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1

How Adolescents Use Technology for Health Information: Implications for Health Professionals from Focus Group Studies  

PubMed Central

Background Adolescents present many challenges in providing them effective preventive services and health care. Yet, they are typically the early adopters of new technology (eg, the Internet). This creates important opportunities for engaging youths via eHealth. Objective To describe how adolescents use technology for their health-information needs, identify the challenges they face, and highlight some emerging roles of health professionals regarding eHealth services for adolescents. Methods Using an inductive qualitative research design, 27 focus groups were conducted in Ontario, Canada. The 210 participants (55% female, 45% male; median age 16 years) were selected to reflect diversity in age, sex, geographic location, cultural identity, and risk. An 8-person team analyzed and coded the data according to major themes. Results Study participants most-frequently sought or distributed information related to school (89%), interacting with friends (85%), social concerns (85%), specific medical conditions (67%), body image and nutrition (63%), violence and personal safety (59%), and sexual health (56%). Finding personally-relevant, high-quality information was a pivotal challenge that has ramifications on the depth and types of information that adolescents can find to answer their health questions. Privacy in accessing information technology was a second key challenge. Participants reported using technologies that clustered into 4 domains along a continuum from highly-interactive to fixed information sources: (1) personal communication: telephone, cell phone, and pager; (2) social communication: e-mail, instant messaging, chat, and bulletin boards; (3) interactive environments: Web sites, search engines, and computers; and (4) unidirectional sources: television, radio, and print. Three emerging roles for health professionals in eHealth include: (1) providing an interface for adolescents with technology and assisting them in finding pertinent information sources; (2) enhancing connection to youths by extending ways and times when practitioners are available; and (3) fostering critical appraisal skills among youths for evaluating the quality of health information. Conclusions This study helps illuminate adolescent health-information needs, their use of information technologies, and emerging roles for health professionals. The findings can inform the design and more-effective use of eHealth applications for adolescent populations.

Biscope, Sherry; Poland, Blake; Goldberg, Eudice

2003-01-01

2

Genetic information: Special or not? Responses from focus groups with members of a health maintenance organization.  

PubMed

Genetic information is used increasingly in health care. Some experts have argued that genetic information is qualitatively different from other medical information and, therefore, raises unique social issues. This view, called "genetic exceptionalism," has importantly influenced recent policy efforts. Others have argued that genetic information is like other medical information and that treating it differently may actually result in unintended disparities. Little is known about how the general public views genetic information. To identify opinions about implications of genetic and other medical information among the general population, we conducted a series of focus groups in Seattle, WA. Participants were women and men between ages 18 and 74, living within 30 miles of Seattle and members of the Group Health Cooperative. A structured discussion guide was used to ensure coverage of all predetermined topics. Sessions lasted approximately 2 hr; were audio taped and transcribed. The transcripts formed the basis of the current analysis. Key findings included the theme that genetic information was much like other medical information and that all sensitive medical information should be well protected. Personal choice (i.e., the right to choose whether to know health risk information and to control who else knows) was reported to be of crucial importance. Participants had an understanding of the tensions involved in protecting privacy versus sharing medical information to help another person. These data may guide future research and policy concerning the use and protection of medical information, including genetic information. PMID:17318844

Diergaarde, Brenda; Bowen, Deborah J; Ludman, Evette J; Culver, Julie O; Press, Nancy; Burke, Wylie

2007-03-15

3

Quality and integration of public health information systems: A systematic review focused on immunization and vital records systems  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Public health professionals rely on quantitative data for the daily practice of public health as well as organizational decision making and planning. However, several factors work against effective data sharing among public health agencies in the US. This review characterizes the reported barriers and enablers of effective use of public health IS from an informatics perspective. Methods: A systematic review of the English language literature for 2005 to 2011 followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) format. The review focused on immunization information systems (IIS) and vital records information systems (VRIS). Systems were described according to the structural aspects of IS integration and data quality. Results: Articles describing IIS documented issues pertaining to the distribution of the system, the autonomy of the data providers, the heterogeneous nature of information sharing as well as the quality of the data. Articles describing VRIS were focused much more heavily on data quality, particularly whether or not the data were free from errors. Conclusions: For state and local practitioners to effectively utilize data, public health IS will have to overcome the challenges posed by a large number of autonomous data providers utilizing a variety of technologies.

Vest, Joshua R; Kirk, Hilary M; Issel, L Michele

2012-01-01

4

The Native Telehealth Outreach and Technical Assistance Program: A Community-Based Approach to the Development of Multimedia-Focused Health Care Information  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The development and dissemination of culturally relevant health care information has traditionally taken a "top-down" approach. Governmental funding agencies and research institutions have too often dictated the importance and focus of health-related research and information dissemination. In addition, the digital divide has affected rural…

Dick, Rhonda Wiegman; Manson, Spero M.; Hansen, Amy L.; Huggins, Annie; Trullinger, Lori

2007-01-01

5

Characteristics of primary health care units with focus on drug information from the pharmaceutical industry and adherence to prescribing objectives: a cross-sectional study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Adherence to prescribing guidelines varies between primary health care units. The aim of the present study was to investigate correlations between characteristics of primary health care units and adherence to prescribing objectives for rational drug use with focus on drug information from the pharmaceutical industry. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in all 25 primary health care units in

Daniel Carlzon; Lena Gustafsson; Anna L Eriksson; Karin Rignér; Anders Sundström; Susanna M Wallerstedt

2010-01-01

6

Focus Issue: Women's Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This week’s issues of Science and Science’s STKE concern health-related issues that are specifically pertinent to women. Topics at STKE include cell signaling pathways through which human papillomaviruses promote the development of cervical cancer and the role of membrane-associated signaling pathways in the anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen and the beneficial actions of estrogen on cardiovascular function.

L. Bryan Ray (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Editor of Science's STKE and Senior Editor of Science REV); Elizabeth M. Adler (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Associate Editor of Science's STKE REV); Nancy R. Gough (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Managing Editor of Science's STKE REV)

2005-06-14

7

Clinical Care Improvement with Use of Health Information Technology Focusing on Evidence Based Medicine  

PubMed Central

Objectives Healthcare institutions need timely patient information from various sources at the point-of-care. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a tool for proper and efficient incorporation of the results of research in decision-making. Characteristics of medical treatment processes and practical experience concerning the effect of EBM in the clinical process are surveyed. Methods A cross sectional survey conducted in Tehran hospitals in February-March 2012 among 51 clinical residents. The respondents were asked to apply EBM in clinical decision-making to answer questions about the effect of EBM in the clinical process. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used in this study. Results EBM provides a framework for problem solving and improvement of processes. Most residents (76%) agreed that EBM could improve clinical decision making. Eighty one percent of the respondents believed that EBM resulted in quick updating of knowledge. They believed that EBM was more useful for diagnosis than for treatment. There was a significant association between out-patients and in-patients in using electronic EBM resources. Conclusions Research findings were useful in clinical practice and decision making. The computerized guidelines are important tools for improving clinical process quality. When learning how to use IT, methods of search and evaluation of evidence for diagnosis, treatment and medical education are necessary. Purposeful use of IT in clinical processes reduces workload and improves decision-making.

Peyman, Rezaei Hachesu; Ahmadi, Maryam; Aziz, Rezapoor; Farahnaz, Sadughi; Nader, Maroufi

2012-01-01

8

Information needs of health care workers in developing countries: a literature review with a focus on Africa  

PubMed Central

Health care workers in developing countries continue to lack access to basic, practical information to enable them to deliver safe, effective care. This paper provides the first phase of a broader literature review of the information and learning needs of health care providers in developing countries. A Medline search revealed 1762 papers, of which 149 were identified as potentially relevant to the review. Thirty-five of these were found to be highly relevant. Eight of the 35 studies looked at information needs as perceived by health workers, patients and family/community members; 14 studies assessed the knowledge of health workers; and 8 looked at health care practice. The studies suggest a gross lack of knowledge about the basics on how to diagnose and manage common diseases, going right across the health workforce and often associated with suboptimal, ineffective and dangerous health care practices. If this level of knowledge and practice is representative, as it appears to be, it indicates that modern medicine, even at a basic level, has largely failed the majority of the world's population. The information and learning needs of family caregivers and primary and district health workers have been ignored for too long. Improving the availability and use of relevant, reliable health care information has enormous potential to radically improve health care worldwide.

Pakenham-Walsh, Neil; Bukachi, Frederick

2009-01-01

9

A Decade of Research on Health Content in the Media: The Focus on Health Challenges and Sociocultural Context and Attendant Informational and Ideological Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a burgeoning interest in the health and illness content of popular media in the domains of advertising, journalism, and entertainment. This article reviews the past 10 years of this research, describing the relationship between the health topics addressed in the research, the shifting focus of concerns about the media, and, ultimately, the variation in problems for health promotion.

Kimberly N. Kline

2006-01-01

10

Evaluating Health Information  

MedlinePLUS

Millions of consumers get health information from magazines, TV or the Internet. Some of the information is reliable and up to date; some is not. ... a branch of the government, a university, a health organization, a hospital or a business? Focus on ...

11

Activities and ways of organizing better occupational health and safety in small workplaces: special focus on information.  

PubMed

Information is needed in all activities aiming at the development and improvement of working conditions. The information and communication technology has made it possible to have information available 24 h a day, 360 d a year. The administrative structures in various countries also call for more information steering at the workplace level. This means that more web-based and other materials for small enterprises are needed in all countries in order to improve safety and health of the workers. Four different approaches to improve workplace level activities are described here to provide models for others to modify them to their local conditions. The networking of small workplaces supports the development of their safety and thereby also their productivity and possibilities to offer jobs also in the future. PMID:16610526

Lehtinen, Suvi

2006-01-01

12

How do consumers search for and appraise health information on the world wide web? Qualitative study using focus groups, usability tests, and in-depth interviews  

PubMed Central

Objectives To describe techniques for retrieval and appraisal used by consumers when they search for health information on the internet. Design Qualitative study using focus groups, naturalistic observation of consumers searching the world wide web in a usability laboratory, and in-depth interviews. Participants A total of 21 users of the internet participated in three focus group sessions. 17 participants were given a series of health questions and observed in a usability laboratory setting while retrieving health information from the web; this was followed by in-depth interviews. Setting Heidelberg, Germany. Results Although their search technique was often suboptimal, internet users successfully found health information to answer questions in an average of 5 minutes 42 seconds (median 4 minutes 18 seconds) per question. Participants in focus groups said that when assessing the credibility of a website they primarily looked for the source, a professional design, a scientific or official touch, language, and ease of use. However, in the observational study, no participants checked any “about us” sections of websites, disclaimers, or disclosure statements. In the post-search interviews, it emerged that very few participants had noticed and remembered which websites they had retrieved information from. Conclusions Further observational studies are needed to design and evaluate educational and technological innovations for guiding consumers to high quality health information on the web. What is already known on this topicLittle is known about how consumers retrieve and assess the quality of health information on the internetQualitative data are needed to design educational and technological innovations to guide consumers to high quality health informationWhat this study addsUsers of the internet explore only the first few links on general search engines when seeking health informationConsumers say that when assessing the credibility of a site they primarily look for the source, a professional design, and a variety of other criteriaIn practice, internet users do not check the “about us” sections of websites, try to find out who authors or owners of the site are, or read disclaimers or disclosure statementsVery few internet users later remember from which websites they retrieved information or who stood behind the sites

Eysenbach, Gunther; Kohler, Christian

2002-01-01

13

Connecting for Health Literacy: Health Information Partners  

PubMed Central

This article describes a community-based health information partnership to address health literacy and health information inequalities in marginalized communities. Public health, medical, literacy, and library practitioners promote health literacy through outreach, training, and professional development activities in community settings. They create learning environments for people to develop the necessary knowledge and skills to better understand health information and health policy so they can make decisions concerning personal and community health. Outreach activities focus on visits to neighborhood health centers, health fairs, health exhibits at union meetings and conferences; training programs involve hands-on, peer-led computer classes for people living with HIV and for the general public; and professional development programs connect librarians, health providers, public health workers, and literacy teachers in joint planning and learning. Several learners currently participate in and lead community health education programs and HIV advocacy. The coalition's strength develops from strongly shared objectives, an absence of territoriality, and a core active leadership group.

Pomerantz, Karyn L.; Muhammad, Abdul-Ali; Downey, Stacey; Kind, Terry

2010-01-01

14

Health information systems.  

PubMed

Health information provides the foundation for all decision making in healthcare whether clinical at the bed side, or at a national government level. This information is generally collected as part of systems which support administrative or clinical workflow and practice. This chapter describes the many and varied features of systems such as electronic health records (EHRs), how they fit with health information systems and how they collectively manage information flow. Systems engineering methods and tools are described together with their use to suit the health industry. This focuses on the need for suitable system architectures and semantic interoperability. These concepts and their relevance to the health industry are explained. The relationship and requirements for appropriate data governance in these systems is also considered. PMID:24018514

Hovenga, Evelyn J S; Grain, Heather

2013-01-01

15

Costs And Benefits Of Health Information Technology: New Trends From The Literature Since 2005, patient-focused applications have proliferated, but data on their costs and benefits remain sparse  

Microsoft Academic Search

To understand what is new in health information technology (IT), we updated a systematic review of health IT with studies published during 2004-2007. From 4,683 titles, 179 met inclusion criteria. We identified a proliferation of patient-focused applications al- though little formal evaluation in this area; more descriptions of commercial electronic health records (EHRs) and health IT systems designed to run

Caroline Lubick Goldzweig; Ali Towfigh; Margaret Maglione; Paul G. Shekelle

16

Information Technology Outside Health Care  

PubMed Central

Non-health-care uses of information technology (IT) provide important lessons for health care informatics that are often overlooked because of the focus on the ways in which health care is different from other domains. Eight examples of IT use outside health care provide a context in which to examine the content and potential relevance of these lessons. Drawn from personal experience, five books, and two interviews, the examples deal with the role of leadership, academia, the private sector, the government, and individuals working in large organizations. The interviews focus on the need to manage technologic change. The lessons shed light on how to manage complexity, create and deploy standards, empower individuals, and overcome the occasional “wrongness” of conventional wisdom. One conclusion is that any health care informatics self-examination should be outward-looking and focus on the role of health care IT in the larger context of the evolving uses of IT in all domains.

Tuttle, Mark S.

1999-01-01

17

Focusing effects in predecisional information acquisition.  

PubMed

Legrenzi et al. [Legrenzi, P., Girotto, V., & Johnson-Laird, P. N. (1993). Focusing in reasoning and decision making. Cognition, 49, 37-66] showed that when a single option is proposed for consideration the decision makers limit their information acquisition to this one option, failing to take into account potential alternatives. Unfortunately, the evidence supporting this focusing effect is weak and its determinants are largely unknown. In three experiments, we provided stronger support for the reality of the focusing effect and we identified two significant determinants of this phenomenon. The results show that both representational and value-related manipulations are able to reduce the effect. Results also suggest the need to distinguish between two different types of focusing: representational focusing and search-related focusing. PMID:16919591

Del Missier, Fabio; Ferrante, Donatella; Costantini, Erica

2006-08-21

18

Focusing on reproductive health for adolescents.  

PubMed

JOICFP is producing a still photo video consisting of three segments from photos shot in Bangladesh (April 22 - May 2), Thailand (May 2-15), and Mexico (June 29 - July 7) in 1995. The first segment highlights the daily life of a husband, aged 20, and his wife, Moni, aged 14. Moni married at age 13, before the onset of menstruation, and now serves and feeds her husband's large extended family. The Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB), the local implementing agent of the Sustainable Community-based Family Planning/Maternal and Child Health (FP/MCH) Project with Special Focus on Women, which is supported by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and executed by JOICFP, introduced Moni to the concept of reproductive health and encouraged her to join other women in activities designed to improve their health and raise their economic status. The second segment depicts the life of a former commercial sex worker who is undergoing occupational skill development training promoted by the Population and Community Development Association. The girl is now a leader of teenagers in her village; she works to change attitudes that sent her to work as a prostitute with an estimated 150,000 other poor rural teenage women. The third segment focuses on teen pregnancy and the efforts of the Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM) in the areas of health care and education for adolescents. PMID:12289887

1995-06-01

19

Risk information - barrier to informed choice? A focus group study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Objectives: To study consumers' information needs for informed choice on colorectal cancer screening, and to develop and evaluate information material that is evidence-based and communicates benefit as well as lack of benefit and risks as natural frequencies. Methods: Design: Focus group study; during a first round con- sumers' needs and attitudes were surveyed, in a second round the information

Anke Steckelberg; Jürgen Kasper; Michael Redegeld; Ingrid Mühlhauser

2004-01-01

20

Health Information Privacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thoughtful scholarship in the area of informational privacy sometimes assumes that a significant level of privacy can coexist with the development of a modern health information infrastructure. Some commentators suggest that we can have it both ways: that adequate legal protection of informational privacy will eliminate the need to significantly limit the collection of health data. This article demonstrates that

Lawrence O. Gostin

1995-01-01

21

How does health information influence African American men's health behavior?  

PubMed

Few researchers have examined where African American men obtain, process, and use health information. A thematic analysis of data from eighteen exploratory focus groups conducted with 154 urban African American men aged 32 years and older revealed that men received health information from a variety of sources, including health professionals, media, and members of their social networks. At times, information raised their awareness of health issues, but trust in the source of the information influenced how this information was perceived. Medical professionals were the most common source of health information, but family members were the most trusted source of health information. Health problems and social support increased men's motivation to use health information in order to improve their health and healthy behaviors. These findings illustrate that it is critical to identify factors that influence what information men choose to believe and follow or decide to ignore. PMID:22178902

Griffith, Derek M; Ellis, Katrina R; Ober Allen, Julie

2011-12-15

22

Observations on health information in developing countries.  

PubMed

Based on personal experiences, observations are offered on health information in developing countries, ways in which information systems can be strengthened, and opportunities for health-information science graduates. Although data collection consumes a significant portion of the health worker's day, information systems are often a low priority in developing countries. Health-information systems can be strengthened by focusing on local solutions, by building skills in health workers, by utilizing appropriate technology, and by integrating information systems into health programs. Health-information science graduates can assist in improving systems in developing countries, but this will require a broad and flexible definition of health information science, which is much more than computing technology; it is supporting health workers to define, manage, and apply the information they need. PMID:8072420

Hull, C

1994-06-01

23

Coping focus counselling in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper was to describe a newly-developed system of mental health nurse counselling (coping focus counselling (CFC)) for people with serious and complex mental health needs. The system is based on the recovery alliance theory (RAT) of mental health nursing. The paper identifies shortcomings in current practices in psychotherapy and counselling in the exclusive use of techniques from a single approach, for example, cognitive behaviour therapy, client-centred therapy, attachment theory, or Gestalt theory. It also discusses the opposite dangers of the use of many techniques from different approaches, without a clear rationale for their selection. CFC was developed to avoid these practices. It accommodates the selective use of techniques from different approaches. Techniques selected are viewed as deriving their meanings from the theoretical framework into which they are assimilated, namely RAT, and no longer take the same meaning from the theory from which they originated. Central to this integrative process is the use of the concept of coping. Other distinguishing features of CFC are the use of everyday language in using the system and the reaffirmation of the nurse-client relationship within a working alliance as the basis in which the CFC operates. PMID:22640173

Shanley, Eamon; Jubb-Shanley, Maureen

2012-05-29

24

Security of Health Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic generation, transmission, and storage of health data have transformed patient care by making it easy to acquire,\\u000a search, manipulate, and distribute large amounts of information. An electronic workflow facilitates direct patient care and\\u000a can be used for purposes such as quality assurance and submission of health insurance claims. Information in the health record\\u000a is also used for purposes not

Gordon Gibby; Keith J. Ruskin

25

Regional Health Information Systems  

PubMed Central

Abstract In general, there is agreement that robust integrated information systems are the foundation for building successful regional health care delivery systems. Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) institutions that, over the years, have developed strategies for creating cohesive institutional information systems and services are finding that IAIMS strategies work well in the even more complex regional environment. The key elements of IAIMS planning are described and lessons learned are discussed in the context of regional health information systems developed. The challenges of aligning the various information agencies and agendas in support of a regional health information system are complex ; however, the potential rewards for health care in quality, efficacy, and cost savings are enormous.

Fuller, Sherrilynne

1997-01-01

26

Application of Information Technology: Promoting Health Literacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report reviews some of the extensive literature in health literacy, much of it focused on the intersection of low literacy and the understanding of basic health care information. Several articles describe methods for assessing health literacy as well as methods for assessing the readability of texts, although generally these latter have not been developed with health materials in mind.

Alexa T. McCray

2005-01-01

27

Health Information Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of health information technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 14 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 6 units specific to the occupation of emergency medical technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

28

Information in Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The report stresses the fact that while there is unity in the continuum of medicine, information in health care is markedly different from information in medical education and research. This difference is described as an anomaly in that it appears to deviate in excess of normal variation from needs common to research and education. In substance,…

Mayeda, Tadashi A.

29

77 FR 55217 - Health Information Technology Implementation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Services Administration Health Information Technology Implementation AGENCY...Health Service Act) Health Information Technology Implementation for Health...effective use of Health Information Technology (HIT)....

2012-09-07

30

Occupational health: A discipline out of focus  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article first examines three areas of occupational health: the work of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the work on chemicals of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), and the International Labour Organization (ILO) Convention and Recommendation on Occupational Health Services. All three areas are criticized, using the notion of a scientific strategy which is the

2009-01-01

31

Sports medicine: a focus on health.  

PubMed

As part of a detailed survey, we recently asked our physician readers to define sports medicine. No single definition stood out. Words and phrases used included (among many others): art and science of medicine applied to physical activity, care of athletes, disease prevention and treatment, emphasis on function, enhancing fitness, exercise, health, health for all age groups, human performance, medical conditions affected by exercise, medical subspecialty, musculoskeletal medicine, nutrition, orthopedic subspecialty, physiology, prevention, psychology, rehabilitation, sports injuries, sports-related medical conditions, sports science, etc. PMID:20086662

Matheson, G O

1999-10-01

32

Personalized Health Information Retrieval System.  

PubMed

Consumers face barriers when seeking health information on the Internet. A Personalized Health Information Retrieval System (PHIRS) is proposed to recommend health information for consumers. The system consists of four modules: (1) User modeling module captures user inverted exclamation mark s preference and health interests; (2) Automatic quality filtering module identifies high quality health information; (3) Automatic text difficulty rating module classifies health information into professional or patient educational materials; and (4) User profile matching module tailors health information for individuals. The initial results show that PHIRS could assist consumers with simple search strategies. PMID:16779435

Wang, Yunli; Liu, Zhenkai

2005-01-01

33

Health and Young Children. Focus on Fitness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|How much "junk food" is too much? This question is difficult to answer, because it depends on the health and weight status of the child. If the child already has a weight problem, then this type of snack should be more restricted than for a child without weight issues. In this article, Dr. Ludwig states that, as a general rule, parents should not…

Ludwig, David

2006-01-01

34

77 FR 2734 - Health Information Technology Implementation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Services Administration Health Information Technology Implementation AGENCY...Health Service Act) Health Information Technology Implementation for Health...the opportunity to advance information technology resources of the...

2012-01-19

35

Patient-Focused Technology and the Health Care Delivery System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The promise of e-health is upon us! Specialized, patient-focused computer systems – such as health-related websites, consumer health informatics tools, patient portals to hospital records and clinical resources, and palm-top reminders for medications and disease management – help lay people and their family caregivers better understand their health challenges, participate in health care choices, cope with the implications of disease

Patricia Flatley Brennan

36

Social marketing: consumer focused health promotion.  

PubMed

1. Social marketing provides a theoretical basis to increase awareness of preventable health conditions and to increase participation in wellness programs. 2. The philosophy of social marketing underscores the necessity to be aware of and responsive to the consumer's perception of needs. 3. Social marketing is distinguished by its emphasis on "non-tangible" products such as ideas, attitudes, and lifestyle changes. 4. "Marketing mix" is a social marketing strategy that intertwines elements of product, price, place, and promotion to satisfy needs and wants of consumers. PMID:7575787

Blair, J E

1995-10-01

37

The Health Information Revolution  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Healthcare quality improvement is an economic and moral necessity. The transformation, which is needed to improve productivity\\u000a and effectiveness, will rely on computer interoperability to deliver information when and where required, support soundly-based\\u000a decision-making, eliminate unnecessary repetition, reduce delays and avoid errors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Interoperability is one of the core themes of the US Federal Health Information Technology Strategic Plan, which states:

Tim Benson

38

Privacy and Your Health Information  

MedlinePLUS

... Use or share your information for marketing or advertising purposes • Share private notes about your mental health counseling sessions The Law Protects the Privacy of Your Health Information Providers ...

39

National Institutes of Health: Health Information  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Health Information portion of the National Institutes of Health website covers a wide range of topics. This consumer-oriented site includes Quick Links, on the left side of the page, to such topics as "Child & Teen Health", "Men's Health", "Minority Health", and "Seniors' Health". To browse health categories, the visitor can browse several different ways. They can browse under "Body Location/Systems", "Conditions/Diseases", "Procedures", and "Health and Wellness". On the left side of the page the visitor can also choose to search for Health Topics alphabetically and for those more inclined toward audio learning, visitors can listen to NIH Radio by clicking on "MP3 audio reports" on the right side of the page. The Research in Action feature in the top middle of the page offers insight into how humans hear. Just click on the picture above Research in Action to be taken to the article. For visitors who just can't find what they need on the Health Information site, there are a slew of Related Links near the bottom of the page, including Health Information on the Web, Health Newsletters, Health Databases, and Federal Health Agencies.

40

Privacy and Health Information Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increased use of health information technology (health IT) is a common element of nearly every health reform proposal because it has the potential to decrease costs, improve health outcomes, coordinate care, and improve public health. However, it raises concerns about security and privacy of medical information.\\u000aThis paper examines some of the “gaps” in privacy protections that arise out

Deven McGraw

2009-01-01

41

Health Services Career Cluster ITAC for Career-Focused Education. Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Designed for Ohio educators responsible for planning programs to prepare high school students for careers in health services, this document presents an overview of Ohio's Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC) system of career-focused education and specific information about the health services ITAC career cluster. The first half…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

42

Providing relevant health information to patient-centered healthcare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient-centric healthcare is an emerging healthcare model that optimizes the healthcare system to focus on patient experience and outcomes for better health and well-being. It requires that patients as well as physicians should have the ability to obtain and understand health information, and make appropriate health decisions. A problem is how such health information should be gathered from a variety

J. Puustjarvi; L. Puustjarvi

2010-01-01

43

Bridging the information divide: health information sharing in home care.  

PubMed

As in many health sectors, in home care there have been significant investments made in electronic health information systems (EHIS) and accompanying standardized assessment instruments. While the potential of these systems to enhance the quality of care has been recognized, it has yet to be fully realized in Canadian home care settings. Data on EHIS barriers and facilitators were collected using a survey (n = 22).The results were discussed at a workshop (n = 30) and a "world café" session was held to consider strategies and interventions for improving health information exchange, with a focus on home care rehabilitation. PMID:23789525

Santi, Selena M; Hinton, Stephanie; Berg, Katherine; Stolee, Paul

2013-03-01

44

The rise of a health-IT academic focus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction The U.S. health care industry is catching up on its lagging information technology (IT) investment, and this trend has important ramifications for IT academics and practitioners. During the 1990s, investing in IT was a relatively low priority for hospitals and health systems, which faced fiscal constraints and pressing need to upgrade aging facilities. Now IT has come to be

E. Vance Wilson; Bengisu Tulu

2010-01-01

45

Second Life and health information.  

PubMed

Second Life (SL) is emerging as a repository of health information. The purpose of this study was to determine the number of places and groups that offer specific health information in SL. A retrospective analysis of SL places and groups was conducted for cancer. Findings indicate that more cancer information is available from groups than specific places in SL. All current and future cancer information will need to be evaluated for reliability and efficacy. PMID:19592946

Brixey, Juliana J; Turley, James P

2009-01-01

46

How Does Health Information Influence African American Men’s Health Behavior?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few researchers have examined where African American men obtain, process, and use health information. A thematic analysis of data from eighteen exploratory focus groups conducted with 154 urban African American men aged 32 years and older revealed that men received health information from a variety of sources, including health professionals, media, and members of their social networks. At times, information

Derek M. Griffith; Katrina R. Ellis; Julie Ober Allen

2012-01-01

47

Public health information infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The public health infrastructure is a set of agencies and organizations whose mission is to create the environment in which we can be healthy. This broadest of definitions includes state and local health departments, selected federal agencies, and a wide range of other governmental, nonprofit, and for-profit agencies and organizations. This report will limit itself to state and local health

JOEL L. NITZKIN; CHRISTOPHER BUTTERY

2008-01-01

48

45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION...

2010-10-01

49

Equity-focused health impact assessment: A tool to assist policy makers in addressing health inequalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Australasia (Australia and New Zealand) the use of health impact assessment (HIA) as a tool for improved policy development is comparatively new. The public health workforce do not routinely assess the potential health and equity impacts of proposed policies or programs. The Australasian Collaboration for Health Equity Impact Assessment was funded to develop a strategic framework for equity-focused HIA

Sarah. Simpson; Mary Mahoney; Elizabeth Harris; Rosemary Aldrich; Jenny Stewart-Williams

2005-01-01

50

Self-rated health and ethnicity: focus on indigenous populations  

PubMed Central

Objectives Self-rated health (SRH) is a commonly used measure in surveys to assess general health status or health-related quality of life. Differences have been detected in how different ethnic groups and nationalities interpret the SRH measure and assess their health. This review summarizes the research conducted on SRH within and between ethnic groups, with a focus on indigenous groups. Study design and methods A search of published academic literature on SRH and ethnicity, including a comprehensive review of all relevant indigenous research, was conducted using PubMed and summarized. Results A wide variety of research on SRH within ethnic groups has been undertaken. SRH typically serves as an outcome measure. Minority respondents generally rated their health worse than the dominant population. Numerous culturally-specific determinants of SRH have been identified. Cross-national and cross-ethnicity comparisons of the associations of SRH have been conducted to assess the validity of SRH. While SRH is a valid measure within a variety of ethnicities, differences in how SRH is assessed by ethnicities have been detected. Research in indigenous groups remains generally under-represented in the SRH literature. Conclusions These results suggest that different ethnic groups and nationalities vary in SRH evaluations, interpretation of the SRH measure, and referents employed in rating health. To effectively assess and redress health disparities and establish culturally-relevant and effective health interventions, a greater understanding of SRH is required, particularly among indigenous groups, in which little research has been conducted.

Bombak, Andrea E.; Bruce, Sharon G.

2012-01-01

51

Online Information Search Strategies: A Focus On Flights and Accommodations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of the research was to understand information search strategies that individuals utilized in online travel product purchases. Two products, flights and accommodations, were selected to examine each product's explanatory variables in online purchase behaviors. The results indicate online flight purchasers utilize direct information sources and focus on transactional attributes. Online accommodation purchasers utilize various types of sources; and

Soo Hyun Jun; Christine A. Vogt; Kelly J. MacKay

2010-01-01

52

Using Focus Groups to Develop Health Surveys: An Example from Research on Social Relationships and AIDS-Preventive Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Focus group data can inform the choice of words or phrases in a questionnaire, the construction of items to measure a given concept, the formation of new hypotheses, and the development of survey procedures. To date, few examples exist to show researchers in health behavior and health education how they might use focus groups for these purposes. This paper provides

Kerth OBrien

1993-01-01

53

Older Inmates' Pursuit of Good Health: A Focus Group Study  

PubMed Central

A multitude of intersecting factors including the graying of the broader society, a paradigm shift away from rehabilitation, fewer opportunities for parole, and retrospective prosecutions contribute to an exponential increase in number of geriatric inmates. Elderly prisoners are likely to live in small tight quarters with other inmates, have two or more chronic health conditions, and encounter multiple barriers impeding health promotion while incarcerated. The purpose of this study was to identify perceived challenges to the health of older male inmates and to explore their self-care strategies. Focus group methodology was used. Data were collected from 42 male inmates age 50 and over who were aging in place and living with comorbidity. Cost issues, prison personnel and policies, food concerns, fellow inmates, and personal barriers all challenged older inmates’ abilities to maintain their health in prison. However, these older inmates engaged in a variety of self-care strategies, including: accessing resources and support; staying positive; managing diet and weight; engaging in physical activity; and protecting self. A key motivator for pursuing good health was to be respected and perceived as healthy and strong by fellow inmates. Looking to the future, development and testing of programs to enhance inmates' self-management of chronic conditions and to facilitate health promotion are in order.

Steffensmeier, Darrell

2012-01-01

54

[Juvenile obesity with a focus on health promotion: integrative review].  

PubMed

This integrative review summarizes nursing researches that contribute to study juvenile obesity with a focus on health promotion. 20 articles were identified in a bibliographical survey that followed the criteria: date, language, and the descriptors: nursing, adolescent, obesity and health promotion. The Pediatric Nursing Journal published seven of these papers (35%). Indexed papers were published in the last ten years in Portuguese and English. Results showed the construction of scientific knowledge in nursing that developed health promotion strategies in cases of juvenile obesity, thus contributing to the development of the profession. Showing the cumulative risk that juvenile obesity presents of turning subjects into obese adults is a precious resource to plan nursing actions for this population, and for these actions to achieve effective results. PMID:21988003

Luna, Izaildo Tavares; Moreira, Rosa Aparecida Nogueira; da Silva, Kelanne Lima; Caetano, Joselany Afio; Pinheiro, Patrícia Neyva da Costa; Rebouças, Cristiana Brasil de Almeida

2011-06-01

55

Content validity in the PROMIS social health domain: a qualitative analysis of focus group data  

PubMed Central

Purpose Our aim was to assess the content validity of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) social health item banks by comparing a prespecified conceptual model with concepts that focus-group participants identified as important social-health-related outcomes. These data will inform the process of improving health-related quality-of-life measures. Methods Twenty-five patients with a range of social limitations due to chronic health conditions were recruited at two sites; four focus groups were conducted. Raters independently classified participants' statements using a hierarchical, nested schema that included health-related outcomes, role performance, role satisfaction, family/friends, work, and leisure. Results Key themes that emerged were fulfilling both family and work responsibilities and the distinction between activities done out of responsibility versus enjoyment. Although focus-group participants identified volunteerism and pet ownership as important social-health-related concepts, these were not in our original conceptual model. The concept of satisfaction was often found to overlap with the concept of performance. Conclusion Our conceptual model appeared mostly comprehensive but is being further refined to more appropriately (a) distinguish between responsibilities versus discretionary activities, and (b) situate the outcome of satisfaction as it relates to impairment in social and other domains of health.

Castel, Liana D.; Williams, Kelly A.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Eisen, Susan V.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Irwin, Debra E.; Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Morse, Jennifer; Stover, Angela; DeWalt, Darren A.; DeVellis, Robert F.

2009-01-01

56

Informed Consent with a Focus on Islamic Views  

PubMed Central

For at least 50 years informed consent in medicine has focused on the principle of autonomy. Recently, attention has been given to informed consent being a shared decision. A primary mandate to do what is in the best interest of the patient still remains. The shared view looks to expand beyond the dyadic image of doctor and patient, to acknowledge the essential contribution to be made to informed consent from the cultural, religious, and personal values. This paper explores some of the cultural aspects of Islam that should influence informed consent.

Packer, Samuel

2012-01-01

57

Health Information Retrieval Tool (HIRT)  

PubMed Central

The World Wide Web (WWW) is a powerful way to deliver on-line health information, but one major problem limits its value to consumers: content is highly distributed, while relevant and high quality information is often difficult to find. To address this issue, we experimented with an approach that utilizes three-dimensional anatomic models in conjunction with free-text search.

