant differences in HISB were noted as well, including history of having undertaken an information search (P?0.0001), likelihood of having concerns about information quality (P?0.0001), and difficulty knowing where to find information (P?0.0001). Differences were influenced by singing status, age, and gender. The insights provided by these data may inform decision-making processes regarding patient care, patient education, and clinical outreach to the target population. PMID:21865009

  20. An Innovative Mixed Methods Approach to Studying the Online Health Information Seeking Experiences of Adults with Chronic Health Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayoh, Joanne; Bond, Carol S.; Todres, Les

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an innovative sequential mixed methods approach to researching the experiences of U.K. adults with chronic health conditions seeking health information online. The use of multiple methods integrated within a single study ensured that the focus of the research was emergent and relevant and ultimately provided a more complete…

  1. Finding Reliable Health Information Online

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with your physician any articles that interest you. Internet Credibility Help from Genetic Alliance The Access To ... for people developing educational materials. Top of page Internet Resources Genetics Information Genetic Testing Registry www.ncbi. ...

  2. HealthLine: Speech-based access to health information by low-literate users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Sherwani; N. Ali; S. Mirza; A. Fatma; Y. Memon; M. Karim; R. Tongia; R. Rosenfeld

    2007-01-01

    Health information access by low-literate community health workers is a pressing need of community health programs across the developing world. We present results from a needs assessment we conducted to understand the health information access practices and needs of various types of health workers in Pakistan. We also present a prototype for speech-based health information access, as well as discuss

  3. SFINKS: Secure Focused Information, News, and Knowledge Sharing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Ryutov; T. Kichkaylo; R. Neches; M. Orosz

    2008-01-01

    Cross-agency collaboration and sharing of digital data is critical to respond to or prevent threats to U.S. interests. While traditional hierarchical information sharing approaches ensure that only relevant information is delivered to authorized nodes, the resulting organizational overhead severely impedes timely sharing of critical information. Although alternative approaches to secure data release have previously been proposed, they all have had

  4. The National Women's Health Information Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Women's Health Information Center (NWHIC) is a service of the Office of Women's Health, which was originally established in 1991. Without a doubt, this fine site will be of great interest to health care professionals, educators, and a wide segment of society. Their homepage offers a wide array of helpful resources, divided into topics such as pregnancy and breastfeeding, funding opportunities, and a set of health tools. The health tools area is particularly useful as it offers such resources as ovulation calculator, a BMI calculator, and a heart disease risk test. Visitors to the homepage will also want to look through the day's health news, search their event calendar, and access the most recently updated sections. Finally, a number of these resources are available in Spanish.

  5. Children's Environmental Health: 2007 Highlights. Environment, Health, and a Focus on Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created in 1970 to protect human health and the environment. The year 2007 marks 10 years of concerted Federal effort to address children's environmental health risks as mandated by Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. Much of the agency's…

  6. Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - UDC

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, L.; R. Foster; and R. Womble

    2010-11-02

    Training update with Environmental a health focus. Training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine - HBCU ACCESS Project at the University of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC on November 2, 2010.

  7. A stimulus to define informatics and health information technology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the growing interest by leaders, policy makers, and others, the terminology of health information technology as well as biomedical and health informatics is poorly understood and not even agreed upon by academics and professionals in the field. Discussion The paper, presented as a Debate to encourage further discussion and disagreement, provides definitions of the major terminology used in biomedical and health informatics and health information technology. For informatics, it focuses on the words that modify the term as well as individuals who practice the discipline. Other categories of related terms are covered as well, from the associated disciplines of computer science, information technolog and health information management to the major application categories of applications used. The discussion closes with a classification of individuals who work in the largest segment of the field, namely clinical informatics. Summary The goal of presenting in Debate format is to provide a starting point for discussion to reach a documented consensus on the definition and use of these terms. PMID:19445665

  8. Health Information on the Web and Consumers’ Perspectives on Health Professionals’ Responses to Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health information technology, which is sometimes referred to as informaticization of medicine, is changing the extent to which patients become competent producers of their own health by enabling them access to health information anytime and anywhere. Objective This research provides preliminary information on users' perceptions of the extent to which use of the Internet for health information impacts medical encounters. We specifically explored the following questions: (1) To what extent perceptions of positive or negative changes in medical encounters are associated with sociodemographic background of online health information seekers, and how often the Internet information is discussed with providers? (2) To what extent is there an association between perceived changes in medical encounters and frequency of referring to the Internet during medical encounters? (3) To what extent is there an association between sociodemographic background of online health information users and frequency of discussing of the Internet information with providers? Methods The data for this study was derived from a national sampling of online health and medical information users who participated in the Study of Health and Medical Information in Cyberspace—Survey of User Perceptions (N=710). This study used a nationally representative online research panel of the US adults maintained by the Knowledge Networks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square, and t tests were performed to examine the data. Results Although Internet sources allow people the opportunity to gather health or medical information, discussion of this information was not a very common activity. It is noteworthy that half of the sample never or rarely discussed health/medical information obtained from Internet sources with health professionals. Chi-square analyses revealed that discussion of online health information with providers were associated with education, income, and marital status. We also found that discussion of the Internet information mostly promotes better physician-patient interactions. Analyses with post-hoc tests identified that perceived changes in medical encounters were associated with age, education, and income. However, 9.1% (64/703) of our respondents strongly agreed that the interactions with their providers have been strained. T test analyses showed that marital status, race, and gender were not significant. Conclusions Embracing new technologies, and adapting to changing roles and relationships in delivery of medical care are critical to effective delivery of patient-centered care. Health professionals could also guide patients on how to evaluate information and where to access to reliable and accurate information. PMID:25075248

  9. Achieving effective biosurveillance with the Nationwide Health Information Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen L Chen

    2009-01-01

    The federal government is currently developing the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN). Described as a “network of networks,” the NHIN seeks to provide a nationwide, interoperable health information infrastructure that will securely connect consumers with those involved in health care. As part of the national health information technology (HIT) agenda, the NHIN aims to improve individual and population health by

  10. 78 FR 32234 - Notice of Request for Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection: Public Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...Approved Information Collection: Public Health Information System--Animal...and rabbit slaughter for the Public Health Information System--Animal...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Public Health Information System--...

  11. The synergism of Health Information Science/Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Protti, D J

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is threefold: to review the status of Health Information Science (Health Informatics) as reported in the literature; to suggest a taxonomy to integrate the many varied concepts being discussed under the rubric of Health Information Science; and to propose a framework into which research can be classified and potential research hypotheses generated. It is suggested that such a framework is needed if generalizations are to be made to the end that the knowledge produced from research efforts may be cumulative with that from other studies. A framework for research is needed if the field is to become an established academic discipline; whether or not it takes on the mantel of a "science" is another matter. PMID:3333021

  12. Gender, Work, and Health for Trans Health Providers: A Focus on Transmen

    PubMed Central

    MacDonnell, Judith A.; Grigorovich, Alisa

    2012-01-01

    Well-documented health research points to trans people's vulnerability to health inequities that are linked to deeply embedded structural and social determinants of health. Gender and work, as social determinants of health for trans people, both shape and are shaped by multiple factors such as support networks, social environments, income and social status, shelter, and personal health practices. There is a gap in the nursing literature in regards to research on work and health for diverse trans people and a virtual silence on the particular issues of trans-identified health providers. This qualitative study used comparative life history methodology and purposeful sampling to examine links among work, career, and health for transmen who are health providers. Semistructured interviews were completed with four Canadian transmen involved in health care professional and/or practice contexts with diverse professions, age, work, and transitioning experiences. Critical gender analysis showed that unique and gender-related critical events and influences shape continuities and discontinuities in their careerlives. This strength-based approach foregrounds how resilience and growth emerged through participants' articulation with everyday gender dynamics. These findings have implications for nursing research, education, and practice that include an understanding of how trans providers “do transgender work” and supporting them in that process. PMID:23316387

  13. 78 FR 14793 - Advancing Interoperability and Health Information Exchange

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary...CMS-0038-NC] Advancing Interoperability and Health Information Exchange AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and...

  14. Rewriting public health information in plain language.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Rima E; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Colton, Tayla; Gregoire, John; Hyde, James

    2004-01-01

    Public health materials are often designed to inform and rally the public to spur action and maintain vigilance on important issues to family, work, community, and public policy. Limited access to public health information certainly curtails knowledge and awareness but may also hamper action and civic involvement. A growth in published assessments of health materials indicates an increased interest in the mismatch between the reading level of most health materials and the reading ability of the average adult. However, while several guidebooks offer suggestions for developing new materials, little attention has been given to the process of rewriting materials and grappling with bureaucratic language. We describe, in this case study, a process we used to assess and then rewrite a federally mandated report to consumers about the quality of their water. PMID:15360033

  15. African-American men's perceptions of health: a focus group study.

    PubMed Central

    Ravenell, Joseph E.; Johnson, Waldo E.; Whitaker, Eric E.

    2006-01-01

    African-American men are disproportionately affected by preventable medical conditions, yet they underutilize primary care health services. Because healthcare utilization is strongly dependent on health beliefs, the purpose of this qualitative study was to identify and explore African-American men's perceptions of health and health influences. We conducted eight focus group interviews with select subgroups of African-American men, including adolescents, trauma survivors, HIV-positive men, homeless men, men who have sex with men, substance abusers, church-affiliated men and a mixed sample (N=71). Definitions of health, beliefs about health maintenance and influences on health were elicited. Participants' definitions of health went beyond the traditional "absence of disease" definition and included physical, mental, emotional, economic and spiritual well-being. Being healthy also included fulfilling social roles, such as having a job and providing for one's family. Health maintenance strategies included spirituality and self-empowerment. Stress was cited as a dominant negative influence on health, attributed to lack of income, racism, "unhealthy" neighborhoods and conflict in relationships. Positive influences included a supportive social network and feeling valued by loved ones. This study provides insight into African-American men's general health perceptions and may have implications for future efforts to improve healthcare utilization in this population. PMID:16623067

  16. Bringing Office Information Systems into Focus Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Elizabeth A.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a Delphi survey of 23 experts on what constitutes office information systems as a collegiate field of study within the domain of information systems. Appendices include a summary of issues and concerns, a list of reviewers and pilot participants, the Delphi panel, and the Delphi round responses. (JOW)

  17. Promoting eHealth literacy in older adults: key informant perspectives.

    PubMed

    Manafò, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Health literacy has the potential to improve an individual's capacity to access, understand, evaluate, and communicate basic health information and services in order to make appropriate health decisions. We developed a research agenda to help older adults become aware of health literacy and its function in promoting their nutritional health and well-being. A key activity is the development, implementation, and evaluation of an eHealth literacy tool, eSEARCH, targeted at older adults to help improve their eHealth literacy skills. Before consultations were held with this subpopulation to assess their eHealth literacy needs and abilities, key informant interviews were conducted with eight experts in the field of health literacy, the older adult population, and/or online communications. Some experts were identified from the relevant literature; others were identified by informants who had already been interviewed. Informants were asked nine questions about the perceived importance of health literacy in Canada, key considerations in developing an eHealth literacy tool, and supporting resources for advancement of the eHealth literacy tool. Informants agreed that health literacy is a key concept and stressed that key considerations for development of the eSEARCH tool are identifying the target population's needs, focusing on health promotion, and increasing confidence in information-seeking behaviours. Identified challenges are ensuring accessibility, applicability to older adults, and adoption of the tool by dietetic and other health care professionals. PMID:23449214

  18. Approaching Equity in Consumer Health Information Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Theodore A.; Guard, J. Roger; Marine, Stephen A.; Schick, Leslie; Haag, Doris; Tsipis, Gaylene; Kaya, Birsen; Shoemaker, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Abstract The growing public interest in health and wellness information stems from many sources, including social changes related to consumers' rights and women's health movements, and economic changes brought about by the managed health care revolution. Public, hospital, and medical center libraries have been ill-equipped to meet the increasing need for consumer-oriented materials, even though a few notable programs have been established. The “Information Superhighway” could be an effective tool for sharing health information if access to telecomputing equipment and training were available to those with an information need. The University of Cincinnati Medical Center, with its libraries in the leading role, is delivering NetWellness, an electronic consumer health library service, to residents of 29 counties in three midwestern states. Users connect directly through the Internet, through regional Free-Nets, and by visiting one of 43 public access sites where networked workstations have been installed. The continued success of the project depends on developing partnerships, providing quality content and maintaining fair access. PMID:8988468

  19. Redefining leadership education in graduate public health programs: prioritization, focus, and guiding principles.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Jennifer A; Oxendine, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    Public health program graduates need leadership skills to be effective in the complex, changing public health environment. We propose a new paradigm for schools of public health in which technical and leadership skills have equal priority as core competencies for graduate students. Leadership education should focus on the foundational skills necessary to effect change independent of formal authority, with activities offered at varying levels of intensity to engage different students. Leadership development initiatives should be practice based, process focused, interdisciplinary, diversity based, adaptive, experimental, innovative, and empowering, and they should encourage authenticity. Leadership training in graduate programs will help lay the groundwork for public health professionals to have an immediate impact in the workforce and to prioritize continuous leadership development throughout their careers. PMID:25706021

  20. Linking credentialed skills, social class, working conditions and self-reported health: a focus on health inequality-generating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vanroelen, Christophe; Levecque, Katia; Moors, Guy; Louckx, Fred

    2010-09-01

    In this study, focus is on the mechanisms linking credentialed skills and social class relations to five dimensions of occupational stressors and three self-reported health outcomes: persistent fatigue, musculoskeletal complaints and emotional wellbeing. We test for direct health associations of skills/class. Moreover, indirect health associations of skills/class, through differential exposure to occupational stressors and effect modifications of the occupational stressors, are tested. A modified LISREL analysis is applied to a representative cross-sectional sample of 11,099 Flemish wage-earners. The direct health effects of credentialed skills/class are limited, but they are clearly indirectly related to the self-reported health outcomes through differential exposure to occupational stressors. The indirect mechanisms point to both reinforcing and moderating effects on socio-economic health inequalities. Two cases of effect modification are also observed: social class modifying the association between control and persistent fatigue; and skills affecting the association between the quality of social relations and emotional wellbeing. Differential exposure to occupational stressors is a crucial mechanism linking skills/class to socio-economic health inequalities. Direct effects and effect modification of class/skills are relevant, but of limited importance. One of the effect modifications found suggests that a specific focus on contradictory class positions might be warranted in future research. PMID:20887630

  1. Air pollution and health: emerging information on susceptible populations

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Carrie V.; Devlin, Robert B.; Utell, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution poses risks to human health in communities around the world, and research on populations who are most susceptible continues to reveal new insights. Human susceptibility to adverse health effects from exposure to air pollution can be related to underlying disease; demographic or anthropometric characteristics; genetic profile; race and ethnicity; lifestyle, behaviors, and socioeconomic position; and location of residence or daily activities. In health research, an individual or group may have an enhanced responsiveness to a given, identical level of pollution exposure compared to those who are less susceptible. Or, people in these different groups may experience varying levels of exposure (for example, a theoretically homogeneous population whose members differ only by proximity to a road). Often the information available for health research may relate to both exposure and enhanced response to a given dose of pollution. This paper discusses the general direction of research on susceptibility to air pollution, with a general though not an exclusive focus on particulate matter, with specific examples of research on susceptibility related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, and genetic and epigenetic features. We conclude by commenting how emerging knowledge of susceptibility can inform policy for controlling pollution sources and exposures to yield maximal health benefit and discuss two areas of emerging interest: studying air pollution and its connection to perinatal health, as well as land use and urban infrastructure design. PMID:25741389

  2. Focused, Unfocused, and Defocused Information in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rerko, Laura; Oberauer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of selection cues in working memory (WM) on the fate of not-selected contents of WM. Experiments 1A and 1B showed that focusing on 1 cued item in WM does not impair memory for the remaining items. The nonfocused items are maintained in WM even when this is not required by the task. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that…

  3. PRESIDENT'S INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Panel on Transforming Health Care

    E-print Network

    Horvitz, Eric

    #12;PRESIDENT'S INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE Panel on Transforming Health Care February 2001 Transforming Health Care Through Information Technology REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT #12;c/o National Coordination Office for Information Technology Research & Development 4201 Wilson Boulevard

  4. 45 CFR 170.207 - Vocabulary standards for representing electronic health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS...CRITERIA AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and Implementation...

  5. White Paper: Advancing Personalized Health Care through Health Information Technology: An Update from the American Health Information Community's Personalized Health Care Workgroup

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Glaser; Douglas E. Henley; Gregory Downing; Kristin M. Brinner

    2008-01-01

    The Personalized Health Care Workgroup of the American Health Information Community was formed to determine what is needed to promote standard reporting and incorporation of medical genetic\\/genomic tests and family health history data in electronic health records. The Workgroup has examined and clarified a range of issues related to this information, including interoperability standards and requirements for confidentiality, privacy, and

  6. Large scale health information exchange: implementation experiences from five states.

    PubMed

    Dullabh, Prashila; Hovey, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    There is widespread consensus that Health Information Exchange, the electronic sharing of patients' health information between delivery settings, is critical to improving the quality and efficiency of patient care. The United States has had limited success in establishing broad-based HIE. To address these issues, the federal government funded the State Health Information Exchange Cooperative Agreement Program. An in-depth qualitative study was conducted, consisting of site visits and semi-structured discussions with 105 respondents in 5 states to understand early HIE implementation experiences. Results show the last two years have seen unprecedented growth in HIE infrastructure. Key factors such as maturity of HIE at baseline and healthcare market characteristics have shaped governance models and technical infrastructures. Early focus on stakeholder value proposition and sustainability planning is critical for long-term success. States continue to face numerous challenges in converting stakeholder support into financial commitment and real-time exchange of health information. We discuss the key issues states faced in attempting to realize broad-based HIE and offer insights that may assist other states. PMID:23920629

  7. “Defense Health Information System as a case study for national health IT”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seong Ki Mun

    2009-01-01

    The National Forum on the Future of Defense Health Information Systems (National Forum) held in Washington, DC in March 2008 provided a unique opportunity to conduct a case study of developing a large complex health information system. The concept of the health information system has evolved from the days to electronic hospital information system (HIS) to longitudinal health record (LHR)

  8. Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2014-2015

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    HLTHST 332 Managing Clinical Classification Systems HLTHST 333 Reimbursement Methodologies HLTHST 350 Systems HLTHST 420 Strategic Planning and Project Management HLTHST 427 Health Information Management Clinical Practice HLTHST 431 Quality Issues in Health Care HLTHST 437 Health Information Management

  9. Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2013-2014

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    HLTHST 332 Managing Clinical Classification Systems HLTHST 333 Reimbursement Methodologies HLTHST 350 Systems HLTHST 420 Strategic Planning and Project Management HLTHST 427 Health Information Management Clinical Practice HLTHST 431 Quality Issues in Health Care HLTHST 437 Health Information Management

  10. Making Sense of Health Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitzmiller, Rebecca Rutherford

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hospital adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems is promoted as essential to decreasing medical error and their associated 44,000 annual deaths and $17 billion in healthcare costs (Institute of Medicine, 2001; Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 1999). Leading national healthcare groups, such as the Institute of Medicine,…

  11. Privacy & Information Security Student Health Services

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    Privacy & Information Security Student Health Services December 2011 #12;AGENDA 1. HIPAA ­ What's new ­ "In the news" 2. What you need to know ­ Privacy & IT Security 3. Lessons Learned ­ Recent Privacy/IT Security Issues 4. Emerging Privacy / IT Security Issues ­ Social Networking - Facebook #12

  12. CORBA security services for health information systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Blobel; Martin Holena

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to ‘shared care’, enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based

  13. Human Resource Services Health Insurance Informational Session

    E-print Network

    Karonis, Nicholas T.

    Human Resource Services Health Insurance Informational Session January 2013 Human Resource Services Completion of Paperwork Human Resource Services #12;HRS Insurance Office Contacts Deborah Haliczer (rbechtel@niu.edu ­ 753-8230) Bridgett Davis (bdavis@niu.edu ­ 753-6318) Human Resource Services #12;Recent

  14. Data Liquidity in Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Paul K.

    2011-01-01

    In 2001 the IOM report "Crossing the Quality Chasm" and the NCVHS report "Information for Health" were released and they provided the context for the development of information systems used to support health-supporting processes. Both had as their goals, implicit or explicit, to ensure the right data is provided to the right person at the right time, which is one definition of "Data Liquidity". This concept has had some traction in recent years as a shorthand way to express a system property for Health IT, but there is not a well-defined characterization of what properties of a system or of its components give it better or worse data liquidity. This paper looks at some recent work that help to identify those properties and perhaps can help to ground the concept with metrics that are assessable. PMID:21799328

  15. A Security Architecture for Health Information Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kailar, Rajashekar

    2007-01-01

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today’s healthcare enterprise. Recent work on ‘nationwide health information network’ architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communication between network nodes, we abstract network security requirements to a core set to enable secure inter-network data sharing. We propose a minimum set of security controls that can be implemented without needing major new technologies, but yet realize network security and privacy goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability. This framework combines a set of technology mechanisms with environmental controls, and is shown to be sufficient to counter commonly encountered network security threats adequately. PMID:18693862

  16. A security architecture for health information networks.

    PubMed

    Kailar, Rajashekar; Muralidhar, Vinod

    2007-01-01

    Health information network security needs to balance exacting security controls with practicality, and ease of implementation in today's healthcare enterprise. Recent work on 'nationwide health information network' architectures has sought to share highly confidential data over insecure networks such as the Internet. Using basic patterns of health network data flow and trust models to support secure communication between network nodes, we abstract network security requirements to a core set to enable secure inter-network data sharing. We propose a minimum set of security controls that can be implemented without needing major new technologies, but yet realize network security and privacy goals of confidentiality, integrity and availability. This framework combines a set of technology mechanisms with environmental controls, and is shown to be sufficient to counter commonly encountered network security threats adequately. PMID:18693862

  17. Highlighted Resources for Children, Parents, and Educators from SAMHSA Children and Youth--SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Information Series installment

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    --SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Information Series installment http://www.samhsa.gov/dtac/dbhis/dbhis_children_intro.asp This SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Information Series installment focuses on the reactions and mental health needs of children and youth after a disaster and contains resources from both the child trauma

  18. A Definition of Research Focus for International Information Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans P. Lehmann

    1997-01-01

    International information systems (IIS) technology is a field where academic research is sparse. This contrasts starkly with a growing concern of practitioners who have come to regard IIS as a double threat: They are often vitally critical for the globally oriented firm, but at the same time they are perceived as difficult and risky. Previous research is reviewed and classified

  19. FOCUS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN COLLABORATIVE SUPPLY CHAIN RELATIONSHIPS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sami Sarpola

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates how companies develop and use information systems to support collaboration with their supply chain partners. For this purpose the case study approach is adopted and used to analyze empirical data collected from eight collaborative buyer-supplier relationships. As a result of the study three profiles - internal foci, external foci, and supply chain foci - were identified from

  20. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  1. Status of Oregon's Children: 2002 County Data Book. Special Focus: Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children First for Oregon, Portland.

    This Kids Count data book examines trends in the well-being of Oregons children, focusing on child health, nutrition, and child safety. This statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators of child well-being: (1) child care supply; (2) third grade reading proficiency; (3) third grade math proficiency; (4) juvenile arrests; (5) suicide attempts;…

  2. The identification and measurement of quality dimensions in health care: focus group interview results.

    PubMed

    Jun, M; Peterson, R T; Zsidisin, G A

    1998-01-01

    The identification and measurement of service quality are critical factors that are responsible for customer satisfaction. This article identifies 11 attributes that define quality of care and patient satisfaction and reveals various gaps among the patient, physician, and administrator groups in the perceived importance of those dimensions. Managerial implications for patient-focused health care are discussed. PMID:9803321

  3. Internet Use for Health Information Among College Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cam Escoffery; Kathleen R Miner; Daniel D Adame; Susan Butler; Laura McCormick; Elizabeth Mendell

    2005-01-01

    Use of the Internet to retrieve health information is increasingly common. The authors surveyed 743 undergraduate students at 2 academic institutions to examine their Internet use, health-seeking behaviors, and attitudes related to the use of the Internet to obtain health information. Fifty-three percent of the respondents indicated that they would like to get health information online, and 28% reported that

  4. Student Health and Counseling Center Authorization for Release of Protected Health Information

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Diane

    Student Health and Counseling Center Authorization for Release of Protected Health Information I ________________________________________________ hereby authorize the staff of the UAF Center for Health and Counseling to release my Protected Health ___________ Initial here _________ ____ Counseling Summary Date range ___________ Initial here _________ ____ Other

  5. Nevada Information and Communications Technology Focus Group Analysis Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This report documents the initiative of the College of Southern Nevada, Truckee Meadows Community College, and Western Nevada College to reach out to employers and other organizations to describe knowledge and skills needed by information and communications technology works. It also aims to "describe the current and projected employment opportunities for technicians" and "describe industry perceptions of colleges and community college graduates as potential employees" This 34 page document is available for download as a PDF.

