Science.gov

Sample records for health recovery programs

  1. SHPPS 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study--Crisis Preparedness, Response, and Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief presents data on crisis preparedness, response, and recovery as it pertains to health services, mental health and social services, nutrition…

  2. A mental health program for ground zero rescue and recovery workers: cases and observations.

    PubMed

    Katz, Craig L; Smith, Rebecca; Silverton, Marsha; Holmes, Anastasia; Bravo, Carlos; Jones, Kristina; Kiliman, Marta; Lopez, Norma; Malkoff, Laurie; Marrone, Kathryn; Neuman, Alla; Stephens, Tricia; Tavarez, Wendy; Yarowsky, Anne; Levin, Stephen; Herbert, Robin

    2006-09-01

    Clinical vignettes from the World Trade Center Worker and Volunteer Mental Health Monitoring and Treatment Program at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City are presented. The hospital-based program pairs mental health screenings with federally funded occupational medical screenings to identify persons with mental health problems related to their rescue and recovery roles. The program also provides on-site mental health treatment. The cases illustrate the diverse mental health needs of the rescue and recovery workers, some of whom initially sought treatment years after September 11, 2001. The cases show that in addition to symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, workers experienced survivor guilt, distressing memories of childhood trauma, shame associated with intense feelings, substance abuse relapse, psychosis, and problems with family relationships. PMID:16968767

  3. Psychometric properties of an assessment for mental health recovery programs.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Dennis G; Pilon, David; Hershberger, Scott L; Reynolds, Grace L; LaMaster, Stephen C; Davis, Monica

    2009-08-01

    The concept of recovery can be operationalized from either the point of view of the consumer, or from the perspective of the agency providing services. The Milestones of Recovery Scale (MORS) was created to capture aspects of recovery from the agency perspective. Evidence establishing the psychometric properties of the MORS was obtained in three efforts: Inter-rater reliability using staff at The Village, a multi-service organization serving the homeless mentally ill in Long Beach, California; inter-rater reliability was also obtained from Vinfen Corporation, a large provider of housing services to mentally ill persons in Boston, Massachusetts. A test-retest reliability study was conducted using staff rating of clients at The Village, and evidence for validity was obtained using the Level of Care Utilization System (LOCUS) as a validity measure. The intra-class correlation coefficient for the inter-rater reliability study was r = .85 (CI .81, .89) for The Village and r = .86 (CI .80, .90) for Vinfen Corporation; test-retest reliability was r = .85 (CI .81, .87); and validity coefficients for the LOCUS were at or above r = .49 for all subscales except one. There is sufficient evidence for the reliability and validity of the MORS. PMID:19582574

  4. Evaluation of the Waste Tire Resources Recovery Program and Environmental Health Policy in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Ching; Yamada, Tetsuji; Chiu, I-Ming; Liu, Yi-Kuen

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of Taiwanese environmental health policies, whose aim is to improve environmental quality by reducing tire waste via the Tire Resource Recovery Program. The results confirm that implemented environmental health policies improve the overall health of the population (i.e. a decrease in death caused by bronchitis and other respiratory diseases). Current policy expenditures are far below the optimal level, as it is estimated that a ten percent increase in the subsidy would decrease the number of deaths caused by bronchitis and other respiratory diseases by 0.58% per county/city per year on average. PMID:19440434

  5. The Partners in Recovery program: mental health commissioning using value co-creation.

    PubMed

    Cheverton, Jeff; Janamian, Tina

    2016-04-18

    The Australian Government's Partners in Recovery (PIR) program established a new form of mental health intervention which required multiple sectors, services and consumers to work in a more collaborative way. Brisbane North Primary Health Network applied a value co-creation approach with partners and end users, engaging more than 100 organisations in the development of a funding submission to PIR. Engagement platforms were established and continue to provide opportunities for new co-creation experiences. Initially, seven provider agencies - later expanded to eight to include an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander provider organisation - worked collaboratively as a Consortium Management Committee. The co-creation development process has been part of achieving the co-created outcomes, which include new initiatives, changes to existing interventions and referral practices, and an increased understanding and awareness of end users' needs. PMID:27078791

  6. A family-based mental health program of recovery from state terror in Kosova.

    PubMed

    Griffith, James L; Agani, Ferid; Weine, Stevan; Ukshini, Shqipe; Pulleyblank-Coffey, Ellen; Ulaj, Jusuf; Rolland, John; Blyta, Afrim; Kallaba, Melita

    2005-01-01

    Family processes of communication, mutual support, and sustenance of cultural values can play vital roles in recovery from psychological and material damage in societies afflicted by terror. This is particularly the case when a campaign of terror has specifically targeted family life and its traditions, when the culture is one whose identity has been centered in its families, and when public mental health resources have been scarce. At the end of the 1999 war in Kosova, the Kosovar Family Professional Educational Collaborative (KFPEC) was initiated to counter mental health sequelae of war in Kosova. This initiative focused upon the recovery and strengthening of Kosovar families, rather than the psychiatric treatment of individuals for post-traumatic symptoms. Findings and outcomes from this project may usefully inform the design of other international public mental health initiatives. PMID:16094645

  7. Maslow and mental health recovery: a comparative study of homeless programs for adults with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Henwood, Benjamin F; Derejko, Katie-Sue; Couture, Julie; Padgett, Deborah K

    2015-03-01

    This mixed-methods study uses Maslow's hierarchy as a theoretical lens to investigate the experiences of 63 newly enrolled clients of housing first and traditional programs for adults with serious mental illness who have experienced homelessness. Quantitative findings suggests that identifying self-actualization goals is associated with not having one's basic needs met rather than from the fulfillment of basic needs. Qualitative findings suggest a more complex relationship between basic needs, goal setting, and the meaning of self-actualization. Transforming mental health care into a recovery-oriented system will require further consideration of person-centered care planning as well as the impact of limited resources especially for those living in poverty. PMID:24518968

  8. Maslow and Mental Health Recovery: A Comparative Study of Homeless Programs for Adults with Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Derejko, Katie-Sue; Couture, Julie; Padgett, Deborah K.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study uses Maslow’s hierarchy as a theoretical lens to investigate the experiences of 63 newly enrolled clients of housing first and traditional programs for adults with serious mental illness who have experienced homelessness. Quantitative findings suggests that identifying self-actualization goals is associated with not having one’s basic needs met rather than from the fulfillment of basic needs. Qualitative findings suggest a more complex relationship between basic needs, goal setting, and the meaning of self-actualization. Transforming mental health care into a recovery-oriented system will require further consideration of person-centered care planning as well as the impact of limited resources especially for those living in poverty. PMID:24518968

  9. Biomass Program Recovery Act Factsheet

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    The Biomass Program has awarded about $718 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) funds. The projects the Program is supporting are intended to: Accelerate advanced biofuels research, development, and demonstration; Speed the deployment and commercialization of advanced biofuels and bioproducts; Further the U.S. bioindustry through market transformation and creating or saving a range of jobs.

  10. Uses and abuses of recovery: implementing recovery-oriented practices in mental health systems

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Mike; Amering, Michaela; Farkas, Marianne; Hamilton, Bridget; O'Hagan, Mary; Panther, Graham; Perkins, Rachel; Shepherd, Geoff; Tse, Samson; Whitley, Rob

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of recovery as a personal and subjective experience has emerged within mental health systems. This meaning of recovery now underpins mental health policy in many countries. Developing a focus on this type of recovery will involve transformation within mental health systems. Human systems do not easily transform. In this paper, we identify seven mis-uses (“abuses”) of the concept of recovery: recovery is the latest model; recovery does not apply to “my” patients; services can make people recover through effective treatment; compulsory detention and treatment aid recovery; a recovery orientation means closing services; recovery is about making people independent and normal; and contributing to society happens only after the person is recovered. We then identify ten empirically-validated interventions which support recovery, by targeting key recovery processes of connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (the CHIME framework). The ten interventions are peer support workers, advance directives, wellness recovery action planning, illness management and recovery, REFOCUS, strengths model, recovery colleges or recovery education programs, individual placement and support, supported housing, and mental health trialogues. Finally, three scientific challenges are identified: broadening cultural understandings of recovery, implementing organizational transformation, and promoting citizenship. PMID:24497237

  11. Uses and abuses of recovery: implementing recovery-oriented practices in mental health systems.

    PubMed

    Slade, Mike; Amering, Michaela; Farkas, Marianne; Hamilton, Bridget; O'Hagan, Mary; Panther, Graham; Perkins, Rachel; Shepherd, Geoff; Tse, Samson; Whitley, Rob

    2014-02-01

    An understanding of recovery as a personal and subjective experience has emerged within mental health systems. This meaning of recovery now underpins mental health policy in many countries. Developing a focus on this type of recovery will involve transformation within mental health systems. Human systems do not easily transform. In this paper, we identify seven mis-uses ("abuses") of the concept of recovery: recovery is the latest model; recovery does not apply to "my" patients; services can make people recover through effective treatment; compulsory detention and treatment aid recovery; a recovery orientation means closing services; recovery is about making people independent and normal; and contributing to society happens only after the person is recovered. We then identify ten empirically-validated interventions which support recovery, by targeting key recovery processes of connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (the CHIME framework). The ten interventions are peer support workers, advance directives, wellness recovery action planning, illness management and recovery, REFOCUS, strengths model, recovery colleges or recovery education programs, individual placement and support, supported housing, and mental health trialogues. Finally, three scientific challenges are identified: broadening cultural understandings of recovery, implementing organizational transformation, and promoting citizenship. PMID:24497237

  12. Communicating health risks to the community from a state-of-the art waste-to-energy resource recovery facility through multimedia environmental monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, R.K.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1986, when Montgomery County, Maryland decided to construct a municipal solid waste Resource Recovery Facility (RRF), the County has been seeking citizen input through citizen advisory committee meetings. Due to public concern that organics, primarily dioxins, that are released from municipal waste combustion create the risk of potential health-effects including cancer, the County conducted a multiple pathway health-risk study in 1989. In this study, organics and trace metals that are known to be released from municipal waste combustors and are generally considered to be of importance from a public health perspective were addressed. The County conducted several citizen meetings for communicating the results of the health risk studies. In these meetings, some citizens living in the neighborhood of the facility still expressed concern, and asked the County to conduct an ambient monitoring program prior to and during the operation of the facility. The County agreed to conduct a multimedia environmental monitoring program. The County Council endorsed this program. The major objective of the program was to determine the existing background levels of toxics prior to the operation of the facility and incremental increases, if any, resulting from the operation of the facility. In this program organics and trace metals discussed earlier, were periodically sampled. The media sampled were: air, soil, garden vegetables, surface water, fish and sediment from the farm ponds, dairy milk and hay. This paper discusses the original design of the program, citizen input to the design of the program, results of the program, and typical issues raised by the citizens in numerous public briefing conducted by the County, and the County's responses.

  13. Rasch analysis of the Mental Health Recovery Measure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yen-Ching; Ailey, Sarah H; Heller, Tamar; Chen, Ming-De

    2013-01-01

    Consumer-oriented recovery among people with mental illness has been discussed for more than two decades, but few reliable and valid recovery measurements are currently available. This study used Rasch methods to assess the Mental Health Recovery Measure (MHRM). Participants were 156 adults with mental illness who lived in the community. After the Rasch analyses, the MHRM was modified to a 26-item measure with a 4-point Likert scale. Unidimensionality was confirmed for the revised MHRM, and it also showed proper rating scale functioning and high reliability. The revised MHRM is sufficient to assess only those in the initial and middle stages of recovery. More high-recovery-level items are needed to assess people in a high-recovery stage. Occupational therapists can use the revised MHRM in future quantitative studies and program evaluation. PMID:23791322

  14. Evaluating a measure of social health derived from two mental health recovery measures: the California Quality of Life (CA-QOL) and Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program Consumer Survey (MHSIP).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jordan A; Sarkin, Andrew J; Levack, Ashley E; Sklar, Marisa; Tally, Steven R; Gilmer, Todd P; Groessl, Erik J

    2011-08-01

    Social health is important to measure when assessing outcomes in community mental health. Our objective was to validate social health scales using items from two broader commonly used measures that assess mental health outcomes. Participants were 609 adults receiving psychological treatment services. Items were identified from the California Quality of Life (CA-QOL) and Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program (MHSIP) outcome measures by their conceptual correspondence with social health and compared to the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ) using correlational analyses. Pearson correlations for the identified CA-QOL and MSHIP items with the SFQ ranged from .42 to .62, and the identified scale scores produced Pearson correlation coefficients of .56, .70, and, .70 with the SFQ. Concurrent validity with social health was supported for the identified scales. The current inclusion of these assessment tools allows community mental health programs to include social health in their assessments. PMID:20878235

  15. [Mental health mainstreaming: promotion and recovery].

    PubMed

    Chang, Chueh; Hsieh, Chia-Jung

    2014-02-01

    Mental health is a human right and fundamental to good personal health. Developing, planning, and implementing mental health programs is a key part of health policies worldwide. This paper uses the perspective of "mental health mainstreaming" to define mental health and explore its relationship with mental illness and psychiatric disease. Further, we apply this perspective to Taiwan's three-tiered community mental illness prevention strategy as a reference for mental health promotion and rehabilitation programs in hopes that all healthcare providers help facilitate holistic community health. PMID:24519340

  16. Resource Recovery Overview [Teacher's Guide]; Resource Recovery and You [Student Book]. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The Resource Recovery Education Program contains a variety of ideas, approaches, and learning aids for teaching about solid waste disposal at the secondary level. The program kit consists of a teacher's guide which provides an overview; separate teacher's guides for social studies, science, and industrial arts; a student booklet of readings; and a…

  17. Continuing Day Treatment Programs Promote Recovery in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Continuing day treatment programs focus on community stabilization through comprehensive individualized rehabilitation. They promote recovery through a variety of practical clinical therapeutic interventions. This empirically based report describes a continuing day treatment program’s rehabilitation of four clients with schizophrenia, chronic type in a western New York mental health clinic who were in each of the specialty services: a two-phase program, a program for seniors, and a program for co-occurring substance dependence. Some particularly difficult psychiatric symptoms of schizophrenia were successfully treated in this continuing day treatment program. Each of these clients showed improvements in their symptoms and overall community adjustment that may well have been unobtainable with less intensive outpatient treatment. PMID:19724730

  18. Recovery in Austria: mental health trialogue.

    PubMed

    Amering, Michaela; Mikus, Monika; Steffen, Sigrid

    2012-02-01

    The active involvement of service users and relatives and friends is essential for the development of recovery-orientated mental health practice and research. However, accepting each other as equally entitled experts is still a challenge. In trialogue groups users, carers and friends and mental health workers meet regularly in an open forum that is located on 'neutral terrain' - outside any therapeutic, familial or institutional context - with the aim of discussing the experiences and consequences of mental health problems and ways forward. Trialogues offer new possibilities for gaining knowledge and insights and developing new ways of communicating beyond role stereotypes. They also function as the basis and starting point for trialogic activities on different levels, e.g. serving on quality control boards or teaching in trialogic teams, and different topics, e.g. a task force on stigma busting or a work group on trauma and psychosis. In German-speaking countries well over a hundred trialogue groups are regularly attended by altogether about 5,000 people. International interest and experiences are growing fast. Trialogues facilitate a discrete and independent form of acquisition and production of knowledge and drive relevant changes in forms of communication as well as in structures. PMID:22385422

  19. Phase recovery based on quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan Bing; Ge, Xiao Juan; Cheng, Ya Dong; Ni, Na

    2014-11-01

    Most of the information of optical wavefront is encoded in the phase which includes more details of the object. Conventional optical measuring apparatus is relatively easy to record the intensity of light, but can not measure the phase of light directly. Thus it is important to recovery the phase from the intensity measurements of the object. In recent years, the methods based on quadratic programming such as PhaseLift and PhaseCut can recover the phase of general signal exactly for overdetermined system. To retrieve the phase of sparse signal, the Compressive Phase Retrieval (CPR) algorithm combines the l1-minimization in Compressive Sensing (CS) with low-rank matrix completion problem in PhaseLift, but the result is unsatisfied. This paper focus on the recovery of the phase of sparse signal and propose a new method called the Compressive Phase Cut Retrieval (CPCR) by combining the CPR algorithm with the PhaseCut algorithm. To ensure the sparsity of the recovered signal, we use CPR method to solve a semi-definite programming problem firstly. Then apply linear transformation to the recovered signal, and set the phase of the result as the initial value of the PhaseCut problem. We use TFOCS (a library of Matlab-files) to implement the proposed CPCR algorithm in order to improve the recovered results of the CPR algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can improve the accuracy of the CPR algorithm, and overcome the shortcoming of the PhaseCut method that it can not recover the sparse signal effectively.

  20. Teaching Resource Recovery in Industrial Arts. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (See SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level industrial arts classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to understand that litter represents a small but highly visible portion of our…

  1. Teaching Resource Recovery in Science. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (see SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level science classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to understand that sufficient technology exists to recover a greater segment of the…

  2. Teaching Resource Recovery in Social Studies. Resource Recovery Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Resource Recovery, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide, one component of the Resource Recovery Education Kit (see SO 007 866 for a description), contains ideas and activities for teaching about solid waste disposal in secondary level social studies classes. Among the course objectives are the following: (1) to explore the impact of our society on the problem of solid waste and the need for…

  3. Facilitating College Students' Recovery through the Use of Collegiate Recovery Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePue, M. Kristina; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an untapped resource that counselors can use to help serve the multiple needs of college students recovering from addiction: collegiate recovery programs. The authors provide detailed information about the collegiate recovery population and give examples of successful programs. Implications for future research are discussed,…

  4. National Weatherization Assistance Program Characterization Describing the Recovery Act Period

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Hawkins, Beth A.