Nyun, Mra Thinzar; Ogunyemi, Omolola; Zeng, Qing

2002-01-01

58

Health Information in Hindi (??????): MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... ?????? (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Nuclear Scans Bone Scan ?????? (Hindi) Bilingual PDF ... ?????? (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Nuclear or Radiation Emergencies ?????? (Hindi) Bilingual PDF ...

59

Health Information in Japanese (???): MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... ??????? - ??? (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Nuclear Scans Bone Scan ????? - ??? (Japanese) Bilingual PDF ... ?? - ??? (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Nuclear or Radiation Emergencies ?????????????? - ??? (Japanese) Bilingual PDF ...

60

Health Information in Ukrainian (??????????): MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... ?????? - ?????????? (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Concussion Types of Brain Injury ???? ????? ????????? ????? - ... ??????? - ?????????? (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Mobility Aids Crutch Walking ??????? ?? ??????? - ?????????? (Ukrainian) ...

61

Evolving public health nursing roles: focus on community participatory health promotion and prevention.  

PubMed

Public health nursing (PHN) practice is population-focused and requires unique knowledge, competencies, and skills. Early public health nursing roles extended beyond sick care to encompass advocacy, community organizing, health education, and political and social reform. Likewise, contemporary public health nurses practice in collaboration with agencies and community members. The purpose of this article is to examine evolving PHN roles that address complex, multi-causal, community problems. A brief background and history of this role introduces an explanation of the community participation health promotion model. A community-based participatory research project, Youth Substance Use Prevention in a Rural County provides an exemplar for description of evolving PHN roles focused on community health promotion and prevention. Also included is discussion about specific competencies for PHNs in community participatory health promoting roles and the contemporary PHN role. PMID:22686109

Kulbok, Pamela A; Thatcher, Esther; Park, Eunhee; Meszaros, Peggy

2012-05-31

62

The Role of Health Literacy and Social Networks in Arthritis Patients' Health Information-Seeking Behavior: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background. Patients engage in health information-seeking behaviour to maintain their wellbeing and to manage chronic diseases such as arthritis. Health literacy allows patients to understand available treatments and to critically appraise information they obtain from a wide range of sources. Aims. To explore how arthritis patients' health literacy affects engagement in arthritis-focused health information-seeking behaviour and the selection of sources of health information available through their informal social network. Methods. An exploratory, qualitative study consisting of one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Twenty participants with arthritis were recruited from community organizations. The interviews were designed to elicit participants' understanding about their arthritis and arthritis medication and to determine how the participants' health literacy informed selection of where they found information about their arthritis and pain medication. Results. Participants with low health literacy were less likely to be engaged with health information-seeking behaviour. Participants with intermediate health literacy were more likely to source arthritis-focused health information from newspapers, television, and within their informal social network. Those with high health literacy sourced information from the internet and specialist health sources and were providers of information within their informal social network. Conclusion. Health professionals need to be aware that levels of engagement in health information-seeking behaviour and sources of arthritis-focused health information may be related to their patients' health literacy.

Ellis, Janette; Mullan, Judy; Worsley, Anthony; Pai, Nagesh

2012-01-01

63

An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

Karras, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

64

An Examination of Health Information Management by the Deaf  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Little is known about how Deaf people perceive, access, and utilize interpersonal and media sources for health information. In light of the scarcity of research on health information management among this group, a two-phase study was conducted that included eight focus groups (N=39) and survey data (N=366) with Deaf participants to determine the…

Karras, Elizabeth

2010-01-01

65

77 FR 70444 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information Technology; HIT Policy Committee: Request for Comment...Health Records (EHRs) AGENCY: Health Information Technology (HIT) Policy Committee, Office of...

2012-11-26

66

Health information imperatives for Third World countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of health information in the health delivery services of a nation is stressed with examples from the advanced nations. Factors responsible for the poor state of health information systems in the Third World and the effects on health delivery services are identified. Probable factors that may lead to the development of health information systems in the Third World

Stephen A. Osiobe

1989-01-01

67

Designing a bone health and soy focus group discussion guide based on the health belief model  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Focus groups were used to assess the knowledge and skills of women in order to support curricula development. The Health Belief Model was applied to the discussion guide to enhance focus group findings and applications. Constructs related to perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers...

68

Translating family-focused prevention science into public health impact.  

PubMed

Underage drinking is a pervasive problem in the United States, with serious consequences for youth, families, communities, and society as a whole. Family-focused preventive interventions for children and adolescents have shown potential for reducing underage drinking and other problem behaviors. Research findings indicate that clear advances have been made, in terms of both the number of evidence-based interventions available, and in the quality of the methods used to evaluate them. To fully reap the benefits of such preventive interventions and achieve public health impact, the findings of family-focused preventive intervention science must be translated into real-world, community practices. This type of translation can be enhanced through four sets of translational impact factors-effectiveness of interventions, extensiveness of their population coverage, efficiency of interventions, and engagement of eligible populations, with sustained quality intervention implementation. Findings from studies conducted by researchers at the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute and other empirical work highlight the importance of these factors. A model for community- university partnerships has been developed that potentially can facilitate the dissemination and public health impact of universal interventions to prevent underage drinking and other problem behaviors. This model fits well within a comprehensive strategic framework for promoting effective prevention. PMID:22330218

Spoth, Richard L; Schainker, Lisa L; Hiller-Sturmhöefel, Susanne

2011-01-01

69

Using health information technology to engage communities in health, education, and research.  

PubMed

The August 2011 Clinical and Translational Science Awards conference "Using IT to Improve Community Health: How Health Care Reform Supports Innovation" convened four "Think Tank" sessions. Thirty individuals, representing various perspectives on community engagement, attended the "Health information technology (HIT) as a resource to improve community health and education" session, which focused on using HIT to improve patient health, education, and research involvement. Participants discussed a range of topics using a semistructured format. This article describes themes and lessons that emerged from that session, with a particular focus on using HIT to engage communities to improve health and reduce health disparities in populations. PMID:22301550

Marriott, Lisa K; Nelson, David A; Allen, Shauntice; Calhoun, Karen; Eldredge, Christina E; Kimminau, Kim S; Lucero, Robert J; Pineda-Reyes, Fernando; Rumala, Bernice B; Varanasi, Arti P; Wasser, June S; Shannon, Jackilen

2012-02-01

70

Using health information technology to engage communities in health, education, and research  

PubMed Central

The August 2011 Clinical & Translational Science Awards (CTSA) conference Using IT to Improve Community Health: How Health Care Reform Supports Innovation, convened four “think tank” sessions. Thirty individuals, representing various perspectives on community engagement, attended the Health Information Technology (HIT) as a Resource to Improve Community Health and Education session, which focused on using HIT to improve patient health, education, and research involvement. Participants discussed a range of topics using a semi-structured format. This article describes themes and lessons that emerged from that session, with a particular focus on using HIT to engage communities in order to improve health and reduce health disparities in populations.

Marriott, Lisa K.; Nelson, David A.; Allen, Shauntice; Calhoun, Karen; Eldredge, Christina E.; Kimminau, Kim S.; Lucero, Robert J.; Pineda-Reyes, Fernando; Rumala, Bernice B.; Varanasi, Arti P.; Wasser, June S.; Shannon, Jackilen

2012-01-01

71

National Health Priority Areas Report, 1998--Mental Health: A Report Focusing on Depression, 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents procedures for national mental health that involve many levels of government and draws advice from a range of professional organizations. Due to the enormous impact of depression on the social, human, economic, and public health costs to Australians and the Australian government, this initiative focuses efforts on dealing…

Australian Dept. of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

72

75 FR 76986 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Health Information Technology; Request for Information Regarding the...Realizing the Full Potential of Health Information Technology To Improve Healthcare for...

2010-12-10

73

Qualitative Study of Health Information Needs, Flow, and Use in Senegal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many health professionals and policymakers in Africa lack access to the information needed to make evidence-based decisions for effective health care. This study collected qualitative data from 75 key informants and members of two focus groups in Senegal on various aspects of health information needs, particularly in family planning and reproductive health, including information sources, strategies, and systems to transfer

Amadou Hassane Sylla; Elizabeth T. Robinson; Laura Raney; Karim Seck

2012-01-01

74

Oral Health Information on the Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

The publication of Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General was a hallmark for America's oral health. This first-ever report explained why oral health is essential to an American's health and well-being. Oral health's meaning has evolved from a narrow focus on teeth and gums to recognition of the mouth's critical role in health. As a mirror

Janice E. Cox

2008-01-01

75

Internet Use for Health Information  

MedlinePLUS

... Internet access persist by age, race and ethnicity, education, and income. 1 In 2009, 45.5 percent of all adults reported having used the Internet to obtain health information in the past year (data not shown in graph images or in data tables on this site). Overall, ...

76

Connecting information to improve health.  

PubMed

Effective health information systems require timely access to all health data from all sources, including sites of direct care. In most parts of the world today, these data most likely come from many different and unconnected systems-but must be organized into a composite whole. We use the word interoperability to capture what is required to accomplish this goal. We discuss five priority areas for achieving interoperability in health care applications (patient identifier, semantic interoperability, data interchange standards, core data sets, and data quality), and we contrast differences in developing and developed countries. Important next steps for health policy makers are to define a vision, develop a strategy, identify leadership, assign responsibilities, and harness resources. PMID:20348075

Hammond, W Ed; Bailey, Christopher; Boucher, Philippe; Spohr, Mark; Whitaker, Patrick

2010-02-01

77

A Personalized Health Information Retrieval System  

PubMed Central

Consumers face barriers when seeking health information on the Internet. A Personalized Health Information Retrieval System (PHIRS) is proposed to recommend health information for consumers. The system consists of four modules: (1) User modeling module captures user’s preference and health interests; (2) Automatic quality filtering module identifies high quality health information; (3) Automatic text difficulty rating module classifies health information into professional or patient educational materials; and (4) User profile matching module tailors health information for individuals. The initial results show that PHIRS could assist consumers with simple search strategies.

Wang, Yunli; Liu, Zhenkai

2005-01-01

78

Focus on transformation: a public health model of mental health for the 21st century.  

PubMed

In 2003 the President's New Freedom Commission called for the transformation of the public mental health system to one that is person centered, recovery focused, evidence based, and quality driven. In this column the director of the Center for Mental Health Services describes progress made by the center over the past five years as well as challenges and opportunities. She presents a strategic forecast, based on stakeholder input, to guide policy formulation and resource allocation. Central to the forecast is the concept of a public health model of mental health that takes a community approach to prevention, treatment, and promotion of well-being. PMID:19411342

Power, A Kathryn

2009-05-01

79

The Health Management Information System in Primary Health Care: The Palestinian Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management capabilities and performance of primary health care (PHC) can be improved by strengthening the information system. This study focuses on the Palestinian Health Management Information System (HMIS), used in PHC and reports on the achievements and shortcomings. A retrospective review and content analysis of the HMIS documentation was carried out and a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT)

Tayser Abu Mourad; Mohammed A. Afifi; Suzanne Shashaa; Dimitris Kounalakis; Christos Lionis; Anastas Philalithis

80

CHID: a unique health information and education database.  

PubMed Central

The public's growing interest in health information and the health professions' increasing need to locate health education materials can be answered in part by the new Combined Health Information Database (CHID). This unique database focuses on materials and programs in professional and patient education, general health education, and community risk reduction. Accessible through BRS, CHID suggests sources for procuring brochures, pamphlets, articles, and films on community services, programs at HMOs and hospitals, aspects of coping, and more. CHID is a joint project of six federally funded agencies in the Public Health Service. CHID provides citations with abstracts to major health journals, books, reports, pamphlets, hard-to-find information resources, and to health education programs under way in state and local health departments and other locations.

Lunin, L F; Stein, R S

1987-01-01

81

78 FR 42945 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy...established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee (Health...have expertise in health information privacy and security....

2013-07-18

82

Pacific child health indicator project: information for action.  

PubMed

The Pacific Child Health Indicator Project (CHIP) is a clinician-led project with the primary objective of improving child health in the Pacific through effective health information, effective clinical governance and decision support. The project was developed by Pacific Paediatricians who were concerned at the disconnect between front-line paediatrics and health information systems and policy. The project initially worked with health services in Samoa and Tonga. Its focus was to develop functional child health information that effectively reflected the priority clinical issues facing children in Samoa and Tonga. In addition to baseline and trends in indicators and health information for priority child health conditions, a project focus has been on policy implications and the development of "Best Bets" for health service intervention. The methodology is inclusive and country driven, building on existing collegial working relationships between the principal investigators (Dr Percival, Dr Fakakovi and Dr Fatupaito-Maru) and in-country health sectors. Through the development of robust child health information the project will provide a baseline platform to assist clinicians, health services, Ministries, non-government organisations and donors respond to the burden of disease for children. PMID:23240357

2012-04-01

83

The Quality of Spanish Health Information Websites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spurred by the explosion of information technology and access to information, Internet health sites used to gather information about disease and wellness have become an accepted health education tool (Sciamanna, Clark, Houston & Diaz, 2002). There is growing evidence of concerted efforts to use the Internet to increase the access of health information to underserved populations such as Hispanics, a

Alberto Jose Frick Cardelle; Elaine Giron Rodriguez

2005-01-01

84

The impact of health information technology on the quality of medical and health care: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to systematically review the published evidence of the impact of health information technology (HIT) or health information systems (HIS) on the quality of healthcare, focusing on clinicians' adherence to evidence-based guidelines and the corresponding impact this had on patient clinical outcomes. The review covered the use of health information technologies and systems in both

Aziz Jamal; Kirsten McKenzie; Michele Clark

2009-01-01

85

How to Benefit from Focus in Health Services?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of focused factory has been successfully applied in manufacturing for decades. In healthcare, the concept of focused healthcare unit (FHU) has been proposed as an alternative to the traditional discipline-driven organizations. Unlike manufacturing, focusing has led to conflicting results in healthcare. In this paper we present a model to characterize the focus concept and its utilization in healthcare

Antti Peltokorpi; Paulus Torkki; Paul Lillrank

2011-01-01

86

Mental Health Services for Children; Focus: The Community Mental Health Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need to help the emotionally disturbed is discussed with a focus on community mental health centers. Psychiatric services described are diagnosis, inpatient care, day care, outpatient care, emergency care, continuity of care and services, and care adjusted to age groupings ranging from infancy to adolescence. Aspects of the community goal of…

National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Center for Studies of Child and Family Mental Health.

87

Border Health Focused Research Agenda Development Conference Proceedings: Executive Summary and Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Border Health Focused Research Agenda Development Conference brought together health policymakers (legislators and health commissioners) and policy researchers from the four U.S. -Mexico Border States. The primary goal of the Conference which was conv...

A. W. Nichols

1981-01-01

88

On What Diseases and Health Conditions Should New Economic Research on Health and Development Focus?  

PubMed Central

Given the public goods nature of research, economic research on health in developing countries is likely to have the highest returns by focusing, inter alia, on diseases and health conditions that are relatively widespread and costly and that are relatively rapidly growing. This article first summarizes the time patterns in economic research on diseases and health in developing countries for 1990–2005. It then compares those time patterns with the distribution of DALYS for diseases and health conditions in developing countries estimated for 2005 and for 2030. These comparisons suggest relatively overemphasis on HIV/AIDS and underemphasis on noncommunicable diseases. This opens the possibility for individuals or organizations initiating, re-evaluating or increasing their economic research on health and development to make a significant contribution by focusing particularly on the analysis of behaviour and policy choices related to non-communicable diseases. Careful consideration must, of course, be given to other demands, but on the basis of these two criteria, potential contributions are likely to be greatest from research with such a focus.

Behrman, Jere R.; Behrman, Julia A.; Perez, Nykia M.

2010-01-01

89

Online Pediatric Information Seeking Among Mothers of Young Children: Results From a Qualitative Study Using Focus Groups  

PubMed Central

Background Pre-natal and post-natal periods are times when many women actively seek health information from multiple sources, including the Internet. However, little is known about how pregnant women and mothers of young children seek and process online pediatric health information. Objective To explore why and where mothers of young children look for online health information and how they determine if the information they receive is trustworthy. Methods Focus groups were conducted in a Southeastern US city to provide an in-depth exploration of web-related behaviors and beliefs among mothers who work inside and outside of the home. Data from the focus groups were coded using deductive and inductive coding schemes and content was analyzed for the existence of themes. Results Twenty mothers of young children participated in four focus groups. Most participants sought information on the Internet during pregnancy and nearly all sought online information after their child was born, primarily to diagnose or treat pediatric conditions and to seek advice on parenting and development. Participants mainly used commercial information websites for health information and many expressed disdain for commercial product websites. Many also expressed concerns about the reliability of health information on the web and described strategies for determining how much they trust each website. Conclusions Women appear to be high information seekers during pregnancy and the first few years following delivery, and this period represents an important window of time for providing online health information. Participants suggested that online information sources and motives for providing online information should be clear in order to increase perceptions of trust. Participants expressed preference for online clinical health information that is presented by clinical professionals, and online parenting advice that is presented from other parents.

Felter, Elizabeth M

2004-01-01

90

Content validity in the PROMIS social-health domain: a qualitative analysis of focus-group data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Our aim was to assess the content validity of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) social\\u000a health item banks by comparing a prespecified conceptual model with concepts that focus-group participants identified as important\\u000a social-health-related outcomes. These data will inform the process of improving health-related quality-of-life measures.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Twenty-five patients with a range of social limitations due to chronic health conditions

Liana D. Castel; Kelly A. Williams; Hayden B. Bosworth; Susan V. Eisen; Elizabeth A. Hahn; Debra E. Irwin; Morgen A. R. Kelly; Jennifer Morse; Angela Stover; Darren A. DeWalt; Robert F. DeVellis

2008-01-01

91

Issues in Consumer Health Information Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines two issues to determine how they affect delivery of consumer health information: (1) Who is responsible for disseminating consumer health information, and what role should public and health science libraries play? (2) Should librarians (public or health science) provide medical reference works for general public? Thirty-five references…

Alloway, Catherine Suyak; Salisbury, Linda

1983-01-01

92

Community readiness for a computer-based health information network.  

PubMed

The need for timely and accurate communication among healthcare providers has prompted the development of computer-based health information networks that allow patient and client information to be shared among agencies. This article reports the findings of a study to assess whether residents of an upstate New York community were ready for a computer-based health information network to facilitate delivery of long term care services. Focus group sessions, which involved both consumers and professionals, revealed that security of personal information was of concern to healthcare providers, attorneys, and consumers. Physicians were the most enthusiastic about the possibility of a computer-based health information network. Consumers and other healthcare professionals, including nurses, indicated that such a network would be helpful to them personally. Nurses and other healthcare professionals need to be knowledgeable about the use of computer-based health information networks and other electronic information systems as this trend continues to spread across the U.S. PMID:16929715

Ervin, Naomi E; Berry, Michelle M

93

The Nationalization of Health Information Privacy Protections  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Part II, this article examines the justifications for implementing comprehensive national health information privacy regulations, including the personal nature of health information and the increasing threats to personal privacy from the shift to an electronic health information infrastructure. In doing so, it looks at historical attempts by federal and state officials to regulate the use and disclosure of personal

Lawrence O. Gostin; Hodge James G. Jr; Lauren Marks

2002-01-01

94

Using health information exchange to improve public health.  

PubMed

Public health relies on data reported by health care partners, and information technology makes such reporting easier than ever. However, data are often structured according to a variety of different terminologies and formats, making data interfaces complex and costly. As one strategy to address these challenges, health information organizations (HIOs) have been established to allow secure, integrated sharing of clinical information among numerous stakeholders, including clinical partners and public health, through health information exchange (HIE). We give detailed descriptions of 11 typical cases in which HIOs can be used for public health purposes. We believe that HIOs, and HIE in general, can improve the efficiency and quality of public health reporting, facilitate public health investigation, improve emergency response, and enable public health to communicate information to the clinical community. PMID:21330598

Shapiro, Jason S; Mostashari, Farzad; Hripcsak, George; Soulakis, Nicholas; Kuperman, Gilad

2011-02-17

95

Application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Health Information Access and Dissemination in Uganda  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports on a study which assessed the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) in health information access and dissemination in Uganda. The project focused not only on information obtainable through libraries for research, teaching, learning and practice, but also on ICT applications concerned with the…

Omona, Walter; Ikoja-Odongo, Robert

2006-01-01

96

Sexual Health Information Seeking Online Among Runaway and Homeless Youth.  

PubMed

Research shows runaway and homeless youth are reluctant to seek help from traditional health providers. The Internet can be useful in engaging this population and meeting their needs for sexual health information, including information about HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using a sample of homeless youth living in Los Angeles, California in June 2009, this study assesses the frequency with which runaway and homeless youth seek sexual health information via the Internet, and assesses which youth are more likely to engage in seeking health information from online sources. Drawing from Andersen's (1968) health behavior model and Pescosolido's (1992) network episode model, we develop and refine a model for seeking online sexual health information among homeless youth. Rather than testing the predicative strength of a given model, our aim is to identify and explore conceptually driven correlates that may shed light on the characteristics associated with these help seeking behaviors among homeless youth. Analyses using multivariate logistic regression models reveal that among the sample of youth, females and gay males most frequently seek sexual health information online. We demonstrate the structure of social network ties (e.g., connection with parents) and the content of interactions (e.g., e-mail forwards of health information) across ties are critical correlates of online sexual health information seeking. Results show a continued connection with parents via the Internet is significantly associated with youth seeking HIV or STI information. Similarly for content of interactions, more youth who were sent health information online also reported seeking HIV information and HIV-testing information. We discuss implications for intervention and practice, focusing on how the Internet may be used for dissemination of sexual health information and as a resource for social workers to link transient, runaway, and homeless youth to care. PMID:22247795

Barman-Adhikari, Anamika; Rice, Eric

2011-06-01

97

Patient health questionnaire. Using a patient-focused assessment tool.  

PubMed Central

A patient health questionnaire was developed for use in family practice to help identify lifestyle risk factors, assess health care needs, and better understand patients. This article discusses the questionnaire's development and practical application. Images Figure 3

Mitchell, J. D.

1996-01-01

98

Focus on: information technology. Electronic prescribing: an update.  

PubMed

Electronic prescribing has been gaining momentum with the passage of recent federal legislation. This article attempts to present the current status of e-prescribing. "Electronic communications between physicians and pharmacists is being recognized as the new standard of practice in the health care industry," said Kevin Hutchinson, SureScripts president and CEO. I am not sure I would go that far yet, but electronic prescribing has come a long way since 1998 when Drs. Schiff and Rucker wrote in the American Medical News: "Physicians should never again write a prescription. Given the explosion of scientific information and advances in computer technology, prescribing medications on a blank piece of paper will soon seem as antiquated as ordering tinctures of botanicals in Latin." The benefits of electronic prescribing have been, and continue to be, touted in many articles written, even in lay literature. PMID:15696996

Kaufmann, Mark D

99

Building the national health information infrastructure for personal health, health care services, public health, and research  

PubMed Central

Background Improving health in our nation requires strengthening four major domains of the health care system: personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and health-related research. Many avoidable shortcomings in the health sector that result in poor quality are due to inaccessible data, information, and knowledge. A national health information infrastructure (NHII) offers the connectivity and knowledge management essential to correct these shortcomings. Better health and a better health system are within our reach. Discussion A national health information infrastructure for the United States should address the needs of personal health management, health care delivery, public health, and research. It should also address relevant global dimensions (e.g., standards for sharing data and knowledge across national boundaries). The public and private sectors will need to collaborate to build a robust national health information infrastructure, essentially a 'paperless' health care system, for the United States. The federal government should assume leadership for assuring a national health information infrastructure as recommended by the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee. Progress is needed in the areas of funding, incentives, standards, and continued refinement of a privacy (i.e., confidentiality and security) framework to facilitate personal identification for health purposes. Particular attention should be paid to NHII leadership and change management challenges. Summary A national health information infrastructure is a necessary step for improved health in the U.S. It will require a concerted, collaborative effort by both public and private sectors. If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin

Detmer, Don E

2003-01-01

100

Interpersonal communication in the health professions: A focus on training  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field of Health Psychology has enjoyed a prodigious growth over the past 15 years. The interpersonal dynamic of the practitioner-patient relationship is one of the areas which has been illuminated thereby accentuating its contribution to effective levels of health care. This paper examines the concepts of interpersonal communication and communication skill. The contribution of skilful communication by health workers

David A. Dickson

1989-01-01

101

A renewed focus on primary health care: revitalize or reframe?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The year 2008 celebrated 30 years of Primary Health Care (PHC) policy emerging from the Alma Ata Declaration with publication of two key reports, the World Health Report 2008 and the Report of the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. Both reports reaffirmed the relevance of PHC in terms of its vision and values in today's world. However, important

Mrigesh Bhatia; Susan Rifkin

2010-01-01

102

Understanding informal payments in health care: motivation of health workers in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background There is growing evidence that informal payments for health care are fairly common in many low- and middle-income countries. Informal payments are reported to have a negative consequence on equity and quality of care; it has been suggested, however, that they may contribute to health worker motivation and retention. Given the significance of motivation and retention issues in human resources for health, a better understanding of the relationships between the two phenomena is needed. This study attempts to assess whether and in what ways informal payments occur in Kibaha, Tanzania. Moreover, it aims to assess how informal earnings might help boost health worker motivation and retention. Methods Nine focus groups were conducted in three health facilities of different levels in the health system. In total, 64 health workers participated in the focus group discussions (81% female, 19% male) and where possible, focus groups were divided by cadre. All data were processed and analysed by means of the NVivo software package. Results The use of informal payments in the study area was confirmed by this study. Furthermore, a negative relationship between informal payments and job satisfaction and better motivation is suggested. Participants mentioned that they felt enslaved by patients as a result of being bribed and this resulted in loss of self-esteem. Furthermore, fear of detection was a main demotivating factor. These factors seem to counterbalance the positive effect of financial incentives. Moreover, informal payments were not found to be related to retention of health workers in the public health system. Other factors such as job security seemed to be more relevant for retention. Conclusion This study suggests that the practice of informal payments contributes to the general demotivation of health workers and negatively affects access to health care services and quality of the health system. Policy action is needed that not only provides better financial incentives for individuals but also tackles an environment in which corruption is endemic.

Stringhini, Silvia; Thomas, Steve; Bidwell, Posy; Mtui, Tina; Mwisongo, Aziza

2009-01-01

103

Australia's HealthInsite: Your Gateway to Reliable Health Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

This column discusses Australia's HealthInsite, a multi-topic consumer health information site that brings together content from more than 80 Australian health information providers. All partner organizations meet stringent quality assurance, process, and publication standards prior to inclusion in the network.

Donna MacLeod

2008-01-01

104

Information Requirements for CHPASEW Mental Health Planning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The types of information needed for the assessment of the mental health status of the southeastern region of Wisconsin and the mechanisms for obtaining and utilizing the information are determined. Three categories of information are identified: general p...

1975-01-01

105

Transforming The Public Health Information Infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: The public health information infrastructure is undergoing,a transformation that is enabled,by changes,in health care informatics. The implementation,of the Health In- surance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996, the patient medical record infor- mation standards, and National Health Information Infrastructure (NHII) recommendations by the National Committee,on Vital and Health Statistics provide the basis for improved data reporting to public

John R. Lumpkin; Margaret S. Richards

2002-01-01

106

Focus Groups Inform a Web-Based Program to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Intake  

PubMed Central

Objective To use focus groups to inform a web-based educational intervention for increased fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption. Methods Twelve groups (participants =137, aged 21–65) were recruited from four geographically diverse health systems. Four groups were stratified by gender and eight by race (white and African American) and gender. Questions included perceptions of healthy eating, factors that encourage or serve as barriers to FV consumption and features preferred for a web-based educational intervention. Results Though knowledgeable about healthy eating, participants did not know how to achieve or always care about healthy nutritional choices. Motivators for FV consumption included being role models and health concerns. Barriers included: lack of time, expense and FV availability. Website preferences included: visuals, links, tailored materials, menu suggestions, goal setting assistance, printable summaries and built in motivation. The developers incorporated nearly all suggestions. Conclusion Focus groups provided needs-based tactical strategies for an online, education intervention targeting factors to improve FV consumption. Practice Implications Focus groups can provide valuable input to inform interventions. Further, web-based programs’ abilities to offer information without time or geographic constraints, with capacity for tailoring and tracking progress makes them a valuable addition in the arsenal of efforts to promote healthy behaviors.

Rolnick, Sharon J.; Calvi, Josephine; Heimendinger, Jerianne; McClure, Jennifer B.; Kelley, Mary; Johnson, Christine; Alexander, Gwen L.

2009-01-01

107

Charting the use of electronic health records and other information technologies among child health providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Previous studies regarding the use of information technologies (IT) specifically among pediatricians and other physicians who treat children are lacking. As such, the objective of this study is to examine the use of electronic health record (EHR) systems and other IT applications among pediatricians and other child health providers (CHPs) in Florida. METHODS: We focus on pediatricians and other

Nir Menachemi; Donna L Ettel; Robert G Brooks; Lisa Simpson

2006-01-01

108

Focus Group Interview: An Underutilized Research Technique for Improving Theory and Practice in Health Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to increase awareness about and stimulate interest in using focus group interviews, a qualitative research technique, to advance the state-of- the-art of education and learning about health. After a brief discussion of small group process in health education, features of focus group interviews are presented, and a theoretical framework for planning a focus group

Charles E. Basch

1987-01-01

109

Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE for Information Literacy Education (SMILE): A Dental Public Health Information Project  

PubMed Central

The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of “power information users” among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provide public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel.

Gaines, Julie K.; Levy, Linda S.; Cogdill, Keith W.

2012-01-01

110

Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE® for information literacy education (SMILE): a dental public health information project.  

PubMed

The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of "power information users" among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provided public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel. PMID:22040242

Gaines, Julie K; Levy, Linda S; Cogdill, Keith W

2011-01-01

111

The pharmacy as part of an integrated hospital information system: a focus on benefits.  

PubMed

An integrated hospital information system benefits not only the pharmacy but also each department within a hospital, including the physician and patient. The Composite Health Care System (CHCS) is a fully integrated healthcare information system that has been developed for the Department of Defense's medical treatment facilities. CHCS provides modules for Patient Administration, Patient Appointment Scheduling, Radiology, Laboratory, Pharmacy, and Physician/Nursing Order Entry and Results Retrieval, which serve to integrate inpatient wards, clinical services, administrative departments, and remote outpatient clinics. CHCS provides an integrated patient profile to care givers throughout the medical facility, improving the quality of their clinical decisions. The integrated hospital information system also helps to coordinate the delivery of patient care and automates many interdepartmental transactions, which allows for more efficient use of resources and increases the turnaround time for delivery of services. This article focuses on the system's pharmacy component to demonstrate the benefits realized with an integrated hospital information system. PMID:10134171

Hubbell, P J

1994-05-01

112

FDA Issues Public Health Advisory Informing Health Care ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

... FDA Issues Public Health Advisory Informing Health Care Providers of Safety Concerns Associated with the Use of Two Eczema Drugs, Elidel and ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/postmarketdrugsafetyinformationforpatientsandproviders

113

Newborn Screening Information Supports Public Health More than Informed Choice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To appraise information resources on newborn blood spot screening currently available for parents and health professionals internationally. Method: Health information on newborn blood spot screening was sourced internationally through the internet and, in the United Kingdom, through health service providers and support organisations.…

Hargreaves, Katrina; Stewart, Ruth; Oliver, Sandy

2005-01-01

114

Air Pollution and Health: A New Focus on Sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

2 Almost everyone agrees that breathing polluted air is harmful. But what really is the impact of air pollution on health, and what types of air pollution are most hazardous? Answers to these questions are central to formulating an air pollution control policy that most directly benefits public health. Being both a pulmonary physician and an epidemiologist has allowed me

Sverre Vedal

115

Strategic Facilities Planning: A Focus on Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turbulent market conditions have forced the health care sector to re-examine its business and operational practices. Health care has become increasingly complex as decisions and planning are reframed in light of the current lagging economy, an increased demand for services, new global competition, and impending legislation reform. The stress is felt most keenly within the nation's hospitals and consortia of

Ellen D. Hoadley; Brian Jorgensen

2010-01-01

116

Protecting health information on mobile devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile applications running on devices such as smart phones and tablets will be increasingly used to provide convenient access to health information to health professionals and patients. Also, patients will use these devices to transmit health information captured by sensing devices in settings like the home to remote repositories. As mobile devices become targets of security threats, we must address

Musheer Ahmed; Mustaque Ahamad

2012-01-01

117

Taking the Pulse of Health Information Seeking  

Microsoft Academic Search

When planning the purchase, management, delivery, and evaluation of electronic resources in a health sciences setting, it is useful to consider the broader landscape of how users seek and understand health information. To that end, the author examined reports that provide useful insights related to information-seeking behavior and health literacy. This column summarizes salient points of some Pew Research Center

Elizabeth Connor

2009-01-01

118

Improving Information Access for Public Health Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fundamental to our protection against biological weapons and the detection of disease outbreaks is the need to strengthen our surveillance systems. Improved electronic communications between local, state, and federal public health agencies provide a way for health officials to share information on unusual disease outbreaks and provide important health alert information. This article describes a model of a partnership between

Sharon Telleen; Elaine Martin

2002-01-01

119

[Health Information Technology -where are we heading?].  

PubMed

The current issue of "Harefuah" dedicates a special corner to Health Information Technology (HIT), with a collection of five review papers discussing different areas of the field, focusing on its benefits to the quality of healthcare. In the first paper Topaz and Ash describe the United States MeaningfuL Use project, and list the lessons that the Israeli health system should learn from it. Zelingher and Ash analyze the decision of the Israeli Ministry of Health to move from the old coding system of ICD-9-CM to a combination of SNOMED-CT as a clinical terminology system and ICD-10-CM as the classification coding system. The authors conclude that achieving a standardized, homogenous and thorough coding of problems, diagnoses and procedures will enable interoperability in the Israeli health system. Shalom et al present us to the world of computerized clinical guidelines. They review the different projects that aim to bring tools and methods to transform the paper based guidelines to computer programs that support the everyday decisions that physicians take regarding their patients. The authors focus on their experience in developing methodology, tools and a library of computerized guidelines, and describe their evaluation in several projects. Shahar et al dive deeper to describe the challenge of representing time in cLinicaL guidelines and creating tools to discover new knowledge based on represented known knowledge. These two papers demonstrate the meaningful use of medicaL data. In the last article, Siegal addresses some legal concerns evolving from the HIT revolution, pointing to the emerging concepts in Israeli jurisprudence, which regards medical IT as an important contribution to patient empowerment, aspects of medical risk management and management of national health system resources. In the judgment of the Israeli court, a medical organization will possibly have to take the responsibiLity of not implementing a proven HIT system. This paper concludes with descriptions of two studies evaluating health information systems in Israel. These studies will be presented at the forthcoming conference of the IsraeLi Association of Medical Informatics (ILAMI). PMID:23885446

Ash, Nachman; Levy, Ilan

2013-05-01

120

Reducing the health disparities of Indigenous Australians: time to change focus  

PubMed Central

Background Indigenous peoples have worse health than non-Indigenous, are over-represented amongst the poor and disadvantaged, have lower life expectancies, and success in improving disparities is limited. To address this, research usually focuses on disadvantaged and marginalised groups, offering only partial understanding of influences underpinning slow progress. Critical analysis is also required of those with the power to perpetuate or improve health inequities. In this paper, using Australia as a case example, we explore the effects of ‘White’, Anglo-Australian cultural dominance in health service delivery to Indigenous Australians. We address the issue using race as an organising principle, underpinned by relations of power. Methods Interviews with non-Indigenous medical practitioners in Western Australia with extensive experience in Indigenous health encouraged reflection and articulation of their insights into factors promoting or impeding quality health care to Indigenous Australians. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. An inductive, exploratory analysis identified key themes that were reviewed and interrogated in light of existing literature on health care to Indigenous people, race and disadvantage. The researchers’ past experience, knowledge and understanding of health care and Indigenous health assisted with data interpretation. Informal discussions were also held with colleagues working professionally in Indigenous policy, practice and community settings. Results Racism emerged as a key issue, leading us to more deeply interrogate the role ‘Whiteness’ plays in Indigenous health care. While Whiteness can refer to skin colour, it also represents a racialized social structure where Indigenous knowledge, beliefs and values are subjugated to the dominant western biomedical model in policy and practice. Racism towards Indigenous patients in health services was institutional and interpersonal. Internalised racism was manifest when Indigenous patients incorporated racist attitudes and beliefs into their lived experience, lowering expectations and their sense of self-worth. Conclusions Current health policies and practices favour standardised care where the voice of those who are marginalised is often absent. Examining the effectiveness of such models in reducing health disparities requires health providers to critically reflect on whether policies and practices promote or compromise Indigenous health and wellbeing - an important step in changing the discourse that places Indigenous people at the centre of the problem.