  6. Information management in health visitors' public health and community development activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruth Bacigalupo; Nick Fox; Philippa Levy

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to identify UK health visitors’ management of information, with particular reference to their public health and community development activities. Widely recognized concepts, such as information audit to assess information need and process models of information management, were applied at operational level to represent health visitors’ information environment. The naturalistic methodology included interviews and observation, the use

  7. What is Covered under the Privacy Protected Health Information (PHI)

    E-print Network

    Biederman, Irving

    HIPAA & RESEARCH #12;What is Covered under the Privacy Rule? Protected Health Information (PHI) · Health information + Identifier = PHI · Transmitted or maintained in any form (paper, electronic, forms, web-based, etc.) · Decedents' information included Does not include de-identified health information

  8. Markets, information asymmetry and health care: towards new social contracts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Gerald; Standing, Hilary; Lloyd, Robert

    2008-05-01

    This paper explores the implications of the increasing role of informal as well as formal markets in the health systems of many low and middle-income countries. It focuses on institutional arrangements for making the benefits of expert medical knowledge widely available in the face of the information asymmetries that characterise health care. It argues that social arrangements can be understood as a social contract between actors, underpinned by shared behavioural norms, and embedded in a broader political economy. This contract is expressed through a variety of actors and institutions, not just through the formal personnel and arrangements of a health sector. Such an understanding implies that new institutional arrangements, such as the spread of reputation-based trust mechanisms can emerge or be adapted from other parts of the society and economy. The paper examines three relational aspects of health systems: the encounter between patient and provider; mechanisms for generating trust in goods and services in the context of highly marketised systems; and the establishment of socially legitimated regulatory regimes. This analysis is used to review experiences of health system innovation and change from a number of low income and transition countries. PMID:18316147

  9. Consumer-mediated health information exchanges: the 2012 ACMI debate.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J; Frisse, Mark E; Halamka, John; Sweeney, Latanya; Yasnoff, William

    2014-04-01

    The American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) sponsors periodic debates during the American Medical Informatics Fall Symposium to highlight important informatics issues of broad interest. In 2012, a panel debated the following topic: "Resolved: Health Information Exchange Organizations Should Shift Their Principal Focus to Consumer-Mediated Exchange in Order to Facilitate the Rapid Development of Effective, Scalable, and Sustainable Health Information Infrastructure." Those supporting the proposition emphasized the need for consumer-controlled community repositories of electronic health records (health record banks) to address privacy, stakeholder cooperation, scalability, and sustainability. Those opposing the proposition emphasized that the current healthcare environment is so complex that development of consumer control will take time and that even then, consumers may not be able to mediate their information effectively. While privately each discussant recognizes that there are many sides to this complex issue, each followed the debater's tradition of taking an extreme position in order emphasize some of the polarizing aspects in the short time allotted them. In preparing this summary, we sought to convey the substance and spirit of the debate in printed form. Transcripts of the actual debate were edited for clarity, and appropriate supporting citations were added for the further edification of the reader. PMID:24561078

  10. Examination of visual information as a mediator of external focus benefits.

    PubMed

    Land, William M; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Ward, Paul; Marquardt, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Attunement to visual information has been suggested to mediate the performance advantage associated with adopting an external focus of attention (e.g., Al-Abood, Bennett, Moreno Hernandez, Ashford, & Davids, 2002; Magill, 1998). We tested this hypothesis by examining the extent to which online visual information underpins the external focus advantage. The study examined skilled golfers on a putting task under one of three attentional focus conditions: control (no instructions), irrelevant (tone counting), and external (movement effect focus), with either full or occluded vision. In addition to task performance, the effect of attentional focus and vision on between-trial movement variability was examined. We found a significant advantage for an external focus of attention in the absence of vision. The results of the movement variability analysis further indicated that external focus was not mediated by the online use of vision. We discuss these findings in the context of traditional cognitive perspectives to external focus effects. PMID:23798588

  11. Electronic Tools for Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As patients experience transitions in care, there is a need to share information between care providers in an accurate and timely manner. With the push towards electronic medical records and other electronic tools (eTools) (and away from paper-based health records) for health information exchange, there remains uncertainty around the impact of eTools as a form of communication. Objective To examine the impact of eTools for health information exchange in the context of care coordination for individuals with chronic disease in the community. Data Sources A literature search was performed on April 26, 2012, using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published until April 26, 2012 (no start date limit was applied). Review Methods A systematic literature search was conducted, and meta-analysis conducted where appropriate. Outcomes of interest fell into 4 categories: health services utilization, disease-specific clinical outcomes, process-of-care indicators, and measures of efficiency. The quality of the evidence was assessed individually for each outcome. Expert panels were assembled for stakeholder engagement and contextualization. Results Eleven articles were identified (4 randomized controlled trials and 7 observational studies). There was moderate quality evidence of a reduction in hospitalizations, hospital length of stay, and emergency department visits following the implementation of an electronically generated laboratory report with recommendations based on clinical guidelines. The evidence showed no difference in disease-specific outcomes; there was no evidence of a positive impact on process-of-care indicators or measures of efficiency. Limitations A limited body of research specifically examined eTools for health information exchange in the population and setting of interest. This evidence included a combination of study designs and was further limited by heterogeneity in individual technologies and settings in which they were implemented. Conclusions There is evidence that the right eTools in the right environment and context can significantly impact health services utilization. However, the findings from this evidence-based analysis raise doubts about the ability of eTools with care-coordination capabilities to independently improve the quality of outpatient care. While eTools may be able to support and sustain processes, inefficiencies embedded in the health care system may require more than automation alone to resolve. Plain Language Summary Patients with chronic diseases often work with many different health care providers. To ensure smooth transitions from one setting to the next, health care providers must share information and coordinate care effectively. Electronic medical records (eTools) are being used more and more to coordinate patient care, but it is not yet known whether they are more effective than paper-based health records. In this analysis, we reviewed the evidence for the use of eTools to exchange information and coordinate care for people with chronic diseases in the community. There was some evidence that eTools reduced the number of hospital and emergency department visits, as well as patients' length of stay in the hospital, but there was no evidence that eTools improved the overall quality of patient care. PMID:24194799

  12. Humanising illness: presenting health information in educational comics.

    PubMed

    McNicol, Sarah

    2014-06-01

    Research into the effectiveness of comic books as health education tools overwhelmingly consists of studies evaluating the information learnt as a result of reading the comic, for example using preintervention and postintervention questionnaires. In essence, these studies evaluate comics in the same way in which a patient information leaflet might be evaluated, but they fail to evaluate the narrative element of comics. Health information comics have the potential to do much more than simply convey facts about an illness; they can also support patients in dealing with the social and psychological aspects of a condition. This article discusses how some common elements of educational comics are handled in a selection of comics about diabetes, focusing on the more personal or social aspects of the condition as well as the presentation of factual information. The elements examined include: fears and anxieties; reactions of friends and family; interactions with medical professionals; self-management; and prevention. In conclusion, the article argues that comics, potentially, have many advantages over patient information leaflets, particularly in the way in which they can offer 'companionship', helping patients to address fears and negative feelings. However, empirical studies are required to evaluate educational comics in a way which takes account of their potential role in supporting patients in coming to terms with their condition, as well as becoming better informed. PMID:24398159

  13. Incremental change without policy learning: Explaining information rejection in English mental health services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon Glasby; Helen Lester

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews recent policy changes in English mental health services and the nature of the evidence base that has guided these changes. In particular, the paper focuses on different groups within mental health policy and practice, citing examples of information rejection by each of the key stakeholders. Drawing on a neo-Durkheimian institutionalist framework, the paper argues that each group

  14. The Place of Health Information and Socio-Emotional Support in Social Questioning and Answering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrall, Adam; Oh, Sanghee

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the quality of health information in social contexts or how socio-emotional factors impact users' evaluations of quality. We explored how librarians, nurses and users assessed the quality of health answers posted on Yahoo! Answers, focusing on socio-emotional reactions displayed, advice given to users and…

  15. Being healthy or looking good? The effectiveness of health versus appearance-focused arguments in two-sided messages.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Erlinde; Cauberghe, Verolien; De Pelsmacker, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Two experimental studies test the effectiveness of health versus appearance-related arguments in two-sided messages. The first study shows that two-sided messages to discourage suntanning are more effective when using appearance-focused instead of health-focused arguments. Study 2 elaborates on the underlying mechanism and extends the generalization of the results of the first study, by investigating two-sided messages to promote physical exercise. The results show that for health-motivated consumers, a health-focused message is more effective, whereas for appearance-motivated consumers, an appearance-focused message is more effective. This matching effect is mediated by argument relevance. PMID:23682067

  16. The Digital Health Divide: Evaluating Online Health Information Access and Use among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Amanda K.; Bernhardt, Jay M.; Dodd, Virginia; Vollrath, Morgan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Innovations in health information technology (HIT) provide opportunities to reduce health care spending, improve quality of care, and improve health outcomes for older adults. However, concerns relating to older adults' limited access and use of HIT, including use of the Internet for health information, fuel the digital health divide…

  17. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multi-Family Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore multiple family members’ perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home. Design Ten multi-family focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting Community setting. Participants Primarily Black and White families. Family members (n = 103) were between the ages of 8–61 years. Analysis A grounded hermeneutic approach. Phenomenon of Interest Risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home environment. Results Ten major themes were identified by family members related to health behaviors in the home environment, including: (a) accessibility to healthy foods and activity, (b) time constraints, (c) stage of youth development, (d) individual investment in health behaviors, (e) family investment in health behaviors, (f) family meals and shared activities, (g) parent modeling, (h) making health behaviors fun, (i) making health behaviors part of the family lifestyle, and (j) community investment in family health behaviors. Conclusions and Implications This study identified the importance of the family system and the reciprocal influences within the home environment on health behaviors. In addition, individual and community-level suggestions were identified. Insights from the families provide leads for future research and ideas for the prevention of youth obesity. PMID:22192951

  18. Informed consent in international health research.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Patricia A

    2006-03-01

    Informed consent is universally recognized as a central component of ethical conduct in scientific research. Investigators working with diverse populations throughout the world face myriad challenges. The application of standards for informed consent can be daunting for researchers when they face the pragmatic constraints of the field and the reality of cultural beliefs about consent that may be in direct conflict with regulatory requirements. This paper explores cultural and social factors underlying informed consent for health research with diverse populations in international settings. Sociocultural influences on comprehension of information, perceptions of risk, and beliefs regarding decisional authority are reviewed. The implications of power inequities between study sponsors, researchers and participants are also considered. Issues associated with the development and preparation of consent forms, including translation and documentation are highlighted. Recommendations for good practices are outlined and future directions for research are explored. PMID:19385865

  19. Computers, health care, and medical information science.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, T L; Korpman, R A

    1980-10-17

    The clinical laboratory is examined as a microcosm of the entire health care delivery system. The introduction of computers into the clinical laboratory raises issues that are difficult to resolve by the methods of information science or medical science applied in isolation. The melding of these two disciplines, together with the contributions of other disciplines, has created a new field of study called medical information science. The emergence of this new discipline and some specific problem-solving approaches used in its application in the clinical laboratory are examined. PMID:6999622

  20. Flexibility and Structure May Enhance Implementation of Family-Focused Therapy in Community Mental Health Settings

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Bowen; Mikesell, Lisa; Miklowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    This study elicited provider and administrator preferences in implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) for bipolar disorder or psychosis, family-focused therapy (FFT). Providers (n=35) and administrators (n= 5) from three community mental health centers took part in FFT training and participated in pre- and post-training focus groups. Transcripts were examined using conventional content analysis. Providers and administrators discussed barriers to implementing EBPs. Successful EBPs were described as incorporating flexibility and close supervision to maximize provider adherence. Providers expressed preferences for structured EBPs like FFT that have both explicit implementation steps and built-in flexibility. PMID:24810982

  1. Flexibility and structure may enhance implementation of family-focused therapy in community mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bowen; Mikesell, Lisa; Miklowitz, David

    2014-10-01

    This study elicited provider and administrator preferences in implementing an evidence-based practice (EBP) for bipolar disorder or psychosis, family-focused therapy (FFT). Providers (n = 35) and administrators (n = 5) from three community mental health centers took part in FFT training and participated in pre- and post-training focus groups. Transcripts were examined using conventional content analysis. Providers and administrators discussed barriers to implementing EBPs. Successful EBPs were described as incorporating flexibility and close supervision to maximize provider adherence. Providers expressed preferences for structured EBPs like FFT that have both explicit implementation steps and built-in flexibility. PMID:24810982

  2. The Tanzania Connect Project: a cluster-randomized trial of the child survival impact of adding paid community health workers to an existing facility-focused health system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tanzania has been a pioneer in establishing community-level services, yet challenges remain in sustaining these systems and ensuring adequate human resource strategies. In particular, the added value of a cadre of professional community health workers is under debate. While Tanzania has the highest density of primary health care facilities in Africa, equitable access and quality of care remain a challenge. Utilization for many services proven to reduce child and maternal mortality is unacceptably low. Tanzanian policy initiatives have sought to address these problems by proposing expansion of community-based providers, but the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW ) lacks evidence that this merits national implementation. The Tanzania Connect Project is a randomized cluster trial located in three rural districts with a population of roughly 360,000 ( Kilombero, Rufiji, and Ulanga). Description of intervention Connect aims to test whether introducing a community health worker into a general program of health systems strengthening and referral improvement will reduce child mortality, improve access to services, expand utilization, and alter reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health seeking behavior; thereby accelerating progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Connect has introduced a new cadre — Community Health Agents (CHA) — who were recruited from and work in their communities. To support the CHA, Connect developed supervisory systems, launched information and monitoring operations, and implemented logistics support for integration with existing district and village operations. In addition, Connect’s district-wide emergency referral strengthening intervention includes clinical and operational improvements. Evaluation design Designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial, CHA were randomly assigned to 50 of the 101 villages within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in the three study districts. To garner detailed information on household characteristics, behaviors, and service exposure, a random sub-sample survey of 3,300 women of reproductive age will be conducted at the baseline and endline. The referral system intervention will use baseline, midline, and endline facility-based data to assess systemic changes. Implementation and impact research of Connect will assess whether and how the presence of the CHA at village level provides added life-saving value to the health system. Discussion Global commitment to launching community-based primary health care has accelerated in recent years, with much of the implementation focused on Africa. Despite extensive investment, no program has been guided by a truly experimental study. Connect will not only address Tanzania’s need for policy and operational research, it will bridge a critical international knowledge gap concerning the added value of salaried professional community health workers in the context of a high density of fixed facilities. Trial registration: ISRCTN96819844 PMID:23819587

  3. Standards for health information technology to ensure adolescent privacy.

    PubMed

    Blythe, Margaret J; Del Beccaro, Mark A

    2012-11-01

    Privacy and security of health information is a basic expectation of patients. Despite the existence of federal and state laws safeguarding the privacy of health information, health information systems currently lack the capability to allow for protection of this information for minors. This policy statement reviews the challenges to privacy for adolescents posed by commercial health information technology systems and recommends basic principles for ideal electronic health record systems. This policy statement has been endorsed by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. PMID:23109684

  4. 77 FR 55217 - Health Information Technology Implementation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration...Implementation AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)....

  5. Health Information in Bosnian (Bosanski): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nakon operacije - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Substance Abuse or Dependence ... ili ovisnost - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Alzheimer's Disease Inside the Brain: An Interactive Tour - ...

  6. Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 66, July 2011 Use of the Internet for Health Information: United States, 2009 On This Page Key ... than men to have used the Internet for health information. Women were more likely than men to ...

  7. Using rangeland health assessment to inform successional management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland health assessment provides qualitative information on ecosystem attributes. Successional management is a conceptual framework that allows managers to link information gathered in rangeland health assessment to ecological processes that need to be repaired to allow vegetation to change in ...

  8. Health Information in Chinese - Simplified (????): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDF Health Information Translations Healthy Aging Secrets of Longevity - English ????? - ???? (Chinese - Simplified) PDF Chinese Community ... Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Q Quitting Smoking How to Quit Smoking ???? - ???? (Chinese - Simplified) ...

  9. The health information system security threat lifecycle: An informatics theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juanita I. Fernando; Linda L. Dawson

    2009-01-01

    PurposeThis manuscript describes the health information system security threat lifecycle (HISSTL) theory. The theory is grounded in case study data analyzing clinicians’ health information system (HIS) privacy and security (P&S) experiences in the practice context.

  10. Transcript for Evaluating Internet Health Information: A Tutorial

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medlineplus/webeval/webeval_transcript.html Transcript for Evaluating Internet Health Information: A Tutorial To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Evaluating Internet Health Information: A Tutorial from the National Library ...

  11. Health Information Technology in Oncology Practice: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fasola, G; Macerelli, M; Follador, A; Rihawi, K; Aprile, G; Mea, V Della

    2014-01-01

    The adoption and implementation of information technology are dramatically remodeling healthcare services all over the world, resulting in an unstoppable and sometimes overwhelming process. After the introduction of the main elements of electronic health records and a description of what every cancer-care professional should be familiar with, we present a narrative review focusing on the current use of computerized clinical information and decision systems in oncology practice. Following a detailed analysis of the many coveted goals that oncologists have reached while embracing informatics progress, the authors suggest how to overcome the main obstacles for a complete physicians’ engagement and for a full information technology adoption, and try to forecast what the future holds. PMID:25506195

  12. Student Reception, Sources, and Believability of Health-Related Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Matthew Yiu Wing; Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P.; Lowe, David; Taman, Sara; Faulkner, Guy E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify the health topics students received information about, how students obtained health-related information, and perceived believability of those sources. Participants and Methods: Students (N = 1202) were surveyed using the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) of the American College Health

  13. Speaking up: Teens Voice Their Health Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Kathryn A.; Parker, Randy Spreen; Lampert, Joan; Sulo, Suela

    2012-01-01

    School nurses provide an important role in the continuity of health care especially for adolescents who are at high risk for significant health concerns. The purpose of this study was to assess adolescents' health information needs and identify their preferences for accessing health information. Using an inductive qualitative research design, 11…

  14. What is child survival? Child-focused strategy forms key element of PLAN's health policy.

    PubMed

    Tam, L

    1993-01-01

    PLAN in Bolivia and the Dominican Republic has directed interventions to increase child survival. In Bolivia in August 1991, an 18 month infant with rapid breathing and cough was brought to a health center because the mother had remembered the warning symptoms provided by a community health worker. This child's life was saved by the contact with the health worker, the mother's action to bring the child to the health center, and the timely, appropriate use of antibiotics. Follow-up by a community worker revealed a return to health for the child; a child death was averted. The case of a measles epidemic in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic in February 1992 was described, where health workers had targeted a slum area for house to house immunization and thus child deaths were averted when the measles epidemic struck. PLAN's child survival programs, funded by USAID and PLAN, have been innovative and successful in tailoring approaches to local needs and priorities. The Santo Domingo Field Office prioritized efforts in immunization, oral rehydration therapy, and child nutrition. Findings in 1992 showed that Child Survival participants had 50% less malnutrition than other neighboring community children aged 12-23 months. Bolivia's Field Office in Sucre stressed acute respiratory infections, immunizations, and oral rehydration therapy. Findings have shown that Child Survival families were four times more likely to use health facilities for respiratory infections. Success has been attributed to a focus on high risk populations, use of technical interventions, emphasis on selected key behavioral change objectives, a community based approach, cooperative relationships with other local health providers, and "community ownership" of interventions. Individual health taking behavior was changed. PMID:12179562

  15. Assessment of the National Library of Medicine's health disparities plan: a focus on Native American outreach*

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Elliot R.; Wood, Frederick B.; Dutcher, Gale A.; Ruffin, Angela; Logan, Robert A.; Scott, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Overcoming health disparities between majority and minority populations is a significant national challenge. This paper assesses outreach to Native Americans (American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians) by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). A companion paper details NLM's portfolio of Native American outreach projects. Method: NLM's Native American outreach is assessed in light of the presentations at a community-based health information outreach symposium and the goals set by NLM's plan to reduce health disparities. Results: NLM's current portfolio of Native American outreach projects appears most advanced in meeting the goal set in area 1 of the health disparities plan, “Promote use of health information by health professionals and the public.” NLM's portfolio also shows significant strength and good progress regarding area 2 of the plan, “Expand partnerships among various types of libraries and community-based organizations.” The portfolio is weaker in area 3, “Conduct and support informatics research.” More knowledge-building efforts would benefit NLM, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, and Native American and community-based organizations. Implications: The current Native American outreach portfolio should be continued, but new approaches are needed for evaluating Native American outreach and for forging collaborations with Native American groups, approaches grounded in consultation and mutual understanding of needs and perspectives. PMID:16239954

  16. Study on the Visualization Elements of Web Information Services: Focused on Researcher Network and Graphic Chart

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hanmin Jung; Mikyoung Lee; Pyung Kim; DoWan Kim

    2011-01-01

    To provide information efficiently to users with web service, we study information visualization techniques, especially focused on researcher network and graphic chart. In the viewpoint of data set and level of functionality, we analyze the following four academic information services; Authoratory, Researchgate, Biomedexperts, and Academic.research. We analyze researcher network and graphic chart of each service and then propose evaluation criteria

  17. Health information and cigarette consumption: supply and spatial considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig A. Gallet

    2006-01-01

    Assessments of the impact of health information on smoking incidence have largely been based upon estimates of the national demand for cigarettes. Yet various arguments can be made for health information also affecting the supply of cigarettes. Moreover, the effect of policy may vary spatially. Indeed, by estimating the relationship between U.S. health information, demand, and supply, at the state-level,

  18. Helping Consumers Find Reliable Health Information on the Internet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann Duesing

    2004-01-01

    Finding reliable health information should be the highest priority for all health information consumers when searching the Internet. However, without guidelines, support, and training, that can be an intimidating task. Outreach librarians from academic medical centers have developed projects and partnerships that facilitate the identification of, and access to, the most reliable health information the Internet has to offer. The

  19. Pathway to Support the Sustainable National Health Information System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naiyana Sahavechaphan; Jedsada Phengsuwan; Suriya U-Ruekolan; Kamron Aroonrua; Jukrapong Ponhan; Nattapon Harnsamut; Sornthep Vannarat

    2011-01-01

    Heath information across geographically distributed healthcare centers has been recognized as an essential resource that drives an efficient national health-care plan. There is thus a need for the National Health Information System (NHIS) that provides the transparent and secure access to health information from different healthcare centers both on demand and in a time efficient manner. As healthiness is the

  20. The issues in securing electronic health information in transit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Mahncke; Patricia Williams

    2007-01-01

    It is anticipated that there will continue to be an exponential increase in the demand for electronic data . The use of public networks, such as the Internet, to transmit private health information gives rise to numerous information security concerns., This paper investigates the security practices implemented by health care practices when transmitting and receiving patient health information from third

  1. Reviewing and reforming policy in health enterprise information security

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen Sostrom; Jeff R. Collmann

    2001-01-01

    Health information management policies usually address the use of paper records with little or no mention of electronic health records. Information Technology (IT) policies often ignore the health care business needs and operational use of the information stored in its systems. Representatives from the Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center, TRICARE and Offices of the Surgeon General of each Military

  2. Reasons for participating and genetic information needs among racially and ethnically diverse biobank participants: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Streicher, Samantha A; Sanderson, Saskia C; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Diefenbach, Michael; Smirnoff, Meg; Peter, Inga; Horowitz, Carol R; Brenner, Barbara; Richardson, Lynne D

    2011-09-01

    In order for DNA biobanks to be a valuable reservoir of genetic information, large numbers of participants from all racial and ethnic backgrounds need to be recruited. This study explored reasons for participating in a new biobank among primarily Hispanic and African American individuals, as well as their general attitudes towards genetic research, and their views on obtaining genetic tests. Focus groups were conducted with Mount Sinai Biobank participants recruited from predominantly lower income, minority communities. The topic guide included questions on The Mount Sinai Biobank, genetic research, and genetic testing. All focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. The six focus groups comprised 43 participants: 39 females and four males, aged 27-76 years, with a median household income category of $20,000-$39,999. Twenty-one participants were Hispanic, 20 African American, one Asian, and one White. Participants' reasons for participating in the biobank included altruism, personal and family benefit, and general curiosity. Although there was evidence of conflation between genetic research and genetic testing, most participants held positive views of genetic research and expressed interest in receiving personal genetic test results. Participants wanted to learn more about genetic research and suggested various venues such as health fairs for disseminating information. Participation in biobanks by racial and ethnic minorities is apparently driven by altruism, and desire for personal or collective health benefits. Participants had generally positive attitudes, limited understanding of genetics and genetic research, and made useful suggestions regarding information dissemination mechanisms. PMID:22109822

  3. Health equipment information, number 115, October 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Contents: Squibb Surgicare Ltd: System 2-Stoma Bridge for loop ostomy; Electronic and medical equipment: guidance on documentation required for maintenance; Assessment of the radio-opacity of catheters; IEC Publication number 731: dosimeters with ionization chambers as used in radiotherapy; Seminar on digital radiology; Economic appraisal of a Mobile CT Scanning Service; Equipment for the disabled; Evaluation of the Greiner G300 Analyser; Launch of Occupational Therapists' Reference Book 1983/4; Summary of health notices (hazard): 1 April 1983-31 August 1983; Safety Information Bulletin No 9-May 1983: Summary of items; Safety Information Bulletin No 10-July 1983: Summary of items; Safety Information Bulletin No 11-September 1983: Summary of items; Amendment to HEI 112 July 1983: evaluation of ECG Recorders.

  4. Using health technology assessment for informing coverage decisions in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Mohara, Adun; Youngkong, Sitaporn; Velasco, Román Pérez; Werayingyong, Pitsaphun; Pachanee, Kumaree; Prakongsai, Phusit; Tantivess, Sripen; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Lertiendumrong, Jongkol; Jongudomsuk, Pongpisut; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2012-03-01

    This article aims to illustrate and critically analyze the results from the 1-year experience of using health technology assessment (HTA) in the development of the Thai Universal Coverage health benefit package. We review the relevant documents and give a descriptive analysis of outcomes resulting from the development process in 2009-2010. Out of 30 topics nominated by stakeholders for prioritization, 12 were selected for further assessment. A total of five new interventions were recommended for inclusion in the benefit package based on value for money, budget impact, feasibility and equity reasons. Different stakeholders have diverse interests and capabilities to participate in the process. In conclusion, HTA is helpful for informing coverage decisions for health benefit packages because it enhances the legitimacy of policy decisions by increasing the transparency, inclusiveness and accountability of the process. There is room for improvement of the current use of HTA, including providing technical support for patient representatives and civic groups, better communication between health professionals, and focusing more on health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:24237374

  5. McMaster Health Forum puts focus on need for better chronic pain management July 18, 2011

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    McMaster Health Forum puts focus on need for better chronic pain management July 18, 2011 A strong and increase support for and coordination in comprehensive chronic pain management was vocalized at a day-long dialogue convened by the McMaster Health Forum to focus increased attention on chronic pain management

  6. Information Technology in Complex Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Southon, Frank Charles Gray; Sauer, Chris; Dampney, Christopher Noel Grant (Kit)

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To identify impediments to the successful transfer and implementation of packaged information systems through large, divisionalized health services. Design: A case analysis of the failure of an implementation of a critical application in the Public Health System of the State of New South Wales, Australia, was carried out. This application had been proven in the United States environment. Measurements: Interviews involving over 60 staff at all levels of the service were undertaken by a team of three. The interviews were recorded and analyzed for key themes, and the results were shared and compared to enable a continuing critical assessment. Results: Two components of the transfer of the system were considered: the transfer from a different environment, and the diffusion throughout a large, divisionalized organization. The analyses were based on the Scott-Morton organizational fit framework. In relation to the first, it was found that there was a lack of fit in the business environments and strategies, organizational structures and strategy-structure pairing as well as the management process-roles pairing. The diffusion process experienced problems because of the lack of fit in the strategy-structure, strategy-structure-management processes, and strategy-structure-role relationships. Conclusion: The large-scale developments of integrated health services present great challenges to the efficient and reliable implementation of information technology, especially in large, divisionalized organizations. There is a need to take a more sophisticated approach to understanding the complexities of organizational factors than has traditionally been the case. PMID:9067877

  7. 45 CFR 170.207 - Vocabulary standards for representing electronic health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Specifications for Health Information Technology § 170...electronic health information. The Secretary...electronic health information: (a) Problems —(1) Standard...for Maintaining, Collecting, and...

  8. Information Management in Health Administration College of Public Health and Health Professions

    E-print Network

    Kane, Andrew S.

    is to give students interested in the administration of health care organizations a basis in the fundamental. The fundamentals of the management of information systems, including systems analysis and design, databases, networking, security, and systems architecture. 2. Basic information requirements of healthcare organizations

  9. Building the case for quality improvement in the health care industry: a focus on goals and training.

    PubMed

    Field, Joy M; Heineke, Janelle; Langabeer, James R; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2014-01-01

    Health care organizations are under intense pressure to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of care delivery and, increasingly, they are using quality improvement teams to identify and target projects to improve performance outcomes. This raises the question of what factors actually drive the performance of these projects in a health care environment. Using data from a survey of health care professionals acting as informants for 244 patient care, clinical-administrative, and nonclinical administrative quality improvement project types in 93 health care organizations, we focus on 2 factors--goal setting and quality training--as potential drivers of quality improvement project performance. We find that project-level goals and quality training have positive associations with process quality, while organizational-level goals have no impact. In addition, the relationship between project-level goals and process quality is stronger for patient care projects than for administrative projects. This indicates that the motivational and cognitive effects of goal setting are greater for projects that involve interactions with clinicians than for ones that involve interactions with other staff. Although project-level goal setting is beneficial for improving process quality overall, our findings suggest the importance of being especially attentive to goal setting for projects that impact direct patient care. PMID:24978163

  10. 77 FR 72985 - Health Information Technology: Revisions to the 2014 Edition Electronic Health Record...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...2009. The HITECH Act amended the Public Health Service Act (PHSA) and created ``Title XXX--Health Information Technology and Quality'' (Title XXX) to improve health care quality, safety, and efficiency through the promotion of...

  11. Climate change and environmental impacts on maternal and newborn health with focus on Arctic populations

    PubMed Central

    Rylander, Charlotta; Odland, Jon Ø.; Sandanger, Torkjel M.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presented a report on global warming and the impact of human activities on global warming. Later the Lancet commission identified six ways human health could be affected. Among these were not environmental factors which are also believed to be important for human health. In this paper we therefore focus on environmental factors, climate change and the predicted effects on maternal and newborn health. Arctic issues are discussed specifically considering their exposure and sensitivity to long range transported contaminants. Methods Considering that the different parts of pregnancy are particularly sensitive time periods for the effects of environmental exposure, this review focuses on the impacts on maternal and newborn health. Environmental stressors known to affects human health and how these will change with the predicted climate change are addressed. Air pollution and food security are crucial issues for the pregnant population in a changing climate, especially indoor climate and food security in Arctic areas. Results The total number of environmental factors is today responsible for a large number of the global deaths, especially in young children. Climate change will most likely lead to an increase in this number. Exposure to the different environmental stressors especially air pollution will in most parts of the world increase with climate change, even though some areas might face lower exposure. Populations at risk today are believed to be most heavily affected. As for the persistent organic pollutants a warming climate leads to a remobilisation and a possible increase in food chain exposure in the Arctic and thus increased risk for Arctic populations. This is especially the case for mercury. The perspective for the next generations will be closely connected to the expected temperature changes; changes in housing conditions; changes in exposure patterns; predicted increased exposure to Mercury because of increased emissions and increased biological availability. Conclusions A number of environmental stressors are predicted to increase with climate change and increasingly affecting human health. Efforts should be put on reducing risk for the next generation, thus global politics and research effort should focus on maternal and newborn health. PMID:22084626

  12. 77 FR 24685 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Client Focus Groups and Qualitative Interviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ...Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Client Focus Groups and Qualitative Interviews AGENCY...to collect feedback from the U.S. business clients it serves. These surveys ask the client to evaluate the U.S. Commercial Service...

