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Sample records for health organization minimum

  1. [Health care levels and minimum recommendations for neonatal care].

    PubMed

    Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echániz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Moreno Hernando, J; Salguero García, E; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-07-01

    A policy statement on the levels of care and minimum recommendations for neonatal healthcare was first proposed by the Standards Committee and the Board of the Spanish Society of Neonatology in 2004. This allowed us to define the level of care of each center in our country, as well as the health and technical requirements by levels of care to be defined. This review takes into account changes in neonatal care in the last few years and to optimize the location of resources. Facilities that provide care for newborn infants should be organized within a regionalized system of perinatal care. The functional capabilities of each level of care should be defined clearly and uniformly, including requirements for equipment, facilities, personnel, ancillary services, training, and the organization of services (including transport) needed to cover each level of care. PMID:23266243

  2. The Health Maintenance Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Doman

    1973-01-01

    Controversial proposals to establish health organizations could drastically change the delivery of health services. Understanding the issues in this controversy can help professionals in the human services see what is needed in health reform and legislation. (Author)

  3. The right to a decent minimum of health care.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen E

    1984-01-01

    Buchanan examines, and finds inadequate, several philosophical approaches to justifying and specifying the content of a universal right to a decent minimum of health care: utilitarian arguments, Rawlsian ideal contract arguments, and Norman Daniels' equality of opportunity argument. Also rejecting the libertarian hypothesis that there is no right to a decent minimum of care, he contends that the claim that society should guarantee certain health care services can be supported by a pluralistic approach encompassing special right-claims, harm prevention, prudential arguments emphasizing public health benefits, and beneficence. PMID:11651753

  4. Pan American Health Organization

    MedlinePlus

    ... international partner organizations are urging strong financial and political support for a medium-term cholera plan recently ... Collaborating Centers IRIS Institutional Repository for Information Sharing Public Health Associations Bulletins Virtual Campus for Public Health ...

  5. 77 FR 33607 - Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... management. On May 27, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 30864- 30868, Docket No. APHIS-2011... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 11 RIN 0579-AD43 Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum Penalties for Violations AGENCY: Animal...

  6. EVALUATION OF MINIMUM DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR ACUTE TOXICITY VALUE EXTRAPOLATION WITH AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buckler, Denny R., Foster L. Mayer, Mark R. Ellersieck and Amha Asfaw. 2003. Evaluation of Minimum Data Requirements for Acute Toxicity Value Extrapolation with Aquatic Organisms. EPA/600/R-03/104. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Re...

  7. How 'decent' is a decent minimum of health care?

    PubMed

    ter Meulen, Ruud

    2011-12-01

    This article tries to analyze the meaning of a decent minimum of health care, by confronting the idea of decent care with the concept of justice. Following the ideas of Margalith about a decent society, the article argues that a just minimum of care is not necessarily a decent minimum. The way this minimum is provided can still humiliate individuals, even if the end result is the best possible distribution of the goods as seen from the viewpoint of justice. This analysis is combined with an analysis from the perspective of solidarity, particularly of reflective solidarity, as a way to develop decent care, which is care that does not humiliate individuals and maintains their dignity. PMID:22241865

  8. The Comparison of the Minimum Data Set for Elderly Health in Selected Countries

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Shahi, Mehraban; Ahmadi, Maryam; Davaridolatabadi, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ongoing increase in the elderly population in many developed countries has drawn attention to health of this age group. Recording adequate and relevant data for the elderly is considered as the basis for future planning for this segment of society. So this study was conducted to compare minimum data about elderly health in selected countries. Methods: This review study was conducted through Internet and library studies. Key words were extracted from search engines and data bases including Google, Yahoo, Google Scholar, PubMed, ProQuest and Iranian National Medical Digital Library. Inclusion criteria included English language with no time limits. All articles, research projects, theses, guidelines and progress reports were retrieved from the United States, Sweden, Japan and Iran and reviewed. Also, websites of organizations responsible for elderly health in selected countries were visited and their documents were reviewed. Results from this search were provided narratively and finally were presented within comparison tables. Findings: The findings of this study showed that elderly data in the selected countries are collected around four axis including minimum demographic data, medical histories, health assessment and financial data of elderly health. Discussion and Conclusion: Given the importance of the minimum data set of elderly health for future planning, the use of experiences of leading countries in elderly health seems necessary; however, localization of it according to the country’s needs is inevitable. PMID:26862252

  9. 17 CFR 1.52 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... Miscellaneous § 1.52 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt rules prescribing minimum financial and...

  10. Organization theory. Analyzing health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Cors, W K

    1997-02-01

    Organization theory (OT) is a tool that can be applied to analyze and understand health care organizations. Transaction cost theory is used to explain, in a unifying fashion, the myriad changes being undertaken by different groups of constituencies in health care. Agency theory is applied to aligning economic incentives needed to ensure Integrated Delivery System (IDS) success. By using tools such as OT, a clearer understanding of organizational changes is possible. PMID:10164970

  11. 17 CFR 1.52 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements. 1.52 Section 1.52 Commodity and Securities... Miscellaneous § 1.52 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial...

  12. Mental health organizations in transition.

    PubMed

    Guy, B N

    1975-03-01

    Many mental health institutions are changing their traditional treatment policies and practices and their organizational structures. Literature is reviewed which provides a model for changing mental health organizations based in general systems theory. The systems organizational model has empirical support in the growing community mental health movement. The strong interaction of technological and ideological factors determining the nature of the new mental health organizations is stressed. Also considered are some of the problems facing those planning and managing changing mental health organizations. PMID:1057420

  13. The health care learning organization.

    PubMed

    Hult, G T; Lukas, B A; Hult, A M

    1996-01-01

    To many health care executives, emphasis on marketing strategy has become a means of survival in the threatening new environment of cost attainment, intense competition, and prospective payment. This paper develops a positive model of the health care organization based on organizational learning theory and the concept of the health care offering. It is proposed that the typical health care organization represents the prototype of the learning organization. Thus, commitment to a shared vision is proposed to be an integral part of the health care organization and its diagnosis, treatment, and delivery of the health care offering, which is based on the exchange relationship, including its communicative environment. Based on the model, strategic marketing implications are discussed. PMID:10158798

  14. Democratizing the world health organization.

    PubMed

    van de Pas, R; van Schaik, L G

    2014-02-01

    A progressive erosion of the democratic space appears as one of the emerging challenges in global health today. Such delimitation of the political interplay has a particularly evident impact on the unique public interest function of the World Health Organization (WHO). This paper aims to identify some obstacles for a truly democratic functioning of the UN specialized agency for health. The development of civil society's engagement with the WHO, including in the current reform proposals, is described. The paper also analyses how today's financing of the WHO--primarily through multi-bi financing mechanisms--risks to choke the agency's role in global health. Democratizing the public debate on global health, and therefore the role of the WHO, requires a debate on its future role and engagement at the country level. This desirable process can only be linked to national debates on public health, and the re-definition of health as a primary political and societal concern. PMID:24417900

  15. Women's Health Care Minimum Data Set: pilot test and validation for use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Farley, Cindy L; Tharpe, Nell; Miller, Liane; Ruxer, Debbie Jenkins

    2006-01-01

    Basic elements of the structure, process, and outcomes of midwifery practice have not been fully determined, particularly in the areas of women's gynecologic and primary health care. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) supported the development of clinical data sets to describe structure, process, and outcomes of midwifery practice for use by clinical practitioners. The Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set was developed using a panel of expert midwives and other women's health care professionals, as well as literature resources. Students of the Graduate Midwifery Program at Philadelphia University performed pilot testing of the Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set as a service to the profession of midwifery while applying concepts learned in their research methods courses. Each student (n = 19) recruited a midwifery practice in which she had a clinical affiliation, and gathered data sets on the previous 30 consecutive women's health care encounters by CNMs or CMs (n = 569). Item analysis and refinement were done. Criterion-related validity and construct-related validity of the Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set were explored through comparison with the medical record and through the testing of plausible hypotheses. The Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set has the potential to be an important instrument in documenting and understanding the evolving nature of the practice of primary women's health care by midwives and other women's health care providers. PMID:17081941

  16. Do minimum wages improve early life health? Evidence from developing countries.

    PubMed

    Majid, Muhammad Farhan; Mendoza Rodríguez, José M; Harper, Sam; Frank, John; Nandi, Arijit

    2016-06-01

    The impact of legislated minimum wages on the early-life health of children living in low and middle-income countries has not been examined. For our analyses, we used data from the Demographic and Household Surveys (DHS) from 57 countries conducted between 1999 and 2013. Our analyses focus on height-for-age z scores (HAZ) for children under 5 years of age who were surveyed as part of the DHS. To identify the causal effect of minimum wages, we utilized plausibly exogenous variation in the legislated minimum wages during each child's year of birth, the identifying assumption being that mothers do not time their births around changes in the minimum wage. As a sensitivity exercise, we also made within family comparisons (mother fixed effect models). Our final analysis on 49 countries reveal that a 1% increase in minimum wages was associated with 0.1% (95% CI = -0.2, 0) decrease in HAZ scores. Adverse effects of an increase in the minimum wage were observed among girls and for children of fathers who were less than 35 years old, mothers aged 20-29, parents who were married, parents who were less educated, and parents involved in manual work. We also explored heterogeneity by region and GDP per capita at baseline (1999). Adverse effects were concentrated in lower-income countries and were most pronounced in South Asia. By contrast, increases in the minimum wage improved children's HAZ in Latin America, and among children of parents working in a skilled sector. Our findings are inconsistent with the hypothesis that increases in the minimum wage unconditionally improve child health in lower-income countries, and highlight heterogeneity in the impact of minimum wages around the globe. Future work should involve country and occupation specific studies which can explore not only different outcomes such as infant mortality rates, but also explore the role of parental investments in shaping these effects. PMID:27132065

  17. 17 CFR 1.52 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements. 1.52 Section 1.52 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Miscellaneous § 1.52...

  18. Minimum Standards for Tribal Child Care: A Health and Safety Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Child Care Bureau is reissuing the minimum standards as a "Health and Safety Guide" for Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Tribal Lead Agencies in conjunction with the 2005 Tribal Cluster Trainings, "Supporting the Physical, Social, and Emotional Wellness of Our Tribal Children." These voluntary guidelines represent the baseline from which…

  19. 5 CFR 890.202 - Minimum standards for health benefits carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FEHB Program shall be those contained in 48 CFR subpart 1609.70. ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum standards for health benefits carriers. 890.202 Section 890.202 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED)...

  20. Nitrogen cycling driven by organic matter export in the South Pacific oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Lam, Phyllis; Contreras, Sergio; Arteaga, Lionel; Löscher, Carolin R.; Oschlies, Andreas; Paulmier, Aurélien; Stramma, Lothar; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are expanding globally, and at present account for around 20-40% of oceanic nitrogen loss. Heterotrophic denitrification and anammox--anaerobic ammonium oxidation with nitrite--are responsible for most nitrogen loss in these low-oxygen waters. Anammox is particularly significant in the eastern tropical South Pacific, one of the largest oxygen minimum zones globally. However, the factors that regulate anammox-driven nitrogen loss have remained unclear. Here, we present a comprehensive nitrogen budget for the eastern tropical South Pacific oxygen minimum zone, using measurements of nutrient concentrations, experimentally determined rates of nitrogen transformation and a numerical model of export production. Anammox was the dominant mode of nitrogen loss at the time of sampling. Rates of anammox, and related nitrogen transformations, were greatest in the productive shelf waters, and tailed off with distance from the coast. Within the shelf region, anammox activity peaked in both upper and bottom waters. Overall, rates of nitrogen transformation, including anammox, were strongly correlated with the export of organic matter. We suggest that the sinking of organic matter, and thus the release of ammonium into the water column, together with benthic ammonium release, fuel nitrogen loss from oxygen minimum zones.

  1. Capitated contracting of integrated health provider organizations.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, G J; Dynan, L; Burns, L R

    This paper examines global capitation of integrated health provider organizations that link physicians and hospitals, such as physician-hospital organizations and management service organizations. These organizations have proliferated in recent years, but their contracting activity has not been studied. We develop a conceptual model to understand the capitated contracting bargaining process. Exploratory multivariate analysis suggests that global capitation of these organizations is more common in markets with high health maintenance organization (HMO) market share, greater numbers of HMOs, and fewer physician group practices. Additionally, health provider organizations with more complex case mix, nonprofit status, more affiliated physicians, health system affiliations, and diversity in physician organizational arrangements are more likely to have global capitation. Finally, state regulation of provider contracting with self-insured employers appears to have spillover effects on health plan risk contracting with health providers. PMID:10711318

  2. Job satisfaction in health-care organizations

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Kavita; Srivastava, Kalpana

    2012-01-01

    Job satisfaction among health-care professionals acquires significance for the purpose of maximization of human resource potential. This article is aimed at emphasizing importance of studying various aspects of job satisfaction in health-care organizations. PMID:23766585

  3. 17 CFR 1.52 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prescribing minimum financial and related reporting requirements for all its members who are registered... minimum financial and related reporting requirements for all its members who are registered introducing... adopt, and submit for Commission approval, rules prescribing minimum financial and related...

  4. 5 CFR 890.201 - Minimum standards for health benefits plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... withdrawal of approval of the plan in accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. A health benefits plan shall: (1) Comply... the enrollment, in accordance with this part, and without regard to age, race, sex, health status, or... child, except that a plan that is sponsored or underwritten by an employee organization may not...

  5. Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... up/change plans About Medicare health plans Medicare Advantage Plans + Share widget - Select to show Subcategories Getting ... plan? About Medicare health plans , current subcategory Medicare Advantage Plans , current page Medicare Medical Savings Account (MSA) ...

  6. 17 CFR 31.28 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... TRANSACTIONS § 31.28 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation and sales practice requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt, and submit...

  7. 17 CFR 31.28 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... TRANSACTIONS § 31.28 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation and sales practice requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt, and submit...

  8. 17 CFR 31.28 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... TRANSACTIONS § 31.28 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation and sales practice requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt, and submit...

  9. 17 CFR 31.28 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-regulatory organization... TRANSACTIONS § 31.28 Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation and sales practice requirements. (a) Each self-regulatory organization must adopt, and submit...

  10. Achieving Population Health in Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deborah Klein

    2013-01-01

    Although “population health” is one of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Triple Aim goals, its relationship to accountable care organizations (ACOs) remains ill-defined and lacks clarity as to how the clinical delivery system intersects with the public health system. Although defining population health as “panel” management seems to be the default definition, we called for a broader “community health” definition that could improve relationships between clinical delivery and public health systems and health outcomes for communities. We discussed this broader definition and offered recommendations for linking ACOs with the public health system toward improving health for patients and their communities. PMID:23678910

  11. 25 CFR 900.44 - What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract... Financial Management Systems § 900.44 What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract? The fiscal...

  12. 25 CFR 900.44 - What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract... Financial Management Systems § 900.44 What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract? The fiscal...

  13. 25 CFR 900.44 - What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract... Financial Management Systems § 900.44 What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract? The fiscal...

  14. 25 CFR 900.44 - What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract... Financial Management Systems § 900.44 What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract? The fiscal...

  15. 25 CFR 900.44 - What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract... Financial Management Systems § 900.44 What minimum general standards apply to all Indian tribe or tribal organization financial management systems when carrying out a self-determination contract? The fiscal...

  16. Physician Incentives in Health Maintenance Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, Martin; Rebitzer, James B.; Taylor, Lowell J.

    2004-01-01

    Managed care organizations rely on incentives that encourage physicians to limit medical expenditures, but little is known about how physicians respond to these incentives. We address this issue by analyzing the physician incentive contracts in use at a health maintenance organization. By combining knowledge of the incentive contracts with…

  17. The World Health Organization and Global Health Governance: post-1990.

    PubMed

    Lidén, J

    2014-02-01

    This article takes a historical perspective on the changing position of WHO in the global health architecture over the past two decades. From the early 1990s a number of weaknesses within the structure and governance of the World Health Organization were becoming apparent, as a rapidly changing post Cold War world placed more complex demands on the international organizations generally, but significantly so in the field of global health. Towards the end of that decade and during the first half of the next, WHO revitalized and played a crucial role in setting global health priorities. However, over the past decade, the organization has to some extent been bypassed for funding, and it lost some of its authority and its ability to set a global health agenda. The reasons for this decline are complex and multifaceted. Some of the main factors include WHO's inability to reform its core structure, the growing influence of non-governmental actors, a lack of coherence in the positions, priorities and funding decisions between the health ministries and the ministries overseeing development assistance in several donor member states, and the lack of strong leadership of the organization. PMID:24388640

  18. A new weapon for the interstellar complex organic molecule hunt: the minimum energy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The hunt for the interstellar complex organic molecules (COMs) supposed to be the building blocks of the molecules at the origin of life is a challenging but very expensive task. It starts with laboratory experiments, associated with theoretical calculations, that give the line frequencies and strengths of the relevant molecules to be identified and finishes with observations at the telescopes. Aims: The present study aims to suggest possible guidelines to optimize this hunt. Levering on the minimum energy principle (MEP) presented in a previous study, we discuss the link between thermodynamic stability and detectability of a number of structures in the important families of amides, sugars and aminonitriles. Methods: The question of the relative stability of these different species is addressed by means of quantum density functional theory simulations. The hybrid B3LYP formalism was used throughout. All 72 molecules part of this survey were treated on an equal footing. Each structure, fully optimized, was verified to be a stationary point by vibrational analysis. Results: A comprehensive screening of 72 isomers of CH3NO, C2H5NO, C3H7NO, C2H4O2, C3H6O3 and C2H4N2 chemical formula has been carried out. We found that formamide, acetamide and propanamide (the first two identified in the Inter-Stellar Medium) are the most stable compounds in their families demonstrating at the same time that the peptide bond >N-C=O at the origin of life is the most stable bond that can be formed. Dihydroxyacetone, whose detection awaits for confirmation, is far from being the most stable isomer of its family while aminoacetonitrile, that has been recently identified, is effectively the most stable species. Conclusions: The MEP appears to be a useful tool for optimizing the hunt for new species by identifying the potentially more abundant isomers of a given chemical formula.

  19. 17 CFR 1.52 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... obligation to segregate customer funds, risk management requirements, financial reporting requirements... compliance with the minimum financial and related reporting requirements and risk management requirements... management requirements for futures commission merchant member registrants that shall be the same as, or...

  20. [Organizing health care: an ethical perspective].

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Health care at population level is a complex problem. Having this in mind, the purpose of this paper is to focus on the goods that are ethically relevant in the process of caring for health at this level. We briefly analyze some of the Chilean health statistics that, although they show important improvements along the years, demonstrate that certain conditions are to be deemed as inadequate by both healthcare providers and patients. Ethics is a central component to determine how to structure and organize health care systems and how they should operate. We emphasize human dignity as an ethical corner stone of the health care system, along with other important values such as justice and humanization, under the scope of the ends of medicine, and other components such as technical competence of providers and the financing of the whole process. We conclude that as far as a health care system is organized in a way that medical practice is well ordered, primarily and fundamentally according the ends of medicine and the good of persons, such a health care system is ethically adequate. PMID:24121582

  1. [Ethical dilemmas in public health care organizations].

    PubMed

    Pereda Vicandi, M

    2014-01-01

    Today you can ask if you can apply ethics to organizations because much of the greater overall impact decisions are not made by private individuals, are decided by organizations. Any organization is legitimate because it satisfies a need of society and this legitimacy depends if the organization does with quality. To offer a good service, quality service, organizations know they need to do well, but seem to forget that should do well not only instrumental level, must also make good on the ethical level. Public health care organizations claim to promote attitudes and actions based on ethics, level of their internal functioning and level of achievement of its goals, but increased awareness and analysis of its inner workings can question it. Such entities, for its structure and procedures, may make it difficult for ethical standards actually govern its operation, also can have negative ethical consequences at the population level. A healthcare organization must not be organized, either structurally or functionally, like any other organization that offers services. In addition, members of the organization can not simply be passive actors. It is necessary that operators and users have more pro-ethical behaviors. Operators from the professionalism and users from liability. PMID:25467632

  2. Problem solving in health services organizations.

    PubMed

    Rakich, J S; Krigline, A B

    1996-01-01

    Health services organization managers at all levels are constantly confronted with problems. Conditions encountered that initiate the need for problem solving are opportunity, threat, crisis, deviation, and improvement. A general problem-solving model presenting an orderly process by which managers can approach this important task is described. An example of the model applied to the current strategic climate is presented. PMID:10158720

  3. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR POLYCYCLIC ORGANIC MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document responds to Section 122 of the Clean Air Act as Amended August 1977, which requires the Administrator to decide whether atmospheric emissions of polycyclic organic matter (POM) potentially endanger public health. This document reviews POM data on chemical and physica...

  4. Recommendations by health organizations for pulse consumption.

    PubMed

    Leterme, Pascal

    2002-12-01

    The present paper aims to study why and how health organizations recommend the consumption of pulses such as beans, chickpeas or lentils. Although it is recognized that frequent pulse consumption may reduce serum cholesterol levels and helps reduce risks of coronary heart disease and diabetes, these advantages are scarcely mentioned by health-promoting associations, i.e. vegetarians and organizations helping people to reduce the risks for chronic diseases. Pulses, especially common beans, are rather considered as whole grains that provide plenty of proteins, starch, dietary fibres, minerals and vitamins. Many organizations refer to the food guide pyramid to advise their members, and place beans either in the third part, together with meat, in the second one with fruits and vegetables, or in the bottom part with starchy foods. Whatever their place, they have acquired the status of staple food for anyone who wants to eat a healthy diet. PMID:12498622

  5. Organ Procurement Organizations and the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Howard, R J; Cochran, L D; Cornell, D L

    2015-10-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has adversely affected the ability of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to perform their federally mandated function of honoring the donation decisions of families and donors who have signed the registry. The difficulties gaining access to potential donor medical record has meant that assessment, evaluation, and management of brain dead organ donors has become much more difficult. Delays can occur that can lead to potential recipients not receiving life-saving organs. For over 40 years, OPO personnel have had ready access to paper medical records. But the widespread adoption of EHRs has greatly limited the ability of OPO coordinators to readily gain access to patient medical records and to manage brain dead donors. Proposed solutions include the following: (1) hospitals could provide limited access to OPO personnel so that they could see only the potential donor's medical record; (2) OPOs could join with other transplant organizations to inform regulators of the problem; and (3) hospital organizations could be approached to work with Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to revise the Hospital Conditions of Participation to require OPOs be given access to donor medical records. PMID:26138032

  6. Communicating with Public Health Organizations: Technical Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, Alexandru; Catalan, Daniel; Kurapkiene, Skaidra; Felfly, Wadih

    By working with experts throughout Europe, ECDC pools Europe's health knowledge, so as to develop authoritative scientific opinions about the risks posed by current and emerging infectious diseases. Difficulties rose in the management of competent bodies' lists and the information was duplicated several times across the organization. ECDC started implementing a CRM system to organize the information in a structured data model, track the history of communication, provide contact information to application in house and support the nomination process and the user identity management for these applications.

