Science.gov

Sample records for health professions students

  1. How Health Professions Students Finance Their Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    This report was based on a survey to determine how students in the health professions of medicine osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine financed their educations during the 1970-71 school year. The purpose of this nationwide survey was to provide information on patterns of student expenses and on the sources…

  2. Health professions students' use of social media.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carolyn; Giordano, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The internet is increasingly a part of everyday life by facilitating networking opportunities and offering ways to associate with others who have similar interests, values, or goals. An online survey was administered to 644 first-year students and 413 graduating students via Surveymonkey to investigate their media preferences, to gauge if they are active on social media sites, and to evaluate how they responded to advertisements. Students were in the following health professions: biotechnology, couple and family therapy, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, public health, radiologic and imaging sciences, and pharmacy. Results indicate that students prefer online media as their primary source of information. The majority of students were using Facebook, and very few were using Twitter or LinkedIn or other social networking sites. Understanding social media usage has several implications for educating, connecting with, and researching health professions students from all stages of their academic career. PMID:21695367

  3. Weight Bias in University Health Professions Students.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Cynthia; Brooks, Jennifer K; McKnight, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Negative attitudes toward people with high body weight have been documented in pre-professional health students, prompting concern that such feelings may manifest as poor patient care in professional practice. This study assessed weight bias in university students in the non-physician health professions. A convenience sample of 206 students completed an online survey composed of a validated 14-item scale (1-5 lowest to highest weight bias) and questions regarding personal experiences of weight bias. Respondents were grouped by discipline within graduate and undergraduate levels. Weight bias was present in a majority of respondents. Overall, the percentage of responses indicative of weight bias was 92.7%. The mean total score was 3.65. ± 0.52, and the rating exceeded 3 for all 14 scale descriptors of high-weight people. In graduate students, discipline had a significant main effect on total score (p=0.01), with lower scores in dietetics (3.17 ± 0.46) vs audiology/sign language/speech language pathology (3.84 ± 0.41) and physician assistant students (3.78 ± 0.51; p<0.05). These findings show that weight bias is prevalent in health professions students at a mountain west university. Well-controlled studies that track students into professional practice would help determine whether bias-reduction interventions in college improve provider behaviors and clinical outcomes. PMID:27585618

  4. 42 CFR 57.208 - Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health professions student loan promissory note and..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.208 Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements. (a) Promissory note form. Each health professions student...

  5. 42 CFR 57.207 - Maximum amount of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum amount of health professions student loans... LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.207 Maximum amount of health professions student loans. The total of the health professions student loans made from the fund to any student for a school year...

  6. 42 CFR 57.207 - Maximum amount of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum amount of health professions student loans... LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.207 Maximum amount of health professions student loans. The total of the health professions student loans made from the fund to any student for a school year...

  7. Australian health professions student use of social media.

    PubMed

    Usher, Kim; Woods, Cindy; Casellac, Evan; Glass, Nel; Wilson, Rhonda; Mayner, Lidia; Jackson, Debra; Brown, Janie; Duffy, Elaine; Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Irwin, Pauletta

    2014-01-01

    Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by higher education students has markedly increased. Social media are already used widely across the health sector but little is currently known of the use of social media by health profession students in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to explore health profession students' use of social media and their media preferences for sourcing information. An electronic survey was made available to health profession students at ten participating universities across most Australian states and territories. Respondents were 637 first year students and 451 final year students. The results for first and final year health profession students indicate that online media is the preferred source of information with only 20% of students nominating traditional peer-reviewed journals as a preferred information source. In addition, the results indicate that Facebook usage was high among all students while use of other types of social media such as Twitter remains comparatively low. As health profession students engage regularly with social media, and this use is likely to grow rather than diminish, educational institutions are challenged to consider the use of social media as a validated platform for learning and teaching. PMID:25109207

  8. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... noncompliance provisions of § 57.218 and the Department's Claims Collections regulations (45 CFR part 30), as... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds. 57.205 Section 57.205 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS...

  9. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. (a) Each health professions student loan, including accrued interests, will be repayable......

  10. 42 CFR 57.209 - Payment of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of health professions student loans. 57.209 Section 57.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS... Health Professions Student Loans § 57.209 Payment of health professions student loans. (a)...

  11. 42 CFR 57.209 - Payment of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of health professions student loans. 57.209 Section 57.209 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS... Health Professions Student Loans § 57.209 Payment of health professions student loans. (a)...

  12. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shall exercise the level of care required of a fiduciary with regard to these deposits and investments... noncompliance provisions of § 57.218 and the Department's Claims Collections regulations (45 CFR part 30), as... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds....

  13. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shall exercise the level of care required of a fiduciary with regard to these deposits and investments... noncompliance provisions of § 57.218 and the Department's Claims Collections regulations (45 CFR part 30), as... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds....

  14. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shall exercise the level of care required of a fiduciary with regard to these deposits and investments... noncompliance provisions of § 57.218 and the Department's Claims Collections regulations (45 CFR part 30), as... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds....

  15. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... shall exercise the level of care required of a fiduciary with regard to these deposits and investments... noncompliance provisions of § 57.218 and the Department's Claims Collections regulations (45 CFR part 30), as... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds....

  16. 42 CFR 57.211 - Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.211 Cancellation of health professions... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death. 57.211 Section 57.211 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  17. 42 CFR 57.211 - Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.211 Cancellation of health professions... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death. 57.211 Section 57.211 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  18. A Health Education Program for Underserved Community Youth Led by Health Professions Students

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ann Ryan; Christensen, Carla; Lust, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To develop and implement a health fair and educational sessions for elementary school children led by health professions students. Design The structure and process were developed with elementary school administration to determine the health topics to be covered. Students and faculty members created a “hands-on,” youth-oriented health fair and interactive health educational sessions. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected on learning outcomes from the underserved child population and health professions students. Assessment The health fair and educational sessions increased awareness of underserved youth in the areas of critical health behaviors, purposeful education on health issues facing their community, and exposure to careers in various health professions. The activities provided meaningful learning experiences for the health professions students. Conclusion The health education program model is an excellent way to teach health education, communication and critical thinking skills, and service learning to health professions students. PMID:19885067

  19. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of health... consideration for a health professions student loan if they are: (i) Residents of the United States and......

  20. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health...

  1. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health...

  2. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health...

  3. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of...

  4. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of...

  5. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of...

  6. The Allied Health Professions: Opportunities for Minority Students. Career Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Maria

    The term "allied health" refers to a cluster of health professions encompassing as many as 200 occupational titles (exclusive of physicians and nurses) involved with the delivery of health or related services pertaining to the identification, evaluation, prevention, and treatment of diseases and disorders; dietary and nutritional services; and…

  7. Attitudes of Students in Health Professions toward Caring for Older People: Needed Curricula Revisions in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fajemilehin, Boluwaji Reuben

    2004-01-01

    This descriptive study examined the conceptions and misconceptions students in health professions have regarding older people. The research was conducted in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The findings revealed that students in health professions, as a whole, demonstrated a high degree of stereotypic misconceptions and poor knowledge about aging and older…

  8. Evaluation of the Pathways for Students into Health Professions: The Training of Under-Represented Minority Students to Pursue Maternal and Child Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Faye J.; Inkelas, Moira; Perez, Victor H.; Verdugo, Bobby; Kuo, Alice A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pathways for Students into Health Professions program is one of four nationally funded programs by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services to support the training of undergraduate students, particularly from under-represented minority groups to pursue maternal and child health professions. To assess the program’s impact on student ratings, knowledge, and interest in maternal and child health professions. A baseline survey on student ratings and knowledge in maternal and child health topics and careers, public health topics, and career development topics was provided to 32 students at the beginning of their first year in the program and approximately 1 year after participation. Half of the students (16 students) in the program from 2009–2011 were from traditionally underrepresented minority groups. After participation, students reported significantly higher ratings of interest in maternal and child health topics and careers and in receiving adequate academic and career guidance. Students also reported significantly higher knowledge of public health, childhood and maternal morbidity and mortality, health care disparities, and life course health development. The program’s didactic, experiential, and mentorship activities are changing student ratings and knowledge in a favorable direction toward maternal and child health careers and topics. Undergraduate training programs may be an important mechanism to strengthen the pipeline of a diverse healthcare workforce. PMID:25366098

  9. Evaluation of the pathways for students into health professions: the training of under-represented minority students to pursue maternal and child health professions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Alma D; Holmes, Faye J; Inkelas, Moira; Perez, Victor H; Verdugo, Bobby; Kuo, Alice A

    2015-02-01

    The Pathways for Students into Health Professions program is one of four nationally funded programs by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services to support the training of undergraduate students, particularly from under-represented minority groups to pursue maternal and child health professions. To assess the program's impact on student ratings, knowledge, and interest in maternal and child health professions. A baseline survey on student ratings and knowledge in maternal and child health topics and careers, public health topics, and career development topics was provided to 32 students at the beginning of their first year in the program and approximately 1 year after participation. Half of the students (16 students) in the program from 2009-2011 were from traditionally underrepresented minority groups. After participation, students reported significantly higher ratings of interest in maternal and child health topics and careers and in receiving adequate academic and career guidance. Students also reported significantly higher knowledge of public health, childhood and maternal morbidity and mortality, health care disparities, and life course health development. The program's didactic, experiential, and mentorship activities are changing student ratings and knowledge in a favorable direction toward maternal and child health careers and topics. Undergraduate training programs may be an important mechanism to strengthen the pipeline of a diverse healthcare workforce. PMID:25366098

  10. Student Participation in Health Professions Education Research: In Pursuit of the Aristotelian Mean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ruth P.

    2011-01-01

    In research ethics reviews, traditional approaches of research ethics boards (REBs) balance the risks with the potential for benefit of proposed studies, and this review process has been similar for health professions education research (HPER) as it has been for clinically based studies. Health professions students are the primary population from…

  11. Does Behavioral Style Influence Learning Strategy in Health Professions Students?

    PubMed

    Williamson, J W; Krumwiede, K H; Reed, JoyLynn; Farmer, Suzanne; Behrendt, William

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency in areas of task completion, information processing, and time management are important attributes for successful academic performance and can be assessed using the Learning Assessment Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences in learning strategies across four behavioral profiles using the DISC style analysis (Dominance, Influence, Steadiness, Compliance). Graduate health professions students (n=247) were administered the DISC and LASSI to assess study strategy categories based on their natural DISC behavioral style. A one-way ANOVA was used to assess differences for 10 LASSI category scores across the four DISC profiles; scores were also compared with national percentile scores. The D and C profiles were above the 75th percentile for information processing, but below the 50th percentile for self-testing. The S profile had significantly lower scores (p<0.005) for information processing and was below the 50th percentile for anxiety (i.e., higher anxiety). The I profile was below the 50th percentile for time management and concentration to academic tasks. The data are in close agreement with recognized behaviors specific for each behavioral style and suggest that behavioral style should be considered an important factor in academic performance. PMID:26342613

  12. Impatience of health professions students for health equity--can a new definition help?

    PubMed

    Miše, Joško

    2014-08-01

    The International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA) is concerned that students are not graduating feeling energized by their social purpose. IFMSA raises a question about the role of the definition of health in limiting the comprehensiveness of the current approach to health and health care in medical and health professions education. IFMSA surveyed medical students about medical curricula. We found that a minority of surveyed students have experienced interdisciplinary teaching, with the lowest exposure in low- and middle-income countries. Medical students are clearly stating their dissatisfaction with the lack of holistic and comprehensive approach to health and health care. Our impatience for contributing to health equity is a virtue in seeking change in curricula and broader collaboration for health. PMID:24943662

  13. 42 CFR 57.208 - Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in Lending Regulation Z (12 CFR part 226). (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements. 57.208 Section 57.208 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  14. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Department's Claims Collection regulations (45 CFR part 30), as appropriate. (5) Disclosure of taxpayer... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  15. Study of How Health Professions Students Finance Their Education, 1976-1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocniak, Nina; And Others

    Expenses that health professions students incurred, sources of income to meet those expenditures, and indebtedness incurred by the students during the 1976-77 school year were studied. A questionnaire, which is appended, was mailed to a sample of students registered in schools of dentistry, optometry, osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, podiatry,…

  16. Evaluating career values of dietetic students. A model for other allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Vista V; Shanklin, Carol W

    2004-01-01

    Increased job opportunities in health professions make recruitment of students imperative. Effective recruitment requires a knowledge of what students value when making career decisions. This study of dietetic (n = 514) and other college students (n = 352) showed that achievement and economic security were the most important factors in their career selection regardless of major or race. Dietetic majors rated achievement, economic security, ability utilization, personal development, altruism, and working conditions significantly higher than did nondietetic students (p < or = 0.001). Economic security was rated significantly more important by dietetic and allied health majors than by other students. Many of the values important to students in this study are attainable through careers in dietetics and other allied health professions. The results of this study should be examined further with a larger sample of allied health majors to assist educators in recruiting and providing career counseling to students. PMID:15053221

  17. Where do students in the health professions want to work?

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Deborah; Fletcher, Susan; Fuller, Jeffery; Birden, Hudson; Page, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Background Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. While a number of schemes have been developed to improve recruitment to and retention of the rural health workforce, they will be effective only if appropriately targeted. This study examines the factors that most encourage students attending rural clinical placements to work in rural Australia, and the regions they prefer. Methods The Careers in Rural Health Tracking Survey was used to examine the factors that most influence medical, nursing and allied health students' preference for practice locations and the locations preferred. Results Students showed a preference for working in large urban centres within one year, but would consider moving to a more rural location later in life. Only 10% of students surveyed said they would never work in a rural community with a population of less than 10 000. Almost half the sample (45%) reported wanting to work overseas within five years. The type of work available in rural areas was found to be the factor most likely to encourage students to practice rurally, followed by career opportunities and challenge Conclusion The decision to practise rurally is the result of a complex interaction between a number of factors including ethnicity, discipline, age and sex, among others. Incentives that aim to entice all students to rural practice while considering only one of these variables are likely to be inadequate. PMID:19686605

  18. Making Tactile Charts on a Personal Computer for Blind Students in the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Tsuguo; Ohtake, Nobuyuki

    2002-01-01

    This article describes how to make tactile charts for students who are blind and in the allied health professions on the basis of medical images and how students who are blind evaluate these charts. Editing rules for creating the charts are discussed. (Contains references.) (CR)

  19. Development of a Financial Aid Handbook for the Health Professions Division Students at Nova Southeastern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynter, Shelley

    2004-01-01

    The problem addressed by this study was that the Health Professions Division (HPD) students at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) were not fully aware of the financial aid process. The issue created frustrated students who were unable to manage their overall debt because they were left financially powerless, resulting in the prospect of being…

  20. Actions Underway to Reduce Delinquencies in the Health Professions and Nursing Student Loan Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The problem of loan payment delinquency in the Health Professions and Nursing Student Loan Programs was reviewed. Problems that schools have had in billing and collecting outstanding loans and the lack of effective program monitoring by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) were assessed, along with the DHHS' efforts to correct the…

  1. The librarian's role in an enrichment program for high school students interested in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Beverly; Burnham, Judy; Wright, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Librarians from the University of South Alabama Biomedical Library partnered to participate in a program that targets minority students interested in health care with instruction in information literacy. Librarians participate in the summer enrichment programs designed to encourage minority students to enter health care professions by enhancing their preparation. The curriculum developed by the Biomedical Library librarians is focused on developing information searching skills. Students indicated that the library segment helped them in their library research efforts and helped them make more effective use of available resources. Librarians involved report a sense of self-satisfaction as the program allows them to contribute to promoting greater diversity in health care professions. Participating in the summer enrichment program has been beneficial to the students and librarians. PMID:23394421

  2. Learning Style of Students and Practitioners in Five Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Noomi; Heimann, Nanci

    1991-01-01

    An Israeli sample of 378 students and 251 practitioners in occupational therapy (OT), social work, nursing, physical therapy, and clinical psychology completed Kolb's Learning Style Inventory. Findings suggest greater variance in learning style among students. OT students were least abstract. Both OT students and practitioners were predominantly…