2012-01-01

121

[Consumer health-care information technology].  

PubMed

Consumer health-care information technology is intended to improve patients' opportunities to gather information about their own health. Ideally, this will be achieved through an improved involvement of existing data bases and an improved communication of information to patients and to care providers, if desired by patients. Additionally, further interconnection of existing and new systems and pervasive system design may be used. All consumer health-care information technology services are optional and leave patients in control of their medical data at all times. This article reflects the current status of consumer health-care information technology research and suggests further research areas that should be addressed. PMID:23695812

Sunyaev, A

2013-05-21

122

New health systems using network information technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new health system is coming based on network information technologies. It consists of health measurement across the full spectrum of health determinants, using mobile devices such as smartphones. This measurement generates personal health records for each individual within a population, which can then be analyzed to identify cohorts, using statistical clustering on supercomputers. These cohorts determine \\

Bruce R. Schatz

2011-01-01

123

Health Information Privacy and Syndromic Surveillance Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of syndromic surveillance systems to detect potential terrorist-related outbreaks has the potential to be a useful public health surveillance activity. However, the perception of how the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy Rule applies to the disclosure of certain public health information might affect the ability of state and local health departments to implement

Daniel Drociuk; J. Gibson; J. Hodge

124

Requirements for information and imaging standards in Health Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Planning, designing and efficiently managing health information systems (HIS) requires introduction of key technologies for successful operation. Information and communication technologies, could dramatically contribute to achieve better results in such activities. Health information exchange processes require stringent procedures and interoperability. It is of utmost importance to introduce key standards thus ensuring high level of confidence in such systems. Usage of

M. Kovac; Dragan Schwarz; T. Jakopovic

2008-01-01

125

Focus group: Implications for program evaluation of mental health services  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus group is a qualitative research method that involves group interaction based on a selected topic. It generally involves\\u000a eight to 12 individuals who discuss a particular topic under the direction of a moderator who promotes interaction and guides\\u000a the discussion on the topic of interest. This paper presents theoretical perspectives and a review of focus group methodology\\u000a applied

Judith M. Richter; Donna J. Bottenberg; Karen A. Roberto

1991-01-01

126

Health information exchange and patient safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most promising advantages for health information exchange (HIE) is improved patient safety. Up to 18% of the patient safety errors generally and as many as 70% of adverse drug events could be eliminated if the right information about the right patient is available at the right time. Health information exchange makes this possible.Here we present an overview

David C. Kaelber; David W. Bates

2007-01-01

127

Meeting Basic Health Information Needs in Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on a paper presented at a meeting held on 15 July 1994 at BMA House, London: Getting health information from the developed to the developing world. Discusses problems faced by the University of Zimbabwe Medical Library (UZML) in meeting health information needs of academics and students. These include: lack of books, journals and experienced staff. Factors enabling information delivery

Helga Patrikios

1995-01-01

128

Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network (OVCHIN) works to determine the efficacy of delivering health information to residents of rural southern Ohio and the urban and suburban Cincinnati area. OVCHIN is a community-based, consumer-defined demonstration grant program funded by the National Telecommunications and Information

Guard, Roger; And Others

129

The Teen Health Information Network (THINK).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the Teen Health Information Network (THINK), a grant-funded partnership of Aurora, Illinois, public libraries, schools, and community agencies to provide materials, information, and programming on issues related to teen health. Seven appendixes provide detailed information on survey results, collection evaluation and development,…

Kuzel, Judith; Erickson, Su

1995-01-01

130

Meridian health annual report focuses on what is 'brand new'.  

PubMed

The 2003-2004 annual report by Meridian Health, Neptune, N.J., is titled brand new. The high-end publication was produced especially for the healthcare system's employees, board members, shareholders and volunteers. PMID:15901061

Botvin, Judith D

131

Guide for Security-Focused Configuration Management of Information Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An information system is composed of many components4 that can be interconnected in a multitude of arrangements to meet a variety of business, mission, and information security needs. How these information system components are networked, configured, and ...

A. Johnson D. Bailey K. Dempsey R. Ross S. Gupta

2011-01-01

132

Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information  

MedlinePLUS

... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Page Content What is bone health ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

133

Consumer Health Information for Better Nutrition Initiative ...  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... Consumer Health Information for Better Nutrition Initiative: Task Force Final Report. July 10, 2003. ... 1 National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling/labelingnutrition

134

Informational Privacy, Public Health, and State Laws  

PubMed Central

Developments in information technology that make it possible to rapidly transmit health information also raise questions about the possible inappropriate use and protection of identifiable (or potentially identifiable) personal health information. Despite efforts to improve state laws, adoption of provisions has lagged. We found that half of states have no statutes addressing nondisclosure of personally identifiable health information generally held by public health agencies. Exceptional treatment of HIV, sexually transmitted infections, or tuberculosis-related information was common. Where other provisions were found, there was little consistency in the laws across states. The variation in state laws supports the need to build consensus on the appropriate use and disclosure of public health information among public health practitioners.

Matthews, Gene

2011-01-01

135

Informational privacy, public health, and state laws.  

PubMed

Developments in information technology that make it possible to rapidly transmit health information also raise questions about the possible inappropriate use and protection of identifiable (or potentially identifiable) personal health information. Despite efforts to improve state laws, adoption of provisions has lagged. We found that half of states have no statutes addressing nondisclosure of personally identifiable health information generally held by public health agencies. Exceptional treatment of HIV, sexually transmitted infections, or tuberculosis-related information was common. Where other provisions were found, there was little consistency in the laws across states. The variation in state laws supports the need to build consensus on the appropriate use and disclosure of public health information among public health practitioners. PMID:21852633

O'Connor, Jean; Matthews, Gene

2011-08-18

136

Mission-Driven Priorities: Public Health in Health Information Exchange  

PubMed Central

Developing state- and nationwide health information exchange (HIE) is one of the health priorities defined in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. States are expected to take leadership in statewide planning and implementation. To balance limited resources among mandated responsibilities and emerging HIE accountability, we maintain that state public health practitioners must integrate HIE into our mission-driven practice in five priority areas: 1) connecting real-time disease surveillance and notifiable case reporting through HIE to better protect citizens; 2) sharing public health-managed clinical information through HIE for preventive services, 3) conduct health education for targeted populations via HIE to promote healthy lifestyles; 4) leverage public health informatics with Medicaid information system to provide quality healthcare; and 5) serve as a regulator for standardized HIT to participate in healthcare reform. We summarize public health’s broad practice into “Five P’s” and link each domain’s historical foundation, current and proposed practices to sustain success.

Nangle, Barry; Xu, Wu; Sundwall, David N.

2009-01-01

137

75 FR 32161 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Consumer Focus...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Collection; Comment Request; Consumer Focus Groups AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety...persons who may participate in Consumer Focus Groups. DATES: Submit written or electronic...information technology. Title: Consumer Focus Groups (OMB Control Number...

2010-06-07

138

Academic Research Journals in Medical Sociology, Medical Anthropology, and Contemporary Social Medicine: A Focus on Public and Global Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

A bibliography of 31 academic journals in medical sociology, medical anthropology, and contemporary social medicine with a focus on public and global health is provided. Along with basic identifying information, the bibliometric measures of Eigenfactor, Article Influence Score, SCImago Journal Rank, and H-index have been specified for each journal when available. Brief annotations along with both Library of Congress and

Spencer Acadia

2012-01-01

139

Nursing students and Internet health information.  

PubMed

This study investigates use of the internet by nursing students to access health information and their evaluation practices in relation to this information. The research method was a retrospective descriptive postal survey. A questionnaire was sent to all undergraduate students enrolled in a Bachelor of Nursing programme at a New Zealand university in 2005. The response rate was 50% or 174 responses. Findings from the study included marked variations in respondents ability to successfully search for and evaluate relevant internet health and nursing information. Few respondents assessed patients use of the internet to gather health information or assisted patients with evaluation. As searching, evaluating and sharing online information is a core element of nursing practice, formal education to develop competency in the ability of all nursing students to retrieve and assess internet health information is essential. The integration of these skills into nursing practice is a vital step in developing new approaches to working with knowledgeable consumers of internet health information. PMID:18700178

Scott, Susan D; Gilmour, Jean; Fielden, Jann

2008-08-10

140

The Information Technology Workforce Crisis: Planning for the Next Environment. NYSFIRM Government Information Focus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Attention has been focused on critical shortages of information technology professionals. These shortages have begun to affect the ability of state and local governments to perform core operations, meet new agency program needs and support the development of new enterprise-wide capacities. The shortages are not expected to disappear any time…

Maxwell, Terrence A.

141

Health Information in Russian (???????): MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Russian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations PFT (Pulmonary Function Test) PFT (???? ???????? ???????) - ??????? (Russian) Bilingual ... Russian) Multimedia Healthy Roads Media Pain Relievers PCA (Patient Controlled Analgesia) Pump ????? ??????????????? ????????????? ???????? - ??????? ( ...

142

Health Information in Korean (???): MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... Action Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Postpartum Care Your Recovery after Vaginal Birth ???? ? ?? - ??? (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Postpartum Depression Emotional Changes after Giving Birth ?? ? ...

143

A qualitative study of health information technology in the Canadian public health system  

PubMed Central

Background Although the adoption of health information technology (HIT) has advanced in Canada over the past decade, considerable challenges remain in supporting the development, broad adoption, and effective use of HIT in the public health system. Policy makers and practitioners have long recognized that improvements in HIT infrastructure are necessary to support effective and efficient public health practice. The objective of this study was to identify aspects of health information technology (HIT) policy related to public health in Canada that have succeeded, to identify remaining challenges, and to suggest future directions to improve the adoption and use of HIT in the public health system. Methods A qualitative case study was performed with 24 key stakeholders representing national and provincial organizations responsible for establishing policy and strategic direction for health information technology. Results Identified benefits of HIT in public health included improved communication among jurisdictions, increased awareness of the need for interoperable systems, and improvement in data standardization. Identified barriers included a lack of national vision and leadership, insufficient investment, and poor conceptualization of the priority areas for implementing HIT in public health. Conclusions The application of HIT in public health should focus on automating core processes and identifying innovative applications of HIT to advance public health outcomes. The Public Health Agency of Canada should develop the expertise to lead public health HIT policy and should establish a mechanism for coordinating public health stakeholder input on HIT policy.

2013-01-01

144

Contextualizing consumer health information searching: an analysis of questions in a social Q&A community  

Microsoft Academic Search

The existing research on consumer health information searching has focused on types of information that users need concerning a particular disease and their querying behavior in general search engines. The context of health information searching, such as people's goals, motivations, and emotions, has received comparatively little attention. Given the significant impact of context on the result of information searching, this

Yan Zhang

2010-01-01

145

Internet-Based Health Information Consumer Skills Intervention for People Living With HIV\\/AIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical information can improve health, and there is an enormous amount of health information available on the Internet. A randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of an intervention based on social-cognitive theory to improve information use among people living with HIV\\/AIDS. Men and women (N = 448) were placed in either (a) an 8-session intervention that focused on Internet information

Seth C. Kalichman; Charsey Cherry; Demetria Cain; Howard Pope; Moira Kalichman; Lisa Eaton; Lance Weinhardt; Eric G. Benotsch

2006-01-01

146

Improving adolescent health: Focus on HPV vaccine acceptance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The success of future human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs will depend on individuals’ willingness to accept vaccination, parents’ willingness to have their preadolescent and early adolescent children vaccinated, and health care providers’ willingness to recommend HPV vaccination. The purpose of this article is to provide a qualitative review of the relevant literature, including research on knowledge and attitudes about HPV

Gregory D. Zimet

2005-01-01

147

Strategies of suicide prevention: Focus on health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suicide is a major health problem, showing an increasing tendency in many developed countries. In this synthetic review, having briefly described the possible risk factors of suicide, those recent strategies that have been proved to be effective methods of reducing the suicide rate are summarised. Psychiatric illness, first of all the affective disorders (particularly in the case of a previous

Zoltán Rihmer

1996-01-01

148

A focus on two major health problems in the Indian subcontinent.  

PubMed

Every 2 years, Professor Sarman Singh organizes the International Conference on Opportunistic Pathogens, which is held in the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. International experts in the field of opportunistic infections in AIDS patients and transplant recipients are invited to share their experience with their Indian colleagues. In this article, two presentations are summarized. The focus on those presentations is not necessarily because they convey new information (most of the data are available on the WHO website or in the literature), but rather because this information is still highly relevant today and because, in the opinion of the author, it is very important to heighten readers' awareness of these major health problems in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:21342062

Ajzenberg, Daniel

2011-02-01

149

Information Dissemination in the Public Health Service.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper reviews the literature on information dissemination activities and describes several information dissemination activities sponsored by Public Health Services (PHS) agencies and institutes including the following: (1) Depression/Awareness, Recogn...

1991-01-01

150

Mission-Driven Priorities: Public Health in Health Information Exchange  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developing state- and nationwide health information exchange (HIE) is one of the health priorities defined in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. States are expected to take leadership in statewide planning and implementation. To balance limited resources among mandated responsibilities and emerging HIE accountability, we maintain that state public health practitioners must integrate HIE into our mission- driven practice in

Barry Nangle; Wu Xu; David N. Sundwall

151

Primary Sources of Health Information: Comparisons in the Domain of Health Attitudes, Health Cognitions, and Health Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent growth in consumer autonomy in health care accompanied by the surge in the use of new media for health information gathering has led to an increasing schol- arly interest in understanding the consumer health information search construct. This article explores consumer health information seeking in the realm of the primary sources of health information used by consumers. Based

Mohan J. Dutta-Bergman

2004-01-01

152

A curriculum focused on informed empathy improves attitudes toward persons with disabilities.  

PubMed

Empathy is an important component of the provider-patient relationship. In the United States one in five persons has a disability. Persons with disabilities perceive gaps in health care providers' understanding of their health care preferences and needs. The purpose of this study was to use valid and reliable assessment methods to investigate the association between empathy and attitudes toward persons with disabilities and advocacy. An educational module was developed to enhance health care students' capacity for informed empathy. Pre- and post-assessment measures included the Attitude toward Disabled Persons scale (ATDP), the Attitudes toward Patient Advocacy Microsocial scale (AMIA) and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). ATDP (t(94) = -5.95, p = .000) and AMIA (t(92) = -5.99, p = .000) scores increased significantly after the education module. Correlations between the pre- or post-module ATDP or AMIA scores and the IRI scores were not significant. Empathy in general may not be sufficient to ensure optimal attitudes toward persons with disabilities or advocacy in pre-health care professionals. However, a curriculum based on informed empathy and focused on the experiences of persons with disabilities can result in more positive attitudes toward and advocacy for people with disabilities. PMID:23670683

Miller, Sonya R

2013-03-01

153

Mission-driven priorities: public health in health information exchange.  

PubMed

Developing state- and nationwide health information exchange (HIE) is one of the health priorities defined in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. States are expected to take leadership in statewide planning and implementation. To balance limited resources among mandated responsibilities and emerging HIE accountability, we maintain that state public health practitioners must integrate HIE into our mission-driven practice in five priority areas: 1) connecting real-time disease surveillance and notifiable case reporting through HIE to better protect citizens; 2) sharing public health-managed clinical information through HIE for preventive services, 3) conduct health education for targeted populations via HIE to promote healthy lifestyles; 4) leverage public health informatics with Medicaid information system to provide quality healthcare; and 5) serve as a regulator for standardized HIT to participate in healthcare reform. We summarize public health's broad practice into "Five P's" and link each domain's historical foundation, current and proposed practices to sustain success. PMID:20351901

Nangle, Barry; Xu, Wu; Sundwall, David N

2009-11-14

154

Modeling Information Assurance: A Value Focused Thinking Approach.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The information revolution has brought forth new and improved capabilities to rapidly disseminate and employ information in decision-making. These capabilities are critical to the civilian and military infrastructures of the United States, and act as forc...

J. T. Hamill

2000-01-01

155

Sexual health information seeking: a survey of adolescent practices.  

PubMed

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify sources of information and support preferred by young people to understand adolescent practices as adolescents develop a sexual health knowledge base. BACKGROUND: Statistics suggest that adolescents are not always making safe sexual health decisions. It is essential to develop an understanding of preferred sources of information and support to structure health and education services so that adolescents develop skills and knowledge to make safer choices. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey design. METHODS: A wide-ranging questionnaire was developed using validated questions, drawn from similar adolescent lifestyle surveys and adapted with guidance from an advisory group; 2036 13-16-year-olds responded. Two questions, reporting information sources adolescents find useful and sources of approachable support, are considered here. RESULTS: Adolescents find informal sources more useful and experience higher levels of comfort accessing informal support especially from their best friends and mothers. Of formal provision, school-based sources are preferred; however, sexual health information seeking is gendered and changes across year groups. The range of sexual health information sources adolescents access increases with age, and how they access these information sources changes as sexual activity increases and the information becomes more relevant. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the targeting of sexual health provision in relation to age and gender and suggest a youth-focused approach to formal provision, including outreach working and a collaborative relationship with adolescents and parents. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The findings contribute to an understanding of sources of information and support preferred by adolescents. In particular, they need to reconsider how services external to the school may be developed so they are youth-focused and approachable. Nurses need to consider how best to work in partnership with adolescents and their families to disseminate accurate information and develop relevant services. PMID:23452062

Whitfield, Clare; Jomeen, Julie; Hayter, Mark; Gardiner, Eric

2013-03-01

156

A public health focus on infertility prevention, detection, and management.  

PubMed

In 2002, 2 million American women of reproductive age were infertile. Infertility is also common among men. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducts surveillance and research on the causes of infertility, monitors the safety and efficacy of infertility treatment, and sponsors national prevention programs. A CDC-wide working group found that, despite this effort, considerable gaps and opportunities exist in surveillance, research, communication, and program and policy development. We intend to consult with other federal agencies, professional and consumer organizations, the scientific community, the health care community, industry, and other stakeholders, and participate in the development of a national public health plan for the prevention, detection, and management of infertility. PMID:18992879

Macaluso, Maurizio; Wright-Schnapp, Tracie J; Chandra, Anjani; Johnson, Robert; Satterwhite, Catherine L; Pulver, Amy; Berman, Stuart M; Wang, Richard Y; Farr, Sherry L; Pollack, Lori A

2008-11-06

157

77 FR 27774 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Vacancy AGENCY: Government Accountability...Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee (Health IT Policy...

2012-05-11

158

78 FR 7784 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Nomination Letters  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Nomination Letters AGENCY: Government...Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee (Health IT Policy...

2013-02-04

159

Why do young adult smokers continue to smoke despite the health risks? A focus group study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this article is on constructions of health and illness in relation to smoking. Specifically, we were interested in how culturally embedded health promotion messages were discussed and understood by our young smokers–and how continued smoking was rationalised in the context of a thoroughgoing anti-smoking climate. To investigate accounts of smoking maintenance, we conducted focus group discussions (N

Brendan Gough; Gary Fry; Sarah Grogan; Mark Conner

2009-01-01

160

A Qualitative Analysis of Women's Satisfaction with Primary Care from a Panel of Focus Groups in the National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health issues unique to women and differences in healthcare experiences have recently gained attention as health plans and systems seek to extend and improve health promotion and dis- ease prevention in the population. Successful efforts focused on enhancing quality of care will require information from the patient's perspective on how to improve such services to best support women's attempts to

Roger T. Anderson; Angela M. Barbara; Carol Weisman; Sarah Hudson Scholle; Joann Binko; Tracy Schneider; Karen Freund; Valerie Gwinner

2001-01-01

161

National health information privacy: regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.  

PubMed

Health information privacy is important in US society, but existing federal and state law does not offer adequate protection. The Department of Health and Human Services, under powers granted by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, recently issued a final rule providing systematic, nationwide health information privacy protection. The rule is extensive in its scope, applying to health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers (hospitals, clinics, and health departments) who conduct financial transactions electronically ("covered entities"). The rule applies to personally identifiable information in any form, whether communicated electronically, on paper, or orally. The rule does not preempt state law that affords more stringent privacy protection; thus, the health care industry will have to comply with multiple layers of federal and state law. The rule affords patients rights to education about privacy safeguards, access to their medical records, and a process for correction of records. It also requires the patient's permission for disclosures of personal information. While privacy is an important value, it may conflict with public responsibilities to use data for social goods. The rule has special provisions for disclosure of health information for research, public health, law enforcement, and commercial marketing. The privacy debate will continue in Congress and within the president's administration. The primary focus will be on the costs and burdens on health care providers, the ability of health care professionals to use and share full medical information when treating patients, the provision of patient care in a timely and efficient manner, and parents' access to information about the health of their children. PMID:11410101

Gostin, L O

2001-06-20

162

Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - WSSU  

SciTech Connect

Environmental health focus with training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine HBCU ACCESS Project at Winston-Salem State University, NC on November 10, 2010.

McMurray, L. and W. Templin-Branner

2010-11-10

163

Integrating Change Management into Clinical Health Information Technology Project Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The management of change within a clinical health information technology (HIT) project traditionally focuses on cost, schedule and scope, considered ldquohardrdquo change management (CM). Despite massive funding, clinical HIT projects continue to fail suggesting that the management of risk associated with hard change elements alone, is not effective. The cause of clinical HIT failure is usually attributed to user resistance

Margaret Leyland; Danielle Hunter; James Dietrich

2009-01-01

164

Preferences for health information and decision-making: development of the Health Information Wants (HIW) questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Health Information Wants (HIW) Questionnaire was developed to measure 1) a broad range of the types and amount of each type of information health consumers want to have in dealing with health-related issues; and 2) the degree to which health consumers want to participate in each type of decision-making in each corresponding area. With parallel items in each corresponding

Bo Xie; Mo Wang; Robert Feldman

2011-01-01

165

Semantic Interoperability in Health Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid development of community health information networks raises the issue of semantic interoperability between distributed and heterogeneous components. Indeed, operational health information systems originate from heterogeneous teams of independent developers and have to cooperate in order to exchange data and services. A good cooperation is naturally based on a good understanding of the messages exchanged between the systems. The main

Patrice Degoulet; Dominique Sauquet; Marie-Christine Jaulent; Eric Zapletal; Marion Lavril

166

Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview…

Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

2012-01-01

167

Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

Liu, Darren

2009-01-01

168

Data Mining in Health and Medical Information.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to data mining (DM) in health and medical information: the potential of DM in health and medicine; statistical methods; evaluation of methods; DM tools for health and medicine; inductive learning of symbolic rules; application of DM tools in diagnosis and prognosis; and…

Bath, Peter A.

2004-01-01

169

Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and…

Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

2012-01-01

170

Training Older Adults to Access Health Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many older adults do not use health information available on the Internet. Older adults residing in affordable housing were taught to use the NIHSeniorHealth.gov Web site. Participants were predominantly African American women with limited education and income (N = 42). Outcomes included changes in computer and health Web site navigation skills. Results showed significant improvements for all demographic groups in both computer

Elizabeth M. Bertera; Robert L. Bertera; Russell Morgan; Ellen Wuertz; Alfred M. O. Attey

2007-01-01

171

Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and…

Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

2012-01-01

172

Federal health information privacy cases from 2005.  

PubMed

The federal Personal Information Protection and Electronics Documents Act (PIPEDA) governs the collection, use and disclosure of personal information. PIPEDA is important legislation for people living with HIV/AIDS as it establishes rules for the handling of personal information, including personal health information. PIPEDA applies to personal information handled by commercial enterprises in the course of commercial activities throughout Canada, except in provinces that have significantly similar laws. Complaints under PIPEDA are heard by the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (PC). This article reviews the interpretation and application of PIPEDA in complaints related to health information decided in 2005. PMID:16805025

Herget, Greg

2006-04-01

173

Focus on mental health care reforms in Europe. Mental health services in Europe: an overview.  

PubMed

Psychiatric services in Europe are experiencing a period of change, driven by political commitment at national and intergovernmental levels in response to the public health challenges posed by mental health problems. However, diversity among European countries makes any generalization speculative. Resources such as funding, workforce, and infrastructure vary dramatically, and new investment is limited. Some European countries can take pride in sophisticated service systems, whereas others continue to rely almost exclusively on asylums. Reforms are hampered by a lack of comparable information and a lack of research, particularly in less developed countries. However, many exciting local initiatives are emerging, even in the poorest countries. The challenge will be to translate good local practice into national policies and practice, supported by adequate resources. PMID:18451001

Muijen, Matt

2008-05-01

174

PPACA and Public Health: Creating a Framework to Focus on Prevention and Wellness and Improve the Public's Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), a major piece of health care reform legislation.This comprehensive legislation includes provisions that focus on prevention, wellness, and public health. Some, including authors in this symposium, question whether Congress considered public health, prevention, and wellness issues as mere afterthoughts in the creation of PPACA. As

Gwendolyn R. Majette

2011-01-01

175

Policy Description for Information Lifecycle Management Focused on Metadata  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data retention, regulatory compliance, and security requirements are increasing by explosive information growth and government regulations. Information Lifecycle Management (ILM) has gotten a lot of attention as a solution for these requirements recently. The goal of ILM is to ensure that information is stored on the most effective and appropriate storage medium depending on the service level required in the phase of the life of information. And the goal of our research is to automate the ILM process using “policy" indicating managers' intension. This paper proposes the method for description and interpretation of the policy.

Tanaka, Tetsuo; Ueda, Ryoichi; Aizono, Toshiko; Ushijima, Kazutomo; Naitoh, Ichiro; Komoda, Norihisa

176

Using Focus Groups to Design a Community Health Program: What Roles Should Volunteers Play?  

Microsoft Academic Search

:This volunteer-based community health advisory program illustrated the benefits of using focus groups to monitor and guide program development. Three focus groups, conducted by program evaluators, obtained input regarding the role of community volunteers. Focus group findings confirmed some of the assumptions held by program developers but refuted others. For example, prospective community participants and program developers were found to

Lillian Trettin; Catherine Musham

2000-01-01

177

Using Focus Groups to Design a Community Health Program: What Roles Should Volunteers Play?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This volunteer-based community health advisory program illustrated the benefits of using focus groups to monitor and guide program development. Three focus groups, conducted by program evaluators, obtained input regarding the role of community volunteers. Focus group findings confirmed some of the assumptions held by program developers but refuted others. For example, prospective community participants and program developers were found to

2000-01-01

178

Consumer Health Information Seeking as Hypothesis Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Objective: Despite the proliferation of consumer health sites, lay individuals often experience difficulty finding health information,online. The present,study,attempts,to understand,users’ information,seeking difficulties by drawing,on a hypothesis,testing explanatory,framework.,It also addresses,the role of user competencies,and,their interaction with internet resources. Design: Twenty,participants,were,interviewed,about their understanding,of a hypothetical,scenario,about,a family member,suffering from,stable angina and,then searched,MedlinePlus, consumer,health information,portal for information,on the problem,presented,in the scenario. Participants’ understanding,of heart

Alla Keselman; Allen C. Browne; David R. Kaufman

179

Focusing on Children's Inhalation Dosimetry and Health Effects for Risk Assessment: An Introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Substantial effort has been invested in improving children's health risk assessment in recent years. However, the body of scientific evidence in support of children's health assessment is constantly advancing, indicating the need for continual updating of risk assessment methods. Children's inhalation dosimetry and child-specific adverse health effects are of particular concern for risk assessment. When focusing on this topic within

Brenda Foos; Melanie Marty; Joel Schwartz; William Bennett; Jacqueline Moya; Annie M. Jarabek; Andrew G. Salmon

2007-01-01

180

EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Information and Many-Body Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantum many-body models describing natural systems or materials and physical systems assembled piece by piece in the laboratory for the purpose of realizing quantum information processing share an important feature: intricate correlations that originate from the coherent interaction between a large number of constituents. In recent years it has become manifest that the cross-fertilization between research devoted to quantum information

Jens Eisert; Martin B. Plenio

2010-01-01

181

Information literacy in global perspective: how disaster focuses our minds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information literacy is crucially important for all peoples as has been dramatically demonstrated in times of disaster as well as in more normal times. Its many dimensions have been much discussed in the library and information literature and have been defined in standards in a number of countries. Putting those concepts into practice presents a logistical and resource challenge, a

Alex Byrne

2005-01-01

182

Health Information Seeking, Receipt, and Use in Diabetes Self-Management  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Diabetes self-management is essential for diabetes control, yet little is known about patient preferences for sources of health information or about the extent to which information is sought directly or received passively through various media sources. The aim of this qualitative study was to identify how individuals with diabetes seek and use health care information. METHODS Using a health information model to guide our research, we conducted 9 focus groups with 46 adults with a diagnosis of diabetes and then analyzed the transcripts and notes from these focus groups. RESULTS Five themes emerged: (1) passive receipt of health information about diabetes is an important aspect of health information behavior; (2) patients weave their own information web depending on their disease trajectory; (3) patients’ personal relationships help them understand and use this information; (4) a relationship with a health care professional is needed to cope with complicated and sometimes conflicting information; and (5) health literacy makes a difference in patients’ ability to understand and use information. CONCLUSIONS Patients make decisions about diabetes self-management depending on their current needs, seeking and incorporating diverse information sources not traditionally viewed as providing health information. Based on our findings, we have developed a new health information model that reflects both the nonlinear nature of health information-seeking behavior and the interplay of both active information seeking and passive receipt of information.

Longo, Daniel R.; Schubert, Shari L.; Wright, Barbara A.; LeMaster, Joseph; Williams, Casey D.; Clore, John N.

2010-01-01

183

Health care, information needs, and outreach: reaching Ohio's rural citizens  

PubMed Central

As a rural state, Ohio has a vital interest in addressing rural health and information needs. NetWellness is a Web-based consumer health information service that focuses on the needs of the residents of Ohio. Health sciences faculty from the state's three Carnegie Research I universities—University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University, and The Ohio State University—create and evaluate content and provide Ask an Expert service to all visitors. Through partnerships at the state and local levels, involving public, private, commercial, and noncommercial organizations, NetWellness has grown from a regional demonstration project in 1995 to a key statewide service. Collaboration with public libraries, complemented by alliances with kindergarten through twelfth grade agencies, makes NetWellness Ohio's essential health information resource.

Guard, Roger; Fredericka, Theresa M.; Kroll, Susan; Marine, Stephen; Roddy, Carol; Steiner, Tim; Wentz, Susan

2000-01-01

184

Effects of varying attentional focus on health-related physical fitness performance.  

PubMed

Assessing health-related physical fitness is important for determining health status. However, verbal instructions provided during an assessment generally do not specify direction of attentional focus. This investigation examined the effect of attentional focus on performance outcomes during appraisals of health-related physical fitness. Eight females (25.0 ± 4.0 years) and 8 males (26.3 ± 3.9 years) completed 7 physical fitness tests of the Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness and Lifestyle Approach (modified Canadian Aerobic Fitness Test, grip strength, push-ups, sit and reach, partial curl-ups, vertical jump, and back extension) on 3 different days, each separated by 1 week. On day 1, no attentional focus was specified. On days 2 and 3, participants were asked to adopt an external focus (instructions focused attention away from the body) or an internal focus (instructions focused attention on the body's movement) in randomized order. Irrespective of sex, adopting an external focus resulted in significantly better performance on all tests when compared with no focus or internal-focus conditions. An internal focus also resulted in performance decrements for grip strength, push-ups, and vertical jump vs. no focus. These results demonstrate that instructing individuals to adopt an external focus provides a performance advantage on appraisals of aerobic and musculoskeletal fitness, whereas an internal focus may hinder performance. In some participants, these scores may convert to a rating of health status that is 1 health benefit zone higher or lower, respectively. This highlights further the importance of formulating verbal instructions that incorporate attentional focus for optimal performance on appraisals of physical fitness. PMID:23438227

Bredin, Shannon S D; Dickson, Danika B; Warburton, Darren E R

2013-02-14

185

Health care consumers' preferences around health information exchange.  

PubMed

PURPOSE Consumer buy-in is important for the success of widespread federal initiatives to promote the use of health information exchange (HIE). Little is known, however, of consumers' preferences around the storing and sharing of electronic health information. We conducted a study to better understand consumer preferences regarding the privacy and security of HIE. METHODS In 2008 we conducted a cross-sectional, random digit dial telephone survey of residents in the Hudson Valley of New York State, a state where patients must affirmatively consent to having their data accessed through HIE. RESULTS There was an 85% response rate (N = 170) for the survey. Most consumers would prefer that permission be obtained before various parties, including their clinician, could view their health information through HIE. Most consumers wanted any method of sharing their health information to have safeguards in place to protect against unauthorized viewing (86%). They also wanted to be able to see who has viewed their information (86%), to stop electronic storage of their data (84%), to stop all viewing (83%), and to select which parts of their health information are shared (78%). Among the approximately one-third (n = 54) of consumers who were uncomfortable with automatic inclusion of their health information in an electronic database for HIE, 78% wished to approve all information explicitly, and most preferred restricting information by clinician (83%), visit (81%), or information type (88%). CONCLUSION Consumers in a state with an opt-in consent policy are interested in having greater control over the privacy and security of their electronic health information. These preferences should be considered when developing and implementing systems, standards and policies. PMID:22966106

Dhopeshwarkar, Rina V; Kern, Lisa M; O'Donnell, Heather C; Edwards, Alison M; Kaushal, Rainu

186

Correlates of consumer trust in online health information: findings from the health information national trends survey.  

PubMed

The past few decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in consumers seeking health information online. However, the quality of such information remains questionable, and the trustworthiness of online health information has become a hot topic, whereas little attention has been paid to how consumers evaluate online health information credibility. This study builds on theoretical perspectives of trust such as personal-capital-based, social-capital-based, and transfer-based, and it examines various correlates of consumer trust in online health information. The author analyzed the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey data (N = 7,674). Results showed that consumer trust in online health information did not correlate with personal capital such as income, education, and health status. Social capital indicated by visiting social networking Web sites was not associated with trust in online health information either. Nevertheless, trust in online health information transferred from traditional mass media and government health agencies to the Internet, and it varied by such information features as easiness to locate and to understand. Age appeared to be a key factor in understanding the correlates of trust in online health information. Theoretical and empirical implications of the results are discussed. PMID:21086209

Ye, Yinjiao

2011-01-01

187

Information Seeking and Avoiding in Health Contexts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests a research agenda that would provide a basis for proposing normative recommendations for information management in health contexts. Overviews information seeking and avoiding processes. Describes challenges and dilemmas faced by those who seek, avoid, and provide information. Offers research questions derived from a normative agenda for…

Brashers, Dale E.; Goldsmith, Daena J.; Hsieh, Elaine

2002-01-01

188

The National Women's Health Information Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Designed to provide women with authoritative and timely knowledge of a host of womens health issues, the National Womens Health Information Center site (sponsored by the US Department of Health and Human Services) offers a reliable and thorough overview of hundreds of topics and current news briefs. Health topics on the site (which range from abstinence to yellow fever) are alphabetically listed or can also be located by entering keywords. Visitors to the site can also sign up here to receive weekly health tips via email. Along with featuring information on health topics, other issues affecting women are well-represented here, including domestic violence awareness and body image. Also helpful is the fact that the site is also available in Spanish, which will be useful to Spanish-speaking persons and health professionals working with Spanish speakers.