  7. The World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ).

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Barber, Catherine; Beck, Arne; Berglund, Patricia; Cleary, Paul D; McKenas, David; Pronk, Nico; Simon, Gregory; Stang, Paul; Ustun, T Bedirhan; Wang, Phillip

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ), a self-report instrument designed to estimate the workplace costs of health problems in terms of reduced job performance, sickness absence, and work-related accidents-injuries. Calibration data are presented on the relationship between individual-level HPQ reports and archival measures of work performance and absenteeism obtained from employer archives in four groups: airline reservation agents (n = 441), customer service representatives (n = 505), automobile company executives (n = 554), and railroad engineers (n = 850). Good concordance is found between the HPQ and the archival measures in all four occupations. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the calibration methodology used to monetize HPQ reports and of future directions in substantive research based on the HPQ. PMID:12625231

  8. Tweeting as Health Communication: Health Organizations' Use of Twitter for Health Promotion and Public Engagement.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyojung; Reber, Bryan H; Chon, Myoung-Gi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how major health organizations use Twitter for disseminating health information, building relationships, and encouraging actions to improve health. The sampled organizations were the American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, and American Diabetes Association. A content analysis was conducted on 1,583 tweets to examine these organizations' use of Twitter's interactive features and to understand the message functions and topics of their tweets. The numbers of retweets and favorites were also measured as engagement indicators and compared by different message functions. The results revealed that all of the organizations posted original tweets most, but they differed in the degree to which they used the retweet and reply functions. Hashtags and hyperlinks were the most frequently used interactive tools. The majority of the tweets were about organization-related topics, whereas personal health-related tweets represented a relatively small portion of the sample. Followers were most likely to like and retweet personal health action-based messages. PMID:26716546

  9. Health maintenance organizations; Midwest Health Plan--Health Resources and Services Administration.

    PubMed

    1983-04-26

    On January 21, 1983, the Office of Health Maintenance Organizations (OHMO) notified Midwest Health Plan (MHP), 3415 Bridgeland Drive, Bridgeton, Missouri 63044, a federally qualified health maintenance organization (HMO), that MHP had successfully reestablished compliance with its assurances to the Secretary that it would (1) maintain a fiscally sound operation, and (2) maintain satisfactory administrative and managerial arrangements. This determination took effect on January 1, 1983. PMID:10324428

  10. The EQ-5D-5L health status questionnaire in COPD: validity, responsiveness and minimum important difference

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Claire M; Longworth, Louise; Lord, Joanne; Canavan, Jane L; Jones, Sarah E; Kon, Samantha S C; Man, William D-C

    2016-01-01

    Background The EQ-5D, a generic health status questionnaire that is widely used in health economic evaluation, was recently expanded to the EQ-5D-5L to address criticisms of unresponsiveness and ceiling effect. Aims To describe the validity, responsiveness and minimum important difference of the EQ-5D-5L in COPD. Methods Study 1: The validity of the EQ-5D-5L utility index and visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) was compared with four established disease-specific health status questionnaires and other measures of disease severity in 616 stable outpatients with COPD. Study 2: The EQ-5D-5L utility index and EQ-VAS were measured in 324 patients with COPD before and after 8 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation. Distribution and anchor-based approaches were used to estimate the minimum important difference. Results There were moderate-to-strong correlations between utility index and EQ-VAS with disease-specific questionnaires (Pearson's r=0.47–0.72). A ceiling effect was seen in 7% and 2.6% of utility index and EQ-VAS. Utility index decreased (worsening health status) with indices of worsening disease severity. With rehabilitation, mean (95% CI) changes in utility index and EQ-VAS were 0.065 (0.047 to 0.083) and 8.6 (6.5 to 10.7), respectively, with standardised response means of 0.39 and 0.44. The mean (range) anchor estimates of the minimum important difference for utility index and EQ-VAS were 0.051 (0.037 to 0.063) and 6.9 (6.5 to 8.0), respectively. Conclusions The EQ-5D-5L is a valid and responsive measure of health status in COPD and may provide useful additional cost-effectiveness data in clinical trials. PMID:27030578

  11. The Raising of Minimum Alcohol Prices in Saskatchewan, Canada: Impacts on Consumption and Implications for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinhui; Giesbrecht, Norman; Macdonald, Scott; Thomas, Gerald; Wettlaufer, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We report impacts on alcohol consumption following new and increased minimum alcohol prices in Saskatchewan, Canada. Methods. We conducted autoregressive integrated moving average time series analyses of alcohol sales and price data from the Saskatchewan government alcohol monopoly for 26 periods before and 26 periods after the intervention. Results. A 10% increase in minimum prices significantly reduced consumption of beer by 10.06%, spirits by 5.87%, wine by 4.58%, and all beverages combined by 8.43%. Consumption of coolers decreased significantly by 13.2%, cocktails by 21.3%, and liqueurs by 5.3%. There were larger effects for purely off-premise sales (e.g., liquor stores) than for primarily on-premise sales (e.g., bars, restaurants). Consumption of higher strength beer and wine declined the most. A 10% increase in minimum price was associated with a 22.0% decrease in consumption of higher strength beer (> 6.5% alcohol/volume) versus 8.17% for lower strength beers. The neighboring province of Alberta showed no change in per capita alcohol consumption before and after the intervention. Conclusions. Minimum pricing is a promising strategy for reducing the public health burden associated with hazardous alcohol consumption. Pricing to reflect percentage alcohol content of drinks can shift consumption toward lower alcohol content beverage types. PMID:23078488

  12. 48 CFR 1609.7001 - Minimum standards for health benefits carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. (1) It must be lawfully engaged in the business of supplying health benefits... instructions and directives. (2) Legal and ethical business and health care practices. (3) Compliance with the... chargeable to the contract; (2) Using fraudulent or unethical business or health care practices or...

  13. What could a strengthened right to health bring to the post-2015 health development agenda?: interrogating the role of the minimum core concept in advancing essential global health needs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Global health institutions increasingly recognize that the right to health should guide the formulation of replacement goals for the Millennium Development Goals, which expire in 2015. However, the right to health’s contribution is undercut by the principle of progressive realization, which links provision of health services to available resources, permitting states to deny even basic levels of health coverage domestically and allowing international assistance for health to remain entirely discretionary. Discussion To prevent progressive realization from undermining both domestic and international responsibilities towards health, international human rights law institutions developed the idea of non-derogable “minimum core” obligations to provide essential health services. While minimum core obligations have enjoyed some uptake in human rights practice and scholarship, their definition in international law fails to specify which health services should fall within their scope, or to specify wealthy country obligations to assist poorer countries. These definitional gaps undercut the capacity of minimum core obligations to protect essential health needs against inaction, austerity and illegitimate trade-offs in both domestic and global action. If the right to health is to effectively advance essential global health needs in these contexts, weaknesses within the minimum core concept must be resolved through innovative research on social, political and legal conceptualizations of essential health needs. Summary We believe that if the minimum core concept is strengthened in these ways, it will produce a more feasible and grounded conception of legally prioritized health needs that could assist in advancing health equity, including by providing a framework rooted in legal obligations to guide the formulation of new health development goals, providing a baseline of essential health services to be protected as a matter of right against governmental claims of

  14. Influencing Organizations to Promote Health: Applying Stakeholder Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Gerjo; Gurabardhi, Zamira; Gottlieb, Nell H.; Zijlstra, Fred R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholder theory may help health promoters to make changes at the organizational and policy level to promote health. A stakeholder is any individual, group, or organization that can influence an organization. The organization that is the focus for influence attempts is called the focal organization. The more salient a stakeholder is and the more…

  15. Creating High Reliability in Health Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Pronovost, Peter J; Berenholtz, Sean M; Goeschel, Christine A; Needham, Dale M; Sexton, J Bryan; Thompson, David A; Lubomski, Lisa H; Marsteller, Jill A; Makary, Martin A; Hunt, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Objective The objective of this paper was to present a comprehensive approach to help health care organizations reliably deliver effective interventions. Context Reliability in healthcare translates into using valid rate-based measures. Yet high reliability organizations have proven that the context in which care is delivered, called organizational culture, also has important influences on patient safety. Model for Improvement Our model to improve reliability, which also includes interventions to improve culture, focuses on valid rate-based measures. This model includes (1) identifying evidence-based interventions that improve the outcome, (2) selecting interventions with the most impact on outcomes and converting to behaviors, (3) developing measures to evaluate reliability, (4) measuring baseline performance, and (5) ensuring patients receive the evidence-based interventions. The comprehensive unit-based safety program (CUSP) is used to improve culture and guide organizations in learning from mistakes that are important, but cannot be measured as rates. Conclusions We present how this model was used in over 100 intensive care units in Michigan to improve culture and eliminate catheter-related blood stream infections—both were accomplished. Our model differs from existing models in that it incorporates efforts to improve a vital component for system redesign—culture, it targets 3 important groups—senior leaders, team leaders, and front line staff, and facilitates change management—engage, educate, execute, and evaluate for planned interventions. PMID:16898981

  16. 78 FR 27001 - Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations To Assess and Enforce Minimum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2012 (77 FR 33607-33619, Docket No. APHIS-2011-0030), and... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 11 RIN 0579-AD43 Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse Industry Organizations... Federal Register on June 7, 2012, and effective on July 9, 2012, we amended the horse...

  17. Lack of enhanced preservation of organic matter in sediments under the oxygen minimum on the Oman Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, T.F. ); Shimmield, G.B.; Price, N.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The impingement of oxygen minima on continental margins is widely thought to promote the accumulation of sedimentary facies enriched in well-preserved organic matter. It is shown here, however, that such a relationship does not clearly apply to the productive Oman Margin in the Arabian Sea, which hosts one of the most severe oxygen minima in the oceans. Measurements made on the 0-1 cm depth interval from fourteen box cores collected from the outer shelf-upper continental slope area off Oman show that (1) deposited organic matter is overwhelmingly of marine origin, (2) there is no significant correlation between the abundance of sedimentary organic carbon (C{sub org}) and the bottom-water O{sub 2} concentration, (3) there is no relation between the sedimentary C{sub org}:N ratio and bottom-water O{sub 2}, and (4) there is no correlation between the hydrogen index (HI) of the organic matter and bottom water oxygen. There are, however, significant correlations between the C{sub org}:N ratio and the I:C{sub org}, Cr:Al, and Zr:Al ratios, as well as between the C{sub org}:N ratio and the hydrogen index. Overall, these data suggest that the bottom water oxygen concentration has little effect in governing either the distribution of the degree of preservation of organic matter on this margin. Thus, the generally high but spatially variable C{sub org} content of the sediments on the Oman Margin may not reflect the occurrence of an oxygen minimum but instead be the result of a high settling flux of organic matter, supported by monsoon-driven upwelling, and post-depositional redistribution of the organic material by hydrodynamic influences.

  18. Medical informatics and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Holden, F M

    1991-01-01

    A dialogue between upper management and operational elements over an organization's informatics policies and procedures could take place in an environment in which both parties could succeed. Excellent patient care practices can exist in organizational settings where upper management is not concerned with the specifics of the medical care process. But as the medical care process itself becomes costly, complex, and part of the purview of upper management, solutions to ambiguous informatics policies and practices need to be found. As the discussion of cost determination suggests, a comprehensive "top-down" solution may not be feasible. Allowing patient care expertise to drive the design and implementation of clinical computing modules without unduly restrictive specifications from above is probably the best way to proceed. But if the organization needs to know the specifics of a treatment episode, then the informatics definitions specific to treatment episodes need to be unambiguous and consistently applied. As the discussion of Social Security numbers suggests, communication of information across various parts of the organization not only requires unambiguous data structure definitions, but also suggests that the communication process not be dependent on the content of the messages. Both ideas--consistent data structure definitions for essential data and open system communication architectures--are current in the medical informatician's vocabulary. The same ideas are relevant to the management and operation of large and diffuse health care enterprises. The lessons we are learning about informatics policy and practice controls in clinical computing need to be applied to the enterprise as a whole. PMID:1921663

  19. 5 CFR 890.201 - Minimum standards for health benefits plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... withdrawal of approval of the plan in accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. A health benefits plan shall: (1) Comply... plan offering benefits for dentistry or cosmetic surgery, or both, limited to conditions arising...

  20. 5 CFR 890.201 - Minimum standards for health benefits plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... withdrawal of approval of the plan in accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. A health benefits plan shall: (1) Comply... plan offering benefits for dentistry or cosmetic surgery, or both, limited to conditions arising...

  1. 5 CFR 890.201 - Minimum standards for health benefits plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... withdrawal of approval of the plan in accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. A health benefits plan shall: (1) Comply... plan offering benefits for dentistry or cosmetic surgery, or both, limited to conditions arising...

  2. 5 CFR 890.201 - Minimum standards for health benefits plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... withdrawal of approval of the plan in accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. A health benefits plan shall: (1) Comply... plan offering benefits for dentistry or cosmetic surgery, or both, limited to conditions arising...

  3. [The right to health: a model for determining the contents of the minimum core and the periphery].

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Liliana M

    2012-01-01

    The right to health has been widely recognized in the Argentine courts, however only those who have the ability to access the justice system are able to fully enjoy that right. Therefore traditionally excluded groups, who for different reasons have not been able to make their demands heard in a judicial court, do not benefit from the recognition gained up to this point in the different judicial resolutions. Taking into account these institutionalized unequal practices, this article suggests a model for understanding the right to health truly as a right. A distinction is made between the right to health as a rule (understood as the minimum or essential core of that right) and the right to health as a principle (understood as the periphery of the right). In this way, it is shown how considering the right to health as both a rule and as a principle could offer greater equality in recognition of that right for disadvantaged groups that lack access to the justice system. PMID:23995542

  4. Health systems organization for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Pedroto, Isabel; Amaro, Pedro; Romãozinho, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of acute and severe digestive diseases presenting to hospital emergency departments, mainly related with an ageing population, demands an appropriate answer from health systems organization, taking into account the escalating pressure on cost reduction. However, patients expect and deserve a response that is appropriate, effective, efficient and safe. The huge variety of variables which can influence the evolution of such cases warranting intensive monitoring, and the coordination and optimization of a range of human and technical resources involved in the care of these high-risk patients, requires their admission in hospital units with conveniently equipped facilities, as is done for heart attack and stroke patients. Little information of gastroenterology emergencies as a function of structure, processes and outcome is available at the organizational level. Surveys that have been conducted in different countries just assess local treatment outcome and question the organizational structure and existing resources but its impact on the outcome is not clear. Most studies address the problem of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the out-of-hours endoscopy services in the hospital setting. The demands placed on emergency (part of the overall continuum of care) are obvious, as are the needs for the efficient use of resources and processes to improve the quality of care, meaning data must cover the full care cycle. Gastrointestinal emergencies, namely gastrointestinal bleeding, must be incorporated into the overall emergency response as is done for heart attack and stroke. This chapter aims to provide a review of current literature/evidence on organizational health system models towards a better management of gastroenterology emergencies and proposes a research agenda. PMID:24160936

  5. Sedimentary pigments and nature of organic matter within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (Indian margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasiq, K. T.; Kurian, S.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sedimentary pigments, carbon and nitrogen content and their stable isotopes were studied in three short cores collected from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Arabian Sea (EAS). Nine pigments including chlorophyll a and their degradation products were quantified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Astaxanthin followed by canthaxanthin and zeaxanthin were the major carotenoids detected in these cores. The total pigment concentration was high in the core collected from 500 m water depth (6.5 μgg-1) followed by 800 m (1.7 μgg-1) and 1100 m (1.1 μgg-1) depths respectively. The organic carbon did not have considerable control on sedimentary pigments preservation. Pigment degradation was comparatively high in the core collected from the 800 m site which depended not only the bottom dissolved oxygen levels, but also on the faunal activity. As reported earlier, the bottom water dissolved oxygen and presence of fauna have good control on the organic carbon accumulation and preservation at Indian margin OMZ sediments. The C/N ratios and δ13C values for all the cores conclude the marine origin of organic matter and δ15N profiles revealed signature of upwelling associated denitrification within the water column.

  6. 48 CFR 1609.7001 - Minimum standards for health benefits carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. (1) It must be lawfully engaged in the business of supplying health benefits... (EHB) Fund less amounts set aside for the administrative and contingency reserves prescribed in 5 CFR... eligible survivor annuitants, former spouses continuing coverage with the carrier under 5 CFR...

  7. 48 CFR 1609.7001 - Minimum standards for health benefits carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. (1) It must be lawfully engaged in the business of supplying health benefits... (EHB) Fund less amounts set aside for the administrative and contingency reserves prescribed in 5 CFR... eligible survivor annuitants, former spouses continuing coverage with the carrier under 5 CFR...

  8. 48 CFR 1609.7001 - Minimum standards for health benefits carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. (1) It must be lawfully engaged in the business of supplying health benefits... (EHB) Fund less amounts set aside for the administrative and contingency reserves prescribed in 5 CFR... eligible survivor annuitants, former spouses continuing coverage with the carrier under 5 CFR...

  9. 48 CFR 1609.7001 - Minimum standards for health benefits carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with 5 CFR 890.204. (1) It must be lawfully engaged in the business of supplying health benefits... (EHB) Fund less amounts set aside for the administrative and contingency reserves prescribed in 5 CFR... eligible survivor annuitants, former spouses continuing coverage with the carrier under 5 CFR...

  10. Public health departments and accountable care organizations: finding common ground in population health.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Richard; Scutchfield, F Douglas; Costich, Julia F

    2015-05-01

    We examined areas of potential collaboration between accountable care organizations and public health agencies, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators. We interviewed 9 key informants on 4 topics: advantages of public health agency involvement in accountable care organizations; services public health agencies could provide; practical, cultural, and legal barriers to accountable care organization-public health agency involvement; and business models that facilitate accountable care organization-public health agency collaboration. Public health agencies could help accountable care organizations partner with community organizations and reach vulnerable patients, provide population-based services and surveillance data, and promote policies that improve member health. Barriers include accountable care organizations' need for short-term financial yield, limited public health agency technical and financial capacity, and the absence of a financial model. PMID:25790392

  11. Representations of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in UK newspapers: a case study of a public health policy debate

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Chris; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Wood, Karen; Hilton, Shona

    2015-01-01

    Background Mass media influence public acceptability, and hence feasibility, of public health interventions. This study investigates newsprint constructions of the alcohol problem and minimum unit pricing (MUP). Methods Quantitative content analysis of 901 articles about MUP published in 10 UK and Scottish newspapers between 2005 and 2012. Results MUP was a high-profile issue, particularly in Scottish publications. Reporting increased steadily between 2008 and 2012, matching the growing status of the debate. The alcohol problem was widely acknowledged, often associated with youths, and portrayed as driven by cheap alcohol, supermarkets and drinking culture. Over-consumption was presented as a threat to health and social order. Appraisals of MUP were neutral, with supportiveness increasing slightly over time. Arguments focused on health impacts more frequently than more emotive perspectives or business interests. Health charities and the NHS were cited slightly more frequently than alcohol industry representatives. Conclusion Emphases on efficacy, evidence and experts are positive signs for evidence-based policymaking. The high profile of MUP, along with growing support within articles, could reflect growing appetite for action on the alcohol problem. Representations of the problem as structurally driven might engender support for legislative solutions, although cultural explanations remain common. PMID:25312002

  12. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions. PMID:27445556

  13. Competition between health maintenance organizations and nonintegrated health insurance companies in health insurance markets.

    PubMed

    Baranes, Edmond; Bardey, David

    2015-12-01

    This article examines a model of competition between two types of health insurer: Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) and nonintegrated insurers. HMOs vertically integrate health care providers and pay them at a competitive price, while nonintegrated health insurers work as indemnity plans and pay the health care providers freely chosen by policyholders at a wholesale price. Such difference is referred to as an input price effect which, at first glance, favors HMOs. Moreover, we assume that policyholders place a positive value on the provider diversity supplied by their health insurance plan and that this value increases with the probability of disease. Due to the restricted choice of health care providers in HMOs a risk segmentation occurs: policyholders who choose nonintegrated health insurers are characterized by higher risk, which also tends to favor HMOs. Our equilibrium analysis reveals that the equilibrium allocation only depends on the number of HMOs in the case of exclusivity contracts between HMOs and providers. Surprisingly, our model shows that the interplay between risk segmentation and input price effects may generate ambiguous results. More precisely, we reveal that vertical integration in health insurance markets may decrease health insurers' premiums. PMID:26608954

  14. Organization and evaluation of health fairs.

    PubMed

    Germer, P; Price, J H

    1981-02-01

    In summary, the success of a health fair as a source of health education and promoter of healthful behaviors depends to a great extent upon the organizational expertise of the sponsor and cooperating forces. However, even more essential is the stimulation of health fair visitors' interest and participation, the provision of information and health status feedback and the reinforcement of positive health values. The health fair which best achieves these objectives will have a greater likelihood of also attaining its original preventive health goals and objectives. Although evaluation articles tend to stress the positive findings, this review does not imply that every health fair is a success or that every successful health fair is without criticism. Long waiting lines, unexpected equipment malfunctions, inadequate hours for visiting, understaffed activities, limited floor space and/or visual distractions and noise disturbances may still occur despite the most thorough organizational efforts. This review has attempted to synthesize from the existing sources on health fairs those essential organizational and evaluative factors necessary for a health fair to maximize its potential health education impact. PMID:6907548

  15. Volatile Organic Compunds (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gases Impact on Weather Health Effects Take Action Water Pollution Water Pollution Home Chemicals and Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water ... Gases Impact on Weather Health Effects Take Action Water Pollution Water Pollution Home Chemicals and Pollutants Natural Disasters ...

  16. Communicating in Multicultural Health Care Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Gary L.; Kunimoto, Elizabeth

    This paper investigates the multicultural demands of health care delivery by examining the role of organizational communication in promoting effective multicultural relations in modern health care systems. The paper describes the multicultural make-up of modern health care systems--noting, for example that providers from different professional…

  17. Influencing organizations to promote health: applying stakeholder theory.

    PubMed

    Kok, Gerjo; Gurabardhi, Zamira; Gottlieb, Nell H; Zijlstra, Fred R H

    2015-04-01

    Stakeholder theory may help health promoters to make changes at the organizational and policy level to promote health. A stakeholder is any individual, group, or organization that can influence an organization. The organization that is the focus for influence attempts is called the focal organization. The more salient a stakeholder is and the more central in the network, the stronger the influence. As stakeholders, health promoters may use communicative, compromise, deinstitutionalization, or coercive methods through an ally or a coalition. A hypothetical case study, involving adolescent use of harmful legal products, illustrates the process of applying stakeholder theory to strategic decision making. PMID:25829111

  18. The organization of health services for Indian people.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Reyes, L L; Buzzard, G D

    1987-01-01

    The Indian Health Service (IHS) is a bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, an agency of the Public Health Service. It was formed in 1955 by a transfer of health services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior. Since that time, IHS has grown larger and more complicated and has become a truly complex national organization that is responsible for direct and contract health care services to approximately 1 million Indian people. The historical background of the Service, its present organization, and the services that it provides through a variety of organizational structures are outlined in this report. PMID:3112842

  19. Organic foods: health and environmental advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Forman, Joel; Silverstein, Janet

    2012-11-01

    The US market for organic foods has grown from $3.5 billion in 1996 to $28.6 billion in 2010, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic products are now sold in specialty stores and conventional supermarkets. Organic products contain numerous marketing claims and terms, only some of which are standardized and regulated. In terms of health advantages, organic diets have been convincingly demonstrated to expose consumers to fewer pesticides associated with human disease. Organic farming has been demonstrated to have less environmental impact than conventional approaches. However, current evidence does not support any meaningful nutritional benefits or deficits from eating organic compared with conventionally grown foods, and there are no well-powered human studies that directly demonstrate health benefits or disease protection as a result of consuming an organic diet. Studies also have not demonstrated any detrimental or disease-promoting effects from an organic diet. Although organic foods regularly command a significant price premium, well-designed farming studies demonstrate that costs can be competitive and yields comparable to those of conventional farming techniques. Pediatricians should incorporate this evidence when discussing the health and environmental impact of organic foods and organic farming while continuing to encourage all patients and their families to attain optimal nutrition and dietary variety consistent with the US Department of Agriculture's MyPlate recommendations. This clinical report reviews the health and environmental issues related to organic food production and consumption. It defines the term "organic," reviews organic food-labeling standards, describes organic and conventional farming practices, and explores the cost and environmental implications of organic production techniques. It examines the evidence available on nutritional quality and production contaminants in conventionally produced and organic foods. Finally, this

  20. Civil Society Organizations and the Functions of Global Health Governance: What Role within Intergovernmental Organizations?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Amid discussion of how global health governance should and could be strengthened, the potential role of civil society organizations has been frequently raised. This paper considers the role of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in four health governance instruments under the auspices of the World Health Organization – the International Code on the Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, International Health Regulations and Codex Alimentarius - and maps the functions they have contributed to. The paper draws conclusions about the opportunities and limitations CSOs represent for strengthening global health governance (GHG). PMID:27274776

  1. Quantifying the linkages among soil health, organic farming, and food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic farming systems utilize organic amendments, diverse crop rotations and cover crops to promote soil fertility and enhance soil health. These practices increase biologically available forms of soil organic matter, and increase the activities of beneficial soil microbes and invertebrates. Physi...