  3. Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Behaviors in Health Professions Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; Scott, David M.; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Bartek, Jean K.; Davis-Hall, R. Ellen; Reardon, Thomas P.; DeSimone, Edward M., II

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors of health professions students (HPS) were assessed by surveying both university-based HPS and other nursing programs in a Midwestern state in 1999. Response was 2,646 (56.4%) of surveyed students. Family history of alcohol-related and drug-related problems were reported by 39.8% and 13.9%, respectively,…

  4. Learning Styles of Physiology Students Interested in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breckler, Jennifer; Joun, David; Ngo, Huy

    2009-01-01

    Student learning may be classified according to the sensory modalities by which one prefers to take in information. One such classification scheme uses the VARK instrument, which categorizes learning preferences as visual (V), auditory (A), reading-writing (R), or kinesthetic (K). Many students have a single, strong preferences ("unimodal"),…

  5. Evaluation of Student Performance in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hullinger, Ronald L.; And Others

    The proposal in this document is based on the assumption that learning to learn is the most important outcome of professional and all formal education. It is suggested that a primary task of instruction is to assist the student to move from external motivation to internal motivation for learning and continuing to learn. It is proposed that these…

  6. Information and communication technology use among Victorian and South Australian oral health professions students.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Habibi, Elmira; Morgan, Michael; Au-Yeung, Winnie

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and analyze the use of information and communication technology (ICT) by oral health professions students in Victoria and South Australia. Data were collected during the 2009 and 2010 academic years via electronic survey. Out of 1,138 students studying in Adelaide and Victorian dental schools, 740 students participated, for an overall response rate of 65 percent. The majority were dental students (n=609) with 131 seeking a Bachelor of Oral Health (B.O.H.) degree. The majority were female (62.0 percent), had home Internet access (91.7 percent), and no barriers to accessing the Internet (87.2 percent). Among those who mentioned barriers, difficult access and cost were the most common. The Internet was accessed at least once a week by the majority for general purposes (93.5 percent) and for study purposes (84.2 percent). Nonetheless, thirty-nine students (5.3 percent) were non-frequent ICT users. The probability of an oral health professions student being in the non-ICT users group was explored utilizing a logistic regression analysis. The final model contained three predictors: location of school, ethnic background, and place of Internet use (χ(2) [3]=117.7; p<0.0001). After controlling for other variables in the model, those studying in South Australia were significantly more likely (OR=2.32; 95 percent CI 1.05 to 5.11) to be in the non-users groups. In the same manner, students from an Asian background were three times more likely to be non-users (OR=3.06; 95 percent CI 1.16 to 8.08). Those who had access to the Internet at home (OR=0.02; 95 percent CI 0.01 to 0.05) were less likely to be a non-user. These results represent a preliminary evaluation of ICT use among oral health professions students in Australia. It seems that a digital divide exists among these students. The information can be utilized in planning dental education programs and incorporating the use of ICT suitable for oral health professions students and

  7. Mainstreaming quality and safety: a reformulation of quality and safety education for health professions students

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Pamela M; Ogrinc, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    The urgent need to expand the ability of health professionals to improve the quality and safety of patient care in the USA has been well documented. Yet the current methods of teaching quality and safety to health professionals are inadequate for the task. To the extent that quality and safety are addressed at all, they are taught using pedagogies with a narrow focus on content transmission, didactic sessions that are spatially and temporally distant from clinical work, and quality and safety projects segregated from the provision of actual patient care. In this article an argument for a transformative reorientation in quality and safety education for health professions is made. This transformation will require new pedagogies in which a) quality improvement is an integral part of all clinical encounters, b) health professions students and their clinical teachers become co-learners working together to improve patient outcomes and systems of care, c) improvement work is envisioned as the interdependent collaboration of a set of professionals with different backgrounds and perspectives skilfully optimising their work processes for the benefit of patients, and d) assessment in health professions education focuses on not just individual performance but also how the care team's patients fared and how the systems of care were improved. PMID:21450779

  8. Analysis of eHealth Search Perspectives Among Female College Students in the Health Professions Using Q Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J. Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Background The current “Millennial Generation” of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. Objective To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Methods Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Results Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants’ objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students

  9. Interprofessional education for students of the health professions: the "Seamless Care" model.

    PubMed

    Mann, K V; Mcfetridge-Durdle, J; Martin-Misener, R; Clovis, J; Rowe, R; Beanlands, H; Sarria, M

    2009-05-01

    "Seamless Care" was one of 21 grants awarded by Health Canada to inform policymakers of the effectiveness of interprofessional education in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice among health professionals. The "Seamless Care" model of interprofessional education was designed with input from three Faculties at Dalhousie University (Medicine, Dentistry and Health Professions). The design was grounded in relevant learning theories--Social Cognitive Theory, Self-efficacy, Situated Learning theory and Constructivism. The intervention was informed by principles of active learning, problem-based learning, reflection and role modeling. The primary goal of Seamless Care was to develop students' interprofessional patient-centred collaborative skills through experiential learning. Fourteen student teams, each including one student from medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and dental hygiene, learned with, from and about each other while they were mentored in the collaborative care of patients transitioning from acute care to the community. Student teams providing collaborative care assisted patients experiencing a chronic illness to become more active in managing their health through development of self-management and decision-making skills. This paper describes the Seamless Care model of interprofessional education and discusses the theoretical underpinnings of this experiential model of interprofessional education designed to extend classroom-based interprofessional education to the clinical setting. PMID:19387906

  10. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nelofar S.; Shahnaz, Syed I.; Gomathi, Kadayam G.

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula. PMID:27606105

  11. Peer-led problem-based learning in interprofessional education of health professions students

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Michael D.; Murray, Samuel; Benzar, Ruth; Stormont, Ryan; Lightfoot, Megan; Hafertepe, Michael; Welch, Gabrielle; Peters, Nicholas; Maio, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of peer teachers in interprofessional education has not been extensively studied. This study is designed to determine if peer-teacher-led problem-based seminars can influence medical and pharmacy students’ perceptions of interprofessional education. Methods Undergraduate medical and pharmacy students participated in one-hour problem-based learning seminars held over the course of 16 weeks. A case–control study design was used to compare perceptions of interprofessional education between students who participated in seminars and students who did not participate in seminars. The validated Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was used to assess perceptions of interprofessional education and was distributed to medical and pharmacy students at the conclusion of 16 weeks of seminars. A two-tailed t-test was used to determine significance between groups. A survey was also distributed to all students regarding perceived barriers to involvement in interprofessional education training. Results In total, 97 students responded to IEPS (62 medical, 35 pharmacy). Data showed significantly higher perception of professional cooperation among medical students (p=0.006) and pharmacy students (p=0.02) who attended interprofessional seminars compared to those who did not attend. One hundred and nine students responded to the survey regarding perceived barriers to interprofessional education, with the two most common barriers being: ‘I am not aware of interprofessional education opportunities’ (61.5%) and ‘I do not have time to participate’ (52.3%). Conclusion Based on this data we believe peer-teacher-led problem-based interprofessional seminars can be used to increase medical and pharmacy students’ perceived need for professional cooperation. Currently, major barriers to interprofessional education involvement are awareness and time commitment. Undergraduate health professions education can incorporate student-led seminars to improve

  12. Use of Mobile Devices to Access Resources Among Health Professions Students: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mi, Misa; Wu, Wendy; Qiu, Maylene; Zhang, Yingting; Wu, Lin; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review examines types of mobile devices used by health professions students, kinds of resources and tools accessed via mobile devices, and reasons for using the devices to access the resources and tools. The review included 20 studies selected from articles published in English between January 2010 and April 2015, retrieved from PubMed and other sources. Data extracted included participants, study designs, mobile devices used, mobile resources/apps accessed, outcome measures, and advantages of and barriers to using mobile devices. The review indicates significant variability across the studies in terms of research methods, types of mobile programs implemented, resources accessed, and outcomes. There were beneficial effects of using mobile devices to access resources as well as conspicuous challenges or barriers in using mobile devices. PMID:26794197

  13. Using the Personal Background Preparation Survey to Identify Health Science Professions Students at Risk for Adverse Academic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig W.; Johnson, Ronald; McKee, John C.; Kim, Mira

    2009-01-01

    In the first predictive validity study of a diagnostic and prescriptive instrument for averting adverse academic status events (AASE) among multiple populations of diverse health science professions students, entering matriculates' personal background and preparation survey (PBPS) scores consistently significantly predicted 1st- or 2nd-year AASE.…

  14. Interprofessional Workplace Learning in Primary Care: Students from Different Health Professions Work in Teams in Real-Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi; Holst, Lone; Haugland, Mildrid; Baerheim, Anders; Raaheim, Arild

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional education may be defined as an occasion when two or more professions learn with, from, and about each other in order to improve collaboration and quality of care. We studied the self-reported experiences from Norwegian health care students participating in interprofessional workplace learning in primary care. We discuss the…

  15. The value of community-focused interprofessional care in peru for developing cultural competency in health professions students.

    PubMed

    Allen, Carol B; Smart, Denise A; Odom-Maryon, Tamara; Swain, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    International immersion experiences for health-care students have increased over the past 10 years. Students and faculty expect these experiences to increase cultural competency; however, research on outcomes of these programs has lacked rigor. Over a 4-year period, groups of nursing and other health professions students spent 3 weeks in Peru providing primary care and health education. Students attended pre-departure seminars addressing personal travel health and safety, culture and health care in Peru, working with interpreters, and ethics of international health care. Student participants (N=77) completed an instrument assessing self-perceived cultural competency before and after the experience. Results of pre- and post-immersion scores showed significant increases in perceived cultural competency and increased self-efficacy in cultural knowledge, skills, and attitudes for four groups of students. Implications and future directions are discussed and recommended. PMID:23832952

  16. Sociodemographic profile and career decisions of Australian oral health profession students.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Au-Yeung, Winnie; Habibi, Elmira; Morgan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    This study collected and analyzed recent information regarding the sociodemographic profile and career decisions of Australian oral health profession students (earning B.D.Sc. and B.O.H. degrees) and the reasons for their career choice. Data were collected during the 2009-10 academic year via a web-based survey. A total of 829 students participated; the response rates for each oral health course at the seven participating universities ranged from 15.0 percent to 88.7 percent. The respondents had an average age of 21.4 years, ranging from eighteen to fifty-one. The majority of the respondents were female (61.4 percent), single (91.0 percent), and of Asian ethnicity (65.0 percent), and almost half had attended a public secondary school (49.7 percent). Most of the responding students either lived in rented accommodation (44.0 percent) or with their parents (28.6 percent), and 41.5 percent reported having an urban address. Most respondents' fathers (67.2 percent) and mothers (54.8 percent) had completed undergraduate or postgraduate education and were employed in managerial or professional occupations (68.5 percent and 54.9 percent, respectively). Most of the students said they had selected their course in high school (66.8 percent) and were most influenced in their career choice by self-motivation (85.3 percent) and caring for and helping other people (86.6 percent). The majority of the respondents reported wishing to work in a city (51.5 percent), practicing general dentistry (31.8 percent) in either the public or private sector (40.2 percent each). This article provides a preliminary look at the future dental workforce of Australia, identifying issues for further analysis and assisting each university to address current inequalities and challenges. PMID:22942421

  17. Using a real-life case scenario to integrate additional health professions students into an existing interprofessional team seminar.

    PubMed

    Pole, David; Breitbach, Anthony P; Howell, Timothy G

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization stated that the goal of interprofessional education (IPE) is to prepare students as collaboration-ready members of interprofessional care teams. Educators try to create meaningful and relevant learning experiences for multiple health professions students. A longitudinal Interprofessional Team Seminar (IPTS) course includes over 650 students from seven health professions at the professional training level. Recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) promote the inclusion of athletic training (AT) students in IPE initiatives. A new IPTS module included AT students focusing on the attributes of rapidly forming and different care teams as the patient transitions from an on-field injury, to acute care, inpatient care, and rehabilitative care, and back to activities of daily living. Qualitative review of reflections from the students assessed the impact of these IPTS modules. The intentional design of this course, focusing on behaviours of collaborative practice and supporting students to be collaboration ready, effectively introduced and highlighted profession-specific strengths and unique contributions to team-based care. PMID:26889945

  18. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    PubMed

    Glazer, Greer; Startsman, Laura F; Bankston, Karen; Michaels, Julia; Danek, Jennifer C; Fair, Malika

    2016-01-01

    Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30), motivation (22), readiness for the profession (17), service (12), and problem-solving (12). Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes. PMID:26924541

  19. Medical Student Financing and the Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Victoria; And Others

    The impact of the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-484) on the supply of physicians for the armed services was assessed. As background to the survey findings, information is presented on conditions of three federal programs and differences in their benefit structures and implications for program participation. These…

  20. 78 FR 16685 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ]...

  1. 75 FR 1384 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers:...

  2. It's "Supposed" to Be Personal: Personal and Educational Factors Associated with Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, Comfort and Skill in Health Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Lindsey M.; Stepleman, Lara M.; Wilson, Christina K.; Campbell, Jeff; Villarosa, Margo; Bodie, Brittany; Decker, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The health professional and the patient are cultural beings with beliefs and attitudes that are shaped by family traditions, social development, and exposure to novel experiences. As such, it is especially important for health profession students to gain awareness about the personal and educational factors that likely inform their practice and…

  3. 77 FR 21568 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Overview Information: Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health...

  4. "How to Do Things with Words" in Health Professions Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W.; Towle, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study of journal entries written by students in six health professions participating in the Interprofessional Health Mentors program at the University of British Columbia, Canada. The study examined (1) what health professions students learn about professional language and communication when given the…

  5. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This report presents the results of a review of health professions education in Florida and the social and economic forces affecting the supply and demand for health professionals in the state. Individual sections focus on medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, public health, nursing, physician assistantship, physical therapy,…

  6. Obesity, Diet, and Physical Activity Behaviors of Students in Health- Related Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Cynthia M.; Nobrega, Cheryl; Dulfan, Faina

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined incidence of obesity and healthy lifestyle behaviors in college students in health-related (HM) compared to other majors (NH). Since individuals are more likely to follow health promotion advice if the health care professional lives a healthy lifestyle, this information may be important in determining compliance of…

  7. Native Americans in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane; Blue Spruce, George, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr., who became the first American Indian dentist in 1956, shares his views on health professions for Indian young people, as well as his own experiences. Resources for prospective dental students, information on the Society of American Indian Dentists, and inspiring stories of American Indian healers are provided. (CDS)

  8. ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT GRANTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS PERSONNEL ACT OF 1966 AUTHORIZES THE SURGEON GENERAL TO MAKE GRANTS TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING PROGRAMS WHICH QUALIFY STUDENTS (1) FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE OR ITS EQUIVALENT OR THE MASTER'S DEGREE TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED FOR BASIC PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION, REGISTRATION, OR LICENSURE…

  9. Health Professions and Nursing Student Loan and Scholarship Programs. Manual of Information, Policies, and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower Education.

    This manual covers basic policies and procedures governing four student loan and scholarship programs administered within the Bureau of Health Manpower, National Institutes of Health. An introductory chapter provides definitions, procedures, and reporting common to all programs, and this is followed by chapters describing: (1) The Health…

  10. The integrated model for interprofessional education: a design for preparing health professions' students to work in interprofessional teams.

    PubMed

    Grapczynski, Cynthia A; Schuurman, Shelley; Booth, Andrew D; Bambini, Deborah; Beel-Bates, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the process of helping students learn to work interprofessionally is figuring out how to design high-impact learning experiences that engage students in meaningful learning that is collaborative and experiential and can transform students understanding of their own and others' roles in the health care process. In this article, a model for interprofessional education, the Integrated Model for Interprofessional Education (IMIPE), is shared for introducing students in the health professions to the roles and responsibilities of some of the other healthcare professionals with whom they will work in practice. The IMIPE is a process model developed by an interprofessional faculty team used as the focal point of a pilot educational event for students from nursing, occupational therapy, physician assistant studies, and social work. The IMIPE is a derived model that combines concepts of holism, participation, and practical education, grounded in the adult educational philosophy of progressivism. Progressive adult education is focused on practical knowledge and problem-solving skills. The model uses collaborative, experiential, and transformative learning approaches to foster outcomes of communication, critical reflection, teamwork, ethics, and recognition of patient-client needs. These outcomes represent those identified by the World Health Organization and the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel. PMID:26046119

  11. 76 FR 8743 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-Graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-Graduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ] CFDA Numbers: 93.971, 93.123, and 93.972. DATES:...