  13. Research on Trusted Personal Health and Wellness Information in Ubiquitous Health Information Space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Nykänen; P. Ruotsalainen; B. Blobel; A. Seppälä

    \\u000a Information structures of current electronic patient record systems (EHRs) are based on the traditional paper-based documentation\\u000a systems. The semantic interoperability of these systems is limited and security aspects are static. The usability and usefulness\\u000a of these systems to citizen-based care model is very limited. In this research we identify the shift to pervasive health care\\u000a where any type of health

  14. Health information technology impact on productivity.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Managers work to achieve the greatest output for the least input effort, better balancing all factors of delivery to achieve the most with the smallest resource effort. Documentation of actual health information technology (HIT) cost savings has been elusive. Information technology and linear programming help to control hospital costs without harming service quality or staff morale. This study presents production function results from a study of hospital output during the period 2008-2011. The results suggest that productivity varies widely among the 58 hospitals as a function of staffing patterns, methods of organization, and the degree of reliance on information support systems. Financial incentives help to enhance productivity. Incentive pay for staff based on actual productivity gains is associated with improved productivity. HIT can enhance the marginal value product of nurses and staff, so that they concentrate their workday around patient care activities. The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) was associated with a 1.6 percent improvement in productivity. PMID:23971142

  15. [Information on health: production, consumption and biopower].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cléber Domingos Cunha

    2013-10-01

    This article seeks to elicit misgivings regarding the value attributed to medical truth found in the biomedical literature. The issue of the protection of sexual practices was taken by way of example and the works of thinkers like Nietzsche, Baudrillard, Bourdieu, and especially Michel Foucault, were consulted. This was done in order to consider that the elaboration and use of health information can be interpreted as a practice constituting a policy that dynamically inspires both experts and non-experts on medical truth, constituting a morality that is based on the production and consumption of this truth. It is a policy that Foucault called biopolitics, able to establish ways of living where the exercise of thought does not seem to be so "rewarding," where practices of command and obedience are mediated by health information. In this perspective, physicians and non-physicians have been seduced by the desire to attain the truth, such that the commitment of everyone is seen to concentrate on the production and use of statements that they believe can prolong life and save from getting sick. These are discourses cultivated in the market of a media-dominated society in which individuals controlled by information produce subjectivities that are anchored in the medical-capital truth binomial. PMID:24061035

  16. 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030 Confidential Health Information Enclosed

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030 Confidential Health Information Enclosed Sender: _____________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Health care information is personal and sensitive information. It is being faxed to you after we have it in a safe, secure and confidential manner. Re-disclosure of this information without the expressed consent

  17. Use of health information in air pollution health research: Past successes and emerging needs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George D Thurston; Marni Y V Bekkedal; Eric M Roberts; Kazuhiko Ito; C Arden Pope; Barbara S Glenn; Halûk Özkaynak; Mark J Utell

    2009-01-01

    In September 2006, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) co-organized a symposium on “Air Pollution Exposure and Health.” The main objective of this symposium was to identify opportunities for improving the use of exposure and health information in future studies of air pollution health effects. This paper deals with the health information needs

  18. Adolescent Health Literacy: The Importance of Credible Sources for Online Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaddar, Suad F.; Valerio, Melissa A.; Garcia, Carolyn M.; Hansen, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little research has examined adolescent health literacy and its relationship with online health information sources. The purpose of this study is to explore health literacy among a predominantly Hispanic adolescent population and to investigate whether exposure to a credible source of online health information, MedlinePlus[R], is…

  19. HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal characteristics

    E-print Network

    DiMarco, Chrysanne

    HealthDoc: Customizing patient information and health education by medical condition and personal a comprehensive approach to the customization of patient-information and health-education materials through of ontological and linguistic knowledge sources. 1 Customizing patient-education material Present-day health-education

  20. Review of health information technology usability study methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Usability factors are a major obstacle to health information technology (IT) adoption. The purpose of this paper is to review and categorize health IT usability study methods and to provide practical guidance on health IT usability evaluation. 2025 references were initially retrieved from the Medline database from 2003 to 2009 that evaluated health IT used by clinicians. Titles and abstracts were first reviewed for inclusion. Full-text articles were then examined to identify final eligibility studies. 629 studies were categorized into the five stages of an integrated usability specification and evaluation framework that was based on a usability model and the system development life cycle (SDLC)-associated stages of evaluation. Theoretical and methodological aspects of 319 studies were extracted in greater detail and studies that focused on system validation (SDLC stage 2) were not assessed further. The number of studies by stage was: stage 1, task-based or user–task interaction, n=42; stage 2, system–task interaction, n=310; stage 3, user–task–system interaction, n=69; stage 4, user–task–system–environment interaction, n=54; and stage 5, user–task–system–environment interaction in routine use, n=199. The studies applied a variety of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Methodological issues included lack of theoretical framework/model, lack of details regarding qualitative study approaches, single evaluation focus, environmental factors not evaluated in the early stages, and guideline adherence as the primary outcome for decision support system evaluations. Based on the findings, a three-level stratified view of health IT usability evaluation is proposed and methodological guidance is offered based upon the type of interaction that is of primary interest in the evaluation. PMID:21828224

  1. Comparing Information Needs of Health Care Providers and Older Adults: Findings from a Wellness Study

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Le, Thai; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2015-01-01

    Consumer health informatics technologies have the potential to enhance shared decision-making and communication between older adults, health care providers, and other stakeholders. The objective of this study was to characterize the information needs of these stakeholders to inform the design of informatics tools that support wellness in older adults. We conducted four focus groups with 31 older adults and three focus groups with 10 health care providers to explore information needs, goals, and preferences for information sharing. Analysis of focus group transcripts was performed to identify and compare themes for different stakeholders. We identified four themes related to information activities: perceived goals of others, perceived information needs of others, information sharing by older adults, and role of family members. Older adults, family members and health care providers differ in their information needs. We provide recommendations to facilitate design and adoption of informatics tools that connect these stakeholders. Larger studies are needed to characterize different stakeholder goals, information needs and preferences. PMID:23920507

  2. A qualitative exploration of the perceptions and information needs of public health inspectors responsible for food safety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mai T Pham; Andria Q Jones; Jan M Sargeant; Barbara J Marshall; Catherine E Dewey

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Ontario, local public health inspectors play an important frontline role in protecting the public from foodborne illness. This study was an in-depth exploration of public health inspectors' perceptions of the key food safety issues in public health, and their opinions and needs with regards to food safety information resources. METHODS: Four focus group discussions were conducted with public

  3. From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issue Past Issues From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... all information on the Internet is reliable. Some Web sites post inaccurate or biased medical information. Others ...

  4. Privacy and health information: health cards offer a workable solution.

    PubMed

    Neame, Roderick

    2008-01-01

    Collections of computerised personal health data present a very real threat to privacy. Access control is difficult to manage in order to maintain privacy and at the same time to retain flexibility of usage. The legal situation is clear, imposing a requirement to respect personal privacy and human rights. Primary users (those whose access is based on a duty of care) may exceed their authorisation and access records where they have no duty of care or need to know. Secondary users (those generating analyses, research reports and financial management data) may be given access to datasets containing identifiers which are not required for their work. The 'owners' of the data (e.g. government) may use them in ways that are inconsistent with the permissions under which the data were provided (e.g. by permitting links to other databases to create 'new' information), behind closed doors and without independent audit. Currently there is a crisis emerging in which professionals are arguing that they are being compelled to compromise their ethical responsibilities to their patients, and government is responding that their measures are necessary to preserve access to quality data for research and planning. This paper proposes an integrated plan for managing these issues in a manner that is ethically sustainable, as well as in keeping with all provisions of the law, using a personal health card. PMID:19192327

  5. Older drivers' opinions of criteria that inform the cars they buy: A focus group study.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jenny; Porter, Michelle M; Polgar, Jan; Vrkljan, Brenda

    2013-12-01

    Safe driving in older adulthood depends not only on health and driving ability, but also on the driving environment itself, including the type of vehicle. However, little is known about how safety figures into the older driver's vehicle selection criteria and how it ranks among other criteria, such as price and comfort. For this purpose, six focus groups of older male and female drivers (n=33) aged 70-87 were conducted in two Canadian cities to explore vehicle purchasing decisions and the contribution of safety in this decision. Themes emerged from the data in these categories: vehicle features that keep them feeling safe, advanced vehicular technologies, factors that influence their car buying decisions, and resources that inform this decision. Results indicate older drivers have gaps with respect to their knowledge of safety features and do not prioritize safety at the time of vehicle purchase. To maximize the awareness and uptake of safety innovations, older consumers would benefit from a vehicle design rating system that highlights safety as well as other features to help ensure that the vehicle purchased fits their lifestyle and needs. PMID:23522914

  6. Health information science at UVic: the student perspective.

    PubMed

    Anglin, C R

    1989-11-01

    The graduates and students of the School of Health Information Science (HIS) at the University of Victoria (UVic) have pioneered the Canadian sphere in health informatics since 1982. After six years of growth this co-operative education program has matured and establishment of a research base and graduate school has become a recent focus. In this context an evaluation of the HIS curriculum and co-op work experience from the student perspective was undertaken. Eighty-five persons, including 50 upper level students were surveyed. Thirty-five graduates were tracked and queried regarding their present employment, job satisfaction, future goals and perception of their professional status. In particular, students were queried on the retrospective value and/or shortcomings of the HIS co-op program. Their perceptions on the training that they have had or that they observe as leading to successful careers is documented. The student view on the ascribed role of 'change agent' and concerns regarding the lack of professional identity are noted. The implications of these findings on the future form of the Health Information Science curriculum and the direction of its educational model are subsequently discussed. PMID:2622380

  7. Sources of Health Information Related to Preventive Health Behaviors in a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Nicole; Baer, Heather J.; Clark, Cheryl R.; Lipsitz, Stuart; Hicks, LeRoi S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Current literature suggests that certain sources of information are used in varying degrees among different socioeconomic and demographic groups; therefore, it is important to determine if specific classes of health information sources are more effective than others in promoting health behaviors. Purpose To determine if interpersonal versus mass media sources of health information are associated with meeting recommendations for health behaviors (nonsmoking, fruit/vegetable intake, and exercise) and cancer screening. Methods Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship of health information sources (mass media sources including print, TV, Internet; and interpersonal sources including friends and family, community organizations, and healthcare providers); with meeting recommendations for healthy behaviors and cancer screening in the 2005 and 2007 Health Information National Trends Surveys (HINTS). Analyses were conducted in 2009. Results In the 2005 HINTS, participants reporting use of print media and community organizations as sources of health information over the past year were mostly likely to meet recommendations for health behaviors. In the 2007 HINTS, utilization of healthcare providers for health information was associated with meeting recommendations for health behaviors, particularly cancer screening. Conclusions Use of print media and interpersonal sources of health information are most consistently associated with self-reported health behaviors. Additional research should explore the relationship of health information sources to clinical outcomes. Social network interventions to promote adoption of health behaviors should be further developed. PMID:20494238

  8. Focusing National Institutes of Health HIV/AIDS research for maximum population impact.

    PubMed

    Walensky, Rochelle P; Auerbach, Judith D

    2015-03-15

    Progress in advancing research on the pathophysiology, prevention, treatment, and impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is threatened by the decaying purchasing power of National Institutes of Health (NIH) dollars. A working group of the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council was charged by the NIH Director with developing a focused and concise blueprint to guide the use of limited funding over the next few years. Science priorities outlined by the working group and reported here are intended to maximally address individuals, groups, and settings most affected by the epidemic, and to redress shortcomings in realizing population-level HIV prevention, treatment, and eradication goals. Optimizing these priorities requires that traditional silos--defined by topic focus and by scientific discipline--be dissolved and that structural issues affecting the pipeline of new investigators and the ability of the Office of AIDS Research to fulfill its role of steward of the NIH HIV/AIDS research program be directly addressed. PMID:25422391

  9. Promoting women's health in hospitals: a focus on breastfeeding and lactation support for employees and patients.

    PubMed

    Belay, Brook; Allen, Jessica; Williams, Nancy; Dooyema, Carrie; Foltz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals often are one of the largest employers in communities, and nationwide, they employ more than 6.3 million employees. Hospitals also serve tens of millions of inpatients annually. Hospitals, therefore, can be leaders in worksite wellness and promoting breastfeeding and lactation support for new mothers. By adopting model standards and practices that promote breastfeeding, hospitals can influence women's health. This article focuses on the efforts of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity to promote breastfeeding and lactation support for hospital employees and patients. PMID:23215865

  10. The need for a behavioural science focus in research on mental health and mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Knappe, Susanne; Andersson, Gerhard; Araya, Ricardo; Banos Rivera, Rosa M; Barkham, Michael; Bech, Per; Beckers, Tom; Berger, Thomas; Berking, Matthias; Berrocal, Carmen; Botella, Christina; Carlbring, Per; Chouinard, Guy; Colom, Francesc; Csillag, Claudio; Cujipers, Pim; David, Daniel; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Essau, Cecilia A; Fava, Giovanni A; Goschke, Thomas; Hermans, Dirk; Hofmann, Stefan G; Lutz, Wolfgang; Muris, Peter; Ollendick, Thomas H; Raes, Filip; Rief, Winfried; Riper, Heleen; Tossani, Eliana; van der Oord, Saskia; Vervliet, Bram; Haro, Josep M; Schumann, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    Psychology as a science offers an enormous diversity of theories, principles, and methodological approaches to understand mental health, abnormal functions and behaviours and mental disorders. A selected overview of the scope, current topics as well as strength and gaps in Psychological Science may help to depict the advances needed to inform future research agendas specifically on mental health and mental disorders. From an integrative psychological perspective, most maladaptive health behaviours and mental disorders can be conceptualized as the result of developmental dysfunctions of psychological functions and processes as well as neurobiological and genetic processes that interact with the environment. The paper presents and discusses an integrative translational model, linking basic and experimental research with clinical research as well as population-based prospective-longitudinal studies. This model provides a conceptual framework to identify how individual vulnerabilities interact with environment over time, and promote critical behaviours that might act as proximal risk factors for ill-health and mental disorders. Within the models framework, such improved knowledge is also expected to better delineate targeted preventive and therapeutic interventions that prevent further escalation in early stages before the full disorder and further complications thereof develop. In contrast to conventional "personalized medicine" that typically targets individual (genetic) variation of patients who already have developed a disease to improve medical treatment, the proposed framework model, linked to a concerted funding programme of the "Science of Behaviour Change", carries the promise of improved diagnosis, treatment and prevention of health-risk behaviour constellations as well as mental disorders. PMID:24375534

  11. Health information systems in humanitarian emergencies.

    PubMed Central

    Thieren, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Health information systems (HIS) in emergencies face a double dilemma: the information necessary to understand and respond to humanitarian crises must be timely and detailed, whereas the circumstances of these crises makes it challenging to collect it. Building on the technical work of the Health Metrics Network on HIS and starting with a systemic definition of HIS in emergencies, this paper reviews the various data-collection platforms in these contexts, looking at their respective contributions to providing what humanitarian actors need to know to target their intervention to where the needs really are. Although reporting or sampling errors are unavoidable, it is important to identify them and acknowledge the limitations inherent in generalizing data that were collected in highly heterogeneous environments. To perform well in emergencies, HIS require integration and participation. In spite of notable efforts to coordinate data collection and dissemination practices among humanitarian agencies, it is noted that coordination on the ground depends on the strengths and presence of a lead agency, often WHO, and on the commitment of humanitarian agencies to investing resources in data production. Poorly integrated HIS generate fragmented, incomplete and often contradictory statistics, a situation that leads to a misuse of numbers with negative consequences on humanitarian interventions. As a means to avoid confusion regarding humanitarian health statistics, this paper stresses the importance of submitting statistics to a rigorous and coordinated auditing process prior to their publication. The audit trail should describe the various steps of the data production chains both technically and operationally, and indicate the limits and assumptions under which each number can be used. Finally emphasis is placed on the ethical obligation for humanitarian agencies to ensure that the necessary safeguards on data are in place to protect the confidentiality of victims and minority groups in politically sensitive contexts. PMID:16184277

  12. Project Summary for: Integrating and Mapping Community Health Assessment Information

    E-print Network

    Department: Pediatrics Goal: To develop an automated web-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS health information from a variety of data sources to support community health improvement planning public health statistics at different geographic levels. This infrastructure uses the Wisconsin Public

  13. Internet Use for Health Information among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escoffery, Cam; Miner, Kathleen R.; Adame, Daniel D.; Butler, Susan; McCormick, Laura; Mendell, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Use of the Internet to retrieve health information is increasingly common. The authors surveyed 743 undergraduate students at 2 academic institutions to examine their Internet use, health-seeking behaviors, and attitudes related to the use of the Internet to obtain health information. Fifty-three percent of the respondents indicated that they…

  14. Privacy and Security in Open and Trusted Health Information Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vicky Liu; William Caelli; Tony Sahama

    The Open and Trusted Health Information Systems (OTHIS) Research Group has formed in response to the health sector's privacy and security requirements for contemporary Health Information Systems (HIS). Due to recent research developments in trusted computing concepts, it is now both timely and desirable to move electronic HIS towards privacy-aware and security-aware applications. We introduce the OTHIS architecture in this

  15. Georgia AHEC Librarians Deliver Consumer Health Information to Rural Areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Poorbaugh; Mary V. Fielder; Lisa Smith

    2004-01-01

    AHEC librarians are forming traditional and nontraditional partners to deliver consumer health information. Through alliances with public libraries, public health departments, and hospitals\\/ clinics in 15 rural and four urban counties, training to locate quality consumer health information was provided to patrons, clients, and patients. This article will explain how funding was obtained, secrets to the programs' successes, and the

  16. IMPROVING THE SECURITY OF HEALTH CARE INFORMATION THROUGH ELECTRONIC MEANS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Thomson; Dalenca Pottas

    Around 40 years ago the health care sector began to look towards computers to help with the everyday functions that clinicians performed. While a good idea at the time, it took 20 years before the concept of a health care or health information system was truly accepted as the information and communication technology had matured enough to implement the systems.

  17. Linking Native Americans to Quality Health Information on the Internet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith L. Rieke

    2005-01-01

    Native Americans experience significant health problems. Teaching them how to access health information on the Internet has the potential to give them knowledge to maintain more healthy lifestyles, provide them with reliable information about their problems, and make them aware of possible treatment options. The staff at the Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences, University of North Dakota

  18. TITLE: ACCOUNTING OF DISCLOSURES OF A PATIENT'S PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    TITLE: ACCOUNTING OF DISCLOSURES OF A PATIENT'S PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION POLICY: Columbia of Disclosures listing the disclosure made of their Protected Health Information (PHI) by Columbia University Medical Center. PURPOSE: One of the rights granted to patient under the Health Insurance Portability

  19. Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information

    E-print Network

    Lichtarge, Olivier

    Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information Section 81.003 of the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code requires employers of persons who provide Mental Health Services to make inquiries, and former patients. Please read the following information regarding mental health services and providers

  20. AUTHORIZATION FOR RELEASE OF HEALTH INFORMATION I authorize: To release health information to

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    and Safety Code §120980(g)). _____ I specifically authorize the release of genetic testing information the relevant line(s) below: _____ I specifically authorize the release of HIV/AIDS test results (Health is voluntary. Treatment, payment, enrollment or eligibility for benefits may not be conditioned on signing

  1. Health Insurance Claim Review Using Information Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Sik; Speedie, Stuart M.; Yoon, Hojung; Lee, Jiseon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this paper is to describe the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA)'s payment request (PARE) system that plays the role of the gateway for all health insurance claims submitted to HIRA, and the claim review support (CRS) system that supports the work of claim review experts in South Korea. Methods This study describes the two systems' information technology (IT) infrastructures, their roles, and quantitative analysis of their work performance. It also reports the impact of these systems on claims processing by analyzing the health insurance claim data submitted to HIRA from April 1 to June 30, 2011. Results The PARE system returned to healthcare providers 2.7% of all inpatient claims (97,930) and 0.1% of all outpatient claims (317,007) as un-reviewable claims. The return rate was the highest for the hospital group as 0.49% and the lowest rate was found in clinic group. The CRS system's detection rate of the claims with multiple errors in inpatient and outpatient areas was 23.1% and 2.9%, respectively. The highest rate of error detection occurred at guideline check-up stages in both inpatient and outpatient groups. Conclusions The study found that HIRA's two IT systems had a critical role in reducing heavy administrative workloads through automatic data processing. Although the return rate of the problematic claims to providers and the error detection rate by two systems was low, the actual count of the returned claims was large. The role of IT will become increasingly important in reducing the workload of health insurance claims review. PMID:23115745

  2. Informed use of patients' records on trusted health care services.

    PubMed

    Sahama, Tony; Miller, Evonne

    2011-01-01

    Health care is an information-intensive business. Sharing information in health care processes is a smart use of data enabling informed decision-making whilst ensuring. the privacy and security of patient information. To achieve this, we propose data encryption techniques embedded Information Accountability Framework (IAF) that establishes transitions of the technological concept, thus enabling understanding of shared responsibility, accessibility, and efficient cost effective informed decisions between health care professionals and patients. The IAF results reveal possibilities of efficient informed medical decision making and minimisation of medical errors. Of achieving this will require significant cultural changes and research synergies to ensure the sustainability, acceptability and durability of the IAF. PMID:21335699

  3. Establishing a research agenda for Scientific and Technical Information (STI): Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  4. Establishing a research agenda for scientific and technical information (STI) - Focus on the user

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    This report addresses the relationship between library science and information science theory and practice, between the development of conceptual understanding, and the practical competence of information professionals. Consideration is given to the concept of research, linking theory with practice, and the reality of theory based practice. Attention is given to the need for research and research priorities, focus on the user and information-seeking behavior, and a user-oriented research agenda for STI.

  5. Health Problems with the Use of Information Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunduz, Semseddin

    2007-01-01

    The rapid and correct performance of computers, when accompanied by human skills, will lead to greater gains in productivity. This study focuses on the possible risks of computer use in terms of human health, rather than on the countless beneficial effects of its use on the issue of health. Health problems caused by inappropriate or inadequate use…

  6. Satisfaction with focused antenatal care service and associated factors among pregnant women attending focused antenatal care at health centers in Jimma town, Jimma zone, South West Ethiopia; a facility based cross-sectional study triangulated with qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Client satisfaction is essential for further improvement of quality of focused antenatal care and to provide uniform health care services for pregnant women. However, studies on level of client satisfaction with focused antenatal care and associated factors are lacking. So, the purpose of this study is to assess satisfaction with focused antenatal care service and associated factors among pregnant women attending focused antenatal care at health centers in Jimma town. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study involving both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection was used from Feb 1-30/2013. Three hundred eighty nine pregnant women those come to the health centers were included in the study. A semi-structured questionnaire and focus group discussion guide was employed to obtain the necessary information for this study. Quantitative data was analysed using SPSS for windows version 16.0. Logistic regression model was used to compare level of satisfaction by predictors’ variables. Qualitative data was analyzed based on thematic frameworks to support the quantitative results. Result More than half of the respondents (60.4%) were satisfied with the service that they received. As to specific components, most of the respondents (80.7%) were satisfied with interpersonal aspects, and 62.2% were satisfied with organization of health care aspect. Meanwhile, 49.9% of the respondents were not satisfied with technical quality aspect and 67.1% were not satisfied with physical environment aspect. Multivariate logistic regression analysis result showed that type of health center, educational status of mother, monthly income of the family, type of pregnancy and history of stillbirth were the predictors of the level of satisfaction. The study found out that dissatisfaction was high in mothers utilizing service at Jimma health center, in mothers with tertiary educational level, in mothers with average monthly family income >1000birr, in mothers with unplanned pregnancy and in mothers with history of stillbirth. Conclusions Even though greater percentages of women (60.4%) were satisfied with the focused antenatal care service, the level of satisfaction was lower compared to other studies. The investigator recommends that patient feedback should be recognized as a legitimate method of evaluating health services in the health center as a whole. PMID:24646407

  7. Information sharing between the National Health Service and criminal justice system in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Charlotte; Mason, Julie; McDonnell, Sharon; Shaw, Jenny; Senior, Jane

    2012-09-01

    Offenders with mental health problems often have complex and interrelated needs which separately challenge the criminal justice system (CJS) and National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom (U.K.). Consequently, interagency collaboration and timely information sharing are essential. This study focused on the sharing of information about people with mental health problems in contact with the CJS. Questionnaires were distributed to a range of health and criminal justice personnel. The results showed that there was a mismatch between what service user information criminal justice agencies felt they needed and what was routinely received. Prison Service staff received more information (between 15% and 37%) from health agencies than the police (between 6% and 22%). Health professionals received most of the information they needed from criminal justice agencies (between 55% and 85%). Sharing service user information was impeded by incompatible computer systems and restrictions due to data protection/confidentiality requirements. In the U.K., recent governmental publications have highlighted the importance of information sharing; however there remains a clear mismatch between what health related information about service users criminal justice agencies need, and what is actually received. Better guidance is required to encourage and empower people to share. PMID:22925128

  8. Information management in civil engineering infrastructural development: with focus on geological and geotechnical information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Tegtmeier; S. Zlatanova; P. J. M. Van Oosterom; H. R. G. K. Hack

    2009-01-01

    In civil engineering infrastructural projects, information exchange and (re-) use in and between involved parties is difficult. This is mainly caused by a lack of information harmonization. Various specialists are working together on the development of an infrastructural project and are all using their own specific software and definitions for the various information types. The variety of information types adds

  9. Using information technology to exchange health information among healthcare providers : measuring usage and understanding value

    E-print Network

    Rudin, Robert (Robert Samuel)

    2011-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) - the electronic exchange of health information among healthcare institutions - has been projected to hold enormous promise as an antidote to the fragmented healthcare delivery system in ...

  10. Low risk research using routinely collected identifiable health information without informed consent: encounters with the Patient Information Advisory Group.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, C; Martin, R M; Noble, S; Lane, J A; Hamdy, F C; Neal, D E; Donovan, J L

    2008-01-01

    Current UK legislation is impacting upon the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of medical record-based research aimed at benefiting the NHS and the public heath. Whereas previous commentators have focused on the Data Protection Act 1998, the Health and Social Care Act 2001 is the key legislation for public health researchers wishing to access medical records without written consent. The Act requires researchers to apply to the Patient Information Advisory Group (PIAG) for permission to access medical records without written permission. We present a case study of the work required to obtain the necessary permissions from PIAG in order to conduct a large scale public health research project. In our experience it took eight months to receive permission to access basic identifying information on individuals registered at general practices, and a decision on whether we could access clinical information in medical records without consent took 18 months. Such delays pose near insurmountable difficulties to grant funded research, and in our case 560,000pound of public and charitable money was spent on research staff while a large part of their work was prohibited until the third year of a three year grant. We conclude by arguing that many of the current problems could be avoided by returning PIAG's responsibilities to research ethics committees, and by allowing "opt-out" consent for many public health research projects. PMID:18156520

  11. Exploiting Personal Health Records in Automating Information Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juha Puustjärvi; Leena Puustjärvi

    2010-01-01

    Information therapy (Ix) is the prescription of specific, evidence-based medical information, to the right person, at right time to help that individual make a better health decision. We have investigated the usability of knowledge management technologies in automating the delivery of medical information in Ix. In our developed solution the content of personal health records as well as the medicinal

  12. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160

  13. Developing population interventions with migrant women for maternal-child health: a focused ethnography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Literature describing effective population interventions related to the pregnancy, birth, and post-birth care of international migrants, as defined by them, is scant. Hence, we sought to determine: 1) what processes are used by migrant women to respond to maternal-child health and psychosocial concerns during the early months and years after birth; 2) which of these enhance or impede their resiliency; and 3) which population interventions they suggest best respond to these concerns. Methods Sixteen international migrant women living in Montreal or Toronto who had been identified in a previous study as having a high psychosocial-risk profile and subsequently classified as vulnerable or resilient based on indicators of mental health were recruited. Focused ethnography including in-depth interviews and participant observations were conducted. Data were analyzed thematically and as an integrated whole. Results Migrant women drew on a wide range of coping strategies and resources to respond to maternal-child health and psychosocial concerns. Resilient and vulnerable mothers differed in their use of certain coping strategies. Social inclusion was identified as an overarching factor for enhancing resiliency by all study participants. Social processes and corresponding facilitators relating to social inclusion were identified by participants, with more social processes identified by the vulnerable group. Several interventions related to services were described which varied in type and quality; these were generally found to be effective. Participants identified several categories of interventions which they had used or would have liked to use and recommended improvements for and creation of some programs. The social determinants of health categories within which their suggestions fell included: income and social status, social support network, education, personal health practices and coping skills, healthy child development, and health services. Within each of these, the most common suggestions were related to creating supportive environments and building healthy public policy. Conclusions A wealth of data was provided by participants on factors and processes related to the maternal-child health care of international migrants and associated population interventions. Our results offer a challenge to key stakeholders to improve existing interventions and create new ones based on the experiences and views of international migrant women themselves. PMID:23672838

  14. The Combined Health Information Database (CHD) Online

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1997-01-01

    A joint project of the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this unified database of bibliographic records has been available to the public since 1985, and now sports a clean new interface. There are sixteen separately maintained databases that can be searched individually or at once, ranging from AIDS Education and Alzheimers Disease to Cancer Prevention and Weight Control. The simple search interface offers a single box into which keywords are entered. The detailed search interface allows the user to specify date of publication, media type, and language, and provides multiple query boxes that may be linked together by Boolean operators. Searches return lists of matches, from which individual bibliographic records (including abstracts) may be viewed. Reprint ordering procedures are also listed. Users may also browse information on the scope and coverage of each of the sixteen databases.