  2. Core competencies of the entrepreneurial leader in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kristina L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss core competencies that entrepreneurial health care leaders should acquire to ensure the survival and growth of US health care organizations. Three overlapping areas of core competencies are described: (1) health care system and environment competencies, (2) organization competencies, and (3) interpersonal competencies. This study offers insight into the relationship between leaders and entrepreneurship in health care organizations and establishes the foundation for more in-depth studies on leadership competencies in health care settings. The approach for identifying core competencies and designing a competency model is useful for practitioners in leadership positions in complex health care organizations, so that through the understanding and practice of these 3 areas of core competencies, they can enhance their entrepreneurial leadership skills to become more effective health care entrepreneurial leaders. This study can also be used as a tool by health care organizations to better understand leadership performance, and competencies can be used to further the organization's strategic vision and for individual improvement purposes. PMID:19225332

  3. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Ria; Kolli, Santharam; Bauer, Johannes H

    2013-01-01

    The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans). Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health. PMID:23326371

  4. Animal Health and Welfare Issues Facing Organic Production Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Mhairi A.; Webster, Jim; Sutherland, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary The demand for organically grown, animal derived produce is increasing due to a growing desire for consumer products that have minimal chemical inputs and high animal welfare standards. Evaluation of the scientific literature suggests that a major challenge facing organic animal production systems is the management and treatment of health-related issues. However, implementation of effective management practices can help organic animal producers achieve and maintain high standards of health and welfare, which is necessary to assure consumers that organic animal-based food and fibre has not only been produced with minimal or no chemical input, but under high standards of animal welfare. Abstract The demand for organically-grown produce is increasing worldwide, with one of the drivers being an expectation among consumers that animals have been farmed to a high standard of animal welfare. This review evaluates whether this expectation is in fact being met, by describing the current level of science-based knowledge of animal health and welfare in organic systems. The primary welfare risk in organic production systems appears to be related to animal health. Organic farms use a combination of management practices, alternative and complementary remedies and convenional medicines to manage the health of their animals and in many cases these are at least as effective as management practices employed by non-organic producers. However, in contrast to non-organic systems, there is still a lack of scientifically evaluated, organically acceptable therapeutic treatments that organic animal producers can use when current management practices are not sufficient to maintain the health of their animals. The development of such treatments are necessary to assure consumers that organic animal-based food and fibre has not only been produced with minimal or no chemical input, but under high standards of animal welfare. PMID:26479750

  5. [Individuals and changes in health organizations: a psychosociological approach].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Creuza da Silva; Braga Neto, Francisco Campos; Sá, Marilene de Castilho

    2002-01-01

    The Brazilian health sector has undergone a severe crisis, affecting the case-resolving capacity, efficiency and governability of the health system as a whole and health organizations in particular. Although innovative management systems and tools have been encouraged, such innovations are limited in their ability to spawn organizational change, especially with regard to the challenge of enabling individual adherence to institutional projects and relations involving individuals and organizations. This paper focuses on the French psychosociological approach for analyzing and intervening in organizations, one of whose main thinkers is Eugène Enriquez. In its view of contemporary organizations, this approach focuses on the conflict between reproduction and creation as the main problem to be solved by management processes. While an organization is essentially seen as a place of order and repetition, organizational change implies the challenge of bringing creative individuals into the organization's project, avoiding the trap of controlling their minds and behavior. PMID:11910442

  6. [The Argentine Health System: organization and financial features].

    PubMed

    Arce, Hugo E

    2012-01-01

    The Argentine health system is defined by the following features: a) federal country organization; b) coexistence of public and private services with either outpatients or inpatients; c) fragmented entities of social security, most of these originated outside of the state organization. Components of the system are described and weighed; making decisions strength between national and provincial health authorities is analyzed and the Argentine system is compared with that of other countries. Statistical data on distribution of health expenditures and coverage of health services are presented as well as financial flow among diverse funding sources, insurers, providers and users of each sector. PMID:23089118

  7. Organizing the public health-clinical health interface: theoretical bases.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Reinharz, Daniel; Gauthier, Jacques-Bernard

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of the interface between public health and clinical health within the context of the search for networking approaches geared to a more integrated delivery of health services. The articulation of an operative interface is complicated by the fact that the definition of networking modalities involves complex intra- and interdisciplinary and intra- and interorganizational systems across which a new transversal dynamics of intervention practices and exchanges between service structures must be established. A better understanding of the situation is reached by shedding light on the rationale underlying the organizational methods that form the bases of the interface between these two sectors of activity. The Quebec experience demonstrates that neither the structural-functionalist approach, which emphasizes remodelling establishment structures and functions as determinants of integration, nor the structural-constructivist approach, which prioritizes distinct fields of practice in public health and clinical health, adequately serves the purpose of networking and integration. Consequently, a theoretical reframing is imperative. In this regard, structuration theory, which fosters the simultaneous study of methods of inter-structure coordination and inter-actor cooperation, paves the way for a better understanding of the situation and, in turn, to the emergence of new integration possibilities. PMID:16645802

  8. Managing diversity in health services organizations.

    PubMed

    Muller, H J; Haase, B E

    1994-01-01

    The changing ethnic, racial, and gender workforce characteristics require innovations in management philosophy and practice. Valuing employees' differences is believed to be a competitive advantage in many modern corporations. This article offers recommendations to health care managers for rethinking and improving the management of their heterogeneous workforces. A conceptual framework and evaluative criteria are developed in an attempt to better understand the factors that influence effective diversity management. The experiences of health services institutions in the Southwest (already a multicultural region) are studied to illustrate various approaches to diversity management. Leader philosophy and support, organizational policies and programs, workforce composition, structural integration, and organizational type constitute the main elements in this study. As the nation debates restructuring the health industry, it should also take the opportunity to integrate a management philosophy that values diversity and its practice. PMID:10138715

  9. A closer look at the World Health Organization's prescribing indicators

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Asenso, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This communication focuses on the World Health Organization's prescribing indicators. It describes the methods for computing the indicators and highlights their applicability as well as limitations in evaluating the patterns of medicines usage. PMID:27127400

  10. [Experience in organizing competition of school health education teams].

    PubMed

    Tsurikov, V T; Gavriushenko, V V

    1991-01-01

    One of the main tasks of Soviet medicine--the healthy lifestyle formation among population can be accomplished with the help of school health education teams. The training of school health education teams is one of the forms of out-of-school hours activities in hygienic education and training of pupils and can easily be accomplished through organizational plans of activities at any school or industrial training school. The organization of school health education teams should unite the efforts of teachers, specialists from the service of healthy lifestyle formation, cultural institutions, young communist league and youth organizations and other departments and public agencies concerned. Using various active publicity media school health education teams should become active healthy lifestyle promotion organizations and their performance can be conducted before any audiences. The working experience of school health education teams is in need of investigation, improvement and dissemination. PMID:1876903

  11. Personality organization, five-factor model, and mental health.

    PubMed

    Laverdière, Olivier; Gamache, Dominick; Diguer, Louis; Hébert, Etienne; Larochelle, Sébastien; Descôteaux, Jean

    2007-10-01

    Otto Kernberg has developed a model of personality and psychological functioning centered on the concept of personality organization. The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the relationships between this model, the five-factor model, and mental health. The Personality Organization Diagnostic Form (Diguer et al., The Personality Organization Diagnostic Form-II (PODF-II), 2001), the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (Costa and McCrae, Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) Professional Manual. 1992a), and the Health-Sickness Rating Scale (Luborsky, Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1962;7:407-417) were used to assess these constructs. Results show that personality organization and personality factors are distinct but interrelated constructs and that both contribute in similar proportion to mental health. Results also suggest that the integration of personality organization and factors can provide clinicians and researchers with an enriched understanding of psychological functioning. PMID:18043522

  12. Contribution of organically grown crops to human health.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Eva; Hussain, Abrar; Kuktaite, Ramune; Andersson, Staffan C; Olsson, Marie E

    2014-04-01

    An increasing interest in organic agriculture for food production is seen throughout the world and one key reason for this interest is the assumption that organic food consumption is beneficial to public health. The present paper focuses on the background of organic agriculture, important public health related compounds from crop food and variations in the amount of health related compounds in crops. In addition, influence of organic farming on health related compounds, on pesticide residues and heavy metals in crops, and relations between organic food and health biomarkers as well as in vitro studies are also the focus of the present paper. Nutritionally beneficial compounds of highest relevance for public health were micronutrients, especially Fe and Zn, and bioactive compounds such as carotenoids (including pro-vitamin A compounds), tocopherols (including vitamin E) and phenolic compounds. Extremely large variations in the contents of these compounds were seen, depending on genotype, climate, environment, farming conditions, harvest time, and part of the crop. Highest amounts seen were related to the choice of genotype and were also increased by genetic modification of the crop. Organic cultivation did not influence the content of most of the nutritional beneficial compounds, except the phenolic compounds that were increased with the amounts of pathogens. However, higher amounts of pesticide residues and in many cases also of heavy metals were seen in the conventionally produced crops compared to the organic ones. Animal studies as well as in vitro studies showed a clear indication of a beneficial effect of organic food/extracts as compared to conventional ones. Thus, consumption of organic food seems to be positive from a public health point of view, although the reasons are unclear, and synergistic effects between various constituents within the food are likely. PMID:24717360

  13. Contribution of Organically Grown Crops to Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Eva; Hussain, Abrar; Kuktaite, Ramune; Andersson, Staffan C.; Olsson, Marie E.

    2014-01-01

    An increasing interest in organic agriculture for food production is seen throughout the world and one key reason for this interest is the assumption that organic food consumption is beneficial to public health. The present paper focuses on the background of organic agriculture, important public health related compounds from crop food and variations in the amount of health related compounds in crops. In addition, influence of organic farming on health related compounds, on pesticide residues and heavy metals in crops, and relations between organic food and health biomarkers as well as in vitro studies are also the focus of the present paper. Nutritionally beneficial compounds of highest relevance for public health were micronutrients, especially Fe and Zn, and bioactive compounds such as carotenoids (including pro-vitamin A compounds), tocopherols (including vitamin E) and phenolic compounds. Extremely large variations in the contents of these compounds were seen, depending on genotype, climate, environment, farming conditions, harvest time, and part of the crop. Highest amounts seen were related to the choice of genotype and were also increased by genetic modification of the crop. Organic cultivation did not influence the content of most of the nutritional beneficial compounds, except the phenolic compounds that were increased with the amounts of pathogens. However, higher amounts of pesticide residues and in many cases also of heavy metals were seen in the conventionally produced crops compared to the organic ones. Animal studies as well as in vitro studies showed a clear indication of a beneficial effect of organic food/extracts as compared to conventional ones. Thus, consumption of organic food seems to be positive from a public health point of view, although the reasons are unclear, and synergistic effects between various constituents within the food are likely. PMID:24717360

  14. 17 CFR 31.28 - Self-regulatory organization adoption and surveillance of minimum financial, cover, segregation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reporting requirements for all its members who are registered leverage transaction merchants. Each self..., segregation and sales practice, and related reporting requirements adopted by such self-regulatory... such minimum financial, cover, segregation and sales practice, and related reporting requirements....

  15. Engaging Student Health Organizations in Reducing Health Disparities in Underserved Communities through Volunteerism: Developing a Student Health Corps

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Vickie M.; Ly, Lichin; Allen, Erica; Young, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    One underutilized method for reducing health disparities and training culturally competent health care workers is the engagement of undergraduate student health organizations in conducting health screenings, promotion, and health education outreach activities in in underserved racial/ethnic communities. We conducted a needs assessment of 14 predominantly racial/ethnic minority undergraduate student-run health organizations. The 14 organizations annually served approximately 12,425 people (67% Hispanic, 25% African American, 6.33% Asian Pacific Islander), predominantly at health fairs within Los Angeles County (averaging 138 attendees). Student organizations provided screenings on general health conditions and diseases, with less emphasis on behavioral risk factors (e.g., drinking, smoking). Organizations indicated a need for increased and affordable trainings in preventive health screenings and help in understanding target populations’ needs. Universities are in an excellent position to train, supervise, and organize volunteer health corps in order to engage students in reducing health disparities and to train culturally competent health care providers. PMID:19648716

  16. Behavioral Groups as Preventive Care in a Health Maintenance Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Joan; And Others

    This paper describes the use of a particular therapeutic modality--behavioral groups--in a relatively new delivery system called a Health Maintenance Organization. The program described, run under the George Washington University Health Plan, offers short-term structured groups designed to aid people at particularly difficult or vulnerable…

  17. [Health care organization and health in a region of Zaire].

    PubMed

    Campanella, N; Tarantini, F

    1989-01-01

    Kampene is a roughly 10,000 inhabitants village in Kivu, eastern region of Republic of Zaire. The equatorial rainforest in river Zaire basin surrounds it, far from the main and most crowded roads. Climate is warm and wet, rainfalls constant throughout ten months a years. Eighty seven per cent of the population of Kampene and of its administrative district (around 100,000 inhabitants) work in agriculture. Most of the remainder gets by on mineral search and mining (tin, cassiterite, gold). Health facilities and their organisation should be set up as according to Zaire Health Planning, worked out of 1977 Alma Ata Conference's guidelines on Primary Health Care, but actually they are hard to be implemented because of the wide territory, of the scattered settlements to be served, because of infrastructure and funds shortages. High children death ratio (roughly from 104 to 200/1000 altogether, short mean lifetimes and generally morbidity are caused by: parasitoses (malaria, filariasis, gut worms, bilharziosis, amebiasis), bacterial infections (breast feeding babies' toxic enteritis, tuberculosis, salmonellosis, shigellosis, gonococcosis, tetanus, epidemic meningitis), viral diseases (measles, poliomyelitis, virus B hepatitis, AIDS), protein-energy malnutrition, obstetric pathology (uterus fractures, ectopic pregnancy, obstructed labour). The management of Kampene Hospital is taken over by a Zaire-Italian team, according to the "Progetto Socio-Sanitario a Kampene", project carried out by Centro Volontari Marchigiani, a not-governmental organisation recognized and financed by Italian Foreign Office. The utilization of Kampene hospital wards has been investigated throughout 20 months (since 1/1/1986 to 31/8/1987) by working some parameters out: numbers of admissions, numbers of hospital days, man length of stay, bed occupancy rate, turnover index for bed. The utilisation of outpatient clinic has been investigated by means of the number of outpatients and outpatients per

  18. Are Public Health Organizations Tweeting to the Choir? Understanding Local Health Department Twitter Followership

    PubMed Central

    Choucair, Bechara; Maier, Ryan C; Jolani, Nina; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the essential services provided by the US local health departments is informing and educating constituents about health. Communication with constituents about public health issues and health risks is among the standards required of local health departments for accreditation. Past research found that only 61% of local health departments met standards for informing and educating constituents, suggesting a considerable gap between current practices and best practice. Objective Social media platforms, such as Twitter, may aid local health departments in informing and educating their constituents by reaching large numbers of people with real-time messages at relatively low cost. Little is known about the followers of local health departments on Twitter. The aim of this study was to examine characteristics of local health department Twitter followers and the relationship between local health department characteristics and follower characteristics. Methods In 2013, we collected (using NodeXL) and analyzed a sample of 4779 Twitter followers from 59 randomly selected local health departments in the United States with Twitter accounts. We coded each Twitter follower for type (individual, organization), location, health focus, and industry (eg, media, government). Local health department characteristics were adopted from the 2010 National Association of City and County Health Officials Profile Study data. Results Local health department Twitter accounts were followed by more organizations than individual users. Organizations tended to be health-focused, located outside the state from the local health department being followed, and from the education, government, and non-profit sectors. Individuals were likely to be local and not health-focused. Having a public information officer on staff, serving a larger population, and “tweeting” more frequently were associated with having a higher percentage of local followers. Conclusions Social media has the

  19. The World Health Organization: Is It Still Relevant?

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is the United Nation's lead agency for directing and coordinating health. As leaders, nurse executives must advocate for a stronger nursing and midwifery health policy agenda at the global level and a seat at the table on WHO's technical advisory bodies and expert committees. There are no more borders as nurse executives; we are global citizens, leading global change. Nurse leaders hold the master key to shape the world's policies for sustainable global development. PMID:26281282

  20. Towards a Healthy District: Organizing and Managing District Health Systems Based on Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarimo, E.

    This book is concerned with orienting health care workers in district health systems in developing countries to ways and means of overcoming problems, and describes briefly how district health systems can be improved. The book is organized around nine issues in nine chapters, each of which is an integral part of a district planning cycle. The…

  1. Health politics meets post-modernism: its meaning and implications for community health organizing.

    PubMed

    Rosenau, P V

    1994-01-01

    In this article, post-modern theory is described and applied to health politics with examples from community health organizing, social movements, and health promotion. Post-modernism questions conventional assumptions about concepts such as representation, participation, empowerment, community, identity, causality, accountability, responsibility, authority, and roles in community health promotion (those of expert, leader, and organizer). I compare post-modern social movements with their modern counterparts: the organizational forms, leadership styles, and substantive intellectual orientations of the two differ. I explain the social planning, community development, and social action models of community health organizing, comparing them with the priorities of post-modern social movements, and show the similarities and differences between them as to structural preferences, process, and strategies. Finally, and most importantly, I present the implicit lessons that post-modernism offers to health politics and outline the strengths and weaknesses of this approach to health politics. PMID:8077633

  2. The health maintenance organization strategy: a corporate takeover of health services delivery.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J W

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a political economic framework for viewing the social organization of the delivery of health care servies and predicting a qualitatively different institutional configuration involving the health maintenance organization. The principal forces impacting American capitalism today are leading to a fundamental restructuring for increased social efficiency of the entire social welfare sector, including the health services industry. The method to achieve this restructuring involves health policy directed at raising the contribution to the social surplus from the delivery of health care services and eventual corporate domination. The health maintenance organization conceptualization is examined with suggestions as to how the HMO strategy promoted by the state leads to this corporate takeover. The mechanism and extent of the present corporate involvement are examined and implications of health services as a social control mechanism are presented. PMID:1230440

  3. The World Health Organization Global Health Emergency Workforce: What Role Will the United States Play?

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2016-08-01

    During the May 2016 World Health Assembly of 194 member states, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the process of developing and launching emergency medical teams as a critical component of the global health workforce concept. Over 64 countries have either launched or are in the development stages of vetting accredited teams, both international and national, to provide surge support to national health systems through WHO Regional Organizations and the delivery of emergency clinical care to sudden-onset disasters and outbreak-affected populations. To date, the United States has not yet committed to adopting the emergency medical team concept in funding and registering an international field hospital level team. This article discusses future options available for health-related nongovernmental organizations and the required educational and training requirements for health care provider accreditation. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:531-535). PMID:27364937

  4. The normative authority of the World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Gostin, L O; Sridhar, D; Hougendobler, D

    2015-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) was born after the devastation of World War II, as a normative agency endowed with unprecedented constitutional powers. But even as it has achieved stunning successes, such as the eradication of smallpox, it has failed to live up to the exalted expectations of the postwar health and human rights movement - exemplified most recently by its inadequate response to the Ebola epidemic. Our aim is to offer innovative ideas for restoring the Organization to its leadership position by exercising its normative authority, even as it faces a crowded and often chaotic global health architecture. Before doing so, it will be helpful to summarize the main tensions the Organization faces in today's global health landscape. PMID:26100341

  5. The contributions of Henry E. Sigerist to health service organization.

    PubMed

    Terris, M

    1975-01-01

    Henry E. Sigerist made profound and strikingly original contributions to health service organization. Not only did he expand greatly our concepts of the functions of medicine, but he redefined health in a manner which was later to be paraphrased by the World Health Organization. Sigerist's account of the evolution of the physician and his discussion of the role of the people in the fight for health provide important new insights into current realities, while his remarkable analysis of the genesis of national health insurance makes it possible to understand its continued absence in the United States. Although he was in the forefront of the campaign for national health insurance, Sigbrist always considered it inferior to a national health service. His thorough studies of the Soviet national health service opened new vistas in the promotion of health and prevention of disease and the development of team practice in health centers. Sigerist's impact was world-wide, and was particularly important in Chile, Cuba, China, and Great Britain. PMID:765888

  6. Can organizations benefit from worksite health promotion?

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, L C

    1989-01-01

    A decision-analytic model was developed to project the future effects of selected worksite health promotion activities on employees' likelihood of chronic disease and injury and on employer costs due to illness. The model employed a conservative set of assumptions and a limited five-year time frame. Under these assumptions, hypertension control and seat belt campaigns prevent a substantial amount of illness, injury, and death. Sensitivity analysis indicates that these two programs pay for themselves and under some conditions show a modest savings to the employer. Under some conditions, smoking cessation programs pay for themselves, preventing a modest amount of illness and death. Cholesterol reduction by behavioral means does not pay for itself under these assumptions. These findings imply priorities in prevention for employer and employee alike. PMID:2499556

  7. [The organization of health services: the comparison as contribution].

    PubMed

    Conill, E M; Mendonça, M H; da Silva, R A; Gawryszewski, V

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses about a recent procedure in health care studies, the comparison as a methodology of analysis. The different analytical currents refer to a particular method of understanding health-disease process. They are: functionalism, the historical-materialism and the new currents. Their phylosophical and sociological basis, concepts, analysis instruments and purposes are showed here by a review of the principal works from representative authors as Navarro, Terris, Roemer, Fry, Illich, Capra and others. The paper suggests that comparative analysis can take two directions: the first is a operational approach for analysing the concrete situations of health's service organization, the second, a more conceptual one, aimed at identifying critical questions and international tendencies in health's systems. The recent discussion search for the overcoming of these dichotomies toward the progress of the production of knowledge and its effects in health's services organization. PMID:15806244

  8. Modification of Treatment of Certain Health Organizations. Final regulations.

    PubMed

    2016-06-22

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance to Blue Cross and Blue Shield organizations, and certain other organizations, on computing and applying the medical loss ratio and the consequences for not meeting the medical loss ratio threshold. The final regulations reflect the enactment of a technical correction to section 833(c)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code by the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2015. The final regulations affect Blue Cross and Blue Shield organizations, and certain other organizations involved in providing health insurance. PMID:27373011

  9. The contribution of organization theory to nursing health services research.

    PubMed

    Mick, Stephen S; Mark, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    We review nursing and health services research on health care organizations over the period 1950 through 2004 to reveal the contribution of nursing to this field. Notwithstanding this rich tradition and the unique perspective of nursing researchers grounded in patient care production processes, the following gaps in nursing research remain: (1) the lack of theoretical frameworks about organizational factors relating to internal work processes; (2) the need for sophisticated methodologies to guide empirical investigations; (3) the difficulty in understanding how organizations adapt models for patient care delivery in response to market forces; (4) the paucity of attention to the impact of new technologies on the organization of patient care work processes. Given nurses' deep understanding of the inner workings of health care facilities, we hope to see an increasing number of research programs that tackle these deficiencies. PMID:16360704

  10. The Pan American Health Organization and international health: a history of training, conceptualization, and collective development.

    PubMed

    Auer, Annella; Guerrero Espinel, Juan Eduardo

    2011-08-01

    A constantly changing and increasingly complex global environment requires leaders with special competencies to respond effectively to this scenario. Within this context, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) goes beyond traditional leadership training models both in terms of its design as well as its conceptual approach to international health. As an intergovernmental, centenary organization in health, PAHO allows participants a unique vantage point from which to conceptualize, share experiences and develop projects relevant to international health. Derived from over two decades of experience (1985-2006) training professionals through its predessor Training Program in International Health, the Leaders in International Health Program "Edmundo Granda Ugalde" (LIHP) utilizes an innovative design, virtual and practical learning activities, and a problem-based approach to analyze the main concepts, theories, actors, forces, and processes relevant to international health. In collaboration with PAHO/WHO Representative Offices and national institutions, participants develop country projects based on priority health issues, many of which are integrated into the Organization's technical cooperation and/or implemented by relevant ministries and other entities in their respective countries/subregions. A total of 185 participants representing 31 countries have participated in the LIHP since its inception in 2008, building upon the 187 trained through its predecessor. These initiatives have contributed to the development of health professionals in the Region of the Americas devoted to international health, as well as provided important input towards a conceptual understanding of international health by fostering debate on this issue. PMID:22159721

  11. Case management in the social health maintenance organization demonstrations

    PubMed Central

    Yordi, Cathleen L.