189

DEChealth: A Comprehensive Occupational Health Information System  

PubMed Central

Today, corporations are faced with the responsibility of protecting the health of their employees and the health of the general public through control of the industrial environment. DEChealth, the DEOmed Occupational Health System, developed by an inter-disciplinary team of occupational health professionals and computer engineers, is designed to provide an information management tool in the industrial setting. The DEChealth system enables management to comply with governmental regulations and to meet the increasing demands of employees for information on potential health risks associated with their job. As a comprehensive occupational health surveillance system, employees, agents, and areas are tracked over time and integrated with industrial hygiene data and medical data. In addressing the complex issues of employee health and safety, the DEChealth product offers unique advantages.

Reed, Linda J.; Solomon, Martin E.

1982-01-01

190

Toxic contaminants and ecosystems health: A Great Lakes focus (Advances in Science and Technology, Volume 21)  

SciTech Connect

In 1983, the Science Advisory Board of the International Joint Commission established the Health and Aquatic Communities Task Force to synthesize information on the effects of toxic substances on the Great Lakes aquatic communtiies. The culmination of the Task Force's activities was a symposium and workshop held 18-21 June 1985 as part of the annual meeting of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography. After this meeting, participants prepared the chapters that form the basis of this book. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 consists of six chapters, each devoted to the effects of toxics on a major trophic level. Great Lakes biota are emphasized in each chapter. Part 2 is divided into 17 chapters that focus on new methods beyond single species bioassays for assessing toxic effects. Part 3 consists of six summary chapters (again corresponding roughly to major trophic levels) that synthesize the opinions of workshop participants on future directions for assessing toxic effects.

Evans, M.S. (ed.)

1988-01-01

191

Involvement, competencies, gender and food health information seeking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the role of gender, food health involvement, and food health information competency in predicting consumer food health information seeking. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A conceptual model for predicting consumer food health information seeking is proposed. The predicting constructs are general food health involvement, general food health competency, product-specific health involvement, and

Torben Hansen; Heidi Boye; Thyra Uth Thomsen

2010-01-01

192

Fringe Focus: Informal Economy and Green Career Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Asserts that what are currently regarded as peripheral career development activities will move to the center of career counseling. Argues that counseling in the informal economy and environmentally concerned career counseling will move up the agenda as traditional concepts of careers fade away. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/GCP)|

Plant, Peter

1999-01-01

193

Focus on Parents: The Parenting Materials Information Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To bridge the gap between producers of parenting materials and potential users, the National Institute of Education funded the Southwest Educational Laboratory to design, develop, and research the effectiveness of a model Parenting Materials Information Center. During the last 2 years this model has been developed to include more than 1400…

Espinoza, Renato

194

The Mobile School Health Information Initiative: Creating and Sustaining a Free Curriculum for P-12 Staff to Find Credible Health Information.  

PubMed

Three health sciences librarians created a curriculum to connect pre-school - grade 12 (P-12) personnel with credible health information. The course focuses on MedlinePlus® and KidsHealth.org®. They obtained external funding to deliver a revised curriculum for free throughout the metropolitan area. The funded portion of the project reached 93 people at 8 sites. Efforts to sustain the program beyond its funded cycle have reached another 33 people. Evaluations indicate the curriculum successfully equips staff to be health information champions within their schools. Participants report increased confidence locating credible health information. Written comments indicate both short-term gains and sustained use of the knowledge. PMID:23243394

Olmstadt, William; Hansen, Judy; Engeszer, Robert J

2012-11-15

195

Health Information on the Web: Finding Reliable Information  

MedlinePLUS

... may contain myths or rumors. Other Organizations Medical Library Association User's Guide to Finding and Evaluating Health Information on the Web Healthfinder Written by familydoctor.org editorial staff Reviewed/Updated: 07/10 Created: 02/04

196

Transforming Health Care through Information Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information technology provides many exciting applications for the health sector, such as computer-aided surgery, the use of telesensing methods to examine patients from their homes, and patient/doctor interaction via the Internet and digital medical libr...

2001-01-01

197

Patients' Attitudes Toward Electronic Health Information Exchange: Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background In many countries, there has been substantial progress in establishing the electronic transmission of patients’ health information between health care providers, but little is known about how best to engage patients in the process. Objective We explored patients’ views about sharing of electronic health information and their preferences for learning about and participating in this process. Methods Patients in one Massachusetts community in the northeastern United States were recruited to participate in focus-group discussions. Prior to discussion, participants completed a written questionnaire that captured their reactions to draft educational materials and a consent form. The discussion moderator and two physicians analyzed the moderator’s detailed notes from each session and participants’ written comments, using an immersion-crystallization approach. Results Three dominant themes emerged: (1) concerns about privacy and security, (2) the potential benefit to a person’s health, and (3) the desire for more information about the consent process. On the pre-discussion questionnaire, 55 out of 62 participants (88%) indicated that they would provide consent for their information to be shared electronically among their health care providers, given the materials they had reviewed. Conclusions Patients are enthusiastic about electronic health information exchange, recognizing its capacity to improve the quality and safety of health care; however, they are also concerned about its potential to result in breached privacy and misuse of health data. As the exchange of electronic health information becomes more widespread, policy makers will need to ensure that patients have access to concise educational materials and opportunities to engage in conversations about the risks and benefits of participation.

Evans, J Stewart; Benjamin, Alison; Delano, David; Bates, David W

2009-01-01

198

Building support for health information technologies.  

PubMed

Despite the increasing role of information technology in health care, its use still lags behind that occurring in other sectors. Factors contributing to this include the complex health care environment and conflicting political agendas. Building political support for information technology in health care depends on understanding the importance of stakeholders and the environment in which they operate. It is important to involve stakeholders early in the process of implementing new information technology in order to identify needs, barriers, and non-starters. Understanding the historical experience of the community and its past attempts at using information technology is also important. Quality of care issues, nursing shortages, cost control concerns, health insurance costs and coverage rates, institutional solvency, and overwhelming paperwork are current problems in the healthcare environment that can hinder willingness to invest in information technology. Ironically, information technology can also help remedy these problems. Impact on workflow, privacy of personal health information, and system reliability, interoperability, and the ease of updating the system can all have political ramifications with regard to acceptance and implementation of information technology. PMID:15455845

Rippen, Helga

2003-01-01

199

Ontology-driven health information systems architectures.  

PubMed

Following an architecture vision such as the Generic Component Model (GCM) architecture framework, health information systems for supporting personalized care have to be based on a component-oriented architecture. Representing concepts and their interrelations, the GCM perspectives system architecture, domains, and development process can be described by the domains' ontologies. The paper introduces ontology principles, ontology references to the GCM as well as some practical aspects of ontology-driven approaches to semantically interoperable and sustainable health information systems. PMID:19745296

Blobel, Bernd; Oemig, Frank

2009-01-01

200

Clear It Up: Plain Language in Government Health Information  

MedlinePLUS

... find and use health information. We host a health literacy web site that provides tips and tools for ... be more effective communicators. We also provide free health literacy training for anyone working to communicate health information ...

201

Everyday health and the internet: a mediated health perspective on health information seeking.  

PubMed

This paper explores the relationship between internet use and individuals' health experience. Adopting a 'mediated health' approach, it presents four cases studies of households using the internet for health information. The study shows that participants use the internet as it offers personalized information in line with individuals' and families' health needs affecting their everyday routines. The internet emerges as an everyday helper linked to the intimacy of health experiences. Agency is manifest in study participants' choice of both becoming more informed as well as having the possibility of ignoring information. Case studies also show how personal internet use is confronted by informational surroundings generating flows of information that may induce uncertainty on the information seeker's side. The paper calls for a perspective which considers together personal health experience and media use to embed online health information seeking within an everyday context of internet use. PMID:19220804

Kivits, Joëlle

2009-02-11

202

Health information technology and the medical home.  

PubMed

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) supports development and universal implementation of a comprehensive electronic infrastructure to support pediatric information functions of the medical home. These functions include (1) timely and continuous management and tracking of health data and services over a patient's lifetime for all providers, patients, families, and guardians, (2) comprehensive organization and secure transfer of health data during patient-care transitions between providers, institutions, and practices, (3) establishment and maintenance of central coordination of a patient's health information among multiple repositories (including personal health records and information exchanges), (4) translation of evidence into actionable clinical decision support, and (5) reuse of archived clinical data for continuous quality improvement. The AAP supports universal, secure, and vendor-neutral portability of health information for all patients contained within the medical home across all care settings (ambulatory practices, inpatient settings, emergency departments, pharmacies, consultants, support service providers, and therapists) for multiple purposes including direct care, personal health records, public health, and registries. The AAP also supports financial incentives that promote the development of information tools that meet the needs of pediatric workflows and that appropriately recognize the added value of medical homes to pediatric care. PMID:21518710

2011-04-25

203

Where do college students get health information? Believability and use of health information sources.  

PubMed

This study aims to identify predictors of use of health information sources among U.S. college students. For this purpose, the Spring 2006 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) database of 94,806 students at 117 colleges and universities was used. Univariate and multivariable analyses of survey data were conducted. The four most believable sources of health information as indicated by survey respondents were health center medical staff, health educators, faculty or coursework, and parents. Health center medical staff, health educators, and faculty or coursework were underutilized in relation to their perceived believability, whereas parents were both used and believed at high frequencies. In general, older students, females, full time students, and Black and Hispanic students were more likely to use information from one of the four health sources. However, there was considerable subgroup variability, especially in the use of parents as a health information source. The authors conclude that information on use and believability of health information sources can help colleges to design more effective health information campaigns. PMID:21282492

Vader, Amanda M; Walters, Scott T; Roudsari, Bahaman; Nguyen, Norma

2011-01-31

204

78 FR 24749 - Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Health Information Technology Policy Committee Appointment...established the Health Information Technology Policy Committee to make...implementation of a nationwide health information technology infrastructure to the...

2013-04-26

205

78 FR 17418 - Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant...award under the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant...responsibilities for the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development...

2013-03-21

206

76 FR 4350 - Health Information Technology Extension Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Extension Program ACTION...announces changes to the Health Information Technology Extension Program, which...meaningful users of health information technology, as authorized under...

2011-01-25

207

Focused Attention – How easy is it to find information on the ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

... Focused Attention – How easy is it to find information on the label? Statistics. N. Valid. ... 301, 0. How easy is it to find information in the label? Frequency ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/developmentapprovalprocess/developmentresources

208

Information for Health. A Strategy for Building the National Health Information Infrastructure.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent events have tragically underscored the need to connect healthcare and public health professionals and the public to sound information-and to each other. The National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics (NCHVHS) hopes this report can prompt the...

2001-01-01

209

Where Do College Students Get Health Information? Believability and Use of Health Information Sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to identify predictors of use of health information sources among U.S. college students. For this purpose, the Spring 2006 American College Health Association–National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) database of 94,806 students at 117 colleges and universities was used. Univariate and multivariable analyses of survey data were conducted. The four most believable sources of health information as indicated

Amanda M. Vader; Scott T. Walters; Bahaman Roudsari; Norma Nguyen

2011-01-01

210

Effectively Addressing Mental Health Issues in Permanency-Focused Child Welfare Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children and families built by adoption or relative caregiving have specialized needs. This paper proposes a rubric for the central elements of permanency-focused mental health services in child welfare practice. Kinship Center provides an innovative mental health service delivery system, weaving foster and adoptive placement programs, adoption…

Ornelas, Laura A.; Silverstein, Deborah N.; Tan, Sherylle

2007-01-01

211

Pilot study in the development of an interactive multimedia learning environment for sexual health interventions: a focus group approach.  

PubMed

In the UK there are high rates of sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies amongst young people. There is limited and contradictory evidence that current sexual health education interventions are effective or that they improve access to appropriate sexual health services. This paper describes the outcome of focus group work with young people that was undertaken to inform the design of an Interactive Multimedia Learning Environment that incorporates message framing, intended for use in sexual health promotion. The focus group work addressed sexual attitudes, behaviour, risk perception, and knowledge of sexual health and sexual health services in Nottingham. The results provided new insights into young peoples' sexual behaviour, and their diversity of knowledge and beliefs. Common themes expressed regarding sexual health services included concerns about confidentiality, lack of confidence to access services and fear of the unknown. The results showed that while the adolescents are reasonably knowledgeable about infection, they do not know as much about the relevant services to treat it. This work emphasizes the need for user involvement throughout the design and development of a sexual health intervention, and will form the basis of the next part of the project. PMID:15972303

Goold, P C; Bustard, S; Ferguson, E; Carlin, E M; Neal, K; Bowman, C A

2005-06-21

212

Health and the National Information Infrastructure  

PubMed Central

Only information technology offers society the opportunity to reinvent health care into a more value-driven, knowledge-based, cost-effective industry. The author urges the health informatics community to assume greater leadership for defining and securing a robust health information infrastructure (HII). A blueprint for the future tied to a coalition of advocates pushing for change would enable the step-interval improvements in health care needed by the nation. Our nation and its people are fortunate. We are blessed with a system of government that offers ordinary citizens the opportunity to shape the future, leadership that seeks to anticipate and create a better society, and at present a robust economy. Moreover, like many other countries, we are benefiting from astounding advances in medical knowledge and technologies. Finally, the increasing power and affordability of information technology is transforming the work of many industries and incrementally changing the lives of many citizens. At the same time this is true, there is much about which to be concerned with respect to health care. Tens of millions lack financial access to care; quality is very uneven and not receiving serious attention from health professionals; and costs are once again rising. Our people are unhappy with their care; providers are unhappy with the system; payers will soon become more unhappy about costs; and government reacts by enacting regulations that will fail to create substantial change. There will never be sufficient funds to do all we would like to do. Better knowledge and treatments will come from biomedical research, but the progress will be gradual and likely offset by increased demand by an aging society. While improved health care system management will result from health services research, only the information technology revolution and better policy offer promise of dramatic help. Yet there is little evidence of movement to harness this opportunity. One of the great challenges for our generation is to assure that the astonishing capabilities of information technology benefit human health to the fullest extent possible in the future. This paper seeks to stir debate, discussion, and action. It identifies and discusses some of the likely elements of our nation's emerging information infrastructure that can revolutionize health care to the betterment of our society. Further, it advises on ways to move this strategic agenda forward. This paper relates to the formal position of the American Medical Informatics Association on a national health information infrastructure and other policy documents on advancing health information technology in the hope that continued discussion will stimulate further refinement and action.

Detmer, Don E.

1998-01-01

213

Consumer Demand for Health Information on the Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

The challenges consumers face in acquiring and using information are a defining feature of health care markets. In this paper, we examine demand for health information on the Internet. We find that individuals in poor health are more likely than those in better health to use the Internet to search for health information and to communicate with others about health

Kate Bundorf; Laurence Baker; Sara Singer; Todd Wagner

2004-01-01

214

Quality information and consumer health plan choices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an empirical analysis of the effects of providing information about plan quality on consumers’ health plan choices in a private employment setting. Analysis of plan switching behavior suggests that the provision of quality information had a small, but significant effect on consumer plan choices. Employees were more likely to switch from plans with lower reported quality. Cross-sectional

Nancy Dean Beaulieu

2002-01-01

215

Creating a consumer health information network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Describes how a consortium, consisting of City University of New York Office Library Services, METRO, the New York Academy of Medicine and New York Public Library received a TIIAP grant from the US Department of Commerce in October 1991, to demonstrate the power of the National Information Infrastructure to bring consumer health information to the broadest possible public. The partners

Marsha Ra

1997-01-01

216

Patients' access to personal health information.  

PubMed

Four physicians comment on an issue paper from the Department of Health and Social Security about provisions of the Data Protection Act that would permit patient access to computerized health records in 1987 unless the Secretary of State rules otherwise. S. Jenkins, a general practitioner, fears that patient access would refocus the record on the doctor's best interests rather than the patient's. C.J. Dickinson, a medical professor, welcomes access as fostering trust. M.A. Heasman, a health administrator, opposes unrestricted access but urges physicians to reveal more to patients. B.W. Ellis, a consultant surgeon, holds that patients have a right to see their records, subject to physician discretion in disclosing information to the patient's general practitioner or other third party. An interprofessional working group's "Statement on subject access to personal health information" rejects unrestricted access lest it inhibit health professionals from recording sensitive data. PMID:3081093

Jenkins, S; Dickinson, C J; Heasman, M A; Ellis, B W

1986-01-25

217

Effect of temporal focus on the recall of expectancy-consistent and expectancy-inconsistent information  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined the impact of temporal focus on the recall of information that is consistent or inconsistent with an expectation. A consistent pattern of results across 4 experiments indicates that when Ss' expectations are temporally unfocused, better memory for consistent information is observed. In contrast, when expectations are focused in time—that is, Ss know when the relevant events are

Scott F. Madey; Thomas Gilovich

1993-01-01

218

Assisted Focus: Heuristic Automation for Guiding Users' Attention Toward Critical Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theaters of operation are busy environments, and displays of tactical situations can quickly become congested and cluttered with military or other symbols. This clutter can distract users from critical information, unnecessarily increase workload, and delay responding. We have developed a concept called Assisted Focus that intelligently augments human attention by reducing clutter and helping users focus on critical information. In

Harvey S. Smallman; Daniel I. Manes Pacific

219

Transforming a health care information management system.  

PubMed

The article presents results from a survey of 98 top executives at Baylor Health Care System (BHCS), a large, multifunction health care organization in Dallas, Texas. The survey assessed the executives' perceptions of current BHCS quality practices using the first survey developed for the health care industry based on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) criteria. Findings regarding the quality of BHCS internal and external data and information include the need for a $50 million information system transformation to achieve seven critical success factors for all business units and improved internal and external data and information for the business process redesign and quality transformation. Results highlight the need for further research investigating the information and analysis MBNQA criteria. PMID:10174724

Prybutok, V R; Spink, A

1997-11-01

220

76 FR 62400 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Focus Groups as...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...focus groups) related to economics projects. Over the next three...associated with a variety of economics projects including those related...ecosystems, children's health risks, mortality risk reductions...used to develop and improve economics-related surveys. To...

2011-10-07

221

Impact of Health Disclosure Laws on Health Information Exchanges  

PubMed Central

Health information exchanges (HIEs) are expected to facilitate data sharing between healthcare entities, thereby improving the efficiency and quality of care. Privacy concerns have been consistently cited as one of the primary challenges to HIE formation and success. Currently, it is unclear how privacy laws – in particular, legislation restricting the disclosure of health records – have shaped the development of HIEs. This preliminary study explores the landscape of state-level health privacy legislation and examines the impact of variations in such privacy and confidentiality laws on the progress of HIEs. We found that states with stronger privacy laws, limiting the disclosure of health information, had significantly more HIEs exchanging data and had fewer failed HIEs. We suggest that this counterintuitive finding may be explained by the more subtle benefits of such laws, such as increased confidence and trust of participants in an exchange. Other key contributors to this work are Alessandro Acquisti, Rahul Telang, and Julia Adler-Milstein

Adjerid, Idris; Padman, Rema

2011-01-01

222

Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - UDC  

SciTech Connect

Training update with Environmental a health focus. Training conducted as part of the United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine - HBCU ACCESS Project at the University of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC on November 2, 2010.

McMurray, L.; R. Foster; and R. Womble

2010-11-02

223

NIHSeniorHealth Health Information for Older Adults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Library of Medicine recently launched NIHSeniorHealth.gov, a website developed from NIA research on older adults, cognitive aging, and computer usage. This easy-to-use website "makes aging-related health information easily accessible for adults 60 and older" and serves as "a useful tool for family members and friends who are seeking online health information for their older relatives." Topics covered include Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, exercising for older adults, and more. The website offers several options for enhancing usability, including a virtual voice that reads all text aloud. Visitors may also watch video clips (captions available), take short quizzes, or follow links to MEDLINEplus websites for more detailed information.

224

The National Women's Health Information Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Women's Health Information Center (NWHIC) is a service of the Office of Women's Health, which was originally established in 1991. Without a doubt, this fine site will be of great interest to health care professionals, educators, and a wide segment of society. Their homepage offers a wide array of helpful resources, divided into topics such as pregnancy and breastfeeding, funding opportunities, and a set of health tools. The health tools area is particularly useful as it offers such resources as ovulation calculator, a BMI calculator, and a heart disease risk test. Visitors to the homepage will also want to look through the day's health news, search their event calendar, and access the most recently updated sections. Finally, a number of these resources are available in Spanish.

225

Focusing on Children's Health: Community Approaches to Addressing Health Disparities. Workshop Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Socioeconomic conditions are known to be major determinants of health at all stages of life, from pregnancy through childhood and adulthood. Life-course epidemiology has added a further dimension to the understanding of the social determinants of health b...

K. M. Anderson T. M. Wizemann

2009-01-01

226

Children's Environmental Health: 2007 Highlights. Environment, Health, and a Focus on Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created in 1970 to protect human health and the environment. The year 2007 marks 10 years of concerted Federal effort to address children's environmental health risks as mandated by Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. Much of the…

US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

2007-01-01

227

The information management and technology strategy of the UK National Health Service – Determining progress in the NHS acute hospital sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

The publication of the United Kingdom National Health Service (NHS) Information for Health Strategy heralded a new strategic focus for the provision of information systems (IS) support across the NHS. Key changes concerned the placement of much greater emphasis on clinical information needs by route of the Electronic Patient Record (EPR) and the Electronic Health Record (EHR). The last decade

David Wainwright; Teresa Waring

2000-01-01

228

Health information and substitution between fish: Lessons from laboratory and field experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper compares results from a lab experiment and a field experiment conducted in France to evaluate the impact of health information on fish consumption. In both experiments, health information concerns a benefit (omega 3) and a risk (methylmercury). While the lab experiment focuses on two species, namely canned tuna and canned sardines, the field experiment offers a complete measure

Stéphan Marette; Jutta Roosen; Sandrine Blanchemanche

2008-01-01

229

Information, Advertising and Health Choices: A Study of the Cereal Market  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the effects of information on consumer and producer behavior by focusing on the ready-to-eat cereal market during a period in which information developed about the health benefits of fiber cereal consumption. Although cereal producers were initially prohibited from advertising these health benefits, the regulatory ban against producer advertising was lifted during the period we study. Our results

Pauline M. Ippolito; Alan D. Mathios

1990-01-01

230

Emotional Health Services for Children, Youths: Coordinated Care, Insurance Coverage Needed. Growing Up Well. Focus on Prevention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, sixth of a series of eight, focuses on the emotional health and well-being of children and youths. It discusses the prevalence of mental health problems among young people, development of mental health systems of care, and mental health benefits as a part of health insurance coverage. The California Center for Health Improvement asked…

Crowell, Areta

231

Preventive health information on the Internet. Qualitative study of consumers' perspectives.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To explore how best to make high-quality preventive health information available to consumers on the Internet. DESIGN: Focus groups. SETTING: Three urban workplaces and one local hospital with patients from a rural family medical practice. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-two men and 17 women patients. METHOD: Qualitative survey of four focus groups, analysis of transcripts and researchers' notes. MAIN FINDINGS: Five themes characterized participants' perceptions of a consumer website of evidence-based preventive guidelines: content expectations, website design, trustworthiness of content, marketing, and the implications of consumer health information on the Internet. CONCLUSION: Consumers want preventive health information both for taking care of themselves and for participating in a more informed way in their health care when they see a physician. Findings of this study reveal some ways in which consumers' use of Internet health information can affect physicians' and other health professionals' work.

Quintana, Y.; Feightner, J. W.; Wathen, C. N.; Sangster, L. M.; Marshall, J. N.

2001-01-01

232

Health information and health benefits: a case study of digital interactive television information users  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of a questionnaire survey of the health information use and views of 723 subscribers of a digital interactive television service are presented. Subscribers using the service had access to the Living Health channel, a content database (mostly text) on a wide range of health topics. The questionnaire was distributed to Telewest subscribers in the Birmingham area. Sixty-seven per

David Nicholas; Paul Huntington; Peter Williams; Barrie Gunter

2003-01-01

233

77 FR 72985 - Health Information Technology: Revisions to the 2014 Edition Electronic Health Record...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...170 RIN 0991-AB89 Health Information Technology: Revisions to the 2014...National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and Centers for...National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, Attention: Steven...

2012-12-07

234

Information support for the ambulant health worker.  

PubMed

Health workers are trained to work in information-rich environments. Nineteen medical students evaluated 2700 patients in four villages in Kenya where there was no power or phone. A model of information support included personal digital assistants (PDA), electronic medical records (EMR), satellite telecommunications, medical software, and solar power. The students promptly found the advantages of PDA over paper. By using software for decision support and interacting with the EMR data for medical expertise, very few live telemedicine consults were needed. The cost of this information support was only US 0.28 dollars per patient visit. We conclude information resources can be provided in remote environments at reasonable cost. PMID:15689646

Merrell, Ronald C; Merriam, Nathaniel; Doarn, Charles

2004-01-01

235

Job Loss -- Important Information Workers Need to Know to Protect Their Health Coverage and Retirement Benefits  

MedlinePLUS

... updated. DOL > EBSA > Newsroom > Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Job Loss - Important Information Workers Need To Know To ... Accountability Act (HIPAA). This fact sheet focuses on job loss and its effect on workers’ health benefits ...

236

Gender, Work, and Health for Trans Health Providers: A Focus on Transmen  

PubMed Central

Well-documented health research points to trans people's vulnerability to health inequities that are linked to deeply embedded structural and social determinants of health. Gender and work, as social determinants of health for trans people, both shape and are shaped by multiple factors such as support networks, social environments, income and social status, shelter, and personal health practices. There is a gap in the nursing literature in regards to research on work and health for diverse trans people and a virtual silence on the particular issues of trans-identified health providers. This qualitative study used comparative life history methodology and purposeful sampling to examine links among work, career, and health for transmen who are health providers. Semistructured interviews were completed with four Canadian transmen involved in health care professional and/or practice contexts with diverse professions, age, work, and transitioning experiences. Critical gender analysis showed that unique and gender-related critical events and influences shape continuities and discontinuities in their careerlives. This strength-based approach foregrounds how resilience and growth emerged through participants' articulation with everyday gender dynamics. These findings have implications for nursing research, education, and practice that include an understanding of how trans providers “do transgender work” and supporting them in that process.

MacDonnell, Judith A.; Grigorovich, Alisa

2012-01-01

237

Retention of allied health professionals in rural New South Wales: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions  

PubMed Central

Background Uneven distribution of the medical workforce is globally recognised, with widespread rural health workforce shortages. There has been substantial research on factors affecting recruitment and retention of rural doctors, but little has been done to establish the motives and conditions that encourage allied health professionals to practice rurally. This study aims to identify aspects of recruitment and retention of rural allied health professionals using qualitative methodology. Methods Six focus groups were conducted across rural NSW and analysed thematically using a grounded theory approach. The thirty allied health professionals participating in the focus groups were purposively sampled to represent a range of geographic locations, allied health professions, gender, age, and public or private work sectors. Results Five major themes emerged: personal factors; workload and type of work; continuing professional development (CPD); the impact of management; and career progression. ‘Pull factors’ favouring rural practice included: attraction to rural lifestyle; married or having family in the area; low cost of living; rural origin; personal engagement in the community; advanced work roles; a broad variety of challenging clinical work; and making a difference. ‘Push factors’ discouraging rural practice included: lack of employment opportunities for spouses; perceived inadequate quality of secondary schools; age related issues (retirement, desire for younger peer social interaction, and intention to travel); limited opportunity for career advancement; unmanageable workloads; and inadequate access to CPD. Having competent clinical managers mitigated the general frustration with health service management related to inappropriate service models and insufficient or inequitably distributed resources. Failure to fill vacant positions was of particular concern and frustration with the lack of CPD access was strongly represented by informants. Conclusions While personal factors affecting recruitment and retention of allied health study participants were similar to doctors, differences also existed. Allied health professionals were attracted by advanced work roles in a context of generalist practice. Access to CPD and inequitable resource distribution were strong ‘push’ factors in this group. Health policy based on the assumption of transferability between professions may be misguided.

2012-01-01

238

Achieving effective biosurveillance with the Nationwide Health Information Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The federal government is currently developing the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN). Described as a “network of networks,” the NHIN seeks to provide a nationwide, interoperable health information infrastructure that will securely connect consumers with those involved in health care. As part of the national health information technology (HIT) agenda, the NHIN aims to improve individual and population health by

Stephen L Chen

2009-01-01

239

Serious Technology Assessment for Health Care Information Technology  

PubMed Central

Abstract United States health care is engaged in an ambitious project to make its clinical and administrative records “100% electronic.” Substantial benefits are expected in both clinical care delivery and medical research (especially for public health surveillance and outcomes/effectiveness studies). Substantial costs also potentially accrue, beyond the large outlays for an expanded computer and telecommunications infrastructure. Privacy and confidentiality are obviously at risk if such systems cannot be made secure. Limited empirical evidence currently available suggests health information systems security may not be very good, at least in the “average” institutional setting. Privacy-focused critics of electronic record-keeping are sometimes accused of taking Luddite stands, insufficiently attentive to IT's benefits. It may also be fair to worry about a certain Panglossian tendency in “industry” commentary, insufficiently attentive to potential problems. Better federal and state laws structuring health data use will help; the industry must also attend more candidly to the technical uncertainties.

Cushman, Reid

1997-01-01

240

An Innovative Mixed Methods Approach to Studying the Online Health Information Seeking Experiences of Adults with Chronic Health Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an innovative sequential mixed methods approach to researching the experiences of U.K. adults with chronic health conditions seeking health information online. The use of multiple methods integrated within a single study ensured that the focus of the research was emergent and relevant and ultimately provided a more complete…

Mayoh, Joanne; Bond, Carol S.; Todres, Les

2012-01-01

241

Moving from information transfer to information exchange in health and health care.  

PubMed

Communication in most health and health care settings assumes that information provision is both necessary and sufficient to improve individual behavior and, subsequently, health. This paper examines and challenges commonly accepted practices of information transmission in health settings, demonstrating how such practices are insufficient because they are rooted in a one-way model of information transfer. Three case studies show how this model is pervasive in different health and health care milieus: patient/provider encounters, health promotion programs, and national health policymaking. Drawing on critical theoretical perspectives, the work shows the limits of current information transfer approaches by critiquing the dominant assumptions that underpin current practice. At the same time, it provides empirical examples of the usefulness of critical approaches to identify relations of power in health communication. The paper concludes by suggesting that researchers and practitioners move beyond traditional practices of information transfer (based on a one-way monologue) and toward a more useful and appropriate notion of information exchange (based on two-way dialogue). PMID:12570966

Lee, Renée Gravois; Garvin, Theresa

2003-02-01

242

Trends in Child Welfare's Focus on Children's Mental Health and Services from 1980-2004  

PubMed Central

This study examined how one of the oldest and most widely distributed child welfare practice journals addressed children's mental health issues over a 25-year period. The content of 478 articles was coded. Logistic regression findings indicate that mental health issues were discussed less frequently over the first half of the period examined, and then more frequently over the last decade. Residential treatment was discussed less frequently over time, but other community-based alternatives to residential treatment were rarely discussed at any point, so that overall the content related to treatment of mental health issues decreased as discussion of residential treatment decreased. These findings suggest that although the child welfare literature has recently focused more on children's mental health, dissemination of specific concepts from the mental health to the child welfare literature does not naturally occur over time. Efforts targeted at dissemination of effective community-based mental health interventions for foster children may be needed to support this process.

Leathers, Sonya J.; McMeel, Lorri S.; Prabhughate, Abhijit; Atkins, Marc S.

2009-01-01

243

African-American men's perceptions of health: a focus group study.  

PubMed

African-American men are disproportionately affected by preventable medical conditions, yet they underutilize primary care health services. Because healthcare utilization is strongly dependent on health beliefs, the purpose of this qualitative study was to identify and explore African-American men's perceptions of health and health influences. We conducted eight focus group interviews with select subgroups of African-American men, including adolescents, trauma survivors, HIV-positive men, homeless men, men who have sex with men, substance abusers, church-affiliated men and a mixed sample (N=71). Definitions of health, beliefs about health maintenance and influences on health were elicited. Participants' definitions of health went beyond the traditional "absence of disease" definition and included physical, mental, emotional, economic and spiritual well-being. Being healthy also included fulfilling social roles, such as having a job and providing for one's family. Health maintenance strategies included spirituality and self-empowerment. Stress was cited as a dominant negative influence on health, attributed to lack of income, racism, "unhealthy" neighborhoods and conflict in relationships. Positive influences included a supportive social network and feeling valued by loved ones. This study provides insight into African-American men's general health perceptions and may have implications for future efforts to improve healthcare utilization in this population. PMID:16623067

Ravenell, Joseph E; Johnson, Waldo E; Whitaker, Eric E

2006-04-01

244

42 CFR 438.242 - Health information systems.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Health information systems. 438.242 Section 438.242 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...Improvement Measurement and Improvement Standards § 438.242 Health information systems. (a)...

2012-10-01

245

78 FR 14793 - Advancing Interoperability and Health Information Exchange  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary...CMS-0038-NC] Advancing Interoperability and Health Information Exchange AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) and...

2013-03-07

246

Health Promotion: Results of focus groups with African-American men  

PubMed Central

Background Almost half (49%) of the people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in the United States (US) are African-Americans. Although African-Americans represent only about 13% of the overall population, they continue to account for a higher proportion of cases at all stages of HIV/AIDS. Most documented interventions targeting the African-American population have focused on women, children, men who have sex with men or drug addicts. Methods Six focus group sessions with African-American men (39) and women (15) were conducted in a heterogeneously populated American city. We used a pre-focus group questionnaire to collect data about the socio-economic background of the participants. In our focus group sessions we examined the feasibility of instituting a health promotion program for African-American men. Results The men who participated in the sessions showed great interest in attending the health promotion program. They had no prior knowledge of positive behavioral practices that could promote their individual health and well-being. HIV infection rates in the African-American population remain the highest in the US. Conclusion The results of our focus group sessions showed that the heterosexual African-American men were eager to learn how to protect themselves against communicable and non-communicable diseases in health promotion programs.

Heeren, G. Anita; Jemmott, John B.

2011-01-01

247

Patient Privacy, Consent, and Identity Management in Health Information Exchange: Issues for the Military Health System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Military Health System (MHS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) have been among the nation s leaders in health information technology (IT), including the development of health IT systems and electronic health records (EHRs) that summarize pa...

S. D. Hosek S. G. Straus

2013-01-01

248

The demand for consumer health information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data from an evaluation of a community-wide informational intervention, we modeled the demand for medical reference books, telephone advice nurses, and computers for health information. Data were gathered from random household surveys in Boise, ID (experimental site), Billings, MT, and Eugene, OR (control sites). Conditional difference-in-differences show that the intervention increased the use of medical reference books, advice nurses,

Todd H. Wagner; Teh-wei Hu; Judith H. Hibbard

2001-01-01

249

Iona college community centered family health history project: lessons learned from student focus groups.  