  15. Evaluating health information technology's clinical effects.

    PubMed

    Strom, Brian L; Schinnar, Rita

    2011-02-01

    In 2009 the federal government appropriated $34 billion in stimulus-related funding to promote the "meaningful use" of health information technology among Medicare and Medicaid providers and hospitals. One of the key elements of this technology is the adoption of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems for inpatient drug prescribing. The potential for CPOE to improve prescribing patterns and prevent adverse events is large, and as yet, unrealized. Amidst enthusiasm for the benefits of CPOE, providers and policymakers are becoming aware that CPOE could introduce new errors into the system and cannot simply be assumed to "work." This Issue Brief reports on the experience of one hospital system that used its CPOE to reduce the incidence of a serious drug interaction. This rigorous test of a specific CPOE intervention shows that an electronic alert system can be effective in changing prescribing, but may also have unintended consequences for patient safety. PMID:21365962

  16. Women Empowerment through Health Information Seeking: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikbakht Nasrabadi, Alireza; Sabzevari, Sakineh; Negahban Bonabi, Tayebeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Today, women empowering is an important issue.  Several methods have been introduced to empower women. Health information seeking is one of the most important activities in this regard. A wide range of capabilities have been reported as outcomes of health information seeking in several studies. As health information seeking is developed within personal-social interactions and also the health system context, it seems that the qualitative paradigm is appropriate to use in studies in this regard. This study aimed to explore how women’s empowerment through health information seeking is done. Methods In this qualitative content analysis study, data collection was done with regard to inclusion criteria, through purposive sampling by semi-structured interviews with 17 women and using documentation and field notes until data saturation. Qualitative data analysis was done constantly and simultaneous with data collection. Results Four central themes were emerged to explain women’s empowerment through health information seeking that included: a) Health concerns management with three subcategories of Better coping, Stress management, Control of situation, b) Collaborative care with two subcategories of Effective interaction with health professions and Participation in health decision making c) Individual development d) Self-protection with four sub- categories of Life style modification,  Preventive behaviors promoting, Self-care promoting, and  medication adherence. Conclusion The results of this study indicate the importance of women empowerment through foraging their health information seeking rights and comprehensive health information management. PMID:26005690

  17. Diffusion of personal health information services: self-determining and empowering practices for Manitoba Inuit.

    PubMed

    Clark, Wayne Voisey

    2014-01-01

    This article highlights findings from research conducted with the Manitoba Urban Inuit Association with regard to culturally safe practices for communicating personal health information services related to a provincial integrated electronic health record. By applying a "two-eyed seeing research approach," which incorporates traditional and Western scientific perspectives, the author describes Inuit cultural considerations when communicating electronic health concepts with a vision of advancing toward program evaluation opportunities. The research is supported by two Inuit-driven focus groups, interviews with three jurisdictional representatives of electronic health program delivery agencies and one interview with an Inuk elder. PMID:24844716

  18. Leveraging Health Information Exchange to Improve Population Health Reporting Processes: Lessons in Using a Collaborative-Participatory Design Process

    PubMed Central

    Revere, Debra; Dixon, Brian E.; Hills, Rebecca; Williams, Jennifer L.; Grannis, Shaun J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Surveillance, or the systematic monitoring of disease within a population, is a cornerstone function of public health. Despite significant investment in information technologies (IT) to improve the public’s health, health care providers continue to rely on manual, spontaneous reporting processes that can result in incomplete and delayed surveillance activities. Background: Participatory design principles advocate including real users and stakeholders when designing an information system to ensure high ecological validity of the product, incorporate relevance and context into the design, reduce misconceptions designers can make due to insufficient domain expertise, and ultimately reduce barriers to adoption of the system. This paper focuses on the collaborative and informal participatory design process used to develop enhanced, IT-enabled reporting processes that leverage available electronic health records in a health information exchange to prepopulate notifiable-conditions report forms used by public health authorities. Methods: Over nine months, public health stakeholders, technical staff, and informatics researchers were engaged in a multiphase participatory design process that included public health stakeholder focus groups, investigator-engineering team meetings, public health survey and census regarding high-priority data elements, and codesign of exploratory prototypes and final form mock-ups. Findings: A number of state-mandated report fields that are not highly used or desirable for disease investigation were eliminated, which allowed engineers to repurpose form space for desired and high-priority data elements and improve the usability of the forms. Our participatory design process ensured that IT development was driven by end user expertise and needs, resulting in significant improvements to the layout and functionality of the reporting forms. Discussion: In addition to informing report form development, engaging with public health end users and stakeholders through the participatory design process provided new insights into public health workflow and allowed the team to quickly triage user requests while managing user expectations within the realm of engineering possibilities. Conclusion: Engaging public health, engineering staff, and investigators in a shared codesigning process ensured that the new forms will not only meet real-life needs but will also support development of a product that will be adopted and, ultimately, improve communicable and infectious disease reporting by clinicians to public health. PMID:25848615

  19. In Sickness, Health, and Cyberspace: Protecting the Security of Electronic Private Health Information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharona Hoffman; Andy Podgurski

    2007-01-01

    The electronic processing of health information provides considerable benefits to patients and health care providers while at the same time creating serious risks to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. The Internet provides a conduit for rapid and uncontrolled dispersion and trafficking of illicitly obtained private health information, with far-reaching consequences to unsuspecting victims. To address such threats

  20. Feasibility of a patient decision aid regarding disclosure of personal health information: qualitative evaluation of the Health Care Information Directive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Shawn Tracy; Guilherme Coelho Dantas; Ross EG Upshur

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concerns regarding the privacy of health information are escalating owing both to the growing use of information technology to store and exchange data and to the increasing demand on the part of patients to control the use of their medical records. The objective of this study was to evaluate the Health Care Information Directive (HCID), a recently-developed patient decision

  1. Impact and user satisfaction of a clinical information portal embedded in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development. PMID:22016670

  2. Impact and User Satisfaction of a Clinical Information Portal Embedded in an Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development. PMID:22016670

  3. Electronic Health Systems: Integration of Inconsistent Information in Heterogeneous Multidatabase Health Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carole Alcock; Lois Burgess; Khin Than Win; Joan Cooper

    The ability to provide accurate, timely information to authorised health providers will unquestionably improve health care delivery. Essential to this is the development of Electronic Health Record Systems. Such systems will be dependent on accurate linking of data from disparate healthcare databases. Correct identification of Electronic Health Records(EHRs) through Universal Patient Identifiers(UPIs) and guaranteed integrity of content are two elements

  4. TITLE: RELEASING PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO PREVENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO HEALTH OR SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    TITLE: RELEASING PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION TO PREVENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO HEALTH OR SAFETY the patient's authorization in order to prevent a serious threat to health or safety. PURPOSE The purpose will not be made to prevent a serious threat to health or safety. Columbia University Medical Center

  5. 45 CFR 170.553 - Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules...Health and Human Services HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION...

  6. 45 CFR 170.553 - Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...false Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION...

  7. 45 CFR 170.553 - Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION...

  8. 45 CFR 170.553 - Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...false Certification of health information technology other than Complete EHRs and EHR Modules...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION...

  9. Pilot Study in the Development of an Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment for Sexual Health Interventions: A Focus Group Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, P. C.; Bustard, S.; Ferguson, E.; Carlin, E. M.; Neal, K.; Bowman, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    In the UK there are high rates of sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies amongst young people. There is limited and contradictory evidence that current sexual health education interventions are effective or that they improve access to appropriate sexual health services. This paper describes the outcome of focus group work with…

  10. Health Information Technology and Physician Career Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Keith T.; Wiltshire, Jacqueline C.; Rooks, Ronica N.; BeLue, Rhonda; Gary, Lisa C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Health information technology (HIT) and physician career satisfaction are associated with higher-quality medical care. However, the link between HIT and physician career satisfaction, which could potentially reduce provider burnout and attrition, has not been fully examined. This study uses a nationally representative survey to assess the association between key forms of HIT and career satisfaction among primary care physicians (PCPs) and specialty physicians. Methods We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of physician career satisfaction using the Community Tracking Study Physician Survey, 2004–2005. Nine specific types of HIT as well as the overall adoption of HIT in the practice were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Results Physicians who used five to six (odds ratio [OR] = 1.46) or seven to nine (OR = 1.47) types of HIT were more likely than physicians who used zero to two types of HIT to be “very satisfied” with their careers. Information technology usages for communicating with other physicians (OR = 1.31) and e-mailing patients (OR = 1.35) were positively associated with career satisfaction. PCPs who used technology to write prescriptions were less likely to report career satisfaction (OR = 0.67), while specialists who wrote notes using technology were less likely to report career satisfaction (OR = 0.75). Conclusions Using more information technology was the strongest positive predictor of physicians being very satisfied with their careers. Toward that end, healthcare organizations working in conjunction with providers should consider exploring ways to integrate various forms of HIT into practice. PMID:20808606

  11. 75 FR 3906 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ...Collection: Indian Health Service Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: Indian Health...Indian Health Service Customer Satisfaction Survey.'' Type of Information...Indian Health Service Customer Satisfaction Survey.''...

  12. HIPAA Policy 5100 Protected Health Information (PHI) Security Compliance

    E-print Network

    HIPAA Policy 5100 Protected Health Information (PHI) Security Compliance Responsible Office Office of the Provost Effective Date 08/17/10 Responsible Official Chief Information Officer & HIPAA Privacy Officer ................................................................................................................................................. 10 5100.18 Ensure computing Devices are Physically Secured

  13. Surveys assessing STI related health information needs of adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Morgan; Joshi, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Individuals are widely using different sources to acquire health information. To better understand the adolescents' needs of having tailored health information, it becomes important to assess the existing sources that they utilize to obtain that information. Our study objective was to identify sources of STI related health information studied among adolescents. A search was conducted using Google during November 2011 to January 2012 to identify different STI related health information sources. A combination of 3 key words including adolescent sexual health survey, sex health information survey, and sexual health education assessment were used. The first 20 weblinks from each search were combined resulting in a total of 60 primary weblinks. Secondary search was conducted to identify additional relevant articles. A total of 10 articles were found relevant, of which 52% were non US-based. 87% of the primary articles were excluded as they did not gather the source of STI related health information in their surveys. Most common sources assessed were TV, doctor, books, magazines, friends, and parents. Internet was assessed only in 3 of the final 10 articles. Future research should be done to assess role of internet as a possible source of disseminating STI related health information among adolescents. PMID:23000558

  14. Forensic focused treatment planning: a new standard for forensic mental health systems.

    PubMed

    Schaufenbil, Robert J; Kornbluh, Rebecca; Stahl, Stephen M; Warburton, Katherine D

    2015-06-01

    Almost no literature addresses treatment planning for the forensic psychiatric patient. In the absence of such guidance, recovery-oriented multifocal treatment planning has been imported into forensic mental health systems from community psychiatric settings, despite the fact that conditions of admission and discharge are vastly different for forensic psychiatry inpatients. We propose that instead of focusing on recovery, forensic treatment planning should prioritize forensic outcomes, such as restoration of trial competence or mitigation of violence risk, as the first steps in a continuum of care that eventually leads to the patient's ability to resolve forensic issues and return to the community for recovery-oriented care. Here we offer a model for treatment planning in the forensic setting. PMID:25801440

  15. Reducing Oral Health Disparities: A Focus on Social and Cultural Determinants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald L Patrick; Rosanna Shuk Yin Lee; Michele Nucci; David Grembowski; Carol Zane Jolles; Peter Milgrom

    2006-01-01

    Oral health is essential to the general health and well-being of individuals and the population. Yet significant oral health disparities persist in the U.S. population because of a web of influences that include complex cultural and social processes that affect both oral health and access to effective dental health care. This paper introduces an organizing framework for addressing oral health

  16. Health Beliefs and Practices Related to Dengue Fever: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Li Ping; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2013-01-01

    Background This qualitative study aimed to provide an in-depth understanding of the meaning of dengue fever (DF) amongst people living in a dengue endemic region, dengue prevention and treatment-seeking behaviours. The Health Belief Model was used as a framework to explore and understand dengue prevention behaviours. Methods A total of 14 focus group discussions were conducted with 84 Malaysian citizens of different socio-demographic backgrounds between 16th December, 2011 and 12th May, 2012. Results The study revealed that awareness about DF and prevention measures were high. The pathophysiology of dengue especially dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) were rarely known; as a result, it was seen as deadly by some but was also perceived as easily curable by others without a basis of understanding. Young adults and elderly participants had a low perception of susceptibility to DF. In general, the low perceived susceptibility emerged as two themes, namely a perceived natural ability to withstand infection and a low risk of being in contact with the dengue virus vector, Aedes spp. mosquitoes. The barriers to sustained self-prevention against dengue prevention that emerged in focus groups were: i) lack of self-efficacy, ii) lack of perceived benefit, iii) low perceived susceptibility, and iv) unsure perceived susceptibility. Low perceived benefit of continued dengue prevention practices was a result of lack of concerted action against dengue in their neighborhood. Traditional medical practices and home remedies were widely perceived and experienced as efficacious in treating DF. Conclusion Behavioural change towards attaining sustainability in dengue preventive practices may be enhanced by fostering comprehensive knowledge of dengue and a change in health beliefs. Wide use of unconventional therapy for DF warrants the need to enlighten the public to limit their reliance on unproven alternative treatments. PMID:23875045

  17. Special Communication Consumer-mediated health information exchanges: The 2012 ACMI

    E-print Network

    Cimino, James J.

    Protection Act of 1998 ­ all of which addressed the issue of patient access to their own records. The topicSpecial Communication Consumer-mediated health information exchanges: The 2012 ACMI debate James J Organizations Should Shift Their Principal Focus to Consumer-Mediated Exchange in Order to Facilitate the Rapid

  18. Unconventional natural gas development and public health: toward a community-informed research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Korfmacher, Katrina Smith; Elam, Sarah; Gray, Kathleen M.; Haynes, Erin; Hughes, Megan Hoert

    2015-01-01

    Unconventional natural gas development (UNGD) using high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) has vastly increased the potential for domestic natural gas production in recent years. However, the rapid expansion of UNGD has also raised concerns about its potential impacts on public health. Academics and government agencies are developing research programs to explore these concerns. Community involvement in activities such as planning, conducting, and communicating research is widely recognized as having an important role in promoting environmental health. Historically, however, communities most often engage in research after environmental health concerns have emerged. This community information needs assessment took a prospective approach to integrating community leaders' knowledge, perceptions, and concerns into the research agenda prior to initiation of local UNGD. We interviewed community leaders about their views on environmental health information needs in three states (New York, North Carolina, and Ohio) prior to widespread UNGD. Interviewees emphasized the cumulative, long-term, and indirect determinants of health, as opposed to specific disease outcomes. Responses focused not only on information needs, but also on communication and transparency with respect to research processes and funding. Interviewees also prioritized investigation of policy approaches to effectively protect human health over the long term. Although universities were most often cited as a credible source of information, interviewees emphasized the need for multiple strategies for disseminating information. By including community leaders' concerns, insights, and questions from the outset, the research agenda on UNGD is more likely to effectively inform decision making that ultimately protects public health. PMID:25204212

  19. Unconventional natural gas development and public health: toward a community-informed research agenda.

    PubMed

    Korfmacher, Katrina Smith; Elam, Sarah; Gray, Kathleen M; Haynes, Erin; Hughes, Megan Hoert

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional natural gas development (UNGD) using high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") has vastly increased the potential for domestic natural gas production in recent years. However, the rapid expansion of UNGD has also raised concerns about its potential impacts on public health. Academics and government agencies are developing research programs to explore these concerns. Community involvement in activities such as planning, conducting, and communicating research is widely recognized as having an important role in promoting environmental health. Historically, however, communities most often engage in research after environmental health concerns have emerged. This community information needs assessment took a prospective approach to integrating community leaders' knowledge, perceptions, and concerns into the research agenda prior to initiation of local UNGD. We interviewed community leaders about their views on environmental health information needs in three states (New York, North Carolina, and Ohio) prior to widespread UNGD. Interviewees emphasized the cumulative, long-term, and indirect determinants of health, as opposed to specific disease outcomes. Responses focused not only on information needs, but also on communication and transparency with respect to research processes and funding. Interviewees also prioritized investigation of policy approaches to effectively protect human health over the long term. Although universities were most often cited as a credible source of information, interviewees emphasized the need for multiple strategies for disseminating information. By including community leaders' concerns, insights, and questions from the outset, the research agenda on UNGD is more likely to effectively inform decision making that ultimately protects public health. PMID:25204212

  20. Health information law in the context of minors.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Abramson, Susan; MacTaggart, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a legal overview of privacy and autonomy considerations related to children in the context of health information technology adoption and use. All uses of health-related technologies take place within a legal framework that guides health care generally; the privacy laws and autonomy principles long predate health information technology and can be expected to shape its design and use. Furthermore, it is a legal tenet that technology advances shape the law, and this can be expected as health information technology use evolves. Most laws related to health care, medical practice, and the right to privacy are state-based and subject to high variability. As the health information revolution increasingly eliminates the importance of geographic boundaries to health care, interstate tensions can be expected to grow. Health information privacy law is even more complex in the case of children, because the relationship between privacy law and children is itself complex. The law considers minor children to be deserving of special protection against harm and risk exposure, and this concern extends to privacy. Regardless of whether minors can shield health information from parents, it is clear that parents and children have the power to control the flow of information to and among entities. Although information protections may pose a higher standard where information about children is concerned, this fact should not overshadow the extent to which information can be used under existing legal principles. Over time, as the security and safety of information sharing are established, the law may yet evolve to permit a freer flow of information. PMID:19088227

  1. Activity-based Management in France: A focus on the information systems department of a bank

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the Activity-based Costing and Management methods applied in France. For that purpose, we use a literature-Saxon countries and that the methods are strategically oriented. Keywords-Activity based costing; activity-based1 Activity-based Management in France: A focus on the information systems department of a bank

  2. FOCUS TERRAThe Earth Science Research and Information Centre of ETH Zurich

    E-print Network

    Gilli, Adrian

    FOCUS TERRAThe Earth Science Research and Information Centre of ETH Zurich Discover the Wonders. Housed within the Department of Earth Sciences the exhibition builds a bridge between scientists scientists and students. The striking architecture of the Earth Sciences' building and the exhibition tower

  3. Project Information Form Project Title Eco-Driving to Reduce Emissions Trucks (Behavioral Focus)

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Information Form Project Title Eco-Driving to Reduce Emissions ­ Trucks (Behavioral Focus the transportation sector, a variety of eco-driving techniques are being developed that show great promise. Eco/decelerations, vehicle energy consumption can be significantly reduced. To date, the majority of eco-driving studies have

  4. Project Information Form Project Title Eco-Driving to Reduce Emissions Cars (Behavioral Focus)

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Information Form Project Title Eco-Driving to Reduce Emissions ­ Cars (Behavioral Focus with both an up-to-date review of eco-driving outcomes and an understanding of how those outcomes depend interventions to assure potential improvements are realized. While eco-driving research has developed

  5. Distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health.

    PubMed

    Diomidous, Marianna; Zikos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Distributed systems and grid computing systems are used to connect several computers to obtain a higher level of performance, in order to solve a problem. During the last decade, projects use the World Wide Web to aggregate individuals' CPU power for research purposes. This paper presents the existing active large scale distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health. There have been found and presented 11 active projects with more than 2000 Processing Units (PUs) each. The research focus for most of them is molecular biology and, specifically on understanding or predicting protein structure through simulation, comparing proteins, genomic analysis for disease provoking genes and drug design. Though not in all cases explicitly stated, common target diseases include research to find cure against HIV, dengue, Duchene dystrophy, Parkinson's disease, various types of cancer and influenza. Other diseases include malaria, anthrax, Alzheimer's disease. The need for national initiatives and European Collaboration for larger scale projects is stressed, to raise the awareness of citizens to participate in order to create a culture of internet volunteering altruism. PMID:22491123

  6. The transitioning experiences of internationally-educated nurses into a Canadian health care system: A focused ethnography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Beyond well-documented credentialing issues, internationally-educated nurses (IENs) may need considerable support in transitioning into new social and health care environments. This study was undertaken to gain an understanding of transitioning experiences of IENs upon relocation to Canada, while creating policy and practice recommendations applicable globally for improving the quality of transitioning and the retention of IENs. Methods A focused ethnography of newly-recruited IENs was conducted, using individual semi-structured interviews at both one-to-three months (Phase 1) and nine-to-twelve months post-relocation (Phase 2). A purposive sample of IENs was recruited during their orientation at a local college, to a health authority within western Canada which had recruited them for employment throughout the region. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, and data was managed using qualitative analytical software. Data analysis was informed by Roper and Shapira's framework for focused ethnography. Results Twenty three IENs consented to participate in 31 interviews. All IENs which indicated interest during their orientation sessions consented to the interviews, yet 14 did not complete the Phase 2 interview due to reorganization of health services and relocation. The ethno-culturally diverse group had an average age of 36.4 years, were primarily educated to first degree level or higher, and were largely (under) employed as "Graduate Nurses". Many IENs reported negative experiences related to their work contract and overall support upon arrival. There were striking differences in nursing practice and some experiences of perceived discrimination. The primary area of discontentment was the apparent communication breakdown at the recruitment stage with subsequent discrepancy in expected professional role and financial reimbursement. Conclusions Explicit and clear communication is needed between employers and recruitment agencies to avoid employment contract misunderstandings and to enable clear interpretation of the credentialing processes. Pre-arrival orientation of IENs including health care communications should be encouraged and supported by the recruiting institution. Moreover, employers should provide more structured and comprehensive workplace orientation to IENs with consistent preceptorship. Similar to findings of many other studies, diversity should be valued and incorporated into the professional culture by nurse managers. PMID:21693059

  7. Health & Safety Information For Students in Teaching Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Krstic, Miroslav

    Health & Safety Information For Students in Teaching Laboratories Working with or around teaching animals and animal wastes can expose students to health and safety risks. The most common risk. If you have known allergy to the animal species in this class or if you have other health concerns about

  8. HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STUDENT MUSICIANS

    E-print Network

    Adali, Tulay

    HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STUDENT MUSICIANS Introduction The UMBC students and faculty of health and safety issues, hazards, and procedures inherent in practice, performance and faculty of the connections between musicians' health, the suitability and safety of equipment

  9. Alcohol and your health Research-based information from the

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Alcohol and your health Research-based information from the National Institutes of Health U Institutes of Health on alcohol use and its consequences. Alcohol use by adults in the United States* 7 in 10 for alcoholism, liver disease, and other problems *Although the minimum legal drinking age in the U.S. is 21

  10. Applications of Electronic Health Information in Public Health: Uses, Opportunities & Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Tomines, Alan; Readhead, Heather; Readhead, Adam; Teutsch, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health information systems can reshape the practice of public health including public health surveillance, disease and injury investigation and control, decision making, quality assurance, and policy development. While these opportunities are potentially transformative, and the federal program for the Meaningful Use (MU) of electronic health records (EHRs) has included important public health components, significant barriers remain. Unlike incentives in the clinical care system, scant funding is available to public health departments to develop the necessary information infrastructure and workforce capacity to capitalize on EHRs, personal health records, or Big Data. Current EHR systems are primarily built to serve clinical systems and practice rather than being structured for public health use. In addition, there are policy issues concerning how broadly the data can be used by public health officials. As these issues are resolved and workable solutions emerge, they should yield a more efficient and effective public health system. PMID:25848571

  11. Big Data and Smart Health Strategies: Findings from the Health Information Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize excellent current research in the field of Health Information Systems. Method Creation of a synopsis of the articles selected for the 2014 edition of the IMIA Yearbook. Results Four papers from international peer reviewed journals were selected and are summarized. Conclusions Selected articles illustrate current research regarding the impact and the evaluation of health information technology and the latest developments in health information exchange. PMID:25123731

  12. TITLE: DISPOSAL OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION POLICY & PURPOSE

    E-print Network

    Salzman, Daniel

    TITLE: DISPOSAL OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION POLICY & PURPOSE: To assure confidential/or devices, please see link below to Information Security Policy. https://secure.cumc.columbia.edu/cumcit/secure/security information including patient and research information is disposed of in an appropriate manner. PROCEDURE

  13. An argument against the focus on Community Resilience in Public Health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that Public Health professionals focus on community resilience in tackling chronic problems, such as poverty and deprivation; is this approach useful? Discussion Resilience is always i) of something ii) to something iii) to an endpoint, as in i) a rubber ball, ii) to a blunt force, iii) to its original shape. “Community resilience” might be: of a neighbourhood, to a flu pandemic, with the endpoint, to return to normality. In these two examples, the endpoint is as-you-were. This is unsuitable for some examples of resilience. A child that is resilient to an abusive upbringing has an endpoint of living a happy life despite that upbringing: this is an as-you-should-be endpoint. Similarly, a chronically deprived community cannot have the endpoint of returning to chronic deprivation: so what is its endpoint? Roughly, it is an as-you-should-be endpoint: to provide an environment for inhabitants to live well. Thus resilient communities will be those that do this in the face of challenges. How can they be identified? One method uses statistical outliers, neighbourhoods that do better than would be expected on a range of outcomes given a range of stressors. This method tells us that a neighbourhood is resilient but not why it is. In response, a number of researchers have attributed characteristics to resilient communities; however, these generally fail to distinguish characteristics of a good community from those of a resilient one. Making this distinction is difficult and we have not seen it successfully done; more importantly, it is arguably unnecessary. There already exist approaches in Public Health to assessing and developing communities faced with chronic problems, typically tied to notions such as Social Capital. Community resilience to chronic problems, if it makes sense at all, is likely to be a property that emerges from the various assets in a community such as human capital, built capital and natural capital. Summary Public Health professionals working with deprived neighbourhoods would be better to focus on what neighbourhoods have or could develop as social capital for living well, rather than on the vague and tangential notion of community resilience. PMID:24447588

  14. The Public Health Information Network (PHIN) Preparedness Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Loonsk, John W.; McGarvey, Sunanda R.; Conn, Laura A.; Johnson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    The Public Health Information Network (PHIN) Preparedness initiative strives to implement, on an accelerated pace, a consistent national network of information systems that will support public health in being prepared for public health emergencies. Using the principles and practices of the broader PHIN initiative, PHIN Preparedness concentrates in the short term on ensuring that all public health jurisdictions have, or have access to, systems to accomplish known preparedness functions. The PHIN Preparedness initiative defines functional requirements, technical standards and specifications, and a process to achieve consistency and interconnectedness of preparedness systems across public health. PMID:16221945

  15. Information empowerment: predeparture resource training for students in global health.

    PubMed

    Rana, Gurpreet K

    2014-04-01

    The Taubman Health Sciences Library (THL) collaborates with health sciences schools to provide information skills instruction for students preparing for international experiences. THL enhances students' global health learning through predeparture instruction for students who are involved in global health research, clinical internships, and international collaborations. This includes teaching international literature searching skills, providing country-specific data sources, building awareness of relevant mobile resources, and encouraging investigation of international news. Information skills empower creation of stronger global partnerships. Use of information resources has enhanced international research and training experiences, built lifelong learning foundations, and contributed to the university's global engagement. THL continues to assess predeparture instruction. PMID:24860266

  16. Health and safety information program for hazardous materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. OBrien; N. J. Fallon; A. V. Kuehner

    1979-01-01

    The system is used as a management tool in several safety and health programs. It is used to: trace the use of hazardous materials and to determine monitoring needs; inform the occupational physician of the potential health problems associated with materials ordered by a given individual; inform the fire and rescue group of hazardous materials in a given building; provide

  17. Public Access to Health Information: A Psychoanalyst's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Examines cultural and personal factors which may affect an individual's request for medical information from a librarian and the concept of the librarian as "educator-catalyst" working with health care professionals, highlighting self-destructive tendencies of society, negative effects of some advertising, the flood tide of health information, and…

  18. Computer Self-Efficacy among Health Information Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Dorothy Marie

    2011-01-01

    Roles and functions of health information professionals are evolving due to the mandated electronic health record adoption process for healthcare facilities. A knowledgeable workforce with computer information technology skill sets is required for the successful collection of quality patient-care data, improvement of productivity, and…

  19. Informal electronic waste recycling: A sector review with special focus on China

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Xinwen, E-mail: x.chi@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Streicher-Porte, Martin [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Technology and Society Laboratory, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Wang, Mark Y.L. [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Reuter, Markus A. [Outotec Pty Ltd., Melbourne, 12 Kitchen Road, Dandenong, VIC 3175 (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Informal recycling is a new and expanding low cost recycling practice in managing Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE or e-waste). It occurs in many developing countries, including China, where current gaps in environmental management, high demand for second-hand electronic appliances and the norm of selling e-waste to individual collectors encourage the growth of a strong informal recycling sector. This paper gathers information on informal e-waste management, takes a look at its particular manifestations in China and identifies some of the main difficulties of the current Chinese approach. Informal e-waste recycling is not only associated with serious environmental and health impacts, but also the supply deficiency of formal recyclers and the safety problems of remanufactured electronic products. Experiences already show that simply prohibiting or competing with the informal collectors and informal recyclers is not an effective solution. New formal e-waste recycling systems should take existing informal sectors into account, and more policies need to be made to improve recycling rates, working conditions and the efficiency of involved informal players. A key issue for China's e-waste management is how to set up incentives for informal recyclers so as to reduce improper recycling activities and to divert more e-waste flow into the formal recycling sector.