    1988-01-01

    In this article, case management departments and roles during the early years of the social health maintenance organization (S/HMO) demonstrations are compared. These organizations provide acute and chronic care services under a prepaid plan for the elderly. Eligibility criteria for case management and chronic care services at each site are compared, followed by a description of the resultant case mix of members receiving chronic care benefits. Case managers principal activities are described, and a preliminary assessment is made about the strength of the linkages that have been developed between the case management component of these plans and the larger health care system. PMID:10312977

  12. Selection bias in health maintenance organizations: Analysis of recent evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, Fred J.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of recent research regarding selection bias in health maintenance organizations (HMO's) is presented in this article. Review of the available literature leads one to conclude that prepaid group practice HMO's do experience favorable selection. It has been demonstrated in numerous studies that prior use of health services by HMO enrollees is less than prior use of health services by those who remain in the fee-for-service sector, and there is considerable evidence that shows a statistically significant positive relationship between prior use and current use. This is true for both those under 65 years of age and those 65 years of age or over. PMID:10312393

  13. Mental Snapshots: Creating an Organized Plan for Health Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fosbrook, Susan Curro

    2015-01-01

    Beginning nursing students enter a rapidly moving and changing health care climate. Multiple stimulations can frighten and overwhelm the student's ability to find order of essential patient information. Students need to know how to collect, process, and manage important health data accurately and efficiently in the clinical setting. An integrative method for teaching nursing students to walk into the patient's room and construct a patterned sequence of focused assessments assists students in creating an organized plan for health assessment. The Mental Snapshots Method includes three components for health assessment: (a) sequential assessment steps of the patient; (b) color-coded visual images of the patient representing a bodily condition; and (c) focused assessment questions of primary health complaint(s) with a plan for nursing care. This mental snapshots strategy employs an information processing model of sensory, memory, and motor functioning, which enable students to maintain patient quality and safety. PMID:26428347

  14. Analysis and implementation of a World Health Organization health report: methodological concepts and strategies.

    PubMed

    von Groote, Per Maximilian; Giustini, Alessandro; Bickenbach, Jerome Edmond

    2014-01-01

    A long-standing scientific discourse on the use of health research evidence to inform policy has come to produce multiple implementation theories, frameworks, models, and strategies. It is from this extensive body of research that the authors extract and present essential components of an implementation process in the health domain, gaining valuable guidance on how to successfully meet the challenges of implementation. Furthermore, this article describes how implementation content can be analyzed and reorganized, with a special focus on implementation at different policy, systems and services, and individual levels using existing frameworks and tools. In doing so, the authors aim to contribute to the establishment and testing of an implementation framework for reports such as the World Health Organization World Report on Disability, the World Health Organization International Perspectives on Spinal Cord Injury, and other health policy reports or technical health guidelines. PMID:24356078

  15. Associations between state minimum wage policy and health care access: a multi-level analysis of the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor survey.

    PubMed

    McCarrier, Kelly P; Martin, Diane P; Ralston, James D; Zimmerman, Frederick J

    2010-05-01

    Minimum wage policies have been advanced as mechanisms to improve the economic conditions of the working poor. Both positive and negative effects of such policies on health care access have been hypothesized, but associations have yet to be thoroughly tested. To examine whether the presence of minimum wage policies in excess of the federal standard of $5.15 per hour was associated with health care access indicators among low-skilled adults of working age, a cross-sectional analysis of 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data was conducted. Self-reported health insurance status and experience with cost-related barriers to needed medical care were adjusted in multi-level logistic regression models to control for potential confounding at the state, county, and individual levels. State-level wage policy was not found to be associated with insurance status or unmet medical need in the models, providing early evidence that increased minimum wage rates may neither strengthen nor weaken access to care as previously predicted. PMID:20453369

  16. Community Organization and Mental Health; The Woodlawn Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Michael D.; Lewis, Judith A.

    A paraprofessional training program designed to provide community controlled mental health services to the Woodlawn community of Chicago, Illinois, is described in this monograph. The neighborhood and The Woodlawn Organization (T.W.O.A), a self help project formed in early 1960, are described from an historical perspective. Some of the areas…

  17. Professionalism: good for patients and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael D; Monson, Verna

    2014-05-01

    Professionalism is an indispensable element in the compact between the medical profession and society that is based on trust and putting the needs of patients above all other considerations. The resurgence of interest in professionalism dates back to the 1980s when health maintenance organizations were formed and proprietary influences in health care increased. Since then, a rich and comprehensive literature has emerged in defining professionalism, including desirable individual attributes and behaviors and how they may be taught, promoted, and assessed. More recently, scholarship has shifted from individual to organizational professionalism. This literature addresses the role that health care organizations can play to establish environments that are conducive to the consistent expression of professionalism by individuals and health care teams. We reviewed interdisciplinary empirical studies from health care effectiveness and outcomes, organizational sciences, positive psychology, and social psychology, finding evidence that organizational and individual professionalism is associated with a wide range of benefits to patients and the organization. We identify actionable organizational strategies and approaches that, if adopted, can foster and promote combined organizational and individual professionalism. In doing so, trust in the medical profession and its institutions can be enhanced, which in turn will reconfirm a commitment to the social compact. PMID:24797645

  18. Organizing and managing care in a changing health system.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, L T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine ways in which the management and organization of medical care is changing in response to the shifting incentives created by managed care. DATA SOURCES: Site visits conducted in 12 randomly selected communities in 1996/ 1997. STUDY DESIGN: Approximately 35-60 interviews were conducted per site with key informants in healthcare and community organizations; about half were with providers. DATA COLLECTION: A standardized interview protocol was implemented across all sites, enabling cross-site comparisons. Multiple respondents were interviewed on each issue. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A great deal of experimentation and apparent duplication exist in efforts to develop programs to influence physician practice patterns. Responsibility for managing care is being contested by health plans, medical groups and hospitals, as each seeks to accrue the savings that can result from the more efficient delivery of care. To manage the financial and clinical risk, providers are aggressively consolidating and reorganizing. Most significant was the rapid formation of intermediary organizations, such as independent practice arrangements (IPAs), physician-hospital organizations (PHOs), or management services organizations (MSOs), for contracting with managed care organizations. CONCLUSIONS: Managed care appears to have only a modest effect on how healthcare organizations deliver medical care, despite the profound effect that managed care has on how providers are organized. Rather than improving the efficiency of healthcare organizations, provider efforts to build large systems and become indispensable to health plans are exacerbating problems of excess capacity. It is not clear if new organizational arrangements will help providers manage the changing incentives they face, or if their intent is to blunt the effects of the incentives by forming larger organizations to improve their bargaining power and resist change. PMID:10778823

  19. A framework for describing health care delivery organizations and systems.

    PubMed

    Piña, Ileana L; Cohen, Perry D; Larson, David B; Marion, Lucy N; Sills, Marion R; Solberg, Leif I; Zerzan, Judy

    2015-04-01

    Describing, evaluating, and conducting research on the questions raised by comparative effectiveness research and characterizing care delivery organizations of all kinds, from independent individual provider units to large integrated health systems, has become imperative. Recognizing this challenge, the Delivery Systems Committee, a subgroup of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Effective Health Care Stakeholders Group, which represents a wide diversity of perspectives on health care, created a draft framework with domains and elements that may be useful in characterizing various sizes and types of care delivery organizations and may contribute to key outcomes of interest. The framework may serve as the door to further studies in areas in which clear definitions and descriptions are lacking. PMID:24922130

  20. New systems of work organization and workers' health.

    PubMed

    Kompier, Michiel A J

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims at identifying major changes in and around work organizations, their effects upon job characteristics and the health and well-being of today's employees, and related research challenges. Increased internationalization and competition, increased utilization of information and communication technology, the changing workforce configuration, and flexibility and new organizational practices are considered. As work has changed from physical to mental in nature, job characteristics have changed significantly. Meanwhile work and family life have blended. New systems of work organization have become more prevalent, but they do not represent a radical change across the whole economy. New practices may have an adverse impact upon job characteristics, but their effects depend on their design, implementation, and management. Research recommendations include improved monitoring of changes in work organization and studies into their health and safety consequences, intervention studies, studies into the motivating potential of modern work practices, studies of marginalized workers and workers in less developed countries, and "mechanism studies". PMID:17173199

  1. A Message for Governors and State Legislators: "The Minimum Competency Approach Can Be Bad for the Health of Higher Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anrig, Gregory R.

    Aspects of proposed higher education reforms that involve assessment of students learning are clarified by the president of the Educational Testing Service. Governors and state legislators are advised not to adopt state minimum competency standards for higher education. It is claimed that the responsibility for setting instructional standards and…

  2. Determination of Minimum Data Set (MSD) in Echocardiography Reporting System to Exchange with Iran’s Electronic Health Record (EHR) System

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudvand, Zahra; Kamkar, Mehran; Shahmoradi, Leila; Nejad, Ahmadreza Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Determination of minimum data set (MDS) in echocardiography reports is necessary for documentation and putting information in a standard way, and leads to the enhancement of electrocardiographic studies through having access to precise and perfect reports and also to the development of a standard database for electrocardiographic reports. Aim: to determine the minimum data set of echocardiography reporting system to exchange with Iran’s electronic health record (EHR) system. Methods: First, a list of minimum data set was prepared after reviewing texts and studying cardiac patients’ records. Then, to determine the content validity of the prepared MDS, the expert views of 10 cardiologists and 10 health information management (HIM) specialists were obtained; to estimate the reliability of the set, test-retest method was employed. Finally, the data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The highest degree of consensus was found for the following MDSs: patient’s name and family name (5), accepting doctor’s name and family name, familial death records due to cardiac disorders, the image identification code, mitral valve, aortic valve, tricuspid valve, pulmonary valve, left ventricle, hole, atrium valve, Doppler examination of ventricular and atrial movement models and diagnoses with an average of. Conclusions: To prepare a model of echocardiography reporting system to exchange with EHR system, creation a standard data set is the vital point. Therefore, based on the research findings, the minimum reporting system data to exchange with Iran’s electronic health record system include information on entity, management, medical record, carried-out acts, and the main content of the echocardiography report, which the planners of reporting system should consider. PMID:27147803

  3. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  4. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  5. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or tribal organization's financial management system contain to meet these standards? 900.45 Section... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... financial management system contain to meet these standards? An Indian tribe or tribal...

  6. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... or tribal organization's financial management system contain to meet these standards? 900.45 Section... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... financial management system contain to meet these standards? An Indian tribe or tribal...

  7. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... or tribal organization's financial management system contain to meet these standards? 900.45 Section... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... financial management system contain to meet these standards? An Indian tribe or tribal...

  8. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... or tribal organization's financial management system contain to meet these standards? 900.45 Section... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... financial management system contain to meet these standards? An Indian tribe or tribal...

  9. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or tribal organization's financial management system contain to meet these standards? 900.45 Section... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... financial management system contain to meet these standards? An Indian tribe or tribal...

  10. 78 FR 25909 - Minimum Value of Eligible Employer-Sponsored Plans and Other Rules Regarding the Health Insurance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... that applies to qualified health plans. The preamble to the HHS regulations (see 78 FR 12833) notes... Other Rules Regarding the Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable...

  11. Health maintenance organization environments in the 1980s and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Ellen M.; Luft, Harold S.

    1990-01-01

    Throughout the past decade, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) were buffeted by dramatic regulatory and competitive changes. In this article, literature of the 1980s is reviewed to update our knowledge on the HMO industry and to suggest future research. The influence of intensified competition on these organizations and the determinants of market entry, expansion, and exit are examined. These organizations are now beginning to require copayments and deductibles and to offer point-of-service choice, while indemnity plans are developing sophisticated utilization management techniques. Given these significant structural changes, past distinctions among HMO, preferred provider organization and fee-for-service medicine must be replaced with a distinction between degree of provider choice and level of benefits. PMID:10113465

  12. Building IT capability in health-care organizations.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Naresh

    2006-05-01

    While computer technology has revolutionized industries such as banking and airlines, it has done little for health care so far. Most of the health-care organizations continue the early-computer-era practice of buying the latest technology without knowing how it might effectively be employed in achieving business goals. By investing merely in information technology (IT) rather than in IT capabilities they acquire IT components--primarily hardware, software, and vendor-provided services--which they do not understand and, as a result, are not capable of fully utilizing for achieving organizational objectives. In the absence of internal IT capabilities, health-care organizations have relied heavily on the fragmented IT vendor market in which vendors do not offer an open architecture, and are unwilling to offer electronic interfaces that would make their 'closed' systems compatible with those of other vendors. They are hamstrung as a result because they have implemented so many different technologies and databases that information stays in silos. Health systems can meet this challenge by developing internal IT capabilities that would allow them to seamlessly integrate clinical and business IT systems and develop innovative uses of IT. This paper develops a comprehensive conception of IT capability grounded in the resource-based theory of the firm as a remedy to the woes of IT investments in health care. PMID:16643706

  13. Applying total quality management concepts to public health organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzny, A D; McLaughlin, C P; Simpson, K

    1992-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is a participative, systematic approach to planning and implementing a continuous organizational improvement process. Its approach is focused on satisfying customers' expectations, identifying problems, building commitment, and promoting open decision-making among workers. TQM applies analytical tools, such as flow and statistical charts and check sheets, to gather data about activities within an organization. TQM uses process techniques, such as nominal groups, brainstorming, and consensus forming to facilitate communication and decision making. TQM applications in the public sector and particularly in public health agencies have been limited. The process of integrating TQM into public health agencies complements and enhances the Model Standards Program and assessment methodologies, such as the Assessment Protocol for Excellence in Public Health (APEX-PH), which are mechanisms for establishing strategic directions for public health. The authors examine the potential for using TQM as a method to achieve and exceed standards quickly and efficiently. They discuss the relationship of performance standards and assessment methodologies with TQM and provide guidelines for achieving the full potential of TQM in public health organizations. The guidelines include redefining the role of management, defining a common corporate culture, refining the role of citizen oversight functions, and setting realistic estimates of the time needed to complete a task or project. PMID:1594734

  14. Back to the future? Health benefits, organized labor, and universal health care.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Marie

    2007-12-01

    The umbrella of employment-based health benefits is growing increasingly threadbare. As a result, health benefits are once again a major arena of labor-management strife, and once again calls for universal health care by many labor leaders mask important differences between them over health care reform. Some labor leaders advocate a bottom-up mobilization in support of a single-payer solution that would dismantle the system of job-based benefits rooted in private insurance. Others stake their health care strategy on wooing key business leaders to be constructive partners in some kind of unspecified comprehensive reform of the health system. Organized labor faces enormous obstacles, both institutional and ideological, to forging an effective united front to fight for comprehensive, high-quality, affordable health care for all. Two entrenched features of the shadow welfare state of job-based benefits, notably the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) of 1974 and the union-run health and welfare funds created under the Taft-Hartley Act, remain daunting barriers on the road to reform, exacerbating tensions and differences within organized labor. Moreover, a dramatic ideological schism in the labor movement about its future direction vexes its stance on health care reform. These ideological differences fuel vastly different views within organized labor about how best to confront the unraveling of job-based health benefits and the growing popularity among business leaders, insurers, and public officials of the "individual-mandate" solution, which would penalize people who do not have adequate health insurance. PMID:18000156

  15. Minimum Value of Eligible Employer-Sponsored Plans and Other Rules Regarding the Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit. Final regulations.

    PubMed

    2015-12-18

    This document contains final regulations on the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, as amended by the Medicare and Medicaid Extenders Act of 2010, the Comprehensive 1099 Taxpayer Protection and Repayment of Exchange Subsidy Overpayments Act of 2011, and the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011. These final regulations affect individuals who enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges, sometimes called Marketplaces) and claim the health insurance premium tax credit, and Exchanges that make qualified health plans available to individuals and employers. PMID:26685369

  16. Work organization and the health of bank employees.

    PubMed

    Silva, Juliana Lemos; Navarro, Vera Lucia

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilian banking sector has undergone an intense restructuring process and taken a leading position in the incorporation of new technologies and organizational innovations. Computerization in the industry, in association with forms of work organization, has resulted in changes that reflect on the workers' health. Based on the theoretical and methodological frameworks of historical and dialectical materialism, this qualitative study investigates the work conditions of bank employees in order to identify the extent to which changes in work organization interfere with these workers' health. Data were collected through interviews held with 11 bank employees. In addition to physical sickening due to occupational diseases directly related to work intensification, the results also show an increased incidence of mental suffering and a feeling of loss of professional identity. Work-related frustration, instability and concerns related to psychological pressure resulting from the need to achieve goals predominated in the reports. PMID:22699722

  17. [Malaria and activities of the World Health Organization].

    PubMed

    Nájera, J A

    1991-08-01

    Malaria has been one of the main health problems demanding the attention of WHO from the time the Organization was created. This review of the historical record analyzes the different approaches to the malaria problem in the past 40 years and shows how WHO tried to fulfill its constitutional mandate. The article exposes the historical roots of the present situation and helps towards an understanding of current problems and approaches to malaria control. PMID:1834084

  18. Adoption of Clinical Information Systems in Health Services Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Charles J.; Holland, Gloria J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model of factors which influence organizational decisions to invest in the installation of clinical information systems. Using results of previous research as a framework, the relative influence of clinical, fiscal, and strategic-institutional decision structures are examined. These adoption decisions are important in health services organizations because clinical information is essential for managing demand and allocating resources, managing quality of care, and controlling costs.

  19. Hispanic Medical Organizations' Support for LGBT Health Issues.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, John Paul; Sola, Orlando; Ramallo, Jorge; Sánchez, Nelson Felix; Dominguez, Kenneth; Romero-Leggott, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Hispanics represent the fastest growing ethnic segment of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States and are disproportionately burdened by LGBT-related health issues and limited political support from Hispanic medical organizations. Recently, the Latino Medical Student Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, and the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools, representing over 60,000 Hispanic students and providers and 35 institutions, collaborated to support a resolution opposing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity and recognizing the obstacles encountered by LGBTQ Hispanics. The resolution provides an important framework for organizational members and leaders to address LGBT health issues and serve to support a more positive sociopolitical climate for the Hispanic LGBT community nationally and internationally. PMID:26789708

  20. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves. PMID:20200865

  1. Improving Coordination of Addiction Health Services Organizations with Mental Health and Public Health Services.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Erick G; Andrews, Christina; Harris, Lesley; Padwa, Howard; Kong, Yinfei; M S W, Karissa Fenwick

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, we examined coordination of mental health and public health services in addiction health services (AHS) in low-income racial and ethnic minority communities in 2011 and 2013. Data from surveys and semistructured interviews were used to evaluate the extent to which environmental and organizational characteristics influenced the likelihood of high coordination with mental health and public health providers among outpatient AHS programs. Coordination was defined and measured as the frequency of interorganizational contact among AHS programs and mental health and public health providers. The analytic sample consisted of 112 programs at time 1 (T1) and 122 programs at time 2 (T2), with 61 programs included in both periods of data collection. Forty-three percent of AHS programs reported high frequency of coordination with mental health providers at T1 compared to 66% at T2. Thirty-one percent of programs reported high frequency of coordination with public health services at T1 compared with 54% at T2. Programs with culturally responsive resources and community linkages were more likely to report high coordination with both services. Qualitative analysis highlighted the role of leadership in leveraging funding and developing creative solutions to deliver coordinated care. Overall, our findings suggest that AHS program funding, leadership, and cultural competence may be important drivers of program capacity to improve coordination with health service providers to serve minorities in an era of health care reform. PMID:26350114

  2. The new organization of the health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Shortell, S M; Hull, K E

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is restructuring at a dizzying pace. In many parts of the country, managed care has moved into third-generation models emphasizing capitated payment for enrolled lives and, in the process, turning most providers and institutions into cost centers to be managed rather than generators of revenue. While the full impact of the new managed care models remains to be seen, most evidence to date suggests that it tends to reduce inpatient use, may be associated with greater use of physician services and preventive care, and appears to result in no net differences either positive or negative with regard to quality or outcomes of care in comparison with fee-for-service plans. Some patients, however, tend to be somewhat less satisfied with scheduling of appointments and the amount of time spent with providers. There is no persuasive evidence that managed care lowers the rate of growth in overall health care costs within a given market. Further, managed care performance varies considerably across the country, and the factors influencing managed care performance are not well understood. Organized delivery systems are a somewhat more recent phenomenon representing various forms of ownership and strategic alliances among hospitals, physicians, and insurers designed to provide more cost-effective care to defined populations by achieving desired levels of functional, physician-system, and clinical integration. Early evidence suggests that organized delivery systems that are more integrated have the potential to provide more accessible coordinated care across the continuum, and appear to be associated with higher levels of inpatient productivity, greater total system revenue, greater total system cash flow, and greater total system operating margin than less integrated delivery forms. Some key success factors for developing organized delivery systems have been identified. Important roles are played by organizational culture, information systems, internal

  3. The future of global health cooperation: designing a new World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Forss, K; Stenson, B; Sterky, G

    1996-06-01

    This article discusses some needed changes to the functioning and management of the World Health Organization (WHO). WHO is unable to meet new challenges and needs reform. The Executive Board of WHO initiated an internal review in 1992 that led to a management-related focus, while informal groups within the agency tackled funding constraints. Some governments and nongovernmental groups have proposed reorganization of international health assistance. The authors urge that the public health sector and researchers join the reform effort. WHO was established in 1948 and was the sole global health agency. The demand for greater international health cooperation has increased over time. WHO is an association of sovereign states. WHO demonstrated success in eliminating smallpox, promotion of health policy, collection and dissemination of epidemiologic information, and establishment of standards in health care and medical ethics. WHO staff comprises about 5000 persons. The annual budget is too small at about US$900 million. In 1995 only 56% of receipts were collected. WHO's constitution mandates complete health for all, but there has been a widening gap between rich and poor and those with access to health services and those without. Absolute and relative poverty are the main determinants of premature mortality and ill health. The major challenge for health policy is this disparity; the focus of international collaboration should be on this issue. The machine metaphor of organizational structure no longer works in today's world. The authors propose that WHO limit functions in health development and create a full mandate for dealing with determinants of health. WHO should be participatory, open to constituents, autonomous, and flexible. Member states must be more powerful in policy formulation. Program implementation should occur in independent programs in a decentralized system. PMID:12291612

  4. Health of returnees in Osijek Region and required special measures of health care and community organization.

    PubMed

    Prlić, Lidija; Ebling, Zdravko; Glavina, Kresimir; Gmajnić, Rudika; Vuletić, Gorka; Kovacić, Luka; Tokalić, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Many citizens from the Osijek-Baranja County, in order to survive, left their homes during the 1991/92 war in Croatia and spent between 5 and 7 years in exile. The aim of this pilot research was to assess the health status (physical, mental and social) of refugee /returnee population and their use of health services, to identify the factors influencing their adaptation, and to propose the health programs, psychological and social support, which could help foster integration into the social and community life, education and employment. The study was done on a randomized sample of 589 respondents using the 2003 Croatian Health Survey with an additional questionnaire related to the problems of returnees. The results of the study show good organization of health service in returnees' communities, with exception of gynecological and dental services. There was also a presence of health transportation problem and the problem in the supply of medicines. Finally, the results show that the returnees' communities were dominated by social problems such as lack of employment, lack of support for elderly, poverty, and concerns for children's prospects. This implies the necessity for intervention in both mental and social aspects. Measures to be undertaken in the next stage of the Project will be aimed at the work in the refugee communities and based on public health working methods such as organization of the community by stimulating intergenerational solidarity, education and raising awareness of self-help. PMID:15571108

  5. Information technology and knowledge exchange in health-care organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Vimarlund, V.; Timpka, T.; Patel, V. L.