PubMed

The Community Centered Family Health History project was initiated to create accessible family health history tools produced by and for the community. The project goal was to promote increased community engagement in health education by encouraging conversations among family members that would translate knowledge of family health history into healthy lifestyle choices. As one of seven community partners, Iona College participated in customizing and beta-testing the Does It Run in the Family? toolkit. Twenty-nine college students were engaged to recruit three relatives related by blood to provide feedback on the utility of the toolkit. The toolkit consists of two booklets--"A Guide to Family Health History" and "A Guide to Understanding Genetics and Health"--explaining the importance of knowing and talking about health within the family as well as basics about how conditions are passed down through generations. Twenty-two of the twenty-nine students participated in focus groups to discuss their reactions to participation in the project. Students in the focus group reported that the study participants--students and their family members--found the toolkit to be user friendly and the experience a valuable one that prompted many to take positive steps toward good health. PMID:21830165

Moore, Penelope J; Gratzer, William; Lieber, Caroline; Edelson, Vaughn; O'Leary, James; Terry, Sharon F

2011-08-10

250

75 FR 76393 - Notice of Request for a New Information Collection (Public Health Information System)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...including any personal information, to http...For Additional Information: Contact John...Room 6065, South Building, Washington...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Public Health Information System (PHIS)....

2010-12-08

251

Overcoming the Linguistic Divide - A Barrier to Consumer Health Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Seeking health information online has become very popular. Despite this popularity, health consumers,face many,barriers to successfully retrieving good quality health information. The present paper reviews the literature on the linguistic divide between health consumers,and consumer,health information. Consumer,health vocabularies (CHV) and natural language processing (NLP) show potential for bridging the divide, thereby improving recall and precision from information retrieval systems.

Catherine Boden

252

Meeting the Health Information Needs of Health Workers: What Have We Learned?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The information challenges facing health workers worldwide include lack of routine systems for seeking and sharing information, lack of high-quality and current health information, and lack of locally relevant materials and tools. This issue of Journal of Health Communication presents three studies of health information needs in India, Senegal, and Malawi that demonstrate these information challenges, provide additional insight, and

Margaret DAdamo; Madeleine Short Fabic; Saori Ohkubo

2012-01-01

253

Consumer health information: a federal perspective on a important aspect of the national information infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

People need health information to attain good health and make health care decisions. This paper discusses the transition from print-based to new modes of electronic dissemination of multimedia-based consumer health information. Developed in the context of the federal national information infrastructure initiative, the issues presented relate to the entire enterprise of public and private consumer health information production, delivery and

K. Patrick; S. Koss; M. J. Deering; L. Harris

1995-01-01

254

Different for girls? Feminism, health information and librarianship.  

PubMed

This paper focuses on the provision and organization of health information materials in women's health centres in UK and Ireland in the late 20th century Such centres sprung from the work of feminist activists and health workers from the late 1960s onwards, promoting health information and other interventions to counteract women's devalued status within society, and the stereotypes perpetuated by health care and other systems. Centres that developed were (and still are) typically within the voluntary sector, have a strong feminist perspective and are run by lay workers. This paper will draw on research into information provision in these centres, its scope, organization and who provides it. It will argue that this work is of interest to mainstream librarianship, but there are minimal linkages as feminist thinking within librarianship has been unable overall to make common cause with the work of these, and other such agencies, which has inhibited potential developments of mutual benefit. This paper draws on ongoing research into feminism and librarianship, and findings that have been presented in a number of settings. PMID:12075848

Ilett, Rosie

2002-03-01

255

Health information technology: fallacies and sober realities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current research suggests that the rate of adoption of health information technology (HIT) is low, and that HIT may not have the touted beneficial effects on quality of care or costs. The twin issues of the failure of HIT adoption and of HIT efficacy stem primarily from a series of fallacies about HIT. We discuss 12 HIT fallacies and their

Ben-Tzion Karsh; Matthew B. Weinger; Patricia A. Abbott; Robert L. Wears

2010-01-01

256

Technical means for securing health information.  

PubMed

Securing health information is an application domain which can learn more from other environments like airlines and banking than from military formalism or academic freedom. The techniques of the 80s using clear separation between public and private areas have to be upgraded. Propositions are made. Costs are evaluated. PMID:8960920

de Roulet, D; Scherrer, J R

1996-10-01

257

Integrating health information systems in Sierra Leone  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an ongoing project in Sierra Leone to integrate health information systems at district and national level through a novel approach. Employing solar-powered low-energy computers running Linux, a wide consortium of local and international actors have tried to counter the severe problems of electricity supply breakdowns and computer viruses. The paper discusses the experiences from this effort, as

J. Saeb; Edem Kwame Kossi; R. T. Golly-Kobrissa; O. Titlestad; J. Braa

2009-01-01

258

Health Effects Information Relating to Particulate Matter.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) met on December 16-17, 1985 to hold a preliminary discussion with EPA staff and members of the public on health effects information relating to particulate matter that has become available since the Comm...

1986-01-01

259

Improving health information access through social networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustaining user participation is a challenge for even the most popular web sites. In this work we report on an effort to increase exposure to, and interaction with, a repository of health based information by coupling the repository with a social networking application. We hypothesize that we can sustain user interaction with a repository and increase nutrition knowledge through content

Jill Freyne; Shlomo Berkovsky; Stephen Kimani; Nilufar Baghaei; Emily Brindal

2010-01-01

260

Data Liquidity in Health Information Systems  

PubMed Central

In 2001 the IOM report "Crossing the Quality Chasm" and the NCVHS report "Information for Health" were released and they provided the context for the development of information systems used to support health-supporting processes. Both had as their goals, implicit or explicit, to ensure the right data is provided to the right person at the right time, which is one definition of "Data Liquidity". This concept has had some traction in recent years as a shorthand way to express a system property for Health IT, but there is not a well-defined characterization of what properties of a system or of its components give it better or worse data liquidity. This paper looks at some recent work that help to identify those properties and perhaps can help to ground the concept with metrics that are assessable.

Courtney, Paul K.

2011-01-01

261

Large scale health information exchange: implementation experiences from five States.  

PubMed

There is widespread consensus that Health Information Exchange, the electronic sharing of patients' health information between delivery settings, is critical to improving the quality and efficiency of patient care. The United States has had limited success in establishing broad-based HIE. To address these issues, the federal government funded the State Health Information Exchange Cooperative Agreement Program. An in-depth qualitative study was conducted, consisting of site visits and semi-structured discussions with 105 respondents in 5 states to understand early HIE implementation experiences. Results show the last two years have seen unprecedented growth in HIE infrastructure. Key factors such as maturity of HIE at baseline and healthcare market characteristics have shaped governance models and technical infrastructures. Early focus on stakeholder value proposition and sustainability planning is critical for long-term success. States continue to face numerous challenges in converting stakeholder support into financial commitment and real-time exchange of health information. We discuss the key issues states faced in attempting to realize broad-based HIE and offer insights that may assist other states. PMID:23920629

Dullabh, Prashila; Hovey, Lauren

2013-01-01

262

Aspects of consumer search for health information: a framework for structuring information problems.  

PubMed

Consumer search for health information is the focus of increasing scholarly activity and administrative thinking. It has drawn attention in many circles of inquiry including marketing, health-care, and public policy. Because of this widespread attention, the literature is rather fragmented and therefore research problems are not easily defined. This paper presents an integrative framework to help formulate health information problems more precisely and to distinguish important areas for continued research efforts. Three major aspects of consumer search for health information are identified: sources, effort, and topics. These aspects- and the interrelationships among them--comprise the framework. Related research can be categorized and synthesized, and then critical gaps in the research streams become more evident. Furthermore, the framework can be applied to particular information problems to both clarify the issues and to communicate those issues to health care managers and relevant constituencies. Applied examples discussed in this paper are: (1) direct-to-consumer advertising, (2) telephone information services, and (3) hospital mortality data. PMID:10137019

Bunn, M D

1994-01-01

263

An Exploration of the Culture of Information Technology: Focus on Unrelenting Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based upon sociological theories of occupational culture (e.g., Van Maanen & Barley, 1984), this study focuses on information technology (IT) culture as perceived by experienced IT profession- als. Using a qualitative methodology, this exploratory study examines perceptions of these pro- fessionals regarding technological change utilizing data gathered from individual interviews as well as from focus groups. The findings are presented

Nancy Chase

2008-01-01

264

An empirical examination of the relationship between information technology (IT) infrastructure, customer focus, and business advantages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a model that tests the relationship between information technology (IT) infrastructure, customer focus, and business advantages. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Customer focus is categorized into: customer responsiveness and product\\/service innovation. The data for the study are obtained from 116 executives from a number of business organizations. Findings – IT infrastructure is found

Ganesh D. Bhatt; Ali F. Emdad

2010-01-01

265

The public health information infrastructure. A national review of the law on health information privacy.  

PubMed

Our objectives were to review and analyze the laws in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico that regulate the acquisition, storage, and use of public health data and to offer proposals for reform of the laws on public health information privacy. Virtually all states reported some statutory protection for governmentally maintained health data for public health information in general (49 states), communicable diseases (42 states), and sexually transmitted diseases (43 states). State statutes permitted disclosure of data for statistical purposes (42 states), contact tracing (39 states), epidemiologic investigations (22 states), and subpoena or court order (14 states). The survey revealed significant problems that affect both the development of fair and effective public health information systems and the protection of privacy. Statutes may be silent about the degree of privacy protection afforded, confer weaker privacy protection to certain kinds of information, or grant health officials broad discretion to disseminate personal information. Our proposals for law reform are based on a meeting of experts at the Carter Presidential Center under the auspices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists: (1) an independent data protection commission should be established, (2) health authorities should justify the collection of personally identifiable information, (3) subjects should be given basic information about data practices, (4) data should be held and used in accordance with fair information practices, (5) legally binding privacy and security assurances should attach to identifiable health information with significant penalties for breach of these assurances, (6) disclosure of data should be made only for purposes consistent with the original collection, and (7) secondary uses beyond those originally intended by the data collector should be permitted only with informed consent. PMID:8648874

Gostin, L O; Lazzarini, Z; Neslund, V S; Osterholm, M T

1996-06-26

266

Health information privacy and syndromic surveillance systems.  

PubMed

The development of syndromic surveillance systems to detect potential terrorist-related outbreaks has the potential to be a useful public health surveillance activity. However, the perception of how the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Privacy Rule applies to the disclosure of certain public health information might affect the ability of state and local health departments to implement syndromic surveillance systems within their jurisdictions. To assess this effect, a multiple-question survey asked respondents to share their experiences regarding patient confidentiality and HIPAA Privacy Rule requirements when implementing syndromic surveillance systems. This assessment summarizes the results of a national survey of state terrorism-preparedness coordinators and state epidemiologists and reflects the authors' and others' experiences with implementation. PMID:15717396

Drociuk, Daniel; Gibson, J; Hodge, J

2004-09-24

267

Understanding the information needs of public health practitioners: A literature review to inform design of an interactive digital knowledge management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The need for rapid access to information to support critical decisions in public health cannot be disputed; however, development of such systems requires an understanding,of the actual information,needs of public health professionals. This paper reports the results of a literature review focused,on the information,needs of public health professionals. The authors reviewed,the public health literature to answer,the following questions: (1)

Debra Revere; Anne M. Turner; Ann Madhavan; Neil Rambo; Paul F. Bugni; Annmarie Kimball; Sherrilynne S. Fuller

2007-01-01

268

Using Focus Groups to Identify Factors Affecting Healthful Weight Maintenance in Latino Immigrants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To explore (1) how migration influenced physical activity and dietary behaviors among Latino immigrants and (2) participants' perception of concepts related to a Health at Every Size (HAES) approach to weight maintenance (mindful eating, taking care of oneself). Methods: Four focus groups (n = 35), homogenous by sex, were conducted in…

Greaney, Mary L.; Lees, Faith D.; Lynch, Breanna; Sebelia, Linda; Greene, Geoffrey W.

2012-01-01

269

Perceptions of Factors Influencing Healthful Food Consumption Behavior in the Lower Mississippi Delta: Focus Group Findings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To identify perceptions of Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) residents regarding factors that influence a change in healthful food consumption behavior to assist in planning sustainable nutrition interventions in the LMD. Design: Nine focus groups were conducted with LMD residents in 9 counties in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. One…

McGee, Bernestine B.; Richardson, Valerie; Johnson, Glenda S.; Thornton, Alma; Johnson, Crystal; Yadrick, Kathleen; Ndirangu, Murugi; Goolsby, Susan; Watkins, Debra; Simpson, Pippa M.; Hyman, Edith; Stigger, Flavelia; Bogle, Margaret L.; Kramer, Tim R.; Strickland, Earline; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

2008-01-01

270

Status of Oregon's Children: 2002 County Data Book. Special Focus: Health and Safety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Kids Count data book examines trends in the well-being of Oregons children, focusing on child health, nutrition, and child safety. This statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators of child well-being: (1) child care supply; (2) third grade reading proficiency; (3) third grade math proficiency; (4) juvenile arrests; (5) suicide attempts;…

Children First for Oregon, Portland.

271

Health Behaviors Among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers  

PubMed Central

Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among “Baby Boomer” caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state’s non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and 12,941 non-caregivers. Logistic regression models were estimated separately for four individual health-risk behaviors—smoking, sedentary behavior, and regular soda and fast-food consumption—as well as a global health-risk measure. Results: Controlling for psychological distress and personal characteristics and social resources such as age, gender, income and education, work and marital status, and neighborhood safety, caregivers had greater odds than non-caregivers of overall negative health behavior and of smoking and regular soda and fast-food consumption. We did not observe significant differences in odds of negative behavior related to stress for spousal caregivers and caregivers in the role for longer periods of time or those providing more hours of weekly care compared with other caregivers. Implications: Our study found evidence that Baby Boomer caregivers engage in poor health behaviors that are associated with exposure to caregiving. Baby Boomer caregivers may be at risk for certain behavioral factors that are associated with disability and chronic illness.

Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

2012-01-01

272

From Sponge to Source: Health Information in the Lives of Gay Men Living with HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing research into the information activities of people living with HIV has typically focused on issues of where individuals look and how they search. Little attention has been directed to understanding the meaning health information carries for those who use it or how information practices are contextualised within the social experience of living with a chronic condition. This paper explores

Joel Minion; Peter Bath; Kendra Albright

273

Enabling Consumer-Driven Service Innovation in Health Care: The Role of Online Health Information Technologies (HIT)  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the past few years, consumer participation in health care has increased significantly with the ready availability of medical\\u000a information on health websites and the ability to interact in disease-focused online health communities. Importantly, such\\u000a consumer participation also involves creating new knowledge based on consumers’ direct experiences with particular diseases\\u000a and treatments – new knowledge that could lead to new

Priya Nambisan

274

Patient involvement in primary care mental health: a focus group study  

PubMed Central

Background Patient involvement in health care is a strong political driver in the NHS. However in spite of policy prominence, there has been only limited previous work exploring patient involvement for people with serious mental illness. Aim To describe the views on, potential for, and types of patient involvement in primary care from the perspectives of primary care health professionals and patients with serious mental illness. Design of study Qualitative study consisting of six patient, six health professional and six combined focus groups between May 2002 and January 2003. Setting Six primary care trusts in the West Midlands, England. Method Forty-five patients with serious mental illness, 39 GPs, and eight practice nurses participated in a series of 18 focus groups. All focus groups were audiotaped and fully transcribed. Nvivo was used to manage data more effectively. Results Most patients felt that only other people with lived experience of mental illness could understand what they were going through. This experience could be used to help others navigate the health- and social-care systems, give advice about medication, and offer support at times of crisis. Many patients also saw paid employment within primary care as a way of addressing issues of poverty and social exclusion. Health professionals were, however, more reluctant to see patients as partners, be it in the consultation or in service delivery. Conclusions Meaningful change in patient involvement requires commitment and belief from primary care practitioners that the views and experiences of people with serious mental illness are valid and valuable.

Lester, Helen; Tait, Lynda; England, Elizabeth; Tritter, Jonathan

2006-01-01

275

Strengthening information systems for heart health in Canada  

PubMed Central

Information plays a key role in monitoring, management, evaluation and policy development related to cardiovascular diseases. Canada currently lacks a comprehensive, integrated pan-Canadian system to address the growing burden of cardiovascular diseases, including reliable and timely data that can be used by policy-makers, health care providers, researchers and the public. Theme Working Group 1 (one of six Theme Working Groups) aimed to address different aspects of the Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan, with a focus on strengthening information systems. Members of the group, who are experts in the cardiovascular field and/or information systems, defined the scope of the issue, identified gaps and solutions, and discussed priorities. The process is described and suggestions for final recommendations are presented. These suggestions were made taking into consideration the needs of health care providers, patients and consumers, the needs for planning, innovation, evaluation and system improvement, and the needs for information on populations and environments. A sustained integrated system that meets cardiovascular information needs requires a major commitment of expertise, leadership and funding.

McFarlane, Anne; Wielgosz, Andreas

2009-01-01

276

Developing a health information infrastructure for Arizona.  

PubMed

Network connectivity is critical in Arizona, where travel distances are great, academic programs dispersed, and health care practitioners often geographically isolated. Accordingly, the University of Arizona (UA) applied for $50,000.00 in National Library of Medicine/National Science Foundation (NLM/NSF) Connections Program funding to promote statewide collaboration in supporting UA's health sciences education and research programs by expanding network connectivity to hospitals and other health-related institutions. The proposal outlined three strategies: Each major nonuniversity teaching hospital would secure and maintain a leased communications line dedicated to network connectivity, and NSF funds would be used to buy some necessary hardward. NSF funds would be used to establish a modern bank for dial-up Internet access by rural practitioners and teaching sites. Co-principal investigators of the project would promote and support the use of this new statewide connectivity and foster its continued expansion. The proposal was based on a conservative philosophy: familiar technologies and, where possible, existing networks and equipment would be used. The proposal was approved, and NSF funds hastened creation of an expanded health information network in Arizona. Once that network was in place, participants moved quickly from managing the mechanics of connectivity to planning for a computing and communications platform with services. Private funds were obtained to help organize the Arizona Health Information Network to direct these expanded services. PMID:7841909

Anderson, R K; Haddix, A; McCray, J C; Wunz, T P

1994-10-01

277

Developing a health information infrastructure for Arizona.  

PubMed Central

Network connectivity is critical in Arizona, where travel distances are great, academic programs dispersed, and health care practitioners often geographically isolated. Accordingly, the University of Arizona (UA) applied for $50,000.00 in National Library of Medicine/National Science Foundation (NLM/NSF) Connections Program funding to promote statewide collaboration in supporting UA's health sciences education and research programs by expanding network connectivity to hospitals and other health-related institutions. The proposal outlined three strategies: Each major nonuniversity teaching hospital would secure and maintain a leased communications line dedicated to network connectivity, and NSF funds would be used to buy some necessary hardward. NSF funds would be used to establish a modern bank for dial-up Internet access by rural practitioners and teaching sites. Co-principal investigators of the project would promote and support the use of this new statewide connectivity and foster its continued expansion. The proposal was based on a conservative philosophy: familiar technologies and, where possible, existing networks and equipment would be used. The proposal was approved, and NSF funds hastened creation of an expanded health information network in Arizona. Once that network was in place, participants moved quickly from managing the mechanics of connectivity to planning for a computing and communications platform with services. Private funds were obtained to help organize the Arizona Health Information Network to direct these expanded services.

Anderson, R K; Haddix, A; McCray, J C; Wunz, T P

1994-01-01

278

White Paper: Advancing Personalized Health Care through Health Information Technology: An Update from the American Health Information Community's Personalized Health Care Workgroup  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Personalized Health Care Workgroup of the American Health Information Community was formed to determine what is needed to promote standard reporting and incorporation of medical genetic\\/genomic tests and family health history data in electronic health records. The Workgroup has examined and clarified a range of issues related to this information, including interoperability standards and requirements for confidentiality, privacy, and

John Glaser; Douglas E. Henley; Gregory Downing; Kristin M. Brinner

2008-01-01

279

Managing Health(Care Systems) Using Information Health Technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to compare and contrast how specific information health technologies (IHTs) have been debated, how they have\\u000a proliferated, and what they have enabled in Germany’s and England’s healthcare systems. For this a discourse analysis was\\u000a undertaken that specifically focussed on future-scenarios articulated in policy documents and strategy papers released by\\u000a relevant actors from both healthcare systems. The study

Thomas Mathar

2011-01-01

280

Master's Degree in Management Information Systems with a Supply Chain Management Focus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A graduate curriculum in Management Information Systems with a Supply Chain Management focus is presented. The motivation for this endeavor stems from the fact that the global scope of modern business organizations and the competitive environment in which they operate, requires an information system leveraged supply chain management system (SCM)…

Ramaswamy, Kizhanatham V.; Boyd, Joseph L.; Desai, Mayur

2007-01-01

281

Reverse logistics: superior performance through focused resource commitments to information technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of businesses in the automobile aftermarket industry provided insights into how reverse logistics performance can be influenced by a few key strategic decisions. Resource commitment is critical to program performance. However, it is important that the resources be focused on developing information technology capabilities. This, no doubt, is reflective of the nature of reverse logistics. Information support––for authorizing,

Patricia J. Daugherty; R. Glenn Richey; Stefan E. Genchev; Haozhe Chen

2005-01-01

282

Master's Degree in Management Information Systems with a Supply Chain Management Focus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A graduate curriculum in Management Information Systems with a Supply Chain Management focus is presented. The motivation for this endeavor stems from the fact that the global scope of modern business organizations and the competitive environment in which they operate, requires an information system leveraged supply chain management system (SCM)…

Ramaswamy, Kizhanatham V.; Boyd, Joseph L.; Desai, Mayur

2007-01-01

283

“Defense Health Information System as a case study for national health IT”  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Forum on the Future of Defense Health Information Systems (National Forum) held in Washington, DC in March 2008 provided a unique opportunity to conduct a case study of developing a large complex health information system. The concept of the health information system has evolved from the days to electronic hospital information system (HIS) to longitudinal health record (LHR)

Seong Ki Mun

2009-01-01

284

Consumer access to health information on the internet: health policy implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Providers of health care usually have much better information about health and health care interventions than do consumers. The internet is an important and rapidly evolving source of global health-related information and could provide a means of correcting for asymmetric information. However, little is known about who accesses this information and how it is used in New Zealand. The

W Guy Scott; Helen M Scott; Terry S Auld

2005-01-01

285

20 CFR 402.65 - Health care information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Health care information. 402.65 Section...AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.65 Health care information. We have some information about health care programs under titles XVIII...

2013-04-01

286

Health information technology: fallacies and sober realities  

PubMed Central

Current research suggests that the rate of adoption of health information technology (HIT) is low, and that HIT may not have the touted beneficial effects on quality of care or costs. The twin issues of the failure of HIT adoption and of HIT efficacy stem primarily from a series of fallacies about HIT. We discuss 12 HIT fallacies and their implications for design and implementation. These fallacies must be understood and addressed for HIT to yield better results. Foundational cognitive and human factors engineering research and development are essential to better inform HIT development, deployment, and use.

Weinger, Matthew B; Abbott, Patricia A; Wears, Robert L

2010-01-01

287

Core Sexual/Reproductive Health Care to Deliver to Male Adolescents: Perceptions of Clinicians Focused on Male Health  

PubMed Central

Purpose Male adolescents experience adverse sexual/reproductive health (SRH) outcomes, yet few providers deliver male SRH care. Given the lack of evidence base for male SRH care, the purpose of this study was to examine perceived importance in delivering SRH care to male adolescents among clinicians focused on male health. Methods Seventeen primary care clinicians focused on male health, representing pediatricians, family physicians, internists, and nurse practitioners, were individually queried about male adolescents’ SRH needs and perceived importance to screen/assess for 13 male SRH services using a case-scenario approach varying by visit type and allotted time. Results Participants were highly consistent in identifying a scope of 10 SRH services to deliver to male adolescents during a longer annual visit and a core set of 6 SRH services during a shorter annual visit including 1) counseling on sexually transmitted infection/human immunodeficiency (STI/HIV) risk reduction including testing/treatment; and assessing for 2) pubertal growth/development; 3) substance abuse/mental health; 4) non-STI/HIV genital abnormalities; 5) physical/sexual abuse; and 6) male pregnancy prevention methods. Participants did not agree whether SRH care should be delivered during non-annual acute visits. Conclusions Despite lack of data for male SRH care, clinicians focused on male health strongly agreed upon male SRH care to deliver during annual visits that varied by visit type and allotted time. Study findings provide a foundation for much needed clinical guidelines for male adolescents’ SRH care and have implications for education and training health professionals at all levels and the organization and delivery of male SRH services.

Marcell, Arik V.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

2011-01-01

288

Center for International Health Information (CIHI)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The CIHI Website provides data on current status and trends in population, nutrition, and health for developing countries that receive USAID assistance. Country, regional, and time series data are available in tables in either text or .pdf format for sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Near East, and Latin America and the Caribbean. Indicators include infant and maternal mortality, nutritional status, vaccination coverage, contraceptive use, and population and fertility rates. Users can download Global Health Data Viewer (GHDV) software containing over 60 indicators from 200 countries from the site. GHDV allows users to display a selected single point in time or time series data in spreadsheet or graphic form for manipulation or export to other programs. Other sections of the site contain reports of USAID projects and links to international population and health information sources.

289

Seeking Health Information Online: Does Wikipedia Matter?  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the significance of the English Wikipedia as a source of online health information. Design The authors measured Wikipedia's ranking on general Internet search engines by entering keywords from MedlinePlus, NHS Direct Online, and the National Organization of Rare Diseases as queries into search engine optimization software. We assessed whether article quality influenced this ranking. The authors tested whether traffic to Wikipedia coincided with epidemiological trends and news of emerging health concerns, and how it compares to MedlinePlus. Measurements Cumulative incidence and average position of Wikipedia® compared to other Web sites among the first 20 results on general Internet search engines (Google®, Google UK®, Yahoo®, and MSN®), and page view statistics for selected Wikipedia articles and MedlinePlus pages. Results Wikipedia ranked among the first ten results in 71–85% of search engines and keywords tested. Wikipedia surpassed MedlinePlus and NHS Direct Online (except for queries from the latter on Google UK), and ranked higher with quality articles. Wikipedia ranked highest for rare diseases, although its incidence in several categories decreased. Page views increased parallel to the occurrence of 20 seasonal disorders and news of three emerging health concerns. Wikipedia articles were viewed more often than MedlinePlus Topic (p = 0.001) but for MedlinePlus Encyclopedia pages, the trend was not significant (p = 0.07–0.10). Conclusions Based on its search engine ranking and page view statistics, the English Wikipedia is a prominent source of online health information compared to the other online health information providers studied.

Laurent, Michael R.; Vickers, Tim J.

2009-01-01

290

Disseminating health information and diabetes care for Latinos via electronic information kiosks.  

PubMed

This study investigated the use of electronic, web-enabled touch-screen information kiosks as a tool to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate diabetes information to Latino audiences. Two kiosk models (high privacy sit-down, group enabled stand-up) in two locations (pharmacy, community center) in Northeast Georgia provided bilingual, read-aloud diabetes education and local resource information on health care. Data from public use and interviews with focus group participants showed that users found the kiosks and their functions helpful and usable, though usage was moderated by presence or absence of a peer health educator (promotora); participants also preferred the sit-down, multi-function kiosk model. PMID:18392935

Matthews, Paul H; Darbisi, Carolina; Sandmann, Lorilee; Galen, Robert; Rubin, Donald

2008-04-08

291

MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records to Health Information  

MedlinePLUS

... health IT providers to link patient portals and electronic health record (EHR) systems to MedlinePlus, an authoritative ... information. See examples of health care organizations and electronic health records systems using MedlinePlus Connect . Quick Facts ...

292

Usability of geographic information - Factors identified from qualitative analysis of task-focused user interviews.  

PubMed

Understanding user needs for geographic information and the factors which influence the usability of such information in diverse user contexts is an essential part of user centred development of information products. There is relatively little existing research focused on the design and usability of information products in general. This paper presents a research approach based on semi structured interviews with people working with geographic information on a day to day basis, to establish a reference base of qualitative data on user needs for geographic information with respect to context of use. From this reference data nine key categories of geographic information usability are identified and discussed in the context of limited existing research concerned with geographic information usability. PMID:23321506

Harding, Jenny

2013-01-12

293

Impact of Thailand Universal Coverage Scheme on the Country's Health Information Systems and Health Information Technology.  

PubMed

Thailand achieved universal healthcare coverage with the implementation of the Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) in 2001. This study employed qualitative method to explore the impact of the UCS on the country's health information systems (HIS) and health information technology (HIT) development. The results show that health insurance beneficiary registration system helps improve providers' service workflow and country vital statistics. Implementation of casemix financing tool, Thai Diagnosis-Related Groups, has stimulated health providers' HIS and HIT capacity building, data and medical record quality and the adoption of national administrative data standards. The system called "Disease Management Information Systems" aiming at reimbursement for select diseases increased the fragmentation of HIS and increase burden on data management to providers. The financial incentive of outpatient data quality improvement project enhance providers' HIS and HIT investment and also induce data fraudulence tendency. Implementation of UCS has largely brought favorable impact on the country HIS and HIT development. However, the unfavorable effects are also evident. PMID:23920763

Kijsanayotin, Boonchai

2013-01-01

294

Optimal health and well-being for women: definitions and strategies derived from focus groups of women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Women participating in focus groups were asked how they define health and well-being, and what strategies they would suggest for health optimization. Women defined health and well-being largely in terms of relationships. Their strategies for improving health involved enhancement of the quality of relationships with families, partners, and community. These proposed strategies included: creating a context for resilience; valuing and

Shelley Kasle; Mari S Wilhelm; Kathryn L Reed

2002-01-01

295

Privacy policy analysis for health information networks and regional health information organizations.  

PubMed

Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs) are forming in response to President George W. Bush's 2004 mandate that medical information be made available electronically to facilitate continuity of care. Privacy concerns are a deterrent to widespread acceptance of RHIOs. The Health Information Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 provides some guidelines for privacy protection. However, most states have stricter guidelines, causing difficulty when RHIOs form across these jurisdictions. This article compares several RHIOs including their privacy policies where available. In addition, studies were reviewed considering privacy concerns of people in the United States and elsewhere. Surveys reveal that Americans are concerned about the privacy of their personal health information and ultimately feel it is the role of the government to provide protection. The purpose of this article is to look at the privacy issues and recommend a policy that may help to resolve some of the concerns of both providers and patients. Policy research and action are needed to move the National Health Information Network toward reality. Efforts to provide consistency in privacy laws are a necessary early step to facilitate the construction and maintenance of RHIOs and the National Health Information Network. PMID:17992107

Noblin, Alice M

296

Focus group methods: Using interactive and nominal groups to explore emerging technology-driven phenomena in accounting and information systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper puts forth arguments for why focus group methods should be used more frequently in accounting and information technology research in order to address emerging technology-driven phenomena in accounting. In this overview of focus group methods and their application to studying accounting and information technology phenomena, we focus on what alternative types of focus group methods may be applied,

Steve G. Sutton; Vicky Arnold

297

Health equipment information, number 115, October 1983  

SciTech Connect

Contents: Squibb Surgicare Ltd: System 2-Stoma Bridge for loop ostomy; Electronic and medical equipment: guidance on documentation required for maintenance; Assessment of the radio-opacity of catheters; IEC Publication number 731: dosimeters with ionization chambers as used in radiotherapy; Seminar on digital radiology; Economic appraisal of a Mobile CT Scanning Service; Equipment for the disabled; Evaluation of the Greiner G300 Analyser; Launch of Occupational Therapists' Reference Book 1983/4; Summary of health notices (hazard): 1 April 1983-31 August 1983; Safety Information Bulletin No 9-May 1983: Summary of items; Safety Information Bulletin No 10-July 1983: Summary of items; Safety Information Bulletin No 11-September 1983: Summary of items; Amendment to HEI 112 July 1983: evaluation of ECG Recorders.

Not Available

1984-01-01

298

Assessment of the National Library of Medicine's health disparities plan: a focus on Native American outreach*  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Overcoming health disparities between majority and minority populations is a significant national challenge. This paper assesses outreach to Native Americans (American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians) by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). A companion paper details NLM's portfolio of Native American outreach projects. Method: NLM's Native American outreach is assessed in light of the presentations at a community-based health information outreach symposium and the goals set by NLM's plan to reduce health disparities. Results: NLM's current portfolio of Native American outreach projects appears most advanced in meeting the goal set in area 1 of the health disparities plan, “Promote use of health information by health professionals and the public.” NLM's portfolio also shows significant strength and good progress regarding area 2 of the plan, “Expand partnerships among various types of libraries and community-based organizations.” The portfolio is weaker in area 3, “Conduct and support informatics research.” More knowledge-building efforts would benefit NLM, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, and Native American and community-based organizations. Implications: The current Native American outreach portfolio should be continued, but new approaches are needed for evaluating Native American outreach and for forging collaborations with Native American groups, approaches grounded in consultation and mutual understanding of needs and perspectives.

Siegel, Elliot R.; Wood, Frederick B.; Dutcher, Gale A.; Ruffin, Angela; Logan, Robert A.; Scott, John C.

2005-01-01

299

Using rangeland health assessment to inform successional management  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rangeland health assessment provides qualitative information on ecosystem attributes. Successional management is a conceptual framework that allows managers to link information gathered in rangeland health assessment to ecological processes that need to be repaired to allow vegetation to change in ...

300

45 CFR 164.526 - Amendment of protected health information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information § 164.526 Amendment of protected health information. (a) Standard: Right to amend . (1) Right to amend . An individual has the...

2009-10-01

301

Occupational health legislation and practices related to seafarers on passenger ships focused on communicable diseases: results from a European cross-sectional study (EU SHIPSAN PROJECT)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Seafarers play an important role in the transmission of communicable diseases. The aim of the present study is to draw information and identify possible gaps on occupational health practices related to seafarers sailing on ships within the European Union Member States (EU MS) with focus on communicable diseases. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was sent to competent authorities from 21

George Rachiotis; Varvara A Mouchtouri; Clara Schlaich; Tobias Riemer; Carmen Varela Martinez; Gordon Nichols; Christopher LR Bartlett; Jenny Kremastinou; Christos Hadjichristodoulou

2010-01-01

302

Development and Validation of the High Blood Pressure-Focused Health Literacy Scale  

PubMed Central

Objective While the role of health literacy in chronic disease management is well documented, few intervention studies have been reported. A major barrier to designing and implementing such interventions is the lack of valid health literacy tools. This study developed and tested a novel health literacy scale for individuals with high blood pressure (HBP). Methods A two-step design process was used: In the construction phase, focus group studies and a literature review were conducted to generate a pool of items. The testing phase involved a psychometric evaluation and pilot-testing of the scale on hypertensive Korean Americans (n=386). The end product was a HBP-health literacy scale (HBP-HLS) with two essential domains, print literacy and functional health literacy. Results Psychometric testing indicated that the scale was reliable (Kuder-Richardson-20 coefficient=0.98), valid (content validity index ?0.8), and significantly correlated with theoretically selected variables (education, r=0.67, p<0.01; HBP knowledge, r= 0.33, p<0.01). Conclusion The HBP-HLS demonstrated its utility for evaluating HBP management interventions in the community setting. Practice Implications: Utilizing the HBP-HLS should be considered as a potential tool for improving health literacy and evaluating intervention studies in the context of HBP management.

Kim, Miyong T.; Song, Hee-Jung; Han, Hae-Ra; Song, Youngshin; Nam, Soohyun; Nguyen, Tam Hieu; Lee, Ho-Chang Benjamin; Kim, Kim B.

2011-01-01

303

Good health information--an asset not a burden!  