    2015-10-01

    This report characterizes the U.S. Department of Energy s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) during the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) period. This research was one component of the Recovery Act evaluation of WAP. The report presents the results of surveys administered to Grantees (i.e., state weatherization offices) and Subgrantees (i.e., local weatherization agencies). The report also documents the ramp up and ramp down of weatherization production and direct employment during the Recovery Act period and other challenges faced by the Grantees and Subgrantees during this period. Program operations during the Recovery Act (Program Year 2010) are compared to operations during the year previous to the Recovery Act (Program Year 2008).

  5. Getting the Most from Your Reading Recovery[R] Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Noel K.

    1998-01-01

    This paper focuses on the administrative support needed to establish a Reading Recovery program that works effectively at school and district levels. It first establishes three important ideas for Reading Recovery to work: leadership is required; change cannot be accomplished in one or two years; and program effectiveness is dependent upon the…

  6. High efficiency shale oil recovery. [Kilntrol program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The overall project objective is to demonstrate the high efficiency of the Adams Counter-Current shale oil recovery process. The efficiency is first being demonstrated at bench scale, in the current phase, after which the demonstration will be extended to the operation of a small pilot plant. Thus the immediate project objective is to obtain data on oil shale retorting operations in a small batch rotary kiln that will be representative of operations in the proposed continuous process pilot plant. This batch kiln is a unit constructed in a 1987 Phase I SBIR tar sand retorting project. The kiln worked fairly well in that project; however, the need for certain modifications was observed. These modifications, now completed, provide for a great improvement in the operation and make the data and analysis more exact. Last quarter we reported on equipment modifications and refurbishments which resulted in a sophisticated analytical rotary kiln. As we began operating the equipment this quarter, we observed that the software package was inadequate for our purpose and that the appropriate software could not be purchased as a shelf item. Therefore, we were required to modify the equipment interface and to write our own software. The quartz sand kiln calibration runs have been completed and the results are included in this report. Computer Interface: The computer interface was designed on CTR-05, DAS-08 and MUX-32 Boards from ComputerBoards Inc. We purchased a software program, Control EG by Quinn-Curtis, to use with these boards. As we began operating the equipment we realized that the software control was inadequately sensitive for our system as it would not provide time-proportioning output. This problem was resolved by writing our own software and providing time-proportioning duty cycles for the output to each of five heaters. We have entitled this program Kilntrol.'' It is included in the Appendix of this report.

  7. Flight crew health stabilization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flight crew health stabilization program was developed to minimize or eliminate the possibility of adverse alterations in the health of flight crews during immediate preflight, flight, and postflight periods. The elements of the program, which include clinical medicine, immunology, exposure prevention, and epidemiological surveillance, are discussed briefly. No crewmember illness was reported for the missions for which the program was in effect.

  8. Mental Health Treatment Program Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

  9. The Ramathibodi Community Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, Prem; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The Ramathibodi Faculty of Medicine in Bangkok, Thailand, has developed a teaching and research program in community health aimed at brining the institution into close association with the health needs of the country. (Editor)

  10. Measuring Mental Health Recovery: An Application of Rasch Modeling to the Consumer Recovery Measure.

    PubMed

    Lusczakoski, Kathryn Kd; Olmos-Gallo, P Antonio; Milnor, William; McKinney, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    As the need for recovery-oriented outcomes increases, it is critical to understand how numeric recovery scores are developed. In the current article, the modern Rasch modeling techniques were applied to establish numeric scores of consumers' perceptions of recovery. A sample of 1,973 adult consumers at a community-based mental health center (57.5% male; average age of 47 years old) completed the 15-item Consumer Recovery Measure. A confirmatory factor analysis revealed the unidimensional nature of the Consumer Recovery Measure and provided construct validity evidence. The Rasch analysis displayed that the items produced acceptable model fit, reliability, and identified the difficulty of the items. The conclusion emphasizes the value of Rasch modeling regarding the measurement of recovery and its relevance to consumer-derived assessments in the clinical decision-making process. PMID:24870400

  11. The Mental Health Recovery Movement and Family Therapy, Part II: A Collaborative, Appreciative Approach for Supporting Mental Health Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehart, Diane R.

    2012-01-01

    A continuation of Part I, which introduced mental health recovery concepts to family therapists, Part II of this article outlines a collaborative, appreciative approach for working in recovery-oriented contexts. This approach draws primarily upon postmodern therapies, which have numerous social justice and strength-based practices that are easily…

  12. The recovery of Bay State Health Care.

    PubMed

    Maltz, D L

    1994-03-01

    Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Massachusetts acquired Bay State Health Care after the HMO's tumultuous downturn. The case study described herein provides a useful lesson in the moves that must be made, particularly in an era of health care consolidation and intensive competition, to maintain health plan stability and reinforce its position in the marketplace. PMID:10133054

  13. 50 CFR 679.45 - IFQ cost recovery program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 679.45 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fishing Quota Management Measures § 679.45 IFQ cost recovery program. (a) Cost recovery fees—(1... the fee liability for GAF is not subject to challenge. If the IFQ permit holder revises NMFS'...

  14. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  15. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  16. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  17. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  18. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  19. Predictors of recovery-oriented competencies among mental health professionals in one community mental health system.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Jennifer; Rocha, Anita; Christian, Ann; Johnson, David

    2014-11-01

    A survey of 813 mental health professionals serving adults with severe mental illness clustered in 25 community mental health centers assessed the extent to which mental health professionals possess clinical competencies that support recovery and the predictors of these competencies. The results suggest there is room for improvement in recovery-oriented competencies. In-depth professional training in recovery, greater job variety, more years practicing in mental health, participation on an intensive case management team, and perceptions of workplace recovery culture were predictors of recovery-oriented competencies. Prioritization of on-going professional, worker retention, and management strategies that incorporate a team approach to treatment and improvements in workplace recovery culture may potentially increase recovery-oriented clinical practice. PMID:24510273

  20. Revitalizing school health programs worldwide.

    PubMed

    Benzian, Habib

    2010-10-01

    Each year, the Shils Fund recognizes outstanding activities that help improve oral health. The program is named in memory of Dr. Edward B. Shils, who led the Dental Manufacturers of America and Dental Dealers of America for more than 50 years. A 2010 Shils Award will be given to an innovative school health initiative called Fit For Schools Program (FFSP) in the Philippines. Such recognition in the US indicates the lessons that can be learned from a program initially tailored for another country. Health in a highly industrialized nation can be enhanced by heeding the FFSP principles used to craft an effective health promotion initiative. This evidence-based intervention is not exclusively an oral health initiative; it is an integration with other evidence-based health interventions and models a sustainable public-private partnership to advance positive health outcomes in socially responsible entrepreneurial ways. As the editor of this column in Compendium, I wish to applaud both leaders of FFSP: Dr. Habib Benzian and Dr. Bella Monse. The following article was written by the senior advisor, Dr. Benzian, who modestly refers to the program's receipt of another award from the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, and the World Health Organization in 2009. To my knowledge, the presentation of that award was the first time a health promotion project led by dentists has ever received such high-level global recognition and was one of three projects so recognized for innovative solutions to global health in that year. PMID:20960987

  1. Recovery and mental health: a review of the British literature.

    PubMed

    Bonney, S; Stickley, T

    2008-03-01

    Recovery is not a new concept within mental health, although in recent times, it has come to the forefront of the policy agenda. However, there is no universal definition of recovery, and it is a contested concept. The aim of this study was to examine the British literature relating to recovery in mental health. Three contributing groups are identified: service users, health care providers and policy makers. A review of the literature was conducted by accessing all relevant published texts. A search was conducted using these terms: 'recovery', 'schizophrenia', 'psychosis', 'mental illness' and 'mental health'. Over 170 papers were reviewed. A thematic analysis was conducted. Six main themes emerged, which were examined from the perspective of the stakeholder groups. The dominant themes were identity, the service provision agenda, the social domain, power and control, hope and optimism, risk and responsibility. Consensus was found around the belief that good quality care should be made available to service users to promote recovery both as inpatient or in the community. However, the manner in which recovery was defined and delivered differed between the groups. PMID:18211561

  2. Revictimization and recovery from sexual assault: implications for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Vania; Speer, Susan A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-seven adult females' responses from an online qualitative questionnaire were analyzed to explore their views on being recovered from an experience of sexual assault, and identify aspects of their postassault health service encounters that facilitated or impeded their recovery process. Being recovered involved accepting the experience, being freed from negative states, regaining control and trust, and receiving help from and being believed by others. Participants predominantly reported negative experiences with health services. Factors perceived as impeding the recovery process include health professionals' inexperience in dealing with survivors of sexual assault, adhering to rape myths and stereotypes, and disrespectful or inconsiderate treatment of survivors. We argue that these postassault negative experiences revictimized survivors. Addressing these factors may reduce revictimization, facilitate recovery, and decrease assaulted women's long-term use of health services. PMID:23763112

  3. Art Making as a Mental Health Recovery Tool for Change and Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Lith, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic benefits of art making may be implicated in how and why people with mental illness turn to art therapy to aid their recovery. In this longitudinal multiple case study adult participants (N = 12) with severe and ongoing mental illness were recruited through their involvement in diverse community mental health art therapy programs. An…

  4. Environmental health program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  5. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  6. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health System. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  7. 76 FR 1441 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  8. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  9. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  10. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Area Primary Health Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  11. Credit Recovery Programs. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Credit recovery programs" allow high school students to recover course credit, through in-school, online, or mixed modes, for classes they previously failed. The WWC reviewed the research on these programs and their impacts on middle school, junior high school, or high school students at risk of dropping out or who have already dropped…

  12. An Operating Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipana, J. G.; Masters, R. L.; Winter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some concepts of an operational program for medical and environmental health are outlined. Medical services of this program are primarily concerned with emergency care, laboratory examinations, advice to private physician with patient permission, medical monitoring activities, and suggestions for treatment or control of the malfunction.

  13. What is a Christian faith-based recovery program?

    PubMed

    Timmons, Shirley M

    2011-01-01

    No descriptions of faith-based recovery programs (FBRPs) that include explicit religious content and activities were found searching 2004-2010 electronic databases. This article describes an underdocumented FBRP: an evangelical Christian faith-based recovery home (FBRH) known as The Potters House Restoration Ministries, to increase awareness about a FBRP that incorporates explicitly religious components, and reiterates the call for better description of FBRPs so that replication and evaluation of outcomes are possible. PMID:21853717

  14. Programmed Multiphasic Health Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershberg, P. I.

    1970-01-01

    Multiphase health screening procedures are advocated for detection and prevention of disease at an early stage through risk factor analysis. The use of an automated medical history questionnaire together with scheduled physical examination data provides a scanning input for computer printout. This system makes it possible to process laboratory results from 1,000 to 2,000 patients for biochemical determinations on an economically feasible base.

  15. Formative evaluation: Developing measures for online family mental health recovery education.

    PubMed

    Rue, Lisa A; Estrada, Samantha; Floren, Michael; MacKinnon, Krista

    2016-04-01

    Families facing mental health challenges have very limited access to ongoing support. A formative evaluation of Families Healing Together (FHT), a new online family mental health recovery program was conducted using five waves (N=108) of data. Exploratory factor analysis of the measures identified as important to the program theory found strong reliability evidence (α=.77-.86) for 6 constructs. A poor response rate (25%) did not allow for valid pre and postoutcome evaluation, however we did have enough information to assess the psychometric properties of the new measures. The new evaluation tool accounted for 34% of the variance in Capacity to Support Family Member, and nearly 50% of the variance in Hopefulness toward Recovery. New programs without existing measures require formative evaluation strategies that accurately describe program activities in order to develop outcome measures sensitive to novel aspects of program components. Most outcome measures are developed for individuals with mental health challenges not family members. These new measures may be beneficial to effectively evaluate programs that promote family recovery and wellness. PMID:26702882

  16. Characteristics of students participating in Collegiate Recovery Programs: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, Alexandre B.; Harris, Kitty; Kimball, Thomas; Winters, Ken C.; Moberg, D. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Relapse rates are high among individuals with substance use disorders (SUD), and for young people pursuing a college education, the high rates of substance use on campus can jeopardize recovery. Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs) are an innovative campus-based model of recovery support that is gaining popularity but remains under-investigated. This study reports on the first nationwide survey of CRP-enrolled students (N = 486 from 29 different CRPs). Using an online survey, we collected information on background, SUD and recovery history, and current functioning. Most students (43% females, mean age = 26) had used multiple substances, had high levels of SUD severity, high rates of treatment and 12-step participation. Fully 40% smoke. Many reported criminal justice involvement and periods of homelessness. Notably, many reported being in recovery from, and currently engaging in multiple behavioral addictions-e.g., eating disorders, and sex and love addiction. Findings highlight the high rates of co-occurring addictions in this under-examined population and underline the need for treatment, recovery support programs and college health services to provide integrated support for mental health and behavioral addictions to SUD-affected young people. PMID:25481690

  17. Characteristics of students participating in collegiate recovery programs: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Laudet, Alexandre B; Harris, Kitty; Kimball, Thomas; Winters, Ken C; Moberg, D Paul

    2015-04-01

    Relapse rates are high among individuals with substance use disorders (SUD), and for young people pursuing a college education, the high rates of substance use on campus can jeopardize recovery. Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs) are an innovative campus-based model of recovery support that is gaining popularity but remains under-investigated. This study reports on the first nationwide survey of CRP-enrolled students (N = 486 from 29 different CRPs). Using an online survey, we collected information on background, SUD and recovery history, and current functioning. Most students (43% females, mean age =26) had used multiple substances, had high levels of SUD severity, high rates of treatment and 12-step participation. Fully 40% smoke. Many reported criminal justice involvement and periods of homelessness. Notably, many reported being in recovery from, and currently engaging in multiple behavioral addictions-e.g., eating disorders, and sex and love addiction. Findings highlight the high rates of co-occurring addictions in this under-examined population and underline the need for treatment, recovery support programs and college health services to provide integrated support for mental health and behavioral addictions to SUD--affected young people. PMID:25481690

  18. An Online Recovery Plan Program: Can Peer Coaching Increase Participation?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gregory E.; Cutsogeorge, Dona; Ludman, Evette J.; Operskalski, Belinda; Goodale, Lisa C.; Savarino, James; Dykstra, Donna M.; Pabiniak, Chester; Stone, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective A pilot study evaluated whether the addition of online coaching from a peer specialist increased participation in an online program featuring educational and interactive modules to promote self-management of bipolar disorder. Methods A total of 118 participants with bipolar disorder recruited from online and in-person support groups and clinical settings were enrolled in MyRecoveryPlan. Half the group was randomly assigned to receive online coaching support from a certified peer specialist. Results Participants offered online peer coaching were more likely to return to the program after registration (71% versus 44%, p=.005) and to continue using the program after three weeks (38% versus 9%, p<.001). This pattern was consistent for all program elements. Conclusions The addition of online coaching from a peer specialist significantly increased engagement and retention in the program, but further research is needed to evaluate the program’s effects on clinical and recovery outcomes. PMID:21632737

  19. 75 FR 73110 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Room AIDS Ministry, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  20. 75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Cornerstone Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  1. 78 FR 25457 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Center, Inc. for provision of services in Gwinnett County, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Health Resources...

  2. In College and in Recovery: Reasons for Joining a Collegiate Recovery Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudet, Alexandre B.; Harris, Kitty; Kimball, Thomas; Winters, Ken C.; Moberg, D. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs), a campus-based peer support model for students recovering from substance abuse problems, grew exponentially in the past decade, yet remain unexplored. Methods: This mixed-methods study examines students' reasons for CRP enrollment to guide academic institutions and referral sources. Students (N =…

  3. Behaviour Recovery: A Whole-School Program for Mainstream Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Bill

    This book offers guidance on teaching behavior to children with behavior problems, based on the premise that a small percentage of children need one-to-one modeling and rehearsal to enable them to "recover" the behaviors that those in the typical range have established already. The behavior recovery program emphasizes the whole-school nature of…

  4. Health Occupations Extended Campus Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likhite, Vivek

    A Health Occupations Program designed as an integrated science course offers students at Evanston Township High School (Illinois) an opportunity to master science skills, content, and laboratory techniques while working and studying within local hospitals (the Evanston Hospital and St. Francis Hospital) as well as within their high school…

  5. 78 FR 54256 - Health Careers Opportunity Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Careers Opportunity Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive...

  6. Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program - The State Energy Program and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-01

    To help the nation weather the ongoing economic downturn and meet key energy goals, the State Energy Program (SEP) will invest $3.1 billion from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) for additional grants. These grants do not require matching state funds.

  7. Illness management and recovery (IMR) in Danish community mental health centres

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are severe mental illnesses that can have a significant disabling impact on the lives of people. Psychosocial interventions that stress hope and recovery as a part of a multi-dimensional approach are possibly indicated to support people with severe mental illness in facilitating recovery. Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) is a curriculum-based psychosocial intervention designed as structured program with a recovery-oriented approach. The aim of IMR is to rehabilitate people with severe mental illnesses by helping them acquire knowledge and skills in managing their illness and achieve personal recovery goals. Previous randomised clinical trials indicate that IMR can be implemented with a good effect and a high fidelity though further trials are crucial to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of IMR. Methods/Design The trial design is a randomised, assessor-blinded, multi-centre, clinical trial of the IMR program compared with treatment as usual for 200 participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder under the care of two community mental health centres in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is level of functioning at the end of treatment. The secondary outcomes are disease symptoms; use of alcohol/drugs; individual meaning of recovery; hope; hospital admissions and out-patient psychiatric treatment at the end of treatment and the abovementioned and level of functioning at follow-up 21 months after baseline. Discussion If the results of this trial show IMR to be effective these positive results will strengthen the evidence of IMR as an effective comprehensive psychosocial intervention with a recovery-oriented approach for people with severe mental illness. This will have significant implications for the treatment and recovery of people with severe mental illness. Trial registration Registration number NCT01361698. PMID:21849024

  8. Directory of Health Education Programs for Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Kansas City. Center on Rural Elderly.