    1999-01-01

    Despite the increasing global interest in information technology among health care institutions, little has been discussed about its importance for the effectiveness of knowledge management. In this study, economic theories are used to analyze and describe a theoretical framework for the use of information technology in the exchange of knowledge. The analyses show that health care institutions would benefit from developing global problem-solving collaboration, which allows practitioners to exchange knowledge unrestricted by time and geographical barriers. The use of information technology for vertical integration of health-care institutions would reduce knowledge transaction costs, i.e. decrease costs for negotiating and creating communication channels, and facilitating the determination of what, when, and how to produce knowledge. A global network would allow organizations to increase existing knowledge, and thus total productivity, while also supporting an environment where the generation of new ideas is unrestricted. Using all the intellectual potential of market actors and thereby releasing economic resources can reduce today's global budget conflicts in the public sector, i.e. the necessity to choose between health care services and, for instance, schools and support for the elderly. In conclusion, global collaboration and coordination would reduce the transaction costs inherent in knowledge administration and allow a more effective total use of scarce health-care resources. PMID:10566436

  6. Mental health disorders and solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Chris; Armstrong, Matthew J; Parker, Richard; Webb, Kerry; Neuberger, James M

    2013-10-15

    Depression affects up to 60% of solid-organ recipients and is independently associated with both mortality (hazard ratio for death of ~2) and de novo malignancy after transplantation, although the mechanism is not clear. Both pretransplantation psychosis and depression occurring more than 2 years after transplantation are associated with increased noncompliance and graft loss. It remains to be shown that effective treatment of depression is associated with improved outcomes and quality of life. Immunosuppressive drugs (especially corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors) and physiologic challenges can precipitate deterioration in mental health. All potential transplant candidates should be assessed for mental health problems and preexisting medical conditions that can mimic mental health problems, such as uremic, hepatic, or hypoxic encephalopathy, should be identified and treated appropriately. Expert mental health review of those with identified risk factors (such as previous suicide attempts, history of mental illness or noncompliance with medications) is advisable early in the transplant assessment process to mitigate risk and support the patient. Patients with mental health disorders, when adequately controlled and socially supported, have outcomes similar to the general transplant population. Therefore, exclusion from transplantation based on the diagnosis alone is neither ethically nor medically justified. However, it is ethically and clinically justifiable to deny access to transplantation to those who, despite full support, would have a quality of life that is unacceptable to the candidate or are likely to be noncompliant with treatment or follow-up, which would lead to graft loss. PMID:23743726

  7. The Effects of Organic Pollutants in Soil on Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lynn

    2013-04-01

    The soil has always been depository of the organic chemicals produced naturally or anthropogenically. Soil contamination is a serious human and environmental problem. A large body of evidence has shown the risks of adverse health effects with the exposure to contaminated soil due to the large quantities of organic chemicals used in agriculture and urban areas that have a legacy of environmental pollution linked to industrial activities, coal burning, motor vehicle emissions, waste incineration and waste dumping. In agricultural areas, because of the effort to provide adequate quantities of agricultural products, farmers have been using an increasing amount of organic chemicals, but the resulting pollution has enormous potential for environmental damage. The types of organic pollutants commonly found in soils are polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides, herbicides and organic fuels, especially gasoline and diesel. Another source of soil pollution is the complex mixture of organic chemicals, metals and microorganisms in the effluent from septic systems, animal wastes and other sources of biowaste. The soils of the world are a vast mixture of chemicals and although conditions are such that an individual is rarely exposed to a single compound, the great majority of people are exposed to a vast chemical mixture of organics, their metabolites, and other compounds at low concentrations Human exposure to organic pollutants in the soil is an area of toxicology that is very difficult to study due to the low concentration of the pollutants. The toxicological studies of single organic pollutants found in soils are limited and research on the metabolites and of chemical mixtures is very limited. The majority of toxicological studies are conducted at relatively high doses and for short periods of exposure. This makes the application of this data to exposure

  8. The Pan American Health Organization and the mainstreaming of human rights in regional health governance.

    PubMed

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Ayala, Ana S

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of centralized human rights leadership in an increasingly fragmented global health policy landscape, regional health offices have stepped forward to advance the rights-based approach to health. Reviewing the efforts of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), this article explores the evolution of human rights in PAHO policy, assesses efforts to mainstream human rights in the Pan American Sanitary Bureau (PASB), and analyzes the future of the rights-based approach through regional health governance, providing lessons for other regional health offices and global health institutions. This article explores PAHO's 15-year effort to mainstream human rights through PASB technical units, national capacity-building, the Inter-American human rights system, and the PAHO Directing Council. Through documentary analysis of PAHO policies and semi-structured interviews with key PASB stakeholders, the authors analyze the understandings and actions of policymakers and technical officers in implementing human rights through PAHO governance. Analyzing the themes arising from this narrative, the authors examine the structural role of secretariat leadership, state support, legal expertise, and technical unit commitment in facilitating a rights-based approach to the health in the Americas. Human rights are increasingly framing PAHO efforts, and this analysis of the structures underlying PAHO's approach provides an understanding of the institutional determinants of the rights-based approach to health, highlighting generalizable themes for the mainstreaming of human rights through regional health governance. With this regional-level understanding of health governance, future national-level research can begin to understand the causal forces linking regional human rights work with national policy reforms and public health outcomes. PMID:25264093

  9. Tobacco and oral health--the role of the world health organization.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2003-01-01

    In addition to several other chronic diseases, tobacco use is a primary cause of many oral diseases and adverse oral conditions. For example, tobacco is a risk factor for oral cancer, periodontal disease, and congenital defects in children whose mothers smoke during pregnancy. The epidemic of tobacco use is one of the greatest threats to global health; sadly the future appears worse because of the globalization of marketing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has strengthened the work for effective control of tobacco use. At the World Health Assembly in May 2003 the Member States agreed on a groundbreaking public health treaty to control tobacco supply and consumption. The treaty covers tobacco taxation, smoking prevention and treatment, illicit trade, advertising, sponsorship and promotion, and product regulation. Oral health professionals and dental associations worldwide should consider this platform for their future work for tobacco prevention since in several countries they play an important role in communication with patients and communities. The WHO Oral Health Programme gives priority to tobacco control in many ways through the development of national and community programmes which incorporates oral health and tobacco issues, tobacco prevention through schools, tobacco risk assessment in countries, and design of modern surveillance systems on risk factors and oral health. Systematic evaluation of coordinated efforts should be carried out at country and inter-country levels. PMID:15643759

  10. 76 FR 58466 - Request for Comments on World Health Organization Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... influenza preparedness via the Federal Register on September 14, 2010; 75 FR 55776-55777. The Department of... International Trade Administration Request for Comments on World Health Organization Pandemic Influenza... the World Health Organization Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework (...

  11. The World Health Organization hand hygiene observation method.

    PubMed

    Sax, Hugo; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Chraïti, Marie-Noëlle; Boyce, John; Larson, Elaine; Pittet, Didier

    2009-12-01

    Monitoring hand hygiene adherence and providing performance feedback to health care workers is a critical component of multimodal hand hygiene promotion programs, but important variations exist in the way adherence is measured. Within the framework of the World Health Organization's (WHO) First Global Patient Safety Challenge known as "Clean Care is Safer Care," an evidence-based, user-centered concept, "My five moments for hand hygiene," has been developed for measuring, teaching, and reporting hand hygiene adherence. This concept is an integral part of the WHO's hand hygiene improvement strategy conceived to translate the WHO Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Health Care into practice. It has been tested in numerous health care facilities worldwide to ensure its applicability and adaptability to all settings irrespective of the resources available. Here we describe the WHO hand hygiene observation method in detail-the concept, the profile and the task of the observers, their training and validation, the data collection form, the scope, the selection of the observed staff, and the observation sessions-with the objective of making it accessible for universal use. Sample size estimates, survey analysis and report, and major bias and confounding factors associated with observation are discussed. PMID:20004812

  12. Leishmaniasis in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Postigo, Jose A Ruiz

    2010-11-01

    Leishmaniasis represents a major public health problem in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) of the World Health Organization (WHO). Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis are mainly seen in 14 of the 22 countries of the region. In several of these countries outbreaks have an apparent tendency to occur at around 10-year intervals. In 2008, some 100000 new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were reported. Foci of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania major, occur in Afghanistan, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, Morocco, Palestine, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia and Yemen. Anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, caused by L. tropica, occurs in Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Morocco, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Yemen. Anthroponotic visceral leishmaniasis, caused by L. donovani, occurs mainly in Sudan and Somalia. Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis, caused by L. infantum, occurs in most countries of the region. In order to address the problem of leishmaniasis in the EMR, WHO is supporting ministries of health through a strategic plan focusing on (a) training programme managers and health workers on diagnosis and case management; (b) establishing a harmonized regional surveillance system; (c) creating a regional network of experts; (d) promoting political commitment of national governments. PMID:20728317

  13. Demoralization in mental health organizations: leadership and social support help.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    Demoralization is a commonly observed feeling state that is characterized by a sense of loss of or threat to one's personal values or goals and a perceived inability to overcome obstacles toward achieving these goals. Demoralization has features in common with burnout and may precede or accompany it. Psychiatrists working in many mental health care organizational settings, be they in the public or private sectors, may be at particular risk for demoralization. This is due partly to stressors that threaten their own professional values because of factors such as programmatic cut backs, budgetary reductions and changing social emphases on the value of mental health treatments. They also may be at risk for demoralization because of the effects on them of the governance styles of the agencies in which they are employed. The leadership or governance style in large organizational settings often is authoritarian, hierarchical and bureaucratic, approaches that are antithetical to the more participative leadership styles favored by many mental health professionals in their clinical activities. Clinical leaders in mental health organizations must exhibit various competencies to successfully address demoralization in clinical staff and to provide a counterbalance to the effects of the governance style of many agencies in which they are employed. Appropriate leadership skills, sometimes too simplistically termed "social support", have been found to reduce burnout in various populations and are likely to lessen demoralization as well. This paper reviews these important leadership issues and the relationship of social support to recognized leadership competencies. PMID:22415227

  14. Serious crisis in the practice of international health by the World Health Organization: the Commission on Social Determinants of Health.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Debabar

    2006-01-01

    The Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) is the latest effort by the World Health Organization to improve health and narrow health inequalities through action on social determinants. The CSDH does not note that much work has already been done in this direction, does not make a sufficient attempt to analyze why earlier efforts failed to yield the desired results, and does not seem to have devised approaches to ensure that it will be more successful this time. The CSDH intends to complement the work of the earlier WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, which has not had the desired impact, and it is unclear how the CSDH can complement work that suffers from such serious infirmities. Inadequacies of both commissions reflect a crisis in the practice of international health at the WHO, stemming from a combination of unsatisfactory administrative practices and lack of technical competence to provide insights into the problems afflicting the most needy countries. Often the WHO has ended up distorting the rudimentary health systems of the poor countries, by pressuring them into accepting health policies, plans, and programs that lack sound scientific bases. The WHO no longer seems to take into account historical and political factors when it sets out to improve the health situation in low-income countries--which is supposed to be the focus of the CSDH. An alternative approach is suggested. PMID:17175839

  15. The minimum knowledge base for predicting organ-at-risk dose-volume levels and plan-related complications in IMRT planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao H.; Meyer, Robert R.; Shi, Leyuan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2010-04-01

    IMRT treatment planning requires consideration of two competing objectives: achieving the required amount of radiation for the planning target volume and minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to all other tissues. It is important for planners to understand the tradeoff between competing factors so that the time-consuming human interaction loop (plan-evaluate-modify) can be eliminated. Treatment-plan-surface models have been proposed as a decision support tool to aid treatment planners and clinicians in choosing between rival treatment plans in a multi-plan environment. In this paper, an empirical approach is introduced to determine the minimum number of treatment plans (minimum knowledge base) required to build accurate representations of the IMRT plan surface in order to predict organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume (DV) levels and complications as a function of input DV constraint settings corresponding to all involved OARs in the plan. We have tested our approach on five head and neck patients and five whole pelvis/prostate patients. Our results suggest that approximately 30 plans were sufficient to predict DV levels with less than 3% relative error in both head and neck and whole pelvis/prostate cases. In addition, approximately 30-60 plans were sufficient to predict saliva flow rate with less than 2% relative error and to classify rectal bleeding with an accuracy of 90%.

  16. Stability of frailty in the social/health maintenance organization.

    PubMed

    Hallfors, D; Leutz, W; Capitman, J; Ritter, G

    1994-01-01

    Although many long-term care (LTC) programs assume that the disabilities of their frail elderly participants are stable in nature, there has been suggestive evidence to the contrary. This study tests stability of disability among social/health maintenance organization (S/HMO) members who were judged eligible for admission into a nursing home. Identified persons were reassessed quarterly. By the end of 1 year, less than 50 percent were still considered to be nursing home eligible. Logit analysis revealed an increased likelihood of instability for persons who were newly identified as functionally disabled after hospitalization. Policy implications for capitated managed-care programs for the elderly are discussed. PMID:10138480

  17. Effect of Mergers on Health Maintenance Organization Premiums

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Roger; Wholey, Douglas; Christianson, Jon

    1996-01-01

    This study estimated the effect of mergers on health maintenance organization (HMO) premiums, using data on all operational non-Medicaid HMOs in the United States from 1985 to 1993. Two critical issues were examined: whether HMO mergers increase or decrease premiums; and whether the effects of mergers differ according to the degree of competition among HMOs in local markets. The only significant merger effect was found in the most competitive markets, where premiums increased, but only for 1 year after the merger. Our research does not support the argument that consolidation of HMOs in local markets will benefit consumers through lower premiums. PMID:10158729

  18. Alternative geographic configurations for Medicare payments to health maintenance organizations.

    PubMed

    Porell, F W; Tompkins, C P; Turner, W M

    1990-01-01

    Under prevailing legislation, Medicare payments to health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are based upon projected fee-for-service reimbursement levels for enrollees' county of residence. These rates have been criticized in light of substantial variations in rates among neighboring counties and large fluctuations in rates over time. In this study, the use of nine alternative configurations and the county itself were evaluated on the basis of payment-area homogeneity, payment rate stability, and policy criteria, including the fiscal impacts of reconfiguration on HMOs. The results revealed rather modest differences among most alternative configurations and do not lend strong support for payment area reconfiguration at this time. PMID:10113270

  19. [Peculiarities of oral health of organized collectives and professional communities].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Avdeenko, O E

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of scientific literature on the peculiarities of the dental status of organized groups and professional associations. After reviewing the literature, it becomes clear that the studies carried out in organized groups and professional societies are very relevant today, because the prevalence of dental diseases among them remains high, fueled by a number of factors: habitat, diet, lifestyle, occupational hazards, particularly hygienic oral care. Nowadays there is no information about the features of the dental status among the clergy, whose professional activity is connected with direct close contact with people. This profession covers a large number of our population. The research of certain groups is of special interest, since a number of different factors affect dental health. PMID:27182563

  20. Preparing health care organizations for successful case management programs.

    PubMed

    Bonvissuto, C A; Kastens, J M; Atwell, S R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of four hospital-based providers in varying stages of implementing case management programs. Three of the providers had most of the necessary elements in place to ensure success, such as a mix of reimbursement sources, an effective and integrated information management system, a full range of clinical services, and continuous quality improvement programs. The authors make several suggestions for key activities that must be pursued by any health care organization seeking to implement a case management program in an era of managed care, tightening reimbursement, and consumer demand for quality care. These include the need to (a) organize essential case management functions under a centralized structure; (b) set realistic, quantifiable targets, and (c) design a communications plan for the program. PMID:9335724

  1. Managing the transition to integrated health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J R

    1996-01-01

    Today's successful community hospitals should and will evolve into integrated health care organizations (IHCOs) that will share several common characteristics. IHCOs will have a community--not a membership--orientation, and this will be a distinguishing characteristic and a source of market appeal. The transition to IHCO will be a slow one, and to prosper, the IHCO will have to accommodate both price-oriented markets and traditional ones. Successful IHCOs will expand technical skills and capabilities to control costs and quality. New strategic competencies will have to be developed, and to do this, emerging IHCOs will improve the ability of managers to support decisions and sell them both to the buyers and the public at large. Excellent patient care will rest upon better trained, advised, and informed management teams. Making the change to an IHCO will take time and money, but organizations that make steady progress are likely to succeed. PMID:10156172

  2. An exploratory study of organization design configurations in health care delivery organizations.

    PubMed

    Sheppeck, Mick; Militello, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are configurations of variables that support each other to achieve customer satisfaction. Based on Treacy and Wiersema (1995), we predicted the emergence of two configurations, one supporting a product leadership stance and one predicting the customer intimate approach from a set of 73 for profit health care clinics. In addition, we predicted the emergence of a configuration where the scores on most variables were near the mean for each variable. Using cluster analysis and discriminant function analysis, we identified three configurations: one a "master of two" strategy, one "stuck-in-the-middle," and one showing scores well below the mean on most variables. The implications for organization design and manager actions in the health care industry are discussed. PMID:25004706

  3. Exploring Business Strategy in Health Information Exchange Organizations.

    PubMed

    Langabeer, James R; Champagne, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Unlike consumer goods industries, healthcare has been slow to implement technolo gies that support exchange of data in patients' health records. This results in avoid able medication errors, avoidable hospital readmissions, unnecessary duplicate testing, and other inefficient or wasteful practices. Community-based regional health information exchange (HIE) organizations have evolved in response to federal aims to encourage interoperability, yet little is known about their strategic approach. We use the lens of institutional and strategic management theories to empirically explore the differences in business strategies deployed in HIEs that are, to date, financially sustainable versus those that are not. We developed a 20-question survey targeted to CEOs to assess HIE business strategies. Our sample consisted of 60 community-based exchanges distributed throughout the United States, and we achieved a 58% response rate. Questions centered on competitive strategy and financial sustainability. We relied on logistic regression methods to explore relationships between variables. Our regression identified characteristics common to sustainable organizations. We defined sustainability as revenues exceeding operational costs. Seventeen of the 35 organizations (49%) defined themselves as currently sustainable. Focus and cost leadership strategies were significantly associated with sustainability. Growth strate gies, which were much more common than other strategies, were not associated with sustainability. We saw little evidence of a differentiation strategy (i.e., the basis of competition whereby the attributes of a product or service are unmatched by rivals). Most CEOs had a relatively optimistic outlook, with 60% stating they were confident of surviving over the next 5 years; however, nearly 9% of the organizations were in some phase of divestiture or exit from the market. HIEs are evolving differently based on local leadership decisions, yet their strategic approach is

  4. The case for the World Health Organization's Commission on Social Determinants of Health to address gender identity.

    PubMed

    Pega, Frank; Veale, Jaimie F

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed the case of the World Health Organization's Commission on Social Determinants of Health, which did not address gender identity in their final report. We argue that gender identity is increasingly being recognized as an important social determinant of health (SDH) that results in health inequities. We identify right to health mechanisms, such as established human rights instruments, as suitable policy tools for addressing gender identity as an SDH to improve health equity. We urge the World Health Organization to add gender identity as an SDH in its conceptual framework for action on the SDHs and to develop and implement specific recommendations for addressing gender identity as an SDH. PMID:25602894

  5. Health and Welfare in Dutch Organic Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Bestman, Monique; Wagenaar, Jan-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Data on animal health and welfare and farm management during rearing and laying periods were collected from 49 flocks of organic laying hens in the Netherlands to establish how farms performed in terms of animal health and welfare and which factors affected health and welfare. Abstract From 2007–2008, data on animal health and welfare and farm management during rearing and laying periods were collected from 49 flocks of organic laying hens in the Netherlands. Our aim was to investigate how organic egg farms performed in terms of animal health and welfare and which farm factors affected this performance. The flocks in our study were kept on farms with 34 to 25,000 hens (average 9,300 hens). Seventy-one percent of the flocks consisted of ‘silver hybrids’: white hens that lay brown eggs. Fifty-five percent of the flocks were kept in floor-based housing and 45% of the flocks in aviaries. No relation was found between the amount of time spent outdoors during the laying period and mortality at 60 weeks. Flocks that used their outdoor run more intensively had better feather scores. In 40% of the flocks there was mortality caused by predators. The average feed intake was 129 g/day at 30 weeks and 133 g/day at 60 weeks of age. The average percentage of mislaid eggs decreased from three at 30 weeks to two at 60 weeks. The average mortality was 7.8% at 60 weeks. Twenty-five percent of the flocks were not treated for worms in their first 50 weeks. Flubenol© was applied to the flocks that were treated. Ten percent of the flocks followed Flubenol© instructions for use and were wormed five or more times. The other 65% percent were treated irregularly between one and four times. Sixty-eight percent of the flocks showed little or no feather damage, 24% showed moderate damage and 8% showed severe damage. The feather score was better if the hens used the free-range area more intensely, the laying percentage at 60 weeks was higher, and if they were allowed to go

  6. Workgroup Report: Developing Environmental Health Indicators for European Children: World Health Organization Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Kathy; Kim, Rokho; Carroquino, Maria-Jose; Pirard, Philippe; Gore, Fiona; Cucu, Alexandra; Nemer, Leda; MacKay, Morag; Smedje, Greta; Georgellis, Antonis; Dalbokova, Dafina; Krzyzanowski, Michal

    2007-01-01

    A working group coordinated by the World Health Organization developed a set of indicators to protect children’s health from environmental risks and to support current and future European policy needs. On the basis of identified policy needs, the group developed a core set of 29 indicators for implementation plus an extended set of eight additional indicators for future development, focusing on exposure, health effects, and action. As far as possible, the indicators were designed to use existing information and are flexible enough to be developed further to meet the needs of policy makers and changing health priorities. These indicators cover most of the priority topic areas specified in the Children’s Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) as adopted in the Fourth Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in 2004, and will be used to monitor the implementation of CEHAPE. This effort can be viewed as an integral part of the Global Initiative on Children’s Environmental Health Indicators, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002. PMID:17805431

  7. 42 CFR 475.105 - Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities, affiliates, and payor organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibition against contracting with health care facilities, affiliates, and payor organizations. 475.105 Section 475.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT...