  20. Analysis of the Purpose of State Health Departments' Tweets: Information Sharing, Engagement, and Action

    PubMed Central

    Neiger, Brad L; Burton, Scott H; Thackeray, Callie R

    2013-01-01

    Background Public health agencies are actively using social media, including Twitter. In the public health and nonprofit sectors, Twitter has been limited to one-way communication. Two-way, interactive communication on Twitter has the potential to enhance organizational relationships with followers and help organizations achieve their goals by increasing communication and dialog between the organization and its followers. Research shows that nonprofit organizations use Twitter for three main functions: information sharing, community building, and action. Objective It is not known whether state health departments are using Twitter primarily for one-way information sharing or if they are trying to engage followers to build relationships and promote action. The purpose of this research was to discover what the primary function of Twitter use is among state health departments in the United States and whether this is similar to or different from nonprofit organizations. Methods A complete list of “tweets” made by each state health department account was obtained using the Twitter application programming interface. We randomly sampled 10% of each state health department’s tweets. Four research assistants hand-coded the tweets’ primary focus (organization centric or personal health information centric) and then the subcategories of information dissemination, engagement, or action. Research assistants coded each tweet for interactivity, sophistication, and redirects to another website. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results There were 4221 tweets from 39 state health departments. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of tweets made by a state health department and the state population density (P=.25). The majority of tweets focused on personal health topics (69.37%, 2928/4221) while one-third were tweets about the organization (29.14% , 1230/4221). The main function of organization-based tweets was engagement through conversations to build community (65.77%, 809/1236). These engagement-related tweets were primarily recognition of other organizations’ events (43.6%, 353/809) and giving thanks and recognition (21.4%, 173/809). Nearly all of the personal health information-centric tweets involved general public health information (92.10%, 1399/1519) and 79.03% (3336/4221) of tweets directed followers to another link for more information. Conclusions This is the first study to assess the purpose of public health tweets among state health departments. State health departments are using Twitter as a one-way communication tool, with tweets focused primarily on personal health. A state health department Twitter account may not be the primary health information source for individuals. Therefore, state health departments should reconsider their focus on personal health tweets and envision how they can use Twitter to develop relationships with community agencies and partners. In order to realize the potential of Twitter to establish relationships and develop connections, more two-way communication and interaction are essential. PMID:24217361

  1. Towards sustainability of health information systems: how can we define, measure and achieve it?

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Hullin, Carola M; Chen, Rong; Schuler, Thilo; Gränz, Jana; Knaup, Petra; Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2007-01-01

    Health information systems (HIS) in their current form are rarely sustainable. In order to sustain our health information systems and with it our health systems, we need to focus on defining and maintaining sustainable Health Information System building blocks or components. These components need to be easily updatable when clinical knowledge (or anything else) changes, easily adaptable when business requirements or processes change, and easily exchangeable when technology advances. One major prerequisite for this is that we need to be able to define and measure sustainability, so that it can become one of the major business drivers in HIS development. Therefore, this paper analyses general definitions and indicators for sustainability, and analyses their applicability to HIS. We find that general 'Emergy analysis' is one possibility to measure sustainability for HIS. Based on this, we investigate major enablers and inhibitors to sustainability in a highlevel framework consisting of four pillars: clinical, technical, socio-technical, and political/business. PMID:17911901

  2. Reducing Oral Health Disparities: A Focus on Social and Cultural Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Donald L; Lee, Rosanna Shuk Yin; Nucci, Michele; Grembowski, David; Jolles, Carol Zane; Milgrom, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Oral health is essential to the general health and well-being of individuals and the population. Yet significant oral health disparities persist in the U.S. population because of a web of influences that include complex cultural and social processes that affect both oral health and access to effective dental health care. This paper introduces an organizing framework for addressing oral health disparities. We present and discuss how the multiple influences on oral health and oral health disparities operate using this framework. Interventions targeted at different causal pathways bring new directions and implications for research and policy in reducing oral health disparities. PMID:16934121

  3. Defining Information Needs for Public Health Systems and Services Research

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: People who lead or manage public health agencies have multiple needs for information in order to do their jobs effectively. In seeking to investigate “what works” in public health practice, investigators in the field of public health systems and services research (PHSSR) have largely overlapping information needs but often require a greater detail, specificity, or comprehensiveness than is routinely available in public health data systems. PHSSR Data Needs Meeting: On April 24, 2014, the PHSSR Center of the University of Kentucky and AcademyHealth convened a 1-day meeting of public health practitioners and PHSSR investigators to identify PHSSR information needs. Meeting participants considered data needs for three PHSSR domains: the organization of public health agencies and services, the use of rapidly evolving health information technologies, and the financing and economic evaluation of public health activities. Future Data Needs: Identifying data needs in these and other PHSSR domains requires clarification of research questions, consideration of research methods, a balance of imagination and practicality, and investments to extend the information captured in existing administrative, financial, and population health monitoring systems. PMID:25848628

  4. Use of online health information resources by American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Geana, Mugur V; Daley, Christine Makosky; Nazir, Niaman; Cully, Lance; Etheridge, Jesse; Bledowski, Caroline; Choi, Won S; Greiner, K Allen

    2012-08-01

    According to the Office of Minority Health, an estimated 4.9 million people living in the United States consider themselves American Indian or Alaska Native, either alone or in combination with one or more races/ethnicities. American Indians or Alaska Natives comprise a racial/ethnic group experiencing serious health disparities, with little if any improvement in health outcomes over the past several decades. This study was designed to explore use of the Internet as a health information source among American Indians in the Central Plains region of the United States. The authors recruited 998 Natives in the region from May 2008 to December 2009 at powwows, health fairs, focus groups, career fairs and conferences, and other social and cultural events, and asked them to complete a self-administered survey. Although compared with data from the general population, American Indians or Alaska Natives in this sample may seem to be more frequent Internet users, their use of modern wireless devices is limited, and their use of the Internet to access health information is lower in comparison with the adult U.S. population. Natives living in the Central Plains region face generational differences in general and health-related use of the Internet. Inadequate availability of culturally appropriate health information websites may drive American Indians or Alaska Natives toward search engines and general information websites. PMID:22642739

  5. [Inequities in access to information and inequities in health].

    PubMed

    Filho, Alberto Pellegrini

    2002-01-01

    This piece presents evidence that inequities in information are an important determinant of health inequities and that eliminating these inequities in access to information, especially by using new information and communication technologies (ICTs), could represent a significant advance in terms of guaranteeing the right to health for all. The piece reviews the most important international scientific research findings on the determinants of the health of populations, emphasizing the role of socioeconomic inequities and of deteriorating social capital as factors that worsen health conditions. It is noteworthy that Latin America has both socioeconomic inequities and major sectors of the population living in poverty. Among the fundamental strategies for overcoming the inequalities and the poverty are greater participation by the poor in civic life and the strengthening of social capital. The contribution that the new ICTs could make to these strategies is analyzed, and the Virtual Health Library (VHL) is discussed. Coordinated by the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information (BIREME), the VHL is a contribution by the Pan American Health Organization that takes advantage of the potential of ICTs to democratize information and knowledge and consequently promote equity in health. The "digital gap" is discussed as something that can produce inequity itself and also increase other inequities, including ones in health. Prospects are discussed for overcoming this gap, emphasizing the role that governments and international organizations should play in order to expand access to the global public good that information for social development is. PMID:12162837

  6. Application of information technology: Developing data content specifications for the Nationwide Health Information Network Trial Implementations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilad J. Kuperman; Jeffrey S. Blair; Richard A. Franck; Savithri Devaraj; Alexander F. H. Low

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the Department of Health and Human Services commissioned the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) Trial Implementations project to demonstrate the secure exchange of data among health information exchange organizations around the country. The project's Core Services Content Work Group (CSCWG) developed the content specifications for the project. The CSCWG developed content specifications for a summary patient record and

  7. Electronic Health Information Literacy: An Investigation of the Electronic Health Information Knowledge and Skills of Health Education Majors 

    E-print Network

    Hanik, Bruce Walter

    2012-07-16

    Health educators are expected to serve as resource of health knowledge and being e-health literate enable health educators to perform that function. However, the e-health literacy level of health education undergraduate students is rarely explored...

  8. The Associations between Health Literacy, Reasons for Seeking Health Information, and Information Sources Utilized by Taiwanese Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Mi-Hsiu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the associations between health literacy, the reasons for seeking health information, and the information sources utilized by Taiwanese adults. Method: A cross-sectional survey of 752 adults residing in rural and urban areas of Taiwan was conducted via questionnaires. Chi-squared tests and logistic regression were used for…

  9. The BC health information standards council 1 Presented at the International Medical Informatics Association Working Group 16 Conference on Standardisation in Medical Informatics, `Towards International Consensus and Cooperation', Bermuda, September 11–13, 1997. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James H Coward

    1998-01-01

    The establishment of a British Columbia (BC) Health Information Standards Council is one of the strategies that is helping to develop and implement BCs vision for health information management. This vision is of effectively and efficiently managed information that enables informed decision making to achieve the results desired in our health system. The Council focuses on the identification of standards

  10. Consumer access to health information on the internet: health policy implications

    PubMed Central

    Scott, W Guy; Scott, Helen M; Auld, Terry S

    2005-01-01

    Background Providers of health care usually have much better information about health and health care interventions than do consumers. The internet is an important and rapidly evolving source of global health-related information and could provide a means of correcting for asymmetric information. However, little is known about who accesses this information and how it is used in New Zealand. The aims of this research were to: determine the nature of the health information sought, how respondents use the information, how helpful they perceive the information to be, and the self-assessed value of such information. Methods The researchers conducted an anonymous five minute telephone and mall intercept survey of randomly selected Wellington residents who had searched for health-related information on the internet. Investigators entered the data into an Excel spreadsheet and transferred it to SPSS for data cleaning, data exploration and statistical analysis. Search time costs were based on the opportunity cost of income foregone and respondents were asked to provide a money value for the information found. Results Eighty-three percent of respondents accessed the internet from home, and 87% conducted the search for themselves. Forty-five percent of people were looking for general health and nutrition information, 42% for data about a specific illness and 40% for a medicine. After finding the information, 58% discussed it with a family member/ friend/ workmate, 36% consulted a general practitioner, 33% changed their eating or drinking habits, and 13% did nothing. Respondents found the information very quick to find and useful. It took them on average 0.47 hours and cost $12 (opportunity cost of time) to find the information. The average value of the data found was $60 and the net benefit to the consumer was $48 ($60 – $12). Conclusion The results of this research could assist providers of health information via the internet to tailor their websites to better suit users' needs. Given the high perceived value of internet health information (greater than the average general practitioner fee) and the fact that some of the information found may be unreliable or even unsafe a valuable public health policy initiative would be to provide an improved New Zealand health information website containing information on how to evaluate data sourced from the world-wide-web and links to a range of useful and trustworthy health information sites. PMID:15985172

  11. Semantic interoperability between clinical and public health information systems for improving public health services.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd G M E

    2007-01-01

    Improving public health services requires comprehensively integrating all services including medical, social, community, and public health ones. Therefore, developing integrated health information services has to start considering business process, rules and information semantics of involved domains. The paper proposes a business and information architecture for the specification of a future-proof national integrated system, concretely the requirements for semantic integration between public health surveillance and clinical information systems. The architecture is a semantically interoperable approach because it describes business process, rules and information semantics based on national policy documents and expressed in a standard language such us the Unified Modeling Language UML. Having the enterprise and information models formalized, semantically interoperable Health IT components/services development is supported. PMID:17901617

  12. Reinsurance of health insurance for the informal sector.

    PubMed Central

    Dror, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    Deficient financing of health services in low-income countries and the absence of universal insurance coverage leaves most of the informal sector in medical indigence, because people cannot assume the financial consequences of illness. The role of communities in solving this problem has been recognized, and many initiatives are under way. However, community financing is rarely structured as health insurance. Communities that pool risks (or offer insurance) have been described as micro-insurance units. The sources of their financial instability and the options for stabilization are explained. Field data from Uganda and the Philippines, as well as simulated situations, are used to examine the arguments. The article focuses on risk transfer from micro-insurance units to reinsurance. The main insight of the study is that when the financial results of micro-insurance units can be estimated, they can enter reinsurance treaties and be stabilized from the first year. The second insight is that the reinsurance pool may require several years of operation before reaching cost neutrality. PMID:11477971

  13. Effects of Individual Health Topic Familiarity on Activity Patterns During Health Information Searches

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Koichi; Fukui, Ken–ichi; Numao, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-medical professionals (consumers) are increasingly using the Internet to support their health information needs. However, the cognitive effort required to perform health information searches is affected by the consumer’s familiarity with health topics. Consumers may have different levels of familiarity with individual health topics. This variation in familiarity may cause misunderstandings because the information presented by search engines may not be understood correctly by the consumers. Objective As a first step toward the improvement of the health information search process, we aimed to examine the effects of health topic familiarity on health information search behaviors by identifying the common search activity patterns exhibited by groups of consumers with different levels of familiarity. Methods Each participant completed a health terminology familiarity questionnaire and health information search tasks. The responses to the familiarity questionnaire were used to grade the familiarity of participants with predefined health topics. The search task data were transcribed into a sequence of search activities using a coding scheme. A computational model was constructed from the sequence data using a Markov chain model to identify the common search patterns in each familiarity group. Results Forty participants were classified into L1 (not familiar), L2 (somewhat familiar), and L3 (familiar) groups based on their questionnaire responses. They had different levels of familiarity with four health topics. The video data obtained from all of the participants were transcribed into 4595 search activities (mean 28.7, SD 23.27 per session). The most frequent search activities and transitions in all the familiarity groups were related to evaluations of the relevancy of selected web pages in the retrieval results. However, the next most frequent transitions differed in each group and a chi-squared test confirmed this finding (P<.001). Next, according to the results of a perplexity evaluation, the health information search patterns were best represented as a 5-gram sequence pattern. The most common patterns in group L1 were frequent query modifications, with relatively low search efficiency, and accessing and evaluating selected results from a health website. Group L2 performed frequent query modifications, but with better search efficiency, and accessed and evaluated selected results from a health website. Finally, the members of group L3 successfully discovered relevant results from the first query submission, performed verification by accessing several health websites after they discovered relevant results, and directly accessed consumer health information websites. Conclusions Familiarity with health topics affects health information search behaviors. Our analysis of state transitions in search activities detected unique behaviors and common search activity patterns in each familiarity group during health information searches. PMID:25783222

  14. Occupational Competency Profile for Health Occupations Education Program: Health Agency Assessment. Information Series: Report No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Norma J.

    This assessment instrument is intended to provide health occupations teachers and state departments of education with information needed to revise and improve the curriculum used in training prospective health occupations teachers and in updating certification requirements for practicing health care professionals. The profile lists the…

  15. COMMUNICATING PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY POP HEALTH SCIENCES 660 (1 credit)

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 COMMUNICATING PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATION EFFECTIVELY POP HEALTH SCIENCES 660 (1 credit) Summer to help students improve their ability to communicate with different audiences. From the news media to legislators, and from written to oral communication, students will learn strategies for health communication

  16. A Study on a Home Health Care Support Information System for Health Evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Inada; H. Horio; K. Nakazawa; Y. Sekita; T. Yamanaka; E. Harasawa; H. Hosaka; K. Ishikawa

    1998-01-01

    The need for home health care has been increasing in Japan and the application of various techniques such as medical informatics are desired to support home health care services. Therefore, we developed an information system for health evaluation of the elderly including patients at home by applying a multifunctional telephone set and an IC memory card, by which complaints, symptoms,

  17. Factors influencing health information technology adoption in Thailand's community health centers: Applying the UTAUT model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boonchai Kijsanayotin; Supasit Pannarunothai; Stuart M. Speedie

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundOne of the most important factors for the success of health information technology (IT) implementation is users’ acceptance and use of that technology. Thailand has implemented the national universal healthcare program and has been restructuring the country's health IT system to support it. However, there is no national data available regarding the acceptance and use of health IT in many

  18. Enhancing Health Literacy through Accessing Health Information, Products, and Services: An Exercise for Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brey, Rebecca A.; Clark, Susan E.; Wantz, Molly S.

    2007-01-01

    The second National Health Education Standard states the importance of student demonstration of the ability to access valid health information and services. The teaching technique presented in this article provides an opportunity for children and adolescents to develop their health literacy and advocacy skills by contributing to a class resource…

  19. Digital focusing of OCT images based on scalar diffraction theory and information entropy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guozhong; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a digital method that is capable of automatically focusing optical coherence tomography (OCT) en face images without prior knowledge of the point spread function of the imaging system. The method utilizes a scalar diffraction model to simulate wave propagation from out-of-focus scatter to the focal plane, from which the propagation distance between the out-of-focus plane and the focal plane is determined automatically via an image-definition-evaluation criterion based on information entropy theory. By use of the proposed approach, we demonstrate that the lateral resolution close to that at the focal plane can be recovered from the imaging planes outside the depth of field region with minimal loss of resolution. Fresh onion tissues and mouse fat tissues are used in the experiments to show the performance of the proposed method. PMID:23162717

  20. Evaluating health information systems: an assessment of frameworks.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, R

    1997-01-01

    The rapid increase in investments for computerised systems is a major concern for all health organisations. Questions about these investments arise as information technology is only one of the areas that are competing for a finite amount of resources. There is also some concern that some of the failures of information technology would have been detected if proper evaluation of information systems were conducted. The state of the art of evaluating information systems shows changes from a very positivist approach to more comprehensive approaches that would incorporate multiple methods. This paper presents an assessment of the techniques and methods for information systems evaluation, followed by an application to a case study in community health to illustrate the value of the contextualist approach to evaluation. The paper argues for the use of longitudinal, contextualist approaches to information systems evaluation if decision-makers seek to improve the situation of information systems in the health industry. PMID:10173701

  1. The diamond level health promoting schools (DLHPS) program for reduced child obesity in Thailand: lessons learned from interviews and focus groups.

    PubMed

    Phaitrakoon, Jaruwan; Powwattana, Arpaporn; Lagampan, Sunee; Klaewkla, Jeeranun

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity prevalence among children is increasing globally. Health promoting school policy has been initiated in Thailand to tackle this problem. The schools that best conduct obesity management programs are rated as diamond level health promoting schools (DLHPS). However, the methods used by these schools and their efficacies have not been well-documented. This qualitative study aims to analyze the processes and activities used by four DLHPSs in obesity management programs. In-depth interviews were used to obtain information from school directors, teachers, and cooks, whereas focus group discussions were used for students. School-based obesity management programs have resulted from health promoting school policy and the increasing prevalence of overweight students. Teamwork has been a key strategy in program implementation. Policy diffusion and division of labor have been effected by school directors. A monitoring process is put in place to ensure program delivery. The most evident success factor in the present study has been intersectoral cooperation. Challenges have included confusion about the criteria in obtaining the DLHPS status, parental involvement, and students' resistance to consume vegetables and other healthy foods. From the student focus groups discussions, three activities were most valued: class health and nutrition learning; provision of healthy foods and drinks, together with removal of soft drinks and seasoning from the cafeteria; and exercise for health. Intersectoral cooperation is the key success factor for the operationality of DLHPS, especially in making healthy foods available and physical activity the norm, at school and home. PMID:24901100

  2. Role of Information in Consumer Selection of Health Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sainfort, François; Booske, Bridget C.

    1996-01-01

    Considerable efforts are underway in the public and private sectors to increase the amount of information available to consumers when making health plan choices. The objective of this study was to examine the role of information in consumer health plan decisionmaking. A computer system was developed which provides different plan descriptions with the option of accessing varying types and levels of information. The system tracked the information search processes and recorded the hypothetical plan choices of 202 subjects. Results are reported showing the relationship between information and problem perception, preference structure, choice of plan, and attitude towards the decision. PMID:10165036

  3. Are employees informed about their health care coverage? Evidence from the buyers health care action group.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jean; Feldman, Roger; Carlin, Caroline; Christianson, Jon; Davis, Linda

    2005-07-01

    More than half of all Americans receive health insurance coverage through an employer. The rising costs and escalating complexity of health insurance has led many employers to embark on extensive employee education campaigns. In 2002, 1,365 randomly selected employees from 16 Buyers Health Care Action Group firms in the Minneapolis region were surveyed to evaluate their awareness of employer-provided health plan quality information and the extent to which this information influences their enrollment decisions. The study found mixed evidence with respect to the value of employer communication. On one hand, employer communication does not significantly increase the probability that an employee responded correctly to the pharmacy benefit question posed in the survey. However, employer communication has a large effect on the awareness of quality information. How well those campaigns work, and by extension how well employees are informed about the health benefits decisions they make, is a key issue in health care today. PMID:16060483

  4. [Information and communication technologies in health institutions: the inevitable encounter].

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rosa Maria Neves; Lourenço, Carlos Alberto Machado

    2007-01-01

    It is widely known that the health sector is a complex area within the socio-political context of a country, and we all, as citizens, have something to say about this topic. In a way, our health depends partly on the correct use of Information and Communication Technologies. This work seeks to introduce and promote the impact of information technologies on health organisations, leading them to feel the need to update their procedures, equipment and applications. This scientific article should allow the reader to understand the importance of technological innovations and the provision of technical support in improving the quality of health. PMID:18372535

  5. A gender-informed model to train community health workers in maternal mental health.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan V; Kruse-Austin, Anna

    2015-08-01

    The New Haven Mental Health Outreach for MotherS (MOMS) Partnership is a community-academic partnership that works to develop public health approaches to ensure that pregnant and parenting women living in the City of New Haven achieve the highest possible level of mental health. The MOMS Partnership developed a training model for community health workers specializing in maternal mental health. Six community health workers (termed Community Mental Health Ambassadors or CMHAs) were trained on key topics in this gender-informed maternal mental health curriculum. Pre- and post-test questionnaires assessed changes in attitudes, perceived self-efficacy and control using standardized scales. The results indicated preliminary acceptability of the training curriculum in transforming knowledge and attitudes about maternal mental health among community health workers. PMID:25534578

  6. Addressing the Changing Sources of Health Information in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alishahi-Tabriz, Amir; Sohrabi, Mohammad-Reza; Kiapour, Nazanin; Faramarzi, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Following the entrance of new technologies in health information era, this study aimed to assess changes in health information sources of Iranian people during past decade. Methods: Totally 3000 people were asked about their main sources of health information. They were selected as two community-based samples of 1500 people of more than 18-years-old in two different periods of time in August 2002 and August 2010 from the same locations in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Data analyzed based on age group, sex, educational level and household income in two different periods of time using Chi-square. Odds ratios associated with each basic characteristic were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Most common sources of health information in 2002 were radio and television (17.7%), caregivers (14.9%) and internet (14.2%) and in 2010 were radio and television (19.3%), internet (19.3%) and caregivers (15.8%) (P < 0.001). In 2010, young adults female used television and radio and male used internet as the main source of health information (P = 0.003). In moderate educational level women got their health information from radio and television and caregivers; while men used radio and television and internet as main source of health information (P = 0.005). Highly educated women and men mainly got their health information from internet and radio and television (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Although during 8 years of study radio and television remained as main source of health information but there is an increasing tendency to use internet especially in men. Policymakers should revise their broadcasting strategies based on people demand. PMID:23412519

  7. Supporting cancer patients' unanchored health information management with mobile technology

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    , Seattle, WA Abstract Cancer patients often need to manage care-related information when they are away from that HealthWeaver Mobile can help patients to access care-related information from anywhere, to capture. The enhanced ability to manage information, in turn, helps patients to manage their care and to feel more

  8. UNIVERSITY OF UTAH HEALTH SCIENCES CONFIDENTIALITY AND INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Feschotte, Cedric

    UNIVERSITY OF UTAH HEALTH SCIENCES CONFIDENTIALITY AND INFORMATION SECURITY AGREEMENT WIKI - 1.1A Form - Confidentiality and Information Security Agreement.doc Rev: 08/13/2007 This form is a condition the UUHSC Confidentiality and Information Security Agreement, in its entirety. Name (Please Print): Assigned

  9. Information systems for health sector monitoring in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Cibulskis, R. E.; Hiawalyer, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes (i). how a national health information System was designed, tested and implemented in Papua New Guinea, (ii). how the system was integrated with other management information systems, and (iii). how information has been used to support decision-making. It concludes that central coordination of systems design is essential to make sure that information systems are aligned with government priorities and can deliver the information required by managers. While there is often scope for improving the performance of existing information systems, too much emphasis can be placed on revising data collection procedures and creating the perfect information system. Data analysis, even from imperfect systems, can stimulate greater interest in information, which can improve the quality and completeness of reporting and encourage a more methodical approach to planning and monitoring services. Our experience suggests that senior decision-makers and political leaders can play an important role in creating a culture of information use. By demanding health information, using it to formulate policy, and disseminating it through the channels open to them, they can exert greater influence in negotiations with donors and other government departments, encourage a more rational approach to decision-making that will improve the operation of health services, and stimulate greater use of information at lower levels of the health system. The ability of information systems to deliver these benefits is critical to their sustainability. PMID:12378295

  10. Using wikis as an online health information resource.

    PubMed

    Younger, P

    Wikis can be a powerful online resource for the provision and sharing of information, with the proviso that information found on them should be independently verified. This article defines wikis and sets them in context with recent developments on the internet. The article discusses the use of Wikipedia and other wikis as potential sources of health information for nurses. PMID:20527486

  11. Transforming Health Care through Information Technology. Report to the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Office of the President, Washington, DC.

    This is one in a series of reports to the President and Congress developed by the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) on key contemporary issues in information technology. This report argues that significant improvements in health care would be possible if modern clinical information systems were widely implemented and a…

  12. A Security Mediator for Health Care Information Gio Wiederhold \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Wiederhold, Gio

    A Security Mediator for Health Care Information Gio Wiederhold \\Lambda Stanford University, CA) project addresses a security issue that arises when some information is being shared among collaborating in the protection of medical information that is starting to arise as the basic infrastructure for secure

  13. The health periodicals database: full-text access to consumer and technical health information.

    PubMed

    Lingle, V A

    1990-01-01

    The HEALTH PERIODICALS DATABASE, produced by the Information Access Company, is a unique online file which provides full-text access to both general interest health-related literature and key technical resources in the medical field. Available on DIALOG and CompuServe, the database is described as a useful tool for information on the health, fitness, and nutrition industries. Special features of the database are reviewed and comparisons are made with resources of similar scope. PMID:10110097

  14. Information needs in public health and health policy: Results of recent studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick W. O'Carroll; Marjorie A. Cahn; Ione Auston; Catherine R. Selden

    1998-01-01

    Conclusion  Clearly, much work needs to be done to address the diverse and sometimes unique on-line information needs of public health\\u000a professionals and health policy analysts. In some cases, there are needs for complex new knowledge bases created via linkages\\u000a among multiple databases (e.g., public health-relevant geographic information systems).\\u000a \\u000a However, in many other cases, what is needed is a more systematic

  15. Inform Health Soc Care . Author manuscript Determinants of the frequency of online health information seeking

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    seeking between men, women, the general population and people who work in the health sector. Health status changed health management and health-care utilization for health-care professionals and patients desire in patients to assume more responsibilities in the management of their health. Their perception

  16. Using Exploratory Focus Groups to Inform the Development of Targeted COPD Self-Management Education DVDs for Rural Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study assessed the self-management learning needs, experiences, and perspectives of COPD patients treated at a Certified Federal Rural Health Clinic to inform the development of a COPD self-management DVD. A purposive, homogeneous sample of COPD patients participated in focus group interviews. Data from these interviews were referenced to edit a library of Rvision COPD self-management DVDs into a single condensed DVD containing only the most pertinent self-management topics. Patients reported a lack of knowledge and skill development related to purse lipped breathing, controlled coughing, and stress management; while medication management skills were found to be quite adequate. Engaging rural communities in formal qualitative inquiries to describe COPD specific needs for self-management may lead to future use of educational technologies aimed at improving quality of life for these rural, hard to reach populations. PMID:20672021

  17. Meaning of Health-related Quality of Life among Children and Adolescents in an Asian Country: A Focus Group Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. L. Wee; H. X. Chua; S. C. Li

    2006-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the extent to which HRQoL instruments developed based on the Western notion of health is applicable\\u000a to Asian children and adolescents by assessing their conceptualization of QoL. A secondary objective is to evaluate the necessity\\u000a of developing age- or gender-specific HRQoL instruments. Methods: We explored the meaning of general and health-related QoL through focus group

  18. Effectiveness of eHealth Interventions and Information Needs in Palliative Care: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ganzinger, Matthias; Perez-Lu, Jose; Knaup, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the key components in palliative care is communication. eHealth technologies can be an effective way to support communications among participants in the process of palliative care. However, it is unclear to what extent information technology has been established in this field. Objective Our goal was to systematically identify studies and analyze the effectiveness of eHealth interventions in palliative care and the information needs of people involved in the palliative care process. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search using PubMed, Embase, and LILACS according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We collected and analyzed quantitative and qualitative data regarding effectiveness of eHealth interventions and users’ information needs in palliative care. Results Our search returned a total of 240 articles, 17 of which met our inclusion criteria. We found no randomized controlled trial studying the effects of eHealth interventions in palliative care. Studies tended to be observational, noncontrolled studies, and a few quasi-experimental studies. Overall there was great heterogeneity in the types of interventions and outcome assessments; some studies reported some improvement on quality of care, documentation effort, cost, and communications. The most frequently reported information need concerned pain management. Conclusions There is limited evidence around the effectiveness of eHealth interventions for palliative care patients, caregivers, and health care professionals. Focused research on information needs and high-quality clinical trials to assess their effectiveness are needed. PMID:24610324

  19. Electronic Health Records: Permanent, Private, and Informative | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology ( http://healthit.hhs.gov/ ) What is an electronic health record? An electronic health record is a systematic collection of information about a patient's health. It contains such things ...