    Health education programs for older adults can be an efficient and cost-effective way to meet the challenge of a healthy old age. This directory describes 36 health education programs for the rural elderly in the areas of comprehensive programs, mental health, nutrition, physical health (including exercise), medication, safety, and health…

  9. Migrant Education Health Program 1990. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    The Colorado Migrant Education Program and the Colorado Migrant Health Program (CMHP) together plan and implement a comprehensive health program for migrant summer school students on a yearly basis. This report provides statistical data about the health status of the migrant students and the health services provided to them during the 1990…

  10. Recovery stories: An anthropological exploration of moral agency in stories of mental health recovery.

    PubMed

    Myers, Neely Anne Laurenzo

    2016-08-01

    Moral agency has been loosely defined as the freedom to aspire to a "good life" that makes possible intimate relationships with others. This article uses ethnographic research to further the discussion of the role of moral agency in mental health recovery. This article attends to the ebb and flow of moral agency in the life stories of three people diagnosed with a serious psychiatric disability at different stages in their individual recoveries to illustrate particular aspects of moral agency relevant for recovery. From these, a more complex notion of moral agency emerges as the freedom not only to aspire to a "good life," but also to achieve a "good" life through having both the intention to aspire and access to resources that help bring one's life plans to fruition. Each storyteller describes an initial Aristotelian peripeteia, or "breach" of life plan, followed by an erosion of moral agency and sense of connection to others. The stories then diverge: some have the resources needed to preserve moral agency, and others attempt to replenish moral agency that has been eroded. In these stories, the resources for preserving and nourishing moral agency include the ability to cultivate the social bases of self-respect, autobiographical power, and peopled opportunities. These stories cumulatively suggest that without such resources one's attempts to preserve or nourish the moral agency needed for recovery after the peripeteia, which is often perpetuated by the onset and experience of serious mental illness, may fall short. PMID:27578861

  11. Designing and managing successful endangered species recovery programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Tim W.; Crete, Ron; Cada, John

    1989-03-01

    Endangered species recovery is characterized by complexity and uncertainty in both its biological and organizational aspects. To improve performance in the organizational dimension, some models of organizations are briefly introduced with an emphasis on the organization as a system for processing information, i.e., for successfully dealing with the high uncertainty in the task environment. A strong task orientation,which rewards achievement of the primary goal, is suggested as ideal for this task, as is generative rationality, which encourages workers to observe, critique, and generate new ideas. The parallel organization—a flexible, participatory, problem-solving structure set up alongside traditional bureaucracies—is offered as a useful structure for meeting the demands of uncertainties encountered during recovery. Task forces and projects teams can be set up as parallel organizations. Improved managerial functions include coordinating roles to facilitate the flow and use of information; decision making to avoid “groupthink”—the defects, symptoms, and countermeasures are described; and productive, active management of the inevitable conflict. The inability of organizations to solve dilemmas, to examine their own structures and management, and to change themselves for more effective, efficient, and equitable performance is seen as the major obstacle to improved recovery programs. Some recommendations for effecting change in bureaucracies are made along with a call for case studies detailing the organizational dimensions of endangered species recovery programs.

  12. Space radiation health program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Radiation Health Program intends to establish the scientific basis for the radiation protection of humans engaged in the exploration of space, with particular emphasis on the establishment of a firm knowledge base to support cancer risk assessment for future planetary exploration. This document sets forth the technical and management components involved in the implementation of the Space Radiation Health Program, which is a major part of the Life Sciences Division (LSD) effort in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). For the purpose of implementing this program, the Life Sciences Division supports scientific research into the fundamental mechanisms of radiation effects on living systems and the interaction of radiation with cells, tissues, and organs, and the development of instruments and processes for measuring radiation and its effects. The Life Sciences Division supports researchers at universities, NASA field centers, non-profit research institutes and national laboratories; establishes interagency agreements for cooperative use and development of facilities; and conducts a space-based research program using available and future spaceflight vehicles.

  13. GRACE: Public Health Recovery Methods following an Environmental Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, ER; Whittle, N; Wright, L; McKeown, RE; Sprayberry, K; Heim, M; Caldwell, R; Gibson, JJ; Vena, J.

    2014-01-01

    Different approaches are necessary when Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) of environmental illness is initiated after an environmental disaster within a community. Often such events are viewed as golden scientific opportunities to do epidemiological studies. However, we believe that in such circumstances, community engagement and empowerment needs to be integrated into the public health service efforts in order for both those and any science to be successful, with special care being taken to address the immediate health needs of the community first rather than the pressing needs to answer important scientific questions. We will demonstrate how we have simultaneously provided valuable public health service, embedded generalizable scientific knowledge, and built a successful foundation for supplemental CBPR through our on-going recovery work after the chlorine gas disaster in Graniteville, South Carolina. PMID:20439226

  14. Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.

    2010-01-01

    This document establishes the policy and procedures for the HSP and is authorized through the Director, Johnson Space Center (JSC). This document delineates the medical operations requirements for the HSP. The HSP goals are accomplished through an awareness campaign and procedures such as limiting access to flight crewmembers, medical screening, and controlling flight crewmember activities. NASA's Human Space Flight Program uses strategic risk mitigation to achieve mission success while protecting crew health and safety. Infectious diseases can compromise crew health and mission success, especially in the immediate preflight period. The primary purpose of the Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program (HSP) is to mitigate the risk of occurrence of infectious disease among astronaut flight crews in the immediate preflight period. Infectious diseases are contracted through direct person-to-person contact, and through contact with infectious material in the environment. The HSP establishes several controls to minimize crew exposure to infectious agents. The HSP provides a quarantine environment for the crew that minimizes contact with potentially infectious material. The HSP also limits the number of individuals who come in close contact with the crew. The infection-carrying potential of these primary contacts (PCs) is minimized by educating them in ways to avoid infections and avoiding contact with the crew if they are or may be sick. The transmission of some infectious diseases can be greatly curtailed by vaccinations. PCs are strongly encouraged to maintain updated vaccinations.

  15. Early Childhood Health--Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lawrence S.

    The Maimonides Early Childhood Health-Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program is described. The program provides a broad range of preventive services to children who are five years of age and younger. Services are organized into Post-Natal and Pre-School Programs. The Post-Natal Program offers group education and counseling, individual…

  16. Investment recovery program at Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotcamp, R.T. )

    1993-01-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Company's pioneering investment recovery program was initiated in 1984, Its mission is to dispose of company assets classified as obsolete, scrap, surplus, or retired capital equipment that results from company operations or work projects. These assets include items such as scrap wire, pipe, line hardware, transformers, power station equipment, crates of dusty telephone modems and computer monitors, pallets of residential gas and electric meters, a box of toilet paper holders, burned-out light bulbs, chunks of electric cable, brass and copper valves, electric bills from 1952, and a dozen tattered office chairs. It was risky for Niagara Mohawk to commit money to a program that created a scrap company inside a utility and is not the core business. No one regrets the decision to create and expand investment recovery. The program has contributed more than $35,000,000 ($8,140,585 nuclear division) of cash receipts with an additional $5,000,000 of cost avoidance since its inception. The program has credited these dollars back to the operating departments, which has reduced operating costs thereby improving the [open quotes]bottom line.[close quotes

  17. Microbial enhanced oil recovery and wettability research program

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.P.; Bala, G.A.; Duvall, M.L.

    1991-07-01

    This report covers research results for the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and wettability research program conducted by EG G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The isolation and characterization of microbial species collected from various locations including target oil field environments is underway to develop more effective oil recovery systems for specific applications. The wettability research is a multi-year collaborative effort with the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center (NMPRRC), to evaluate reservoir wettability and its effects on oil recovery. Results from the wettability research will be applied to determine if alteration of wettability is a significant contributing mechanism for MEOR systems. Eight facultatively anaerobic surfactant producing isolates able to function in the reservoir conditions of the Minnelusa A Sands of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming were isolated from naturally occurring oil-laden environments. Isolates were characterized according to morphology, thermostability, halotolerance, growth substrates, affinity to crude oil/brine interfaces, degradative effects on crude oils, and biochemical profiles. Research at the INEL has focused on the elucidation of microbial mechanisms by which crude oil may be recovered from a reservoir and the chemical and physical properties of the reservoir that may impact the effectiveness of MEOR. Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 (ATCC 39307) has been used as a benchmark organism to quantify MEOR of medium weight crude oils (17.5 to 38.1{degrees}API) the capacity for oil recovery of Bacillus licheniformis JF-2 utilizing a sucrose-based nutrient has been elucidated using Berea sandstone cores. Spacial distribution of cells after microbial flooding has been analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Also the effect of microbial surfactants on the interfacial tensions (IFT) of aqueous/crude oil systems has been measured. 87 refs., 60 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. [Medications and financing of health systems in Third World countries. Cost recovery: a concept to review].

    PubMed

    Velasquez, G

    1989-01-01

    During the 1960s most African countries declared that health care would be free in their newly independent countries. Unfortunately, the health care systems inherited from colonial days were hospital based and emphasized curative rather than preventive care, and were too expensive for most countries to maintain. As the quality and availability of health services have deteriorated, the concept of free care has been questioned. At the same time, the number of countries involved in programs of structural adjustment imposed by the International Monetary Fund has grown steadily since the early 1980s, and some countries have drastically restricted public expenditures for health care. IN the search for new sources of financing, the concept of recovery of costs has become prominent. Various attempts have been made to "recover costs" even before the costs have been assessed. Financing of health care by governments, besides being insufficient, has impeded analysis of health care costs in most African countries. The World Bank proposes that the price of each medical product or service should be equal to the cost of providing it. UNICEF proposals stress the need to rationalize expenses and to defend vulnerable population groups during application of adjustment measures. The World Health Organization approach is geared toward attaining the objective of health for all by the year 2000. The basic question is still how to finance quality health care with reasonable participation of users without impeding access of the population to needed health services. An objective of 100% cost recovery will seriously compromise access for the large number of persons without purchasing power to pay the real price of health care. The term "recovery of costs" is inappropriate; the problem is to achieve a balance between participation of the population and government resources for the health system. Health services are not completely self-financing in any developed country and it appears

  19. Ethiopia's health extension program: improving health through community involvement.

    PubMed

    Banteyerga, Hailom

    2011-07-01

    The Health Extension Program is one of the most innovative community-based health programs in Ethiopia. It is based on the assumption that access to and quality of primary health care in rural communities can be improved through transfer of health knowledge and skills to households. Since it became operational in 2004-2005, the Program has had a tangible effect on the thinking and practices of rural people regarding disease prevention, family health, hygiene and environmental sanitation. It has enabled Ethiopia to increase primary health care coverage from 76.9% in 2005 to 90% in 2010. PMID:21778960

  20. Health Is Academic. A Guide to Coordinated School Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva, Ed.; Wooley, Susan Frelick, Ed.; Northrop, Daphne, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of papers that define comprehensive school health programs and their components and provide action steps for their implementation at the local, state, and national levels: (1) "Linking Health and Learning: An Overview of Coordinated School Health Programs" (Floretta Dukes McKenzie and Julius B. Richmond); (2)…

  1. SHIP: the Seafarers Health Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    Urner, C J

    1987-06-01

    The Seafarers Health Improvement Program (SHIP) was initiated in 1978 by the United States Public Health Service to improve the health status of seafarers, their health environment, medical care and safety aboard ship, and communication between parties responsible for the health and safety of American seafarers. The program is a collaborative effort of representatives of the maritime industry, physicians, and concerned governmental agencies. Principal achievements of SHIP include establishment of Entry Level Standards and Retention Guidelines for seafarers, development of the Seafarer Emergency Medical Training Program, and initiation of a program making medical records available on board. PMID:3612327

  2. The NASA Radiation Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The Space Radiation Health Program (SRHP) is defined in terms of motivation and methodology with specific reference given to the impacts of HZE particles and solar energetic particles. The biological hazards are mentioned that can be associated with the two particle types and ionizing radiation in general. The lack of data on the impact of such radiation and effective shielding countermeasures is identified as the primary motivation for worst-case assumptions. However, the resulting shielding designs can potentially overestimate the thickness by a factor of 10 and add unnecessarily to vehicle take-off mass. A space-based validation system is proposed to complement ground-based investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation in interplanetary space. The Lifesat satellite is proposed as a part of the SRHP effort to determine the requirements for protection and future shielding specifications.

  3. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of February 4, 2009 State Children's Health Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's...

  4. An oral health program for children.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carol; Bachman, Jean; Casalone, Gregory G; Farberman, Susann; Fish, Anne

    2014-02-15

    Caries, the most infectious chronic disease of childhood in America, leads to health, learning, and quality-of-life issues. Using the Missouri Preventive Service Program model, a pilot oral health program for children from ages birth to 5 years in a rural health clinic was the first to implement the application of fluoride varnish. PMID:24441318

  5. Program priorities for interdisciplinary oil and gas recovery research

    SciTech Connect

    Milling, M.E. Lucia, F.J.; Hocott, C.R.; Miller, M.A.; Neitzel, E.B. )

    1990-05-01

    The decline in domestic oil production threatens the national and economic security of the US. In the first seven months of 1989 domestic production dropped to an average of 7.7 million bbl per day, and in July 1989 foreign oil imports accounted for over 50% of daily consumption. This trend is continuing despite a huge untapped US oil resource base in existing fields. It is estimated that US fields contain over 300 billion bbl of unrecovered mobile and immobile oil resources. A focused interdisciplinary geoscience oil and gas recovery research effort can play a major role in providing cost-effective advanced technology to recover these resources. The Geoscience Institute's study identifies the highest priority technology needs and research priorities required for development of improved recovery efficiencies. The Institute's study addresses six major program elements and identifies 166 research activities associated with 41 research areas. Chief among these are improved reservoir description methods to better delineate and model heterogeneities at an interwell scale. High-resolution three-dimensional reservoir models must be able to be quickly developed and integrated with engineering data controls to accurately evaluate interwell areas. Such a capability requires development of interdisciplinary programs that provide for the integration of geological, geophysical, and engineering components.

  6. Emergency department naloxone distribution: a Rhode Island department of health, recovery community, and emergency department partnership to reduce opioid overdose deaths.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    In response to increasing rates of opioid overdose deaths in Rhode Island (RI), the RI Department of Health, RI emergency physicians, and Anchor Community Recovery Center designed an emergency department (ED) naloxone distribution and peer-recovery coach program for people at risk of opioid overdose. ED patients at risk for overdose are offered a take home naloxone kit, patient education video, and, when available, an Anchor peer recovery coach to provide recovery support and referral to treatment. In August 2014, the program launched at Kent, Miriam, and Rhode Island Hospital Emergency Departments. PMID:25271659

  7. The impact of AA on non-professional substance abuse recovery programs and sober living houses.

    PubMed

    Polcin, Douglas L; Borkman, Thomasina

    2008-01-01

    In addition to being a widely used and effective approach for alcohol problems, AA has been central to the development of several types of nonprofessional recovery programs. Known as "social model recovery," these programs were staffed by individuals in recovery and they encouraged program participants to become involved in AA as a way to address their drinking problems. In addition, they relied on the traditions, beliefs, and recovery practices of AA as a guide for managing and operating programs (e.g., democratic group processes, shared and rotated leadership, and experiential knowledge). This chapter reviews the philosophy, history, and recent changes in several types of these programs, along with a depiction of AA's influence on them. Programs examined include neighborhood recovery centers, residential social model recovery programs, and two types of sober living houses: California Sober Living Houses and Oxford Houses. Recent outcome evaluations on both types of sober living houses are presented. PMID:19115765

  8. Cross-Validation of Mental Health Recovery Measures in a Hong Kong Chinese Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Shengquan; Pan, Jia-Yan; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Bola, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The concept of recovery has begun shifting mental health service delivery from a medical perspective toward a client-centered recovery orientation. This shift is also beginning in Hong Kong, but its development is hampered by a dearth of available measures in Chinese. Method: This article translates two measures of recovery (mental…

  9. Health Careers Recruitment Program Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Bill, Ed.

    Designed to encourage Native American students in Colorado and New Mexico to pursue health careers, this handbook presents the following information: (1) statistics documenting the need for American Indian health professionals; (2) current career opportunities in the health professions (descriptions of the many health fields and descriptions of…

  10. The Recovery Knowledge Inventory for Measurement of Nursing Student Views on Recovery-oriented Mental Health Services.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Byrne, Louise; Platania-Phung, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Recovery-oriented services are a goal for policy and practice in the Australian mental health service system. Evidence-based reform requires an instrument to measure knowledge of recovery concepts. The Recovery Knowledge Inventory (RKI) was designed for this purpose, however, its suitability and validity for student health professionals has not been evaluated. The purpose of the current article is to report the psychometric features of the RKI for measuring nursing students' views on recovery. The RKI, a self-report measure, consists of four scales: (I) Roles and Responsibilities, (II) Non-Linearity of the Recovery Process, (III) Roles of Self-Definition and Peers, and (IV) Expectations Regarding Recovery. Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses of the baseline data (n = 167) were applied to assess validity and reliability. Exploratory factor analyses generally replicated the item structure suggested by the three main scales, however more stringent analyses (confirmatory factor analysis) did not provide strong support for convergent validity. A refined RKI with 16 items had internal reliabilities of α = .75 for Roles and Responsibilities, α = .49 for Roles of Self-Definition and Peers, and α = .72, for Recovery as Non-Linear Process. If the RKI is to be applied to nursing student populations, the conceptual underpinning of the instrument needs to be reworked, and new items should be generated to evaluate and improve scale validity and reliability. PMID:26514258

  11. Predictors of Criminal Justice Outcomes Among Mental Health Courts Participants: The Role of Perceived Coercion and Subjective Mental Health Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yanos, Philip T.; Kopelovich, Sarah L.; Koerner, Joshua; Alexander, Mary Jane

    2013-01-01

    Internationally, one effort to reduce the number of people with serious mental illness (SMI) in jails and prisons is the development of Mental Health Courts (MHC). Research on MHCs to date has been disproportionately focused on the study of recidivism and re-incarceration over the potential of these problem-solving courts to facilitate mental health recovery and affect the slope or gradient of opportunity for recovery. Despite the strong conceptual links between the MHC approach and the recovery-orientation in mental health, the capacity for MHCs to facilitate recovery has not been explored. This user-informed mental health and criminal justice (MH/CJ) community based participatory (CBPR) study assesses the extent to which MHC practices align with recovery-oriented principles and may subsequently affect criminal justice outcomes. We report on the experiences and perceptions of 51 MHC participants across four metropolitan Mental Health Courts. Specifically, the current study assesses: 1) how defendants’ perceptions of court practices, particularly with regard to procedural justice and coercion, relate to perceptions of mental health recovery and psychiatric symptoms, and, 2) how perceptions of procedural justice and mental health recovery relate to subsequent criminal justice outcomes. The authors hypothesized that perceived coercion and mental health recovery would be inversely related, that perceived coercion would be associated with worse criminal justice outcomes, and perceptions of mental health recovery would be associated with better criminal justice outcomes. Results suggest that perceived coercion in the MHC experience was negatively associated with perceptions of recovery among MHC participants. Perceptions of “negative pressures,” a component of coercion, were important predictors of criminal justice involvement in the 12 month period following MHC admission, even when controlling for other factors that were related to criminal justice outcomes, and

  12. 13 CFR 120.398 - America's Recovery Capital (ARC) Loan Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false America's Recovery Capital (ARC) Loan Program. 120.398 Section 120.398 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Special Purpose Loans America's Recovery Capital (business Stabilization) Loan Program-Arc Loan Program § 120.398 America's...