  12. 78 FR 78976 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers: 93.971, 93.123, AND 93.972 Key...

  13. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nelofar S; Shahnaz, Syed I; Gomathi, Kadayam G

    2016-08-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula. PMID:27606105

  14. Differences in students' perceptions of learning compulsory foundation biochemistry in the health sciences professions.

    PubMed

    Minasian-Batmanian, Laura C; Lingard, Jennifer; Prosser, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Student approaches to learning vary from surface approaches to meaningful, deep learning practices. Differences in approach may be related to students' conceptions of the subject, perceptions of the learning environment, prior study experiences and performance on assessment. This study aims to explore entering students' conceptions of the unit they are about to study and how they intend to approach their studies. It involved a survey of 203 (of 250) first year students in a cross disciplinary unit in the Faculty of Health Sciences. They were asked to complete an open-ended response survey, including questions on what they thought they needed to do to learn biochemistry and what they thought the study of biochemistry was about. A phenomenographic methodology was used to identify categories of description for the questions. The paper will describe the categories in detail, the structural relationship between the categories and the distribution of responses within categories. The study reports a relationship between conception of the topic and approaches to learning. Students with more complex and coherent conceptions of the topic report that they were more likely to adopt deeper approaches to study than those with more fragmented conceptions. However, compared to previous studies, a surprisingly high proportion of students with more cohesive conceptions still intended to adopt more surface approaches. This may reflect the particular context of their learning, namely in a compulsory unit involving material for which most students have minimal background and difficulty seeing its relevance. Implications for teaching such foundation material are discussed. PMID:16362617

  15. Enhancement of anatomical learning and developing clinical competence of first-year medical and allied health profession students.

    PubMed

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A; VanderMeulen, Stephane P; Shostrom, Valerie K; Lomneth, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession students. This study integrated teaching the Lachman test into a first-year anatomy laboratory and examined if students receiving the training would be more confident, competent, and if the training would enhance anatomical learning. First-year medical, physician assistant and physical therapy students were randomly assigned into either the intervention (Group A) or control group (Group B). Both groups received the course lecture on knee anatomy and training on how to perform the Lachman test during a surface anatomy class. Group A received an additional 15 minutes hands-on training for the Lachman test utilizing a lightly embalmed cadaver as a simulated patient. One week later, both groups performed the Lachman test on a lightly embalmed cadaver and later completed a post-test and survey. Students with hands-on training performed significantly better than students with lecture-only training in completing the checklist, a post-test, and correctly diagnosing an ACL tear. Students in Group A also reported being more confident after hands-on training compared to students receiving lecture-only training. Both groups reported that incorporating clinical skill activities facilitated learning and created excitement for learning. Hands-on training using lightly embalmed cadavers as patient simulators increased confidence and competence in performing the Lachman test and aided in learning anatomy. PMID:24002924

  16. Teaching and educational scholarship in Tanzania: faculty initiative to improve performance of health professions' students.

    PubMed

    Mkony, Charles A; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Owibingire, Sirra S; Fyfe, Molly V; Omer, Selma; Freeman, Phyllis; Makubi, Abel; Mloka, Doreen A; Portillo, Carmen J; Leyna, Germana H; Tarimo, Edith; Kaaya, Ephata E; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Well-educated and competent health professionals influence the health system in which they work to improve health outcomes, through clinical care and community interventions, and by raising standards of practice and supervision. To prepare these individuals, training institutions must ensure that their faculty members, who design and deliver education, are effective teachers. We describe the experience of the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) in encouraging improvements in the teaching capacity of its faculty and postgraduate students triggered by a major institutional transition to competency-based education. We employed a multi-stage process that started by identifying the teaching and learning needs and challenges of MUHAS students and faculty. Collaborating with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), MUHAS responded to these needs by introducing faculty to competency-based curricula and later to strategies for long term continuing improvement. We demonstrate that teaching faculty members are keen for local institutional support to enable them to enhance their skills as educators, and that they have been able to sustain a program of faculty development for their peers. PMID:23254841

  17. Enhancing capabilities in health professions education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Susan J.; Siddiqui, Zarrin S.; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article documents the results of ongoing summative program evaluation of a suite of postgraduate courses at The University of Western Australia designed to enhance the educational capabilities, academic leadership and scholarly output of health professionals. Methods Commencing students were invited to participate in this descriptive, longitudinal study that surveyed students at commencement and subsequently over a seven year period. Data was collected at baseline and follow-up in relation to the respondents’ educational leadership responsibilities, promotions, involvement in new educational programs, and recognition for contributions towards student learning, educational scholarly outputs and involvement in training programs. Results The respondents came from a wide range of health professions and worked in various roles, with a quarter already holding leadership positions. During the follow-up period, half reported receiving a new promotion or moving to new positions requiring educational leadership. Those identifying as being involved with the development of new educational programs doubled and 34% received a new teaching award. Scholarly productivity doubled with 45% giving an oral presentation related to education, 21% publishing and 29% being successful in obtaining funding related to an education project.  Conclusions These postgraduate courses in health professions education appear to be positively influencing graduates’ capabilities, especially in the areas of educational leadership skills and scholarly productivity. For those looking to develop a community of leaders in health professions education, the authors offer some suggestions. PMID:26590857

  18. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... financial need in the case of students of medicine or osteopathic medicine. A student will be considered to..., the expected contribution from parents, spouse, self or other family members; and (2) The...

  19. Evaluation of Health Profession Student Attitudes toward an Online Nutrition Education Problem-Based Learning Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Kathleen; Sadera, William

    2015-01-01

    The intent of problem-based learning (PBL) is to increase student motivation to learn, to promote critical thinking and to teach students to learn with complexity. PBL encourages students to understand that there are no straightforward answers and that problem solutions depend on context. This paper discusses the experience of undergraduate health…

  20. A Team-Based Practicum Bringing Together Students Across Educational Institutions and Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    George, Paul; Nimmagadda, Jayashree; Brown, Samantha; Gremel, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess student perceptions of teamwork during an interprofessional exercise and to evaluate if students could identify domestic violence through a standardized patient interview. Design. Medical, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and social work students were assigned to teams to interview and examine a patient with a “cut on the hand” later revealed a result of domestic violence. They also practiced suturing technique and developed a patient care plan. A postexercise survey was administered. Assessment. From 70% to 94% of students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed, respectively, that their responsibilities were clear. All (100%) recognized the benefits of team-based care. Only 38% of the medical students reported team members providing insight into domestic violence, and 52% did not recognize team members as resources for these cases. Conclusion. Students gained perspective of knowledge and responsibilities of each team member. However, the results suggest further enhancements of curriculum related to domestic violence are needed. PMID:27170820

  1. A Team-Based Practicum Bringing Together Students Across Educational Institutions and Health Professions.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Celia; George, Paul; Nimmagadda, Jayashree; Brown, Samantha; Gremel, Kathleen

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To assess student perceptions of teamwork during an interprofessional exercise and to evaluate if students could identify domestic violence through a standardized patient interview. Design. Medical, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and social work students were assigned to teams to interview and examine a patient with a "cut on the hand" later revealed a result of domestic violence. They also practiced suturing technique and developed a patient care plan. A postexercise survey was administered. Assessment. From 70% to 94% of students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed, respectively, that their responsibilities were clear. All (100%) recognized the benefits of team-based care. Only 38% of the medical students reported team members providing insight into domestic violence, and 52% did not recognize team members as resources for these cases. Conclusion. Students gained perspective of knowledge and responsibilities of each team member. However, the results suggest further enhancements of curriculum related to domestic violence are needed. PMID:27170820

  2. Conflict management styles in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, Susan; Hamilton, Patti

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine prevalent conflict management styles chosen by students in nursing and to contrast these styles with those chosen by students in allied health professions. The associations among the level of professional health care education and the style chosen were also determined. A convenience sample of 126 students in a comprehensive university completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which requires respondents to choose behaviors most characteristic of their response to conflict and classifies these behaviors as one of five styles. There was no significant difference between the prevalent conflict management styles chosen by graduate and undergraduate nursing students and those in allied health. Some of the students were already licensed in their discipline; others had not yet taken a licensing exam. Licensure and educational level were not associated with choice of styles. Women and men had similar preferences. The prevalent style for nursing students was compromise, followed by avoidance. In contrast, avoidance, followed by compromise and accommodation, was the prevalent style for allied health students. When compared to the TKI norms, slightly more than one half of all participants chose two or more conflict management styles, commonly avoidance and accommodation at the 75th percentile or above. Only 9.8% of the participants chose collaboration at that level. Implications for nurse educators, researchers, and administrators are discussed. PMID:17540319

  3. Community as Teacher Model: Health Profession Students Learn Cultural Safety from an Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Cathy C.; Godolphin, William J.; Chhina, Gagun S.; Towle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Communication between health care professionals and Aboriginal patients is complicated by cultural differences and the enduring effects of colonization. Health care providers need better training to meet the needs of Aboriginal patients and communities. We describe the development and outcomes of a community-driven service-learning program in…

  4. Perceived Benefits of Mobile Learning Devices for Doctoral Students in a School of Allied Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Cotter, J James; Gendron, T; Kupstas, P; Tartaglia, A; Will, L

    2015-01-01

    Graduate students increasingly use personal electronic devices for learning but little is known about how they evaluate their benefits as mobile learning devices (MLDs). This study surveyed students in a hybrid distance education doctoral (PhD) program about their perceptions of the benefits of MLDs. Overall, the study found a range of opinions about the value of MLDs with about one-half of respondents finding benefits. Respondents emphasized that the MLDs improved motivation and productivity and that they were helpful in reviewing course-casts of on-campus sessions. Continued research is needed on doctoral education in general and the increasing use of innovations such as MLDs. PMID:26661706

  5. Developing Positive Attitudes toward Interprofessional Collaboration among Students in the Health Care Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Juyoung; Hawkins, Michele; Hamlin, Elwood; Hawkins, Wesley; Bamdas, Jo Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration (Physician-Nurse, Physician-Social Worker, Nurse-Social Worker) held by medical, social work, and nursing students changed after completing an interprofessional curriculum consisting of (a) Interprofessional Education Development Session and (b) the Senior Aging and…

  6. Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Ann C., Ed.; Knebel, Elisa, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine study Crossing the Quality Chasm (2001) recommended that an interdisciplinary summit be held to further reform of health professions education in order to enhance quality and patient safety. Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality is the follow up to that summit, held in June 2002, where 150 participants across…

  7. "How to do things with words" in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W; Towle, Angela

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study of journal entries written by students in six health professions participating in the Interprofessional Health Mentors program at the University of British Columbia, Canada. The study examined (1) what health professions students learn about professional language and communication when given the opportunity, in an interprofessional group with a patient or client, to explore the uses, meanings, and effects of common health care terms, and (2) how health professional students write about their experience of discussing common health care terms, and what this reveals about how students see their development of professional discourse and participation in a professional discourse community. Using qualitative thematic analysis to address the first question, the study found that discussion of these health care terms provoked learning and reflection on how words commonly used in one health profession can be understood quite differently in other health professions, as well as on how health professionals' language choices may be perceived by patients and clients. Using discourse analysis to address the second question, the study further found that many of the students emphasized accuracy and certainty in language through clear definitions and intersubjective agreement. However, when prompted by the discussion they were willing to consider other functions and effects of language. PMID:25420529

  8. Student Preparation for the International Environmental Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ian; Meehan, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many universities have strategies for exposing students to international experiences, but little is reported on their implementation. One example of an implemented activity is the multidisciplinary research project for undergraduate environment students, at RMIT University, that both prepares students to work in the environment profession and…

  9. An Investigation of Students' Perceptions of Ethical Practice: Engaging a Reflective Dialogue about Ethics Education in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Phelan, Shanon K.; Lala, Anna Park; Mom, Vanna

    2015-01-01

    The ethical climate in which occupational therapists, and other health practitioners, currently practice is increasingly complex. There have been a number of calls for greater attention to ethics education within health science curricula. This study investigated occupational therapy students' perceptions of the meaning of ethical practice as a…

  10. Enhancement of Anatomical Learning and Developing Clinical Competence of First-Year Medical and Allied Health Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A.; VanderMeulen, Stephane P.; Shostrom, Valerie K.; Lomneth, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession…

  11. Public health as a distinct profession: has it arrived?

    PubMed

    Evashwick, Connie J; Begun, James W; Finnegan, John R

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the elements consistent with the definition of a "profession" in the contemporary United States and argues that public health should be considered a distinct profession, recognizing that it has a unique knowledge base and career paths independent of any other occupation or profession. The Welch-Rose Report of 1915 prescribed education for public health professionals and assumed that, although at first the majority of students would be drawn from other professions, such as medicine, nursing, and sanitary engineering, public health was on its way to becoming "a new profession." Nearly a century later, the field of public health has evolved dramatically in the direction predicted. It clearly meets the criteria for being a "profession" in that it has (1) a distinct body of knowledge, (2) an educational credential offered by schools and programs accredited by a specialized accrediting body, (3) career paths that include autonomous practice, and (4) a separate credential, Certified in Public Health (CPH), indicative of self-regulation based on the newly launched examination of the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Barriers remain that challenge independent professional status, including the breadth of the field, more than one accrediting body, wide variation in graduate school curricula, and the newness of the CPH. Nonetheless, the benefits of recognizing public health as a distinct profession are considerable, particularly to the practice and policy communities. These include independence in practice, the ability to recruit the next generation, increased influence on health policy, and infrastructure based on a workforce of strong capacity and leadership capabilities. PMID:23896977

  12. Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Ann C., Ed.; Knebel, Elisa, Ed.