  20. Development of Information Security-Focused Incident Prevention Measures for Critical Information Infrastructure in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Takahito; Nagayasu, Yukinobu

    In recent years, the dilemma of cyber attacks by malicious third parties targeting security vulnerabilities in information and communication systems has emerged, resulting in security incidents. This situation suggests that the establishment of proactive efforts and recurrence prevention measures are becoming imperative, especially in critical infrastructure sectors.This paper provides an analysis of 58 security incident cases, which occurred in critical infrastructures worldwide and were published in media. The purpose of the analysis is to conclude to a valid list of recurrence prevention measures that constitute good practices.

  1. Privacy-Related Context Information for Ubiquitous Health

    PubMed Central

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Ruotsalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Background Ubiquitous health has been defined as a dynamic network of interconnected systems. A system is composed of one or more information systems, their stakeholders, and the environment. These systems offer health services to individuals and thus implement ubiquitous computing. Privacy is the key challenge for ubiquitous health because of autonomous processing, rich contextual metadata, lack of predefined trust among participants, and the business objectives. Additionally, regulations and policies of stakeholders may be unknown to the individual. Context-sensitive privacy policies are needed to regulate information processing. Objective Our goal was to analyze privacy-related context information and to define the corresponding components and their properties that support privacy management in ubiquitous health. These properties should describe the privacy issues of information processing. With components and their properties, individuals can define context-aware privacy policies and set their privacy preferences that can change in different information-processing situations. Methods Scenarios and user stories are used to analyze typical activities in ubiquitous health to identify main actors, goals, tasks, and stakeholders. Context arises from an activity and, therefore, we can determine different situations, services, and systems to identify properties for privacy-related context information in information-processing situations. Results Privacy-related context information components are situation, environment, individual, information technology system, service, and stakeholder. Combining our analyses and previously identified characteristics of ubiquitous health, more detailed properties for the components are defined. Properties define explicitly what context information for different components is needed to create context-aware privacy policies that can control, limit, and constrain information processing. With properties, we can define, for example, how data can be processed or how components are regulated or in what kind of environment data can be processed. Conclusions This study added to the vision of ubiquitous health by analyzing information processing from the viewpoint of an individual’s privacy. We learned that health and wellness-related activities may happen in several environments and situations with multiple stakeholders, services, and systems. We have provided new knowledge regarding privacy-related context information and corresponding components by analyzing typical activities in ubiquitous health. With the identified components and their properties, individuals can define their personal preferences on information processing based on situational information, and privacy services can capture privacy-related context of the information-processing situation. PMID:25100084

  2. [The role of information in public health decision-making].

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Public health, prevention, health education and health promotion are inseparable from the concepts of information and communication. Information should respond as much as possible to the needs of professionals, decision-makers, and consumers who are more and more concerned and conscious of its importance in light of "information overload", various dissemination channels and the multiplicity of its sources. There are numerous issues at stake ranging from comprehension, to the validation of health information, health education, health promotion, prevention, decision-making, as well as issues related to knowledge and power. Irrespective of the type of choice to be made, the need for information, knowledge, and know-how is inseparable from that of other tools or regulatory measures required for decision-making. Information is the same as competence, epidemiological and population data, health data, scientific opinion, and expert conferences--all are needed to assist in decision-making. Based on the principle of precaution, information must increasingly take into account the rejection of a society which often reasons on the basis of a presumption of zero-risk, in an idealistic manner, and which also excludes the possibility of new risks. The consumer positions himself as the regulator of decisions, specifically those with regard to the notion of acceptable level of risk. All of the actors involved in the health system are or become at one moment or another public health decision-makers. Their decision might be based either on an analytical approach, or on an intuitive approach. Although the act of decision-making is the least visible part of public health policy, it is certainly the driving force. This process should integrate the perspective of all of the relevant players, including consumers, who are currently situated more and more frequently at the heart of the health system. Public health decision-making is conducted as a function of political, strategic and environmental issues; of lobbies and their power; and of social maturation. Decision-making is a necessity. Making the right choice at the right time requires high quality information, and it is often necessary to respect a certain amount of time for reflection and ripening of an issue in order to make the best possible decision. The media and consumers play an increasingly significant role in public health decision-making and in the ensuing legislative consequences and debates which come as a result. Access to information is changing, especially thanks to the Internet which is completely modifying the global scenery of knowledge and know-how. Information supports decision-making with calculated risk, and it offers the opportunity to make choices and decisions, recognising that "to choose, is sometimes to relinquish". PMID:19014090

  3. Examining health information-seeking behaviors of older adults.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Shomir; Le, Thai; White, Cathy; Thompson, Hilaire; Demiris, George

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to examine which resources older adults utilize for their health information needs, how trustworthy and reliable they find these resources, and the difficulties they face in obtaining health-related information. A 41-item survey designed to understand the information-seeking characteristics of older adults was developed and distributed to retirement communities. Some items were taken from the Health Information National Trends Survey. Of 1520 surveys, 403 were returned completed (26.6%). Respondents' mean age was 77.65 years. Average scores indicated respondents trusted particular sources of health information in the following order (highest to lowest): health care providers, pharmacists, friends and relatives, retirement community staff, newspapers, the Internet, television, and the radio. In conclusion, older adults have a greater amount of trust in a person with whom they are able to actively discuss their health as opposed to a nonliving source, which they have to access or manipulate, such as the Internet. Efforts must be made to help older adults better navigate and utilize the Internet and recognize dependable online sources so that they may increase their trust in its use, thereby increasing satisfaction with their own ability to seek and use sources of health information. PMID:23974574

  4. Examining Health Information–Seeking Behaviors of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    CHAUDHURI, SHOMIR; LE, THAI; WHITE, CATHY; THOMPSON, HILAIRE; DEMIRIS, GEORGE

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine which resources older adults utilize for their health information needs, how trustworthy and reliable they find these resources, and the difficulties they face in obtaining health-related information. A 41-item survey designed to understand the information-seeking characteristics of older adults was developed and distributed to retirement communities. Some items were taken from the Health Information National Trends Survey. Of 1520 surveys, 403 were returned completed (26.6%). Respondents’ mean age was 77.65 years. Average scores indicated respondents trusted particular sources of health information in the following order (highest to lowest): health care providers, pharmacists, friends and relatives, retirement community staff, newspapers, the Internet, television, and the radio. In conclusion, older adults have a greater amount of trust in a person with whom they are able to actively discuss their health as opposed to a nonliving source, which they have to access or manipulate, such as the Internet. Efforts must be made to help older adults better navigate and utilize the Internet and recognize dependable online sources so that they may increase their trust in its use, thereby increasing satisfaction with their own ability to seek and use sources of health information. PMID:23974574

  5. Evaluating Online Sources of Health Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information should make it easy for people to learn who is responsible for posting the information. They ... magazine, remember: The authors may not have expert knowledge in this area. They may not say where ...

  6. The effect of health benefit information on consumers health value, attitudes and intentions.

    PubMed

    Tudoran, Alina; Olsen, Svein Ottar; Dopico, Domingo C

    2009-06-01

    This research explored the effect of health benefit information on individuals' stated health value, attitudes towards functional/enriched foods, expectations, perceptions, and intentions to purchase a new fibre-enriched fish product. The study used a randomized design involving an experimental group receiving fibre and health information on the product and a control group who did not receive such information. The results indicated that consumers in the experimental group scored higher on the average attitudes towards functional/enriched foods than did consumers in the control group. No significant differences were observed for other variables. Following a value-attitude-behaviour approach, the study proposed a model relating consumers' health value to their attitudes towards functional/enriched foods, attitudes towards the new functional product and intention to purchase the product, and tested how information affected the structural model. Four of the seven relationships in the structural model proved to be moderated by information. For example, the results indicated that information constrained the association between the health value and product-related health perceptions or hedonic expectations, when individuals had negative attitudes towards the functional/enriched food products. Overall, the study advances the existing literature on the effects of information on consumer behaviour by adding insights into how information simultaneously influenced the mean values and the relationships among the health value, attitudinal factors and intention. PMID:19501752

  7. 75 FR 2013 - Health Information Technology: Initial Set of Standards, Implementation Specifications, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ...Technology HITECH Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health HITSP Healthcare Information Technology Standards Panel HL7 Health...under a contract with HHS, the Healthcare Information Technology Standards Panel...

  8. 77 FR 51805 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Announcement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ...Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Announcement of Requirements...Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. Award Approving Official...Coordinator for Health Information Technology. ACTION: Notice...importantly, any failure of our healthcare system to adequately...

  9. 25 CFR 43.17 - Release of information for health or safety emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. 43.17 Section... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. (a) Educational...information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or other...

  10. 25 CFR 43.17 - Release of information for health or safety emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. 43.17 Section... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. (a) Educational...information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or other...

  11. 25 CFR 43.17 - Release of information for health or safety emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. 43.17 Section... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. (a) Educational...information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or other...

  12. 25 CFR 43.17 - Release of information for health or safety emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. 43.17 Section... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. (a) Educational...information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or other...

  13. 25 CFR 43.17 - Release of information for health or safety emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. 43.17 Section... Release of information for health or safety emergencies. (a) Educational...information is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or other...

  14. Background Informal Problem Statement QC Confidence Intervals Illustrations Women's Health Initiative Simultaneous Confidence Intervals with more

    E-print Network

    Stark, Philip B.

    Background Informal Problem Statement QC Confidence Intervals Illustrations Women's Health Informal Problem Statement QC Confidence Intervals Illustrations Women's Health Initiative Outline Bounds Illustrations Women's Health Initiative #12;Background Informal Problem Statement QC Confidence

  15. Health Information in German (Deutsch): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools You Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? German (Deutsch) URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih. ... medlineplus/languages/german.html Health Information in German (Deutsch) To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  16. National Library of Medicine Guide to Finding Health Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources Might Help Me with My Research? These web pages that may help you with research: Frequently Asked Reference and Consumer Health Questions including pill identification, lab test results, directories, codes, statistics, and more. MedlinePlus ® information ...

  17. Health Information in Italian (italiano): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? Italian (italiano) URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/italian.html Health Information in Italian (italiano) To use ...

  18. Health Information in Amharic (amarunya): MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? Amharic (amarunya) URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/amharic.html Health Information in Amharic (amarunya) To use ...

  19. Beyond Pregnancy Gingivitis: Bringing a New Focus to Women's Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redford, Maryann

    1993-01-01

    Research on women's dental health and on differences between men's and women's dental health issues is reviewed. Factors specifically influencing women's health, including medical, economic, social, psychological, and behavioral factors, are also examined. It is argued that the clustering of risk factors for women indicates a need for more…

  20. Adolescent Transitions: Risk-Taking and Health. Growing Up Well. Focus on Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindis, Claire

    This report, fifth of eight in a series, highlights the views of California parents and other adults about issues affecting the health of adolescents, the role communities play in helping young people grow up well, and policies to address behaviors that undermine their health. Six in 10 parents surveyed by the California Center for Health

  1. Supporting information mapping in Health Informatics via integrated message transformation

    E-print Network

    Grundy, John

    in commercializing our basic research to produce a successful new product. Keywords: Systems integration, Electronic simplifies building such integration infrastructure. Our system allows health systems integrators to specify message exchange system is used to communicate between the data source and data target health information

  2. Application and Evaluation of Personal Health Information Management System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eung-Hun Kim; Maisie Wang; Christopher Lau; Yongmin Kim

    2004-01-01

    A web-based patient-centered personal health record (PHR), called the Personal Health Information Management System (PHIMS), has been developed and its usability has been evaluated in conjunction with a referral system, called the Facilitated Accurate Referral Management System (FARMS). To estimate the system requirements of PHIMS for wider clinical use, we have also studied PHIMS usage by analyzing server log files.

  3. Public Access to Health Information: A Librarian's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Rhea Joyce

    1983-01-01

    Provides an individual's response to article by Dr. Paul Kay in the same issue of "RQ" regarding the use of health care information. Patron's health-related needs, the role of the librarian, the reference interview, and bibliotherapy are highlighted. Five references are listed. (EJS)

  4. Information Technology Adoption and Procedural Performance in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yunfeng

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies two specific topics on information technologies in health care industry. (1) The status and change of integrated health care delivery system level IT spending and hospital level IT adoption between 1999 and 2006. (2) The potential link between hospital level IT adoptions and quality as quantified by procedural performance…

  5. Why Adolescents Use a Computer-Based Health Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Robert P.; And Others

    The Body Awareness Resource Network (BARN) is a system of interactive computer programs designed to provide adolescents with confidential, nonjudgmental health information, behavior change strategies, and sources of referral. These programs cover five adolescent health areas: alcohol and other drugs, human sexuality, smoking prevention and…

  6. Health information systems training for a countrywide implementation in Uruguay

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alvaro Margolis; Alvaro Vero

    Health Information systems training is one of the bottlenecks in clinical systems implementation. In this article, a strategy to massively create and train interdisciplinary coordinating teams is described for a project in Uruguay, which includes 23 health care institutions across the country and a tertiary referral center in Montevideo.

  7. National Institutes of Health Clinical Center PATIENT INFORMATION SHEET

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    and arrive at your first appointment. NIH Campus Access and Clinical Center Parking There are three campusNational Institutes of Health Clinical Center PATIENT INFORMATION SHEET Welcome to the NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10) at the National Institutes of Health. Thank you for agreeing to participate

  8. Balancing Good Intentions: Protecting the Privacy of Electronic Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClanahan, Kitty

    2008-01-01

    Electronic information is a vital but complex component in the modern health care system, fueling ongoing efforts to develop a universal electronic health record infrastructure. This innovation creates a substantial tension between two desirable values: the increased quality and utility of patient medical records and the protection of the privacy…

  9. Predictors of Informal Health Payments: The Example from Turkey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hacer Özgen; Bayram Sahin; Paolo Belli; Mehtap Tatar; Peter Berman

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the factors that can affect informal health payments in Turkey, which is pertinent given that Turkey\\u000a has been undergoing and considering a series of reforms in the health sector. This paper aims to examine the predictors of\\u000a informal payments in Turkey. The study surveyed a random sample of 3,727 people in a medium-sized city, of whom

  10. Strategic approach to information security and assurance in health research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shunichi Akazawa; Manabu Igarashi; Hirofumi Sawa; Hiko Tamashiro

    2005-01-01

    Information security and assurance are an increasingly critical issue in health research. Whether health research be in genetics,\\u000a new drugs, disease outbreaks, biochemistry, or effects of radiation, it deals with information that is highly sensitive and\\u000a which could be targeted by rogue individuals or groups, corporations, national intelligence agencies, or terrorists, looking\\u000a for financial, social, or political gains. The advents

  11. Research paper: Characteristics associated with Regional Health Information Organization viability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Adler-Milstein; John Landefeld; Ashish K. Jha

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveRegional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs) will likely play a key role in our nation's effort to catalyze health information exchange. Yet we know little about why some efforts succeed while others fail. We sought to identify factors associated with RHIO viability.DesignUsing data from a national survey of RHIOs that we conducted in mid-2008, we examined factors associated with becoming operational

  12. Research Paper: Consumer Health Information Seeking as Hypothesis Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alla Keselman; Allen C. Browne; David R. Kaufman

    2008-01-01

    ObjectiveDespite the proliferation of consumer health sites, lay individuals often experience difficulty finding health information online. The present study attempts to understand users' information seeking difficulties by drawing on a hypothesis testing explanatory framework. It also addresses the role of user competencies and their interaction with internet resources.DesignTwenty participants were interviewed about their understanding of a hypothetical scenario about a

  13. 75 FR 62636 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Health Benefits Handbook Satisfaction Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ...Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Health Benefits Handbook Satisfaction...Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department of...SUMMARY: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA),...

  14. 76 FR 625 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Health Benefits Handbook Satisfaction Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ...Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Health Benefits Handbook Satisfaction...Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department of...this notice announces that the Veterans Health Administration, Department...

  15. Viewpoint Paper: Communities' Readiness for Health Information Exchange: The National Landscape in 2004

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Marc Overhage; Lori Evans; Janet Marchibroda

    2005-01-01

    BackgroundThe Secretary of Health and Human Services recently released a report calling for the nation to create a national health information network (NHIN) that would interconnect Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs). These RHIOs, which others have called Local or Regional Health Information Infrastructures (LHII), would in turn interconnect local as well as national health information resources. Little data exist about

  16. Measurement Error Webinar Series: Assessing diet-health relationships with FFQ: focus on episodically-consumed dietary components

    Cancer.gov

    Review statistical risk models for evaluating diet-health relationships in nutritional epidemiology. Describe application of regression calibration to correct for FFQ measurement error using repeat short-term reference measurements in a substudy. With focus on episodically-consumed dietary components, describe application of a new methodology to carry out regression calibration in risk models with energy-adjusted dietary covariates.

  17. Health care provision and service re-design for people with epilepsy, with a focus on Primary Care

    E-print Network

    Jones, Peter JS

    Health care provision and service re-design for people with epilepsy, with a focus on Primary Care four studies which have been designed to promote the greater involvement of primary care care for people with epilepsy are feasible and effective in primary care, within specific programs

  18. Health effects research and regulation of diesel exhaust: an historical overview focused on lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hesterberg, Thomas W; Long, Christopher M; Bunn, William B; Lapin, Charles A; McClellan, Roger O; Valberg, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    The mutagenicity of organic solvent extracts from diesel exhaust particulate (DEP), first noted more than 55 years ago, initiated an avalanche of diesel exhaust (DE) health effects research that now totals more than 6000 published studies. Despite an extensive body of results, scientific debate continues regarding the nature of the lung cancer risk posed by inhalation of occupational and environmental DE, with much of the debate focused on DEP. Decades of scientific scrutiny and increasingly stringent regulation have resulted in major advances in diesel engine technologies. The changed particulate matter (PM) emissions in "New Technology Diesel Exhaust (NTDE)" from today's modern low-emission, advanced-technology on-road heavy-duty diesel engines now resemble the PM emissions in contemporary gasoline engine exhaust (GEE) and compressed natural gas engine exhaust more than those in the "traditional diesel exhaust" (TDE) characteristic of older diesel engines. Even with the continued publication of epidemiologic analyses of TDE-exposed populations, this database remains characterized by findings of small increased lung cancer risks and inconsistent evidence of exposure-response trends, both within occupational cohorts and across occupational groups considered to have markedly different exposures (e.g. truckers versus railroad shopworkers versus underground miners). The recently published National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-National Cancer Institute (NCI) epidemiologic studies of miners provide some of the strongest findings to date regarding a DE-lung cancer association, but some inconsistent exposure-response findings and possible effects of bias and exposure misclassification raise questions regarding their interpretation. Laboratory animal studies are negative for lung tumors in all species, except for rats under lifetime TDE-exposure conditions with durations and concentrations that lead to "lung overload." The species specificity of the rat lung response to overload, and its occurrence with other particle types, is now well-understood. It is thus generally accepted that the rat bioassay for inhaled particles under conditions of lung overload is not predictive of human lung cancer hazard. Overall, despite an abundance of epidemiologic and experimental data, there remain questions as to whether TDE exposure causes increased lung cancers in humans. An abundance of emissions characterization data, as well as preliminary toxicological data, support NTDE as being toxicologically distinct from TDE. Currently, neither epidemiologic data nor animal bioassay data yet exist that directly bear on NTDE carcinogenic potential. A chronic bioassay of NTDE currently in progress will provide data on whether NTDE poses a carcinogenic hazard, but based on the significant reductions in PM mass emissions and the major changes in PM composition, it has been hypothesized that NTDE has a low carcinogenic potential. When the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reevaluates DE (along with GEE and nitroarenes) in June 2012, it will be the first authoritative body to assess DE carcinogenic health hazards since the emergence of NTDE and the accumulation of data differentiating NTDE from TDE. PMID:22663144

  19. Health effects research and regulation of diesel exhaust: an historical overview focused on lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hesterberg, Thomas W.; Long, Christopher M.; Bunn, William B.; Lapin, Charles A.; McClellan, Roger O.; Valberg, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The mutagenicity of organic solvent extracts from diesel exhaust particulate (DEP), first noted more than 55 years ago, initiated an avalanche of diesel exhaust (DE) health effects research that now totals more than 6000 published studies. Despite an extensive body of results, scientific debate continues regarding the nature of the lung cancer risk posed by inhalation of occupational and environmental DE, with much of the debate focused on DEP. Decades of scientific scrutiny and increasingly stringent regulation have resulted in major advances in diesel engine technologies. The changed particulate matter (PM) emissions in “New Technology Diesel Exhaust (NTDE)” from today's modern low-emission, advanced-technology on-road heavy-duty diesel engines now resemble the PM emissions in contemporary gasoline engine exhaust (GEE) and compressed natural gas engine exhaust more than those in the “traditional diesel exhaust” (TDE) characteristic of older diesel engines. Even with the continued publication of epidemiologic analyses of TDE-exposed populations, this database remains characterized by findings of small increased lung cancer risks and inconsistent evidence of exposure-response trends, both within occupational cohorts and across occupational groups considered to have markedly different exposures (e.g. truckers versus railroad shopworkers versus underground miners). The recently published National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-National Cancer Institute (NCI) epidemiologic studies of miners provide some of the strongest findings to date regarding a DE-lung cancer association, but some inconsistent exposure-response findings and possible effects of bias and exposure misclassification raise questions regarding their interpretation. Laboratory animal studies are negative for lung tumors in all species, except for rats under lifetime TDE-exposure conditions with durations and concentrations that lead to'lung overload."The species specificity of the rat lung response to overload, and its occurrence with other particle types, is now well-understood. It is thus generally accepted that the rat bioassay for inhaled particles under conditions of lung overload is not predictive of human lung cancer hazard. Overall, despite an abundance of epidemiologic and experimental data, there remain questions as to whether TDE exposure causes increased lung cancers in humans. An abundance of emissions characterization data, as well as preliminary toxicological data, support NTDE as being toxicologically distinct from TDE. Currently, neither epidemiologic data nor animal bioassay data yet exist that directly bear on NTDE carcinogenic potential. A chronic bioassay of NTDE currently in progress will provide data on whether NTDE poses a carcinogenic hazard, but based on the significant reductions in PM mass emissions and the major changes in PM composition, it has been hypothesized that NTDE has a low carcinogenic potential. When the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reevaluates DE (along with GEE and nitroarenes) in June 2012, it will be the first authoritative body to assess DE carcinogenic health hazards since the emergence of NTDE and the accumulation of data differentiating NTDE from TDE. PMID:22663144

  20. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  1. Public trust in health information sharing: implications for biobanking and electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon's MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one's primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public's trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  2. A qualitative exploration of the perceptions and information needs of public health inspectors responsible for food safety

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Ontario, local public health inspectors play an important frontline role in protecting the public from foodborne illness. This study was an in-depth exploration of public health inspectors' perceptions of the key food safety issues in public health, and their opinions and needs with regards to food safety information resources. Methods Four focus group discussions were conducted with public health inspectors from the Central West region of Ontario, Canada during June and July, 2008. A questioning route was used to standardize qualitative data collection. Audio recordings of sessions were transcribed verbatim and data-driven content analysis was performed. Results A total of 23 public health inspectors participated in four focus group discussions. Five themes emerged as key food safety issues: time-temperature abuse, inadequate handwashing, cross-contamination, the lack of food safety knowledge by food handlers and food premise operators, and the lack of food safety information and knowledge about specialty foods (i.e., foods from different cultures). In general, participants reported confidence with their current knowledge of food safety issues and foodborne pathogens. Participants highlighted the need for a central source for food safety information, access to up-to-date food safety information, resources in different languages, and additional food safety information on specialty foods. Conclusions The information gathered from these focus groups can provide a basis for the development of resources that will meet the specific needs of public health inspectors involved in protecting and promoting food safety. PMID:20553592

  3. Stakeholder needs for air pollution and health information.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Eric Gordon; Fudge, Nina; Totlandsdal, Annike Irene; Brunekreef, Bert; van Bree, Leendert

    2006-10-01

    Within the European Commission-supported thematic network project AIRNET, a stakeholder survey was performed to identify key questions and issues of concern for end users regarding air pollution and health information. On the whole, survey respondents typically asked general questions concerning air pollution and health (i.e., regarding the type of pollutant, emission sources, monitoring, and health impact). Furthermore, an overwhelming response across all stakeholder categories was not the unavailability of information sources to inform policy, but the lack of time available to read and absorb all the information. Overall, the respondents expressed their preference for information that is (1) presented as short and clear overviews, (2) ready for policy use by including a practical linkage between the research findings and implementation of public protection, and (3) in a format easily passed on to others. PMID:16905511

  4. Modelling system level health information exchange: an ontological approach.

    PubMed

    McMurray, J; Zhu, L; McKillop, I; Chen, H

    2015-01-01

    Investment of resources to purposively improve the movement of information between health system providers is currently made with imperfect information. No inventories of system-level digital information flows currently exist, nor do measures of inter-organizational electronic information. exchange (HIE). Using Protégé 4, an open-source OWL Web ontology language editor and knowledge-based framework we formalized a model that decomposes inter-organizational electronic health information flow into derivative concepts such as diversity, breadth, volume, structure, standardization and connectivity. Self-reported data from a regional health system is used to measure HIE; the ontology identifies providers with low and high HIE, useful for planners, and using a related database is used to monitor data quality. PMID:25676986

  5. 2D image registration using focused mutual information for application in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, W; Nyssen, E; Bottenberg, P; Truyen, B; de Groen, P

    2009-06-01

    Spatial alignment of image data is a common task in computer vision and medical imaging. This should preferentially be done with minimal intervention of an operator. Similarity measures with origin in the information theory such as mutual information (MI) have proven to be robust registration criteria for this purpose. Intra-oral radiographs can be considered images of piecewise rigid objects. Teeth and jaws are rigid but can be displaced with respect to each other. Therefore MI criteria combined with affine deformations tend to fail, when teeth and jaws move with respect to each other between image acquisitions. In this paper, we consider a focused weighing of pixels in the reference image. The resulting criterion, focused mutual information (FMI) is an adequate tool for the registration of rigid parts of a scene. We also show that the use of FMI is more robust for the subtraction of lateral radiographs of teeth, than MI confined to a region of interest. Furthermore, the criterion allows the follow-up of small carious lesions when upper and lower jaw moved between the acquisition of test and reference image. PMID:19406393

  6. Effects of Health Information Technology on Malpractice Insurance Premiums

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The widespread adoption of health information technology (IT) will help contain health care costs by decreasing inefficiencies in healthcare delivery. Theoretically, health IT could lower hospitals' malpractice insurance premiums (MIPs) and improve the quality of care by reducing the number and size of malpractice. This study examines the relationship between health IT investment and MIP using California hospital data from 2006 to 2007. Methods To examine the effect of hospital IT on malpractice insurance expense, a generalized estimating equation (GEE) was employed. Results It was found that health IT investment was not negatively associated with MIP. Health IT was reported to reduce medical error and improve efficiency. Thus, it may reduce malpractice claims from patients, which will reduce malpractice insurance expenses for hospitals. However, health IT adoption could lead to increases in MIPs. For example, we expect increases in MIPs of about 1.2% and 1.5%, respectively, when health IT and labor increase by 10%. Conclusions This study examined the effect of health IT investment on MIPs controlling other hospital and market, and volume characteristics. Against our expectation, we found that health IT investment was not negatively associated with MIP. There may be some possible reasons that the real effect of health IT on MIPs was not observed; barriers including communication problems among health ITs, shorter sample period, lower IT investment, and lack of a quality of care measure as a moderating variable. PMID:25995964

  7. A Community-Based Participatory Health Information Needs Assessment to Help Eliminate Diabetes Information Disparities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Carlson; Diane Neal; Gayenell Magwood; Carolyn Jenkins; Marilyn Givens King; Charles L. Hossler

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the participatory research process, results, action plan, and implications of the community health information needs assessment conducted within the African American community in two South Carolina counties. The REACH 2010: Charleston and Georgetown Diabetes Coalition library program is a partnership among community organizations, public and health sciences libraries, and lay community health advisors. A planning committee studied

  8. Insurance Coverage & Whither Thou Goest for Health Information in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Saulsberry, Loren; Price, Mary; Hsu, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective Examine use of the Internet (eHealth) and mobile health (mHealth) technologies by privately insured, publicly insured (Medicare/Medicaid), or uninsured U.S. adults in 2012. Data Source Pew Charitable Trust telephone interviews of a nationally representative, random sample of 3,014 adult U.S. residents, age 18+. Methods Estimate health information seeking behavior overall and by segment (i.e., insurance type), then, adjust estimates for individual traits, clinical need, and technology access using logistic regression. Results Most respondents prefer offline to online (Internet) health information sources; over half across all segments use the Internet. More respondents communicate with providers offline compared with online. Most self-reported Internet users use online tools for health information, with privately insured respondents more likely to use new technologies. Unadjusted use rates differ across segments. Medicaid beneficiaries are more likely than the privately insured to share health information online, and Medicare beneficiaries are more likely than the privately insured to text with health professionals. After adjustment, these differences were minimal (e.g., Medicare beneficiaries had odds similar to the privately insured of online physician consultations), or the direction of the association reversed (e.g., Medicaid beneficiaries had greater odds than the privately insured of online physician consultations versus lower odds before adjustment). Discussion Few adults report eHealth or mHealth use in 2012. Use levels appear unevenly distributed across insurance types, which could be mostly attributed to differences in individual traits and/or need. As out-of-pocket costs of medical care increases, consumers may increasingly turn to these generally free electronic health tools. PMID:25383242

  9. Mental Health Information Systems: Some National Trends

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, James L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a national survey indicate that approximately 90 percent of all state departments of mental health utilize computer support for at least some administrative and clinical functions. Nearly all indicated planning for considerably increased use; very few reported neither current use of computers nor active plans for future use. Both this survey and a similar one concerning community mental health centers indicate extensive development and strong acceptance of computer applications in administrative and documentation areas, in program evaluation, utilization review and research, but rather weak endorsement and proliferation concerning more clinically-oriented computer applications that involve the monitoring of individual patient care, clinical decision making and clinical predictions.