  13. Environmental health program in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrazzo, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    The NASA policy on environmental health uses medical and environmental concepts to: (1) Determine the health status of employees; (2) prevent illness and promote good health among employees; and (3) identify and control factors that affect the health of personnel and quality of environment. Evaluation and control of physical, chemical, radiological and biological factors surrounding personnel and which represent physiological and psychological stresses and impairment are considered.

  14. Planning and Implementing Health Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Katherine P.

    1980-01-01

    School health screening programs, which include screening, education of children and parents, and follow-up in the form of appropriate treatment, are described. A scoliosis screening program is described as an example of the model presented. Suggestions for planners, participants, and evaluators of any school health screening are summarized. (JMF)

  15. Migrant Education Health Program, 1983. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    During 1983 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  16. Migrant Education Health Program, 1984. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Compensatory Education Services Unit.

    During 1984 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  17. Migrant Education Health Program, 1982. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Charles L.; Swanson, Terri M.

    During 1982 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  18. The top ten concerns about recovery encountered in mental health system transformation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Larry; O'Connell, Maria; Tondora, Janis; Styron, Thomas; Kangas, Karen

    2006-05-01

    The notion of "recovery" has recently taken center stage in guiding mental health policy and practice. However, it is not yet clear what the term means and what is to be entailed in transforming the nation's mental health system to promote it. The authors discuss the various meanings of recovery as applied to mental illness and list the top ten concerns encountered in efforts to articulate and implement recovery-oriented care. These concerns include the following: recovery is old news, recovery-oriented care adds to the burden of already stretched providers, recovery involves cure, recovery happens to very few people, recovery represents an irresponsible fad, recovery happens only after and as a result of active treatment, recovery-oriented care is implemented only through the addition of new resources, recovery-oriented care is neither reimbursable nor evidence based, recovery-oriented care devalues the role of professional intervention, and recovery-oriented care increases providers' exposure to risk and liability. These concerns are addressed through discussion of the two over-arching challenges that they pose, namely the issues of resources and risk. PMID:16675756

  19. Mental Health Program Reports - 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Julius, Ed.

    The volume is reported to reflect the broad range of National Institute of Mental Health activities in areas of research, development of mental health manpower, and delivery of mental health services. Twenty papers examine, respectively, relationship of life histories and biochemistry of siblings and twins to schizophrenia, training of Navaho…

  20. 78 FR 59121 - Basic Health Program: State Administration of Basic Health Programs; Eligibility and Enrollment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... 14, 2011 (76 FR 56767), HHS published a Request for Information (RFI) inviting the public to provide... Insurance Program (CHIP). This proposed rule sets forth a framework for Basic Health Program eligibility and... Advance Payments of the Premium Tax Credit BHP Basic Health Program CHIP Children's Health...

  1. Reading Recovery Program Implementation Year Three, School Year 1992-1993. Report of Results and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schotanus, Helen; And Others

    A study examined the results and effectiveness of the third year of the Reading Recovery program in New Hampshire. With the 50 Reading Recovery teachers from previous classes, 32 teachers in the new class, and 3 teacher leaders, a total of 85 teachers taught Reading Recovery during the 1992-93 school year. A total of 422 first-grade children…

  2. Reading Recovery Program Implementation Year Six, School Year 1995-96. Report of Results and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schotanus, Helen; And Others

    A study examined the results and effectiveness of the sixth year of the Reading Recovery program in New Hampshire. With the 95 Reading Recovery teachers from previous classes, 38 teachers in the new class, and 4 teacher leaders, a total of 137 teachers taught Reading Recovery during the 1995-96 school year. A total of 693 first-grade children…

  3. Reading Recovery Program Implementation Year Five, School Year 1994-95. Report of Results and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schotanus, Helen; And Others

    A study examined the results and effectiveness of the fifth year of the Reading Recovery program in New Hampshire. With the 78 Reading Recovery teachers from previous classes, 23 teachers in the new class, and 3 teacher leaders, a total of 104 teachers taught Reading Recovery during the 1994-95 school year. A total of 530 first-grade children…

  4. Migrant Education Health Program, 1989. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    This report details specific 1989 activities of the Migrant Education Health Program in Colorado. The state health department wrote the report to demonstrate that the health services it provided to migrants that year were within the scope of a contractual agreement with the Colorado Department of Education. The report was also designed to share…

  5. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

  6. Natural gas recovery, storage, and utilization SBIR program

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, H.D.

    1993-12-31

    A Fossil Energy natural-gas topic has been a part of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program since 1988. To date, 50 Phase SBIR natural-gas applications have been funded. Of these 50, 24 were successful in obtaining Phase II SBIR funding. The current Phase II natural-gas research projects awarded under the SBIR program and managed by METC are presented by award year. The presented information on these 2-year projects includes project title, awardee, and a project summary. The 1992 Phase II projects are: landfill gas recovery for vehicular natural gas and food grade carbon dioxide; brine disposal process for coalbed gas production; spontaneous natural as oxidative dimerization across mixed conducting ceramic membranes; low-cost offshore drilling system for natural gas hydrates; motorless directional drill for oil and gas wells; and development of a multiple fracture creation process for stimulation of horizontally drilled wells.The 1993 Phase II projects include: process for sweetening sour gas by direct thermolysis of hydrogen sulfide; remote leak survey capability for natural gas transport storage and distribution systems; reinterpretation of existing wellbore log data using neural-based patter recognition processes; and advanced liquid membrane system for natural gas purification.

  7. Attitudinal Determinants of Local Public Health Workers' Participation in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Activities.

    PubMed

    Errett, Nicole A; Egan, Shannon; Garrity, Stephanie; Rutkow, Lainie; Walsh, Lauren; Thompson, Carol B; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Altman, Brian; Schor, Kenneth; Barnett, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Local health departments play a critical role in short-, intermediate-, and long-term recovery activities after a public health emergency. However, research has not explored attitudinal determinants of health department workers' participation in the recovery phase following a disaster. Accordingly, this qualitative investigation aims to understand perceived facilitators and barriers to performing recovery-related activities following Hurricane Sandy among local health department workers. In January 2014, 2 focus groups were conducted in geographically representative clusters of local health departments affected by Hurricane Sandy (1 cluster in Maryland and 1 cluster in New Jersey). Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to qualitatively assess attitudes toward Hurricane Sandy recovery activities. This analysis identified 5 major thematic categories as facilitators and barriers to participation in recovery activities: training, safety, family preparedness, policies and planning, and efficacy. Systems that support engagement of health department personnel in recovery activities may endeavor to develop and communicate intra- and interjurisdictional policies that minimize barriers in these areas. Development and implementation of evidence-informed curricular interventions that explain recovery roles may also increase local health department worker motivation to participate in recovery activities. PMID:26173013

  8. Mental health nursing and the politics of recovery: a global reflection.

    PubMed

    Barker, Phil J; Buchanan-Barker, Poppy

    2011-10-01

    The concept of recovery increasingly dominates mental health policy and practice agendas in most Western countries. However, the many, often conflicting, definitions of recovery have led to theoretical and practical confusion. More importantly, the concept clashes with some of the established assumptions of psychiatric/mental health nursing, especially the traditional notion that the person is "ill" and requires "treatment" or some other active "intervention." The implications of recovery for the further development of person-centered care, especially within a globalized form of mental health nursing, are discussed with specific reference to the Tidal Model, an international midrange theory of mental health nursing. PMID:21978803

  9. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Mathew; Melancon, Jim; Sneed, Demarcus; Nunning, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Currently, heart disease and diabetes dominate society as the leading cause of death for Americans. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a lifestyle enhancement program on factors related to the development of heart disease. The Wabash Valley Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a community-based lifestyle change program with…

  10. Annual health examination program, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, L.; Ladou, J.

    1975-01-01

    A cost analysis of a low-volume multiphasic health testing program is presented. The results indicate that unit costs are similar to those of high-volume automated programs. The comparability in unit cost appears to result from the savings in personnel and space requirements of the smaller program as compared with the larger ones.

  11. Join the Voices for Recovery: Celebrating Health: National Alcohol & Drug Addiction Recovery Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment.

    The Recovery Month observance highlights the societal benefits of substance abuse treatment, lauds the contributions of treatment providers, and promotes the message that recovery from substance abuse in all its forms is possible. The observance also encourages citizens to take action to help expand and improve the availability of effective…

  12. 75 FR 48815 - Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Medicaid Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility... Program and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP); Revisions to the Medicaid Eligibility Quality... Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective...

  13. High School Health Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This curriculum guide contains units of study for high school health science courses in Iowa. The first section is a competency outline for three topics: introduction to health care; nurse aide/orderly; and rehabilitation aide. For each competency, the following information is provided: objectives; suggested learning activities; resources; and…

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC AND ENERGY IMPACTS OF MATERIAL RECOVERY FACILITIES - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFS) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. he MITE Program is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protecti...

  15. Design and implementation of an enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Milà, Marc; Klein, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in perioperative care, major surgery is still associated with major complications. Enhanced recovery after surgery was introduced by the National Health Service in the UK with the aim of improving patient outcomes and reducing length of stay in hospital. The degree of applicability differs between surgical specialties, and in thoracic surgery it has not been developed until recently. We have therefore reviewed recent literature specific to thoracic surgery, and will discuss key elements of the design, implementation and monitoring of an enhanced recovery (ER) program based on our recent experience. The program is divided into several high impact intervention measures that involve the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods. Physical activity promotion and educational programs that provide information about the surgery and the surgical pathway are an essential part of the preoperative strategies. During surgery, an optimal pain control strategy, antibiotic prophylaxis and protective ventilation are important. Minimally invasive surgery and well-planned postoperative care including early drain removal and planned discharge are also important. Overall, we have shown that ER in thoracic surgery can facilitate early discharge from hospital and possibly reduce postoperative complications. Further studies are required to understand the extent of ER benefits when applied to thoracic surgery, and to test individual components in a prospective manner. PMID:26941969

  16. 75 FR 81278 - Medicare Program: Solicitation of Comments Regarding Development of a Recovery Audit Contractor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... rules for the MA program (69 FR 46866) and prescription drug benefit program (69 FR 46632). The final regulations implementing both programs, published on January 28, 2005 (70 FR 4588 and 70 FR 4194, respectively... Regarding Development of a Recovery Audit Contractor Program for the Medicare Part C and D Programs...

  17. 77 FR 11127 - Medicaid Program; Announcement of Medicaid Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) Contingency Fee Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... FR 57808), we published a final rule entitled: ``Medicaid Program; Recovery Audit Contractors.'' This... Medicaid RAC programs. In the September 16, 2011 Federal Register (76 FR 57808), we published a final rule... Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs) Contingency Fee Update AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  18. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  19. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  20. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  1. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  2. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  3. 36 CFR 72.43 - Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants. 72.43 Section 72.43 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Development, Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.43 Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program...

  4. 36 CFR 72.43 - Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants. 72.43 Section 72.43 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Development, Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.43 Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program...

  5. 36 CFR 72.43 - Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants. 72.43 Section 72.43 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Development, Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.43 Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program...

  6. 36 CFR 72.43 - Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants. 72.43 Section 72.43 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Development, Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.43 Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program...

  7. 36 CFR 72.43 - Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program grants. 72.43 Section 72.43 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Development, Rehabilitation and Innovation § 72.43 Fundable elements: Recovery Action Program...

  8. Reading Recovery Program 1996-97 Evaluation Report. Pamphlet 98-C-002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense Education Activity, Arlington, VA.

    A study examined the effectiveness of Reading Recovery programs at 36 Department of Defense Schools (DoDDS). Annually, approximately 500 "below grade level" students are given the opportunity to become independent readers through this program. Major findings are: (1) Reading Recovery students significantly outperformed students not in Reading…

  9. The Implementation of a Reading Recovery Program for At-Risk First-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Angie L.

    2010-01-01

    This 8-week case study involved evaluating the impact of the Reading Recovery intervention program on students with reading difficulties. The participants of this case study were 2 at-risk first-grade students selected for participation in the Reading Recovery program, which provided 30 minutes daily of one-on-one instruction. This study employed…

  10. A Comprehensive Model for Mental Health Tobacco Recovery in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Mia Hanos; Steinberg, Marc L.; Gandhi, Kunal K.; Delnevo, Cris; Steinberg, Michael B.; Foulds, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of tobacco use, disproportionate tobacco consumption, and excess morbidity and mortality, smokers with mental illness have reduced access to tobacco dependence treatment across the health care spectrum. We have developed a comprehensive model for Mental Health Tobacco Recovery in New Jersey (MHTR-NJ) that has the overarching goal of improving tobacco cessation for smokers with serious mental illness. Important steps involve engaging patients, professionals and the community to increase understanding that addressing tobacco use is important. In addition to increasing demand for tobacco treatment services, we must educate mental health professionals in evidence-based treatments so that patients can seek help in their usual behavioral health care setting. Peer services that offer hope and support to smokers are essential. Each of the policy or cessation initiatives described address the two core goals of this model: to increase demand for tobacco cessation services for mentally ill smokers and to help more smokers with mental illness to quit. Each has been pilot tested for feasibility and/or effectiveness and revised with feedback from stakeholders. In this way this implementation model has brought together academics, clinicians, administrators and mental health consumers to develop tobacco programming and policy that has been tested in a real world environment and serves as a model for other states. PMID:21076862

  11. The NASA Space Radiation Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Sulzman, F. M.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Health Program is a part of the Life Sciences Division in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA). The goal of the Space Radiation Health Program is development of scientific bases for assuring adequate radiation protection in space. A proposed research program will determine long-term health risks from exposure to cosmic rays and other radiation. Ground-based animal models will be used to predict risk of exposures at varying levels from various sources and the safe levels for manned space flight.

  12. Adaptive Management for Decision Making at the Program and Project Levels of the Missouri River Recovery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Anderson, Michael G.; Tyre, Drew; Fleming, Craig A.

    2009-02-28

    The paper, “Adaptive Management: Background for Stakeholders in the Missouri River Recovery Program,” introduced the concept of adaptive management (AM), its principles and how they relate to one-another, how AM is applied, and challenges for its implementation. This companion paper describes how the AM principles were applied to specific management actions within the Missouri River Recovery Program to facilitate understanding, decision-making, and stakeholder engagement. For context, we begin with a brief synopsis of the Missouri River Recovery Program (MRRP) and the strategy for implementing adaptive management (AM) within the program; we finish with an example of AM in action within Phase I of the MRPP.

  13. Challenges in evaluating rural health programs.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Joyce; Webb, John

    2002-01-01

    Complex community-based prevention programs are being held to scientific evidence of their effectiveness and rural public health departments that implement such programs often are not equipped to evaluate them. Rural public health departments are fettered by small budgets, small staffs, and less access to evaluation experts and similar resources. Community-based health promotion programs can include complex designs that may work differently in rural areas and evaluation of rural programs can be hampered by lack of control groups and the instability of results from small populations. The University of Kentucky has entered into a contract with the state Department for Public Health to implement an internal, participatory model of evaluation. In this model, the university evaluation expert trains local public health department staff in technical skills for program evaluation and acts as mentor and technical consultant to local public health departments on an ongoing basis. Through training and site visits, this model is one approach to addressing the challenges of evaluating rural health promotion programs. PMID:12135148

  14. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings

    PubMed Central

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E.; Kumpfer, Karol L.; Merrill, Ray M.; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  15. NATIONAL EYE HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM (NEHEP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public and professional education programs that encourage early detection and timely treatment of glaucoma and diabetic eye disease and the appropriate treatment for low vision. NEHEP provides referrals to vision professionals and other health resources.