  8. Global policy for improvement of oral health in the 21st century--implications to oral health research of World Health Assembly 2007, World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Oral Health Programme has worked hard over the past 5 years to increase the awareness of oral health worldwide as oral health is important component of general health and quality of life. Meanwhile, oral disease is still a major public health problem in high income countries and the burden of oral disease is growing in many low- and middle income countries. In the World Oral Health Report 2003, the WHO Global Oral Health Programme formulated the policies and necessary actions to the continuous improvement of oral health. The strategy is that oral disease prevention and the promotion of oral health needs to be integrated with chronic disease prevention and general health promotion as the risks to health are linked. The World Health Assembly (WHA) and the Executive Board (EB) are supreme governance bodies of WHO and for the first time in 25 years oral health was subject to discussion by those bodies in 2007. At the EB120 and WHA60, the Member States agreed on an action plan for oral health and integrated disease prevention, thereby confirming the approach of the Oral Health Programme. The policy forms the basis for future development or adjustment of oral health programmes at national level. Clinical and public health research has shown that a number of individual, professional and community preventive measures are effective in preventing most oral diseases. However, advances in oral health science have not yet benefited the poor and disadvantaged populations worldwide. The major challenges of the future will be to translate knowledge and experiences in oral disease prevention and health promotion into action programmes. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme invites the international oral health research community to engage further in research capacity building in developing countries, and in strengthening the work so that research is recognized as the foundation of oral heath policy at global level. PMID:19046331

  9. Gender stratification in management. The World Health Organization 2000.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Inger A

    2004-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is a global organization that nowadays has integrated gender issues into its policy, programmes and budget. How then is the state of affairs in the area of gender equity at the ultimate governing bodies of the modern WHO? This study aims to assess the representation of women and men and their promotion within the supreme decision-making bodies of the WHO during the year 2000. Information sources used are the official and confirmed protocols of the 53rd World Health Assembly (WHA) in 2000 and of the two Executive Board (EB) meetings of the corresponding year. A descriptive quantitative content analysis approach is used exclusively. The present study demonstrates strikingly skewed gender distribution, with men substantially at an advantage numerically in the prominent positions at the WHA 2000. Additionally, men also hold an advantage in terms of being promoted to leading positions within the bodies examined, notably all upgraded chairs of the EB during 2000. However, the formerly male-dominated supervisory positions of the WHO are, these days, challenged by women having been elected at the very top of the WHO. The present study stresses the need to elaborate a qualitative research design to advance the understanding of the social construction of gender in supreme governing positions of the modern WHO. PMID:15133880

  10. The world health organization multicountry survey on maternal and newborn health: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective interventions to reduce mortality and morbidity in maternal and newborn health already exist. Information about quality and performance of care and the use of critical interventions are useful for shaping improvements in health care and strengthening the contribution of health systems towards the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. The near-miss concept and the criterion-based clinical audit are proposed as useful approaches for obtaining such information in maternal and newborn health care. This paper presents the methods of the World Health Organization Multicountry Study in Maternal and Newborn Health. The main objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of maternal near-miss cases in a worldwide network of health facilities, evaluate the quality of care using the maternal near-miss concept and the criterion-based clinical audit, and develop the near-miss concept in neonatal health. Methods/Design This is a large cross-sectional study being implemented in a worldwide network of health facilities. A total of 370 health facilities from 29 countries will take part in this study and produce nearly 275,000 observations. All women giving birth, all maternal near-miss cases regardless of the gestational age and delivery status and all maternal deaths during the study period comprise the study population. In each health facility, medical records of all eligible women will be reviewed during a data collection period that ranges from two to three months according to the annual number of deliveries. Discussion Implementing the systematic identification of near-miss cases, mapping the use of critical evidence-based interventions and analysing the corresponding indicators are just the initial steps for using the maternal near-miss concept as a tool to improve maternal and newborn health. The findings of projects using approaches similar to those described in this manuscript will be a good starter for a more comprehensive dialogue with

  11. Microsporidiosis Acquired Through Solid Organ Transplantation: A Public Health Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hocevar, Susan N.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Spak, Cedric W.; Rosenblatt, Randall; Diaz-Luna, Hector; Castillo, Isabel; Luna, Sergio; Friedman, Glen C.; Antony, Suresh; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Tiller, Rebekah V.; Peterson, Tammie; Blau, Dianna M.; Sriram, Rama R.; da Silva, Alexandre; de Almeida, Marcos; Benedict, Theresa; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Visvesvara, Govinda S.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a microsporidial species most commonly recognized as a cause of renal, respiratory, and central nervous system infections in immunosuppressed patients, was identified as the cause of a temporally associated cluster of febrile illness among 3 solid organ transplant recipients from a common donor. Objective To confirm the source of the illness, assess donor and recipient risk factors, and provide therapy recommendations for ill recipients. Design Public health investigation. Setting Two transplant hospitals and community interview with the deceased donor’s family. Patients Three transplant recipients and the organ donor. Measurements Specimens were tested for microsporidia by using culture, immunofluorescent antibody, polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Donor medical records were reviewed and a questionnaire was developed to assess for microsporidial infection. Results Kidneys and lungs were procured from the deceased donor and transplanted to 3 recipients who became ill with fever 7 to 10 weeks after the transplant. Results of urine culture, serologic, and polymerase chain reaction testing were positive for Encephalitozoon cuniculi of genotype III in each recipient; the organism was also identified in biopsy or autopsy specimens in all recipients. The donor had positive serologic test results for Encephalitozoon cuniculi. Surviving recipients received albendazole. Donor assessment did not identify factors for suspected Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection. Limitation Inability to detect organism by culture or polymerase chain reaction in donor due to lack of autopsy specimens. Conclusion Transmission of microsporidiosis through organ transplantation is described. Microsporidiosis is now recognized as an emerging transplant-associated disease and should be considered in febrile transplant recipients when tests for routinely encountered agents are unrevealing. Donor-derived disease is critical

  12. Is organic farming safer to farmers’ health? A comparison between organic and traditional farming

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Carla; García-Lestón, Julia; Costa, Solange; Coelho, Patrícia; Silva, Susana; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Mattei, Francesca; Dall’Armi, Valentina; Bonassi, Stefano; Laffon, Blanca; Snawder, John; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to pesticides is a major public health concern, because of the widespread distribution of these compounds and their possible long term effects. Recently, organic farming has been introduced as a consumer and environmental friendly agricultural system, although little is known about the effects on workers’ health. Objectives To evaluate genetic damage and immunological alterations in workers of both traditional and organic farming. Methods Eighty-five farmers exposed to several pesticides, thirty–six organic farmers and sixty-one controls took part in the study. Biomarkers of exposure (pyrethroids, organophosphates, carbamates, and thioethers in urine and butyrylcholinesterase activity in plasma), early effect (micronuclei in lymphocytes and reticulocytes, T-cell receptor mutation assay, chromosomal aberrations, comet assay and lymphocytes subpopulations) and susceptibility (genetic polymorphisms related to metabolism - EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 - and DNA repair – XRCC1 and XRCC2) were evaluated. Results When compared to controls and organic farmers, pesticide farmers presented a significant increase of micronuclei in lymphocytes (frequency ratio, FR=2.80) and reticulocytes (FR=1.89), chromosomal aberrations (FR=2.19), DNA damage assessed by comet assay (mean ratio, MR=1.71), and a significant decrease in the proportion of B lymphocytes (MR=0.88). Overall, organic farmers presented similar levels of genetic damage as controls, in some cases modulated by GSTT1 and GSTM1, GSTP1 105Ile/Ile and XRCC1 399Gln/Gln genotypes. Conclusions Results confirmed the increased presence of DNA damage in farmers exposed to pesticides, and showed as exposure conditions and genetic background influence observed effects. Findings from this study indicate that no evident genetic or immunologic damage can be observed in organic farmers. PMID:24576785

  13. Changing Policy Framing as a Deliberate Strategy for Public Health Advocacy: A Qualitative Policy Case Study of Minimum Unit Pricing of Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Bond, Lyndal; Hilton, Shona

    2014-01-01

    Context Scotland is the first country in the world to pass legislation introducing a minimum unit price (MUP) for alcohol in an attempt to reduce consumption and associated harms by increasing the price of the cheapest alcohol. We investigated the competing ways in which policy stakeholders presented the debate. We then established whether a change in framing helped explain the policy's emergence. Methods We conducted a detailed policy case study through analysis of evidence submitted to the Scottish parliament, and in-depth, one-to-one interviews (n = 36) with politicians, civil servants, advocates, researchers, and industry representatives. Findings Public- and voluntary-sector stakeholders tended to support MUP, while industry representatives were more divided. Two markedly different ways of presenting alcohol as a policy problem were evident. Critics of MUP (all of whom were related to industry) emphasized social disorder issues, particularly among young people, and hence argued for targeted approaches. In contrast, advocates for MUP (with the exception of those in industry) focused on alcohol as a health issue arising from overconsumption at a population level, thus suggesting that population-based interventions were necessary. Industry stakeholders favoring MUP adopted a hybrid framing, maintaining several aspects of the critical framing. Our interview data showed that public health advocates worked hard to redefine the policy issue by deliberately presenting a consistent alternative framing. Conclusions Framing alcohol policy as a broad, multisectoral, public health issue that requires a whole-population approach has been crucial to enabling policymakers to seriously consider MUP, and public health advocates intentionally presented alcohol policy in this way. This reframing helped prioritize public health considerations in the policy debate and represents a deliberate strategy for consideration by those advocating for policy change around the world and in

  14. Reproductive health services for Syrian refugees in Zaatri Camp and Irbid City, Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan: an evaluation of the Minimum Initial Services Package

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Minimum Initial Services Package (MISP) for reproductive health, a standard of care in humanitarian emergencies, is a coordinated set of priority activities developed to prevent excess morbidity and mortality, particularly among women and girls, which should be implemented at the onset of an emergency. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the status of MISP implementation for Syrian refugees in Jordan as part of a global evaluation of reproductive health in crises. Methods In March 2013, applying a formative evaluation approach 11 key informant interviews, 13 health facility assessments, and focus group discussions (14 groups; 159 participants) were conducted in two Syrian refugee sites in Jordan, Zaatri Camp, and Irbid City, respectively. Information was coded, themes were identified, and relationships between data explored. Results Lead health agencies addressed the MISP by securing funding and supplies and establishing reproductive health focal points, services and coordination mechanisms. However, Irbid City was less likely to be included in coordination activities and health facilities reported challenges in human resource capacity. Access to clinical management of rape survivors was limited, and both women and service provider’s knowledge about availability of these services was low. Activities to reduce the transmission of HIV and to prevent excess maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality were available, although some interventions needed strengthening. Some planning for comprehensive reproductive health services, including health indicator collection, was delayed. Contraceptives were available to meet demand. Syndromic treatment of sexually transmitted infections and antiretrovirals for continuing users were not available. In general refugee women and adolescent girls perceived clinical services negatively and complained about the lack of basic necessities. Conclusions MISP services and key elements to support implementation

  15. Implementing information systems in health care organizations: myths and challenges.

    PubMed

    Berg, M

    2001-12-01

    Successfully implementing patient care information systems (PCIS) in health care organizations appears to be a difficult task. After critically examining the very notions of 'success' and 'failure', and after discussing the problematic nature of lists of 'critical success- or failure factors', this paper discusses three myths that often hamper implementation processes. Alternative insights are presented, and illustrated with concrete examples. First of all, the implementation of a PCIS is a process of mutual transformation; the organization and the technology transform each other during the implementation process. When this is foreseen, PCIS implementations can be intended strategically to help transform the organization. Second, such a process can only get off the ground when properly supported by both central management and future users. A top down framework for the implementation is crucial to turn user-input into a coherent steering force, creating a solid basis for organizational transformation. Finally, the management of IS implementation processes is a careful balancing act between initiating organizational change, and drawing upon IS as a change agent, without attempting to pre-specify and control this process. Accepting, and even drawing upon, this inevitable uncertainty might be the hardest lesson to learn. PMID:11734382

  16. Social Health Maintenance Organizations: assessing their initial experience.

    PubMed Central

    Newcomer, R; Harrington, C; Friedlob, A

    1990-01-01

    The Social/Health Maintenance Organization (S/HMO) is a four-site national demonstration. This program combines Medicare Part A and B coverage, with various extended and chronic care benefits, into an integrated health plan. The provision of these services extends both the traditional roles of HMOs and that of long-term care community-service case management systems. During the initial 30 months of operation the four S/HMOs shared financial risk with the Health Care Financing Administration. This article reports on this developmental period. During this phase the S/HMOs had lower-than-expected enrollment levels due in part to market competition, underfunding of marketing efforts, the limited geographic area served, and an inability to differentiate the S/HMO product from that of other Medicare HMOs. The S/HMOs were allowed to conduct health screening of applicants prior to enrolling them. The number of nursing home-certifiable enrollees was controlled through this mechanism, but waiting lists were never very long. Persons joining S/HMOs and other Medicare HMOs during this period were generally aware of the alternatives available. S/HMO enrollees favored the more extensive benefits; HMO enrollees considerations of cost. The S/HMOs compare both newly formed HMOs and established HMOs. On the basis of administrator cost, it is more efficient to add chronic care benefits to an HMO than to add an HMO component to a community care provider. All plans had expenses greater than their revenues during the start-up period, but they were generally able to keep service expenditures within planned levels. PMID:2116384

  17. Five focus strategies to organize health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Linna, Miika; Malmström, Tomi; Torkki, Paulus; Lillrank, Paul Martin

    2016-03-14

    Purpose - The focused factory is one of the concepts that decision-makers have adopted for improving health care delivery. However, disorganized definitions of focus have led to findings that cannot be utilized systematically. The purpose of this paper is to discuss strategic options to focus health care operations. Design/methodology/approach - First the literature on focus in health care is reviewed revealing conceptual challenges. Second, a definition of focus in terms of demand and requisite variety is defined, and the mechanisms of focus are explicated. A classification of five focus strategies that follow the original idea to reduce variety in products and markets is presented. Finally, the paper examines managerial possibilities linked to the focus strategies. Findings - The paper proposes a framework of five customer-oriented focus strategies which aim at reducing variety in different characteristics of care pathways: population; urgency and severity; illnesses and symptoms; care practices and processes; and care outcomes. Research limitations/implications - Empirical research is needed to evaluate the costs and benefits of the five strategies and about system-level effects of focused units on competition and coordination. Practical implications - Focus is an enabling condition that needs to be exploited using specific demand and supply management practices. It is essential to understand how focus mechanisms differ between strategies, and to select focus that fits with organization's strategy and key performance indicators. Originality/value - Compared to previous more resource-oriented approaches, this study provides theoretically solid and practically relevant customer-oriented framework for focusing in health care. PMID:26959897

  18. The World Health Organization Library (Geneva) and Health Literature Services Programme.

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, B

    1988-01-01

    The origins and functions of the World Health Organization (WHO) Library and the global, regional, and national objectives of the WHO Health Literature Services Program (HLSP) are reviewed. WHO is an aggregate of nations and not a supra-national body. With limited resources and unlimited needs, HLSP is involved in surveys, training, regional medical libraries, national and regional networks, bibliographic services and document delivery, promotion, coordination, and communication. The basic concept of HLSP eschews internationally-conceived, self-contained technical projects in favor of broad programs based on national planning. Small rural centers receive more attention than large urban hospitals, and preventive medicine together with health education and community involvement are of more immediate concern than curative medicine. National self-reliance implies national initiative but not necessarily national self-sufficiency. Recent planning and implementation of HLSP activities are described. PMID:3370376

  19. Information, market government, and health policy: a study of health data organizations in the states.

    PubMed

    Overman, E S; Cahill, A G

    1994-01-01

    Information is essential to the success of market-oriented policies. Information on health care costs and quality is collected and distributed by state governments through health data organizations (HDOs) to enhance competition and lower costs in the medical industry and to improve consumer choice among medical alternatives. This article examines the information collected, produced, and distributed by state health data organizations in Colorado and Pennsylvania. Findings reveal that information was not the objective determinant of choice and competition as market-oriented policy designers had hoped. Nor did market-oriented bureaucracies produce and distribute data readily accessible for public choice. Instead, information produced and distributed by these HDOs was the result of political and bureaucratic exercises that conform much more to classic interest group policymaking and captured bureaucracies than to contemporary market-oriented government ideals. The findings underscore the extraordinary difficulties facing federal-level policy designers as they contemplate introducing market-oriented health care policies on the national level. PMID:10135356

  20. Development of Health Equity Indicators in Primary Health Care Organizations Using a Modified Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sabrina T.; Browne, Annette J.; Varcoe, Colleen; Lavoie, Josée; Fridkin, Alycia; Smye, Victoria; Godwin, Olive; Tu, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a core set of indicators that could be used for measuring and monitoring the performance of primary health care organizations' capacity and strategies for enhancing equity-oriented care. Methods Indicators were constructed based on a review of the literature and a thematic analysis of interview data with patients and staff (n = 114) using procedures for qualitatively derived data. We used a modified Delphi process where the indicators were circulated to staff at the Health Centers who served as participants (n = 63) over two rounds. Indicators were considered part of a priority set of health equity indicators if they received an overall importance rating of>8.0, on a scale of 1–9, where a higher score meant more importance. Results Seventeen indicators make up the priority set. Items were eliminated because they were rated as low importance (<8.0) in both rounds and were either redundant or more than one participant commented that taking action on the indicator was highly unlikely. In order to achieve health care equity, performance at the organizational level is as important as assessing the performance of staff. Two of the highest rated “treatment” or processes of care indicators reflects the need for culturally safe and trauma and violence-informed care. There are four indicators that can be used to measure outcomes which can be directly attributable to equity responsive primary health care. Discussion These indicators and subsequent development of items can be used to measure equity in the domains of treatment and outcomes. These areas represent targets for higher performance in relation to equity for organizations (e.g., funding allocations to ongoing training in equity-oriented care provision) and providers (e.g., reflexive practice, skill in working with the health effects of trauma). PMID:25478914

  1. Food protection activities of the Pan American Health Organization.

    PubMed

    1994-03-01

    One of the most widespread health problems in the Caribbean and Latin America is contaminated food and foodborne illness. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has been a major force in activities to strengthen food protection. The program within the regional Program of Technical Cooperation is administered by the Veterinary Public Health program and under the guidance of the Pan American Institute for Food protection and Zoonoses in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A food action plan for 1986-90 was established at the 1986 Pan American Sanitary Conference, and extended to cover 1991-95. Program activities during the 1990s covered cholera, epidemiologic surveillance, street food vendors, shellfish poisoning, meat, national programs, information systems, air catering, food irradiation, and tourism. The action plan for 1991-95 promoted greater political support and cooperation within and between related sectors and institutions, management, and education. The aims were to organize national integrated programs, to strengthen laboratory services, to strengthen inspection services, to establish epidemiologic surveillance systems, and to promote food protection through community participation. Program activities included the initiatives of the Veterinary Public Health Program in 1991 to distribute literature on the transmission of cholera by foods. Studies were conducted in Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru on food contamination. Microbiologists received training on standard methods for detecting Vibrio cholerae in foods. A working group of experts from 10 countries examined the issues and produced a guide for investigating the incidence of foodborne disease. PAHO has contributed to the formation of an Inter-American Network for Epidemiologic Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases. PAHO has worked to improve hygienic practices among street food vendors. Seminars on paralytic shellfish poisoning were conducted in 1990; the outcome was a network working to strengthen national

  2. Implications for alcohol minimum unit pricing advocacy: what can we learn for public health from UK newsprint coverage of key claim-makers in the policy debate?

    PubMed

    Hilton, Shona; Wood, Karen; Patterson, Chris; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal

    2014-02-01

    On May 24th 2012, Scotland passed the Alcohol (Minimum Pricing) Bill. Minimum unit pricing (MUP) is an intervention that raises the price of the cheapest alcohol to reduce alcohol consumption and related harms. There is a growing literature on industry's influence in policymaking and media representations of policies, but relatively little about frames used by key claim-makers in the public MUP policy debate. This study elucidates the dynamic interplay between key claim-makers to identify lessons for policy advocacy in the media in the UK and internationally. Content analysis was conducted on 262 articles from seven UK and three Scottish national newspapers between 1st May 2011 and 31st May 2012, retrieved from electronic databases. Advocates' and critics' constructions of the alcohol problem and MUP were examined. Advocates depicted the problem as primarily driven by cheap alcohol and marketing, while critics' constructions focused on youth binge drinkers and dependent drinkers. Advocates justified support by citing the intervention's targeted design, but critics denounced the policy as illegal, likely to encourage illicit trade, unsupported by evidence and likely to be ineffective, while harming the responsible majority, low-income consumers and businesses. Critics' arguments were consistent over time, and single statements often encompassed multiple rationales. This study presents advocates with several important lessons for promoting policies in the media. Firstly, it may be useful to shift focus away from young binge drinkers and heavy drinkers, towards population-level over-consumption. Secondly, advocates might focus on presenting the policy as part of a wider package of alcohol policies. Thirdly, emphasis on the success of recent public health policies could help portray the UK and Scotland as world leaders in tackling culturally embedded health and social problems through policy; highlighting past successes when presenting future policies may be a valuable

  3. Implications for alcohol minimum unit pricing advocacy: What can we learn for public health from UK newsprint coverage of key claim-makers in the policy debate?

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Shona; Wood, Karen; Patterson, Chris; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal

    2014-01-01

    On May 24th 2012, Scotland passed the Alcohol (Minimum Pricing) Bill. Minimum unit pricing (MUP) is an intervention that raises the price of the cheapest alcohol to reduce alcohol consumption and related harms. There is a growing literature on industry's influence in policymaking and media representations of policies, but relatively little about frames used by key claim-makers in the public MUP policy debate. This study elucidates the dynamic interplay between key claim-makers to identify lessons for policy advocacy in the media in the UK and internationally. Content analysis was conducted on 262 articles from seven UK and three Scottish national newspapers between 1st May 2011 and 31st May 2012, retrieved from electronic databases. Advocates' and critics' constructions of the alcohol problem and MUP were examined. Advocates depicted the problem as primarily driven by cheap alcohol and marketing, while critics' constructions focused on youth binge drinkers and dependent drinkers. Advocates justified support by citing the intervention's targeted design, but critics denounced the policy as illegal, likely to encourage illicit trade, unsupported by evidence and likely to be ineffective, while harming the responsible majority, low-income consumers and businesses. Critics' arguments were consistent over time, and single statements often encompassed multiple rationales. This study presents advocates with several important lessons for promoting policies in the media. Firstly, it may be useful to shift focus away from young binge drinkers and heavy drinkers, towards population-level over-consumption. Secondly, advocates might focus on presenting the policy as part of a wider package of alcohol policies. Thirdly, emphasis on the success of recent public health policies could help portray the UK and Scotland as world leaders in tackling culturally embedded health and social problems through policy; highlighting past successes when presenting future policies may be a valuable

  4. Patterns of Health Maintenance Organization Service Areas in Rural Counties

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Thomas C.; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Johnson-Webb, Karen D.

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzes the 1993 National Directory of HMOs to determine the extent to which rural counties are included in health maintenance organization (HMO) service areas. Two specific questions are addressed: (1) How do the patterns of service areas differ across HMO model types? (2) What are the characteristics that distinguish rural counties served by HMOs from those that are not? Although a majority of rural counties are in HMO service areas, substantially fewer are served by non-individual practice association (non-IPA) models. Access to HMO services is found to decrease with county population density, and adjacency to metropolitan areas is an important predictor of inclusion in service areas. PMID:10153478

  5. Physician adaptation to health maintenance organizations and implications for management.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, R; Scheckler, W E; Girard, C; Barker, K

    1990-01-01

    The growth of health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and other forms of managed care presents a challenge to traditional patterns of private practice. In Dane County, Wisconsin (Madison Metropolitan Area), the proportion of the population enrolled in closed-panel HMOs increased dramatically, from 10 percent in 1983 to over 40 percent by 1986. This study surveyed 850 practicing physicians regarding their expectations before, and experiences after this rapid change to competitive HMOs. Although most physicians expected a loss of earnings and lower-quality care, the majority reported that neither declined. However, most physicians expected and reported a decline in their autonomy. Primary care physicians were most supportive of the change to HMOs. The implications of these findings for management practices are discussed. PMID:2329049

  6. Nursing Minimum Data Set Based on EHR Archetypes Approach.

    PubMed

    Spigolon, Dandara N; Moro, Cláudia M C

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of a Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) can facilitate the use of health information systems. The adoption of these sets and represent them based on archetypes are a way of developing and support health systems. The objective of this paper is to describe the definition of a minimum data set for nursing in endometriosis represent with archetypes. The study was divided into two steps: Defining the Nursing Minimum Data Set to endometriosis, and Development archetypes related to the NMDS. The nursing data set to endometriosis was represented in the form of archetype, using the whole perception of the evaluation item, organs and senses. This form of representation is an important tool for semantic interoperability and knowledge representation for health information systems. PMID:24199126

  7. Reducing Health Disparities: Strategy Planning and Implementation in Israel's Largest Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Balicer, Ran D; Shadmi, Efrat; Lieberman, Nicky; Greenberg-Dotan, Sari; Goldfracht, Margalit; Jana, Liora; Cohen, Arnon D; Regev-Rosenberg, Sigal; Jacobson, Orit

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe an organization-wide disparity reduction strategy and to assess its success in quality improvement and reduction of gaps in health and health care. Study Setting Clalit Health Services, Israel's largest non-for-profit insurer and provider serving 3.8 million persons. Study Design Before and after design: quality assessment before and 12-month postinitiation of the strategic plan. A composite weighted score of seven quality indicators, measuring attainment of diabetes, blood pressure, and lipid control, lack of anemia in infants, and performance of mammography, occult blood tests, and influenza vaccinations. Data Extraction Methods Quality indicator scores, derived from Clalit's central data warehouse, based on data from electronic medical records. Principal Findings Low-performing clinics, of low-socioeconomic and minority populations, were targeted for intervention. Twelve months after the initiation of the project continuous improvement was observed coupled with a reduction of 40 percent of the gap between disadvantaged clinics, serving ∼10 percent of enrollees, and all other medium-large clinics. Conclusion The comprehensive strategy, following a quality improvement framework, with a top-down top-management incentives and monitoring, and a bottom-up locally tailored interventions, approach, is showing promising results of overall quality improvement coupled with disparity reduction in key health and health care indicators. PMID:21352224

  8. Partnerships in Health Systems: Social Organization as limits and possibilities in the Family Health Strategy Management.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa Costa E; Barbosa, Pedro Ribeiro; Hortale, Virgínia Alonso