  10. Aging 2.0: health information about dementia on Twitter.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Julie M; Johnson, Thomas W; Hennessey, Craig; Beattie, B Lynn; Illes, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Online social media is widespread, easily accessible and attracts a global audience with a widening demographic. As a large proportion of adults now seek health information online and through social media applications, communication about health has become increasingly interactive and dynamic. Online health information has the potential to significantly impact public health, especially as the population gets older and the prevalence of dementia increases. However, little is known about how information pertaining to age-associated diseases is disseminated on popular social media platforms. To fill this knowledge gap, we examined empirically: (i) who is using social media to share information about dementia, (ii) what sources of information about dementia are promoted, and (iii) which dementia themes dominate the discussion. We data-mined the microblogging platform Twitter for content containing dementia-related keywords for a period of 24 hours and retrieved over 9,200 tweets. A coding guide was developed and content analysis conducted on a random sample (10%), and on a subsample from top users' tweets to assess impact. We found that a majority of tweets contained a link to a third party site rather than personal information, and these links redirected mainly to news sites and health information sites. As well, a large number of tweets discussed recent research findings related to the prediction and risk management of Alzheimer's disease. The results highlight the need for the dementia research community to harness the reach of this medium and its potential as a tool for multidirectional engagement. PMID:23922827

  11. Business Associates in the National Health Information Network: Implications for Medical Information Privacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward J. Szewczak; Coral R. Snodgrass

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the role of the business associate of healthcare providers (BAHP) in the National Health Information Network. Current Health Insurance Portability and Accountability legislation has little to say about BAHPs and their potential impact on medical information privacy. For the good of the business enterprise, managers who are BAHPs or who supervise BAHPs need to be aware of

  12. Focus group reflections on the current and future state of cognitive assessment tools in geriatric health care

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Jocelyne C; Gambino, Sara A; Richter, Jeffrey D; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides insight into the thoughts and opinions of geriatric health-care professionals toward cognitive assessments and the use of emerging technologies, such as eye-tracking, to supplement current tools. Methods Two focus group sessions were conducted with nurses and physicians who routinely administer neurocognitive assessments to geriatric populations. Video recordings of the focus group sessions were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed. Results Participants reported the need for assessment and diagnostic tools that are accessible and efficient, and that are capable of accommodating the rapid growth in the aging population. The prevalence of more complex ailments experienced by older adults has had repercussions in the quality of care that the clients receive, and has contributed to lengthy wait times and resource shortages. Health-care professionals stated that they are hampered by the disjointed structure of the health-care system and that they would benefit from a more efficient allocation of responsibilities made possible through tools that did not require extensive training or certification. Eyetracking-based cognitive assessments were thought to strongly complement this system, yet it was thought that difficulty would be faced in gaining the support and increased uptake by health-care professionals due to the nonintuitive relationship between eyetracking and cognition. Conclusion The findings suggest that health-care professionals are receptive to the use of eyetracking technology to assess for cognitive health as it would conserve resources by allowing frontline staff to administer assessments with minimal training.

  13. INFORMATION ABOUT ALCOHOL &OTHER COLLEGE HEALTH ISSUES

    E-print Network

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    Intoxicated). Under the "Zero Tolerance Law", anyone younger than 21 with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .02, engineering, medicine and health professions, veterinary medicine, education, and law include "good moralAlcohol and DrugAbuse and the US Department of Education. #12;If I am under 21, can I get in trouble for being

  14. Monash University Health Service Patient Information Sheet

    E-print Network

    Albrecht, David

    consultations. Attendance is required for repeat prescriptions. Home visits Doctors from the UHS are available, skin biopsy and wound suturing. Reminders/Recalls UHS has a system for followup and recall of patients on our reminder system for management of routine health issues. #12;After hours Should you require care

  15. Health Literacy and Willingness to Use Online Health Information by Teens with Asthma and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Dana S.; McCoy, Karen S.; Johnson, Lauren D.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Gardner, William

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study measured health literacy in a population of teens in treatment for asthma or diabetes and tested the association between health literacy and willingness to use online health resources. Materials and Methods: About 180 patients aged 13–18 years treated for asthma or diabetes in specialty care clinics completed assessments of demographic characteristics, health literacy, and Internet access and use. Teens were provided a resource page listing selected publically available health-related Web sites and asked about perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and intent to use the listed Web sites. The relationship between demographic characteristics, health literacy, and online health information use was tested using chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. Predictors of intent to use resource page Web sites were assessed using bivariate and multivariate ordinal logistic regression. Results: About 92% of participants had adequate health literacy. Over 50% of participants had previously searched online for health information. Older age was the only significant predictor of health information search. Most teens (79%) reported intent to use at least one Web site from the resource page at least occasionally within the next 3 months. Higher health literacy (odds ratio [OR]=6.24, p<0.01) and stronger perceived usefulness (OR=1.74, p=0.01) were associated with greater intent for regular use, after controlling for demographic and Internet access variables. Conclusions: Teens with lower health literacy searched online for health information as often as peers with higher literacy, but were less likely to express the intent to use recommended sites. Belief in the usefulness of a Web site is the strongest attitudinal predictor of intended future use. PMID:21943161

  16. "La Comunidad Habla": Using Internet Community-Based Information Interventions to Increase Empowerment and Access to Health Care of Low Income Latino/a Immigrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginossar, Tamar; Nelson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    The innovative educational communication interventions described in this paper include the use of bi-lingual, low literacy level websites and training created by low income Latina women to increase access to health care, health information, and the internet. We focus on one grassroots intervention, aimed at increasing access to health care for…

  17. Accelerating innovation in information and communication technology for health.

    PubMed

    Crean, Kevin W

    2010-02-01

    Around the world, inventors are creating novel information and communication technology applications and systems that can improve health for people in disparate settings. However, it is very difficult to find investment funding needed to create business models to expand and develop the prototype technologies. A comprehensive, long-term investment strategy for e-health and m-health is needed. The field of social entrepreneurship offers an integrated approach to develop needed investment models, so that innovations can reach more patients, more effectively. Specialized financing techniques and sustained support from investors can spur the expansion of mature technologies to larger markets, accelerating global health impacts. PMID:20348074

  18. Preferred Sources of Health Information in Persons With Multiple Sclerosis: Degree of Trust and Information Sought

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Amber R; Tyry, Tuula; Fox, Robert J; Cutter, Gary R

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective health communication is important for informed decision-making, yet little is known about the range of information sources used by persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), the perceived trust in those information sources, or how this might vary according to patient characteristics. Objective We aimed to investigate the sources of health information used by persons with MS, their preferences for the source of health information, and levels of trust in those information sources. We also aimed to evaluate how these findings varied according to participant characteristics. Methods In 2011, participants in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry were asked about their sources of health information using selected questions adapted from the 2007 Health Information National Trends (HINTS) survey. Results Of 12,974 eligible participants, 66.18% (8586/12,974) completed the questionnaire. Mass media sources, rather than interpersonal information sources, were the first sources used by 83.22% (5953/7153) of participants for general health topics and by 68.31% (5026/7357) of participants for MS concerns. Specifically, the Internet was the first source of health information for general health issues (5332/7267, 73.40%) and MS (4369/7376, 59.23%). In a logistic regression model, younger age, less disability, and higher annual income were independently associated with increased odds of use of mass media rather than interpersonal sources of information first. The most trusted information source was a physician, with 97.94% (8318/8493) reporting that they trusted a physician some or a lot. Information sought included treatment for MS (4470/5663, 78.93%), general information about MS (3378/5405, 62.50%), paying for medical care (1096/4282, 25.59%), where to get medical care (787/4282, 18.38%), and supports for coping with MS (2775/5031, 55.16%). Nearly 40% (2998/7521) of participants had concerns about the quality of the information they gathered. Conclusions Although physicians remain the most trusted source of health information for people with MS, the Internet is the first source of health information for most of them. This has important implications for the dissemination of health information. PMID:23635393

  19. PATIENT AUTHORIZATION FOR DISCLOSURE OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Feschotte, Cedric

    of the disclosure of your patient records: or Check here if it is for your own personal use . If applicable, IPATIENT AUTHORIZATION FOR DISCLOSURE OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION PATIENT INFORMATION Patient Name Medical Record # Date of Birth Phone # ( ) Patient Address Patient E-Mail Address

  20. Information From Your Health Care ProviderGASTROENTERITIS (Stomach Flu)

    E-print Network

    Rusu, Adrian

    Information From Your Health Care ProviderGASTROENTERITIS (Stomach Flu) ABASIC INFORMATION DESCRIPTION Irritation and inflammation of the stomach and intestines. Gastroenteritis is a general term may range from 2 or 3 loose stools to many watery stools. · Nausea and vomiting. · Stomach cramps

  1. Geographic Information Systems and Health: An Educational Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Don P.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that the use of geographic information systems (GIS) to analyze spatial dimensions of health care and disease ecology is becoming a realistic prospect for investigators in the social sciences. Contends that enough information is available to provide instructors with materials for classroom units. (CFR)

  2. IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE AND OTHER INSURANCE BENEFITS

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE AND OTHER INSURANCE BENEFITS Don't forget to sign. Benefits Reviews will be held to explain the options to you. The dates for these reviews can be found by viewing the web link at http://www4.uwm.edu/hr/benefits/benefits_reviews.cfm Information on this and other

  3. Changes in Information Delivery Since 1960 in Health Science Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Louise

    1974-01-01

    An overview of information needs and services in the health sciences since 1960, with emphasis on the services of the National Library of Medicine and some other recent government-funded systems for information dissemination. Includes an extensive list of references. (LS)

  4. Protecting the Privacy and Security of Your Health Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... make sure that private information doesn’t become public. If you access your health records online, make sure you use a strong password and keep it secret. Keep in mind that if you post information online in a public forum, you cannot assume it’s private or secure. ...

  5. A security mediator for health care information.

    PubMed Central

    Wiederhold, G.; Bilello, M.; Sarathy, V.; Qian, X.

    1996-01-01

    The TIHI (Trusted Interoperation of Healthcare Information) project addresses a security issue that arises when some information is being shared among collaborating enterprises, although not all enterprise information is sharable. It assumes that protection exists to prevent intrusion by adversaries through secure transmission and firewalls. The TIHI system design provides a gateway, owned by the enterprise security officer, to mediate queries and responses. The latter are typically transmitted via the Internet. The enterprise policy is determined by rules provided to the mediator. We show examples of typical rules. The problem and our solution, although developed in a healthcare context, is equally valid among collaborating enterprises. PMID:8947640

  6. A qualitative study of Canada’s experience with the implementation of electronic health information technology

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, Ronen; Jang, Yeona; Zimlichman, Eyal; Salzberg, Claudia; Tamblyn, Melissa; Buckeridge, David; Forster, Alan; Bates, David W.; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2001, Canada Health Infoway unveiled a plan to implement a national system of interoperable electronic health records. This government-funded corporation introduced a novel model for interprovincial/territorial collaboration to establish core aspects of a national framework. Despite this $1.6 billion initiative, Canada continues to lag behind other Western countries in adopting electronic health records. We conducted a study to identify the success of different aspects of the Canadian plan and ways to improve the adoption of electronic health records. Methods We used a case study approach to assess the 10-year history of Canada’s e-health plan. National reports and documents were reviewed, and structured interviews were conducted with 29 key stakeholders representing national and provincial organizations responsible for establishing policy and strategic direction for health information technology. Using grounded theory, we analyzed transcripts of the interviews to identify themes and their relationships. Results Key stakeholders identified funding, national standards, patient registries and digital imaging as important achievements of the e-health plan. Lack of an e-health policy, inadequate involvement of clinicians, failure to establish a business case for using electronic health records, a focus on national rather than regional interoperability, and inflexibility in approach were seen as barriers to adoption of the plan. Interpretation To accelerate adoption of electronic health records and timely return on investment, an e-health policy needs to be tightly aligned with the major strategic directions of health care reform. Adoption needs to be actively fostered through a bottom-up, clinical-needs-first approach, a national policy for investment in electronic health records, and financial incentives based on patient outcomes that can be achieved with electronic health records. PMID:21343262

  7. The association of understanding of medical statistics with health information seeking and health provider interaction in a national sample of young adults.

    PubMed

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Clayman, Marla L

    2011-01-01

    Numeracy, or, "the ability to use and understand numbers in daily life" is a critical component of health literacy. However, little research has focused on numeracy in young adults (ages 18-29). We used a national sample to examine how health-information seeking, trust in sources, and interactions with health care providers differ for young adults with lower and higher numeracy. We included respondents ages 18 to 29 (n = 661) from the latest administration (2008) of the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). There were no significant differences between those with lower and higher numeracy for most sociodemographic variables, nor did numeracy predict trust in health information sources. However, there were several differences for health-information seeking and health-provider interactions. Those with lower numeracy were significantly more likely to say their most recent search took a lot of effort (46% vs. 24%, p = .0008) and was frustrating (45% vs. 22%, p = .0038). Those in the lower numeracy group also reported more negative interactions with health providers, including feeling less able to rely on their provider (62% vs. 86%, p < .0001), and less likely to say their provider made sure they understood information (70% vs. 88%, p = .0001) and helped with any uncertainty (51% vs. 75%, p < .0001), even when adjusting for other variables. Our data suggest that limited comfort with numbers and statistics can influence a variety of health-related factors for young adults. More research is needed to understand how health literacy skills--including numeracy--influence health-information seeking, patient-provider relationships, and health outcomes, for young adults. PMID:21951250

  8. Patient Informed Governance of Distributed Research Networks: Results and Discussion from Six Patient Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, Laura A.; Browe, Dennis K.; Logan, Holly C.; Kim, Katherine K.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how to govern emerging distributed research networks is essential to their success. Distributed research networks aggregate patient medical data from many institutions leaving data within the local provider security system. While much is known about patients’ views on secondary medical research, little is known about their views on governance of research networks. We conducted six focus groups with patients from three medical centers across the U.S. to understand their perspectives on privacy, consent, and ethical concerns of sharing their data as part of research networks. Participants positively endorsed sharing their health data with these networks believing that doing so could advance healthcare knowledge. However, patients expressed several concerns regarding security and broader ethical issues such as commercialism, public benefit, and social responsibility. We suggest that network governance guidelines move beyond strict technical requirements and address wider socio-ethical concerns by fully including patients in governance processes. PMID:24551383

  9. [Health Geographic Information System (HGIS)--a tool for health planning and epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Karsenty, Eric; Leventhal, Alex

    2002-12-01

    The development of the Health Geographic Information System (HGIS) concept, associated to the wide availability of adapted software applications, has offered an invaluable tool to Public Health Professionals. However its use is still too often limited to the graphic presentation of data or to structural planning, neglecting its main advantages. The HGIS has proven to be a potent tool for risk assessment, decision making, intervention evaluation and health planning. In spite of all the obstacles, the transformation of geographic information systems (GIS) into an epidemiological tool adapted to the health system (HGIS) can now be done in a relatively short span of time, with a minimal investment in terms of budget and manpower. The use of an outsourcing policy enables to limit the operational running costs in health organizations such as the Health Ministry, Hospitals or Sick Funds. PMID:12534207

  10. Information seeking and social support in online health communities: impact on patients' perceived empathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective Many healthcare organizations (HCOs) including Kaiser Permanente, Johns Hopkins, Cleveland Medical Center, and MD Anderson Cancer Center, provide access to online health communities as part of their overall patient support services. The key objective in establishing and running these online health communities is to offer empathic support to patients. Patients' perceived empathy is considered to be critical in patient recovery, specifically, by enhancing patient's compliance with treatment protocols and the pace of healing. Most online health communities are characterized by two main functions: informational support and social support. This study examines the relative impact of these two distinct functions—that is, as an information seeking forum and as a social support forum—on patients' perceived empathy in online health communities. Design This study tests the impact of two variables that reflect the above functions of online health communities—information seeking effectiveness and perceived social support—on perceived empathy. The model also incorporates the potential moderating effect of homophily on these relationships. Measurements A web-based survey was used to collect data from members of the online health communities provided by three major healthcare centers. A regression technique was used to analyze the data to test the hypotheses. Results The study finds that it is the information seeking effectiveness rather than the social support which affects patient's perceived empathy in online health communities run by HCOs. The results indicate that HCOs that provide online health communities for their patients need to focus more on developing tools that will make information seeking more effective and efficient. PMID:21486888

  11. Informal payments in transitional economies: implications for health sector reform.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Witter, S

    2000-01-01

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union increasing evidence is emerging of informal payments by patients for health care services that are officially free. There is little information, however, on the characteristics of these payments and the effect that they have on health care reform initiatives. This paper examines these issues and concludes that the endemic and complex nature of such payments suggests that a range of policy tools are necessary to address the negative features of informal payments in those countries undergoing transition. PMID:11184652

  12. Model Formulation: Health@HomeThe Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Moen; Patricia Flatley Brennan

    2005-01-01

    ObjectiveContemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in

  13. HINTS - Health Information National Trends Survey

    Cancer.gov

    It is of utmost importance to ensure the confidentiality of survey participants. Every effort has been made to exclude identifying information on individual respondents from the computer files. Some demographic information such as sex, race, etc., has been included for research purposes. NCI expects that users of the data set will adhere to the strictest standards of ethical conduct for the analysis and reporting of nationally collected survey data.

  14. Environmental Public Health Tracking: Health and Environment Linked for Information Exchange-Atlanta (HEXIX-Atlanta: A cooperative Program Between CDC and NASA for Development of an Environmental Public Health Tracking Network in the Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Niskar, Amanda Sue

    2005-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is coordinating HELIX- Atlanta to provide information regarding the five-county Metropolitan Atlanta Area (Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinett) via a network of integrated environmental monitoring and public health data systems so that all sectors can take action to prevent and control environmentally related health effects. The HELIX-Atlanta Network is a tool to access interoperable information systems with optional information technology linkage functionality driven by scientific rationale. HELIX-Atlanta is a collaborative effort with local, state, federal, and academic partners, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified the following HELIX-Atlanta initial focus areas: childhood lead poisoning, short-latency cancers, developmental disabilities, birth defects, vital records, respiratory health, age of housing, remote sensing data, and environmental monitoring, HELIX-Atlanta Partners identified and evaluated information systems containing information on the above focus areas. The information system evaluations resulted in recommendations for what resources would be needed to interoperate selected information systems in compliance with the CDC Public Health Information Network (PHIN). This presentation will discuss the collaborative process of building a network that links health and environment data for information exchange, including NASA remote sensing data, for use in HELIX-Atlanta.

  15. Communicating Genetic and Genomic Information: Health Literacy and Numeracy Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lea, D.H.; Kaphingst, K.A.; Bowen, D.; Lipkus, I.; Hadley, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Genomic research is transforming our understanding of the role of genes in health and disease. These advances, and their application to common diseases that affect large segments of the general population, suggest that researchers and practitioners in public health genomics will increasingly be called upon to translate genomic information to individuals with varying levels of health literacy and numeracy. This paper discusses the current state of research regarding public understanding of genetics and genomics, the influence of health literacy and numeracy on genetic communication, and behavioral responses to genetic and genomic information. The existing research suggests that members of the general public have some familiarity with genetic and genomic terms but have gaps in understanding of underlying concepts. Findings from the limited research base to date indicate that health literacy affects understanding of print and oral communications about genetic and genomic information. Numeracy is also likely to be an important predictor of being able to understand and apply this information, although little research has been conducted in this area to date. In addition, although some research has examined behavior change in response to the receipt of information about genetic risk for familial disorders and genomic susceptibility to common, complex diseases, the effects of health literacy and numeracy on these responses have not been examined. Potential areas in which additional research is needed are identified and practical suggestions for presenting numeric risk information are outlined. Public health genomics researchers and practitioners are uniquely positioned to engage in research that explores how different audiences react to and use genomic risk information. PMID:20407217

  16. Communicating genetic and genomic information: health literacy and numeracy considerations.

    PubMed

    Lea, D H; Kaphingst, K A; Bowen, D; Lipkus, I; Hadley, D W

    2011-01-01

    Genomic research is transforming our understanding of the role of genes in health and disease. These advances, and their application to common diseases that affect large segments of the general population, suggest that researchers and practitioners in public health genomics will increasingly be called upon to translate genomic information to individuals with varying levels of health literacy and numeracy. This paper discusses the current state of research regarding public understanding of genetics and genomics, the influence of health literacy and numeracy on genetic communication, and behavioral responses to genetic and genomic information. The existing research suggests that members of the general public have some familiarity with genetic and genomic terms but have gaps in understanding of underlying concepts. Findings from the limited research base to date indicate that health literacy affects understanding of print and oral communications about genetic and genomic information. Numeracy is also likely to be an important predictor of being able to understand and apply this information, although little research has been conducted in this area to date. In addition, although some research has examined behavior change in response to the receipt of information about genetic risk for familial disorders and genomic susceptibility to common, complex diseases, the effects of health literacy and numeracy on these responses have not been examined. Potential areas in which additional research is needed are identified and practical suggestions for presenting numeric risk information are outlined. Public health genomics researchers and practitioners are uniquely positioned to engage in research that explores how different audiences react to and use genomic risk information. PMID:20407217

  17. Working towards a national health information system in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bomba, B; Cooper, J; Miller, M

    1995-01-01

    One of the major administrative dilemmas facing the Australian national health care system is the need to reform practices associated with massive data-information overload. The current system is burdened with paper-based administrative forms, patient record files, referral notes and other manual methods of data organisation. An integrated computer-based information system may be perceived as an attractive solution to such burdens. However, computerisation must not be seen as a panacea with the possibility of exacerbating information overload and accentuating privacy concerns. Recent surveys in Australia [1] and the US [2] indicate a perceived causal link between computers and privacy invasion. Any moves toward a national health information system must counter this perception through macro-level education schemes of affected parties and micro-level mechanisms such as the establishment of hospital privacy officers. Such concerns may be viewed as a subset of the wider privacy debate, and information policy development should address such considerations to develop policies to prevent unauthorized access to personal information and to avoid the extraction and sale of sensitive health data. Conservative in nature and slow to change the health care sector may be forced to adopt more efficient work practices through the increasing proliferation of information technology (IT) in health care delivery and an escalating emphasis upon accountability and efficiency of the public health care dollar. The economic rationalist stance taken by governments in Australia and other nations generally will also force health care workers to adopt and develop more efficient information management practices, health indicators and best practice care methods than presently employed by this sector The benefits of a national health information system are far reaching, particularly in developing a more effective health care system through better identifying and understanding community health care trends and in applying IT to the efficient collection of data for the development of more appropriate performance measures and statistical indicators. A coherent and integrated approach is called for in the design of a national health information system which incorporates the necessary and requisite security features to meet privacy concerns. Protecting information privacy poses complex political, economic, technological, legal and social problems for systems developers and health care providers alike [2]. According to Brannigan [3] there are three components involved in the formulation and implementation of privacy: public policy (What level of privacy does society want?); legal structure (Does the law adequately provide for society's privacy requirements?); and technical (how much privacy can technical tools provide, at what cost, and with what effects on the system?). Examining technical tools alone, it is apparent that the necessary technologies are available in Australia to provide the security of medical records required by public policy. Such tools may include encryption, user and data authentication methods, authorisation schemes and mechanisms for the prevention of data inference. While none of these available measures are infallible, it is suitable for most applications where the encryption mechanism can provide protection for a given length of time. Australia needs to develop a coherent national health information infrastructure policy to ultimately avoid fragmented, duplicated and incompatible systems that rely on different standards and protocols. Such a policy will only work by addressing the key issue of patient privacy within a technological framework. The application of IT to health care systems is a sensitive social experiment affecting many professions including general practitioners, medical administrators, politicians, lawyers, computer specialists, privacy advocates and patients whose records will ultimately reside in the system. (abstract trun PMID:8591519

  18. An In-Depth Analysis of How Elders Seek and Disseminate Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Altizer, Kathryn P.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Quandt, Sara A.; Bell, Ronny A; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This study documents older adults’ sources of health information, describes the purposes for health information seeking, and delineates gender and ethnic variation in health information seeking. Sixty-two African American and white adults age 65 and older completed qualitative interviews describing their use of complementary therapies. Interviews identified how individuals obtained and shared health information. Friends, not family, were the dominant source of health information. Participants ranged from active seekers to passive consumers of health information. Information seeking was common for benign symptoms. More women than men discuss health information with others. Friends are the primary source of health information for rural older adults. There is substantial passivity in the pursuit of health information. Identifying health information sources of rural older adults can support the dissemination of information to those who share it with others. PMID:24188253

  19. CAM Health Information for patients-OCCAM

    Cancer.gov

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) dates back more than 5000 years and has its origin in ancient Taoist philosophy, which states that the complementary forces yin and yang blend together to form harmony in the universe. According to TCM, the life force qi normally circulates throughout the body and diseases occur when there is an imbalance between qi and blood flow, resulting in blockage and stagnation. Health is restored after the blockage is removed and qi is able to flow again.