PubMed

Good health information is central to informing the delivery of health care. Health has mostly struggled to promote the effective use of information to manage services on a day to day basis. Based on the experience at the Children's Hospital at Westmead, a case is made for seeing information as an asset that requires a structured approach to improving data quality, and making a concerted effort to grow a more robust information culture. Transforming Health through better health information will not happen overnight. It needs a long range plan. It should be supported by appropriate business intelligence tools and a structured approach to process improvement, built around data management. PMID:21367323

Hanson, Ralph M

2011-02-01

304

Health Information and Cancer Screening Differences for Asian Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined differences between Asian and non-Asian Americans in sources of health information and cancer screening. A nationally representative sample of 6,722 adults in the US, including those who speak, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese and Korean was selected. Questionnaire items included demographic variables, health status, cancer screening, health care experiences, health information sources, and use of an interpreter in the

Steven E. Shive; Grace X. Ma; Yin Tan; Jamil I. Toubbeh; Lalitha Parameswaran; Joseph Halowich

2006-01-01

305

Student Reception, Sources, and Believability of Health-Related Information  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify the health topics students received information about, how students obtained health-related information, and perceived believability of those sources. Participants and Methods: Students (N = 1202) were surveyed using the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) of the American College Health

Kwan, Matthew Yiu Wing; Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P.; Lowe, David; Taman, Sara; Faulkner, Guy E. J.

2010-01-01

306

Health Information Law in the Context of Minors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a legal overview of privacy and autonomy considerations related to children in the context of health information technology adoption and use. All uses of health-related technologies take place within a legal framework that guides health care generally; the privacy laws and autonomy principles long predate health information technology and can be expected to shape its design and

Sara Rosenbaum; Susan Abramson; Patricia MacTaggart

2009-01-01

307

A Query Analysis of Consumer Health Information Retrieval  

PubMed Central

The log files of MCW HealthLink web site were analyzed to study users' needs for consumer health information and get a better understanding of the health topics users are searching for, the paths users usually take to find consumer health information and the way to improve search effectiveness.

Hong, Yi; de la Cruz, Norberto; Barnas, Gary; Early, Eileen; Gillis, Rick

2002-01-01

308

Perceived facial adiposity conveys information about women's health.  

PubMed

Although several prominent theories of human facial attractiveness propose that some facial characteristics convey information about people's health, empirical evidence for this claim is somewhat mixed. While most previous research into this issue has focused on facial characteristics such as symmetry, averageness, and sexual dimorphism, a recent study reported that ratings of facial adiposity (i.e., perceptions of fatness in the face) were positively correlated with indices of poor physical condition in a sample of young adults (i.e., reported past health problems and measures of cardiovascular fitness). These findings are noteworthy, since they suggest that perceived adiposity is a potentially important facial cue of health that has been overlooked by much of the previous work in this area. Here, we show that ratings of young adult women's facial adiposity are (1) better predicted by their body weight than by their body shape (Studies 1 and 2), (2) correlated with a composite measure of their physical and psychological condition (Study 2), and (3) negatively correlated with their trait (i.e., average) salivary progesterone levels (Study 3). Together, these findings present further evidence that perceived facial adiposity, or a correlate thereof, conveys potentially important information about women's actual health. PMID:23560669

Tinlin, Rowan M; Watkins, Christopher D; Welling, Lisa L M; DeBruine, Lisa M; Al-Dujaili, Emad A S; Jones, Benedict C

2012-06-06

309

Information Technology in Complex Health Services  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective: To identify impediments to the successful transfer and implementation of packaged information systems through large, divisionalized health services. Design: A case analysis of the failure of an implementation of a critical application in the Public Health System of the State of New South Wales, Australia, was carried out. This application had been proven in the United States environment. Measurements: Interviews involving over 60 staff at all levels of the service were undertaken by a team of three. The interviews were recorded and analyzed for key themes, and the results were shared and compared to enable a continuing critical assessment. Results: Two components of the transfer of the system were considered: the transfer from a different environment, and the diffusion throughout a large, divisionalized organization. The analyses were based on the Scott-Morton organizational fit framework. In relation to the first, it was found that there was a lack of fit in the business environments and strategies, organizational structures and strategy-structure pairing as well as the management process-roles pairing. The diffusion process experienced problems because of the lack of fit in the strategy-structure, strategy-structure-management processes, and strategy-structure-role relationships. Conclusion: The large-scale developments of integrated health services present great challenges to the efficient and reliable implementation of information technology, especially in large, divisionalized organizations. There is a need to take a more sophisticated approach to understanding the complexities of organizational factors than has traditionally been the case.

Southon, Frank Charles Gray; Sauer, Chris; Dampney, Christopher Noel Grant (Kit)

1997-01-01

310

AMIA Advocates National Health Information System in Fight Against National Health Threats  

Microsoft Academic Search

To protect public health and national safety, AMIA recommends that the federal government dedicate technologic resources and medical informatics expertise to create a national health information infrastructure (NHII). An NHII provides the underlying information utility that connects local health providers and health officials through high-speed networks to national data systems necessary to detect and track global threats to public health.

Paul C Tang

2002-01-01

311

Improving information technology competencies: implications for psychiatric mental health nursing.  

PubMed

While substantial evidence links information technology (IT) with improved patient safety, care quality, access, and efficiency, nurses must demonstrate competencies in computers, informatics, and information literacy in order to use IT for practice, education, and research. The nursing profession has established IT competencies for all nurses at beginning and experienced levels. Newly revised standards also articulate role-specific expectations for advanced practice nurses. Unfortunately, there is a concern that many nurses may not possess these capabilities and that nurse educators are not prepared to teach them. IT competency evaluations, which have focused predominately on nursing education, indicate novice skill levels for most faculty and students. In numerous studies, again conducted largely in nursing education, significant improvement in IT competencies has been achieved only with intensive interventions. Deficits in IT competencies are a significant concern, because the federal government has mandated full implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) by 2014. EHR will require all nurses to use IT to deliver, document, and obtain reimbursement for patient care. In response to these concerns, two recent initiatives, the "Health Information Technology Scholars (HITS)" and "Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER)" projects, have been launched. By enhancing IT competencies, these projects will enable nurses to use evidence-based practice and other innovations to transform clinical care, education, and research. This report updates psychiatric-mental health nurses on the IT competencies literature, recent enhancement initiatives and innovations, and their implications for the specialty. PMID:19148816

Fetter, Marilyn S

2009-01-01

312

Health-Information Sources for Kenyan Adolescents: Implications for Continuing HIV/AIDS Control and Prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Surveyed and conducted focus groups with Kenyan adolescents to investigate their health information sources, focusing on sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), particularly HIV/AIDS. Respondents relied most heavily on health clinics for information on STDs, their most common health problem. Those with high knowledge of contraceptives were more…

Pratt, Cornelius B.; Obeng-Quaidoo, Isaac; Okigbo, Charles; James, E. Lincoln

2000-01-01

313

Learning Wellness: How Ageing Australians Experience Health Information Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Given identified synergies between information use and health status greater understanding is needed about how people use information to learn about their health. This paper presents the findings of preliminary research into health information literacy. Analysis of data from semi-structured interviews revealed six different ways ageing…

Yates, Christine; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine

2009-01-01

314

Health information and cigarette consumption: supply and spatial considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessments of the impact of health information on smoking incidence have largely been based upon estimates of the national demand for cigarettes. Yet various arguments can be made for health information also affecting the supply of cigarettes. Moreover, the effect of policy may vary spatially. Indeed, by estimating the relationship between U.S. health information, demand, and supply, at the state-level,

Craig A. Gallet

2006-01-01

315

Pathway to Support the Sustainable National Health Information System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heath information across geographically distributed healthcare centers has been recognized as an essential resource that drives an efficient national health-care plan. There is thus a need for the National Health Information System (NHIS) that provides the transparent and secure access to health information from different healthcare centers both on demand and in a time efficient manner. As healthiness is the

Naiyana Sahavechaphan; Jedsada Phengsuwan; Suriya U-Ruekolan; Kamron Aroonrua; Jukrapong Ponhan; Nattapon Harnsamut; Sornthep Vannarat

2011-01-01

316

Learning Wellness: How Ageing Australians Experience Health Information Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given identified synergies between information use and health status greater understanding is needed about how people use information to learn about their health. This paper presents the findings of preliminary research into health information literacy. Analysis of data from semi-structured interviews revealed six different ways ageing Australians…

Yates, Christine; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine

2009-01-01

317

The Tanzania Connect Project: a cluster-randomized trial of the child survival impact of adding paid community health workers to an existing facility-focused health system  

PubMed Central

Background Tanzania has been a pioneer in establishing community-level services, yet challenges remain in sustaining these systems and ensuring adequate human resource strategies. In particular, the added value of a cadre of professional community health workers is under debate. While Tanzania has the highest density of primary health care facilities in Africa, equitable access and quality of care remain a challenge. Utilization for many services proven to reduce child and maternal mortality is unacceptably low. Tanzanian policy initiatives have sought to address these problems by proposing expansion of community-based providers, but the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW ) lacks evidence that this merits national implementation. The Tanzania Connect Project is a randomized cluster trial located in three rural districts with a population of roughly 360,000 ( Kilombero, Rufiji, and Ulanga). Description of intervention Connect aims to test whether introducing a community health worker into a general program of health systems strengthening and referral improvement will reduce child mortality, improve access to services, expand utilization, and alter reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health seeking behavior; thereby accelerating progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. Connect has introduced a new cadre — Community Health Agents (CHA) — who were recruited from and work in their communities. To support the CHA, Connect developed supervisory systems, launched information and monitoring operations, and implemented logistics support for integration with existing district and village operations. In addition, Connect’s district-wide emergency referral strengthening intervention includes clinical and operational improvements. Evaluation design Designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial, CHA were randomly assigned to 50 of the 101 villages within the Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) in the three study districts. To garner detailed information on household characteristics, behaviors, and service exposure, a random sub-sample survey of 3,300 women of reproductive age will be conducted at the baseline and endline. The referral system intervention will use baseline, midline, and endline facility-based data to assess systemic changes. Implementation and impact research of Connect will assess whether and how the presence of the CHA at village level provides added life-saving value to the health system. Discussion Global commitment to launching community-based primary health care has accelerated in recent years, with much of the implementation focused on Africa. Despite extensive investment, no program has been guided by a truly experimental study. Connect will not only address Tanzania’s need for policy and operational research, it will bridge a critical international knowledge gap concerning the added value of salaried professional community health workers in the context of a high density of fixed facilities. Trial registration: ISRCTN96819844

2013-01-01

318

[Information on health: production, consumption and biopower].  

PubMed

This article seeks to elicit misgivings regarding the value attributed to medical truth found in the biomedical literature. The issue of the protection of sexual practices was taken by way of example and the works of thinkers like Nietzsche, Baudrillard, Bourdieu, and especially Michel Foucault, were consulted. This was done in order to consider that the elaboration and use of health information can be interpreted as a practice constituting a policy that dynamically inspires both experts and non-experts on medical truth, constituting a morality that is based on the production and consumption of this truth. It is a policy that Foucault called biopolitics, able to establish ways of living where the exercise of thought does not seem to be so "rewarding," where practices of command and obedience are mediated by health information. In this perspective, physicians and non-physicians have been seduced by the desire to attain the truth, such that the commitment of everyone is seen to concentrate on the production and use of statements that they believe can prolong life and save from getting sick. These are discourses cultivated in the market of a media-dominated society in which individuals controlled by information produce subjectivities that are anchored in the medical-capital truth binomial. PMID:24061035

Silva, Cléber Domingos Cunha da

2013-10-01

319

Security for decentralized health information systems.  

PubMed

Health care information systems must reflect at least two basic characteristics of the health care community: the increasing mobility of patients and the personal liability of everyone giving medical treatment. Open distributed information systems bear the potential to reflect these requirements. But the market for open information systems and operating systems hardly provides secure products today. This 'missing link' is approached by the prototype SECURE Talk that provides secure transmission and archiving of files on top of an existing operating system. Its services may be utilized by existing medical applications. SECURE Talk demonstrates secure communication utilizing only standard hardware. Its message is that cryptography (and in particular asymmetric cryptography) is practical for many medical applications even if implemented in software. All mechanisms are software implemented in order to be executable on standard-hardware. One can investigate more or less decentralized forms of public key management and the performance of many different cryptographic mechanisms. That of, e.g. hybrid encryption and decryption (RSA+DES-PCBC) is about 300 kbit/s. That of signing and verifying is approximately the same using RSA with a DES hash function. The internal speed, without disk accesses etc., is about 1.1 Mbit/s. (Apple Quadra 950 (MC 68040, 33 MHz, RAM: 20 MB, 80 ns. Length of RSA modulus is 512 bit). PMID:8188407

Bleumer, G

1994-02-01

320

Information support for health information management in regional Sri Lanka: health managers' perspectives.  

PubMed

Good management, supported by accurate, timely and reliable health information, is vital for increasing the effectiveness of Health Information Systems (HIS). When it comes to managing the under-resourced health systems of developing countries, information-based decision making is particularly important. This paper reports findings of a self-report survey that investigated perceptions of local health managers (HMs) of their own regional HIS in Sri Lanka. Data were collected through a validated, pre-tested postal questionnaire, and distributed among a selected group of HMs to elicit their perceptions of the current HIS in relation to information generation, acquisition and use, required reforms to the information system and application of information and communication technology (ICT). Results based on descriptive statistics indicated that the regional HIS was poorly organised and in need of reform; that management support for the system was unsatisfactory in terms of relevance, accuracy, timeliness and accessibility; that political pressure and community and donor requests took precedence over vital health information when management decisions were made; and use of ICT was unsatisfactory. HIS strengths included user-friendly paper formats, a centralised planning system and an efficient disease notification system; weaknesses were lack of comprehensiveness, inaccuracy, and lack of a feedback system. Responses of participants indicated that HIS would be improved by adopting an internationally accepted framework and introducing ICT applications. Perceived barriers to such improvements were high initial cost of educating staff to improve computer literacy, introduction of ICTs, and HIS restructure. We concluded that the regional HIS of Central Province, Sri Lanka had failed to provide much-needed information support to HMs. These findings are consistent with similar research in other developing countries and reinforce the need for further research to verify causes of poor performance and to design strategic reforms to improve HIS in regional Sri Lanka. PMID:23087080

Ranasinghe, Kaduruwane Indika; Chan, Taizan; Yaralagadda, Prasad

2012-01-01

321

Precision with Ease: Refining Thesaurus Support for Quality Health Information Searching on Health"Insite"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Health"Insite" is the Australian Government's Internet gateway to reliable health information online, providing access to over 15,000 information items on the websites of more than 80 approved information partners. The gateway provides a variety of searching and browsing options to assist users to find information on a wide range of health

Smith, Jill Buckley; Deacon, Prue

2009-01-01

322

Climate change and environmental impacts on maternal and newborn health with focus on Arctic populations  

PubMed Central

Background In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presented a report on global warming and the impact of human activities on global warming. Later the Lancet commission identified six ways human health could be affected. Among these were not environmental factors which are also believed to be important for human health. In this paper we therefore focus on environmental factors, climate change and the predicted effects on maternal and newborn health. Arctic issues are discussed specifically considering their exposure and sensitivity to long range transported contaminants. Methods Considering that the different parts of pregnancy are particularly sensitive time periods for the effects of environmental exposure, this review focuses on the impacts on maternal and newborn health. Environmental stressors known to affects human health and how these will change with the predicted climate change are addressed. Air pollution and food security are crucial issues for the pregnant population in a changing climate, especially indoor climate and food security in Arctic areas. Results The total number of environmental factors is today responsible for a large number of the global deaths, especially in young children. Climate change will most likely lead to an increase in this number. Exposure to the different environmental stressors especially air pollution will in most parts of the world increase with climate change, even though some areas might face lower exposure. Populations at risk today are believed to be most heavily affected. As for the persistent organic pollutants a warming climate leads to a remobilisation and a possible increase in food chain exposure in the Arctic and thus increased risk for Arctic populations. This is especially the case for mercury. The perspective for the next generations will be closely connected to the expected temperature changes; changes in housing conditions; changes in exposure patterns; predicted increased exposure to Mercury because of increased emissions and increased biological availability. Conclusions A number of environmental stressors are predicted to increase with climate change and increasingly affecting human health. Efforts should be put on reducing risk for the next generation, thus global politics and research effort should focus on maternal and newborn health.

Rylander, Charlotta; Odland, Jon ?.; Sandanger, Torkjel M.

2011-01-01

323

The Relationship Between Health Information Sources and Mental Models of Cancer: Findings from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study used data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, a national sample of U.S. households (N = 5,586), to (1) explore the extent to which specific sources of health information are associated with certain beliefs about cancer; and (2) examine whether the relationship between health information sources and beliefs about cancer is moderated by psychological distress. Health information on

Edith Kealey; Cathy S. Berkman

2010-01-01

324

Extending the infoway benefits evaluation framework for health information systems.  

PubMed

A proposal is made that extends the current Canada Health Infoway Benefits Evaluation (BE) Framework for Health Information Systems (HIS) being deployed in Canada. The current BE framework takes a micro view of HIS quality, use and impact at the local level whereas the extended framework takes into account the broader socio-organizational and contextual aspects known as the meso and macro views of HIS deployment. The meso view addresses the people, organization, network and implementation dimensions. The macro view focuses on the contextual dimensions of technology standard, funding/incentive, legislation/policy and professional practice. Validation of this extended BE framework is being planned through a comparative review of recent HIS evaluation literature, a Delphi-consensus process with HIS experts and users, and multiple validation studies with recent HIS implementation projects in British Columbia. PMID:19380969

Lau, Francis

2009-01-01

325

Maximizing the value of health care. Rather than focus on cutting costs, try charging more for a better experience.  

PubMed

Rather than focus on cutting costs, try charging more for a better experience. You'll improve the bottom line, but you'll also put the health care focus back where it belongs: on the consumer--the health and happiness of your patients. PMID:11565174

Norton, D W; Curtiss, J; Hart, J

326

EXTENDING ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEILLANCE TO USEFUL PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public Health Applications in Remote Sensing (PHAiRS) is addressing: (1) an atmospheric dust modeling system into which Earth observation (EO) data have been assimilated, and (2) a public health information system that is designed to link environmental data to aggregated health outcome data provided by the New Mexico Department of Health and other public health authorities. The objective is to

Stanley A. Morain; Amelia M. Budge

2008-01-01

327

History and Significance of Information Systems and Public Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public health information management has been an important aspect of protecting the health of the public since prehistoric times. Public health practice has used currently available science in mathematics, chemistry, and biology to carry out its mission. In the last 200 years, public health has made dramatic advances. Building on discoveries in other fields, public health has constructed a unique

JOHN R. LUMPKIN

328

Assessing consumer health information needs in a community hospital.  

PubMed Central

A study was conducted by the Oakwood Hospital Library in Dearborn, Michigan, to document health information needs and opinions among staff physicians and area health consumers. The study sought to discover which community sources, besides the hospital library, consumers were consulting for health information and how helpful these sources were; what types of health information physicians were providing to patients in their offices; and whether and how physicians and health consumers might differ in their perceptions of health information. Study results, along with suggested opportunities for additional investigation, are presented.

Phillips, S A; Zorn, M J

1994-01-01

329

Obsessive–compulsive tendencies are associated with a focused information processing strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study examined the hypothesis that obsessive–compulsive (OC) tendencies are related to a reliance on focused and serial rather than a parallel, speed-oriented information processing style. Ten students with high OC tendencies and 10 students with low OC tendencies performed the flanker task, in which they were required to quickly classify a briefly presented target letter (S or H) that

Assaf Soref; Reuven Dar; Galit Argov; Nachshon Meiran

2008-01-01

330

What constitutes an excellent allied health care professional? A multidisciplinary focus group study  

PubMed Central

Background Determining what constitutes an excellent allied health care professional (AHCP) is important, since this is what will guide the development of curricula for training future physical therapists, oral hygienists, speech therapists, diagnostic radiographers, and dietitians. This also determines the quality of care. Aim To describe perspectives of AHCPs on which characteristics are commonly associated with an excellent AHCP. Methods AHCPs’ perspectives were derived from three focus group discussions. Twenty-one health care professionals participated. The final analysis of the focus group discussions produced eight domains, in which content validity was obtained through a Delphi panel survey of 27 contributing experts. Results According to the survey, a combination of the following characteristics defines an excellent AHCP: (1) cognizance, to obtain and to apply knowledge in a broad multidisciplinary health care field; (2) cooperativity, to effectively work with others in a multidisciplinary context; (3) communicative, to communicate effectively at different levels in complex situations; (4) initiative, to initiate new ideas, to act proactively, and to follow them through; (5) innovative, to devise new ideas and to implement alternatives beyond current practices; (6) introspective, to self-examine and to reflect; (7) broad perspective, to capture the big picture; and (8) evidence-driven, to find and to use scientific evidence to guide one’s decisions. Conclusion The AHCPs perspectives can be used as a reference for personal improvement for supervisors and professionals in clinical practice and for educational purposes. These perspectives may serve as a guide against which talented students can evaluate themselves.

Paans, Wolter; Wijkamp, Inge; Wiltens, Egbert; Wolfensberger, Marca V

2013-01-01

331

Lay information mediary behavior uncovered: exploring how nonprofessionals seek health information for themselves and others online*EC  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This research studied motivations for, barriers to, and effects of online health information seeking and explored lay information mediary behavior (LIMB) characteristics in the consumer health information domain. Lay information mediaries (LIMs) seek information on behalf or because of others, without necessarily being asked to do so or engaging in follow up, and have represented more than 50% of health information seekers in prior studies. Methods: A web-based survey was posted on NC Health Info (NCHI) with 211 respondents, self-identified per the information need that brought them to NCHI as 20% LIMs (n?=?43), 58% direct users (n?=?122), and 22% health or information providers (n?=?46). Follow-up telephone interviews were performed with 10% (n?=?21). Interview analysis focused on lay participants (n?=?15 LIMs and direct users combined). Interviewees were reclassified post-survey as 12 LIMs and 3 direct users when studied information behavior extended beyond NCHI search. Interview data were analyzed using grounded theory approach. Results: Surveyed LIMs were 77% female (n?=?33) and searched on behalf or because of family members (81%, n?=?35) and people they felt “extremely close” to (77%, n?=?33). LIMs reported various information seeking barriers “sometimes” to “often.” LIMs searched mostly without prompting (51%, n?=?22). Interview results triangulated survey findings regarding gender, tie strength, and prompting. Conclusions: LIMB may be related to gender and relationship tie strength and appears more internally than externally motivated. Further LIMB research is warranted.

Fisher, Karen E.; Turner, Anne G.; Durrance, Joan C.; Turner, Tammara Combs

2008-01-01

332

Tell me--show me: using combined focus group and photovoice methods to gain understanding of health issues in rural Guatemala.  

PubMed

As health researchers, our training is more literary than visual. We are only beginning to learn about the value of photography as a qualitative data collection method. In this article we describe a project utilizing focus groups and photovoice, sequentially, to gather information about health-related conditions in rural Guatemala. In the first phase, the perceptions of a group of comadronas (birth attendants) were elicited using traditional focus group methodology. In the second phase, conducted several months later, the photovoice method was utilized. During this phase, the same participants viewed and responded to photographs taken during the intervening period by some of the phase-one participants. The findings from this two-phase approach support those from other studies that suggest that photovoice provides more in-depth data and the potential for bringing out additional information that might not emerge during traditional interviews or focus group discussions. PMID:20154296

Cooper, Cheryl M; Yarbrough, Susan P

2010-02-12

333

45 CFR 170.207 - Vocabulary standards for representing electronic health information.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Vocabulary standards for representing electronic health information. 170.207...TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION...PROGRAMS FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Standards and...

2010-10-01

334

Evidence on the Costs and Benefits of Health Information Technology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information plays a key role in health care. Providers such as physicians and hospitals generate and process information as they provide care to patients. Managing that information and using it productively pose a continuing challenge, particularly in lig...

P. Richmond S. Hagen

2008-01-01

335

From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information  

MedlinePLUS

... Issue Past Issues From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... all information on the Internet is reliable. Some Web sites post inaccurate or biased medical information. Others ...

336

[New information technologies and health consumerism].  

PubMed

Concepts related to consumption have shifted to include social processes not previously covered by traditional categories. The current review analyzes the application of classical concepts of consumerism to practices recently identified in the health field, like the phenomenon of cyberchondria. The theoretical challenge relates to the difficulty in extrapolating from the economic perspectives of consumerism to self-care issues in the context of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Drawing on recent anthropological categories, the study seeks to understand the phenomenon of self-care commodification under the imperative of self-accountability for health. New consumer identities are described in light of the unprecedented issues concerning technical improvements currently altering the nature of self-care. The study concludes that health is consumed as vitality, broken down into commercial artifacts in the context of a new bioeconomy - no longer linked to the idea of emulation and possession, but to forms of self-perception and self-care in the face of multiple risks and new definitions of the human being. PMID:21229207

Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Castiel, Luis David; Bagrichevsky, Marcos; Griep, Rosane Harter

2010-08-01

337

Health information technology use and health literacy among community-dwelling African Americans.  

PubMed

The purpose of this descriptive, cross-sectional study of African Americans was to determine the purpose and levels of health information technology (IT) use, health literacy [HL] levels, and to explore the relationship between health IT usage and HL levels. Study participants (N = 88) resided in zip codes with low wellness scores. Participants had adequate HL levels, 83% owned a computer, 65% used the Internet to access health information, those with higher education levels were more likely to use a computer to access health information, those with lower HL levels did not use a computer to access health information or to store personal health information. Participants [77%] indicated they would be willing to use a computer-based program to store their personal health information; however, concerns related to privacy were cited. Findings obtained are useful for planning and implementing health IT programs among this population to enhance health outcomes. PMID:23589966

McCleary-Jones, Voncella; Scheideman-Miller, Cynthia; Rev Dorn, James A; Johnson, Birdie; Overall, Mary; Dwyer, Kathleen

2013-01-01

338

Electronic Personal Health Information Exchange: Health Care Entities' Reported Disclosure Practices and Effects on Quality of Care.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To promote the use of information technology for the electronic exchange of personal health information among providers and other health care entities, Congress passed the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. It pro...

2010-01-01

339

Informal electronic waste recycling: a sector review with special focus on China.  

PubMed

Informal recycling is a new and expanding low cost recycling practice in managing Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE or e-waste). It occurs in many developing countries, including China, where current gaps in environmental management, high demand for second-hand electronic appliances and the norm of selling e-waste to individual collectors encourage the growth of a strong informal recycling sector. This paper gathers information on informal e-waste management, takes a look at its particular manifestations in China and identifies some of the main difficulties of the current Chinese approach. Informal e-waste recycling is not only associated with serious environmental and health impacts, but also the supply deficiency of formal recyclers and the safety problems of remanufactured electronic products. Experiences already show that simply prohibiting or competing with the informal collectors and informal recyclers is not an effective solution. New formal e-waste recycling systems should take existing informal sectors into account, and more policies need to be made to improve recycling rates, working conditions and the efficiency of involved informal players. A key issue for China's e-waste management is how to set up incentives for informal recyclers so as to reduce improper recycling activities and to divert more e-waste flow into the formal recycling sector. PMID:21147524

Chi, Xinwen; Streicher-Porte, Martin; Wang, Mark Y L; Reuter, Markus A

2010-12-13

340

Informal electronic waste recycling: A sector review with special focus on China  

SciTech Connect

Informal recycling is a new and expanding low cost recycling practice in managing Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE or e-waste). It occurs in many developing countries, including China, where current gaps in environmental management, high demand for second-hand electronic appliances and the norm of selling e-waste to individual collectors encourage the growth of a strong informal recycling sector. This paper gathers information on informal e-waste management, takes a look at its particular manifestations in China and identifies some of the main difficulties of the current Chinese approach. Informal e-waste recycling is not only associated with serious environmental and health impacts, but also the supply deficiency of formal recyclers and the safety problems of remanufactured electronic products. Experiences already show that simply prohibiting or competing with the informal collectors and informal recyclers is not an effective solution. New formal e-waste recycling systems should take existing informal sectors into account, and more policies need to be made to improve recycling rates, working conditions and the efficiency of involved informal players. A key issue for China's e-waste management is how to set up incentives for informal recyclers so as to reduce improper recycling activities and to divert more e-waste flow into the formal recycling sector.

Chi Xinwen, E-mail: x.chi@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Streicher-Porte, Martin [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Technology and Society Laboratory, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Wang, Mark Y.L. [Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, 221 Bouverie Street, Carlton, VIC 3010 (Australia); Reuter, Markus A. [Outotec Pty Ltd., Melbourne, 12 Kitchen Road, Dandenong, VIC 3175 (Australia)

2011-04-15

341

Comparing information needs of health care providers and older adults: findings from a wellness study.  

PubMed

Consumer health informatics technologies have the potential to enhance shared decision-making and communication between older adults, health care providers, and other stakeholders. The objective of this study was to characterize the information needs of these stakeholders to inform the design of informatics tools that support wellness in older adults. We conducted four focus groups with 31 older adults and three focus groups with 10 health care providers to explore information needs, goals, and preferences for information sharing. Analysis of focus group transcripts was performed to identify and compare themes for different stakeholders. We identified four themes related to information activities: perceived goals of others, perceived information needs of others, information sharing by older adults, and role of family members. Older adults, family members and health care providers differ in their information needs. We provide recommendations to facilitate design and adoption of informatics tools that connect these stakeholders. Larger studies are needed to characterize different stakeholder goals, information needs and preferences. PMID:23920507

Reeder, Blaine; Le, Thai; Thompson, Hilaire J; Demiris, George

2013-01-01

342

Use of health information technology to reduce diagnostic errors  

PubMed Central

Background Health information technology (HIT) systems have the potential to reduce delayed, missed or incorrect diagnoses. We describe and classify the current state of diagnostic HIT and identify future research directions. Methods A multi-pronged literature search was conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, backwards and forwards reference searches and contributions from domain experts. We included HIT systems evaluated in clinical and experimental settings as well as previous reviews, and excluded radiology computer-aided diagnosis, monitor alerts and alarms, and studies focused on disease staging and prognosis. Articles were organised within a conceptual framework of the diagnostic process and areas requiring further investigation were identified. Results HIT approaches, tools and algorithms were identified and organised into 10 categories related to those assisting: (1) information gathering; (2) information organisation and display; (3) differential diagnosis generation; (4) weighing of diagnoses; (5) generation of diagnostic plan; (6) access to diagnostic reference information; (7) facilitating follow-up; (8) screening for early detection in asymptomatic patients; (9) collaborative diagnosis; and (10) facilitating diagnostic feedback to clinicians. We found many studies characterising potential interventions, but relatively few evaluating the interventions in actual clinical settings and even fewer demonstrating clinical impact. Conclusions Diagnostic HIT research is still in its early stages with few demonstrations of measurable clinical impact. Future efforts need to focus on: (1) improving methods and criteria for measurement of the diagnostic process using electronic data; (2) better usability and interfaces in electronic health records; (3) more meaningful incorporation of evidence-based diagnostic protocols within clinical workflows; and (4) systematic feedback of diagnostic performance.

El-Kareh, Robert; Hasan, Omar; Schiff, Gordon D

2013-01-01

343

Health Insurance Claim Review Using Information Technologies  

PubMed Central

Objectives The objective of this paper is to describe the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA)'s payment request (PARE) system that plays the role of the gateway for all health insurance claims submitted to HIRA, and the claim review support (CRS) system that supports the work of claim review experts in South Korea. Methods This study describes the two systems' information technology (IT) infrastructures, their roles, and quantitative analysis of their work performance. It also reports the impact of these systems on claims processing by analyzing the health insurance claim data submitted to HIRA from April 1 to June 30, 2011. Results The PARE system returned to healthcare providers 2.7% of all inpatient claims (97,930) and 0.1% of all outpatient claims (317,007) as un-reviewable claims. The return rate was the highest for the hospital group as 0.49% and the lowest rate was found in clinic group. The CRS system's detection rate of the claims with multiple errors in inpatient and outpatient areas was 23.1% and 2.9%, respectively. The highest rate of error detection occurred at guideline check-up stages in both inpatient and outpatient groups. Conclusions The study found that HIRA's two IT systems had a critical role in reducing heavy administrative workloads through automatic data processing. Although the return rate of the problematic claims to providers and the error detection rate by two systems was low, the actual count of the returned claims was large. The role of IT will become increasingly important in reducing the workload of health insurance claims review.

Yoon, Jeong-Sik; Speedie, Stuart M.; Yoon, Hojung; Lee, Jiseon

2012-01-01

344

Promoting women's health in hospitals: a focus on breastfeeding and lactation support for employees and patients.  

PubMed

Hospitals often are one of the largest employers in communities, and nationwide, they employ more than 6.3 million employees. Hospitals also serve tens of millions of inpatients annually. Hospitals, therefore, can be leaders in worksite wellness and promoting breastfeeding and lactation support for new mothers. By adopting model standards and practices that promote breastfeeding, hospitals can influence women's health. This article focuses on the efforts of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity to promote breastfeeding and lactation support for hospital employees and patients. PMID:23215865

Belay, Brook; Allen, Jessica; Williams, Nancy; Dooyema, Carrie; Foltz, Jennifer

2012-12-05

345

Substantial health and economic returns from delayed aging may warrant a new focus for medical research.  

PubMed

Recent scientific advances suggest that slowing the aging process (senescence) is now a realistic goal. Yet most medical research remains focused on combating individual diseases. Using the Future Elderly Model-a microsimulation of the future health and spending of older Americans-we compared optimistic "disease specific" scenarios with a hypothetical "delayed aging" scenario in terms of the scenarios' impact on longevity, disability, and major entitlement program costs. Delayed aging could increase life expectancy by an additional 2.2 years, most of which would be spent in good health. The economic value of delayed aging is estimated to be $7.1 trillion over fifty years. In contrast, addressing heart disease and cancer separately would yield diminishing improvements in health and longevity by 2060-mainly due to competing risks. Delayed aging would greatly increase entitlement outlays, especially for Social Security. However, these changes could be offset by increasing the Medicare eligibility age and the normal retirement age for Social Security. Overall, greater investment in research to delay aging appears to be a highly efficient way to forestall disease, extend healthy life, and improve public health. PMID:24101058

Goldman, Dana P; Cutler, David; Rowe, John W; Michaud, Pierre-Carl; Sullivan, Jeffrey; Peneva, Desi; Olshansky, S Jay

2013-10-01

346

Low risk research using routinely collected identifiable health information without informed consent: encounters with the Patient Information Advisory Group  

PubMed Central

Current UK legislation is impacting upon the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of medical record-based research aimed at benefiting the NHS and the public heath. Whereas previous commentators have focused on the Data Protection Act 1998, the Health and Social Care Act 2001 is the key legislation for public health researchers wishing to access medical records without written consent. The Act requires researchers to apply to the Patient Information Advisory Group (PIAG) for permission to access medical records without written permission. We present a case study of the work required to obtain the necessary permissions from PIAG in order to conduct a large scale public health research project. In our experience it took eight months to receive permission to access basic identifying information on individuals registered at general practices, and a decision on whether we could access clinical information in medical records without consent took 18 months. Such delays pose near insurmountable difficulties to grant funded research, and in our case £560 000 of public and charitable money was spent on research staff while a large part of their work was prohibited until the third year of a three year grant. We conclude by arguing that many of the current problems could be avoided by returning PIAG’s responsibilities to research ethics committees, and by allowing “opt-out” consent for many public health research projects.