  16. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings.

    PubMed

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E; Kumpfer, Karol L; Merrill, Ray M; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  17. A call for new standard of care in perioperative gynecologic oncology practice: Impact of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs.

    PubMed

    Miralpeix, Ester; Nick, Alpa M; Meyer, Larissa A; Cata, Juan; Lasala, Javier; Mena, Gabriel E; Gottumukkala, Vijaya; Iniesta-Donate, Maria; Salvo, Gloria; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs aim to hasten functional recovery and improve postoperative outcomes. However, there is a paucity of data on ERAS programs in gynecologic surgery. We reviewed the published literature on ERAS programs in colorectal surgery, general gynecologic surgery, and gynecologic oncology surgery to evaluate the impact of such programs on outcomes, and to identify key elements in establishing a successful ERAS program. ERAS programs are associated with shorter length of hospital stay, a reduction in overall health care costs, and improvements in patient satisfaction. We suggest an ERAS program for gynecologic oncology practice involving preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative strategies including; preadmission counseling, avoidance of preoperative bowel preparation, use of opioid-sparing multimodal perioperative analgesia (including loco-regional analgesia), intraoperative goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT), and use of minimally invasive surgical techniques with avoidance of routine use of nasogastric tube, drains and/or catheters. Postoperatively, it is important to encourage early feeding, early mobilization, timely removal of tubes and drains, if present, and function oriented multimodal analgesia regimens. Successful implementation of an ERAS program requires a multidisciplinary team effort and active participation of the patient in their goal-oriented functional recovery program. However, future outcome studies should evaluate the efficacy of an intervention within the pathway, include objective measures of symptom burden and control, study measures of functional recovery, and quantify outcomes of the program in relation to the rates of adherence to the key elements of care in gynecologic oncology such as oncologic outcomes and return to intended oncologic therapy (RIOT). PMID:26906066

  18. International health program: preventing health problems associated with living abroad.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Carol A

    2004-02-01

    1. The components of the international health program consist of identifying health risks overseas, the availability of the medical resources, the assessment of the medical facility, primary care, as well as the pre-departure health evaluations. 2. The organization should develop and implement standards of care while working toward maintaining and improving those standards to achieve an innovative, effective international medical program. This should be linked by a top down commitment to insure success. 3. The implementation of the emergency response plan will help support employees and their family members while working abroad if a serious illness or injury should occur. PMID:14979618

  19. Migrant Health Program, 1969 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Health, Trenton.

    The New Jersey State Department of Health has placed increasing emphasis on high-quality health care since the first hospital-based Migrant Family Clinic replaced field clinics in 1965. Statistics show that medical services provided by the program reached 38% of all migrant workers in New Jersey at the peak of the 1969 crop season; however,…

  20. THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    INVOLVING INDIVIDUALS AS WELL AS ORGANIZATIONS, THE PROGRAM AIMED AT THE OPTIMUM HEALTH OF ALL CHILDREN, AND IMPROVEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. EACH OF THE CHILDREN WAS URGED TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION FOR SMALL POX, THE DPT SERIES AND BOOSTER, THE POLIO SERIES, AND CORRECTIONS OF ALL DENTAL DEFECTS AND…

  1. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-04-10

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  2. Focus on School Health. MCH Program Interchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This issue of the "MCH Program Interchange" provides information about approximately 55 selected materials and publications related to school health, which have been developed by or are available from Federal agencies, state and local public health agencies, and voluntary and professional organizations. The interchange of this information is meant…

  3. Lifetime Stress Cumulatively Programs Brain Transcriptome and Impedes Stroke Recovery: Benefit of Sensory Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, Fabíola C. R.; Yao, Youli; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Robbins, Jerrah C.; Soltanpour, Nasrin; Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga; Metz, Gerlinde A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) represents a critical variable affecting lifetime health trajectories, metabolic and vascular functions. Beneficial experiences may attenuate the effects of PS and its programming of health outcomes in later life. Here we investigated in a rat model (1) if PS modulates recovery following cortical ischemia in adulthood; (2) if a second hit by adult stress (AS) exaggerates stress responses and ischemic damage; and (3) if tactile stimulation (TS) attenuates the cumulative effects of PS and AS. Prenatally stressed and non-stressed adult male rats underwent focal ischemic motor cortex lesion and were tested in skilled reaching and skilled walking tasks. Two groups of rats experienced recurrent restraint stress in adulthood and one of these groups also underwent daily TS therapy. Animals that experienced both PS and AS displayed the most severe motor disabilities after lesion. By contrast, TS promoted recovery from ischemic lesion and reduced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. The data also showed that cumulative effects of adverse and beneficial lifespan experiences interact with disease outcomes and brain plasticity through the modulation of gene expression. Microarray analysis of the lesion motor cortex revealed that cumulative PS and AS interact with genes related to growth factors and transcription factors, which were not affected by PS or lesion alone. TS in PS+AS animals reverted these changes, suggesting a critical role for these factors in activity-dependent motor cortical reorganization after ischemic lesion. These findings suggest that beneficial experience later in life can moderate adverse consequences of early programming to improve cerebrovascular health. PMID:24651125

  4. Lifetime stress cumulatively programs brain transcriptome and impedes stroke recovery: benefit of sensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zucchi, Fabíola C R; Yao, Youli; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Robbins, Jerrah C; Soltanpour, Nasrin; Kovalchuk, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) represents a critical variable affecting lifetime health trajectories, metabolic and vascular functions. Beneficial experiences may attenuate the effects of PS and its programming of health outcomes in later life. Here we investigated in a rat model (1) if PS modulates recovery following cortical ischemia in adulthood; (2) if a second hit by adult stress (AS) exaggerates stress responses and ischemic damage; and (3) if tactile stimulation (TS) attenuates the cumulative effects of PS and AS. Prenatally stressed and non-stressed adult male rats underwent focal ischemic motor cortex lesion and were tested in skilled reaching and skilled walking tasks. Two groups of rats experienced recurrent restraint stress in adulthood and one of these groups also underwent daily TS therapy. Animals that experienced both PS and AS displayed the most severe motor disabilities after lesion. By contrast, TS promoted recovery from ischemic lesion and reduced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. The data also showed that cumulative effects of adverse and beneficial lifespan experiences interact with disease outcomes and brain plasticity through the modulation of gene expression. Microarray analysis of the lesion motor cortex revealed that cumulative PS and AS interact with genes related to growth factors and transcription factors, which were not affected by PS or lesion alone. TS in PS+AS animals reverted these changes, suggesting a critical role for these factors in activity-dependent motor cortical reorganization after ischemic lesion. These findings suggest that beneficial experience later in life can moderate adverse consequences of early programming to improve cerebrovascular health. PMID:24651125

  5. Using Appreciative Inquiry to Facilitate Implementation of the Recovery Model in Mental Health Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clossey, Laurene; Mehnert, Kevin; Silva, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an organizational development tool called appreciative inquiry (AI) and its use in mental health to aid agencies implementing recovery model services. AI is a discursive tool with the power to shift dominant organizational cultures. Its philosophical underpinnings emphasize values consistent with recovery: community,…

  6. Knowledge and Attitude regarding Recovery among Mental Health Practitioners in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klockmo, Carolina; Marnetoft, Sven-Uno; Nordenmark, Mikael; Dalin, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the knowledge and the attitude regarding recovery among practitioners working in the Swedish mental health system, Personligt Ombud (PO), Supported Housing Team (SHT) and Psychiatric Out Patient Service (POPS), to determine whether and how knowledge and attitude regarding recovery differ between the three services. A…

  7. Beyond Recovery: Colonization, Health and Healing for Indigenous People in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavallee, Lynn F.; Poole, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    How do we limit our focus to mental health when Indigenous teaching demands a much wider lens? How do we respond to mental health recovery when Indigenous experience speaks to a very different approach to healing, and how can we take up the health of Indigenous people in Canada without a discussion of identity and colonization? We cannot, for the…

  8. An Operational Safety and Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhorchak, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes safety/health program activities at Research Triangle Institute (North Carolina). These include: radioisotope/radiation and hazardous chemical/carcinogen use, training, monitoring, disposal; chemical waste management; air monitoring and analysis; medical program; fire safety/training, including emergency planning; Occupational Safety and…

  9. Educational Programs in the Health Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospitals, 1971

    1971-01-01

    This document lists by location educational programs in the health field in the United States and Canada. Areas covered include Certified Laboratory Assistant Programs, Cytotechnology, Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Dietetics, Hospital Administration, Inhalation Therapy, Library Science, Medical Illustration, Medical Records, Medical Technology,…

  10. Diversifying the Health Professions: A Model Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Penny A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a university-based mentoring program in the food and nutritional sciences that addresses the need for multicultural professionals in allied health fields. Methods: The conceptual model for the program includes inputs (goals, resources), transformational process (professional development, social support and recognition) and…

  11. Health Indicators: A Tool for Program Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abou-Sayf, Frank K.

    2006-01-01

    A visual tool used to evaluate instructional program performance has been designed by the University of Hawaii Community College system. The tool combines features from traffic lights, blood-chemistry test reports, and industry production control charts, and is labeled the Program Health-Indicator Chart. The tool was designed to minimize the labor…

  12. Coordinated School Health Programs. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that all children should have the right to coordinated school health programs. NASN supports continued research to document the outcomes of these programs. School nurses should use their professional education and skills to assist their schools and communities in the…

  13. Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  14. [Recovery].

    PubMed

    Estingoy, Pierrette; Gilliot, Élodie; Parisot, Clément

    2015-01-01

    The historical fatalism of the impossibility of recovering from psychosis eased from the 1970s with the shaping of the idea of a possible recovery. Recovery is today the objective for the patient and caregivers. The key to achieving this lies in the encounter with Others. A collective approach, on the level of the institution, must be established. The aim is to create opportunities for the patient to express their doubts and feelings. PMID:26363659

  15. Lifecycle effects of a recession on health behaviors: Boom, bust, and recovery in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ásgeirsdóttir, Tinna Laufey; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2016-03-01

    This study uses individual-level longitudinal data from Iceland, a country that experienced a severe economic crisis in 2008 and substantial recovery by 2012, to investigate the extent to which the effects of a recession on health behaviors are lingering or short-lived and to explore trajectories in health behaviors from pre-crisis boom, to crisis, to recovery. Health-compromising behaviors (smoking, heavy drinking, sugared soft drinks, sweets, fast food, and tanning) declined during the crisis, and all but sweets continued to decline during the recovery. Health-promoting behaviors (consumption of fruit, fish oil, and vitamins/minerals and getting recommended sleep) followed more idiosyncratic paths. Overall, most behaviors reverted back to their pre-crisis levels or trends during the recovery, and these short-term deviations in trajectories were probably too short-lived in this recession to have major impacts on health or mortality. A notable exception is for binge drinking, which declined by 10% during the 2 crisis years, continued to fall (at a slower rate of 8%) during the 3 recovery years, and did not revert back to the upward pre-crisis trend during our observation period. These lingering effects, which directionally run counter to the pre-crisis upward trend in consumption and do not reflect price increases during the recovery period, suggest that alcohol is a potential pathway by which recessions improve health and/or reduce mortality. PMID:26687768

  16. INFORMATION: Special Report on "Selected Department of Energy Program Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was enacted on February 17, 2009, to jumpstart the economy by creating or saving millions of jobs, spurring technological advances in health and science, and investing in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy received over $32.7 billion in Recovery Act funding for various science, energy, and environmental programs and initiatives. As of November 2009, the Department had obligated $18.3 billion of the Recovery Act funding, but only $1.4 billion had been spent. The Department's Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Environmental Management, Science, and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability received the majority of funding allocated to the Department, about $32.3 billion. Obligating these funds by the end of Fiscal Year 2010, as required by the Recovery Act, and overseeing their effective use in succeeding years, represents a massive workload increase for the Department's programs. The effort to date has strained existing resources. As has been widely acknowledged, any effort to disburse massive additional funding and to expeditiously initiate and complete projects increases the risk of fraud, waste and abuse. It is, therefore, important for the Department's program offices to assess and mitigate these risks to the maximum extent practicable. In this light, we initiated this review as an initial step in the Office of Inspector General's charge to determine whether the Department's major program offices had developed an effective approach for identifying and mitigating risks related to achieving the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. The Department's program offices included in our review identified risks and planned mitigation strategies that, if successfully implemented and executed, should help achieve the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. While each office identified risks unique to its respective areas of responsibility, there were a

  17. Valued Social Roles and Measuring Mental Health Recovery: Examining the Structure of the Tapestry

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Marcia G.; Stein, Catherine H.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the concept of mental health recovery often makes it difficult to systematically examine recovery processes and outcomes. The concept of social role is inherent within many acknowledged dimensions of recovery such as community integration, family relationships, and peer support and can deepen our understanding of these dimensions when social roles are operationalized in ways that directly relate to recovery research and practice. Objective This paper reviews seminal social role theories and operationalizes aspects of social roles: role investment, role perception, role loss, and role gain. The paper provides a critical analysis of the ability of social role concepts to inform mental health recovery research and practice. Method PubMed and PsychInfo databases were used for the literature review. Results A more thorough examination of social role aspects allows for a richer picture of recovery domains that are structured by the concept social roles. Increasing understanding of consumers’ investment and changes in particular roles, perceptions of consumers’ role performance relative to peers, and consumers’ hopes for the future with regards to the different roles that they occupy could generate tangible, pragmatic approaches in addressing complex recovery domains. Conclusions and Implications for Practice This deeper understanding allows a more nuanced approach to recovery-related movements in mental health system transformation. PMID:23276237

  18. What Predicts Recovery Orientation in County Departments of Mental Health? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Christine B.; Adams, Neal; Felton, Mistique; Pareja, Candy

    2009-01-01

    In this pilot study we examined the determinants of recovery orientation among employees and influential stakeholders in a sample of 12 county departments of mental health in California. A two-level hierarchical linear model with random intercepts was estimated. Analyses show that recovery orientation has a U-shaped relationship with the age of staff/influential stakeholders and is negatively related to the difference between the desired level of adhocracy and the current level of adhocracy. Recovery orientation is positively related to the education level of staff/influential stakeholders, satisfying transformational leadership outcomes, and larger mental health budgets per capita. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:19888648

  19. IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs

    PubMed Central

    Mantas, John

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Health informatics programs usually are evaluated by national accreditation committees. Not always are the members of these committees well informed about the international level of (education in) health informatics. Therefore, when a program is accredited by a national accreditation committee, this does not always mean that the program is of an international level. The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) has expertise in the field of education. The IMIA Recommendations on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics guide curricula development. The goal of this article is to show that IMIA can also play the role of accreditation agency and to present the IMIA accreditation protocol and experiences obtained with it. Methods The accreditation procedure used in the Netherlands and Belgium was taken as a template for the design of the IMIA accreditation protocol. In a trial period of one and a half year the protocol is tested out on six health informatics programs. Results An accreditation protocol was designed. For judging the curriculum of a program the IMIA Recommendations are used. The institution has to write a self-assessment report and a site visit committee visits the program and judges its quality, supported by the self-assessment report and discussions with all stakeholders of the program. Conclusions After having visited three programs it appears that the IMIA accreditation procedure works well. Only a few changes had to be introduced. Writing the self-assessment report already appears to be beneficial for the management of the program to obtain a better insight in the quality of their program. PMID:24175114

  20. Enhanced recovery program is safe and improves postoperative insulin resistance in gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fujikuni, Nobuaki; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Tokumoto, Noriaki; Suzuki, Takahisa; Hattori, Minoru; Misumi, Toshihiro; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program in gastrectomy and influences on nutrition state and insulin-resistance. METHODS: Our ERAS program involved shortening the fasting periods and preoperative carbohydrate loading. Eighty gastrectomy patients were randomly assigned to either the conventional group (CG) or ERAS group (EG). We assessed the clinical characteristics and postoperative outcomes prospectively. The primary endpoint was noninferiority in timely discharge from the hospital within 12 d. Secondary endpoints were the incidence of aspiration at anesthesia induction, incidence of postoperative complications, health related quality of life (HRQOL) using the SF8 Health Survey questionnaire, nutrition state [e.g., albumin, transthyretin (TTR), retinal-binding protein (RBP), and transferrin (Tf)], the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-R) index, postoperative urine volume, postoperative weight change, and postoperative oral intake. RESULTS: The ERAS program was noninferior to the conventional program in achieving discharge from the hospital within 12 d (95.0% vs 92.5% respectively; 95%CI: -10.0%-16.0%). There was no significant difference in postoperative morbidity between the two groups. Adverse events such as vomiting and aspiration associated with the induction of general anesthesia were not observed. There were no significant differences with respect to postoperative urine volume, weight change, and oral intake between the two groups. EG patients with preoperative HOMA-R scores above 2.5 experienced significant attenuation of their HOMA-R scores on postoperative day 1 compared to CG patients (P = 0.014). There were no significant differences with respect to rapid turnover proteins (TTR, RBP and Tf) or HRQOL scores using the SF8 method. CONCLUSION: Applying the ERAS program to patients who undergo gastrectomy is safe, and improves insulin resistance with no deterioration in QOL. PMID:27231517

  1. 40 CFR 256.31 - Recommendations for developing and implementing resource conservation and recovery programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS Resource Conservation and Resource Recovery Programs § 256.31... practices as the preferred means of solid waste management whenever technically and economically feasible... requirements, pricing mechanisms and long-term contract availability. (3) Resource recovery feasibility...