    The 2001 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report "Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century" recommended that an interdisciplinary summit be held to develop next steps for reform of health professions education in order to enhance patient care quality and safety. In June 2002, the IOM convened this summit, which included 150…

  13. Computer Assisted Instruction in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolurow, Lawrence M.; And Others

    Introductory remarks by staff members at Ohio State University College of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, U.S. Naval Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Michigan State University explore the educational requirements of the health professions and the ways in which the computer can aid in fulfilling these requirements. Programs…

  14. Creighton Collaborative Health Professions Partnership: Assessing Impact beyond the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houtz, Lynne E.; Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade

    2006-01-01

    Creighton University, a private Jesuit institution in the Midwest, included a Health Professions Partnership Initiative (HPPI) to increase the pool of qualified underrepresented minority applicants by identifying students early and encouraging their progress through elementary and middle school, high school, college, and professional schools.…

  15. The Impact of AIDS on Recruitment in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buccelli, Pamela B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 914 Philadelphia high school students (77 percent response) concerned their knowledge and attitudes toward acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the health professions. Results showed that most respondents had a good basic understanding of the transmission of the virus but they did not know or understand the health…

  16. Information and Communication Technology to Facilitate Learning for Students in the Health Professions: Current Uses, Gaps, and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Ellen; Corcoran, Mary; Barnett, Jacqueline S.; Birkmeier, Marisa; Cohn, Rhea; Ekmekci, Ozgur; Falk, Nancy L.; Harrod, Thomas; Herrmann, Debra; Robinson, Sean; Walker, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the U.S. Healthcare System along with the need for institutions of higher education to prepare a work force ready to address the challenges of today and tomorrow have highlighted the need to incorporate technology in its broadest sense as part of the student learning experience. In health professional education, this becomes challenging…

  17. An investigation of students' perceptions of ethical practice: engaging a reflective dialogue about ethics education in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Phelan, Shanon K; Park Lala, Anna; Mom, Vanna

    2015-08-01

    The ethical climate in which occupational therapists, and other health practitioners, currently practice is increasingly complex. There have been a number of calls for greater attention to ethics education within health science curricula. This study investigated occupational therapy students' perceptions of the meaning of ethical practice as a means of engaging in a dialogue about the aims of ethics education in contemporary health science contexts. A phenomenological methodological approach was adopted for the study. Interviews were conducted over 2 years with 25 student participants. The data were analyzed using phenomenological methods of analysis. Seven themes depict students' views about the meaning of ethical practice and include: being faithful to the tenets of your practice, being communicative, being in tune with your values, understanding the client's needs, weighing the pros and cons, negotiating the grey zones, and taking time to reflect. The findings contribute to understanding students' conceptions of the meaning of ethical practice that include and move beyond traditional codes, principles, and professional standards to encompass a range of dimensions of ethical practice. These additional dimensions raise insights of relevance to those who design and facilitate ethics education with health professionals. PMID:25354661

  18. Preparing leaders in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Tekian, Ara; Roberts, Trudie; Batty, Helen P; Cook, David A; Norcini, John

    2014-03-01

    In the past 15 years, the number of Master's degree programs in Health Professions Education (MHPE) has grown from 7 to 121 programs worldwide. New MHPE programs continue to be developed each year, due to increased demand for individuals with specialized knowledge concerning how to best educate future health professionals. During the 2012 Association of Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) meeting in Lyon, France, a symposium was organized to explore the reasons for the proliferation of MHPE programs worldwide. In particular, the issues explored included the need for such programs, their outcomes in developing education leaders and scholars in HPE, and facilitators, barriers and models for initiating such programs. This paper synthesizes the discussion during this symposium. Some of the reasons for enrolling in a Master's degree program in HPE include the formal credential, knowledge of a number of theories and frameworks, new approaches to problems and ways of thinking, the mentored project, and networking and working with faculty and students. The uniqueness of being a trainee in an MHPE program is the immersion in the medical education environment and the assimilation of a new approach to scholarship and a new approach to leadership. PMID:24161013

  19. Steps for Strengthening the Health Education Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perales, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Since its founding in 1950, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has evolved in response to the changing needs of both the public and the profession. This SOPHE Presidential Address provides a brief review of SOPHE's history and the legacy of its achievements over some 60 years. It also describes how new challenges being created by the…

  20. Association of trait and specific hopes: cross sectional study on students and workers of health professions in Split, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Malički, Mario; Marković, Domagoj; Marušić, Matko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Hope (hoping) is most commonly assessed as a dispositional trait and associated with quality of life, self-care agency and non-attempts of suicide. However, little research has been conducted on hoping for specific events. Materials and Methods. We distributed a survey consisting of Integrative Hope Scale (IHS) and visual analogue scales on which respondents could declare their levels (intensity) of hope for specific events, to all first year health students enrolled at the University Department of Health Studies, Split, Croatia in 2011/2012, as well as to working health professionals attending a nursing conference in April 2012. Results. A total of 161 (89.4%) students and 88 (89.8%) working health professionals returned the completed questionnaires. We found high trait hope scores of students and working health professionals (Md = 111, 95% CI [109-113] vs. Md = 115, 95% CI [112-119]; U = 5,353, P = 0.065), and weak to moderate correlations of trait and specific hopes (r = 0.18-0.48, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient). Students and workers reported 31 different things they hoped for most in life, of which the most prevalent were being healthy and happy. There was very little agreement between participants' reported influence of the four factors compromising the trait hope (self-confidence, ambition, optimism, and social support) on their specific hopes. Conclusions. Our findings, while strengthening the validity of hope as a trait, indicate that specific hopes of individuals are moderated by factors not captured by the IHS trait scale. Further research should explore specific hoping in detail, as well as the effectiveness of interventions aimed at increasing specific or generalized hoping. PMID:26819851

  1. Association of trait and specific hopes: cross sectional study on students and workers of health professions in Split, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Domagoj; Marušić, Matko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Hope (hoping) is most commonly assessed as a dispositional trait and associated with quality of life, self-care agency and non-attempts of suicide. However, little research has been conducted on hoping for specific events. Materials and Methods. We distributed a survey consisting of Integrative Hope Scale (IHS) and visual analogue scales on which respondents could declare their levels (intensity) of hope for specific events, to all first year health students enrolled at the University Department of Health Studies, Split, Croatia in 2011/2012, as well as to working health professionals attending a nursing conference in April 2012. Results. A total of 161 (89.4%) students and 88 (89.8%) working health professionals returned the completed questionnaires. We found high trait hope scores of students and working health professionals (Md = 111, 95% CI [109–113] vs. Md = 115, 95% CI [112–119]; U = 5,353, P = 0.065), and weak to moderate correlations of trait and specific hopes (r = 0.18–0.48, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient). Students and workers reported 31 different things they hoped for most in life, of which the most prevalent were being healthy and happy. There was very little agreement between participants’ reported influence of the four factors compromising the trait hope (self-confidence, ambition, optimism, and social support) on their specific hopes. Conclusions. Our findings, while strengthening the validity of hope as a trait, indicate that specific hopes of individuals are moderated by factors not captured by the IHS trait scale. Further research should explore specific hoping in detail, as well as the effectiveness of interventions aimed at increasing specific or generalized hoping. PMID:26819851

  2. Ensuring Competency in Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Shirley Ann

    1986-01-01

    Reports that vocational health occupations programs are undergoing a self-analysis process including evaluation of competency and continuing competency. Presents perspectives of health professionals with comparisons to nursing and medical technology credentialing and continuing education. These perspectives are intended for other occupational…

  3. Health Informatics and E-health Curriculum for Clinical Health Profession Degrees.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kathleen; Choo, Dawn; Butler-Henderson, Kerryn; Whetton, Sue; Maeder, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The project reported in this paper models a new approach to making health informatics and e-health education widely available to students in a range of Australian clinical health profession degrees. The development of a Masters level subject uses design-based research to apply educational quality assurance practices which are consistent with university qualification frameworks, and with clinical health profession education standards; at the same time it gives recognition to health informatics as a specialised profession in its own right. The paper presents details of (a) design with reference to the Australian Qualifications Framework and CHIA competencies, (b) peer review within a three-university teaching team, (c) external review by experts from the professions, (d) cross-institutional interprofessional online learning, (e) methods for evaluating student learning experiences and outcomes, and (f) mechanisms for making the curriculum openly available to interested parties. The project has sought and found demand among clinical health professionals for formal health informatics and e-health education that is designed for them. It has helped the educators and organisations involved to understand the need for nuanced and complementary health informatics educational offerings in Australian universities. These insights may aid in further efforts to address substantive and systemic challenges that clinical informatics faces in Australia. PMID:26210420

  4. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume III: Women in Osteopathic Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    As part of a larger study of the success and problems of women as applicants to and students in the schools of eight health professions, the study of osteopathic medicine involved interviews with administrators, faculty, and medical students. Its central purpose was to identify any characteristics of the profession--in its history, organization,…

  5. Predictors of Success of Black Americans in a College-Level Pre-Health Professions Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, J. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Predictors of success for black freshmen entering Xavier University of Louisiana with an interest in the health professions were studied. Health professions were considered as the mainline fields of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, and pharmacy. Students majoring in biology, chemistry, or…

  6. Estimates and Projections of Black and Hispanic Personnel in Selected Health Professions, 1980-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spratley, Ernell

    Federal efforts to establish financial support for health professions education in the 1960s and 1970s have led to an increase in the enrollment of minorities and women in health professions schools. The increase in the number of minority students graduating from these schools during the past decade has resulted in more minority practitioners…

  7. Assessing Multicultural Competence of Helping-Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladik, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on assessing multicultural competence of helping-profession students. The "Multicultural Competence Scale of Helping-Profession Students" was used for data collection. The aim of the research was to find out the level of students' multicultural competence due to the current lack of this information in Central…

  8. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume V: Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    This exploratory study conducted for the Women's Action Program of HEW aimed at identifying and exploring the barriers to success that women face as school applicants and students and at describing the discrimination process, if any, that limits women's entry into the health professions. In this report on veterinary medicine, the profession is…

  9. Increasing minority representation in the health care professions.

    PubMed

    Gabard, Donald L

    2007-01-01

    Although race is a social construct with no scientific credibility, it is a powerful predictor of diminished health outcomes and health care delivery in the United States. Minorities who enter health professions provide a disproportionate quantity of health care services to minorities, the underserved, and poor. The goal of having a health care delivery system with similar demographics to the population it serves is seriously lacking in most health care professions. The author of this commentary proposes that health care educators should be more aggressive in admitting and recruiting students from minority communities through the use of affirmative action. The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Grutter v. Bollinger, not only supports this approach but also gives guidance for implementation. Under the general category of admission strategies, two strategies are proposed: (1) a defensible structure for admission using race/ethnicity as a factor and (2) expanded criteria for student selection. Under recruitment strategies, four strategies are offered: (1) outreach to kindergarten through 12th grade, (2) better informing school career counselors, (3) advertising possibilities, and (4) community involvement through local school boards. Because affirmative action in admissions is the most controversial and complex set of strategies, this report focuses particularly on this area. PMID:17941411

  10. The Perceptions of Students in the Allied Health Professions towards Stroke Rehabilitation Teams and the SLP's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insalaco, Deborah; Ozkurt, Elcin; Santiago, Dign

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions and knowledge of final-year speech-language pathology (SLP), physical and occupational therapy (PT, OT) students toward stroke rehabilitation teams and the SLPs' roles on them. The investigators adapted a survey developed by (Felsher & Ross, 1994) and administered it to 35 PT, 35 OT, and…

  11. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  12. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  13. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  14. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  15. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  16. The Clergy and the Mental Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Chalke, F. C. R.

    1965-01-01

    In this lecture, as a tribute to the late Samuel Prince, founder of the mental hygiene movement in the Maritime Provinces, the rapprochement between the clergy and mental health profession is discussed. A brief survey of the historical background of the churches' approaches to mental disorder leads to consideration of subjects of present mutual concern. Spiritual and emotional development, responsibility and guilt, law and freedom, psychic structure and sanctity, sexuality, and symbolic representation are among the areas which demand intellectual exploration in depth, jointly, by theologians and social scientists. The need is outlined for training parish clergy to carry out their role in ameliorating emotionally damaging social conditions and of educating and counselling parishioners. PMID:5320919

  17. Clinical prevention and population health: curriculum framework for health professions.

    PubMed

    Allan, Janet; Barwick, Timi Agar; Cashman, Suzanne; Cawley, James F; Day, Chris; Douglass, Chester W; Evans, Clyde H; Garr, David R; Maeshiro, Rika; McCarthy, Robert L; Meyer, Susan M; Riegelman, Richard; Seifer, Sarena D; Stanley, Joan; Swenson, Melinda; Teitelbaum, Howard S; Timothe, Peggy; Werner, Kathryn E; Wood, Douglas

    2004-12-01

    The Clinical Prevention and Population Health Curriculum Framework is the initial product of the Healthy People Curriculum Task Force convened by the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine and the Association of Academic Health Centers. The Task Force includes representatives of allopathic and osteopathic medicine, nursing and nurse practitioners, dentistry, pharmacy, and physician assistants. The Task Force aims to accomplish the Healthy People 2010 goal of increasing the prevention content of clinical health professional education. The Curriculum Framework provides a structure for organizing curriculum, monitoring curriculum, and communicating within and among professions. The Framework contains four components: evidence base for practice, clinical preventive services-health promotion, health systems and health policy, and community aspects of practice. The full Framework includes 19 domains. The title "Clinical Prevention and Population Health" has been carefully chosen to include both individual- and population-oriented prevention efforts. It is recommended that all participating clinical health professions use this title when referring to this area of curriculum. The Task Force recommends that each profession systematically determine whether appropriate items in the Curriculum Framework are included in its standardized examinations for licensure and certification and for program accreditation. PMID:15556746

  18. 78 FR 63993 - ``Low-Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Health Professions and Nursing Programs AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION... provide health professions and nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. These.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The various health professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement...

  19. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles: 1991--Report 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This state-mandated report reviews the status of health professions education programs in Florida. Part 1 provides an overview of health professions education policy by describing special considerations for policymakers and program planning, reviewing outcomes of previous Florida Postsecondary Education Planning Commission recommendations, and…

  20. Problem-Based Learning: Outcomes Evidence from the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Mark A.; Dast, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, problem-based learning (PBL) has become a major force in health professions education and even in the broader educational world. This article focuses on the outcomes that have been found from using PBL in the health professions based on at least 20 reviews done since 1990. The outcomes identified in these reviews are…

  1. The Validation of the Active Learning in Health Professions Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammer, Rebecca; Schreiner, Laurie; Kim, Young K.; Denial, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an assessment tool for evaluating the effectiveness of active learning strategies such as problem-based learning in promoting deep learning and clinical reasoning skills within the dual environments of didactic and clinical settings in health professions education. The Active Learning in Health Professions Scale (ALPHS)…

  2. Decision to Enter the Profession of Student Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Deborah J.; McEwen, Marylu K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider factors that graduate students in master's degree programs in student affairs identify as influential to their decisions to enter the student affairs profession. A total of 300 master's students from 24 randomly selected graduate programs participated in the study. Relatively few differences were found…

  3. Rehabilitation--an emerging allied health profession.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, R E; Pool, D A; Henke, R O; McCollum, P S

    1978-01-01

    Rehabilitation is perceived as the third phase of health care following preventive health care and curative medicine. The rehabilitation specialist assists the health care team in facilitating the patient to live and work with what he has left. The unique role of the rehabilitation specialist in the health care system is described, as well as his/her relation to traditional helth care personnel. The University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas in the School of Allied Health Sciences has offered professional education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in the Department of Rehabilitation Science for the past five years. The curriculum description, student characteristics, and employment placements are distinguishing features of each program and describe how this rehabilitation specialist is educated. PMID:10307652

  4. Issues in Selecting Methods of Evaluating Clinical Competence in the Health Professions: Implications for Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlemas, David A.; Hensal, Carleton

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine methods used to evaluate the clinical competence and proficiency of students in medicine and allied health professions. To identify factors that would be valuable to educators in athletic training and other medical and allied health professions in the development and use of clinical assessment methods. Data Sources: We…

  5. Turkish Geography Student Teachers' Concerns towards the Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezer, Adem

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the levels of concern of Turkish geography student teachers towards the teaching profession. The study was conducted with 293 geography student teachers who are enrolled in the last class of the Geography Student Teachers Program of the Faculties of Education and enrolled in a Non-Thesis Master's Degree…

  6. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    PubMed

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism. PMID:22157995

  7. Learning curves in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Martin V; Boutis, Kathy; Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A

    2015-08-01

    Learning curves, which graphically show the relationship between learning effort and achievement, are common in published education research but are not often used in day-to-day educational activities. The purpose of this article is to describe the generation and analysis of learning curves and their applicability to health professions education. The authors argue that the time is right for a closer look at using learning curves-given their desirable properties-to inform both self-directed instruction by individuals and education management by instructors.A typical learning curve is made up of a measure of learning (y-axis), a measure of effort (x-axis), and a mathematical linking function. At the individual level, learning curves make manifest a single person's progress towards competence including his/her rate of learning, the inflection point where learning becomes more effortful, and the remaining distance to mastery attainment. At the group level, overlaid learning curves show the full variation of a group of learners' paths through a given learning domain. Specifically, they make overt the difference between time-based and competency-based approaches to instruction. Additionally, instructors can use learning curve information to more accurately target educational resources to those who most require them.The learning curve approach requires a fine-grained collection of data that will not be possible in all educational settings; however, the increased use of an assessment paradigm that explicitly includes effort and its link to individual achievement could result in increased learner engagement and more effective instructional design. PMID:25806621

  8. Attitude of Student Teachers towards Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhargava, Anupama; Pathy, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching being a dynamic activity requires a favourable attitude and certain specific competencies from its practitioners. Teachers' proficiency depends on the attitude she possesses for the profession. The positive attitude helps teacher to develop a conductive learner friendly environment in the classroom. This also casts a fruitful effect…

  9. The Corporate State, the Health Service and the Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Rudolf

    1977-01-01

    The problems of the National Health Service in Great Britain are examined with regard to the relationship between public authority and social economy. Attention is directed toward the implications for the position of the medical profession. (LBH)

  10. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    The study focused on eight health professions: medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, pharmacy, and public health. Its central tasks were to identify and explore the barriers to success that women face as medical/professional school applicants and students and to describe the discrimination process that limits…

  11. A Pariah Profession? Some Student Perceptions of Accounting and Accountancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Roy; Murphy, Vivienne

    1995-01-01

    Existing literature and a survey of 106 undergraduate accounting students in the United Kingdom were analyzed for perceptions of the accounting profession and the academic discipline of accounting. Results suggest that among accounting and nonaccounting students alike, there exist coexisting perceptions of accounting as having high status and low…

  12. The Health Professions Requirements Model: Structure and Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, MD. Div. of Health Professions Analysis.