    2016-05-01

    This is a case study in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro about management in the Family Health Strategy based on the Social Organizations model. The aims were to characterize and analyze aspects of the governance system adopted by the Rio de Janeiro Municipal Health Department and identify limits and possibilities of this model as a management option in Brazil's Unified Health System. A qualitative study was performed based on a literature review, document analysisand interviews with key informants. This management model facilitated the expansion of access to primary healthcare through the Family Health Strategy in Rio - where the population covered increased from 7.2% of the population in 2008 to 45.5% in 2015. The results showthat some practices in the contractual logic need to be improved, including negotiation and accountability with autonomywith the service suppliers. Evaluation and control has focus on processes, not results, and there has not been an increase in transparency and social control. The system of performance incentives has been reported as inducing improvements in the work process of the health teams. It is concluded that the regulatory capacity of the municipal management would need to be improved. On the other hand, there is an important and significant process of learning in progress. PMID:27166887

  9. Antidepressant pharmacotherapy: economic outcomes in a health maintenance organization.

    PubMed

    Sclar, D A; Robison, L M; Skaer, T L; Legg, R F; Nemec, N L; Galin, R S; Hughes, T E; Buesching, D P

    1994-01-01

    Recent pharmacotherapeutic advances in the treatment of depression have included the development of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The present study was designed to contrast direct health service expenditures for the treatment of depression among patients enrolled in a health maintenance organization (HMO) and prescribed either the SSRI fluoxetine or one of three tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (amitriptyline, nortriptyline, or desipramine). Information regarding health service utilization was derived from the computer archive of a network-model HMO system serving 400,000 beneficiaries. A total of 701 HMO beneficiaries were found to satisfy the study selection criteria. Multivariate regression analysis was used to discern the incremental influence of selected demographic, clinical, financial, and provider characteristics on 1 year post-period expenditures (PPE) for health care. Analysis-of-variance procedures with Duncan's multiple-range test, or chi-square analyses, revealed no significant difference across antidepressant pharmacotherapy for age, sex, 6-month prior-period expenditures for physician visits, psychiatric visits, laboratory tests, hospitalizations, or psychiatric hospital services related to the treatment of depression, or number of prescribed therapeutic agents for disease state processes other than depression. Receipt of fluoxetine was associated with a significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher rate of initial prescribing by psychiatrists, an increase in the number of prescriptions for antidepressant pharmacotherapy obtained (30-day supplies), and a reduction in the number of monthly intervals during which time antidepressant pharmacotherapy was not procured. Receipt of fluoxetine as antidepressant pharmacotherapy was associated with a significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher mean medication possession ratio (MPR) relative to amitriptyline, nortriptyline, or desipramine. Multivariate findings for patient-level data reflecting a definitive

  10. New Summary Measures of Population Health and Well-Being for Implementation by Health Plans and Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Jason M.; Rauri, Sachin; Tillema, Juliana O.; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Knudson, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Health plans and accountable care organizations measure many indicators of patient health, with standard metrics that track factors such as patient experience and cost. They lack, however, a summary measure of the third leg of the Triple Aim, population health. In response, HealthPartners has developed summary measures that align with the recommendations of the For the Public’s Health series of reports from the Institute of Medicine. (The series comprises the following 3 reports: For the Public’s Health: Investing in a Healthier Future, For the Public’s Health: Revitalizing Law and Policy to Meet New Challenges, and For the Public’s Health: The Role of Measurement in Action and Accountability.) The summary measures comprise 3 components: current health, sustainability of health, and well-being. The measure of current health is disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) calculated from health care claims and death records. The sustainability of health measure comprises member reporting of 6 behaviors associated with health plus a clinical preventive services index that indicates adherence to evidence-based preventive care guidelines. Life satisfaction represents the summary measure of subjective well-being. HealthPartners will use the summary measures to identify and address conditions and factors that have the greatest impact on the health and well-being of its patients, members, and community. The method could easily be implemented by other institutions and organizations in the United States, helping to address a persistent need in population health measurement for improvement. PMID:27390075

  11. New Summary Measures of Population Health and Well-Being for Implementation by Health Plans and Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Kottke, Thomas E; Gallagher, Jason M; Rauri, Sachin; Tillema, Juliana O; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Knudson, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Health plans and accountable care organizations measure many indicators of patient health, with standard metrics that track factors such as patient experience and cost. They lack, however, a summary measure of the third leg of the Triple Aim, population health. In response, HealthPartners has developed summary measures that align with the recommendations of the For the Public's Health series of reports from the Institute of Medicine. (The series comprises the following 3 reports: For the Public's Health: Investing in a Healthier Future, For the Public's Health: Revitalizing Law and Policy to Meet New Challenges, and For the Public's Health: The Role of Measurement in Action and Accountability.) The summary measures comprise 3 components: current health, sustainability of health, and well-being. The measure of current health is disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) calculated from health care claims and death records. The sustainability of health measure comprises member reporting of 6 behaviors associated with health plus a clinical preventive services index that indicates adherence to evidence-based preventive care guidelines. Life satisfaction represents the summary measure of subjective well-being. HealthPartners will use the summary measures to identify and address conditions and factors that have the greatest impact on the health and well-being of its patients, members, and community. The method could easily be implemented by other institutions and organizations in the United States, helping to address a persistent need in population health measurement for improvement. PMID:27390075

  12. Managing facility risk: external threats and health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Reid, Daniel J; Reid, William H

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and clinical administrators should have a basic understanding of physical and financial risk to mental health facilities related to external physical threat, including actions usually viewed as "terrorism" and much more common sources of violence. This article refers to threats from mentally ill persons and those acting out of bizarre or misguided "revenge," extortionists and other outright criminals, and perpetrators usually identified as domestic or international terrorists. The principles apply both to relatively small and contained acts (such as a patient or ex-patient attacking a staff member) and to much larger events (such as bombings and armed attack), and are relevant to facilities both within and outside the U.S. Patient care and accessibility to mental health services rest not only on clinical skills, but also on a place to practice them and an organized system supported by staff, physical facilities, and funding. Clinicians who have some familiarity with the non-clinical requirements for care are in a position to support non-clinical staff in preventing care from being interrupted by external threats or events such as terrorist activity, and/or to serve at the interface of facility operations and direct clinical care. Readers should note that this article is an introduction to the topic and cannot address all local, state and national standards for hospital safety, or insurance providers' individual facility requirements. PMID:24733720

  13. Organ Donation Among Tiers of Health Workers: Expanding Resources to Optimize Organ Availability in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Oluyombo, Rotimi; Fawale, Bimbo Michael; Busari, Olusegun Adesola; Ogunmola, Jeffery Olarinde; Olanrewaju, Timothy Olusegun; Akinleye, Callistus Adewale; Ojewola, Rufus Wale; Yusuf, Musah; Obajolowo, Omotola; Soje, Michael; Gbadegesin, Babajide

    2016-01-01

    The global increase in end organ failure but disproportional shortage of organ donation calls for attention. Expanding the organ pool by assessing and improving health workers' attitude at all levels of care may be a worthwhile initiative. Methods A questionnaire-based cross sectional study involving tertiary, secondary, and primary health institutions in Southwestern Nigeria was conducted. Results Age range was 18 to 62 (36.7 ± 9.2) years. Only 13.5%, 11.7%, and 11.2% from primary, secondary, and tertiary health centers, respectively, would definitely donate despite high level of awareness (>90%) at each level of care. Participants from primary health care are of low income (P < 0.05), and this cohort is less likely to be aware of organ donation (P < 0.05). At each level of care, permission by religion to donate organs influenced positive attitudes (willingness to donate, readiness to counsel families of potential donors, and signing of organ donation cards) toward organ donation. Good knowledge of organ donation only significantly influenced readiness to counsel donors (P < 0.05) and not willingness to donate (P > 0.05). At each level of health care, young health care workers (P < 0.05) and women (P > 0.05) would be willing to donate, whereas men show positive attitude in signing of organ donor cards (P < 0.05) and counseling of families of potential donors (P > 0.05). Conclusions Knowledge and willingness to donate organs among health care levels were not different. Considering the potential advantage of community placement of other tiers of health care (primary and secondary) in Nigeria, integrating them would be strategically beneficial to organ donation. PMID:27500245

  14. [Health maintenance organizations: starting point of a market economical reform of health care].

    PubMed

    Hauser, H

    1981-05-01

    The present work was based on the observations that, as regards health care costs, the major problem in most present systems is that those who are responsible for the treatment decision (physician and patient) do not bear a direct financial responsibility for it, and that the overall system is very fragmented, which leads to numerous externalities. In accordance with this diagnosis, a reform strategy should particularly aim at creating units which are responsible for the provision and the financial coverage of comprehensive health services to a given population. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) are a private economy oriented solution in this direction. They have proved to be a real possibility in the USA over years, at least for part of the population, and show interesting performances as regards costs. They were able to develop and evolve in the largely open US institutional framework. In Switzerland, we have more strongly structured systems, which appear to stand in relative contradiction to the HMO solution. A potential adaptation of the concept to our country would therefore require a preliminary in depth discussion about the meaning of the present collective (insurance) contract structure, the position of hospitals in a private economy health care system as well as about the conditions of the sought for competition in the HMO model. PMID:7303928

  15. Global Health Security Demands a Strong International Health Regulations Treaty and Leadership From a Highly Resourced World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2015-10-01

    If the Ebola tragedy of West Africa has taught us anything, it should be that the 2005 International Health Regulations (IHR) Treaty, which gave unprecedented authority to the World Health Organization (WHO) to provide global public health security during public health emergencies of international concern, has fallen severely short of its original goal. After encouraging successes with the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pandemic, the intent of the legally binding Treaty to improve the capacity of all countries to detect, assess, notify, and respond to public health threats has shamefully lapsed. Despite the granting of 2-year extensions in 2012 to countries to meet core surveillance and response requirements, less than 20% of countries have complied. Today it is not realistic to expect that these gaps will be solved or narrowed in the foreseeable future by the IHR or the WHO alone under current provisions. The unfortunate failures that culminated in an inadequate response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa are multifactorial, including funding, staffing, and poor leadership decisions, but all are reversible. A rush by the Global Health Security Agenda partners to fill critical gaps in administrative and operational areas has been crucial in the short term, but questions remain as to the real priorities of the G20 as time elapses and critical gaps in public health protections and infrastructure take precedence over the economic and security needs of the developed world. The response from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network and foreign medical teams to Ebola proved indispensable to global health security, but both deserve stronger strategic capacity support and institutional status under the WHO leadership granted by the IHR Treaty. Treaties are the most successful means the world has in preventing, preparing for, and controlling epidemics in an increasingly globalized world. Other options are not sustainable. Given the gravity of ongoing

  16. 75 FR 53304 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health; Statement of Organization, Functions, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... health disparities related to sexual orientation. Dated: July 29, 2010. Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary... ``Office of Adolescent Health,'' established in section 1708 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.... Under Part A, Chapter AC, Section AC.10 Organization, insert ``M. Office of Adolescent Health...

  17. Advancing the right to health through global organizations: The potential role of a Framework Convention on Global Health.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Eric A; Gostin, Lawrence O; Buse, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Organizations, partnerships, and alliances form the building blocks of global governance. Global health organizations thus have the potential to play a formative role in determining the extent to which people are able to realize their right to health. This article examines how major global health organizations, such as WHO, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, UNAIDS, and GAVI approach human rights concerns, including equality, accountability, and inclusive participation. We argue that organizational support for the right to health must transition from ad hoc and partial to permanent and comprehensive. Drawing on the literature and our knowledge of global health organizations, we offer good practices that point to ways in which such agencies can advance the right to health, covering nine areas: 1) participation and representation in governance processes; 2) leadership and organizational ethos; 3) internal policies; 4) norm-setting and promotion; 5) organizational leadership through advocacy and communication; 6) monitoring and accountability; 7) capacity building; 8) funding policies; and 9) partnerships and engagement. In each of these areas, we offer elements of a proposed Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH), which would commit state parties to support these standards through their board membership and other interactions with these agencies. We also explain how the FCGH could incorporate these organizations into its overall financing framework, initiate a new forum where they collaborate with each other, as well as organizations in other regimes, to advance the right to health, and ensure sufficient funding for right to health capacity building. We urge major global health organizations to follow the leadership of the UN Secretary-General and UNAIDS to champion the FCGH. It is only through a rights-based approach, enshrined in a new Convention, that we can expect to achieve health for all in our lifetimes. PMID:25006092

  18. Grafting Perspective into Health Law: Organ Transplantation as a Tool for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovbjerg, Randall R.

    1988-01-01

    The topic of organ transplantation adds interest and perspective to the basic health law curriculum. It can be used well to integrate a variety of topics by focusing on the policy and law of organ rationing. (MSE)

  19. Organization of ambulatory care provision: a critical determinant of health system performance in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P.

    2000-01-01

    Success in the provision of ambulatory personal health services, i.e. providing individuals with treatment for acute illness and preventive health care on an ambulatory basis, is the most significant contributor to the health care system's performance in most developing countries. Ambulatory personal health care has the potential to contribute the largest immediate gains in health status in populations, especially for the poor. At present, such health care accounts for the largest share of the total health expenditure in most lower income countries. It frequently comprises the largest share of the financial burden on households associated with health care consumption, which is typically regressively distributed. The "organization" of ambulatory personal health services is a critical determinant of the health system's performance which, at present, is poorly understood and insufficiently considered in policies and programmes for reforming health care systems. This article begins with a brief analysis of the importance of ambulatory care in the overall health system performance and this is followed by a summary of the inadequate global data on ambulatory care organization. It then defines the concept of "macro organization of health care" at a system level. Outlined also is a framework for analysing the organization of health care services and the major pathways through which the organization of ambulatory personal health care services can affect system performance. Examples of recent policy interventions to influence primary care organization--both government and nongovernmental providers and market structure--are reviewed. It is argued that the characteristics of health care markets in developing countries and of most primary care goods result in relatively diverse and competitive environments for ambulatory care services, compared with other types of health care. Therefore, governments will be required to use a variety of approaches beyond direct public provision

  20. Measles eradication: recommendations from a meeting cosponsored by the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and CDC.

    PubMed

    1997-06-13

    Recent successes in interrupting indigenous transmission of measles virus in the Americas and in the United Kingdom prompted the World Health Organization (WHO), Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), and CDC to convene a meeting in July, 1996 to consider the feasibility of global measles eradication. Presentations at the meeting included an overview of global measles control and elimination efforts; detailed reviews of successful measles elimination efforts in Latin America, the English-speaking Caribbean, Canada, and the United States; surveillance for clinical disease; laboratory tools for antibody detection and virus identification; and other factors that might influence the feasibility of disease eradication. With this background information, meeting organizers asked participants to address five questions: 1) Is global measles eradication feasible? 2) Is measles eradication feasible with current vaccines? 3) What are the appropriate vaccination strategies for measles eradication? 4) How should surveillance for measles be carried out? 5) What role should outbreak control play in the strategy to eliminate measles? Participants agreed that measles eradication is technically feasible with available vaccines and recommended adoption of the goal of global eradication with a target date during 2005-2010, with the proviso that measles eradication efforts should not interfere with poliomyelitis eradication but should build on the successes of the global Poliomyelitis Eradication Initiative. Although existing vaccines are adequate for eradication, vaccination strategies that rely on administration of a single dose of vaccine are not. In the Americas, sustained interruption of indigenous measles virus transmission has been achieved through a three-tiered vaccination strategy that includes a) "catch-up" vaccination of all persons aged 1-14 years, regardless of disease history or vaccination status; b) "keep-up" vaccination of > or = 90% of children in each successive

  1. Closing the health equity gap: evidence-based strategies for primary health care organizations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction International evidence shows that enhancement of primary health care (PHC) services for disadvantaged populations is essential to reducing health and health care inequities. However, little is known about how to enhance equity at the organizational level within the PHC sector. Drawing on research conducted at two PHC Centres in Canada whose explicit mandates are to provide services to marginalized populations, the purpose of this paper is to discuss (a) the key dimensions of equity-oriented services to guide PHC organizations, and (b) strategies for operationalizing equity-oriented PHC services, particularly for marginalized populations. Methods The PHC Centres are located in two cities within urban neighborhoods recognized as among the poorest in Canada. Using a mixed methods ethnographic design, data were collected through intensive immersion in the Centres, and included: (a) in-depth interviews with a total of 114 participants (73 patients; 41 staff), (b) over 900 hours of participant observation, and (c) an analysis of key organizational documents, which shed light on the policy and funding environments. Results Through our analysis, we identified four key dimensions of equity-oriented PHC services: inequity-responsive care; trauma- and violence-informed care; contextually-tailored care; and culturally-competent care. The operationalization of these key dimensions are identified as 10 strategies that intersect to optimize the effectiveness of PHC services, particularly through improvements in the quality of care, an improved 'fit' between people's needs and services, enhanced trust and engagement by patients, and a shift from crisis-oriented care to continuity of care. Using illustrative examples from the data, these strategies are discussed to illuminate their relevance at three inter-related levels: organizational, clinical programming, and patient-provider interactions. Conclusions These evidence- and theoretically-informed key dimensions and

  2. Organization of health care in small plants in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Seward E.

    1955-01-01

    In the USA, the concept of an occupational health programme has grown steadily, and now embraces the total health of the worker. Elements of basic in-plant health programmes have been identified and patterns developed for successful operation. Today, health services in small plants still fall far short of optimal requirements. No more than 5% of workers in small plants enjoy the benefit of occupational health services. The main reason for the arrested development of these programmes is the lack of organizational and administrative techniques for providing health services in small plants. Recently, however, several projects have demonstrated that these difficulties can be overcome, and the future development of such programmes in small plants thus looks hopeful. Other recent developments hold promise of strengthening the health services available to workers. Union health centres, now being established in increasing numbers, offer the workers varying services, ranging from diagnostic and preventive procedures to complete medical care. Further benefits to both the worker and his family are being provided under collective bargaining agreements by voluntary health-insurance schemes. In addition to making services available to large numbers of workers previously not covered, the development of both union health centres and the prepaid health-insurance schemes offer future possibilities for integration of these programmes into the preventive and diagnostic services offered in the plant. Finally, governmental occupational health agencies, in addition to their industrial hygiene activities, are taking an increasing interest in the establishment and development of in-plant health programmes. PMID:13276820

  3. Latina Workers in North Carolina: Work Organization, Domestic Responsibilities, Health, and Family Life.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Guadalupe; Trejo, Grisel; Schiemann, Elizabeth; Quandt, Sara A; Daniel, Stephanie S; Sandberg, Joanne C; Arcury, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    This analysis describes the work organization and domestic work experienced by migrant Latinas, and explores the linkage between work and health. Twenty Latina workers in North Carolina with at least one child under age 12 completed in-depth interviews focused on their work organization, domestic responsibilities, work-family conflict, health, and family health. Using a systematic qualitative analysis, these women described a demanding work organization that is contingent and exploitative, with little control or support. They also described demanding domestic roles, with gendered and unequal division of household work. The resulting work-family conflict affects their mental and physical health, and has negative effects on the care and health of their families. The findings from this study highlight that work stressors from an unfavorable work organization create work-family conflict, and that work-family conflict in this population has a negative influence on workers' health and health behaviors. PMID:26590923

  4. Mobile Health Applications for the Most Prevalent Conditions by the World Health Organization: Review and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New possibilities for mHealth have arisen by means of the latest advances in mobile communications and technologies. With more than 1 billion smartphones and 100 million tablets around the world, these devices can be a valuable tool in health care management. Every aid for health care is welcome and necessary as shown by the more than 50 million estimated deaths caused by illnesses or health conditions in 2008. Some of these conditions have additional importance depending on their prevalence. Objective To study the existing applications for mobile devices exclusively dedicated to the eight most prevalent health conditions by the latest update (2004) of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) of the World Health Organization (WHO): iron-deficiency anemia, hearing loss, migraine, low vision, asthma, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis (OA), and unipolar depressive disorders. Methods Two reviews have been carried out. The first one is a review of mobile applications in published articles retrieved from the following systems: IEEE Xplore, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Knowledge, and PubMed. The second review is carried out by searching the most important commercial app stores: Google play, iTunes, BlackBerry World, Windows Phone Apps+Games, and Nokia's Ovi store. Finally, two applications for each condition, one for each review, were selected for an in-depth analysis. Results Search queries up to April 2013 located 247 papers and more than 3673 apps related to the most prevalent conditions. The conditions in descending order by the number of applications found in literature are diabetes, asthma, depression, hearing loss, low vision, OA, anemia, and migraine. However when ordered by the number of commercial apps found, the list is diabetes, depression, migraine, asthma, low vision, hearing loss, OA, and anemia. Excluding OA from the former list, the four most prevalent conditions have fewer apps and research than the final four. Several results are extracted from

  5. Advanced Imaging Among Health Maintenance Organization Enrollees With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loggers, Elizabeth T.; Fishman, Paul A.; Peterson, Do; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen; Greenberg, Caprice; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Lowry, Sarah; Ramaprasan, Arvind; Wagner, Edward H.; Weeks, Jane C.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare expenditures for advanced imaging studies (defined as computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], positron emission tomography [PET] scans, and nuclear medicine studies [NM]) rapidly increased in the past two decades for patients with cancer. Imaging rates are unknown for patients with cancer, whether under or over age 65 years, in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), where incentives may differ. Materials and Methods: Incident cases of breast, colorectal, lung, prostate, leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cancers diagnosed in 2003 and 2006 from four HMOs in the Cancer Research Network were used to determine 2-year overall mean imaging counts and average total imaging costs per HMO enrollee by cancer type for those under and over age 65. Results: There were 44,446 incident cancer patient cases, with a median age of 75 (interquartile range, 71-81), and 454,029 imaging procedures were performed. The mean number of images per patient increased from 7.4 in 2003 to 12.9 in 2006. Rates of imaging were similar across age groups, with the exception of greater use of echocardiograms and NM studies in younger patients with breast cancer and greater use of PET among younger patients with lung cancer. Advanced imaging accounted for approximately 41% of all imaging, or approximately 85% of the $8.7 million in imaging expenditures. Costs were nearly $2,000 per HMO enrollee; costs for younger patients with NHL, leukemia, and lung cancer were nearly $1,000 more in 2003. Conclusion: Rates of advanced imaging appear comparable among FFS and HMO participants of any age with these six cancers. PMID:24844241

  6. Report a Complaint (about a Health Care Organization)

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Accreditation? Become Accredited Download the Gold Seal Find Accredited Organizations Newsletters Publicity Kits State Recognition ... What Is Certification? Become Certified Download the Gold Seal Find Certified Organizations Newsletters Publicity Kit State Recognition ...

  7. 78 FR 52924 - Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Statement of Organization, Functions, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Statement of Organization, Functions, and Delegations of Authority Part A, Office of the Secretary, Statement of Organization, Function, and Delegation of Authority...

  8. 78 FR 9397 - International Drug Scheduling; Convention on Psychotropic Substances; World Health Organization...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... June 2012. In the Federal Register of September 05, 2008 (73 FR 51823), FDA announced the WHO ECDD... Substances; World Health Organization Scheduling Recommendations for Gamma-hydroxybutyric Acid AGENCY: Food... public meeting concerning recommendations by the World Health Organization (WHO) to impose...

  9. 75 FR 48691 - Single Source Cooperative Agreement Award for the World Health Organization (WHO) To Continue...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Single Source Cooperative Agreement Award for the World Health Organization (WHO) To... Authority ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notification of Single Source Cooperative Agreement Award for the World... 2010, BARDA plans to provide a Single Source Continuation Award to the World Health Organization...