Metcalfe, C; Martin, R M; Noble, S; Lane, J A; Hamdy, F C; Neal, D E; Donovan, J L

2009-01-01

347

Dynamic Generation of a Health Topics Overview from Consumer Health Information Documents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online health information use is increasing, but can be too difficult for consumers. We created a system that dynamically generates a health topics overview for consumer health web pages that organises the information into four consumer-preferred categories while displaying topic prevalence through visualisation. It accesses both a consumer health vocabulary and the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). We evaluated its

Trudi Miller; Gondy Leroy

2008-01-01

348

An expert assessment on climate change and health - with a European focus on lungs and allergies  

PubMed Central

Background For almost 20 years, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has been assessing the potential health risks associated with climate change; with increasingly convincing evidence that climate change presents existing impacts on human health. In industrialized countries climate change may further affect public health and in particular respiratory health, through existing health stressors, including, anticipated increased number of deaths and acute morbidity due to heat waves; increased frequency of cardiopulmonary events due to higher concentrations of air pollutants; and altered spatial and temporal distribution of allergens and some infectious disease vectors. Additionally exposure to moulds and contaminants from water damaged buildings may increase. Methods We undertook an expert elicitation amongst European researchers engaged in environmental medicine or respiratory health. All experts were actively publishing researchers on lung disease and air pollution, climate and health or a closely related research. We conducted an online questionnaire on proposed causal diagrams and determined levels of confidence that climate change will have an impact on a series of stressors. In a workshop following the online questionnaire, half of the experts further discussed the results and reasons for differences in assessments of the state of knowledge on exposures and health effects. Results Out of 16 experts, 100% expressed high to very high confidence that climate change would increase the frequency of heat waves. At least half expressed high or very high confidence that climate change would increase levels of pollen (50%), particulate matter (PM2.5) (55%), and ozone (70%). While clarity is needed around the impacts of increased exposures to health impacts of some stressors, including ozone and particulate matter levels, it was noted that definitive knowledge is not a prerequisite for policy action. Information to the public, preventive measures, monitoring and warning systems were among the most commonly mentioned preventative actions. Conclusions This group of experts identifies clear health risks associated with climate change, and express opinions about these risks even while they do not necessarily regard themselves as covering all areas of expertise. Since some changes in exposure have already been observed, the consensus is that there is already a scientific basis for preventative action, and that the associated adaptation and mitigation policies should also be evidence based.

2012-01-01

349

Personal health records: retrieving contextual information with Google Custom Search.  

PubMed

Ubiquitous personal health records, which can accompany a person everywhere, are a necessary requirement for ubiquitous healthcare. Contextual information related to health events is important for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and for the maintenance of good health, yet it is seldom recorded in a health record. We describe a dual cellphone-and-Web-based personal health record system which can include 'external' contextual information. Much contextual information is available on the Internet and we can use ontologies to help identify relevant sites and information. But a search engine is required to retrieve information from the Web and developing a customized search engine is beyond our scope, so we can use Google Custom Search API Web service to get contextual data. In this paper we describe a framework which combines a health-and-environment 'knowledge base' or ontology with the Google Custom Search API to retrieve relevant contextual information related to entries in a ubiquitous personal health record. PMID:23138074

Ahsan, Mahmud; Seldon, H Lee; Sayeed, Shohel

2012-01-01

350

Improving health promotion to American Indians in the midwest United States: preferred sources of health information and its use for the medical encounter.  

PubMed

American Indians and Alaska Natives suffer significant health disparities for many infectious and chronic diseases as compared to the general population. Providing accurate and culturally tailored health information to underserved groups has been shown to influence health behaviors and health outcomes. Little prior research has explored American Indians health information use and preferences. National representative sample surveys such as the Health Information National Trends Survey provide some data on minority groups but are underpowered to provide useful information on American Indians. The present study analyzes data from a survey of over 900 American Indians from the Midwest United States and explores their sources of health information, their preferences for information presentation, and their use of health information prior to and during medical encounters. We conclude that campaigns targeting Natives should be narrowly focused and be community driven or employing community resources. American Indians use a diversity of media sources to obtain health information, with the Internet being underutilized compared to the general population. Partnership with Indian Health Service providers and pharmacists, as well as traditional healers, in the development and dissemination of new health information for Natives may provide the "expert" tone needed to promote health improvements in American Indians. PMID:22477671

Geana, Mugur V; Greiner, K Allen; Cully, Angelia; Talawyma, Myrietta; Daley, Christine Makosky

2012-12-01

351

E-health information search intentions of Turkish internet users  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The internet provides a wide range of technologies that enable health professionals to communicate with people. It ultimately may soon be the primary source for an individual searching for healthcare information, even for emerging economies such as Turkey. This study aims to examine how perceived benefits, perceived quality, and reliability of electronic health (e-health) information affect intention to

Bahar Ya?in; Hilal Özen

2011-01-01

352

Linking Native Americans to Quality Health Information on the Internet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Native Americans experience significant health problems. Teaching them how to access health information on the Internet has the potential to give them knowledge to maintain more healthy lifestyles, provide them with reliable information about their problems, and make them aware of possible treatment options. The staff at the Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences, University of North Dakota

Judith L. Rieke

2005-01-01

353

The effect of health benefit information on consumers health value, attitudes and intentions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research explored the effect of health benefit information on individuals’ stated health value, attitudes towards functional\\/enriched foods, expectations, perceptions, and intentions to purchase a new fibre-enriched fish product. The study used a randomized design involving an experimental group receiving fibre and health information on the product and a control group who did not receive such information. The results indicated

Alina Tudoran; Svein Ottar Olsen; Domingo C. Dopico

2009-01-01

354

Development of Information Security-Focused Incident Prevention Measures for Critical Information Infrastructure in Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, the dilemma of cyber attacks by malicious third parties targeting security vulnerabilities in information and communication systems has emerged, resulting in security incidents. This situation suggests that the establishment of proactive efforts and recurrence prevention measures are becoming imperative, especially in critical infrastructure sectors.This paper provides an analysis of 58 security incident cases, which occurred in critical infrastructures worldwide and were published in media. The purpose of the analysis is to conclude to a valid list of recurrence prevention measures that constitute good practices.

Kobayashi, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Takahito; Nagayasu, Yukinobu

355

The Effects of a Woman-Focused, Woman-Held Resource on Preventive Health Behaviors During Pregnancy: The Pregnancy Pocketbook  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the effectiveness of a woman-held pregnancy record (‘The Pregnancy Pocketbook’) on improving health behaviors important for maternal and infant health. The Pregnancy Pocketbook was developed as a woman-focused preventive approach to pregnancy health based on antenatal management guidelines, behavior-change evidence, and formative research with the target population and health service providers. The Pregnancy Pocketbook was evaluated using a

Shelley A. Wilkinson; Yvette D. Miller; Bernadette Watson

2010-01-01

356

The potential for using hospital bedside TV services in England to provide patients with access to health information  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is a summary of a report which looks at the potential of using television sets at hospital bedsides to provide patients with access to health information. The report was jointly commissioned by The Department of Health (DoH) and National Health Service (NHS) Direct Online, and focused on what could be done using existing (or planned) Patient Power infrastructure.

Gavin McWhirter

2003-01-01

357

Embracing change in a health information exchange.  

PubMed

Managing changes in source system terms and surveilling for associated deviations in HL7 reporting is an essential, but difficult aspect of a health information exchange. We analyzed the mapping records of the Indiana Network for Patient Care in order to characterize the evolution of radiology and laboratory system terms after initial implementation with regard to term mappings and changes in units of measure. Overall, we added half as many new post-implementation terms (9909) as we added for initial system implementations. As a group, INPC institutions have not slowed much in their rate of adding new terms after initial implementation. In general, we encountered unit-related exceptions less frequently than new, unknown terms. Our study highlights the ongoing effort required to keep up with evolving source system terms in a regional HIE and the need to willingly embrace change along the way. PMID:18999242

Vreeman, Daniel J; Stark, Marilyn; Tomashefski, Gail L; Phillips, D Ryan; Dexter, Paul R

2008-11-06

358

Evaluating health information technology's clinical effects.  

PubMed

In 2009 the federal government appropriated $34 billion in stimulus-related funding to promote the "meaningful use" of health information technology among Medicare and Medicaid providers and hospitals. One of the key elements of this technology is the adoption of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems for inpatient drug prescribing. The potential for CPOE to improve prescribing patterns and prevent adverse events is large, and as yet, unrealized. Amidst enthusiasm for the benefits of CPOE, providers and policymakers are becoming aware that CPOE could introduce new errors into the system and cannot simply be assumed to "work." This Issue Brief reports on the experience of one hospital system that used its CPOE to reduce the incidence of a serious drug interaction. This rigorous test of a specific CPOE intervention shows that an electronic alert system can be effective in changing prescribing, but may also have unintended consequences for patient safety. PMID:21365962

Strom, Brian L; Schinnar, Rita

2011-02-01

359

Evaluating Online Health Information: Beyond Readability Formulas  

PubMed Central

Although understanding health information is important, the texts provided are often difficult to understand. There are formulas to measure readability levels, but there is little understanding of how linguistic structures contribute to these difficulties. We are developing a toolkit of linguistic metrics that are validated with representative users and can be measured automatically. In this study, we provide an overview of our corpus and how readability differs by topic and source. We compare two documents for three groups of linguistic metrics. We report on a user study evaluating one of the differentiating metrics: the percentage of function words in a sentence. Our results show that this percentage correlates significantly with ease of understanding as indicated by users but not with the readability formula levels commonly used. Our study is the first to propose a user validated metric, different from readability formulas.

Leroy, Gondy; Helmreich, Stephen; Cowie, James R.; Miller, Trudi; Zheng, Wei

2008-01-01

360

Integrating health information technology into clinical guidelines.  

PubMed

The current use of Health Information Technology (HIT) within healthcare practice is limited. Clinical guidelines have been developed to bring research based evidence into practice. However, there is no defining step during the development process that explores the use of HIT and how it can benefit the patient, staff and delivery of care process. This paper presents a review of current research on the integration of HIT into clinical guidelines, a methodology for updating and altering the clinical guideline development process to include exploration of HIT and an updated version of the Patient Journey Modeling Architecture (PaJMa) to include a technology layer to assist in visually depicting how HIT can benefit healthcare. PMID:19963615

MacDougall, Candice; Percival, Jennifer; McGregor, Carolyn

2009-01-01

361

Sources of Health Information Related to Preventive Health Behaviors in a National Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Current literature suggests that certain sources of information are used in varying degrees among different socioeconomic and demographic groups; therefore, it is important to determine if specific classes of health information sources are more effective than others in promoting health behaviors. Purpose To determine if interpersonal versus mass media sources of health information are associated with meeting recommendations for health behaviors (nonsmoking, fruit/vegetable intake, and exercise) and cancer screening. Methods Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship of health information sources (mass media sources including print, TV, Internet; and interpersonal sources including friends and family, community organizations, and healthcare providers); with meeting recommendations for healthy behaviors and cancer screening in the 2005 and 2007 Health Information National Trends Surveys (HINTS). Analyses were conducted in 2009. Results In the 2005 HINTS, participants reporting use of print media and community organizations as sources of health information over the past year were mostly likely to meet recommendations for health behaviors. In the 2007 HINTS, utilization of healthcare providers for health information was associated with meeting recommendations for health behaviors, particularly cancer screening. Conclusions Use of print media and interpersonal sources of health information are most consistently associated with self-reported health behaviors. Additional research should explore the relationship of health information sources to clinical outcomes. Social network interventions to promote adoption of health behaviors should be further developed.

Redmond, Nicole; Baer, Heather J.; Clark, Cheryl R.; Lipsitz, Stuart; Hicks, LeRoi S.

2010-01-01

362

Creation of environmental health information system for public health service: A pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite more than a decade of research on medical information systems, deficiencies exist in our capability of establishing\\u000a an effective environmental health information infrastructure. In this research, we present a pilot study on creating a feasible\\u000a environmental health information infrastructure. The newly-developed environmental health information system is a web-based\\u000a platform that integrates databases, decision-making tools, geographic information systems for supporting

Ling Li; Li Xu; Hueiwang Anna Jeng; Dayanand N. Naik; Thomas Allen; Maria Frontini

2008-01-01

363

Digital focusing of OCT images based on scalar diffraction theory and information entropy  

PubMed Central

This paper describes a digital method that is capable of automatically focusing optical coherence tomography (OCT) en face images without prior knowledge of the point spread function of the imaging system. The method utilizes a scalar diffraction model to simulate wave propagation from out-of-focus scatter to the focal plane, from which the propagation distance between the out-of-focus plane and the focal plane is determined automatically via an image-definition-evaluation criterion based on information entropy theory. By use of the proposed approach, we demonstrate that the lateral resolution close to that at the focal plane can be recovered from the imaging planes outside the depth of field region with minimal loss of resolution. Fresh onion tissues and mouse fat tissues are used in the experiments to show the performance of the proposed method.

Liu, Guozhong; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

2012-01-01

364

The Near-Term Future for Child Health Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

he developmental process in children offers an opportunity to influence their health and well-being as adults. The information infrastructure of the future needs to support the multiple partners responsible for providing elements of the health protection and health care of children. In this partnership, public health plays simultaneously a supportive role and a leadership role. Five tasks need to guide

David A. Ross; Alan R. Hinman; Kristin N. Saarlas; Michele A. Lloyd-Puryear; Stephen J. Downs

365

Implementing a Population Health Information Framework within Primary Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary Health Organisations (PHOs) have often foun d it difficult to produce information to support the achievement of their population health goals. There have been many barriers to success. These barriers include a lack of understan ding of how population health translates to general practice, the lack of standards, and diffic ulty in collecting and reporting on population health data.

Ken Leech

366

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Health Promotion and Public Health: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this literature review is to identify how geographic information system (GIS) applications have been used in health-related research and to critically examine the issues, strengths, and challenges inherent to those approaches from the lenses of health promotion and public health. Through the review process, conducted in 2007, it is evident that health promotion and public health applications

Candace I. J. Nykiforuk; Laura M. Flaman

2011-01-01

367

Teaching Core Courses with a Focus on Rural Health. An Instructor Resource Guide. Appendix to a Final Report on the Paraprofessional Rurally Oriented Family Home Health Training Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This instructor's resource guide, one in a series of products from a project to develop an associate degree program for paraprofessional rural family health promoters, deals with teaching courses that focus on rural health. Discussed in the first section of the guide are the role of core courses in rural health promotional training and the…

Myer, Donna Foster, Ed.

368

The relationship between health information sources and mental models of cancer: findings from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey.  

PubMed

This study used data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, a national sample of U.S. households (N = 5,586), to (1) explore the extent to which specific sources of health information are associated with certain beliefs about cancer; and (2) examine whether the relationship between health information sources and beliefs about cancer is moderated by psychological distress. Health information on the local news was associated with greater ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.02-1.46, p < .05), while less ambiguity was associated with cancer-specific information (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.69-0.94, p < .05), health information in the newspaper (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.69-0.97, p < .05), and health information on the Internet (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.61-0.84, p < .001). Health information on the local news was also associated with lower likelihood of higher perceived relative risk of cancer (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.86, p < .01). No source of information was associated with the belief that cancer is primarily caused by behavior/lifestyle factors. Psychological distress greatly increased the optimistic bias of those who read health information in the news (OR 3.68, 95% CI 1.69-8.03, p < .001) but had no other moderating effect. Findings suggest that information seeking using active channels of health information decreases ambiguity and corrects for optimistic bias. PMID:21154096

Kealey, Edith; Berkman, Cathy S

2010-01-01

369

Health Services: Sources of Information for Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The publication was developed to help people to understand and to gain access to the health services research literature. It covers current areas of inquiry in health services research as well as methodologies used to conduct health services research. Con...

1992-01-01

370

Nurses and health information technology: working with and around computers.  

PubMed

Information technology is nearly ubiquitous in health care settings. Nurses need basic computer skills and information literacy to effectively practice nursing. In addition, nurses must be prepared not only to work around complex health information technology, but also to communicate with individuals who can address the underlying problems. PMID:22128698

Peace, Jane

371

Considerations for Improving Geographic Information System Research in Public Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many activities to promote better health and to reduce disease are directed at the changing environments in which people live. In response to the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) 1999 Summer Assembly application challenge, this paper describes the uses of geographic information systems in the field of public health care. With the geographic information system, observations regarding the

Gerard Rushton; Gregory Elmes; Robert McMaster

2000-01-01

372

Integrating Intelligent Tutoring Systems and Health Information Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of integrating information about patients in intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) is the opportunity given to the students to direct their own learning. We propose an integration-architecture for sharing patient clinical data among tutoring and health information systems (HISs). HL 7 is used as a standard messaging protocol for collecting the clinical patient data distributed over health information systems.

Carolina González; Juan C. Burguillo; Martín Llamas

2007-01-01

373

Autonomy and reactions to health-risk information  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been suggested that autonomy promotes enhanced reflection on novel information and reduces defensive or biased information processing. This study investigated how autonomy affected people's reactions to known versus novel health-risk information in relation to three behaviours: sun exposure, alcohol consumption and salt intake. Participants (N = 321) completed a measure of autonomy, read either known or novel health-risk

Louisa Jane Pavey; Paul Sparks

2010-01-01

374

Developing population interventions with migrant women for maternal-child health: a focused ethnography  

PubMed Central

Background Literature describing effective population interventions related to the pregnancy, birth, and post-birth care of international migrants, as defined by them, is scant. Hence, we sought to determine: 1) what processes are used by migrant women to respond to maternal-child health and psychosocial concerns during the early months and years after birth; 2) which of these enhance or impede their resiliency; and 3) which population interventions they suggest best respond to these concerns. Methods Sixteen international migrant women living in Montreal or Toronto who had been identified in a previous study as having a high psychosocial-risk profile and subsequently classified as vulnerable or resilient based on indicators of mental health were recruited. Focused ethnography including in-depth interviews and participant observations were conducted. Data were analyzed thematically and as an integrated whole. Results Migrant women drew on a wide range of coping strategies and resources to respond to maternal-child health and psychosocial concerns. Resilient and vulnerable mothers differed in their use of certain coping strategies. Social inclusion was identified as an overarching factor for enhancing resiliency by all study participants. Social processes and corresponding facilitators relating to social inclusion were identified by participants, with more social processes identified by the vulnerable group. Several interventions related to services were described which varied in type and quality; these were generally found to be effective. Participants identified several categories of interventions which they had used or would have liked to use and recommended improvements for and creation of some programs. The social determinants of health categories within which their suggestions fell included: income and social status, social support network, education, personal health practices and coping skills, healthy child development, and health services. Within each of these, the most common suggestions were related to creating supportive environments and building healthy public policy. Conclusions A wealth of data was provided by participants on factors and processes related to the maternal-child health care of international migrants and associated population interventions. Our results offer a challenge to key stakeholders to improve existing interventions and create new ones based on the experiences and views of international migrant women themselves.

2013-01-01

375

Health, sport and nutritional information: tailoring your approach.  

PubMed

One of the intended legacies of the London 2012 Olympics is to increase the level of physical activity amongst the general population. Health information on the positive health benefits of sport and nutrition can assist in this goal and its positive benefit can been seen in communities within and beyond the United Kingdom, particularly within an educational context. In the United States, young people view their teachers as a valuable source of health information, and in Taiwan, teachers have been key collaborators in the development of a national Health e-Learning Network providing multimedia-learning modules for use in the classroom. However, classrooms are not the only source of health information and, with the reported inaccuracies in the translation of health information from academic papers to the popular press, school librarians have a role to play in facilitating students' ability to assess the quality of the health information they access, whatever the source. PMID:22630357

Grant, Maria J

2012-06-01

376

Development of State Level Health Information Exchange Initiatives. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Health information exchange (HIE) has received significant national attention recently, starting with the 2004 directive from President Bush for interoperable electronic health records (EHRs) by 2014. This was followed by the creation of the Office of the...

2006-01-01

377

Hurricane-Related Information for Health Care Professionals  

MedlinePLUS

... Favorites Delicious Digg Google Bookmarks Hurricane Information for Health Care Professionals Clinical Guidance for Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning ... Evacuate Complete Your Plan Hurricane Readiness Educational Materials Health Care Professionals Response and Cleanup Workers PSAs and Podcasts ...

378

How Women With Mental Health Conditions Evaluate the Quality of Information on Mental Health Web sites: A Qualitative Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the primary purposes of using the Web is to find health information for personal health conditions and for the health conditions of care recipients. Women use the Web to find health information more so than men. Information on many health topics is available online. However, many studies have shown that the quality of content on health information Web

Christine Marton

2010-01-01

379

Enhancing access to health information in Africa: a librarian's perspective.  

PubMed

In recent years, tremendous progress has been made toward providing health information in Africa, in part because of technological advancements. Nevertheless, ensuring that information is accessible, comprehensible, and usable remains problematic, and there remain needs in many settings to address issues such as computer skills, literacy, and the infrastructure to access information. To determine how librarians might play a more strategic role in meeting information needs of health professionals in Africa, the author reviewed key components of information systems pertinent to knowledge management for the health sector, including access to global online resources, capacity to use computer technology for information retrieval, information literacy, and the potential for professional networks to play a role in improving access to and use of information. The author concluded that, in regions that lack adequate information systems, librarians could apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate access and use by information seekers. Ensuring access to and use of health information can also be achieved by engaging organizations and associations working to enhance access to health information, such as the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa. These groups can provide assistance through training, dissemination, information repackaging, and other approaches known to improve information literacy. PMID:22724668

Gathoni, Nasra

2012-01-01

380

Information sharing between the National Health Service and criminal justice system in the United Kingdom.  

PubMed

Offenders with mental health problems often have complex and interrelated needs which separately challenge the criminal justice system (CJS) and National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom (U.K.). Consequently, interagency collaboration and timely information sharing are essential. This study focused on the sharing of information about people with mental health problems in contact with the CJS. Questionnaires were distributed to a range of health and criminal justice personnel. The results showed that there was a mismatch between what service user information criminal justice agencies felt they needed and what was routinely received. Prison Service staff received more information (between 15% and 37%) from health agencies than the police (between 6% and 22%). Health professionals received most of the information they needed from criminal justice agencies (between 55% and 85%). Sharing service user information was impeded by incompatible computer systems and restrictions due to data protection/confidentiality requirements. In the U.K., recent governmental publications have highlighted the importance of information sharing; however there remains a clear mismatch between what health related information about service users criminal justice agencies need, and what is actually received. Better guidance is required to encourage and empower people to share. PMID:22925128

Lennox, Charlotte; Mason, Julie; McDonnell, Sharon; Shaw, Jenny; Senior, Jane

2012-04-17

381

Exploring eHealth Ethics and Multi-Morbidity: Protocol for an Interview and Focus Group Study of Patient and Health Care Provider Views and Experiences of Using Digital Media for Health Purposes  

PubMed Central

Background eHealth is a broad term referring to the application of information and communication technologies in the health sector, ranging from health records to medical consultations (telemedicine) and multiple forms of health education, support, and tools. By providing increased and anytime access to information, opportunities to exchange experiences with others, and self-management support, eHealth has been heralded as transformational. It has the potential to accelerate the shift from traditional "passive patient" to an informed, engaged, and empowered "patient as partner," equipped to take part in shared decision-making, and take personal responsibility for self-managing their illness. Objective The objective of our study is to examine how people with chronic illness use eHealth in their daily lives, how it affects patient-provider relationships, and the ethical and practical ramifications for patients, providers, and service delivery. Methods This two-phase qualitative study is ongoing. We will purposively sample 60-70 participants in British Columbia, Canada. To be eligible, patient participants have to have arthritis and at least one other chronic health condition; health care providers (HCPs) need a caseload of patients with multi-morbidity (>25%). To date we have recruited 36 participants (18 patients, 18 HCPs). The participants attended 7 focus groups (FGs), 4 with patients and 3 with rehabilitation professionals and physicians. We interviewed 4 HCPs who were unable to attend a FG. In phase 2, we will build on FG findings and conduct 20-24 interviews with equal numbers of patients and HCPs (rehabilitation professionals and physicians). As in the FGs conducted in phase I, the interviews will use a semistructured, but flexible, discussion guide. All discussions are being audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Constant comparisons and a narrative approach guides the analyses. A relational ethics conceptual lens is being applied to the data to identify emergent ethical issues. Results This study explores ethical issues in eHealth. Our goal is to identify the role of eHealth in the lives of people with multiple chronic health conditions and to explore how eHealth impacts the patient role, self-managing, and the patient-HCP relationship. The ethical lens facilitates a systematic critical analysis of emergent ethical issues for further investigation and pinpoints areas of practice that require interventions as eHealth develops and use increases both within and outside of the clinical setting. Conclusions The potential benefits and burdens of eHealth need to be identified before an ethical framework can be devised.

Adam, Paul; Li, Linda C; McDonald, Michael; Backman, Catherine L

2013-01-01

382

Effectiveness of the Radio as a Health Information Source  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assesses the radio as a source of health information and identifies contributing factors to listeners' intentions to change health-related behavior. After listening to a 1-hour health-talk radio program, 99 participants completed an Internet-based survey instrument. Results indicate 27.3% of participants regularly obtained health information from the radio and 68.7% from the Internet; 92.9% of participants reported an increase

Matthew Lee Smith; Mindy Menn; E. Lisako J. McKyer

2011-01-01

383

Retrospective Information on Health Status and its Application for Population Health Measures  

PubMed Central

Healthy life expectancies are almost always calculated by using health data from cross-sectional surveys. This type of calculation is done partly because data from longitudinal surveys are not always available, and when they are available, they are collected at intervals that are longer than one year. In such cases, collecting health information retrospectively for the years skipped by the survey is useful. The main purpose of this paper is to show how retrospective health information can be used to estimate life expectancies in different health states. Healthy life expectancies are estimated with and without using data on retrospective health information, and the corresponding estimates are compared. The two sets of estimates are similar. We conclude that retrospectively assessed health information based on a one-year recall period can be used to estimate years of life in various health states and that estimates based on such information will closely approximate estimates based on concurrent health information.

MOLLA, MICHAEL T.; LUBITZ, JAMES

2008-01-01

384

Parental health information seeking and re-exploration of the 'digital divide'  

PubMed

Aim: To describe patterns of 'online' and 'offline' health information seeking in families with children under five years of age and living in five socially, economically and culturally disparate local authority (LA) wards in one inner-city area. Background: Earlier work analysed data from the five LA wards merged as one data set. A 'digital divide' in health information seeking was identified between parents who actively sought information from both internet websites and from 14 other health information sources (online health information seekers), and those who acquired information from a more limited range of sources excluding the internet. Of the two groups, the online health information seekers had higher levels of computer ownership and, therefore, internet access within the home. Method: Re-analysis of data (questionnaires n = 224; five focus groups; two interviews with service providers; two opportunistic conversations with service providers). Additional data were retrieved after the original data analysis and between 2005 and 2007. These data were from service user-led discussions (n = 30) held with parents in child health clinics, informal interviews (n = 11) with health visitors and semi-structured interviews (n = 2) with health visitors. Information was also retrieved from the Office for National Statistics data set. In the re-analysis, data were disaggregated at LA ward level in order to explore local influences on patterns of health information seeking. Results: Multiple layers of influence upon parental health information seeking emerged and revealed a non-digital second divide, which was independent of computer ownership and home internet access. This divide was based on preference for use of certain health information sources, which might be either 'online' or 'offline'. A spatial patterning of both digital and preferential divides was identified with an association between each of these and features of the physical, social, cultural and psychosocial environment, one of which was perceived access to primary health care. Conclusion: Complex patterns of health information seeking relate to each of the 'divides' - digital and preferential. Patterns of health information seeking reflect differing perceptions of information availability and usefulness as experienced by parents within their local physical, social, cultural and psychosocial worlds. Access to primary care services is a key component of this local environment. PMID:23676618

Malone, Mary; While, Alison; Roberts, Julia

2013-05-16

385

Public health informatics: how information-age technology can strengthen public health.  

PubMed

The combination of the burgeoning interest in health, health care reform and the advent of the Information Age, represents a challenge and an opportunity for public health. If public health's effectiveness and profile are to grow, practitioners and researchers will need reliable, timely information with which to make information-driven decisions, better ways to communicate, and improved tools to analyze and present new knowledge. "Public Health Informatics" (PHI) is the science of applying Information-Age technology to serve the specialized needs of public health. In this paper we define Public Health Informatics, outline specific benefits that may accrue from its widespread application, and discuss why and how an academic discipline of public health informatics should be developed. Finally, we make specific recommendations for actions that government and academia can take to assure that public health professionals have the systems, tools, and training to use PHI to advance the mission of public health. PMID:7639873

Friede, A; Blum, H L; McDonald, M

1995-01-01

386

Women's health nursing in the context of the National Health Information Infrastructure.  

PubMed

Nurses must be prepared to participate in the evolving National Health Information Infrastructure and the changes that will consequently occur in health care practice and documentation. Informatics technologies will be used to develop electronic health records with integrated decision support features that will likely lead to enhanced health care quality and safety. This paper provides a summary of the National Health Information Infrastructure and highlights electronic health records and decision support systems within the context of evidence-based practice. Activities at the Columbia University School of Nursing designed to prepare nurses with the necessary informatics competencies to practice in a National Health Information Infrastructure-enabled health care system are described. Data are presented from electronic (personal digital assistant) encounter logs used in our Women's Health Nurse Practitioner program to support evidence-based advanced practice nursing care. Implications for nursing practice, education, and research in the evolving National Health Information Infrastructure are discussed. PMID:16466364

Jenkins, Melinda L; Hewitt, Caroline; Bakken, Suzanne

387

Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network: design considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ohio Valley Community Health Information Network (OVCHIN) is a community-based, consumer-defined grant program to determine the efficacy of delivering health information to the rural residents of southern Ohio and to the urban and suburban communities in the Greater Cincinnati tri-state region. The OVCHIN is a collaboratively-developed and publicly and privately funded demonstration project. Consumer health information delivery is via

R. Guard; B. Kaya; J. Riep; T. Sims; S. Shoemaker

1995-01-01

388

How do Consumers Search for and Appraise Information on Medicines on the Internet? A Qualitative Study Using Focus Groups  

PubMed Central

Background Many consumers use the Internet to find information about their medicines. It is widely acknowledged that health information on the Internet is of variable quality and therefore the search and appraisal skills of consumers are important for selecting and assessing this information. The way consumers choose and evaluate information on medicines on the Internet is important because it has been shown that written information on medicines can influence consumer attitudes to and use of medicines. Objective To explore consumer experiences in searching for and appraising Internet-based information on medicines. Methods Six focus groups (N = 46 participants) were conducted in metropolitan Sydney, Australia from March to May 2003 with consumers who had used the Internet for information on medicines. Verbatim transcripts of the group discussions were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Results All participants reported using a search engine to find information on medicines. Choice of search engine was determined by factors such as the workplace or educational environments, or suggestions by family or friends. Some participants found information solely by typing the medicine name (drug or brand name) into the search engine, while others searched using broader terms. Search skills ranged widely from more-advanced (using quotation marks and phrases) to less-than-optimal (such as typing in questions and full sentences). Many participants selected information from the first page of search results by looking for keywords and descriptions in the search results, and by looking for the source of the information as apparent in the URL. Opinions on credible sources of information on medicines varied with some participants regarding information by pharmaceutical companies as the "official" information on a medicine, and others preferring what they considered to be impartial sources such as governments, organizations, and educational institutions. It was clear that although most participants were skeptical of trusting information on the Internet, they had not paid conscious attention to how they selected information on medicines. Despite this, it was evident that participants viewed the Internet as an important source for information on medicines. Conclusions The results showed that there was a range of search and appraisal skills among participants, with many reporting a limited awareness of how they found and evaluated Internet-based information on medicines. Poor interpretation of written information on medicines has been shown to lead to anxiety and poor compliance to therapy. This issue is more important for Internet-based information since it is not subject to quality control and standardization as is written information on medicines. Therefore, there is a need for promoting consumer search and appraisal skills when using this information. Educating consumers in how to find and interpret Internet-based information on medicines may help them use their medicines in a safer and more-effective way.

Aslani, Parisa; Williams, Kylie A

2003-01-01

389

From protection of privacy to control of data streams: a focus group study on biobanks in the information society.  

PubMed

Most people in Europe do not know what biobanks are. In this study, public perceptions of biobanks and collection of genetic and health data were analyzed in relation to other technologies and digital networks where personal information is compiled and distributed. In this setting, people contextualized biobanks in line with their daily experiences with other technologies and data streams. The analysis was based on 18 focus group discussions conducted in Austria, Finland and Germany. We examined the ways in which people frame and talk about problems and benefits of information distribution in digital networks and biobanks. People identify many challenges associated with collection of personal data in the information society. The study showed that instead of privacy - which has been the key term of bioethical debates on biobanks - the notions of control and controllability are most essential for people. From the viewpoint of biobanks, issues of controllability pose challenges. In the information society, people have become accustomed to controlling personal data, which is particularly difficult in relation to biobanks. They expressed strong concerns over the controllability of the goals and benefits of biobanks. PMID:22722693

Snell, K; Starkbaum, J; Lauß, G; Vermeer, A; Helén, I

2012-06-20

390

Towards Web-based representation and processing of health information  

PubMed Central

Background There is great concern within health surveillance, on how to grapple with environmental degradation, rapid urbanization, population mobility and growth. The Internet has emerged as an efficient way to share health information, enabling users to access and understand data at their fingertips. Increasingly complex problems in the health field require increasingly sophisticated computer software, distributed computing power, and standardized data sharing. To address this need, Web-based mapping is now emerging as an important tool to enable health practitioners, policy makers, and the public to understand spatial health risks, population health trends and vulnerabilities. Today several web-based health applications generate dynamic maps; however, for people to fully interpret the maps they need data source description and the method used in the data analysis or statistical modeling. For the representation of health information through Web-mapping applications, there still lacks a standard format to accommodate all fixed (such as location) and variable (such as age, gender, health outcome, etc) indicators in the representation of health information. Furthermore, net-centric computing has not been adequately applied to support flexible health data processing and mapping online. Results The authors of this study designed a HEalth Representation XML (HERXML) schema that consists of the semantic (e.g., health activity description, the data sources description, the statistical methodology used for analysis), geometric, and cartographical representations of health data. A case study has been carried on the development of web application and services within the Canadian Geospatial Data Infrastructure (CGDI) framework for community health programs of the New Brunswick Lung Association. This study facilitated the online processing, mapping and sharing of health information, with the use of HERXML and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) services. It brought a new solution in better health data representation and initial exploration of the Web-based processing of health information. Conclusion The designed HERXML has been proven to be an appropriate solution in supporting the Web representation of health information. It can be used by health practitioners, policy makers, and the public in disease etiology, health planning, health resource management, health promotion and health education. The utilization of Web-based processing services in this study provides a flexible way for users to select and use certain processing functions for health data processing and mapping via the Web. This research provides easy access to geospatial and health data in understanding the trends of diseases, and promotes the growth and enrichment of the CGDI in the public health sector.

Gao, Sheng; Mioc, Darka; Yi, Xiaolun; Anton, Francois; Oldfield, Eddie; Coleman, David J

2009-01-01

391

Standards for privacy of individually identifiable health information. Final rule.  

PubMed

The Department of Health and Human Services ("HHS'' or "Department'') modifies certain standards in the Rule entitled "Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information'' ("Privacy Rule''). The Privacy Rule implements the privacy requirements of the Administrative Simplification subtitle of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. The purpose of these modifications is to maintain strong protections for the privacy of individually identifiable health information while clarifying certain of the Privacy Rule's provisions, addressing the unintended negative effects of the Privacy Rule on health care quality or access to health care, and relieving unintended administrative burdens created by the Privacy Rule. PMID:12180470

2002-08-14

392

Consumer Health Informatics: Health Information Technology for Consumers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Explains consumer health informatics and describes the technology advances, the computer programs that are currently available, and the basic research that addresses both the effectiveness of computer health informatics and its impact on the future direction of health care. Highlights include commercial computer products for consumers and…

Jimison, Holly Brugge; Sher, Paul Phillip

1995-01-01

393

Impact and User Satisfaction of a Clinical Information Portal Embedded in an Electronic Health Record  

PubMed Central

In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development.

Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

2011-01-01

394

Impact and user satisfaction of a clinical information portal embedded in an electronic health record.  