    A major model to forecast requirements for health professionals, which is currently used by the Division of Health Professions Analysis of the U.S. Public Health Service, is described. Specifically, technical documentation is provided for the projections to 1990 that are presented in "A Report to the President and Congress on the Status of Health…

  13. Policy Recommendations for Health Professions Education. Item #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report presents recommendations for Illinois' Board of Higher Education's approval in the areas of: (1) general policies for health professions education, (2) the adoption of immediate program priorities to implement the general policy directions in health education programs, and (3) specific recommendations for adjustments in Health Services…

  14. Mental Health Stigma: Society, Individuals, and the Profession

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Mental health stigma operates in society, is internalized by individuals, and is attributed by health professionals. This ethics-laden issue acts as a barrier to individuals who may seek or engage in treatment services. The dimensions, theory, and epistemology of mental health stigma have several implications for the social work profession. PMID:22211117

  15. Peer Tutoring Programs in Health Professions Schools

    PubMed Central

    Garavalia, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Objective Peer tutoring programs may be one method of maintaining quality of pharmacy education in the face of growing student enrollment and a small faculty body. A critical review of the literature was performed to ascertain whether peer tutoring programs improve or maintain the academic performance of health care professional students. Methods Various electronic databases and abstracts from past American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's annual meetings were searched to identify pertinent research. Only those articles with quantitative data, an experimental design, and comparative statistical analysis were included for review. Results Most studies found that peer tutoring had a positive impact on academic performance. These results may not be readily generalizable as there were numerous methodological flaws and limited descriptions of the programs and participants. Implications Studies with better designs and more detail are needed to answer definitively whether peer tutoring is of benefit. Details of what resources were required should be included in the study to allow the reader to determine the feasibility of the intervention. PMID:17136190

  16. Curricular Principles for Health Professions Education About Family Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Edward N., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Principles for development of health professions curricula in family violence, arising from a 1994 national conference of experts, are identified at three levels: (1) knowledge, skills, and practices to be taught to all health professionals; (2) advanced training for primary care practitioners for comprehensive care and for specialists for…

  17. Using Technology to Promote Active and Social Learning Experiences in Health Professions Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruckert, Elizabeth; McDonald, Paige L.; Birkmeier, Marissa; Walker, Bryan; Cotton, Linda; Lyons, Laurie B.; Straker, Howard O.; Plack, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Time and space constraints, large class sizes, competition for clinical internships, and geographic separation between classroom and clinical rotations for student interaction with peers and faculty pose challenges for health professions educational programs. This article presents a model for effectively incorporating technology to overcome these…

  18. Integrating mobile technology into a health professions curriculum: using flexible technology to meet expectations.

    PubMed

    Kues, John R; Brueggemann, Ralph; Fant, William K; Guard, J Roger; Mincarelli, Delores A

    2003-01-01

    The diverse needs of students, faculty, administrators, and the curriculum itself, create formidable challenges when attempting to integrate mobile technology into a health professions curriculum. Single technology solutions often fail in this environment because they cannot meet user needs. Multiple platform and device agnostic solutions can provide the flexibility to address curricular needs without significantly adding technological complexity. PMID:14728405

  19. 3000 by 2000 and Beyond: Next Steps for Promoting Diversity in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Charles; Beaudreau, James

    2003-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the importance of diversity in health professions schools and historical approaches to achieving this diversity. Then describes Project 3000 by 2000, an effort by the Association of American Medical Colleges to enroll 3,000 underrepresented minority students in medical school by the year 2000. (EV)

  20. Financing Policies for High Cost University of Minnesota Health Professions Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Board, St. Paul.

    Issues and related data are examined concerning financial aid to students in the health professions at the University of Minnesota, with a focus on targeted grant programs for dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and medicine. Following a discussion of policy implications in general and an overview of each of the fields involved, eight policy…

  1. The Reasons Students Choose Teaching Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krecic, Marija Javornik; Grmek, Milena Ivanus

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present the reasons students at the Faculty of Education in Maribor, Slovenija, chose pedagogy for their study direction, and therefore becoming a teacher. A total 237 second-year students of the academic year 2003/04 were included in the research. Of the five groups of reasons for choosing this program (altruistic,…

  2. Student Teaching: Developing Images of a Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Arthur L.; Garmston, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the tremendous impact that professionals have on neophytes in student teaching and suggests three major thrusts that need to be addressed during the student-teaching phase: (1) providing a model of what it means to be a professional educator; (2) passing along some of the tools of the trade; and (3) developing intellectual processes…

  3. Redesigning Continuing Education in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Today in the United States, the professional health workforce is not consistently prepared to provide high quality health care and assure patient safety, even as the nation spends more per capita on health care than any other country. The absence of a comprehensive and well-integrated system of continuing education (CE) in the health professions…

  4. The Health Spa Industry and the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swengros, Glenn V.

    During the past three decades, the health spa industry has grown to become a viable component of our society. Many people, however, still have reservations about the sincerity of health spa proprietors. This is a result of nonprofessional management in the first years of business. Today the health spa industry finds itself with changed…

  5. Health Professions Education Partnerships Act of 1998. Public Law 105-392.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document presents the full text of Public Law 105-392, the Health Professions Partnerships Act of 1998, a law which amends the Public Health Service Act to consolidate and reauthorize health professions and minority and disadvantaged health education programs. Title I concerns health professions education and financial assistance programs.…

  6. Model Allied Health Professions Counseling Program Guide for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Laura P.; Tanner, James R.

    The purpose of this project is to develop and test a model secondary school counseling program emphasizing allied health professions careers. This high school program developer and counselors Guide Book and Resource Kit are produced here to assist secondary schools in their efforts to systematically improve curricular experiences for increased…

  7. Double-Duty Caregiving: Women in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Brown, Judith Belle; Vandervoort, Anthony; McNair, Susan; Dashnay, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this feminist narrative study was to examine the experiences of women in four different health professions (nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, and social work) who provided care to elderly relatives. Although caring is a central and common feature of the personal and professional lives of many women (Baines, Evans, & Neysmith, 1991;…

  8. Index of Opportunity in Nursing and Allied Health Professions, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resource Publications, Inc., Princeton, NJ.

    This publication contains descriptions of 59 hospitals and other medical agencies which offer job opportunities to nurses and those trained in the allied health professions. Included in the descriptions are a brief introduction, salaries and/or benefits, employment opportunities, location, and source of further information. A geographical index…

  9. A Career Model for Nurse Practitioners. Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lucile A.

    Described in this document is a five-stage curriculum model for the training of nurse practitioners which was developed through the Allied Health Professions Project (AHPP). Based on a national survey of nursing occupations, stage I of the curriculum model includes the 60 percent of activities common to all practitioners, and stage II includes the…

  10. Changing the future of health professions: embedding interprofessional education within an academic health center.

    PubMed

    Blue, Amy V; Mitcham, Maralynne; Smith, Thomas; Raymond, John; Greenberg, Raymond

    2010-08-01

    Institutions are increasingly considering interprofessional education (IPE) as a means to improve health care and reduce medical errors in the United States. Effective implementation of IPE within health professions education requires a strategic institutional approach to ensure longevity and sustainability. In 2007, the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) established Creating Collaborative Care (C), an IPE initiative that takes a multifaceted approach to weaving interprofessional collaborative experiences throughout MUSC's culture to prepare students to participate in interprofessional, collaborative health care and research settings.In this article, the authors describe C's guiding conceptual foundation and student learning goals. They present its implementation framework to illustrate how C is embedded within the institutional culture. It is housed in the provost's office, and an overarching implementation committee functions as a central coordinating group. Faculty members develop and implement C activities across professions by contributing to four collaborating domains-curricular, extracurricular, faculty development, and health care simulation-each of which captures an IPE component. The authors provide examples of IPE activities developed by each domain to illustrate the breadth of IPE at MUSC. The authors believe that MUSC's efforts, including the conceptual foundation and implementation framework, can be generalized to other institutions intent on developing IPE within their organizational cultures. PMID:20671454

  11. A model for linkage between health professions education and health: FAIMER international faculty development initiatives.

    PubMed

    Burdick, William; Amaral, Eliana; Campos, Henry; Norcini, John

    2011-01-01

    Linking faculty development to improvement of community health is of particular interest to health professions educators and researchers. While individuals and institutions engaged in health professions education have the potential to improve health, limited literature connects capacity building in education with improvements in health. Understanding the mechanism by which faculty development may promote development of socially accountable institutions and improve health can be useful for improving this connection and evaluating program effectiveness. PMID:21774649

  12. Promoting interprofessionalism: initial evaluation of a master of science in health professions education degree program.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Strang, Aimee; Edelman, David; Navedo, Deborah; Soto-Greene, Maria L; Guarino, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    This survey study assessed former students' perceptions on the efficacy of how well a newly implemented master's in health professions education degree program achieved its academic aims. These academic aims were operationalized by an author-developed scale to assess the following domains: a) developing interprofessional skills and identity; b) acquiring new academic skills; and c) providing a student-centered environment. The respondents represented a broad range of health care providers, including physicians, nurses, and occupational and physical therapists. Generalizability-theory was applied to partition the variance of the scores. Student's overwhelmingly responded that the program successfully achieved its academic aims. PMID:26917985

  13. 75 FR 26167 - Designation of Medically Underserved Populations and Health Professions Shortage Areas; Intent To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Underserved Populations and Health Professions Shortage Areas; Intent To Form Negotiated Rulemaking Committee... of Medically Underserved Populations (MUPs) and Primary Care Health Professions Shortage Areas (HPSAs... indicators, representing the public's interest in assuring that the areas, populations and entities to...

  14. Diversifying the Health Professions: A Model Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Penny A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a university-based mentoring program in the food and nutritional sciences that addresses the need for multicultural professionals in allied health fields. Methods: The conceptual model for the program includes inputs (goals, resources), transformational process (professional development, social support and recognition) and…

  15. Faculty Perspectives of the Educational Needs of At-Risk, Underrepresented Minorities in Health Profession Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Catherine

    Disproportionate numbers of underrepresented minorities (URMs) work in health professions as compared to minority representation in the general population. Meeting the health needs of a population is predicated on health provider racial concordance. A qualitative, phenomenological approach was used to explore10 faculty participant's lived experiences, perceptions of roles in the teaching-learning process, and perceptions of at-risk URM (ARURM) student academic support needs. Colaizzi's method was used for data interpretation, revealing four themes. The first theme relates to the perceived under-preparedness of students and related consequences. The second theme represents a perceived lack of awareness and knowledge of students and faculty. The third theme represents the evolving context of the teaching-learning process. The fourth theme reflects a desire to help ARURM students at faculty and institutional levels. Data generated themes guided development of the Academy of Future Health Professionals, a four credit summer-bridge program created to provide ARURM students with additional education and socialization into professional roles. Implications for positive social change include increasing the number of ARURM students admitted to health profession programs of study, which may result in increasing URMs in professional practice, increasing URM professional mentors, and decreasing health disparities of URMs.

  16. Innovations to Enhance the Quality of Health Professions Education at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences -NECTAR Program

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E; Nathoo, Kusum; Borok, Margaret; Chidzonga, Midion; Aagaard, Eva M.; Connors, Susan C.; Barry, Michele; Campbell, Thomas; Hakim, James

    2014-01-01

    The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS) is Zimbabwe's premier health professions training institution. However, several concerns were raised during the past decade over the quality of health education at UZCHS. The number of faculty and students declined markedly until 2010, when there was a medical student intake of 147 while the faculty comprised only 122 (39%) of a possible 314 positions. The economic and political crises that the country experienced from 1999 to 2009 compounded the difficulties faced by the institution by limiting the availability of resources. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) funding opportunity has given UZCHS the stimulus to embark on reforms to improve the quality of health education it offers. UZCHS, in partnership with the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCSOM), the University of Colorado Denver Evaluation Center (UCDEC), and Stanford University designed the Novel Education Clinical Trainees and Researchers (NECTAR) program to implement a series of health education innovations to meet this challenge. Between 2010 and 2013, innovations that have positively affected the quality of health professions education at UZCHS include the launch of comprehensive faculty development programs and mentored clinical and research programs for postgraduate students. A competency-based curriculum reform process has been initiated; a health professions department has been established; and the Research Support Center has been strengthened, providing critical resources to institutionalize health education and research implementation at the college. A core group of faculty trained in medical education has been assembled, helping to ensure the sustainability of these NECTAR activities. PMID:25072588

  17. When students from different professions are co-located: the importance of interprofessional rapport for learning to work together.

    PubMed

    Croker, Anne; Fisher, Karin; Smith, Tony

    2015-01-01

    With increasing interest and research into interprofessional learning, there is scope to more deeply understand what happens when students from different professions live and study in the same location. This study aimed to explore the issue of co-location and its effects on how students learn to work with other professions. The setting for this study was a rural health education facility in Australia with close links to local health care and community services. Philosophical hermeneutics informed the research method. Interviews were undertaken with 29 participants, including students, academic educators and clinical supervisors in diagnostic radiography, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, pharmacy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology. Photo-elicitation was used to facilitate participant engagement with the topic. The findings foreground the value of interprofessional rapport building opportunities for students learning to work together. Enabled by the proximity of different professions in shared educational, clinical and social spaces, interprofessional rapport building was contingent on contextual conditions (balance of professions, shared spaces and adequate time) and individual's interpersonal capabilities (being interested, being inclusive, developing interpersonal bonds, giving and receiving respect, bringing a sense of own profession and being patient-centred). In the absence of these conditions and capabilities, negative professional stereotypes may be inadvertently re-enforced. From these findings suggestions are made for nurturing interprofessional rapport building opportunities to enable students of different professions to learn to work together. PMID:25010631

  18. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume X: Bibliography and Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    The bibliography is part of an extensive study of the barriers to women's success in the schools and practice of eight health professions. It divides resources into 14 segments: one covers the health professions in general; one treats women and careers in general; one is devoted to each of eight health professions (medicine, osteopathic medicine,…

  19. 3000 by 2000 and beyond: next steps for promoting diversity in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Charles; Beaudreau, James

    2003-09-01

    In 1991, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) launched a national campaign to enroll 3,000 underrepresented minority students in medical school by the year 2000. (The AAMC defined underrepresented minorities as blacks, Mexican Americans, mainland Puerto Ricans, and Native Americans, which includes American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.*) The initiative, named Project 3000 by 2000, focused on education-pipeline interventions. Although the project did not meet its numeric goal, in large part because of court decisions in several regions of the country that hampered affirmative action programs, Project 3000 by 2000 did have a number of important successes. At a time when there is a need to develop new and creative ways to promote diversity in health professions education, there are a number of lessons to be learned from this project. Large-scale national campaigns serve an extremely useful purpose in promoting diversity in the health professions. And for these campaigns to be successful, it is important that the health professions work together to coordinate their activities and share their resources to ensure that health professions close the diversity gap in the twenty-first century. PMID:14518847

  20. Health Professions Education Research and the Institutional Review Board

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, Mitchell T.; DeMeo, Stephen; Nagler, Alisa; Hockenberry, Marilyn J.