  10. Organ harvesting from anencephalic infants: health management over a sinkhole.

    PubMed

    Alatis, A J

    As technology increases in the field of organ transplantation for newborns, a problematic limitation persists: too few organ donors are available to match the number of needy organ donees. Anencephalic newborns have been suggested (and recently used) as organ sources. Anencephalic infants are born without the upper part of their brain and usually die within a week after birth. This article will address the ethical considerations of using these infants as organ sources, particularly from the view of a physician and an attorney. This piece will further analyze the medico-legal ramifications of the various legislative proposals addressing this subject. PMID:10292200

  11. The World Health Organization's mechanisms for increasing the health sector budget: The South African context.

    PubMed

    Venter, Fouche Hendrik Johannes; Wolfaardt, Jaqueline Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    South Africa (SA) has limited scope for raising income taxes, and the proposed National Health Insurance (NHI) scheme will necessitate growth in the health sector budget. The NHI White Paper suggests five funding scenarios to meet the expected shortfall. These scenarios are a mixture of a surcharge on taxable income, an increase in value-added tax and a payroll tax. Five alternative options, suggested by the World Health Organization, are interrogated as ways to decrease the general taxation proposed in the White Paper. The five mechanisms (corporate tax, financial transaction levy, and taxes on tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy foods) were chosen based on their fund-raising potential and their mandatory element. A literature review provides the information for a discussion of the potential costs of each mechanism. Within specific assumptions, potential budgetary contribution is compared with the requirement. First, raising corporate tax rates could raise enough funds, but the losses due to capital flight might be too much for the local economy to bear. Second, a levy on currency transactions is unlikely to raise the required resources, even without a probable decrease in the number of transactions. Third, the increase in the tax on tobacco and alcohol would need to be very large, even assuming that consumption patterns would remain unchanged. Lastly, a tax on unhealthy food products is a new idea and could be explored as an option - especially as the SA Treasury has announced its future implementation. Implementing only one of the mechanisms is unlikely to increase available funding sufficiently, but if they are implemented together the welfare-maximising tax rate for each mechanism may be high enough to fulfil the NHI scheme's budgetary requirement, moderating the increases in the tax burden of the SA population. PMID:27499398

  12. Health and research organization to meet complex needs of developing energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, a unique safety technology organization has been established that is especially geared to respond to interdisciplinary health and safety questions in response to rapidly growing energy technology problems. This concept can be adopted by smaller organizations at a more modest cost, and still maintains the efficiency, flexibility, and technical rigor that are needed more and more in support of any industry health and safety problem. The separation of the technology development role from the operation safety organization allows the operational safety specialists to spend more time upgrading the occupational health and safety program but yet provides the opportunity for interchange with health and safety technology development specialists. In fact, a personnel assignment flow between an operational health and safety organization and a special technology development organization provides a mechanism for upgrading the overall safety capability and program provided by a given industrial or major laboratory.

  13. Work organization research at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    PubMed

    Rosenstock, L

    1997-01-01

    For 25 years, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has conducted and sponsored laboratory, field, and epidemiological studies that have helped define the role of work organization factors in occupational safety and health. Research has focused on the health effects of specific job conditions, occupational stressors in specific occupations, occupational difference in the incidence of stressors and stress-related disorders, and intervention strategies. NIOSH and the American Psychological Association have formalized the concept of occupational health psychology and developed a postdoctoral training program. The National Occupational Research Agenda recognizes organization of work as one of 21 national occupational safety and health research priority areas. Future research should focus on industries, occupations, and populations at special risk; the impact of work organization on overall health; the identification of healthy organization characteristics; and the development of intervention strategies. PMID:9552275

  14. The New Left and Public Health The Health Policy Advisory Center, Community Organizing, and the Big Business of Health, 1967–1975

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Soon after its founding in the politically tumultuous late 1960s, the Health Policy Advisory Center (Health/PAC) and its Health/PAC Bulletin became the strategic hub of an intense urban social movement around health care equality in New York City. I discuss its early formation, its intellectual influences, and the analytical framework that it devised to interpret power relations in municipal health care. I also describe Health/PAC's interpretation of health activism, focusing in particular on a protracted struggle regarding Lincoln Hospital in the South Bronx. Over the years, the organization's stance toward community-oriented health politics evolved considerably, from enthusiastically promoting its potential to later confronting its limits. I conclude with a discussion of Health/PAC's major theoretical contributions, often taken for granted today, and its book American Health Empire. PMID:21228287

  15. Biochemistry in Undergraduate Health Courses: Structure and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Irani F.; Batista, Nildo A.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the following aspects of teaching biochemistry in undergraduate health courses: objectives, number of hours, time in which the subject is studied, selection of content, teaching strategies, and evaluation methodologies used. Fifty-three courses distributed in 13 areas within the health field and offered by 12 institutions…

  16. Services Shared by Health Care Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, IL.

    This bibliography is designed to assist planners in the field of institutional health and health support services in gaining access to knowledge that will enhance their efforts to achieve new or expanded arrangements of service sharing. Entries are cross-referenced to as many categories as the material warrants. Case studies that are not annotated…

  17. Managing professional work: three models of control for health organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, W R

    1982-01-01

    Three arrangements for structuring the work of professional participants in professional organizations are described, contrasted and evaluated. Arguments are illustrated by application to the organization of physicians within hospitals. The primary rationale, the support structures that have fostered its development, the key structural features and the advantages and disadvantages of each arrangement are described. The effect on these arrangements of structures and forces external to any particular professional organization is emphasized. PMID:6749761

  18. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization. PMID:25441318

  19. Design of high reliability organizations in health care

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J S; Rudolph, J W

    2006-01-01

    To improve safety performance, many healthcare organizations have sought to emulate high reliability organizations from industries such as nuclear power, chemical processing, and military operations. We outline high reliability design principles for healthcare organizations including both the formal structures and the informal practices that complement those structures. A stage model of organizational structures and practices, moving from local autonomy to formal controls to open inquiry to deep self‐understanding, is used to illustrate typical challenges and design possibilities at each stage. We suggest how organizations can use the concepts and examples presented to increase their capacity to self‐design for safety and reliability. PMID:17142607

  20. [Toward a new organization of public health services in Spain. 2008 SESPAS Report].

    PubMed

    Artundo Purroy, Carlos; Rivadeneyra Sicilia, Ana

    2008-04-01

    Public health in Spain shows significant weaknesses. Spanish public health services respond reasonably well in crisis situations but tend to be invisible and occupy a marginal position in political agendas and in relation to health services. The organization of the public health subsystem is clearly out of date in terms of its ability to promote and protect community health, to prevent diseases, and to cope effectively with the new public health threats and challenges related to the physical and social environment in today's globalized world. Consequently, there is broad consensus on the need to rethink functions, strategies and the organization of public health in Spain, in line with European and international trends. Thus, public health reform is currently a pending challenge and a strategic priority. Indeed, some Autonomous Communities have initiated a process of modernization and change. Empowerment of public health in the political agendas and in relation to the health services is strongly recommended by promoting intersectorial approaches, the Health in All Policies strategy and Health Impact Assessment. There is also a need for a specific law that would update public health functions, organization and structures, allocate competencies by facilitating alliances and partnership, and regulate coordination and intersectorial intervention. The following key elements related to this reform are described: 1) a participatory leadership in public health; 2) the generation of intelligence and evidence in public health; 3) improvement of professional education and development; 4) the importance of transparent, independent and competent performance and communication, and 5) new and flexible organization coherent with the new strategies and close to the local level and primary health care services. Coordination between the State and the Autonomous Communities should involved a functional and intelligent relationship by building up common spaces, alliances, networks and

  1. The evolution of human rights in World Health Organization policy and the future of human rights through global health governance.

    PubMed

    Meier, B M; Onzivu, W

    2014-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) was intended to serve at the forefront of efforts to realize human rights to advance global health, and yet this promise of a rights-based approach to health has long been threatened by political constraints in international relations, organizational resistance to legal discourses, and medical ambivalence toward human rights. Through legal research on international treaty obligations, historical research in the WHO organizational archives, and interview research with global health stakeholders, this research examines WHO's contributions to (and, in many cases, negligence of) the rights-based approach to health. Based upon such research, this article analyzes the evolving role of WHO in the development and implementation of human rights for global health, reviews the current state of human rights leadership in the WHO Secretariat, and looks to future institutions to reclaim the mantle of human rights as a normative framework for global health governance. PMID:24439475

  2. The Effect of Graphic Organizers on Subjective and Objective Comprehension of a Health Education Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kools, Marieke; van de Wiel, Margaretha W. J.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.; Cruts, Anica; Kok, Gerjo

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of graphic organizers on the comprehension of a health education brochure text and compared subjective with objective comprehension measures. Graphic organizers are graphical depictions of relations among concepts in a text. Participants read a brochure text about asthma with and without these organizers, and…

  3. The World Health Organization and the Transition From “International” to “Global” Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Theodore M.; Cueto, Marcos; Fee, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The term “global health” is rapidly replacing the older terminology of “international health.” We describe the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in both international and global health and in the transition from one to the other. We suggest that the term “global health” emerged as part of larger political and historical processes, in which WHO found its dominant role challenged and began to reposition itself within a shifting set of power alliances. Between 1948 and 1998, WHO moved from being the unquestioned leader of international health to being an organization in crisis, facing budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful players. We argue that WHO began to refashion itself as the coordinator, strategic planner, and leader of global health initiatives as a strategy of survival in response to this transformed international political context. PMID:16322464

  4. Trucking organization and mental health disorders of truck drivers.

    PubMed

    Shattell, Mona; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Collins, Chad; Sönmez, Sevil; Fehrenbacher, Caitlin

    2012-07-01

    There are over 3 million truck drivers employed in the commercial transportation and material moving occupations, one of the largest occupational groups in the United States. Workers in this large and growing occupational segment are at risk for a range of occupational health-induced conditions, including mental health and psychiatric disorders due to high occupational stress, low access and use of health care, and limited social support. The purpose of this study was to explore male truck drivers' mental health risks and associated comorbidities, using a cross-sectional and quantitative design. Data were collected from a random sample of 316 male truckers between the ages of 23 and 76 at a large truck stop located within a 100-mile radius of Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, using a self-administered 82-item questionnaire. Surveyed truckers were found to have significant issues affecting their mental health, such as loneliness (27.9%), depression (26.9%), chronic sleep disturbances (20.6%), anxiety (14.5%), and other emotional problems (13%). Findings have potential to help researchers develop interventions to improve the emotional and occupational health of truck drivers, a highly underserved population. Mental health promotion, assessment, and treatment must become a priority to improve the overall trucking environment for truckers, the transportation industry, and safety on US highways. PMID:22757596

  5. Organic farming: Impacts on soil, food, and human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of responsible stewardship in managing soil is a central tenet of organic farming. Organic farmers believe that practices which stimulate biology and overall quality of soil enhance production of healthy and nutritious crops. Few involved in agriculture would argue this point. Neverth...

  6. The paradox of physicians and administrators in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Peirce, J C

    2000-01-01

    Rapidly changing times in health care challenge both physicians and health care administrators to manage the paradox of providing orderly, high quality, and efficient care while bringing forth innovations to address present unmet problems and surprises that emerge. Health care has grown throughout the past several centuries through differentiation and integration, becoming a highly complex biological system with the hospital as the central attractive force--or "strange attractor"--during this century. The theoretical model of complex adaptive systems promises more effective strategic direction in addressing these chaotic times where the new strange attractor moves beyond the hospital. PMID:10710724

  7. Consumer-directed health care: implications for health care organizations and managers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kristina L

    2010-01-01

    This article uses a pyramid model to illustrate the key components of consumer-directed health care. Consumer-directed health care is considered the essential strategy needed to lower health care costs and is valuable for making significant strides in health care reform. Consumer-directed health care presents new challenges and opportunities for all health care stakeholders and their managers. The viability of the health system depends on the success of managers to respond rapidly and with precision to changes in the system; thus, new and modified roles of managers are necessary to successfully sustain consumerism efforts to control costs while maintaining access and quality. PMID:20436329

  8. e-business means survival for health care organizations in 2010.

    PubMed

    Lutz, S

    2000-01-01

    Within the next five years, most health care organizations will communicate with suppliers, other providers, payers, regulators, and patients through the Internet. The Internet will recalibrate expectations of speed and service for patients and providers, but it also will increase accountability in which digitalized information is tracked and analyzed. The rate at which health care organizations are developing Web-based solutions is neck-snapping in the United States. As individual product lines, departments, and subsidiaries grow their own e-health businesses, organizations must decide which initiatives they must fund, which are essential to survival, and which could be financial black holes. PMID:11184343

  9. Health in the news: an analysis of magazines coverage of health issues in veterans and military service organizations.

    PubMed

    Jitnarin, Nattinee; Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, Christopher K; Jahnke, Sara

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a content analysis of Veterans and Military Service Organizations (VMSOs) magazines to determine what health-related topics VMSOs target and how they inform their constituencies about health issues. Health-related topics in 288 VMSOs' magazines from 21 VMSOs published in 2011 and 2012 were coded by trained raters using a standardized manual. The top three most addressed health topics were Health Services (Health care, Insurance), Disability and Disability benefits, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Topics least frequently covered were Tobacco and Smoking cessation, Illegal drugs, Alcohol, Gulf War Syndrome, and Weight and Body composition. VMSOs are concerned about the health and well-being of their members given the considerable amount of content devoted to certain health topics such as health insurance concerns, disability, and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, other health concerns that affect a considerable number of both current military personnel and veterans and cost both the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense millions annually, such as drug and alcohol problems, and tobacco use and smoking cessation, are infrequently covered. The results of this study improve our understanding of the health-related information that reaches the military and veteran populations through this important media outlet. PMID:25939108

  10. Advocating self-advocacy: board membership in a statewide mental health consumer organization.

    PubMed

    Tanenbaum, Sandra J

    2014-08-01

    Until 2008 Ohio Advocates for Mental Health was a statewide mental health advocacy organization run by mental health consumers and supportive of consumer-run organizations around the state. The author's tenure on the board entailed repeated engagement with questions of identity - self-identity, peer support through personal identification, and negotiation of public identities with provider groups and the state agency. These are fundamental to defining and legitimating the claims of mentally ill people not just for health care resources but for full participation as citizens in the public sphere. PMID:24842977

  11. 42 CFR 84.124 - Facepiece tests; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facepiece tests; minimum requirements. 84.124 Section 84.124 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.124 Facepiece tests; minimum...

  12. 42 CFR 84.115 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.115 Section 84.115 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.115 Breathing tubes; minimum...

  13. Studies in Ambulatory Care Quality Assessment in the Indian Health Service. Volume III: Comparison of Rural Private Practice, Health Maintenance Organizations, and the Indian Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutting, Paul A.; And Others

    Utilizing a quality assessment methodology for ambulatory patient care currently under development by the Indian Health Service's (IHS) Office of Research and Development, comparisons were made between results derived from a pilot test in IHS service units, 2 metropolitan Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO), and 3 rural private practices.…

  14. The Australian experiment: how primary health care organizations supported the evolution of a primary health care system.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Marley, John E; Wells, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Primary health care in Australia has undergone 2 decades of change. Starting with a vision for a national health strategy with general practice at its core, Australia established local meso-level primary health care organizations--Divisions of General Practice--moving from focus on individual practitioners to a professional collective local voice. The article identifies how these meso-level organizations have helped the Australian primary health care system evolve by supporting the roll-out of initiatives including national practice accreditation, a focus on quality improvement, expansion of multidisciplinary teams into general practice, regional integration, information technology adoption, and improved access to care. Nevertheless, there are still challenges to ensuring equitable access and the supply and distribution of a primary care workforce, addressing the increasing rates of chronic disease and obesity, and overcoming the fragmentation of funding and accountability in the Australian system. PMID:22403246

  15. Managing the conflict between individual needs and group interests--ethical leadership in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Shale, Suzanne

    2008-03-01

    This paper derives from a grounded theory study of how Medical Directors working within the UK National Health Service manage the moral quandaries that they encounter as leaders of health care organizations. The reason health care organizations exist is to provide better care for individuals through providing shared resources for groups of people. This creates a paradox at the heart of health care organization, because serving the interests of groups sometimes runs counter to serving the needs of individuals. The paradox presents ethical dilemmas at every level of the organization, from the boardroom to the bedside. Medical Directors experience these organizational ethical dilemmas most acutely by virtue of their position in the organization. As doctors, their professional ethic obliges them to put the interests of individual patients first. As executive directors, their role is to help secure the delivery of services that meet the needs of the whole patient population. What should they do when the interests of groups of patients, and of individual patients, appear to conflict? The first task of an ethical healthcare organization is to secure the trust of patients, and two examples of medical ethical leadership are discussed against this background. These examples suggest that conflict between individual and population needs is integral to health care organization, so dilemmas addressed at one level of the organization inevitably re-emerge in altered form at other levels. Finally, analysis of the ethical activity that Medical Directors have described affords insight into the interpersonal components of ethical skill and knowledge. PMID:18382123

  16. Offering-level strategy formulation in health service organizations.

    PubMed

    Pointer, D D

    1990-01-01

    One of six different strategies must be selected for a health service offering to provide consumers with distinctive value and achieve sustainable competitive advantage in a market or market segment. Decisions must be made regarding objectives sought, market segmentation, market scope, and the customer-value proposition that will be pursued. PMID:2118882

  17. Armenia: Influences and Organization of Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John; Harutyunyan, Hasmik; Smbatyan, Meri; Cressley, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Relatively little has been published on mental health care and counseling as they pertain to Armenia, a country of approximately three million residents that gained independence in 1991 from the former Soviet Union. Various influences, such as its history, economy, religious and family systems, and a major natural disaster in 1988, have affected…

  18. Algae as promising organisms for environment and health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Algae, like other plants, produce a variety of remarkable compounds collectively referred to as secondary metabolites. They are synthesized by these organisms at the end of the growth phase and/or due to metabolic alterations induced by environmental stress conditions. Carotenoids, phenolic compounds, phycobiliprotein pigments, polysaccharides and unsaturated fatty acids are same of the algal natural products, which were reported to have variable biological activities, including antioxidant activity, anticancer activity, antimicroabial activity against bacteria-virus-algae-fungi, organic fertilizer and bioremediation potentials. PMID:21862867

  19. Algae as promising organisms for environment and health.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Emad A

    2011-09-01

    Algae, like other plants, produce a variety of remarkable compounds collectively referred to as secondary metabolites. They are synthesized by these organisms at the end of the growth phase and/or due to metabolic alterations induced by environmental stress conditions. Carotenoids, phenolic compounds, phycobiliprotein pigments, polysaccharides and unsaturated fatty acids are same of the algal natural products, which were reported to have variable biological activities, including antioxidant activity, anticancer activity, antimicroabial activity against bacteria-virus-algae-fungi, organic fertilizer and bioremediation potentials. PMID:21862867

  20. Minimum Principles in Motor Control.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Sascha E.

    2001-06-01

    Minimum (or minimal) principles are mathematical laws that were first used in physics: Hamilton's principle and Fermat's principle of least time are two famous example. In the past decade, a number of motor control theories have been proposed that are formally of the same kind as the minimum principles of physics, and some of these have been quite successful at predicting motor performance in a variety of tasks. The present paper provides a comprehensive review of this work. Particular attention is given to the relation between minimum theories in motor control and those used in other disciplines. Other issues around which the review is organized include: (1) the relation between minimum principles and structural models of motor planning and motor control, (2) the empirically-driven development of minimum principles and the danger of circular theorizing, and (3) the design of critical tests for minimum theories. Some perspectives for future research are discussed in the concluding section of the paper. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11401453

  1. 78 FR 44574 - Third Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Third Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  2. 76 FR 55928 - Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  3. 77 FR 47652 - Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Second Annual Food and Drug Administration Health Professional Organizations Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a conference for representatives of...

  4. Environment Health & Safety Research Program. Organization and 1979-1980 Publications

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This document was prepared to assist readers in understanding the organization of Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and the organization and functions of the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program Office. Telephone numbers of the principal management staff are provided. Also included is a list of 1979 and 1980 publications reporting on work performed in the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program, as well as a list of papers submitted for publication.

  5. [International cooperation and affirmative action policies: the role of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)].

    PubMed

    Maio, Marcos Chor; Pires-Alves, Fernando A; Paiva, Carlos Henrique Assunção; Silva Magalhães, Rodrigo Cesar da

    2010-07-01

    The article analyzes the formulation, legitimation, and implementation of a policy with an ethnic/race approach by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). The study includes the emergence of the theme within this international organization, the institutional dynamics related to it, and the proposals focused on the Black population in Latin America. These issues are discussed on the basis of interaction between PAHO and a range of intergovernmental agencies and private organizations working in the international health domain. Participation by PAHO in the ethnic/racial theme provides elements for understanding the dual role played by intergovernmental organizations in the new global scenario, as both social actors and arenas. As an important social actor in the international health field, PAHO has produced and disseminated values and guidelines related to the ethnic/racial theme. As an arena, the organization has proven open to various interests, seeking to work harmoniously with them through its internal administration. PMID:20694349

  6. Oregon's experiment in health care delivery and payment reform: coordinated care organizations replacing managed care.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven W; Bernell, Stephanie L; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff; Ranit, Claire M

    2015-02-01

    To control Medicaid costs, improve quality, and drive community engagement, the Oregon Health Authority introduced a new system of coordinated care organizations (CCOs). While CCOs resemble traditional Medicaid managed care, they have differences that have been deliberately designed to improve care coordination, increase accountability, and incorporate greater community governance. Reforms include global budgets integrating medical, behavioral, and oral health care and public health functions; risk-adjusted payments rewarding outcomes and evidence-based practice; increased transparency; and greater community engagement. The CCO model faces several implementation challenges. If successful, it will provide improved health care delivery, better health outcomes, and overall savings. PMID:25480844

  7. Oceans and Human Health: Linking Ocean, Organism, and Human Health for Sustainable Management of Coastal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandifer, P. A.; Trtanj, J.; Collier, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and policy-makers are increasingly recognizing that sustainable coastal communities depend on healthy and resilient economies, ecosystems, and people, and that the condition or "health" of the coastal ocean and humans are intimately and inextricably connected. A wealth of ecosystem services provided by ocean and coastal environments are crucial for human survival and well being. Nonetheless, the health of coastal communities, their economies, connected ecosystems and ecosystem services, and people are under increasing threats from health risks associated with environmental degradation, climate change, and unwise land use practices, all of which contribute to growing burdens of naturally-occurring and introduced pathogens, noxious algae, and chemical contaminants. The occurrence, frequency, intensity, geographic range, and number and kinds of ocean health threats are increasing, with concomitant health and economic effects and eroding public confidence in the safety and wholesomeness of coastal environments and resources. Concerns in the research and public health communities, many summarized in the seminal 1999 NRC Report, From Monsoons to Microbes and the 2004 final report of the US Commission on Ocean Policy, resulted in establishment of a new "meta-discipline" known as Oceans and Human Health (OHH). OHH brings together practitioners in oceanography, marine biology, ecology, biomedical science, medicine, economics and other social sciences, epidemiology, environmental management, and public health to focus on water- and food-borne causes of human and animal illnesses associated with ocean and coastal systems and on health benefits of seafood and other marine products. It integrates information across multiple disciplines to increase knowledge of ocean health risks and benefits and communicate such information to enhance public safety. Recognizing the need for a comprehensive approach to ocean health threats and benefits, Congress passed the Oceans and

  8. Consumption of organic and functional food. A matter of well-being and health?

    PubMed

    Goetzke, Beate; Nitzko, Sina; Spiller, Achim

    2014-06-01

    Health is an important motivation for the consumption of both organic and functional foods. The aim of this study was to clarify to what extent the consumption of organic and functional foods are characterized by a healthier lifestyle and a higher level of well-being. Moreover, the influence of social desirability on the respondents' response behavior was of interest and was also analyzed. Well-being and health was measured in a sample of 555 German consumers at two levels: the cognitive-emotional and the behavioral level. The results show that although health is an important aspect for both functional food and organic food consumption, these two forms of consumption were influenced by different understandings of health: organic food consumption is influenced by an overall holistic healthy lifestyle including a healthy diet and sport, while functional food consumption is characterized by small "adjustments" to lifestyle to enhance health and to increase psychological well-being. An overlap between the consumption of organic and functional food was also observed. This study provides information which enables a better characterization of the consumption of functional food and organic food in terms of well-being and health. PMID:24630940

  9. Health Science Libraries of National, State, and Local Medical Organizations

    PubMed Central

    1967-01-01

    This second survey of medical society-sponsored libraries has been expanded to include national association libraries in allied medical fields, as well as special libraries which do not fall into categories established for the MLA survey of health science libraries. A total of fifty-eight libraries in this subset have been identified, and selected characteristics have been measured. Observations are made concerning methodology, user population, and services. PMID:6041830

  10. Describing an Academic and Nonprofit Organization Partnership to Educate At-Risk Adolescents about Cardiovascular Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazzo, Steven J.; Skager, Cherie; Kraiger, Anneliese

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence to suggest community-based interventions can change community-wide behaviors and attitudes toward cardiovascular health. This article describes a partnership between an academic institution and a community nonprofit organization to develop and implement a cardiovascular health promotion program targeting at risk high…