  2. 40 CFR 256.31 - Recommendations for developing and implementing resource conservation and recovery programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS Resource Conservation and Resource Recovery Programs § 256.31... practices as the preferred means of solid waste management whenever technically and economically feasible... requirements, pricing mechanisms and long-term contract availability. (3) Resource recovery feasibility...

  3. 78 FR 25760 - Proposed Information Collection; Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Program Grants... 1237, Washington, DC 20005 (mail); or madonna_baucum@nps.gov (email). Please include ``1024-0048--Urban... subject line. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Urban Park and Recreation Recovery (UPARR)...

  4. Randomized Control Trial of a CBT Trauma Recovery Program in Palestinian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ian G.; Abdallah, Ghassan; Smith, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess the Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT) trauma recovery program within the context of ongoing violence. Utilizing a randomized controlled trial, 11-14-year-old students in Nablus, Palestine, were allocated by class to intervention or wait-list control conditions. Standardized measures assessed trauma exposure,…

  5. Unconventional gas recovery program. Semi-annual report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Manilla, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    This document is the third semi-annual report describing the technical progress of the US DOE projects directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources. Currently the program includes Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, Eastern Gas Shales Project, Western Gas Sands Project, and Geopressured Aquifers Project.

  6. A Historical Case Study of Dropout Recovery Programs in the State of Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portis, Dennis L., III

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this historical case study was to gain an understanding of dropout recovery programs from an interpretive historical perspective. Dropout Recovery is an Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education initiative that provides high school dropouts an opportunity to re-enroll in school, gain academic credit, and participate in…

  7. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services...

  8. Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disasters Health Disparities Profiles in Public Health Study Study Overview Graduates of CEPH-accredited schools and programs of public health are equipped with the population health skills to address the world’s most pressing health issues. ...

  9. Preferences for health care involvement, perceived control and surgical recovery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mahler, H I; Kulik, J A

    1990-01-01

    In a sample (N = 75) of coronary bypass patients, we examined the manner in which preoperative perceptions of personal control over recovery, desires for behavioral involvement in health care, and desires for information about health care predicted recovery in the hospital. Results indicated that preoperative control beliefs and desires for health care involvement predicted independently several important indices of recovery. Specifically, patients who prior to their surgery expressed a greater desire for information tended to experience less surgical pain and more negative psychological reactions. Greater preferences for behavioral involvement were associated with greater pain behavior, more ambulation, and shorter hospital stays. Finally, greater perceived personal control over recovery was associated with a shorter hospital stay. PMID:2244216

  10. Substance Abuse among the Deaf Population: An Overview of Current Strategies, Programs and Barriers to Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Katherine E.

    1989-01-01

    The paper analyzes the problem of alcohol and drug abuse among the deaf population focusing on: precipitating factors leading to substance abuse; barriers to recovery; and descriptions of several treatment centers, programs, and services. (JDD)

  11. 75 FR 68811 - Recovery Publication, P-395, Fire Management Assistance Grant Program (FMAGP) Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Publication, P-395, Fire Management Assistance Grant... Fire Management Assistance Grant Program (FMAGP) Guide. The Guide describes the FMAGP...

  12. Low Shock Pressure Recovery Experiments with Dry Sandstone Samples Within the MEMIN Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R. T.; Reimold, W. U.; Hornemann, U.

    2011-03-01

    Within the MEMIN program shock recovery experiments with Seeberger sandstone were carried out in the pressure range of 5 to 12.5 GPa to investigate shock effects in quartz and the influence of porosity on progressive shock metamorphism.

  13. Integrating a Family Planning Program with a County Health Department Based Maternal and Child Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinoski, Angela; Gressman, John W.

    This paper provides a description and analysis of the development, implementation, and continuing framework of practice for a model of comprehensive, coordinated maternal and child health programs in which traditional maternal and child health services are provided by a local county health department while family planning and related services are…

  14. Mental Health Reform at a Systems Level: Widening the Lens on Recovery-Oriented Care

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Sean A; McKenzie, Kwame J; Virdee, Gursharan

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to collate the literature on psychiatric inpatient recovery-based care and, more broadly, to situate the inpatient care sector within a mental health reform dialogue that, to date, has focused almost exclusively on outpatient and community practices. We make the argument that until an evidence base is developed for recovery-oriented practices on hospital wards, the effort to advance recovery-oriented systems will stagnate. Our scoping review was conducted in line with the 2009 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (commonly referred to as PRISMA) guidelines. Among the 27 papers selected for review, most were descriptive or uncontrolled outcome studies. Studies addressing strategies for improving care quality provide some modest evidence for reflective dialogue with former inpatient clients, role play and mentorship, and pairing general training in recovery oriented care with training in specific interventions, such as Illness Management and Recovery. Relative to some other fields of medicine, evidence surrounding the question of recovery-oriented care on psychiatric wards and how it may be implemented is underdeveloped. Attention to mental health reform in hospitals is critical to the emergence of recovery-oriented systems of care and the realization of the mandate set forward in the Mental Health Strategy for Canada. PMID:25007277

  15. A model for improving endangered species recovery programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brian; Reading, Richard; Conway, Courtney; Jackson, Jerome A.; Hutchins, Michael; Snyder, Noel; Forrest, Steve; Frazier, Jack; Derrickson, Scott

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses common organizational problems that cause inadequate planning and implementation processes of endangered species recovery across biologically dissimilar species. If these problems occur, even proven biological conservation techniques are jeopardized. We propose a solution that requires accountability in all phases of the restoration process and is based on cooperative input among government agencies, nongovernmental conservation organizations, and the academic community. The first step is formation of a task-oriented recovery team that integrates the best expertise into the planning process. This interdisciplinary team should be composed of people whose skills directly address issues critical for recovery. Once goals and procedures are established, the responsible agency (for example, in the United States, the US Fish and Wildlife Service) could divest some or all of its obligation for implementing the plan, yet still maintain oversight by holding implementing entities contractually accountable. Regular, periodic outside review and public documentation of the recovery team, lead agency, and the accomplishments of implementing bodies would permit evaluation necessary to improve performance. Increased cooperation among agency and nongovernmental organizations provided by this model promises a more efficient use of limited resources toward the conservation of biodiversity.

  16. 75 FR 7448 - Species Recovery Grants to Tribes Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... management partners, including tribes. NMFS recognizes the importance of many of these protected species to... Grants and Cooperative Agreements contained in the Federal Register on February 11, 2008 (73 FR 7696... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC15 Species Recovery Grants to Tribes...

  17. Health Risk Behaviors of Texas Students Attending Dropout Prevention/Recovery Schools in 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Nancy F.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Kelder, Steven H.; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Carvajal, Scott C.; Gingiss, Phyllis M.

    1999-01-01

    Determined the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among Texas high school students attending dropout prevention/recovery alternative schools. Student surveys indicated that a substantial number participated in behaviors that placed them at acute or chronic health risk. There were differences in prevalence of risk behaviors by gender,…

  18. A Minority Health Careers Exposure Program

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eldridge F.; Fedinec, Alexander A.; Woodson, Roland T.

    1987-01-01

    The University of Tennessee-Memphis (UT-M) Health Careers Exposure Program was initiated in response to the complaint of minority college students that basic medical science laboratories and clinical centers at private and state-supported health-science organizations in Tennessee were inaccessible to them as career-motivating, summer work experiences. The preceptor-apprentice relationship was the means utilized to expose and stimulate minority college students to enter health careers in this study. The formal activity was usually conducted for eight to ten weeks of summer vacation in the basic science and clinical facilities on the UT-M campus. A survey of the current career activities of former apprentices suggests that direct exposure of academically talented, minority college students to health careers is a factor that increases the number entering the health professions. PMID:3560251

  19. Continuing Care in High Schools: A Descriptive Study of Recovery High School Programs

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Andrew J.; Moberg, D. Paul; Krupp, Amanda Lawton

    2014-01-01

    Data from 17 recovery high schools suggest programs are dynamic and vary in enrollment, fiscal stability, governance, staffing, and organizational structure. Schools struggle with enrollment, funding, lack of primary treatment accessibility, academic rigor, and institutional support. Still, for adolescents having received treatment for substance abuse, recovery schools appear to successfully function as continuing care providers reinforcing and sustaining therapeutic benefits gained from treatment. Small size and therapeutic programming allow for a potentially broader continuum of services than currently exists in most of the schools. Recovery schools thus provide a useful design for continuing care warranting further study and policy support. PMID:24591808

  20. Human resources for health through conflict and recovery: lessons from African countries.

    PubMed

    Pavignani, Enrico

    2011-10-01

    A protracted conflict affects human resources for health (HRH) in multiple ways. In most cases, the inflicted damage constitutes the main obstacle to health sector recovery. Interventions aimed at healing derelict human resources are however fraught with difficulties of a political, technical, financial and administrative order. The experience accumulated in past recovery processes has made some important players aware of the cost incurred by neglecting human resource development. Several transitions from conflict to peace have been documented, even if largely in unpublished reports. This paper presents condensed descriptions of some African HRH-related recovery processes, which provide useful lessons. The technical work demanded to resuscitate a derelict health workforce is fairly well understood. In most situations, the highest hurdles lie outside of the health domain, and are of a political and administrative nature. Success stories are rare. But useful lessons are taught by failure as well as by success. PMID:21913930

  1. Assessment of environmental health and safety issues associated with the commercialization of unconventional gas recovery: methane from coal seams

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, L.J.; Cowan, C.E.; Riedel, E.F.

    1980-07-01

    Potential public health and safety problems and the potential environmental impacts from the recovery of gas from coalbeds are identified and examined. The technology of methane recovery is described and economic and legal barriers to production are discussed. (ACR)

  2. Attendance at Health Promotion Programs: Baseline Predictors and Program Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Catherine J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    As part of a family cardiovascular health promotion project, 111 Mexican-American and 95 Anglo-American families with fifth or sixth grade children were assigned to either a primary prevention program involving 18 sessions or to a control condition. Correlates of attendance were low baseline scores on physical activity and cardiovascular fitness…

  3. 76 FR 4350 - Health Information Technology Extension Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Extension Program ACTION: Public Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces changes to the Health Information Technology Extension Program, which assists...

  4. Prevention and recovery in early psychosis (PREP(®)): building a public-academic partnership program in Massachusetts, United States.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Brina; Zimmet, Suzanna V; Meyer, Eric C; Friedman-Yakoobian, Michelle; Monteleone, Thomas; Jude Leung, Y; Guyer, Margaret E; Rood, Laura Logue; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Seidman, Larry J

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing emphasis on early intervention (EI) for psychotic disorders. EI programs in public mental health settings have been established in countries such as Australia, the United Kingdom, and Canada. However, there are relatively few EI programs in the United States (U.S.). Here we describe the conceptual origins and practical development of the PREP program, i.e., Prevention and Recovery in Early Psychosis, as it evolved in a public academic psychiatry setting in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. PREP developed over a decade through a partnership between the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health and academic institutions within the Harvard Department of Psychiatry. We discuss the evolution, programmatic features, funding mechanisms, staffing, and the role of clinical training in PREP. The key principles in developing the PREP Program include the focus on early, evidence based, person-centered and phase-specific, integrated and continuous, comprehensive care. This program has served as a foundation for the emergence of related services at our institution, including a research clinic treating those at clinical high risk or within the putative "prodromal" period preceding frank psychosis. This account offers one possible blueprint for the development of EI programs despite the lack in the U.S. of a national mandate for EI or prevention-based mental health programs. PMID:23466116

  5. Health Occupations Education Program Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Coll. of Education.

    This final report describes a project to develop a secondary education program management guide for health occupations education in Iowa. Introductory material includes the following: a summary sheet on project objectives, a description of how the objectives were met, the audience served, an educational equity statement, a statement that the…

  6. Child health developmental plasticity, and epigenetic programming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to the organism under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology and long-term health. Developm...

  7. Health Career Education Program. Instructional Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laredo Independent School District, TX.

    This curriculum guide for teachers and its accompanying bilingual (English-Spanish) videotaped series for students are part of a program for improving health education for the Laredo (Texas) district elementary school children, grades K-5. Recommended for children for whom English is a second language, the guide and videotaped series infuse career…

  8. Evaluation of undergraduate nursing students' clinical confidence following a mental health recovery camp.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Thomas; Sumskis, Sue; Moxham, Lorna; Taylor, Ellie; Brighton, Renee; Patterson, Chris; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluate the impact of participation in a mental health recovery camp on the clinical confidence of undergraduate nursing students in dealing with individuals with mental illness. Twenty undergraduate nursing students who participated in the recovery camp completed the Mental Health Nursing Clinical Confidence Scale both before and directly after attending the camp. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Participation in the recovery camp was associated with a statistically-significant increase in students' level of overall confidence between the pretest and post-test data (P < 0.005). The results also demonstrated that students over the age of 25 years and who do not have a family history of mental illness are more likely to self-report a higher level of confidence in both the pre- and post-results. The clinical confidence of undergraduate nursing students improved through participation in an immersive clinical experience within the recovery camp. PMID:26767715

  9. The integration of mental and behavioral health into disaster preparedness, response, and recovery.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Flynn, Brian W; Schonfeld, David; Brown, Lisa M; Jacobs, Gerard A; Dodgen, Daniel; Donato, Darrin; Kaul, Rachel E; Stone, Brook; Norwood, Ann E; Reissman, Dori B; Herrmann, Jack; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Jones, Russell T; Ruzek, Josef I; Ursano, Robert J; Taylor, Robert J; Lindley, David

    2012-03-01

    The close interplay between mental health and physical health makes it critical to integrate mental and behavioral health considerations into all aspects of public health and medical disaster management. Therefore, the National Biodefense Science Board (NBSB) convened the Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee to assess the progress of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in integrating mental and behavioral health into disaster and emergency preparedness and response activities. One vital opportunity to improve integration is the development of clear and directive national policy to firmly establish the role of mental and behavioral health as part of a unified public health and medical response to disasters. Integration of mental and behavioral health into disaster preparedness, response, and recovery requires it to be incorporated in assessments and services, addressed in education and training, and founded on and advanced through research. Integration must be supported in underlying policies and administration with clear lines of responsibility for formulating and implementing policy and practice. PMID:22490938

  10. A comparative approach to assess drivers of success in mammalian conservation recovery programs.

    PubMed

    Crees, Jennifer J; Collins, Amy C; Stephenson, P J; Meredith, Helen M R; Young, Richard P; Howe, Caroline; Price, Mark R Stanley; Turvey, Samuel T

    2016-08-01

    The outcomes of species recovery programs have been mixed; high-profile population recoveries contrast with species-level extinctions. Each conservation intervention has its own challenges, but to inform more effective management it is imperative to assess whether correlates of wider recovery program success or failure can be identified. To contribute to evidence-based improvement of future conservation strategies, we conducted a global quantitative analysis of 48 mammalian recovery programs. We reviewed available scientific literature and conducted semistructured interviews with conservation professionals involved in different recovery programs to investigate ecological, management, and political factors associated with population recoveries or declines. Identifying and removing threats was significantly associated with increasing population trend and decreasing conservation dependence, emphasizing that populations are likely to continue to be compromised in the absence of effective threat mitigation and supporting the need for threat monitoring and adaptive management in response to new and potential threats. Lack of habitat and small population size were cited as limiting factors in 56% and 42% of recovery programs, respectively, and both were statistically associated with increased longer term dependence on conservation intervention, demonstrating the importance of increasing population numbers quickly and restoring and protecting habitat. Poor stakeholder coordination and management were also regularly cited by respondents as key weaknesses in recovery programs, indicating the importance of effective leadership and shared goals and management plans. Project outcomes were not influenced by biological or ecological variables such as body mass or habitat, which suggests that these insights into correlates of conservation success and failure are likely to be generalizable across mammals. PMID:26548375

  11. Mental Illness Sexual Stigma: Implications for Health and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Milton L.; Cournos, Francine; Wall, Melanie M.; Pala, Andrea Norcini; Mann, Claudio Gruber; Pinto, Diana; Pinho, Veronica; McKinnon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Among people in psychiatric care worldwide, the majority is sexually active, and sharply elevated rates of HIV infection compared to the general population have been shown. Recovery-oriented treatment does not routinely address sexuality. We examined the relationship between gender, severe mental illness diagnosis, and stigma experiences related to sexuality among people in psychiatric outpatient care. Method 641 sexually active adults attending eight public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro were interviewed for psychiatric diagnosis and stigma experiences. Stigma mechanisms well established in the literature but not previously examined in relation to sexuality were measured with the Mental Illness Sex Stigma Questionnaire, a 27-item interview about stigma in sexual situations and activities. Results Experiences of stigma were reported by a majority of participants for 48% of questionnaire items. Most people reported supportive attitudes toward their sexuality from providers and family members. Those with severe mental illness diagnoses showed greater stigma on Individual Discrimination and Structural Stigma mechanisms than those with non-severe mental illness diagnoses, while there was no difference on the Social Psychological Processes (internalized stigma) mechanism. Regardless of diagnosis or gender, a majority of participants devalued themselves as sexual partners. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Adults in psychiatric outpatient care frequently reported stigma experiences related to aspects of their sexual lives. From the perspectives of both HIV prevention and recovery from mental illness, examining the consequences of stigma in the sexual lives of people in psychiatric care and improving their measurement would have wide applicability. PMID:27030909