  20. Evidence-based health information and risk competence

    PubMed Central

    Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Albrecht, Martina; Steckelberg, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Consumers and patients want to be included in decisions regarding their own health and have an ethically justified claim on informed decisions. Therefore, sound information is required, but health information is often misleading and based on different interests. The risks of disease and the benefits of medical interventions tend to be overestimated, whereas harm is often underestimated. Evidence-based health information has to fulfil certain criteria, for instance, it should be evidence-based, independent, complete, true as well as understandable. The aim of a medical intervention has to be explained. The different therapeutic options including the option not to intervene have to be delineated. The probabilities for success, lack of success and unwanted side effects have to be communicated in a numerical and understandable manner. Patients have the right to reject medical interventions without any sanctions. PMID:26195924

  1. Focus points for school health promotion improvements in Dutch primary schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mariken T. W. Leurs; Kathelijne Bessems; Herman P. Schaalma; Hein de Vries

    2007-01-01

    To enable improvements in school health pro- motion, this paper examines associations be- tween the number of health-promotion issues addressed by primary school teachers in the Netherlands and factors thought to influence this behavior. The main factors studied are context characteristics and constructs of atti- tude, social influence, self-efficacy (SE) and perceived barriers. A total of 180 primary school teachers

  2. Bringing Mental Health Needs into Focus through School Counseling Program Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruman, Diana H.; Marston, Toby; Koon, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Professional school counselors are educational leaders with training and expertise to address the mental health concerns of students. Unfortunately, work conditions at some schools can create barriers to the delivery of effective mental health services. This article presents a case of one rural, diverse high school that transformed its school…

  3. Lessons Learned From a Decade of Focused Recruitment and Training to Develop Minority Public Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Deidre J.; Thompson, Vetta; Brownson, Ross C.; McClure, Stephanie; Scharff, Darcell P.; Clark, Eddie M.; Haire-Joshu, Debra

    2011-01-01

    From 1999 to 2009, the Eliminating Health Disparities Pre-doctoral Fellowship Program provided specialized education and mentoring to African American graduate students in public health. Fellows received a public health degree, coursework in understanding and eliminating health disparities, experiential learning, mentored research, and professional network building with African American role models. We describe successful strategies for recruiting and training fellows and make 5 recommendations for those seeking to increase workforce diversity in public health: (1) build a community of minority students, not a string of individual recruits; (2) reward mentoring; (3) provide a diverse set of role models and mentors; (4) dedicate staffing to assure a student-centered approach; and, (5) commit to training students with varying levels of academic refinement. PMID:21551376

  4. Lessons learned from a decade of focused recruitment and training to develop minority public health professionals.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Matthew W; Griffith, Deidre J; Thompson, Vetta; Brownson, Ross C; McClure, Stephanie; Scharff, Darcell P; Clark, Eddie M; Haire-Joshu, Debra

    2011-12-01

    From 1999 to 2009, the Eliminating Health Disparities Pre-doctoral Fellowship Program provided specialized education and mentoring to African American graduate students in public health. Fellows received a public health degree, coursework in understanding and eliminating health disparities, experiential learning, mentored research, and professional network building with African American role models. We describe successful strategies for recruiting and training fellows and make 5 recommendations for those seeking to increase workforce diversity in public health: (1) build a community of minority students, not a string of individual recruits; (2) reward mentoring; (3) provide a diverse set of role models and mentors; (4) dedicate staffing to assure a student-centered approach; and, (5) commit to training students with varying levels of academic refinement. PMID:21551376

  5. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anand Krishnan; Baridalyne Nongkynrih; Kapil Yadav; Satyavir Singh; Vivek Gupta

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a

  6. Social networking applications in health care: threats to the privacy and security of health information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Williams

    2010-01-01

    The advent of social networking websites for use in health care has prompted concerns about the risks that such systems pose to the security and privacy of personal health information. In this paper, we survey the research literature, in order to provide a current snapshot of privacy and security safeguards for social network websites. We describe some of the unique

  7. Salary Information for Nuclear Engineers and Health Physicists, October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    1995-10-15

    Salary information was collected for October 1995 for personnel working as nuclear engineers and health physicists. The salary information includes personnel at the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. levels with zero, one, and three years of professional work experience. Information is provided for utilities and non-utilities. Non-utilities include private sector organizations and U.S. Department of Energy contractor-operated facilities. Government agencies, the military, academic organizations, and medical facilities are excluded.

  8. Privacy preserving indexing for eHealth information networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuzhe Tang; Ting Wang; Ling Liu; Shicong Meng; Balaji Palanisamy

    2011-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed an increasing demand for the next generation health information networks (e.g., NHIN[1]), which hold the promise of supporting large-scale information sharing across a network formed by autonomous healthcare providers. One fundamental capability of such information network is to support efficient, privacy-preserving (for both users and providers) search over the distributed, access controlled healthcare documents.

  9. An agile enterprise regulation architecture for health information security management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital. PMID:20815748

  10. Health and Social Media: Perfect Storm of Information

    PubMed Central

    Bau, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The use of Internet in the health domain is becoming a major worldwide trend. Millions of citizens are searching online health information and also publishing content about their health. Patients are engaging with other patients in online communities using different types of social media. The boundaries between mobile health, social media, wearable, games, and big data are becoming blurrier due the integration of all those technologies. In this paper we provide an overview of the major research challenges with the area of health social media. Methods We use several study cases to exemplify the current trends and highlight future research challenges. Results Internet is exploding and is being used for health purposes by a great deal of the population. Social networks have a powerful influence in health decisions. Given the lack of knowledge on the use of health social media, there is a need for complex multidisciplinary research to help us understand how to use social networks in favour of public health. A bigger understanding of social media will give health authorities new tools to help decision-making at global, national, local, and corporate level. Conclusions There is an unprecedented amount of data that can be used in public health due the potential combination of data acquired from mobile phones, Electronic Health Records, social media, and other sources. To identify meaningful information from those data sources it is not trial. Moreover, new analytics tools will need to be developed to analyse those sources of data in a way that it can benefit healthcare professionals and authorities. PMID:25995958

  11. Prolonged sexual abstinence after childbirth: gendered norms and perceived family health risks. Focus group discussions in a Tanzanian suburb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolonged sexual abstinence after childbirth is a socio-cultural practice with health implications, and is described in several African countries, including Tanzania. This study explored discourses on prolonged postpartum sexual abstinence in relation to family health after childbirth in low-income suburbs of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Data for the discourse analysis were collected through focus group discussions with first-time mothers and fathers and their support people in Ilala, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Results In this setting, prolonged sexual abstinence intended at promoting child health was the dominant discourse in the period after childbirth. Sexual relations after childbirth involved the control of sexuality for ensuring family health and avoiding the social implications of non-adherence to sexual abstinence norms. Both abstinence and control were emphasised more with regard to women than to men. Although the traditional discourse on prolonged sexual abstinence for protecting child health was reproduced in Ilala, some modern aspects such as the use of condoms and other contraceptives prevailed in the discussion. Conclusion Discourses on sexuality after childbirth are instrumental in reproducing gender-power inequalities, with women being subjected to more restrictions and control than men are. Thus, interventions that create openness in discussing sexual relations and health-related matters after childbirth and mitigate gendered norms suppressing women and perpetuating harmful behaviours are needed. The involvement of males in the interventions would benefit men, women, and children through improving the gender relations that promote family health. PMID:23316932

  12. Seeking Health Information Online: Association With Young Australian Women’s Physical, Mental, and Reproductive Health

    PubMed Central

    Loxton, Deborah; Dobson, Annette; Mishra, Gita Devi

    2015-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about the extent to which young adults use the Internet as a health information resource and whether there are factors that distinguish between those who do and do not go online for health information. Objective The aim was to identify the sociodemographic, physical, mental, and reproductive health factors associated with young women’s use of the Internet for health information. Methods We used data from 17,069 young women aged 18-23 years who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association between sociodemographic, physical, mental, and reproductive health factors associated with searching the Internet for health information. Results Overall, 43.54% (7433/17,069) of women used the Internet for health information. Women who used the Internet had higher odds of regular urinary or bowel symptoms (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.36-1.54), psychological distress (very high distress: OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13-1.37), self-reported mental health diagnoses (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.23), and menstrual symptoms (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.15-1.36) than women who did not use the Internet for health information. Internet users were less likely to have had blood pressure checks (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.93) and skin cancer checks (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.97) and to have had a live birth (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.64-0.86) or pregnancy loss (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.79-0.98) than non-Internet users. Conclusions Women experiencing “stigmatized” conditions or symptoms were more likely to search the Internet for health information. The Internet may be an acceptable resource that offers “anonymized” information or support to young women and this has important implications for health service providers and public health policy. PMID:25986630

  13. Dr Google and the Consumer: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Navigational Needs and Online Health Information-Seeking Behaviors of Consumers With Chronic Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2014-01-01

    Background The abundance of health information available online provides consumers with greater access to information pertinent to the management of health conditions. This is particularly important given an increasing drive for consumer-focused health care models globally, especially in the management of chronic health conditions, and in recognition of challenges faced by lay consumers with finding, understanding, and acting on health information sourced online. There is a paucity of literature exploring the navigational needs of consumers with regards to accessing online health information. Further, existing interventions appear to be didactic in nature, and it is unclear whether such interventions appeal to consumers’ needs. Objective Our goal was to explore the navigational needs of consumers with chronic health conditions in finding online health information within the broader context of consumers’ online health information-seeking behaviors. Potential barriers to online navigation were also identified. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with adult consumers who reported using the Internet for health information and had at least one chronic health condition. Participants were recruited from nine metropolitan community pharmacies within Western Australia, as well as through various media channels. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and then imported into QSR NVivo 10. Two established approaches to thematic analysis were adopted. First, a data-driven approach was used to minimize potential bias in analysis and improve construct and criterion validity. A theory-driven approach was subsequently used to confirm themes identified by the former approach and to ensure identified themes were relevant to the objectives. Two levels of analysis were conducted for both data-driven and theory-driven approaches: manifest-level analysis, whereby face-value themes were identified, and latent-level analysis, whereby underlying concepts were identified. Results We conducted 17 interviews, with data saturation achieved by the 14th interview. While we identified a broad range of online health information-seeking behaviors, most related to information discussed during consumer-health professional consultations such as looking for information about medication side effects. The barriers we identified included intrinsic barriers, such as limited eHealth literacy, and extrinsic barriers, such as the inconsistency of information between different online sources. The navigational needs of our participants were extrinsic in nature and included health professionals directing consumers to appropriate online resources and better filtering of online health information. Our participants’ online health information-seeking behaviors, reported barriers, and navigational needs were underpinned by the themes of trust, patient activation, and relevance. Conclusions This study suggests that existing interventions aimed to assist consumers with navigating online health information may not be what consumers want or perceive they need. eHealth literacy and patient activation appear to be prevalent concepts in the context of consumers’ online health information-seeking behaviors. Furthermore, the role for health professionals in guiding consumers to quality online health information is highlighted. PMID:25470306

  14. Scenario-based testing of health information systems (HIS) in electronic and hybrid environments.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have identified sources of technology-induced errors involving health information systems (HIS) across the software development lifecycle. In this paper the authors review approaches to identifying technology-induced error and describe, compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of using predictive and post-implementation methodologies to identify technology-induced error. Following this, the authors focus upon clinical simulations using scenario-based testing as a methodology for diagnosing technology-induced errors to assess HIS ability to respond to the stresses and strains of health professionals using such systems in real-world clinical settings. PMID:19380949

  15. Advances in health informatics education: educating students at the intersection of health care and information technology.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Brian; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the authors' work in the area of health informatics (HI) education involving emerging health information technologies. A range of information technologies promise to modernize health care. Foremost among these are electronic health records (EHRs), which are expected to significantly improve and streamline health care practice. Major national and international efforts are currently underway to increase EHR adoption. However, there have been numerous issues affecting the widespread use of such information technology, ranging from a complex array of technical problems to social issues. This paper describes work in the integration of information technologies directly into the education and training of HI students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This has included work in (a) the development of Web-based computer tools and platforms to allow students to have hands-on access to the latest technologies and (b) development of interdisciplinary educational models that can be used to guide integrating information technologies into HI education. The paper describes approaches that allow for remote hands-on access by HI students to a range of EHRs and related technology. To date, this work has been applied in HI education in a variety of ways. Several approaches for integration of this essential technology into HI education and training are discussed, along with future directions for the integration of EHR technology into improving and informing the education of future health and HI professionals. PMID:22910506

  16. Abstract--In this article, we focus on the complementary role of watermarking with respect to medical information

    E-print Network

    are expressions of such a constraint. Focusing on medical information records, which for a patient are a complex to medical information security (integrity, authenticity ...) and management. We review sample cases where, as an instrument for protection of medical information, for secure sharing and handling of medical images

  17. Medical records confidentiality and public health research: two values at stake? An italian survey focus on individual preferences.

    PubMed

    Toccaceli, Virgilia; Fagnani, Corrado; Stazi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-02-20

    In a time when Europe is preparing to introduce new regulations on privacy protection, we conducted a survey among 1700 twins enrolled in the Italian Twin Register about the access and use of their medical records for public health research without explicit informed consent. A great majority of respondents would refuse or are doubtful about the access and use of hospital discharge records or clinical data without their explicit consent. Young and female individuals represent the modal profile of these careful people. As information retrieved from medical records is crucial for progressing knowledge, it is important to promote a better understanding of the value of public health research activities among the general population. Furthermore, public opinions are relevant to policy making, and concerns and preferences about privacy and confidentiality in research can contribute to the design of procedures to exploit medical records effectively and customize the protection of individuals' medical data. Significance for public healthInformation retrieved from medical records is critical for public health research and policy. In particular, large amounts of individual health data are needed in an epidemiological setting, where methodological constraints (e.g. follow-up update) and quality control procedures very often require data to be re-identifiable. Concern about European regulation affecting access to medical records seems to be widespread in the scientific community. Highlighting individuals' concerns and preferences about privacy and informed consent regarding the use of health data can support policy making for public health research. It can contribute to the design of procedures aiming to extract the greatest value from medical records and, more importantly, to create a system for the protection of personal data tailored to the needs of different people. PMID:25918693

  18. Medical Records Confidentiality and Public Health Research: Two Values at Stake? An Italian Survey Focus on Individual Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Toccaceli, Virgilia; Fagnani, Corrado; Stazi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    In a time when Europe is preparing to introduce new regulations on privacy protection, we conducted a survey among 1700 twins enrolled in the Italian Twin Register about the access and use of their medical records for public health research without explicit informed consent. A great majority of respondents would refuse or are doubtful about the access and use of hospital discharge records or clinical data without their explicit consent. Young and female individuals represent the modal profile of these careful people. As information retrieved from medical records is crucial for progressing knowledge, it is important to promote a better understanding of the value of public health research activities among the general population. Furthermore, public opinions are relevant to policy making, and concerns and preferences about privacy and confidentiality in research can contribute to the design of procedures to exploit medical records effectively and customize the protection of individuals’ medical data. Significance for public health Information retrieved from medical records is critical for public health research and policy. In particular, large amounts of individual health data are needed in an epidemiological setting, where methodological constraints (e.g. follow-up update) and quality control procedures very often require data to be re-identifiable. Concern about European regulation affecting access to medical records seems to be widespread in the scientific community. Highlighting individuals’ concerns and preferences about privacy and informed consent regarding the use of health data can support policy making for public health research. It can contribute to the design of procedures aiming to extract the greatest value from medical records and, more importantly, to create a system for the protection of personal data tailored to the needs of different people. PMID:25918693

  19. Consumer health information seeking on the Internet: the state of the art

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. W. Cline; K. M. Haynes

    2001-01-01

    Increasingly, consumers engage in health information seeking via the Internet. Taking a communication perspective, this review argues why public health professionals should be concerned about the topic, considers potential benefits, synthesizes quality concerns, identifies criteria for evaluating online health information and critiques the literature. More than 70 000 websites disseminate health information; in excess of 50 million people seek health

  20. Identifying preferences for mobile health applications for self-monitoring and self-management: Focus group findings from HIV-positive persons and young mothers

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Swendeman, Dallas; Comulada, W. Scott; Estrin, Deborah; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2012-01-01

    Objective Self-management of risk behaviors is a cornerstone of future population health interventions. Using mobile phones for routine self-monitoring and feedback is a cost-efficient strategy for self-management and ecological momentary interventions (EMI). However, mobile health applications need to be designed to be highly attractive and acceptable to a broad range of user groups. To inform the design of an adaptable mobile health application we aimed to identify the dimensions and range of user preferences for application features by different user groups. Methods Five focus group interviews were conducted: two (n = 9; n = 20) with people living with HIV (PLH) and three with young mothers (n = 6; n = 8; n = 10). Thematic analyses were conducted on the focus group sessions’ notes and transcripts. Results Both groups considered customization of reminders and prompts as necessary, and goal setting, motivational messaging, problem solving, and feedback as attractive. For PLH, automated and location-based reminders for medication adherence and sharing data with healthcare providers were both acceptable and attractive features. Privacy protection and invasiveness were the primary concerns, particularly around location tracking, illegal drug use, and sexual partner information. Concerns were ameliorated by use scenario or purpose, monetary incentives, and password protection. Privacy was not a major concern to mothers who considered passwords burdensome. Mothers’ preferences focused on customization that supports mood, exercise and eating patterns, and especially using the mobile phone camera to photograph food to increase self-accountability. Conclusions Individualization emerged as the key feature and design principle to reduce user burden and increase attractiveness and acceptability. Mobile phone EMI uniquely enables individualization, context-aware and real-time feedback, and tailored intervention delivery. PMID:22704234

  1. Repository on maternal child health: Health portal to improve access to information on maternal child health in India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality and essential health information is considered one of the most cost-effective interventions to improve health for a developing country. Healthcare portals have revolutionalized access to health information and knowledge using the Internet and related technologies, but their usage is far from satisfactory in India. This article describes a health portal developed in India aimed at providing one-stop access to efficiently search, organize and share maternal child health information relevant from public health perspective in the country. Methods The portal ‘Repository on Maternal Child Health’ was developed using an open source content management system and standardized processes were followed for collection, selection, categorization and presentation of resource materials. Its usage is evaluated using key performance indicators obtained from Google Analytics, and quality assessed using a standardized checklist of knowledge management. The results are discussed in relation to improving quality and access to health information. Results The portal was launched in July 2010 and provides free access to full-text of 900 resource materials categorized under specific topics and themes. During the subsequent 18 months, 52,798 visits were registered from 174 countries across the world, and more than three-fourth visits were from India alone. Nearly 44,000 unique visitors visited the website and spent an average time of 4 minutes 26 seconds. The overall bounce rate was 27.6%. An increase in the number of unique visitors was found to be significantly associated with an increase in the average time on site (p-value 0.01), increase in the web traffic through search engines (p-value 0.00), and decrease in the bounce rate (p-value 0.03). There was a high degree of agreement between the two experts regarding quality assessment carried out under the three domains of knowledge access, knowledge creation and knowledge transfer (Kappa statistic 0.72). Conclusions Efficient management of health information is imperative for informed decision making, and digital repositories have now-a-days become the preferred source of information management. The growing popularity of the portal indicates the potential of such initiatives in improving access to quality and essential health information in India. There is a need to develop similar mechanisms for other health domains and interlink them to facilitate access to a variety of health information from a single platform. PMID:23281735

  2. Consumer health information and the not-for-profit health agency.

    PubMed

    Calvano, M

    1991-04-01

    Driven by increasing consumer demand, not-for-profit health agencies are responding by providing accurate, current information about the disorders they deal with. A case history of the information service at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the role of the health sciences librarian in the development of such information centers is described. The librarian, as information provider in the health agency setting, obtains professional advisory support, thus assuring delivery of the most responsible information to the constituency represented by the organization. An overview of the decision-making process for development of such a service is provided, including a description of the Cuadra STAR integrated online system. This system offers an infinite number of databases with immediate access to cross database searching of pertinent internal files and standard library records. A random survey of consumers, based on questioning repeat callers, has indicated an overwhelmingly positive response to this service. PMID:2039905

  3. Interventions to Assist Health Consumers to Find Reliable Online Health Information: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery D.; Emmerton, Lynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Health information on the Internet is ubiquitous, and its use by health consumers prevalent. Finding and understanding relevant online health information, and determining content reliability, pose real challenges for many health consumers. Purpose To identify the types of interventions that have been implemented to assist health consumers to find reliable online health information, and where possible, describe and compare the types of outcomes studied. Data Sources PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus and Cochrane Library databases; WorldCat and Scirus ‘gray literature’ search engines; and manual review of reference lists of selected publications. Study Selection Publications were selected by firstly screening title, abstract, and then full text. Data Extraction Seven publications met the inclusion criteria, and were summarized in a data extraction form. The form incorporated the PICOS (Population Intervention Comparators Outcomes and Study Design) Model. Two eligible gray literature papers were also reported. Data Synthesis Relevant data from included studies were tabulated to enable descriptive comparison. A brief critique of each study was included in the tables. This review was unable to follow systematic review methods due to the paucity of research and humanistic interventions reported. Limitations While extensive, the gray literature search may have had limited reach in some countries. The paucity of research on this topic limits conclusions that may be drawn. Conclusions The few eligible studies predominantly adopted a didactic approach to assisting health consumers, whereby consumers were either taught how to find credible websites, or how to use the Internet. Common types of outcomes studied include knowledge and skills pertaining to Internet use and searching for reliable health information. These outcomes were predominantly self-assessed by participants. There is potential for further research to explore other avenues for assisting health consumers to find reliable online health information, and to assess outcomes via objective measures. PMID:24710348

  4. Adolescents Searching for Health Information on the Internet: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Holly A; Resnick, Paul J; Richardson, Caroline R

    2003-01-01

    Background Adolescents' access to health information on the Internet is partly a function of their ability to search for and find answers to their health-related questions. Adolescents may have unique health and computer literacy needs. Although many surveys, interviews, and focus groups have been utilized to understand the information-seeking and information-retrieval behavior of adolescents looking for health information online, we were unable to locate observations of individual adolescents that have been conducted in this context. Objective This study was designed to understand how adolescents search for health information using the Internet and what implications this may have on access to health information. Methods A convenience sample of 12 students (age 12-17 years) from 1 middle school and 2 high schools in southeast Michigan were provided with 6 health-related questions and asked to look for answers using the Internet. Researchers recorded 68 specific searches using software that captured screen images as well as synchronized audio recordings. Recordings were reviewed later and specific search techniques and strategies were coded. A qualitative review of the verbal communication was also performed. Results Out of 68 observed searches, 47 (69%) were successful in that the adolescent found a correct and useful answer to the health question. The majority of sites that students attempted to access were retrieved directly from search engine results (77%) or a search engine's recommended links (10%); only a small percentage were directly accessed (5%) or linked from another site (7%). The majority (83%) of followed links from search engine results came from the first 9 results. Incorrect spelling (30 of 132 search terms), number of pages visited within a site (ranging from 1-15), and overall search strategy (eg, using a search engine versus directly accessing a site), were each important determinants of success. Qualitative analysis revealed that participants used a trial-and-error approach to formulate search strings, scanned pages randomly instead of systematically, and did not consider the source of the content when searching for health information. Conclusions This study provides a useful snapshot of current adolescent searching patterns. The results have implications for constructing realistic simulations of adolescent search behavior, improving distribution and usefulness of Web sites with health information relevant to adolescents, and enhancing educators' knowledge of what specific pitfalls students are likely to encounter. PMID:14713653

  5. Public attitudes towards pricing policies to change health-related behaviours: a UK focus group study

    E-print Network

    Somerville, Claire; Marteau, Theresa M.; Kinmouth, Ann Louise; Cohn, Simon

    2015-05-16

    , particularly for the health service. The idea that either the government or, at the very least the National Health Service, would “go bang” or “flat line” (Jock FGD 067) or become “skint” (Jimmy FGD 070) if additional taxes on unhealthy products were... approaches. Regional Office for Europe; 2011 19 14. Mytton OT, Clarke D, Rayner M. Taxing unhealthy food and drinks to improve health. BMJ; 2012;344:e2931 15. Novak NL, Brownell KD. Taxation as prevention and as a treatment for obesity: the case...

  6. [Computerization and the importance of information in health system, as in health care resources registry].

    PubMed

    Troselj, Mario; Fanton, Davor

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of creating a health care resources registry and its operating in Croatia as well as the importance of information in health system are described. At the Croatian Institute of Public Health, monitoring of human resources is performed through the national Health Workers Registry. It also covers basic data on all health units, bed capacities of health facilities included. The initiated health care computerization has urged the idea of forming one more database on physical resources, i.e. on registered medical devices and equipment, more complete. Linking these databases on health resources would produce a single Health Care Resources Registry. The concept views Health Care Resources Registry as part of the overall health information system with centralized information on the health system. The planned development of segments of a single health information system is based on the implementation of the accepted international standards and common network services. Network services that are based on verified Internet technologies are used within a safe, reliable and closed health computer network, which makes up the health intranet (WAN--Wide Area Network). The resource registry is a software solution based on the relational database that monitors history, thus permitting the data collected over a longer period to be analyzed. Such a solution assumes the existence of a directory service, which would replace the current independent software for the Health Workers Registry. In the Health Care Resources Registry, the basic data set encompasses data objects and attributes from the directory service. The directory service is compatible with the LDAP protocol (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), providing services uniformly to the current records on human and physical resources. Through the storage of attributes defined according to the HL7 (Health Level Seven) standard, directory service is accessible to all applications of the health information system. Directory service does not follow the history of attribute changes, and is optimized for a large number of authorizing inquiries. With it, one follows the following objects and attributes: persons, groups of people (patients, physicians, other personnel), roles (right of access and administrator permissions), organizational units, unit locations, devices and services (according to the list of services and procedures). One can add to the Health Care Resource Registry such attributes as are nonessential for inclusion in the directory service, but are of public health value. Authentication, authorization and digital signature are done by means of Smart Cards, which are used as protective elements against access to system functions, and simultaneously as a physical medium for the storage of the official certificate with which documents are signed digitally. As FINA (state financial control agency) has completed a system for certificate issuance and verification, the option of official digital signature is also available as a computer network service. Any changes taking place in the directory service are transferred by XML messages to a separate part of the Registry that reads them and automatically modifies records in the relational database. Because data input and data changes are made in health units, this makes the data updated and directly connected with health working operations. This avoids all one-time data collection campaigns using form filling about the devices and equipment in the future. As it is very difficult to monitor from a central standpoint how accurate and update the information is, it is necessary to delegate the permissions and duties associated with making changes to the directory service. By this organizational setup, the time needed to ensure data quality control is reduced. In the case described, the Health Care Resource Registry becomes an indicator of change, acquiring certain characteristics of an analytical system. An analysis of topical data renders possible proactive action and makes more effective the planning and utilization of ava

  7. Graduate Environmental Health (GEH) Demographic Information (Optional)

    E-print Network

    , or to the public. This information will be used for statistical purposes only. If you decline to provide or origin, regardless of race. Not Hispanic or Latino Race (Check all that apply): American Indian or Alaska Native ­ a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North or South America

  8. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health

  9. Role of commensal and probiotic bacteria in human health: a focus on inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Miquel, Sylvie; Ulmer, Jonathan; Kechaou, Noura; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G

    2013-01-01

    The human gut is one of the most complex ecosystems, composed of 1013-1014 microorganisms which play an important role in human health. In addition, some food products contain live bacteria which transit through our gastrointestinal tract and could exert beneficial effects on our health (known as probiotic effect). Among the numerous proposed health benefits attributed to commensal and probiotic bacteria, their capacity to interact with the host immune system is now well demonstrated. Currently, the use of recombinant lactic acid bacteria to deliver compounds of health interest is gaining importance as an extension of the probiotic concept. This review summarizes some of the recent findings and perspectives in the study of the crosstalk of both commensal and probiotic bacteria with the human host as well as the latest studies in recombinant commensal and probiotic bacteria. Our aim is to highlight the potential roles of recombinant bacteria in this ecosystem. PMID:23876056

  10. Faculty Wellness Program, University of Ottawa Personal Health Information Privacy Policy

    E-print Network

    Sankoff, David

    , records of your visits to FWP. Occasionally, we collect personal health information about you from otherFaculty Wellness Program, University of Ottawa Personal Health Information Privacy Policy Collection of Personal Health Information We collect personal health information about you directly from you

  11. Essential health information available for India in the public domain on the internet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magdalena Z Raban; Rakhi Dandona; Lalit Dandona

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health information and statistics are important for planning, monitoring and improvement of the health of populations. However, the availability of health information in developing countries is often inadequate. This paper reviews the essential health information available readily in the public domain on the internet for India in order to broadly assess its adequacy and inform further development. METHODS: The

  12. Understanding the Hispanic Health Paradox Through a Multi-Generation Lens: A Focus on Behavior Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William A. Vega; William M. Sribney

    \\u000a The Hispanic Health Paradox refers to the usual finding in population health studies that the most vulnerable sub-population\\u000a of immigrants actually have superior morbidity and mortality compared to either the US population or Hispanics born in the\\u000a United States. In this paper we examine this paradox using an epidemiologic strategy of scrutinizing inter-generational change\\u000a processes in the Latino population.

  13. 78 FR 2412 - Request for Public Comment: 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service Forms...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ...Individually Identifiable Health Information'' (Privacy...Simplification subtitle of the Health Insurance Portability...protect individuals' personal health information, and gives...access to their medical records. 45 CFR...

  14. 42 CFR 495.338 - Health information technology implementation advance planning document requirements (HIT IAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Health information technology implementation advance planning document...STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific...Program § 495.338 Health information technology implementation advance planning...

  15. 42 CFR 495.338 - Health information technology implementation advance planning document requirements (HIT IAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Health information technology implementation advance planning document...STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific...Program § 495.338 Health information technology implementation advance planning...

  16. 42 CFR 495.336 - Health information technology planning advance planning document requirements (HIT PAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Health information technology planning advance planning document...STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific...Program § 495.336 Health information technology planning advance planning document...

  17. 42 CFR 495.338 - Health information technology implementation advance planning document requirements (HIT IAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Health information technology implementation advance planning document...STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific...Program § 495.338 Health information technology implementation advance planning...

  18. 42 CFR 495.336 - Health information technology planning advance planning document requirements (HIT PAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Health information technology planning advance planning document...STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific...Program § 495.336 Health information technology planning advance planning document...

  19. 42 CFR 495.336 - Health information technology planning advance planning document requirements (HIT PAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Health information technology planning advance planning document...STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific...Program § 495.336 Health information technology planning advance planning document...

  20. 42 CFR 495.336 - Health information technology planning advance planning document requirements (HIT PAPD).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Health information technology planning advance planning document...STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM Requirements Specific...Program § 495.336 Health information technology planning advance planning document...