PubMed

In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development. PMID:22016670

Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

2011-10-01

395

Using Exploratory Focus Groups to Inform the Development of Targeted COPD Self-Management Education DVDs for Rural Patients  

PubMed Central

This exploratory study assessed the self-management learning needs, experiences, and perspectives of COPD patients treated at a Certified Federal Rural Health Clinic to inform the development of a COPD self-management DVD. A purposive, homogeneous sample of COPD patients participated in focus group interviews. Data from these interviews were referenced to edit a library of Rvision COPD self-management DVDs into a single condensed DVD containing only the most pertinent self-management topics. Patients reported a lack of knowledge and skill development related to purse lipped breathing, controlled coughing, and stress management; while medication management skills were found to be quite adequate. Engaging rural communities in formal qualitative inquiries to describe COPD specific needs for self-management may lead to future use of educational technologies aimed at improving quality of life for these rural, hard to reach populations.

Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth H.; Chaney, J. Don

2010-01-01

396

Medicaid and health information: current and emerging legal issues.  

PubMed

Legal questions are an inevitable byproduct ofsignificant technology change in health care such as that underway as a result of health information technology (HIT). This article examines several important existing and emerging legal questions in a Medicaid context. First, do the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and State Medicaid agencies, have a fiduciary obligation to adopt and fully use health information technology given its potential to improve health care quality while reducing racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in health and health care? Second, how can Medicaid privacy standards be reconciled with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) privacy rule? Third, what actual or perceived legal barriers exist to ensuring that Medicaid information is interoperable with data produced under critical health care, educational, and social programs from which beneficiaries are simultaneously receiving care? PMID:17427842

Rosenbaum, Sara; MacTaggart, Patricia; Borzi, Phyllis C

2006-01-01

397

Building a digital library for the health sciences: information space complementing information place.  

PubMed Central

In 1990, the University of California, San Francisco, dedicated a new library to serve the faculty, staff, and students and to meet their academic information needs for several decades to come. Major environmental changes present new and additional information management challenges, which can effectively be handled only through the widespread use of computing and computing technologies. Over the next five years, a three-pronged strategy will be followed. We are refining the current physical, paper-based library through the continuous application of technology for modernization and functional improvement. At the same time, we have begun the planning, design, and implementation of a "free-standing" Digital Library of the Health Sciences, focusing on the innovative application of technology. To ensure complementarity and product integrity where the two libraries interface, we will look to technology to transform these separate entities into an eventual, integral whole.

Lucier, R E

1995-01-01

398

Building a digital library for the health sciences: information space complementing information place.  

PubMed

In 1990, the University of California, San Francisco, dedicated a new library to serve the faculty, staff, and students and to meet their academic information needs for several decades to come. Major environmental changes present new and additional information management challenges, which can effectively be handled only through the widespread use of computing and computing technologies. Over the next five years, a three-pronged strategy will be followed. We are refining the current physical, paper-based library through the continuous application of technology for modernization and functional improvement. At the same time, we have begun the planning, design, and implementation of a "free-standing" Digital Library of the Health Sciences, focusing on the innovative application of technology. To ensure complementarity and product integrity where the two libraries interface, we will look to technology to transform these separate entities into an eventual, integral whole. PMID:7581192

Lucier, R E

1995-07-01

399

Exploring general practitioners' experience of informing women about prenatal screening tests for foetal abnormalities: A qualitative focus group study  

PubMed Central

Background Recent developments have made screening tests for foetal abnormalities available earlier in pregnancy and women have a range of testing options accessible to them. It is now recommended that all women, regardless of their age, are provided with information on prenatal screening tests. General Practitioners (GPs) are often the first health professionals a woman consults in pregnancy. As such, GPs are well positioned to inform women of the increasing range of prenatal screening tests available. The aim of this study was to explore GPs experience of informing women of prenatal genetic screening tests for foetal abnormality. Methods A qualitative study consisting of four focus groups was conducted in metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. A discussion guide was used and the audio-taped transcripts were independently coded by two researchers using thematic analysis. Multiple coders and analysts and informant feedback were employed to reduce the potential for researcher bias and increase the validity of the findings. Results Six themes were identified and classified as 'intrinsic' if they occurred within the context of the consultation or 'extrinsic' if they consisted of elements that impacted on the GP beyond the scope of the consultation. The three intrinsic themes were the way GPs explained the limitations of screening, the extent to which GPs provided information selectively and the time pressures at play. The three extrinsic factors were GPs' attitudes and values towards screening, the conflict they experienced in offering screening information and the sense of powerlessness within the screening test process and the health care system generally. Extrinsic themes reveal GPs' attitudes and values to screening and to disability, as well as raising questions about the fundamental premise of testing. Conclusion The increasing availability and utilisation of screening tests, in particular first trimester tests, has expanded GPs' role in facilitating women's informed decision-making. Recognition of the importance of providing this complex information warrants longer consultations to respond to the time pressures that GPs experience. Understanding the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that impact on GPs may serve to shape educational resources to be more appropriate, relevant and supportive.

Nagle, Cate; Lewis, Sharon; Meiser, Bettina; Gunn, Jane; Halliday, Jane; Bell, Robin

2008-01-01

400

Distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health.  

PubMed

Distributed systems and grid computing systems are used to connect several computers to obtain a higher level of performance, in order to solve a problem. During the last decade, projects use the World Wide Web to aggregate individuals' CPU power for research purposes. This paper presents the existing active large scale distributed and grid computing projects with research focus in human health. There have been found and presented 11 active projects with more than 2000 Processing Units (PUs) each. The research focus for most of them is molecular biology and, specifically on understanding or predicting protein structure through simulation, comparing proteins, genomic analysis for disease provoking genes and drug design. Though not in all cases explicitly stated, common target diseases include research to find cure against HIV, dengue, Duchene dystrophy, Parkinson's disease, various types of cancer and influenza. Other diseases include malaria, anthrax, Alzheimer's disease. The need for national initiatives and European Collaboration for larger scale projects is stressed, to raise the awareness of citizens to participate in order to create a culture of internet volunteering altruism. PMID:22491123

Diomidous, Marianna; Zikos, Dimitrios

2012-01-01

401

Health literacy and sources of health information for caregivers of urban children with asthma.  

PubMed

Little is known about the resources used by urban caregivers of children with asthma to obtain health information. The authors analyzed data for 304 families of children with persistent asthma to describe (1) sources of health information, (2) access and use of Internet resources, and (3) the association between the caregiver's health literacy (HL) and use of health information sources. Overall, 37% of caregivers had limited HL. Most families received health information from a health care professional (94%), written sources (51%), family/friends (42%), non-print media (34%), and the Internet (30%). Less than half of caregivers had access to the Internet at home, but 73% reported Internet use in the past year. Caregivers with adequate HL were more likely to obtain information from multiple sources and to use and have access to the Internet. The results suggest that HL is associated with where caregivers obtain health information from for their children and their use of the Internet. PMID:21911409

Fagnano, Maria; Halterman, Jill S; Conn, Kelly M; Shone, Laura P

2011-09-12

402

Health Literacy and Sources of Health Information for Caregivers of Urban Children with Asthma  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the resources urban caregivers of children with asthma use to obtain health information. We analyzed data for 304 families of children with persistent asthma to describe: 1) sources of health information, 2) access and use of Internet resources, and 3) the association between caregiver’s health literacy (HL) and use of health information sources. Overall, 37% of caregivers had Limited HL. Most families received health information from: a health care professional (94%); written sources (51%); family/friends (42%); non-print media (34%); and Internet (30%). Less than ½ of caregivers had access to Internet at home, but 73% reported Internet use in the past year. Caregivers with Adequate HL were more likely to obtain information from multiple sources, and to use and have access to the Internet. Our results suggest that HL is associated with where caregivers obtain health information for their children and their use of the Internet.

Fagnano, Maria; Halterman, Jill S.; Conn, Kelly M.; Shone, Laura P.

2012-01-01

403

In Sickness, Health, and Cyberspace: Protecting the Security of Electronic Private Health Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electronic processing of health information provides considerable benefits to patients and health care providers while at the same time creating serious risks to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data. The Internet provides a conduit for rapid and uncontrolled dispersion and trafficking of illicitly obtained private health information, with far-reaching consequences to unsuspecting victims. To address such threats

Sharona Hoffman; Andy Podgurski

2007-01-01

404

Update on the Adoption of Health Information Technology and Related Efforts to Facilitate the Electronic Use and Exchange of Health Information.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Information is widely recognized as the lifeblood of modern medicine. Health information technology (health IT) has the potential to improve the flow of information across the health care system and serve as the infrastructure to enable care transformatio...

2013-01-01

405

Attitudes to Sharing Personal Health Information in Living Kidney Donation  

PubMed Central

Background and objectives: In living kidney donation, transplant professionals consider the rights of a living kidney donor and recipient to keep their personal health information confidential and the need to disclose this information to the other for informed consent. In incompatible kidney exchange, personal health information from multiple living donors and recipients may affect decision making and outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We conducted a survey to understand and compare the preferences of potential donors (n = 43), potential recipients (n = 73), and health professionals (n = 41) toward sharing personal health information (in total 157 individuals). Results: When considering traditional live-donor transplantation, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's health information should be shared with the donor (86 and 80%, respectively) and that a donor's information should be shared with the recipient (97 and 89%, respectively). When considering incompatible kidney exchange, donors and recipients generally agreed that a recipient's information should be shared with all donors and recipients involved in the transplant (85 and 85%, respectively) and that a donor's information should also be shared with all involved (95 and 90%, respectively). These results were contrary to attitudes expressed by transplant professionals, who frequently disagreed about whether such information should be shared. Conclusions: Future policies and practice could facilitate greater sharing of personal health information in living kidney donation. This requires a consideration of which information is relevant, how to put it in context, and a plan to obtain consent from all concerned.

Hizo-Abes, Patricia; Young, Ann; Reese, Peter P.; McFarlane, Phil; Wright, Linda; Cuerden, Meaghan

2010-01-01

406

Developing Data Elements for Research Information System in Health; a Starting Point for Systems Integration  

PubMed Central

Background: This study defines necessary data elements required for the research information system in the domain of health, and its level of accountability to national health research indicators from the experts’ perspective is being explored. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted based on comparative approach using the focus group method. Data were collected through 6 semi-structured group discussions held at the Undersecretary for Research and Technology, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran. For this study, 48 researchers were selected for the group discussions. All interviews and group discussions were recorded and transcribed. The Data analysis was performed simultaneously using Strauss and Corbin method. Results: Based on content analysis, the necessary data elements identified for the National Health Research Information System designed for all databases were the following: organizations, researchers, journals, articles, research projects and dissertations. Also, extracted from the focus group discussion were three main themes regarding data elements of these databases for the National Health Research Information System: 1) essential elements for each database 2) the system’s data elements accountability to the national indicators in the domain of health research and 3) recommendations in the direction of optimizing the data. Conclusions: The results obtained from this study can serve as a valuable source in designing research information system in the domain of health within the country and in the region as well.

Ghorbani, NR; Ahmadi, M; Sadoughi, F; Ghanei, M

2012-01-01

407

Cultural differences in shame-focused attitudes towards mental health problems in Asian and Non-Asian student women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored differences in shame-focused attitudes to mental health problems in Asian and non-Asian students. The ‘Attitudes Towards Mental Health Problems’ (ATMHP) is a self-report scale designed for this study to measure: external shame (beliefs that others will look down on self if one has mental health problems); internal shame (related to negative self-evaluations); and reflected shame (believing that

Paul Gilbert; Rakhee Bhundia; Ranjana Mitra; Kirsten McEwan; Chris Irons; Jasvinder Sanghera

2007-01-01

408

Decision tools in health care: focus on the problem, not the solution  

PubMed Central

Background Systematic reviews or randomised-controlled trials usually help to establish the effectiveness of drugs and other health technologies, but are rarely sufficient by themselves to ensure actual clinical use of the technology. The process from innovation to routine clinical use is complex. Numerous computerised decision support systems (DSS) have been developed, but many fail to be taken up into actual use. Some developers construct technologically advanced systems with little relevance to the real world. Others did not determine whether a clinical need exists. With NHS investing £5 billion in computer systems, also occurring in other countries, there is an urgent need to shift from a technology-driven approach to one that identifies and employs the most cost-effective method to manage knowledge, regardless of the technology. The generic term, 'decision tool' (DT), is therefore suggested to demonstrate that these aids, which seem different technically, are conceptually the same from a clinical viewpoint. Discussion Many computerised DSSs failed for various reasons, for example, they were not based on best available knowledge; there was insufficient emphasis on their need for high quality clinical data; their development was technology-led; or evaluation methods were misapplied. We argue that DSSs and other computer-based, paper-based and even mechanical decision aids are members of a wider family of decision tools. A DT is an active knowledge resource that uses patient data to generate case specific advice, which supports decision making about individual patients by health professionals, the patients themselves or others concerned about them. The identification of DTs as a consistent and important category of health technology should encourage the sharing of lessons between DT developers and users and reduce the frequency of decision tool projects focusing only on technology. The focus of evaluation should become more clinical, with the impact of computer-based DTs being evaluated against other computer, paper- or mechanical tools, to identify the most cost effective tool for each clinical problem. Summary We suggested the generic term 'decision tool' to demonstrate that decision-making aids, such as computerised DSSs, paper algorithms, and reminders are conceptually the same, so the methods to evaluate them should be the same.

Liu, Joseph; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Altman, Douglas G

2006-01-01

409

Health information law in the context of minors.  

PubMed

This article presents a legal overview of privacy and autonomy considerations related to children in the context of health information technology adoption and use. All uses of health-related technologies take place within a legal framework that guides health care generally; the privacy laws and autonomy principles long predate health information technology and can be expected to shape its design and use. Furthermore, it is a legal tenet that technology advances shape the law, and this can be expected as health information technology use evolves. Most laws related to health care, medical practice, and the right to privacy are state-based and subject to high variability. As the health information revolution increasingly eliminates the importance of geographic boundaries to health care, interstate tensions can be expected to grow. Health information privacy law is even more complex in the case of children, because the relationship between privacy law and children is itself complex. The law considers minor children to be deserving of special protection against harm and risk exposure, and this concern extends to privacy. Regardless of whether minors can shield health information from parents, it is clear that parents and children have the power to control the flow of information to and among entities. Although information protections may pose a higher standard where information about children is concerned, this fact should not overshadow the extent to which information can be used under existing legal principles. Over time, as the security and safety of information sharing are established, the law may yet evolve to permit a freer flow of information. PMID:19088227

Rosenbaum, Sara; Abramson, Susan; MacTaggart, Patricia

2009-01-01

410

Building capacity for evidence informed decision making in public health: a case study of organizational change  

PubMed Central

Background Core competencies for public health in Canada require proficiency in evidence informed decision making (EIDM). However, decision makers often lack access to information, many workers lack knowledge and skills to conduct systematic literature reviews, and public health settings typically lack infrastructure to support EIDM activities. This research was conducted to explore and describe critical factors and dynamics in the early implementation of one public health unit's strategic initiative to develop capacity to make EIDM standard practice. Methods This qualitative case study was conducted in one public health unit in Ontario, Canada between 2008 and 2010. In-depth information was gathered from two sets of semi-structured interviews and focus groups (n = 27) with 70 members of the health unit, and through a review of 137 documents. Thematic analysis was used to code the key informant and document data. Results The critical factors and dynamics for building EIDM capacity at an organizational level included: clear vision and strong leadership, workforce and skills development, ability to access research (library services), fiscal investments, acquisition and development of technological resources, a knowledge management strategy, effective communication, a receptive organizational culture, and a focus on change management. Conclusion With leadership, planning, commitment and substantial investments, a public health department has made significant progress, within the first two years of a 10-year initiative, towards achieving its goal of becoming an evidence informed decision making organization.

2012-01-01

411

Consumer Health Information and the Demand for Medical Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is an empirical investigation of consumer health information. Using a new direct measure of information, the econometric approach treats both information and physician visits as endogenous variables when estimating the demand for medical care. The results show that information increases the probability that a consumer uses medical care, but that conditional on use the quantity of care consumed

Don Kenkel

1990-01-01

412

Participatory approaches to improving safety, health and working conditions in informal economy workplaces - Experiences of Cambodia, Thailand and Viet Nam  

Microsoft Academic Search

(WISE), 1 and Work Improvement in Neighbourhood Development (WIND) 2 are increasingly applied in Asia for supporting grassroots initiatives in informal economy workplaces to improve safety, health and working conditions. These participatory programmes are easy to apply and action-oriented, and focus on immediate improvement needs of informal economy workplaces. Workers in informal economy workplaces have identified and implemented practical safety

Tsuyoshi Kawakami

2007-01-01

413

75 FR 48412 - Proposed Information Collection (Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview of Former VHA Employees...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Information Collection (Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview of Former VHA Employees) Activities; Under OMB Review AGENCY...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview of Former VHA Employees, VA Form 10-0487. OMB...

2010-08-10

414

Health care finance and the early adoption of hospital information systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the adoption of hospital information systems (HIS), specifically focusing on the connection between the financing of health care and the adoption of these new technologies. Using a recently uncovered dataset detailing the systems installed at over 2300 hospitals, the results indicate that state price regulations slowed the adoption of these systems during the 1970's. In contrast, hospitals

Ron Borzekowski

2002-01-01

415

Health information technology: will it make higher quality and more efficient healthcare delivery possible?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Holding a new promise for improving efficiency and quality and reducing cost, Health Information Technology (HIT) has become the latest national priority. Selecting three evidence-based national quality indicator systems\\/models as examples, this paper examines relationships between quality of care and HIT as well as their economic implications. The analysis focuses on the three systems' overall goals; targeted healthcare facilities; data

Jay J. Shen

2007-01-01

416

The transitioning experiences of internationally-educated nurses into a Canadian health care system: A focused ethnography  

PubMed Central

Background Beyond well-documented credentialing issues, internationally-educated nurses (IENs) may need considerable support in transitioning into new social and health care environments. This study was undertaken to gain an understanding of transitioning experiences of IENs upon relocation to Canada, while creating policy and practice recommendations applicable globally for improving the quality of transitioning and the retention of IENs. Methods A focused ethnography of newly-recruited IENs was conducted, using individual semi-structured interviews at both one-to-three months (Phase 1) and nine-to-twelve months post-relocation (Phase 2). A purposive sample of IENs was recruited during their orientation at a local college, to a health authority within western Canada which had recruited them for employment throughout the region. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, and data was managed using qualitative analytical software. Data analysis was informed by Roper and Shapira's framework for focused ethnography. Results Twenty three IENs consented to participate in 31 interviews. All IENs which indicated interest during their orientation sessions consented to the interviews, yet 14 did not complete the Phase 2 interview due to reorganization of health services and relocation. The ethno-culturally diverse group had an average age of 36.4 years, were primarily educated to first degree level or higher, and were largely (under) employed as "Graduate Nurses". Many IENs reported negative experiences related to their work contract and overall support upon arrival. There were striking differences in nursing practice and some experiences of perceived discrimination. The primary area of discontentment was the apparent communication breakdown at the recruitment stage with subsequent discrepancy in expected professional role and financial reimbursement. Conclusions Explicit and clear communication is needed between employers and recruitment agencies to avoid employment contract misunderstandings and to enable clear interpretation of the credentialing processes. Pre-arrival orientation of IENs including health care communications should be encouraged and supported by the recruiting institution. Moreover, employers should provide more structured and comprehensive workplace orientation to IENs with consistent preceptorship. Similar to findings of many other studies, diversity should be valued and incorporated into the professional culture by nurse managers.

2011-01-01

417

Using focus groups to understand health-related practices and perceptions of African Americans: Nashville REACH 2010 preliminary findings.  

PubMed

To gain an understanding of health-related practices and perceptions, Nashville REACH 2010 conducted focus studies among 5 community groups. Attitudes about health, personal risk behaviors, quality of health care, and models of personal behavior change were assessed. All focus-group sessions were transcribed and analyzed using a consensus panel methodology. A combined analysis of the focus groups revealed 3 categories of barriers to healthier living: 1) personal, 2) environmental, and 3) systemic. Personal barriers included lack of adequate finances, physical limitations, lack of knowledge, and stress. Environmental barriers were related to the unavailability of healthy food choices and adequate places to exercise in the community. The accessibility and quality of health care were the most pervasive systemic barriers identified. Though these findings are not novel to urban African-American communities, they will serve as the framework by which Nashville REACH 2010 will implement strategies to reduce and, ultimately, eliminate cardiovascular disease and diabetes disparities. PMID:15682774

Miller, Stephania T; Mushi, Christina; Ahmed, Nasar U; Larson, Celia; McClellan, Linda; Marrs, Michelle

2004-01-01

418

Challenges in health information systems integration: Zanzibar experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The healthcare milieu of most developing countries is often characterized by multiplicity of health programs supported by myriad of donors geared towards reversing disease trends in these countries. However, donor policies tend to support implementation of vertical programs which maintain their own management structures and information systems. The emerging picture overtime is proliferation of multiple and uncoordinated health information systems

Edwin NYELLA

2009-01-01

419

The use of health information technology in seven nations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the state of health information technology (HIT) adoption and use in seven industrialized nations. Design: We used a combination of literature review, as well as interviews with experts in individual nations, to determine use of key information technologies. Main outcome measures: We examined rates of electronic health record (EHR) use in ambula- tory care and hospital settings,

Ashish K. Jha; David Doolan; Daniel Grandt; Tim Scott; David W. Bates

2008-01-01

420

Health information exchange: persistent challenges and new strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent federal policies and actions support the adoption of health information exchange (HIE) in order to improve healthcare by addressing fragmented personal health information. However, concerted efforts at facilitating HIE have existed for over two decades in this country. The lessons of these experiences include a recurrence of barriers and challenges beyond those associated with technology. Without new strategies, the

Joshua R. Vest; Larry D. Gamm

2010-01-01

421

ENSURING THE PRIVACY OF PROTECTED HEALTH INFORMATION IN RESEARCH  

Microsoft Academic Search

An issue of mounting importance for health-care providers and researchers in the United States is that of ensuring the privacy of health information of patients involved in research. Laws and statutes dealing with this issue may be germane in other countries. What do authors and research centers need to know about privacy? How can readers be assured that private information

Bart N. Green

422

Public preferences about secondary uses of electronic health information.  

PubMed

IMPORTANCE As health information technology grows, secondary uses of personal health information offer promise in advancing research, public health, and health care. Public perceptions about sharing personal health data are important for establishing and evaluating ethical and regulatory structures to oversee the use of these data. OBJECTIVE To measure patient preferences about sharing their electronic health information for secondary purposes (other than their own health care). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In this conjoint analysis study, we surveyed 3336 adults (568 Hispanic, 500 non-Hispanic African American, and 2268 non-Hispanic white); participants were randomized to 6 of 18 scenarios describing secondary uses of electronic health information, constructed with 3 attributes: uses (research, quality improvement, or commercial marketing), users (university hospitals, commercial enterprises, or public health departments), and data sensitivity (whether it included genetic information about their own cancer risk). This design enabled participants to reveal their preferences for secondary uses of their personal health information. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Participants responded to each conjoint scenario by rating their willingness to share their electronic personal health information on a 1 to 10 scale (1?represents?low willingness; 10,?high willingness). Conjoint analysis yields importance weights reflecting the contribution of a dimension (use, user, or sensitivity) to willingness to share personal health information. RESULTS The use of data was a more important factor in the conjoint analysis (importance weight, 64.3%) than the user (importance weight, 32.6%) and data sensitivity (importance weight, 3.1%). In unadjusted linear regression models, marketing uses (? = -1.55), quality improvement uses (? = -0.51), drug company users (? = -0.80), and public health department users (? = -0.52) were associated with less willingness to share health information than research uses and university hospital users (all P?health information, although differences were smaller among racial and ethnic minorities. The user of the information was of secondary importance, and the sensitivity was not a significant factor. These preferences should be considered in policies governing secondary uses of health information. PMID:23958803

Grande, David; Mitra, Nandita; Shah, Anand; Wan, Fei; Asch, David A

2013-10-28

423

Towards Web-based representation and processing of health information  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There is great concern within health surveillance, on how to grapple with environmental degradation, rapid urbanization, population mobility and growth. The Internet has emerged as an efficient way to share health information, enabling users to access and understand data at their fingertips. Increasingly complex problems in the health field require increasingly sophisticated computer software, distributed computing power, and standardized

Sheng Gao; Darka Mioc; Xiaolun Yi; Francois Anton; Eddie Oldfield; David J Coleman

2009-01-01

424

Health Information Technology— Results From a Roundtable Discussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Health information technology (HIT), notably e-prescribing and electronic health records (EHR), have the potential to improve the quality of care, reduce medication errors and adverse events, and decrease overall health care utilization and costs. However, the United States continues to lag behind other countries in the adoption and use of HIT. OBJECTIVE: To review the various issues surrounding the

Steven Evans; Jeff Januska; Steve R. Nolan; Mark Noga

425

Approaching Equity in Consumer Health Information Delivery : Net Wellness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing public interest in health and wellness information stems from many sources, including social changes related to consumers' rights and women's health movements, and economic changes brought about by the managed health care revolution. Public, hospital, and medical center libraries have been ill-equipped to meet the increasing need for consumer-oriented materials, even though a few notable programs have been

Theodore A Morris; J Roger Guard; Stephen A Marine; Leslie Schick; Doris Haag; Gaylene Tsipis; Birsen Kaya; Steve Shoemaker

1997-01-01

426

Communicating Genetic and Genomic Information: Health Literacy and Numeracy Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genomic research is transforming our understanding of the role of genes in health and disease. These advances, and their application to common diseases that affect large segments of the general population, suggest that researchers and practitioners in public health genomics will increasingly be called upon to translate genomic information to individuals with varying levels of health literacy and numeracy. This

D. H. Lea; K. A. Kaphingst; D. Bowen; I. Lipkus; D. W. Hadley

2011-01-01

427

Application of information technology: Developing data content specifications for the Nationwide Health Information Network Trial Implementations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2007, the Department of Health and Human Services commissioned the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) Trial Implementations project to demonstrate the secure exchange of data among health information exchange organizations around the country. The project's Core Services Content Work Group (CSCWG) developed the content specifications for the project. The CSCWG developed content specifications for a summary patient record and

Gilad J. Kuperman; Jeffrey S. Blair; Richard A. Franck; Savithri Devaraj; Alexander F. H. Low

2010-01-01

428

77 FR 48157 - Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Announcement of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; Announcement of Requirements...National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) announces the launch...demonstrating how you use health information technology (health IT), such...

2012-08-13

429

Reducing Oral Health Disparities: A Focus on Social and Cultural Determinants  

PubMed Central

Oral health is essential to the general health and well-being of individuals and the population. Yet significant oral health disparities persist in the U.S. population because of a web of influences that include complex cultural and social processes that affect both oral health and access to effective dental health care. This paper introduces an organizing framework for addressing oral health disparities. We present and discuss how the multiple influences on oral health and oral health disparities operate using this framework. Interventions targeted at different causal pathways bring new directions and implications for research and policy in reducing oral health disparities.

Patrick, Donald L; Lee, Rosanna Shuk Yin; Nucci, Michele; Grembowski, David; Jolles, Carol Zane; Milgrom, Peter

2006-01-01

430

Health Information Processing From Television: The Role of Health Orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quintessential presence of television in modern American life has led to decades of research on the unhealthy effects of television. However, recent years have witnessed a surge in scholarship seeking to interrogate the positive health effects of television, particularly in the realm of incorporating health content into entertainment-based television programs. One of the important critical questions in the realm

Mohan J. Dutta

2007-01-01

431

QUANTITATIVE ASPECTS OF THE MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH INFORMATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on quantitative techniques for managing health information as well as for the marketing and the management of health libraries and other health information centres. Important for marketing and management of libraries are the p.r. (public relations) and p.a. (public awareness) activities. We discuss reports (e.g. case studies, annual reports, ...) as important tools in this and pay special

Leo Egghe

432

Readability Assessment of Internet-Based Consumer Health Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A substantial amount of consumer health-related information is available on the Internet. Studies suggest that consumer comprehension may be compromised if content exceeds a 7th-grade reading level, which is the average American reading level identified by the United States Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). OBJECTIVE: To determine the readability of Internet-based consumer health information offered by organizations

Tiffany M Walsh

2008-01-01

433

Promotion of evidence-informed health policymaking in Nigeria: bridging the gap between researchers and policymakers.  

PubMed

In Nigeria, the lack of adequate understanding of the complex nature of translating research into policy and the incompatibility existing between researchers and policymakers constitute a great challenge to evidence-informed policymaking. To address these challenges a one-day evidence-to-policy training workshop was organised for policymakers, researchers and other major stakeholders in the health sector in southeastern Nigeria. Of the 104 individuals invited to the workshop 87 (83.6%) attended. The workshop training sessions focused on capacity development for evidence-informed health policy-making and building effective linkages/partnerships. The post-workshop assessment indicated significant improvements in participants' knowledge, their understanding of the health policymaking process and the use of evidence compared to their pre-workshop status. Using a focus group discussion, major strategies identified by participants that can bridge the gap between health policymakers and researchers included: involving both parties in planning and execution of health research and health programmes; promoting dialogue between researchers and policymakers; institutionalising research grants and commissioning research in health ministries; and ensuring that researchers are made to focus on the core needs of policymakers. There is need for further discussion and debate on the researchers and policymakers partnership concept in low income settings. PMID:22394290

Uneke, Chigozie J; Ezeoha, Abel E; Ndukwe, Chinwendu D; Oyibo, Patrick G; Onwe, Friday

2012-03-07

434

Patient-provider discussion of online health information: results from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).  

PubMed

Increasing numbers of people have turned to the Internet for health information. Little has been done beyond speculation to empirically investigate patients' discussion of online health information with health care professionals (HCPs) and patients' perception of HCPs' reactions to such discussion. The author analyzed data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to identify the characteristics of patients (a) who search for health information on the Internet, (b) who discuss the information found on the Internet with HCPs, and (c) who positively assess HCPs' reaction to the online information. Findings show that men were more likely than were women to have a conversation on online information with HCPs. It is unfortunate that patients who had trouble understanding or trusting online health information were no more likely to ask questions to or seek guidance from HCPs. Reactions of HCPs to online information were perceived as particularly negative by certain groups of patients, such as those who experienced poor health and those who had more concerns about the quality of their searched information. Results are discussed for their implications for patient empowerment and patient-HCP relationships. PMID:23590202

Chung, Jae Eun

2013-04-16

435

Drug Information for Community Pharmacies: Survey on Needs and Use of Drug Information with Special Focus on New Information Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine the sources and needs of drug information for community pharmacies in Palestine. A fifteen item questionnaire was distributed to community pharmacies. Out of approximately one hundred fifty community pharmacies who received the questionnaire through An-Najah university pharmacy trainee students, one hundred eighteen community pharmacies filled in and returned the questionnaire to the

Nidal Jaradat; Waleed Sweileh

436

42 CFR 495.332 - State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements... State Medicaid health information technology (HIT) plan requirements...accordance with the Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA)...

2010-10-01

437

Presenting evidence-based health information for people with multiple sclerosis: the IN-DEEP project protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Increasingly, evidence-based health information, in particular evidence from systematic reviews, is being made available to lay audiences, in addition to health professionals. Research efforts have focused on different formats for the lay presentation of health information. However, there is a paucity of data on how patients integrate evidence-based health information with other factors such as their preferences for information and experiences with information-seeking. The aim of this project is to explore how people with multiple sclerosis (MS) integrate health information with their needs, experiences, preferences and values and how these factors can be incorporated into an online resource of evidence-based health information provision for people with MS and their families. Methods This project is an Australian-Italian collaboration between researchers, MS societies and people with MS. Using a four-stage mixed methods design, a model will be developed for presenting evidence-based health information on the Internet for people with MS and their families. This evidence-based health information will draw upon systematic reviews of MS interventions from The Cochrane Library. Each stage of the project will build on the last. After conducting focus groups with people with MS and their family members (Stage 1), we will develop a model for summarising and presenting Cochrane MS reviews that is integrated with supporting information to aid understanding and decision making. This will be reviewed and finalised with people with MS, family members, health professionals and MS Society staff (Stage 2), before being uploaded to the Internet and evaluated (Stages 3 and 4). Discussion This project aims to produce accessible and meaningful evidence-based health information about MS for use in the varied decision making and management situations people encounter in everyday life. It is expected that the findings will be relevant to broader efforts to provide evidence-based health information for patients and the general public. The international collaboration also permits exploration of cultural differences that could inform international practice.

2012-01-01

438

Achieving Health for a Lifetime: A Community Engagement Assessment Focusing on School-Age Children to Decrease Obesity in Durham, North Carolina  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Obesity is a prominent problem in the United States and in North Carolina. One way of combating it is with community-engaged interventions that foster collaboration between health-oriented organizations and community residents. PURPOSE Our purpose was to assemble a multifaceted group in Durham, North Carolina, to identify factors affecting obesity-related lifestyle behaviors; assess policies, resources, and the population's perception of the problem of obesity; and develop plans to improve health outcomes related to obesity. METHODS A team consisting of more than 2 dozen partners was assembled to form Achieving Health for a Lifetime (AHL) in order to study and address obesity in the community, initially focusing on elementary school-age children. The team developed a resource guide by collecting information by telephone interviews of provider organizations; geospatial resource maps were created using high-resolution geographic information systems, Duke's Data Support Repository, and county and city records; and focus groups were conducted using the nominal group technique. RESULTS The AHL team, in collaboration with 2 other teams focused on diabetes and cardiovascular disease, identified 32 resources for diabetes, 20 for obesity, and 13 for cardiovascular disease. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the team identified an area of Durham that had only 1 supermarket, but 34 fast-food restaurants and 84 convenience stores. LIMITATIONS The focus on particular neighborhoods means that the information obtained might not pertain to all neighborhoods. CONCLUSION The AHL team was able to assemble a large community partnership in Durham that will allow the members of the community to continue to work toward making residents healthier. Communities facing similar challenges can learn from this experience.

Corsino, Leonor; McDuffie, Jennifer R.; Kotch, Jonathan; Coeytaux, Remy; Fuemmeler, Bernard F.; Murphy, Gwen; Miranda, Marie Lynn; Poirier, Brenda; Morton, Janet; Reese, David; Baker, Sharon; Carter, Heidi; Freeman, Rebecca; Blue, Colleen; Yancy, William S.

2013-01-01

439

Disseminating information about healthcare effectiveness: a survey of consumer health information services  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In 1997 a research based information leaflet designed for men considering being screened for prostate cancer was distributed to general practitioners (GPs) and consumer health information services. OBJECTIVES: To investigate consumer health information service staff opinions of the leaflet and the use they made of it. To find out whether such staff would find similar leaflets on other topics

V. A. Entwistle; I. S. Watt

1998-01-01

440

ENHANCING ACCESS TO ANIMAL HEALTH INFORMATION: ROLE OF INFORMATION SPECIALISTS IN ZAMBIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is a product of a larger study conducted between 2002 and 2004 on the state of libraries and use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in research and academic libraries in Zambia. It examines the role of information professionals in enhancing access to animal health information under prevailing conditions. Animal health is an integral aspect of the agricultural sector,

Muyoyeta Simui

441

Differences in Reading Level and Commercial Information Content in Pharmacy-Provided Health Information Printouts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To determine whether the reading level of health information printouts and the inclusion of commercial information varied in a statistically significant manner in printouts obtained from a retail pharmacy. Methods: A total of 31 different health information printouts were evaluated for reading level using the Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) readability analysis. Chi-square was used to determine differences in

Philip D. Rolland

2002-01-01

442

Health care professions: career information on the internet for students.  

PubMed

The United States is currently experiencing a nursing shortage, and it is expected to worsen in the next ten years. Physician shortages are also projected. Some allied health professions are also experiencing personnel shortages. Health sciences libraries can be of service in addressing the shortages by making information available on health care careers. Internet sites and resources on health care career decisions are discussed in this article. PMID:19197745

Guerrieri, Rose

2009-01-01

443

Consumer Health Information for Better Nutrition Initiative ...  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... Guidance: Interim Procedures for Qualified Health Claims in the Labeling of Conventional Human Fo