  12. Alvimopan in an Enhanced Recovery Program Following Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Zach; Parker, Will; Griffin, Josh; Isaacson, Tanner; Mirza, Moben; Wyre, Hadley; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey; Lee, Eugene K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radical cystectomy (RC) carries a high complication rate, including post-operative ileus. Alvimopan is an FDA approved peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist that has shown favorable results for improved recovery of gastro-intestinal function resulting in decreased hospital length of stay. Many enhanced recovery pathways (ERP) have been published demonstrating improved outcomes with decreased hospital stay and morbidity. Objective: We evaluated the addition of alvimopan to an ERP in patients undergoing RC. Methods: Patients undergoing RC at our institution during the implementation phase of alvimopan to our established ERP were retrospectively reviewed. Effect of alvimopan as it related to the use of nasogastric tubes, time to initiation of regular diet, and length of hospital stay was assessed using Chi-squared and Student’s T-tests. Linear regression was performed for univariate analysis and binary logistic regression was performed as a multivariate assessment of the effect of alvimopan. Results: Between July 2011 and January 2013, 80 patients were identified who underwent RC under the ERP (34 alvimopan and 46 standard care). Age, sex, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical technique (open vs. robotic), and type of urinary diversion were not different between groups. Alvimopan was associated with a reduction in mean time to regular diet (5.3 vs 4.1 days, p <  0.01) and a reduction in mean length of hospital stay (6.9 vs 5.7 days, p = 0.01). After controlling for other variables, alvimopan usage predicted for shorter time to regular diet and total hospital stay. Conclusions: Alvimopan may help to improve time to regular diet and decrease hospital stay in patients on an enhanced recovery pathway. PMID:27398398

  13. Financing geriatric programs in community health centers.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, D E; Ray, S; List, N; Duggar, B

    1991-01-01

    There are approximately 600 Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) providing preventive and primary health care services principally to medically underserved rural and urban areas across the United States. The need to develop geriatric programs within C/MHCs is clear. Less clear is how and under what circumstances a comprehensive geriatric program can be adequately financed. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the Public Health Service contracted with La Jolla Management Corporation and Duke University Center on Aging to identify successful techniques for obtaining funding by examining 10 "good practice" C/MHC geriatric programs. The results from this study indicated that effective techniques included using a variety of funding sources, maintaining accurate cost-per-user information, developing a marketing strategy and user incentives, collaborating with the area agency on aging and other community organizations, and developing special services for the elderly. Developing cost-per-user information allowed for identifying appropriate "drawing card" services, negotiating sound reimbursement rates and contracts with other providers, and assessing the financial impact of changing service mixes. A marketing strategy was used to enhance the ability of the centers to provide a comprehensive package of services. Collaboration with the area agency on aging and other community organizations and volunteers in the aging network was found to help establish referral networks and subsequently increase the number of elderly patients served. Finally, development of special services for the elderly, such as adult day care, case management, and health education, was found to increase program visibility, opportunities to work with the network of services for the aging, and clinical utilization. PMID:1908588

  14. Addiction Recovery: 12-Step Programs and Cognitive-Behavioral Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristow-Braitman, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Provides helping professionals with an overview of treatment issues referred to as spiritual by those recovering from alcohol and drug addictions through 12-step programs. Reviews conflicts between academically trained helping professionals and researchers, and those advocating spiritually oriented treatment programs. Discusses spiritual…

  15. Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program plan, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.C.; Wahlen, R.K.; Winship, R.A.

    1991-10-01

    The Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program is responsible to US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland for the safe, cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities at the Hanford Site. The Surplus Facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure program is also responsible to US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland for the program management of specific Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closures at the Hanford Site. This program plan addresses only the surplus facilities. The criteria used to evaluate each factor relative to decommissioning are based on the guidelines presented by the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland, Environmental Restoration Division. The guidelines are consistent with the Westinghouse Hanford Company commitment to decommission Hanford Site retired facilities in the safest and most cost-effective way achievable. This document outlines the plan for managing these facilities until disposal.

  16. Conducting a comprehensive school health program.

    PubMed

    Resnicow, K; Allensworth, D

    1996-02-01

    Since the late 1980s, the eight-component model of the comprehensive school health program (CSHP), has been adopted widely in the United States and internationally. While it is acknowledged that the eight program elements should be delivered in a coordinated, interactive manner, numerous issues regarding how this integration best can be achieved, including who at the school level should have this responsibility and how the eight components relate conceptually and logistically, have not been addressed adequately. In essence, a CSHP transforms several solo performers into an orchestra. This article proposes the school health coordinator as an essential element in the eight-component model of the CSHP--the maestro, without whom there can be no symphony. The coordinator's principal responsibilities include administration, integration of personnel and programs, evaluation, and direct intervention. Three program elements--staff wellness, healthy environment, and community/family involvement--are subsumed within the coordinator's role, effectively reducing the number of program elements from eight to five. Potential benefits in addition to issues regarding feasibility of the SHC, are discussed and studies examining the effectiveness of the SHC model are recommended. PMID:8930011

  17. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan includes services in public institutions for...

  18. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan includes services in public institutions for...

  19. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan includes services in public institutions for...

  20. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan includes services in public institutions for...

  1. 42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan includes services in public institutions for...

  2. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the following areas, as they relate to nutrition: (1) Health Education; (2) Health Services and Mental Health and…

  3. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Program in Patients Undergoing Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Junjie; Szatmary, Peter; Huang, Wei; de la Iglesia-Garcia, Daniel; Nunes, Quentin M.; Xia, Qing; Hu, Weiming; Sutton, Robert; Liu, Xubao; Raraty, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) pathways are multimodal, evidence-based approaches to optimize patient outcome after surgery. However, the use of ERAS protocols to improve morbidity and recovery time without compromising safety following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) remains to be elucidated. We conducted a systemic review and meta-analysis to assess the safety and efficacy of ERAS protocols compared with conventional perioperative care (CPC) in patients following PD. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Science Citation Index Expanded and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library were searched between January 2000 and June 2015. The patients who underwent PD with ERAS protocols or CPC were eligible. The studies that compared postoperative length of hospital stay (PLOS), postoperative complications, or in-hospital costs in the 2 groups were included. A meta-analysis, meta-regression, sensitivity analysis, and subgroup analysis were performed to estimate the postoperative outcomes between the 2 groups and identified the potential confounders. We used the methodological index for nonrandomized studies checklist to assess methodological qualities. Weighted mean differences (WMD) or odds ratios (OR) were calculated with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The publication bias tests were also performed through the funnel plots. In total, 14 nonrandomized comparative studies with 1409 ERAS cases and 1310 controls were analyzed. Implementation of an ERAS protocol significantly reduced PLOS (WMD: −4.17 days; 95%CI: −5.72 to −2.61), delayed gastric emptying (OR: 0.56; 95%CI: 0.44–0.71), overall morbidity (OR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.54–0.74), and in-hospital costs compared to CPC (all P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in other postoperative outcomes. Age, gender, and ERAS component implementation did not significantly contribute to heterogeneity for PLOS as shown by meta

  4. Physical fitness and health education program at NASA Headquarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angotti, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: policy procedures to enter the NASA Headquarters Physical Fitness and Health Program; eligibility; TDY eligibility; health promotions offered; and general facility management.

  5. Resilience and Recovery. Focal Point: Research, Policy, and Practice in Children's Mental Health. Volume 19, Number 1, Summer 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Janet S., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Focal Point" explores the concepts of resilience and recovery and what they mean in the context of mental health care for children and adolescents. From the articles, it emerges that the terminology associated with recovery and resilience (particularly the word, recovery, itself) can be confusing and even off-putting to stakeholders…

  6. A Look at Reading Recovery Programs in Maine Schools: A Supplement to the State of Maine Reading Recovery Report and Evaluation, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Paula; Lysy, Daria C.; Bamford, Rosemary; Cook, Laura

    In an effort to discover how Maine schools are operating their Reading Recovery (RR) programs, Maine Reading Recovery teachers provided information related to school-level implementation. Although completion of the Maine data forms was optional, three-fourths of the 346 Maine RR teachers completed the forms. Two types of implementation data were…

  7. Community Health Workers as Agents of Health Promotion: Analyzing Thailand's Village Health Volunteer Program.

    PubMed

    Kowitt, S D; Emmerling, D; Fisher, E B; Tanasugarn, C

    2015-08-01

    The village health volunteers (VHVs) have been a regular part of Thailand's health system since the 1960s. Despite widespread recognition, little research has been conducted to describe VHV activities, the settings in which VHVs provide help, how the program is administered, and how changing politics and health problems in Thailand have influenced the program. In order to understand the roles and practices of the VHVs, we conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews and focus groups with VHVs, community leaders and members, and public health officials in three semi-urban communities in central Thailand. Using the Social Ecological Framework, we mapped factors that influenced how the VHVs provided support, including governmental oversight, collaboration with public health officials, and community trust. These influences are discussed as "points of consideration," which help to identify the strengths and tensions within the VHV program and best practices in supporting and assessing community health worker efforts. PMID:25744815

  8. Treatment outcome and factors affecting time to recovery in children with severe acute malnutrition treated at outpatient therapeutic care program

    PubMed Central

    Mengesha, Melkamu Merid; Deyessa, Negussie; Tegegne, Balewgizie Sileshi; Dessie, Yadeta

    2016-01-01

    Background The outpatient therapeutic care program (OTP) of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) has been decentralized to health post level in Ethiopia since 2008–2009. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding treatment outcomes and factors related to the duration of stay on treatment after its decentralization to health post level. Objective This study was aimed to assess treatment outcome and factors affecting time to recovery in children with SAM treated at OTP. Design Health facility–based retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from 348 patient cards. The outcome variable was time to recovery. Descriptive analysis was done using percentages for categorical data and mean/median for continuous variables. A robust method of analyzing time to event data, the Cox proportional-hazard regression, was used. All statistical tests in this study are declared significant at p<0.05. Result 89.1% of children with kwashiorkor and 69.4% of children with marasmus were recovered. Of the total children studied, 22% were readmitted cases. The median time of recovery was 35 days for children with kwashiorkor and 49 days for children with marasmus. Children older than 3 years were 33% less likely to achieve nutritional recovery [adjusted hazard ratio, AHR=0.67, 95% confidence interval, CI (0.46, 0.97)]. Similarly, marasmic children stayed longer on treatment [AHR=0.42, 95% CI (0.32, 0.56)]. However, children who gained Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) ≥ 0.24 mm/day were 59% more likely to recover faster [AHR=1.59, 95% CI (1.23, 2.06)]. Conclusions Close monitoring of weight and MUAC gain to assess nutritional improvement with due emphasis given to children with lower admission weight, children of age 3 years and above and marasmic children will have a positive effect on treatment duration and outcome. PMID:27396484

  9. Incorporating Health Services Research into Nursing Doctoral Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cheryl Bland; Lusk, Sally L.

    2002-01-01

    Offers a rationale for involvement of nursing doctoral programs in health services research, which examines health care delivery. Presents recommendations of the Re-envisioning the Ph.D. project, which identified problems in doctoral programs. (Contains 46 references.) (SK)

  10. Recovery Act. Development of a Model Energy Conservation Training Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-07-05

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an updated model Energy Conservation training program for stationary engineers. This revision to the IUOE National Training Fund’s existing Energy Conservation training curriculum is designed to enable stationary engineers to incorporate essential energy management into routine building operation and maintenance tasks. The curriculum uses a blended learning approach that includes classroom, hands-on, computer simulation and web-based training in addition to a portfolio requirement for a workplace-based learning application. The Energy Conservation training program goal is development of a workforce that can maintain new and existing commercial buildings at optimum energy performance levels. The grant start date was July 6, 2010 and the project continued through September 30, 2012, including a three month non-funded extension.

  11. Child health, developmental plasticity, and epigenetic programming.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Z; Feil, R; Constancia, M; Fraga, M; Junien, C; Carel, J-C; Boileau, P; Le Bouc, Y; Deal, C L; Lillycrop, K; Scharfmann, R; Sheppard, A; Skinner, M; Szyf, M; Waterland, R A; Waxman, D J; Whitelaw, E; Ong, K; Albertsson-Wikland, K

    2011-04-01

    Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to the organism under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology and long-term health. Developmental origins of health and disease and life-history transitions are purported to use placental, nutritional, and endocrine cues for setting long-term biological, mental, and behavioral strategies in response to local ecological and/or social conditions. The window of developmental plasticity extends from preconception to early childhood and involves epigenetic responses to environmental changes, which exert their effects during life-history phase transitions. These epigenetic responses influence development, cell- and tissue-specific gene expression, and sexual dimorphism, and, in exceptional cases, could be transmitted transgenerationally. Translational epigenetic research in child health is a reiterative process that ranges from research in the basic sciences, preclinical research, and pediatric clinical research. Identifying the epigenetic consequences of fetal programming creates potential applications in clinical practice: the development of epigenetic biomarkers for early diagnosis of disease, the ability to identify susceptible individuals at risk for adult diseases, and the development of novel preventive and curative measures that are based on diet and/or novel epigenetic drugs. PMID:20971919

  12. Child Health, Developmental Plasticity, and Epigenetic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Feil, R.; Constancia, M.; Fraga, M.; Junien, C.; Carel, J.-C.; Boileau, P.; Le Bouc, Y.; Deal, C. L.; Lillycrop, K.; Scharfmann, R.; Sheppard, A.; Skinner, M.; Szyf, M.; Waterland, R. A.; Waxman, D. J.; Whitelaw, E.; Ong, K.; Albertsson-Wikland, K.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to the organism under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology and long-term health. Developmental origins of health and disease and life-history transitions are purported to use placental, nutritional, and endocrine cues for setting long-term biological, mental, and behavioral strategies in response to local ecological and/or social conditions. The window of developmental plasticity extends from preconception to early childhood and involves epigenetic responses to environmental changes, which exert their effects during life-history phase transitions. These epigenetic responses influence development, cell- and tissue-specific gene expression, and sexual dimorphism, and, in exceptional cases, could be transmitted transgenerationally. Translational epigenetic research in child health is a reiterative process that ranges from research in the basic sciences, preclinical research, and pediatric clinical research. Identifying the epigenetic consequences of fetal programming creates potential applications in clinical practice: the development of epigenetic biomarkers for early diagnosis of disease, the ability to identify susceptible individuals at risk for adult diseases, and the development of novel preventive and curative measures that are based on diet and/or novel epigenetic drugs. PMID:20971919

  13. Collegiate Recovery Communities Programs: What do we know and what do we need to know?

    PubMed

    Laudet, Alexandre; Harris, Kitty; Kimball, Thomas; Winters, Ken C; Moberg, D Paul

    2014-01-01

    As the broad construct of recovery increasingly guides addiction services and policy, federal agencies have called for the expansion of peer-driven recovery support services. The high prevalence of substance use and abuse in colleges and universities in the U.S. constitute a significant obstacle to pursuing an education for the unknown number of youths who have attained remission from substance use dependence. Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs) are an innovative and growing model of peer-driven recovery support delivered on college campuses. Although no systematic research has examined CRPs, available site-level records suggest encouraging outcomes: low relapse rates and above average academic achievement. The number of CRPs nationwide is growing, but there is a noticeable lack of data on the model, its students and their outcomes. We review the literature supporting the need for the expansion of CRPs, present information on the diversity of CRP services and outline key areas where research is needed. PMID:24634609

  14. 75 FR 79323 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY: Department of... contracting with community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program... ``RIN 2900-AN73, Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program.'' Copies of comments received will...

  15. 76 FR 52575 - Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 63 RIN 2900-AN73 Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program AGENCY: Department of... community-based treatment facilities in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) program of the... enrolled in the VA health care system. Through the HCHV program, VA identifies homeless veterans...

  16. Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -- Florida State Energy Program"

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) provides grants to states, territories, and the District of Columbia to support their energy priorities through the State Energy Program (SEP). The SEP provides Federal financial assistance to carry out energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet each state's unique energy needs while also addressing national goals such as energy security. Federal funding is based on a grant formula that takes into account population and energy consumption. The SEP emphasizes the state's role as the decision maker and administrator for the program. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) expanded the SEP, authorizing $3.1 billion in grants. Based on existing grant formulas and after reviewing state-level plans, EERE made awards to states. The State of Florida's Energy Office (Florida) was allocated $126 million - a 90-fold increase over Florida's average annual SEP grant of $1.4 million. Per the Recovery Act, this funding must be obligated by September 30, 2010, and spent by April 30, 2012. As of March 10, 2010, Florida had expended $13.2 million of the SEP Recovery Act funds. Florida planned to use its grant funds to undertake activities that would preserve and create jobs; save energy; increase renewable energy sources; and, reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To accomplish Recovery Act objectives, states could either fund new or expand existing projects. As a condition of the awards, EERE required states to develop and implement sound internal controls over the use of Recovery Act funds. Based on the significant increase in funding from the Recovery Act, we initiated this review to determine whether Florida had internal controls in place to provide assurance that the goals of the SEP and Recovery Act will be met and accomplished efficiently and effectively. We identified weaknesses in the implementation of SEP Recovery Act projects that have adversely impacted

  17. 75 FR 54804 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ...: Academia; safety and health professionals; industry organizations; worker organizations; and government..., safety and health professionals, industry organizations, worker organizations, and government agencies to... programs, including: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Voluntary...

  18. Aerobic Exercise for Alcohol Recovery: Rationale, Program Description, and Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard A.; Abrantes, Ana M.; Read, Jennifer P.; Marcus, Bess H.; Jakicic, John; Strong, David R.; Oakley, Julie R.; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Stuart, Gregory; Dubreuil, Mary Ella; Gordon, Alan A.