    2016-01-01

    The growth in health professions education (HPE) and a desire on the part of nurse and medical educators to disseminate their work have raised important questions about the ethical conduct of education research. At the center of the debate is the institutional review board (IRB) and its proper role in the oversight of HPE research. This article examines the IRB process and types of reviews for education research and presents an Education Project Summary Template to use for IRB reviews. PMID:26501395

  1. Health Professions Education Research and the Institutional Review Board.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T; DeMeo, Stephen; Nagler, Alisa; Hockenberry, Marilyn J

    2016-01-01

    The growth in health professions education (HPE) and a desire on the part of nurse and medical educators to disseminate their work have raised important questions about the ethical conduct of education research. At the center of the debate is the institutional review board (IRB) and its proper role in the oversight of HPE research. This article examines the IRB process and types of reviews for education research and presents an Education Project Summary Template to use for IRB reviews. PMID:26501395

  2. Knowledge and Perceptions of College Students Regarding the Physician Assistant Profession

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, Sandra; Kelsey, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Physician assistants (PAs) are nationally certified and state-licensed medical professionals who practice medicine on healthcare teams with physicians and other providers. Despite the increasing popularity and utility of the profession, knowledge of the role of PAs remains scarce among many segments of the population. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge and perceptions of the PA profession among undergraduate college students, as well as what factors are associated with better knowledge and perception of the profession. Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey, information was gathered regarding knowledge and perception of PAs. A total of 364 students were surveyed from randomly selected undergraduate courses at a Connecticut public university. Results: Knowledge scores were significantly higher (p<0.05) in older students, female students, those with plans to pursue a healthcare career, those majoring in health and human services, and those satisfied with care received from a PA. Significantly better perceptions (p<0.05) of PAs were found in older students, those with plans for a future career in healthcare, those majoring in health and human services, those who received prior care from a PA, and those who were satisfied with prior care from a PA. After a short educational intervention, improvements in perceptions were statistically significant (p<0.001) in the surveyed population. Conclusion: This study identifies areas of needed improvement in knowledge and perception of PAs and also provides impetus for educational and marketing-based interventions to improve knowledge and perception of the PA profession in the college student population. PMID:26623223

  3. Critical Thinking and Reflection Exercises in a Biochemistry Course to Improve Prospective Health Professions Students’ Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Susan; Fjortoft, Nancy; Bjork, Bryan C.; Chandar, Nalini; Green, Jacalyn M.; La Salle, Sophie; Viselli, Susan M.; Burdick, Paulette; Lynch, Sean M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the impact of performing critical-thinking and reflection assignments within interdisciplinary learning teams in a biochemistry course on pharmacy students’ and prospective health professions students’ collaboration scores. Design. Pharmacy students and prospective medical, dental, and other health professions students enrolled in a sequence of 2 required biochemistry courses. They were randomly assigned to interdisciplinary learning teams in which they were required to complete case assignments, thinking and reflection exercises, and a team service-learning project. Assessment. Students were asked to complete the Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration prior to the first course, following the first course, and following the second course. The physician-pharmacist collaboration scores of prospective health professions students increased significantly (p<0.001). Conclusions. Having prospective health professions students work in teams with pharmacy students to think and reflect in and outside the classroom improves their attitudes toward physician-pharmacist collaboration. PMID:24159210

  4. Occupational safety and health aspects of voice and speech professions.

    PubMed

    Vilkman, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    A well-functioning voice is an essential tool for one third of the labour force. Vocal demands vary to a great extent between the different voice and speech professions. In professions with heavy vocal loading (e.g. school and kindergarten teachers), occupational voice disorders threatening working ability are common. Vocal loading is a combination of prolonged voice use and additional loading factors (e.g. background noise, acoustics, air quality) affecting the fundamental frequency, type and loudness of phonation or the vibratory characteristics of the vocal folds as well as the external frame of the larynx. The prevention and treatment of occupational voice disorders calls for improved occupational safety and health (OSH) arrangements for voice and speech professionals. On the basis of epidemiological and acoustic-physiological research, the presence of risk to vocal health can be substantiated. From the point of view of the physical load on the vocal apparatus, loading-related physiological changes (adaptation) may play a role in the occupational risk. Environmental factors affect vocal loading changes. In teaching professions, the working environment is shared with children, who benefit from amendments of OSH legislation concerning their teachers. PMID:15258436

  5. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume I: Data Analysis, Findings, Conclusions, Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    The study focused on women's education in eight health professions: medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, pharmacy, and public health. Its central tasks were to identify and explore the barriers to success that women face as school applicants and students. Almost 600 interviews were conducted with…

  6. Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession: implications for nursing education and practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Kandari, Fatimah H; Lew, Irene

    2005-12-01

    The shortage of nurses in Kuwait is attributed to low production of indigenous nurses, resignation and emigration of foreign nurses, and expansion of health care facilities. This study explored Kuwaiti high school students' perceptions of nursing as a profession, their sources of information about nursing, and factors that affected their choice of nursing as a future career. Questionnaires from 289 students attending seven all-female high schools in Kuwait were analyzed. The results revealed that all of the participants were knowledgeable about the functional aspects of the nursing profession, and 35% of them received this information through contact with nurses during hospital visits. However, only 19% indicated they might consider nursing as a future career. The implications of the study for nursing education and practice, and strategies to attract and retain indigenous high school graduates into nursing programs in Kuwait are discussed. PMID:16402735

  7. Properties, promotive and obstructive conditions of multi-professional teaching and learning of health professions and non-health professions: an explorative survey from the perspective of teachers

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Daniela; Höhmann, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Care for people with dementia is considered a multi-professional challenge that requires a collaborative approach between health professionals and non-health professionals. Didactic strategies to ensure the same qualifications across these occupational groups are lacking. This article presents the joint learning of selected properties and promotive and obstructive conditions, using the example of a multi-professional Master's programme. It subsequently draws conclusions for didactic concepts. Methodology: The perceptions of 12 teachers on this Master's programme, all representing different professions, were determined by using a qualitative exploratory survey on the three stated dimensions. With the aid of a summarising content analysis, their statements were condensed and abstracted so as to deduce appropriate requirements for methodical and didactic learning scenarios. Results: In view of the fact that the students have very varied previous knowledge, the main challenge is finding a balance between expertise and tediousness. Establishing essential and common expertise, as well as sensitivity for different perspectives, is made particularly difficult by the fact that health and non-health professions differ greatly in terms of methods and approaches. For a successful outcome, the content focal points and didactic and methodical concepts for a learning group need to take into account the composition of that specific group. Recourse to didactic standard concepts is only possible to a limited extent. Conclusions: The aim of joint teaching and learning of health and non-health professionals is to enhance the understanding of a profession: This is done by making individuals aware of their role in the chain of care, so they can recognise and organise the mutual conditionality of their own and external professional contributions. PMID:27280137

  8. The Impact of Personal Loss on the Experience of Health Professions: Graduate Students in End-of-Life and Bereavement Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Katherine P.; Vaughn-Cole, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the impact of prior personal experience with grief on self-reported personal and professional development of graduate students in nursing, social work, counseling, pastoral care, and genetic counseling involved as cofacilitators in bereavement support groups, and of medical students observing interdisciplinary inpatient…

  9. The impact of personal loss on the experience of health professions: graduate students in end-of-life and bereavement care.

    PubMed

    Supiano, Katherine P; Vaughn-Cole, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the impact of prior personal experience with grief on self-reported personal and professional development of graduate students in nursing, social work, counseling, pastoral care, and genetic counseling involved as cofacilitators in bereavement support groups, and of medical students observing interdisciplinary inpatient palliative care. Personal experience with death of a family member or close friend was reported in 80% of the 35 participating students. Findings suggest that grief and the students' construction of the meaning of their loss can mediate the students' developing sense of self as a professional helper. Active engagement with suffering persons, the opportunity for self-disclosure and reflection, and teacher-facilitator provision of emotional guidance and modeling contributed positively to learning. PMID:24501851

  10. Interprofessional education and service learning: a model for the future of health professions education.

    PubMed

    De Los Santos, Maria; McFarlin, Christine Degnon; Martin, Lourdes

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of interprofessional education for healthcare professionals has been lackluster, at best, since it was recommended by the Institute of Medicine. There have been various attempts in institutions of higher learning to meet this goal with mixed results. Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University has developed the Green Family NeighborhoodHELP™ (GFNHelp) program to meet this challenge. GFNHelp is an interprofessional, longitudinal, service-learning program for healthcare students. Through participation in this program medical students team up with students from other professions, such as nursing, social work, and law, and collaborate to improve health outcomes for medically underserved families in the community. This educational program emphasizes the Core Competencies of the Interprofessional Education Collaborative through community-based service-learning, allowing student teams to engage firsthand and address the impact of social determinants on health. PMID:24571208

  11. Fact Sheet: Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 (PL 94-484).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 extends health manpower training authorities through FY 1980 with significant changes to meet national needs. It is designed to produce more primary care practitioners and improve health services in manpower shortage areas, providing support for the training of health professions (medicine,…

  12. 76 FR 63624 - Bureau of Health Professions All-Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions All-Advisory...), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Bureau of Health Professions...

  13. Promoting interprofessionalism: initial evaluation of a master of science in health professions education degree program

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Strang, Aimee; Edelman, David; Navedo, Deborah; Soto-Greene, Maria L; Guarino, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    This survey study assessed former students’ perceptions on the efficacy of how well a newly implemented master’s in health professions education degree program achieved its academic aims. These academic aims were operationalized by an author-developed scale to assess the following domains: a) developing interprofessional skills and identity; b) acquiring new academic skills; and c) providing a student-centered environment. The respondents represented a broad range of health care providers, including physicians, nurses, and occupational and physical therapists. Generalizability-theory was applied to partition the variance of the scores. Student’s overwhelmingly responded that the program successfully achieved its academic aims. PMID:26917985

  14. "The Fault Lies Not in Our Students, but in Ourselves": Academic Honesty and Moral Development in Health Professions Education--Results of a Pilot Study in Canadian Pharmacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Zubin; Simpson, Stephanie; Reynen, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Numerous explanations have been offered to explain the ubiquity and enduring nature of academic dishonesty in post-secondary education and professional programs, including dissatisfaction with curricula, disengagement from academic institutions, and poor admissions criteria for students. A pilot study in Canadian pharmacy education was undertaken…

  15. Factors Influencing Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of the Athletic Training Profession and Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Successful athletic training programs should help students develop a desire to work within the athletic training profession while providing adequate preparation for them to enter the workforce. Understanding athletic training students' perceptions of the profession as they leave programs and the factors that influence these…

  16. National Student Conference on Health Manpower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Student American Pharmaceutical Association, Washington, DC.

    This document summarizes the proceedings of the National Student Conference on Health Manpower, Chicago, March 1972. Following a staff report on the conference proceedings, student research papers on workshop topics are presented. These papers concern health profession recruitment and retention with consideration of general minority and sex-biased…

  17. Health Professions and Cooperative Extension: An Emerging Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condo, Erin P.; Martin, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    A project placed health science interns in community-based education and outreach programs in partnership with Extension to provide community education in health behavior and decision making and build community capacity for health care. Evaluation of student reports and participant interviews showed that despite logistical challenges such as lack…

  18. 77 FR 6805 - Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for Under-Represented Minority Individuals AGENCY: Health...) program in health professions education for under-represented minority (URM) individuals is authorized by... resources, clinical education, curricula and cultural competence of schools' graduates relating to...

  19. The Area Resource File (ARF). A Health Professions Planning and Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This report presents a description and sample products of the Area Resource File (ARF), a computer-based county-specific health resources information system which consolidates U.S. data on the health professions, hospital and nursing home facilities, hospital utilization levels, health professions training, hospital expenditures, Medicare…

  20. 75 FR 11189 - Bureau of Health Professions; All Advisory Committee Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions; All Advisory... Professions All-Advisory Committee Meeting (AACM). Dates and Times: April 21, 2010, 8 a.m.-5 p.m....

  1. Analysis of Sex and Gender Content in Allied Health Professions' Curricula.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Lois; Sechrist, Dawndra; Taylor, LesLee

    2016-01-01

    Sex and gender differences in rehabilitation are important because more than half of patients seen by allied health professionals are female. Sex- and gender-specific curricula should be audited to enhance interprofessional education in women's health. The research question was: What is the extent of information about sex and gender differences that is included in selected allied health professions curricula? Student scholars from allied health programs audited courses in real time for references to sex and gender differences. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The emphasis of instruction included primarily statements of facts for the physical and occupational therapy programs and brief discussions in the athletic training program. There was a significant difference among the categories of emphasis for the programs (X2 = 391.23, p<0.05). The individual disciplines identified the majority of content in the same rank order: body systems, health statistics, and health conditions. There were significant differences in the content areas related to sex and gender differences among the three disciplines (X2 = 70.67, p<0.05). This study provided the first content analysis of sex and gender differences in selected allied health professions. No textual inferences were made, but the study reported on the topics discussed and the extent of the sharing of information. PMID:27585612

  2. The supervisor's toolkit: A framework for doctoral supervision in health professions education: AMEE Guide No. 104.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, Susan Camille; Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah; Tekian, Ara; van der Vleuten, Cees; Cilliers, Francois

    2016-05-01

    Doctoral studies represent a complex undertaking for students and supervisors. Some research describes the experience of students while there are volumes of advice for students considering a doctorate. Yet the terrain for supervisors is less well-trodden and the concept of a pedagogy of supervision is only really starting to emerge. Texts on the doctoral journey from the supervisor's perspective are uncommon and less yet has been written in the context of health professions education. The aim of this Guide, therefore, is to provide guidance for the supervisor's journey, drawing on our collective experience and such literature as there is. We explore the doctoral journey of students and their supervisors, highlighting what the implications are for supervisory practice. Recognising the doctorate as much more than merely conducting a research project, and seeing it as a shared educational endeavour is fundamental to understanding the doctoral journey - a journey that is complex and mutable, constantly shifting as the candidate moves from novice to expert, from dependence to growing autonomy. Our intention is to present this Guide as a toolkit for both the novice and the experienced supervisor as it, on the one hand, seeks to make the practice of supervision more transparent while on the other, challenges the reader to critically reflect on the supervisory space in which they currently reside. Our hope is that the Guide opens up opportunities for generative conversations about the practice of doctoral supervision in health professions education. PMID:26998657

  3. (Re)Introducing Communication Competence to the Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Spitzberg, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the central role that communication skills play in contemporary accounts of effective health care delivery in general, and the communication of medical error specifically, there is no common or consensual core in the health professions regarding the nature of such skills. This lack of consensus reflects, in part, the tendency for disciplines to reinvent concepts and measures without first situating such development in disciplines with more cognate specialization in such concepts. In this essay, an integrative model of communication competence is introduced, along with its theoretical background and rationale. Communication competence is defined as an impression of appropriateness and effectiveness, which is functionally related to individual motivation, knowledge, skills, and contextual facilitators and constraints. Within this conceptualization, error disclosure contexts are utilized to illustrate the heuristic value of the theory, and implications for assessment are suggested. Significance for public health Models matter, as do the presuppositions that underlie their architecture. Research indicates that judgments of competence moderate outcomes such as satisfaction, trust, understanding, and power-sharing in relationships and in individual encounters. If the outcomes of health care encounters depend on the impression of competence that patients or their family members have of health care professionals, then knowing which specific communicative behaviors contribute to such impressions is not merely important – it is essential. To pursue such a research agenda requires that competence assessment and operationalization becomes better aligned with conceptual assumptions that separate behavioral performance from the judgments of the competence of that performance. PMID:25170494