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders are a major public health concern. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of a number of different treatments for alcohol dependence, relapse remains a major problem. Healthy lifestyle changes may contribute to long-term maintenance of recovery, and interventions targeting physical activity, in particular, may be especially…

  19. 77 FR 62243 - Rural Health Network Development Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Rural Health Network Development Program... Network Development Program to the Siloam Springs Regional Health Cooperative, Inc. This non-competitive... development activities to ensure the sustainability and viability of a rural health network in order to...

  20. 76 FR 58006 - Consumer Health IT Pledge Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Consumer Health IT Pledge Program AGENCY: Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS. ACTION: Notice of availability for Consumer Health IT Pledge Program....

  1. World Trade Center Health Program; addition of certain types of cancer to the list of WTC-related health conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-12

    Title I of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 amended the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) to establish the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program. The WTC Health Program, which is administered by the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provides medical monitoring and treatment to eligible firefighters and related personnel, law enforcement officers, and rescue, recovery, and cleanup workers who responded to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City, at the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and to eligible survivors of the New York City attacks. In accordance with WTC Health Program regulations, which establish procedures for adding a new condition to the list of covered health conditions, this final rule adds to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions the types of cancer proposed for inclusion by the notice of proposed rulemaking. PMID:22970452

  2. Space Station Freedom Environmental Health Care Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Russo, Dane M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the environmental planning and monitoring aspects of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Health Care Program, which encompasses all phases of the SSF assembly and operation from the first element entry at MB-6 through the Permanent Manned Capability and beyond. Environmental planning involves the definition of acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the radiation dose barothermal parameters and potential contaminants in the SSF air and water and on internal surfaces. Inflight monitoring will be implemented through the Environmental Health System, which consists of five subsystems: Microbiology, Toxicology, Water Quality, Radiation, and Barothermal Physiology. In addition to the environmental data interpretation and analysis conducted after each mission, the new data will be compared to archived data for statistical and long-term trend analysis and determination of risk exposures. Results of these analyses will be used to modify the acceptability limits and monitoring requirements for the future.

  3. An Indian-controlled mental health program.

    PubMed

    Ostendorf, D; Hammerschlag, C A

    1977-09-01

    The control of health care programs for American Indians is shifting slowly from the federal government to the tribes. In 1971 the Apaches began operating a community mental health center on a reservation in northeastern Arizona. The tribal council appointed a 14-member board to administer the center; a majority of the members were Apaches. The board then hired an executive director who was not an Indian. There were 15 professional and paraprofessional staff members; 12 were Apaches or other Indians. In January 1976 the tribal council fired the director and disbanded the board of directors, although the clinic continued operation. The authors discuss sociocultural factors that influenced the center's development and give several reasons for the center's problems, including the general expectation that agencies run by Indians will not be successful. PMID:892727

  4. The social costs of the International Monetary Fund's adjustment programs for poverty: the case of health care development in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Anyinam, C A

    1989-01-01

    A primary health care (PHC) strategy was adopted in Ghana in 1978, but the civilian government at the time failed to implement the program designed to achieve health for all Ghanaians. In 1982, the revolutionary military government under Rawlings indicated its commitment to the full implementation of the PHC program. In this article, the author seeks to examine the extent to which the Economic Recovery Program initiated by the Rawlings' regime, its policy of decentralization and mobilization of the masses, and its promise to institute some fundamental organizational and structural changes in the health care delivery system, are contributing to the process of achieving "health for all" Ghanaians. PMID:2753581

  5. Problems of cost recovery implementation in district health care: a case study from Niger.

    PubMed

    Meuwissen, Liesbeth Emm

    2002-09-01

    This article describes and analyzes the impact of the introduction of a cost recovery system in 11 health centres of Tillabéri district, Niger, West Africa, between August 1997 and August 1999. The study is based on data collected by the health workers, observations of district activities and policy meetings and literature from similar programmes in the region. The central question addressed by this article is why a well-formulated programme, which was implemented accordingly, failed to succeed. The system described fits within the national health policy framework in Niger, which opted to introduce fixed attendance fees in health centres. The system was introduced as a part of a comprehensive package to improve the accessibility, quality and organization of the districts' health care. Discussed are the problems encountered in the functioning of the system, such as the unpredictability of the cost recovery rate, the drop in patients' attendance and the undermining effect of serious and regular shortages of essential generic drugs at the wholesale dealer. Further discussed are the supervision and control of the financial and drug administration and the participation of the population, which are identified as key areas of interest for sustainability of any cost recovery system. PMID:12135997

  6. Promoting resilience and recovery in a Buddhist mental health support group.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Bethany

    2014-04-01

    Communities of faith are important arenas for psychiatric mental health nurses to promote emotional well-being and support recovery for persons with mental health problems. This article describes an innovative faith-based mental health group, based on Buddhist philosophy and practice and established by an advanced practice psychiatric nurse, that uses psychoeducation, peer support, and faith encouragement to help participants find hope and meaning in the experience of mental health problems. A brief overview of Buddhism and selected concepts relevant to the philosophical framework of the Buddhist mental health support group is followed by a review of the common themes of the group discussions. These include: finding value in the illness experience; differentiating the proper role of treatment from that of Buddhist practice in optimizing mental health; and experiencing a deeper sense of joy, despite current suffering. PMID:24702210

  7. Psychometric analysis of the Mental Health Recovery Measure in a sample of veterans with depression.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Kristen M; Nelson, C Beau; Ganoczy, Dara; Zivin, Kara; Brandfon, Samantha; Walters, Heather; Cohen, Jay L; Valenstein, Marcia

    2016-05-01

    Using data from a sample of 398 veterans diagnosed with depression, the present study used principal components analysis to shorten the Mental Health Recovery Measure (MHRM) to a 10-item instrument. Results indicated the 10-item MHRM had excellent internal reliability. Construct validity for the 10-item MHRM was evidenced by correlations with measures of depression coping self-efficacy, social adjustment, hopelessness, and depression. The 10-item MHRM derived in the present study was compared with a 10-item version of the MHRM that was previously empirically derived in a sample of veterans with schizophrenia (Armstrong, Cohen, Hellemann, Reist, & Young, 2014). Results suggest that similar items represent the underlying construct of recovery for veterans with depression and veterans with schizophrenia. Veterans with depression reported lower average levels of recovery than veterans with schizophrenia. Study limitations, directions for future investigations, and the implications of routine assessment of mental health recovery in public mental health systems are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148954

  8. Culture, stress and recovery from schizophrenia: lessons from the field for global mental health.

    PubMed

    Myers, Neely Laurenzo

    2010-09-01

    This cultural case study investigates one U.S. psychosocial rehabilitation organization's (Horizons) attempt to implement the recovery philosophy of the U.S. Recovery Movement and offers lessons from this local attempt that may inform global mental health care reform. Horizons' "recovery-oriented" initiatives unwittingly mobilized stressful North American discourses of valued citizenship. At times, efforts to "empower" people diagnosed with schizophrenia to become esteemed self-made citizens generated more stressful sociocultural conditions for people whose daily lives were typically remarkably stressful. A recovery-oriented mental health system must account for people diagnosed with schizophrenia's sensitivity to stress and offer consumers contextually relevant coping mechanisms. Any attempt to export U.S. mental health care practices to the rest of the world must acknowledge that (1) sociocultural conditions affect schizophrenia outcomes; (2) schizophrenia outcomes are already better in the developing world than in the United States; and (3) much of what leads to "better" outcomes in the developing world may rely on the availability of locally relevant techniques to address stress. PMID:20571905

  9. Culture, Stress and Recovery from Schizophrenia: Lessons from the Field for Global Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This cultural case study investigates one U.S. psychosocial rehabilitation organization’s (Horizons) attempt to implement the recovery philosophy of the U.S. Recovery Movement and offers lessons from this local attempt that may inform global mental health care reform. Horizons’ “recovery-oriented” initiatives unwittingly mobilized stressful North American discourses of valued citizenship. At times, efforts to “empower” people diagnosed with schizophrenia to become esteemed self-made citizens generated more stressful sociocultural conditions for people whose daily lives were typically remarkably stressful. A recovery-oriented mental health system must account for people diagnosed with schizophrenia’s sensitivity to stress and offer consumers contextually relevant coping mechanisms. Any attempt to export U.S. mental health care practices to the rest of the world must acknowledge that (1) sociocultural conditions affect schizophrenia outcomes; (2) schizophrenia outcomes are already better in the developing world than in the United States; and (3) much of what leads to “better” outcomes in the developing world may rely on the availability of locally relevant techniques to address stress. PMID:20571905

  10. Employment and Training Programs: A Context for Reaching Out of School Youth with Mental Health and Other Health Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sonenstein, Freya Lund; Marshall, Beth Dail; Tandon, S. Darius

    2014-01-01

    Youth who have dropped out of school engage in health risk behaviors and have low access to health care. It is difficult for health experts to develop programs that successfully reach this population. Employment and training programs for youth who have dropped out are a potential venue for addressing the many health needs of these youth. This article reviews the history of these programs and the available evidence about their health services and health outcomes. It also describes the development of a mental health intervention in an employment and training program in Baltimore and the lessons learned from that experience. PMID:22423459

  11. Worksite health and wellness programs in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; Madan, Kushal; Veluswamy, Sundar Kumar; Mehra, Rahul; Maiya, Arun G

    2014-01-01

    Worksite health and wellness (WH&W) are gaining popularity in targeting cardiovascular (CV) risk factors among various industries. India is a large country with a larger workforce in the unorganized sector than the organized sector. This imbalance creates numerous challenges and barriers to implementation of WH&W programs in India. Large scale surveys have identified various CV risk factors across various industries. However, there is scarcity of published studies focusing on the effects of WH&W programs in India. This paper will highlight: 1) the current trend of CV risk factors across the industrial community, 2) the existing models of delivery for WH&W in India and their barriers, and 3) a concise evidence based review of various WH&W interventions in India. PMID:24607014

  12. Role of Child Nutrition Programs in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, M. Josephine

    The role of health educators in integrating child nutrition programs into school health education is discussed and issues attending such programs are considered. The importance of breakfast and lunch programs in the school is stressed with particular emphasis on using these programs to instruct children in sound nutritional practices. It is…

  13. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    SciTech Connect

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project

  14. Occupational Health and Safety Program at Metropolitan State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Fred M.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews various aspects of the Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) Program at Metropolitan State College, Denver, including the historical development of the program, its curriculum, continuing education courses, and resources for the OH&S Program. (CS)

  15. 50 CFR 660.115 - Trawl fishery-cost recovery program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Trawl fishery-cost recovery program. 660.115 Section 660.115 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES West...

  16. Statewide Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Program for Florida Libraries. Occasional Papers Number 185.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePew, John N.

    The goals of this program were to alert Florida's academic and public librarians to the nature of fire- and water-related disasters, train them to prepare for and respond to emergency situations in ways that would minimize damage to collections, and establish a statewide library disaster recovery network. These goals were met by means of the…

  17. The School-Police Partnership: Identifying At-Risk Youth through a Truant Recovery Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael D.; Fyfe, James J.; Campbell, Suzanne P.; Goldkamp, John S.

    2001-01-01

    Studied the experiences of 178 juveniles targeted by the Truant Recovery Program, a collaborative and nonpunitive school-law enforcement effort in California. Findings suggest that intensive cooperation between school and police may be effective in identifying troubled youth. Findings also raise questions about appropriate school and justice…

  18. Continuing Care in High Schools: A Descriptive Study of Recovery High School Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Andrew J.; Moberg, D. Paul; Krupp, Amanda Lawton

    2014-01-01

    Data from 17 recovery high schools suggest programs are dynamic and vary in enrollment, fiscal stability, governance, staffing, and organizational structure. Schools struggle with enrollment, funding, lack of primary treatment accessibility, academic rigor, and institutional support. Still, for adolescents having received treatment for substance…

  19. The Effect of Reading Proficiency on Student Success in Online Credit Recovery Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisoc, Randolph P.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study applied the theory that reading skills are predictive of high school graduation to examine the impact that reading proficiency has on student success in online credit recovery programs for credit deficient students, many of whom struggle with reading. Since reading proficiency impacts academic achievement in general, this…

  20. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  1. Recovery of Viable Bacteria from Probiotic Products that Target Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Banas, Jeffrey A.; Popp, Eric T.

    2013-01-01

    Probiotic therapy has predominantly been directed toward promoting and maintaining intestinal health. In recent years, however, probiotic regimens that target oral health have appeared on the market. These regimens are often delivered in the form of lozenges. Despite the oral health claims made by the manufacturers of these products, there is little independent evidence in the literature to support such claims. In theory, probiotic organisms can be beneficial by several different means including direct inhibition of pathogens and boosting of the host immune response, with the underlying assumption that these mechanisms require a critical number of viable organisms. In this study, five brands of probiotics marketed for oral health were tested for the recovery of viable bacteria. For only one brand could viable bacteria be recovered within one log of the manufacturer’s stated starting amount of bacteria. Nearly a billion viable bacteria could be recovered from a lozenge of this brand. The other brands claimed similar starting amounts of bacteria at the time of manufacture but at least a three-log drop off was observed in the amount of viable bacteria recovered from those products. Refrigeration of the probiotics significantly improved the recovery for one brand, but recoveries for all but one brand remained below the recommended daily dosage for probiotic regimens. It is concluded that probiotic brands differ significantly in the quantities of bacteria that remain viable with most failing to meet recommended dosage targets. PMID:24015157

  2. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    PubMed

    Shenderov, Boris A; Midtvedt, Tore

    2014-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the 'central genome dogma' (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions) should be replaced by the 'fluid genome dogma', that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing - and reprograming - throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabolism and microbiota as well as external factors such as diet, pharmaceuticals, environmental compounds, and so on. It is a growing body of results indicating that many chronic metabolic and degenerative disorders and diseases - often called 'civilization diseases' - are initiated and/or influenced upon by non-optimal epigenomic programing, often taking place early in life. In this context, the first 1,000 days of life - from conception into early infancy - is often called the most important period of life. The following sections present some major mechanisms for epigenomic programing as well as some factors assumed to be of importance. The need for more information about own genome and metagenome, as well as a substantial lack of adequate information regarding dietary and environmental databases are also commented upon. However, the mere fact that we can influence epigenomic health programing opens up the way for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The authors underline the importance of creating a 'Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomic Platform' in order to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics as well as in disease epidemiology, prevention and treatment. PMID:24829553

  3. Epigenomic programing: a future way to health?

    PubMed Central

    Shenderov, Boris A.; Midtvedt, Tore

    2014-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that the ‘central genome dogma’ (i.e. a causal chain going from DNA to RNA to proteins and downstream to biological functions) should be replaced by the ‘fluid genome dogma’, that is, complex feed-forward and feed-back cycles that interconnect organism and environment by epigenomic programing – and reprograming – throughout life and at all levels, sometimes also down the generations. The epigenomic programing is the net sum of interactions derived from own metabolism and microbiota as well as external factors such as diet, pharmaceuticals, environmental compounds, and so on. It is a growing body of results indicating that many chronic metabolic and degenerative disorders and diseases – often called ‘civilization diseases’ – are initiated and/or influenced upon by non-optimal epigenomic programing, often taking place early in life. In this context, the first 1,000 days of life – from conception into early infancy – is often called the most important period of life. The following sections present some major mechanisms for epigenomic programing as well as some factors assumed to be of importance. The need for more information about own genome and metagenome, as well as a substantial lack of adequate information regarding dietary and environmental databases are also commented upon. However, the mere fact that we can influence epigenomic health programing opens up the way for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The authors underline the importance of creating a ‘Human Gut Microbiota and Epigenomic Platform’ in order to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations among scientists and clinicians engaged in host microbial ecology, nutrition, metagenomics, epigenomics and metabolomics as well as in disease epidemiology, prevention and treatment. PMID:24829553

  4. Peer Tutoring Programs in Health Professions Schools

    PubMed Central

    Garavalia, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Objective Peer tutoring programs may be one method of maintaining quality of pharmacy education in the face of growing student enrollment and a small faculty body. A critical review of the literature was performed to ascertain whether peer tutoring programs improve or maintain the academic performance of health care professional students. Methods Various electronic databases and abstracts from past American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's annual meetings were searched to identify pertinent research. Only those articles with quantitative data, an experimental design, and comparative statistical analysis were included for review. Results Most studies found that peer tutoring had a positive impact on academic performance. These results may not be readily generalizable as there were numerous methodological flaws and limited descriptions of the programs and participants. Implications Studies with better designs and more detail are needed to answer definitively whether peer tutoring is of benefit. Details of what resources were required should be included in the study to allow the reader to determine the feasibility of the intervention. PMID:17136190

  5. 20 CFR 416.574 - Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? 416.574 Section 416.574 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Underpayments § 416.574 Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? Before...

  6. 20 CFR 416.574 - Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? 416.574 Section 416.574 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Underpayments § 416.574 Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? Before...

  7. 20 CFR 408.932 - Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? 408.932 Section 408.932 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Benefits § 408.932 Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? Before...

  8. 20 CFR 404.540 - Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? 404.540 Section 404.540 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? Before we collect an overpayment from you...

  9. 20 CFR 404.540 - Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will you receive notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? 404.540 Section 404.540 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... notice of our intention to apply cross-program recovery? Before we collect an overpayment from you...

  10. 20 CFR 408.933 - When will we begin cross-program recovery from your current monthly benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Underpayments and Overpayments Adjustment of Title II Benefits § 408.933 When will we begin cross-program recovery from your current monthly benefits? (a) We will begin collecting the overpayment balance by cross-program recovery from your title II...