  4. Health professions ethics rubric: validation of reliability in an interprofessional health ethics course.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Therese I; Hecht, Keith A; Lynch, J Christopher; Otsuka, Allen S; Shafer, Kathy J; Wilhelm, Miranda J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a health professions ethics rubric by an interprofessional team. The rubric was used by two pharmacy and two dental faculty members to score ethics cases submitted by 16 teams comprised of 80 pharmacy and 50 dental students. A debriefing session for each case was moderated by a non-rater faculty member to arrive at a consensus score for the cases. Interrater reliability was calculated for the four raters and the debriefing scores as well as the four raters without the debriefing scores. The overall interrater correlations were in the range of 0.790 to 0.906 for the four raters. Issues ranged from 0.320 to 0.758. Principles ranged from 0.610 to 0.838. Options ranged from 0.655 to 0.843. Analysis ranged from 0.667 to 0.918. Solution ranged from 0.739 to 0.886. With the inclusion of the consensus scores, the interrater correlations were even higher. The best correlations were for the overall score and solution components of the rubric. With further edits in the rubric and enhanced training by faculty raters and changes in the ethics learning session, the revised rubric could be evaluated again for grading. Further training for faculty using the rubric for grading student cases should enhance its reliability. Demonstrating to students the ethical decision making process using the rubric should enhance the validation process. PMID:25838014

  5. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) at two years

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Carey F; Zuber, Alexandra; Kelley, Maureen A; Verani, Andre R; Riley, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    Background The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) for nurses and midwives was created in response to the increasing reliance on shifting HIV tasks to nurses and midwives without the necessary regulation supporting this enhanced professional role. ARC Approach The ARC initiative comprises regional meetings, technical assistance, and regulatory improvement grants which enhance HIV service delivery by nurses and midwives, and systematic evaluation of project impact. Results Eight of 11 countries funded by ARC advanced a full stage in regulatory capacity during their 1-year project period. Countries in ARC also demonstrated increased capacity in project management and proposal writing. Discussion The progress of country teams thus far suggests ARC is a successful model for regulation strengthening and capacity building, as well as presenting a novel approach for sustainability and country ownership. The ARC platform has been a successful vehicle for regional harmonisation of updated regulations and promises to help facilitate the enhancement of HIV service delivery by nurses and midwives. PMID:27066113

  6. Integrating cognitive and affective dimensions of pain experience into health professions education

    PubMed Central

    Murinson, Beth B; Mezei, Lina; Nenortas, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Pain is prevalent in clinical settings, and yet it is relatively under-represented in the education of most students in the health professions. Because pain includes both sensory-discriminative and affective features, teaching students about pain presents unique challenges and opportunities. The present article describes the evolution of a new blueprint for clinical excellence that, among other competencies, incorporates a need for the emotional development of clinical trainees. The framework has been applied to the development and implementation of two new courses in pain. The first course is designed to provide a comprehensive foundation of medical knowledge regarding pain, while integratively introducing students to the affective dimensions of pain. The second course is designed to enhance students’ appreciation for the protean effects of pain through use of the humanities to represent medical experience. It is concluded that, to be most effective, fostering the emotional development of trainees in the health professions necessitates the incorporation of affect-focused learning objectives, educational tasks and assessment methods. PMID:22184551

  7. Assessment of the Educational Needs in Health Professions Programs, 1992. Item #3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report presents an overview of the status of programs of health professions education in Illinois and reviews the policies related to these programs that were adopted by the Board of Higher Education in the early 1980s. Specific questions addressed are as follows: (1) Are the number, type, and distribution of health professions programs…

  8. Evidence-Based Problem Solving: Liberal Education and Preparation for the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegelman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the health professions have moved from "eminence-based" solutions to "evidence-based" problem solving. This evolution provides new opportunities to implement integrative curricula for those preparing for the health professions. These new curricula can be built on the Essential Learning Outcomes identified through the Association…

  9. State Support for Health Professions Education. Prepared for the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, by the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    Information about state support for health professions education and for students attending health professions schools is presented, based on a request by the Senate Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research. The Subcommittee will be considering legislation, during the 96th Congress, to extend and modify Titles VII and VIII of the Public…

  10. The New Scarlet Letter: Student Perceptions of the Accounting Profession after Enron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mimi; Kreuze, Jerry; Langsam, Sheldon

    2004-01-01

    Recent scandals have tarnished the integrity of the accounting profession, marking it with a modern version of the scarlet letter "A," which represented disgrace in Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter." In this study, the authors surveyed college business students on their perceptions of the accounting profession and examined how it can…

  11. Improving cross-cultural communication in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sharon T; Censullo, Meredith; Cameron, Donna D; Baigis, Judith A

    2007-08-01

    In the District of Columbia, health education programs are required for all students, yet inner-city elementary public charter schools do not have enough funding to hire nursing personnel in their schools to provide such programs to their students. Therefore, some public charter school administrators partner with community agencies to bring additional cost-free resources to their schools. However, collaborative and partnership activities in DC can be fraught with racial strife. This article describes the partnership between the Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies, the School of Medicine, and select DC elementary schools and presents a specific example of one partnership between the University and an elementary public charter school. The article describes a communication breakdown between the predominately Caucasian nursing and medical students and the predominately African American faculty, staff, and students of the public charter school, with suggestions about how to avoid and overcome such conflicts in the future. PMID:17727000

  12. Predental students' attitudes toward and perceptions of the dental profession.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Nathan J; Ditmyer, Marcia M; Sandoval, Victor A

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess reasons students seek a career in dentistry, their perceptions of the dental school admissions process, and their expectations of the profession. Of 155 predental students participating in a dental school simulation course offered at a Nevada dental school, 152 participated in this study (68.4 percent [n=104] male, and 31.6 percent [n=48] female). When asked when they made the decision to pursue a career in dentistry, 52 percent (n=79) said they decided in college, while 33.6 percent (n=51) made the decision in high school. A slight majority of the respondents (52.6 percent; n=80) identified their family dentist as having the greatest influence in their decision. Nearly half (47.8 percent; n=64) expected to pursue a career in general dentistry, while the next largest subgroup expected to pursue orthodontics (16.4 percent; n=22). A significant majority of the respondents (72.8 percent; n=110) perceived the dental school admissions process to be fair. Males were significantly more likely to identify themselves as competitive applicants than did females (chi(2)=9.644; p<.01). Approximately half (47.4 percent; n=72) anticipate earning between $100,000 and $199,999 within five years after graduation, with 50.7 percent (n=77) anticipating working between thirty-five and forty hours a week. By understanding the applicant pool and their perceptions, admissions committees can better prepare to attract the applicants they desire. PMID:19056624

  13. A clinical education and practice placements in the allied health professions: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Sylvia; Webb, Gillian; Devitt, Lorraine; Gilbert, John; Wrightson, Pat; McMeeken, Joan

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the outcomes of extensive discussions surrounding clinical education and practice placement issues undertaken by an international group of allied health educators (in audiology, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and speech pathology) who have met since 2001 as part of Universitas 21 Health Sciences annual meetings. The report outlines key issues associated with clinical education and practice placements from an international perspective and across these four allied health professions. The allied health practice context is described in terms of the range of allied health educational programs in Universitas 21 and recent changes in health and tertiary education sectors in represented countries. Some issues and benefits related to supervision during allied health students' practice placements are addressed. A new approach is proposed through partnership such that frameworks for the provision of practice placements can be created to facilitate student learning and educate and support clinical educators. A set of guidelines that can enhance partnerships and collaborative practice for the benefit of clinical education within complex and changing health/human service and educational environments is proposed. PMID:18444440

  14. The Emerging Student Affairs Profession: What Still Needs to Be Done.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Brent G.; Carpenter, D. Stanley

    1989-01-01

    Examines professional status of student affairs and offers recommendations to enhance status. Notes that Council for Advancement of Standards (CAS) Standards and Guidelines for Student Services/Development Programs is step toward student affairs becoming a profession. Concludes that, if student affairs does not determine its destiny, others in…

  15. Health Professions Educational Assistance Amendments of 1985. Report Together with Additional Views to Accompany H.R. 2410. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    A bill amending the Public Health Service Act to revise and extend programs under Title VII (health professions programs) is addressed in this congressional report. The bill reauthorizes for 3 years the following programs: the Health Education Assistance Loan program of insurance for market-rate student loans (the ceiling is raised); the Health…

  16. Task Analysis for Curriculum Design and Validation. Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Bruce B.; And Others

    This report contains an outline of the method and the rationale for a project whose purpose is to develop training programs which are relevant to the specific requirements of technical occupations in nine allied health professions. The nine professions are in (a) nursing, (b) inhalation therapy, (c) radiology (technician level), (d) clinical…

  17. "I Now Have a Visual Image in My Mind and It Is Something I Will Never Forget": An Analysis of an Arts-Informed Approach to Health Professions Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Bidinosti, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of an arts informed approach to ethics education in a health professions education context. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' reported learning experiences as a result of engagement with an arts-informed project in a health professions' ethics course. A hermeneutic phenomenological methodological…

  18. Innovations to enhance the quality of health professions education at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences--NECTAR program.

    PubMed

    Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E; Nathoo, Kusum; Borok, Margaret; Chidzonga, Midion; Aagaard, Eva M; Connors, Susan C; Barry, Michele; Campbell, Thomas; Hakim, James

    2014-08-01

    The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS) is Zimbabwe's premier health professions training institution. However, several concerns were raised during the past decade over the quality of health education at UZCHS. The number of faculty and students declined markedly until 2010, when there was a medical student intake of 147 while the faculty comprised only 122 (39%) of a possible 314 positions. The economic and political crises that the country experienced from 1999 to 2009 compounded the difficulties faced by the institution by limiting the availability of resources. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative funding opportunity has given UZCHS the stimulus to embark on reforms to improve the quality of health education it offers. UZCHS, in partnership with the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the University of Colorado Denver Evaluation Center, and Stanford University, designed the Novel Education Clinical Trainees and Researchers (NECTAR) program to implement a series of health education innovations to meet this challenge. Between 2010 and 2013, innovations that have positively affected the quality of health professions education at UZCHS include the launch of comprehensive faculty development programs and mentored clinical and research programs for postgraduate students. A competency-based curriculum reform process has been initiated, a health professions department has been established, and the Research Support Center has been strengthened, providing critical resources to institutionalize health education and research implementation at the college. A core group of faculty trained in medical education has been assembled, helping to ensure the sustainability of these NECTAR activities. PMID:25072588

  19. Interdisciplinary: Cultural competency and culturally congruent education for millennials in health professions.

    PubMed

    Hawala-Druy, Souzan; Hill, Mary H

    2012-10-01

    The increasingly diverse multicultural and multigenerational student population in the United States requires that educators at all levels develop cultural knowledge, awareness, and sensitivity to help diverse learners fulfill their potential and to avoid cultural misunderstandings that can become obstacles or barriers to learning. The purpose of this study was to design and implement eclectic, creative, evidence-based interdisciplinary educational activities, along with culturally congruent teaching strategies, within a semester-long university course that promoted positive and culturally competent learning outcomes for culturally diverse, largely millennial students. The interdisciplinary course would prepare health professional students with the requisite knowledge and skills, through transformative learning that produces change agents, to provide culturally congruent and quality team-based care to diverse populations. This was a qualitative and quantitative study, which measured students' level of cultural awareness, competence, and proficiency pre and post the educational intervention. Instruments used for data collection included the Inventory for Assessing The Process of Cultural Competence-Student Version (IAPCC-SV) by Campinha-Bacote, course evaluations, students' feedback, and portfolio reflections. The study was conducted at a private academic institution located in the Mid-Atlantic region and the sample population included inter-professional students (N=106) from various health professions including nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. Results from the pre- and post-test IAPCC-SV survey revealed that mean scores increased significantly from pre-test (60.8) to post-test (70.6). Thus, students' levels of cultural competency (awareness, knowledge, skills, desire, encounter) improved post-educational intervention, indicating that the teaching methods used in the course might be applied on a larger scale across the university system to cater to the

  20. Establishing health informatics as a recognised and respected profession in the UK National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Millen, Di

    2003-01-01

    The delivery of healthcare is an information dependent process. National government modernisation targets, and drives to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of care delivery systems and processes have the better use of information and IT at their heart. If we are to realise the benefits information and IT developments can bring, we have to ensure we have a suitable cadre of well educated, proactive professional specialists who understand the business of healthcare. The English NHS has an attrition rate of something like 43% amongst its ICT specialists, and there are recruitment and retention problems in a range of other informatics disciplines like medical records, project management and strategic management. A 1999-2000 survey indicated the reasons for recruitment and retention problems. One agreed solution has been to work towards establishing health informatics as a recognised and respected national profession. This is in addition to other national work to establish career pathways, make health informatics as a profession "mainstream", and to provide development opportunities at all levels. This paper sets out the background to the establishment of a profession in UK health services, outlines progress to date, and summarises other national development activity to support health informatics professionals. PMID:14664092

  1. Pathways to STEMM Professions for Students from Noncollege Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon D.; Pearson, Willie, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we use data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth to examine the influence of parent education on pathways to science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) professions. Building on a general model of factors related to STEMM education and employment, we employ a two-group structural equation model to…

  2. Choosing Teaching Profession as a Career: Students' Reasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balyer, Aydin; Özcan, Kenan

    2014-01-01

    The success of educational change inevitably depends on the quality and performance of teachers. Therefore, the importance of employing high quality teachers is crucial for educational systems. Choosing talented and committed brains to teaching career depends on making it an attractive profession. It is considered that there are some reasons why…

  3. The Careers in Health and Medical Professions Program (CHAMPS): An Impact Study of a University-Based STEM+H Outreach Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Eric W.; Perry, Justin C.; Ferguson, Robert L.; Jackson, Debbie K.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Health (STEM+H) university-based pipeline program, the Careers in Health and Medical Professions Program, over the course of two summers among predominantly African-American high school students recruited from urban school districts (N = 155). Based on…

  4. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Service-Learning: Lessons from the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Kara; Seifer, Sarena; Sebastian, Juliann; Cora-Bramble, Denice; Hart, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Argues that, in the context of the present health care system, interdisciplinary service-learning holds promise for equipping future health professionals with collaborative problem-solving skills needed to effect change in community health care. Describes three models of interdisciplinary service-learning in health professions education, explores…

  5. Health-profession students’ teaching and learning expectations in Ugandan medical schools: pre- and postcommunity placement comparison

    PubMed Central

    Wakida, Edith K; Ruzaaza, Gad; Muggaga, Kintu; Akera, Peter; Oria, Hussein; Kiguli, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The benefits of community-based medical education for both students and teachers are becoming increasingly clear. However, there is paucity of information about the importance of incorporating students’ thoughts in the community-based education curriculum and the impact it has on their intentions to work in rural communities. The purpose of this study was to assess the teaching and learning expectations before and after placement of health-profession students going for community placement for the first time and make suggestions for improvement of the community-based programs. Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey with both structured and unstructured questions. Participants were recruited from four medical schools in Uganda targeting 100% participation of health-profession students going for community placement in 2014. In total, 454 and 305 participants responded to self-administered questionnaires before and after community placement, respectively; and they were from different programs and years of study. Results Students’ learning expectations before placement, in ranking were: community engagement, interpersonal skills, community diagnosis, clinical skills, lifestyle practices, and patient management. After placement, the order of ranking was: interpersonal skills, community engagement, community diagnosis, lifestyle practices, clinical skills, and patient management. Most of the students had prior rural exposure and expected to do community engagement. However, after community placement they indicated having developed interpersonal skills. The various health-profession students were able to harmoniously work together to achieve a common purpose, which they find difficult to do in a classroom environment. Conclusion Having student teams comprised of different health programs and years of study going for community placement together promoted peer-to-peer mentorship and enhanced team building during community placement. PMID:26677345

  6. Attrition from Student Affairs: Perspectives from Those Who Exited the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Sarah M.; Gardner, Megan Moore; Hughes, Carole; Lowery, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Attrition of student affairs professionals is an issue of concern for the profession. This mixed methods study highlights reasons why participants left their student affairs careers. Seven general themes emerged from the study, including burnout, salary issues, career alternatives, work/family conflict, limited advancement, supervisor issues and…

  7. The Elephant in the Room: Deconstructing the Place of Conservatives in the Student Affairs Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisler, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    The student affairs profession places considerable emphasis on the values of diversity, inclusiveness, and social justice as part of its mission to foster the holistic development of college students. Many vocal conservative critics point to these values as evidence of the liberal worldview that they claim dominates the higher education landscape.…

  8. Educational and Career Barriers to the Medical Profession: Perceptions of Underrepresented Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the perception of minority students underrepresented in the medical profession regarding educational and career barriers and to ascertain gender differences on their perceptions. A 30 item educational and career barriers inventory was administered to 97 underrepresented minority (URM) students enrolled in a special premedical…

  9. Attitude of Students towards Teaching Profession in Nigeria: Implications for Education Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egwu, Sarah Oben

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to ascertain attitude of students towards teaching profession in Faculty of Education, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki. A sample of 300 students completed a 15 item questionnaire designed for the study the instrument was validated and the reliability calculated which was 0.92 using Pearson product moment correlation…

  10. To What Extent Do Student Teachers Have the Values Required for the Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales-Vives, Fabia; Camps, Misericordia; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine to what extent the values held by student teachers at the start of a university degree programme coincide with the values that practising teachers consider important for their profession. Our findings show that student teachers and practising teachers have different value profiles, and that there is…

  11. Bridging the Gap between Accounting Students and the Profession: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightweis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the gap between accounting educators and the profession. Research indicates accounting graduates are underprepared for this challenging career. The issue stems from accounting educators who only lecture and accounting students who memorize the information provided in these lectures. Accounting students need opportunities to…

  12. Examining Students' Feelings and Perceptions of Accounting Profession in a Developing Country: The Role of Gender and Student Category

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbawuni, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the preconceived notions accounting students in Ghana have about the accounting profession and whether these perceptions are influenced by gender and student category (graduates and undergraduates). This study was a cross-sectional survey of 516 undergraduate and 78 graduate accounting students from a public university in…

  13. 76 FR 8748 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Number: 93.164. DATES: Key Dates: February 25, 2011 first award cycle deadline date; August 19, 2011...

  14. Using Educational Design Research to Inform Teaching and Learning in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steketee, Carole; Bate, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Teaching has always been at the core of what it means to practice in the health professions. Health professionals generally accept that as part of their role they will be involved in educating future generations in their discipline. However, whilst health professional educators typically have extensive knowledge and skills in their discipline…

  15. Faculty Perspectives of the Educational Needs of At-Risk, Underrepresented Minorities in Health Profession Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Disproportionate numbers of underrepresented minorities (URMs) work in health professions as compared to minority representation in the general population. Meeting the health needs of a population is predicated on health provider racial concordance. A qualitative, phenomenological approach was used to explore 10 faculty participant's lived…

  16. Recurring Bibliography--Education in the Allied Health Professions. Volume 11, April 1978 through March 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Library of Medicine (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    Index Medicus articles listed between April 1978 and March 1979 that focus on education in the health professions are cited in this eleventh annual recurring bibliography. The articles are indexed under subject and author headings. They cover such topics as health occupations, dietetics, continuing education, health manpower, hospital…

  17. Is nursing's image a deterrent to recruiting men into the profession? Male high school students respond.

    PubMed

    Barkley, T W; Kohler, P A

    1992-01-01

    The extremely small number of men choosing the nursing profession as a career, coupled with the continuing shortage of nurses, prompted an investigation of male high school students' opinions about nursing. Kohler and Edwards' Career Questionnaire was administered to 126 male high school students representing grades 9-12 from three area public schools. Findings show that although the majority of subjects have a positive perception of nurses and nursing, the vast majority are not planning on entering the profession. Analysis of subjects' beliefs about nurses' financial status offers a possible explanation. PMID:1608833

  18. Student Services. A Handbook for the Profession. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delworth, Ursula; And Others

    Updated information is presented on various student services to provide student service professionals with ideas for successfully planning, coordinating, delivering, and evaluating student services programs. Six sections contain 24 chapters as follows: (1) professional roots and commitments--"Historical Foundations of Student Services (R. Fenske);…

  19. Promoting minority access to health careers through health profession-public school partnerships: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Davis G; Carline, Jan D

    2006-06-01

    Partnerships between health profession schools and public schools provide a framework for developing comprehensive, creative solutions to the problem of minority underrepresentation in health careers. This review examines the functioning of partner relationships, focusing on elements of the social context that determine success or failure, and stages of partnership development. Influential aspects of the social context include cultural differences between personnel in higher education and K-12 institutions, the resources available to the partnership, and constraints on partnership activity. Stages of the process that partner institutions must negotiate include initiation, ongoing management, and institutionalization. Strategies to improve minority student achievement are reviewed, including specific types of programmatic interventions and best practices. Strategies available to partnerships for improving minority achievement include academic enhancement, science or math instructional enrichment, career awareness and motivation, mentoring, research apprenticeship, reward incentives, and parental involvement. Of these, academic enhancement and instructional enrichment have the greatest potential for improving minority student outcomes. Partnerships need to take a sustained multipronged approach, providing intensive interventions that target students, teachers, and curricula at appropriate educational stages. Documenting program impact is critical for attracting more resources to increase minority access to health careers: sponsoring organizations should dedicate funds for assessment of the partnership's functioning and for rigorous evaluation of interventions. PMID:16723838

  20. A Proposed Curriculum on Death and Dying for the Allied Health Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.

    1980-01-01

    This article summarizes the existing curricular models on death education for health professions students. A proposed course design for allied health professions students modified from Bloch's medical education objectives for a thanatology course is presented. The development of listening skills is given special emphasis. (Author/CT)

  1. Overview to Health Professions Education: Health Education Commission Recommendations for Use in Developing the Illinois Master Plan--Phase IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, J. T.

    Recommendations for the preparation of health professionals in Illinois are made in order to: (1) ensure that an adequate number of health professionals are educated to meet the needs of Illinois citizens; (2) improve the distribution of available health manpower within the State; (3) enhance the access to health professions education programs for…

  2. The Ethics of Our Profession: The Student and Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartoonian, H. Michael

    Student rights and responsibilities vis-a-vis knowledge (methods of study) and purposes of schooling are dealt with. In the area of knowledge, there are two important ethical concerns: students must be able to pursue truth and students have a right to privacy. Turning to the purposes of schooling, it is clear that in social studies education, the…

  3. Clinical and Practicum Education in the Professions: The Student Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralph, Edwin; Wimmer, Randy; Walker, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Undergraduate students in professional education programs typically rate their clinical or practicum experiences as the most important component of their entire pre-service preparation. This essay addresses the value of students' views regarding the effectiveness of practicum programs. We summarize the views of 546 post-practicum students from…

  4. National Workshop on Nutrition Education in Health Professions Schools (Washington, DC, September 30 - October 1, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA. School of Medicine.

    This workshop was designed to provide opportunities for health professional schools to gain from an understanding of: (1) the major issues which face nutrition education; (2) promising practices in nutrition education from leaders in the field; (3) the need for nutrition education for all health professions; and (4) nutrition education curriculum…

  5. Credentialing in the Health, Leisure, and Movement Professions. Trends and Issues Paper No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, Liane M.

    This trends and issues paper considers the emerging presence of credentialing programs in the health, leisure, and movement professions in which such diverse occupations as health education teachers, aerobics instructors, exercise physiologists, dance therapists, community park managers, intramural directors, and military fitness instructors are…

  6. Health Professions Education Facilities in the Non-Profit Sector. 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    In this study of the physical facilities of the nation's health professions schools, all schools of dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry, public health, and veterinary medicine, and all parent institutions of the schools, were surveyed in May of 1973. The major goals of this pioneering survey were to assess the nature and…

  7. Relationships of Academia, Professions and Agencies. Continuing Education in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    These guidelines for relationships of academia, professions, and agencies in mental health were developed for persons responsible for conducting professional continuing education programs in mental health. Following a brief introduction and definitions of terms, content is presented in six sections covering the following areas, respectively: (1)…

  8. Lived Experiences of Female Undergraduate Students, at a Nursing College in Abu Dhabi, about Nursing as a Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantash, Dania Abu; Van Belkum, Corrien

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore the lived experiences of female undergraduate nursing students about nursing as a profession and the circumstances that have influenced their experience. Introduction: Nursing as a profession is a relatively new practice, and thus in the developmental stage, in the UAE. The number of national students (Emirati) who enrol in the…

  9. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices. PMID:24945363

  10. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  11. Student Decision-Making in Selecting Rehabilitation Counseling Programs and Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arokiasamy, Charles; Rajani, Gita; Tracz, Susan; Orteiza, Roslyn

    2007-01-01

    The current and ever-growing shortage of qualified rehabilitation counselors in the country has made recruitment a high priority among rehabilitation counseling programs. This study identified factors that influenced students' decisions to choose or not choose the rehabilitation counseling profession or a particular rehabilitation counseling…

  12. Pointing the profession in the right direction: positive ethical movements among dental students and education.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Brooke

    2008-01-01

    The American Student Dental Association has a substantial stake in the future of the dental profession. ASDA is taking a proactive role in addressing recently publicized cases of academic dishonesty and other ethical problems. Some of these initiatives and a sampling of the positive efforts in dental schools to build sound ethical climates are reviewed. PMID:18777888

  13. Cooperative Learning in Inderdisciplinary Education for the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Bonnie L.

    The concept of cooperative goal structuring was examined, along with the effect of one cooperative learning technique (group consensus examinations) on the perceptions and achievement of college students. Cooperative goal structure exists when students perceive that they can obtain their goal only if the other students with whom they work also…

  14. Recommendations: Health Professions Education. A Report to the Southern Regional Education Board by Its Commission on Health and Human Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Problems facing health professions schools and academic health centers that can damage health were identified by the Southern Regional Education Board, along with recommendations for action within the states. Nine problems for these schools and centers concern: declining applications and enrollments for dental schools and many schools of pharmacy,…

  15. Should Counseling Be Considered a Health Care Profession? Critical Thoughts on the Transition to a Health Care Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2007-01-01

    The counseling profession has increasingly identified with health care ideology. The logical justifications for this transition are critically examined. Ideological and practical consequences of the health care transition are also considered. The author concludes that the usual ways of justifying the transition to health care are insufficient and…

  16. Writing in the Professions: An Internship for Interdisciplinary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourelle, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    This article considers how professional writing courses can prepare students in various disciplines for the workforce. Specifically, I argue for Writing in the Disciplines (WID) internships where students learn to write documents relevant for their careers while participating in practical work experiences. In the WID internships I describe,…

  17. Why Do They Leave? Departure from the Student Affairs Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Tara E.

    2013-01-01

    Departure among student affairs administrators in higher education has been an issue for decades (Evans, 1988; Lorden, 1998; Tull, 2006). Rates of departure from student affairs within the first five years of experience are estimated at 50% to 60% (Holmes, Verrier, & Chisholm, 1983; Lorden, 1998; Tull, 2006). However, there is very little…

  18. Between professional autonomy and economic orientation — The medical profession in a changing health care system

    PubMed Central

    Kälble, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The current discussions surrounding the German health care system are being determined and defined by the concepts of "profitability", "efficiency" and "saving". These concepts also determine the demands made on this system and have had an effect on the medical profession. The economy's growing influence on physicians' decision-making and the increasing necessity to look at and regulate services under economic aspects arising from the need to save costs are seen by the medical profession as a threat to its autonomous conduct and freedom to make decisions, in other words it sees it as a danger to its medical orientation. Conflicts between medical autonomy and economic orientation in physicians' conduct are therefore already foreseeable, as are conflicts between medicine and economy in regards to who has the power to define the terms of the public health system. Objective: This article will outline the area of conflict based on the available literature. It will discuss how the political and economic regulatory attempts affect the medical profession's autonomous conduct. It will also discuss which conflicts of conduct emerge for physicians, what types of solutions the medical profession tends to develop as a reaction, and whether or not this tension between medical and economic orientation can be resolved in an acceptable way. Methodology: This article should first outline the changed economic and political basic conditions and the attempts to reform the German health care system, using this as a starting point. Following this, it will explore the significance professional autonomy acquires within the concept of profession from the point of view of the sociology of professions. With this in mind, the third part of this article will describe and analyze the effects of advanced economization on the medical profession's autonomous conduct, which has long been regarded as uncontested. This part of the article will also describe and analyze the medical profession

  19. Empathy Levels in First- and Third-Year Students in Health and Non-Health Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah E.; Becket, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To compare empathy scores between health professions students (pharmacy and nursing) and non-health professions (law) students and between first- and third-year students. Methods. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy-Student Version was completed by 282 students. Results. Nursing and pharmacy students had significantly more empathy than did law students. Third-year pharmacy students scored higher on empathy than did first-year pharmacy students, whereas the converse was true for nurses. There was no significant difference in empathy between first- and third-year law students. Across the study years, empathy increased among pharmacy students, decreased among nurses, and remained the same among law students. Women scored higher on empathy than did males. Conclusions. Empathy scores among university students vary depending on discipline and year of study. PMID:22438596

  20. The promise of competency-based education in the health professions for improving global health.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Larry D; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S; Kolars, Joseph C

    2012-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) provides a useful alternative to time-based models for preparing health professionals and constructing educational programs. We describe the concept of 'competence' and 'competencies' as well as the critical curricular implications that derive from a focus on 'competence' rather than 'time'. These implications include: defining educational outcomes, developing individualized learning pathways, setting standards, and the centrality of valid assessment so as to reflect stakeholder priorities. We also highlight four challenges to implementing CBE: identifying the health needs of the community, defining competencies, developing self-regulated and flexible learning options, and assessing learners for competence. While CBE has been a prominent focus of educational reform in resource-rich countries, we believe it has even more potential to align educational programs with health system priorities in more resource-limited settings. Because CBE begins with a careful consideration of the competencies desired in the health professional workforce to address health care priorities, it provides a vehicle for integrating the health needs of the country with the values of the profession. PMID:23157696

  1. 76 FR 14417 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles III, VII and VIII of the Public Health Service... nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. These various programs are included in... professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement programs that use the low-income levels to...

  2. 77 FR 22790 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles III, VII and VIII of the Public Health Service... nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. These various programs are included in... professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement programs that use the low-income levels to...

  3. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  4. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Designated Health Science Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in designated health science professions in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements, and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals, mission, values, philosophy, and terminology of accreditation of…

  5. Teaching Clinical Interviewing in the Health Professions: A Review of Empirical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, J. Gregory; Monroe, Judy

    1980-01-01

    A review of 36 empirical studies on teaching interviewing skills in various health profession programs is presented. The focus is on teaching skills which consider the interpersonal skills relevant to effective clinical interviewing. Programs are compared and implications for future research are discussed. (GDC)

  6. The Impact of Word Processing on Office Administration in the Medical and Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Naomi Dornfeld

    The effect of word processing equipment on the future medical secretarial science curriculum was studied. A literature search focused on word processing and the medical and allied health professions, word processing and business education, and futuring of and changes in the secretarial science curriculum. Questionnaires to identify various aspects…

  7. Implementing a Diversity-Orientated Online Graduate-Level Health Professions Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savard, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the strategies implemented in the development of an online Master's degree program in Health Professions Education (HPE) and an online short, Master's level diploma program. The strategies presented pertain to three of the main challenges identified: program cohesiveness, a multidisciplinary approach, and information technology…

  8. Changes in the Composition of the Health Professions Applicant Pool: 1977-1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Health Professions.

    The report synthesizes and summarizes trends in the numbers and characteristics of persons who have applied to selected health professions schools (i.e., allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine) from 1977 to 1987. It is based primarily on data made available by the professional associations of the schools and…

  9. A Study of the Clinical Laboratory Occupations. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The objectives of this study which was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project were: (1) to determine the percent of medical laboratory workers who perform a comprehensive list of tasks and procedures; (2) to evaluate this performance in terms of certification and specialty area; and (3) on the basis of these data, to make…

  10. Women and Minorities in Health Fields: A Trend Analysis of College Freshmen. Volume 1. Freshmen Interested in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmstrom, Engin Inel; And Others

    Just over seven percent of first-time, full-time freshmen in 1966, 1972, and 1974 named a health profession as their long-term career choice. Though the proportion remained fairly stable, the absolute number of aspiring health professionals increased by 37.4 percent over the eight-year period, reflecting the increase in freshmen enrollments. The…