Science.gov

Sample records for health survey design

  1. National health and nutrition examination survey: sample design, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Clifford L; Dohrmann, Sylvia M; Burt, Vicki L; Mohadjer, Leyla K

    2014-03-01

    Background Data collection for the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) consists of a household screener, an interview, and a physical examination. The screener primarily determines whether any household members are eligible for the interview and examination. Eligibility is established using preset selection probabilities for the desired demographic subdomains. After an eligible sample person is selected, the interview collects person-level demographic, health, and nutrition information, as well as information about the household. The examination includes physical measurements, tests such as hearing and dental examinations, and the collection of blood and urine specimens for laboratory testing. Objectives This report provides some background on the NHANES program, beginning with the first survey cycle in the 1970s and highlighting significant changes since its inception. The report then describes the broad design specifications for the 2011-2014 survey cycle, including survey objectives, domain and precision specifications, and operational requirements unique to NHANES. The report also describes details of the survey design, including the calculation of sampling rates and sample selection methods. Documentation of survey content, data collection procedures, estimation methods, and methods to assess nonsampling errors are reported elsewhere. PMID:25569458

  2. Design and methods of the Adult Inuit Health Survey 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Saudny, Helga; Leggee, Donna; Egeland, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Background The Canadian International Polar Year (IPY) program made it possible to undertake much needed health research in 3 jurisdictions within the Canadian Inuit Nunangat (homeland) over a 2-year period: Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR), Nunavut Territory, and Nunatsiavut. Design The Adult Inuit Health Survey (IHS) was a cross-sectional survey and provides baseline data upon which future comparisons can be made for prospectively assessing factors leading to the progression of chronic diseases among Canadian Inuit. With the help of the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen, which was equipped with research and laboratory facilities, 33 coastal communities were visited; land survey teams visited 3 inland communities. Results The Adult IHS succeeded in obtaining important baseline information concerning the health status and living conditions of 2,595 adults living in ISR, Nunavut and Nunatsiavut. Conclusion Information from this survey will be useful for future comparisons and the opportunity to link with the International Inuit Cohort, a follow-up evaluation, and for the development of future health policies and public health interventions. PMID:23166895

  3. Implementing the World Mental Health Survey Initiative in Portugal – rationale, design and fieldwork procedures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Mental Health Survey Initiative was designed to evaluate the prevalence, the correlates, the impact and the treatment patterns of mental disorders. This paper describes the rationale and the methodological details regarding the implementation of the survey in Portugal, a country that still lacks representative epidemiological data about psychiatric disorders. Methods The World Mental Health Survey is a cross-sectional study with a representative sample of the Portuguese population, aged 18 or older, based on official census information. The WMH-Composite International Diagnostic Interview, adapted to the Portuguese language by a group of bilingual experts, was used to evaluate the mental health status, disorder severity, impairment, use of services and treatment. Interviews were administered face-to-face at respondent’s dwellings, which were selected from a nationally representative multi-stage clustered area probability sample of households. The survey was administered using computer-assisted personal interview methods by trained lay interviewers. Data quality was strictly controlled in order to ensure the reliability and validity of the collected information. Results A total of 3,849 people completed the main survey, with 2,060 completing the long interview, with a response rate of 57.3%. Data cleaning was conducted in collaboration with the WMHSI Data Analysis Coordination Centre at the Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School. Collected information will provide lifetime and 12-month mental disorders diagnoses, according to the International Classification of Diseases and to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Conclusions The findings of this study could have a major influence in mental health care policy planning efforts over the next years, specially in a country that still has a significant level of unmet needs regarding mental health services organization, delivery of care and epidemiological

  4. Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

    2010-02-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  5. Designing HIGH-COST Medicine Hospital Surveys, Health Planning, and the Paradox of Progressive Reform

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas’ hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  6. [New design of the Health Survey of Catalonia (Spain, 2010-2014): a step forward in health planning and evaluation].

    PubMed

    Alcañiz-Zanón, Manuela; Mompart-Penina, Anna; Guillén-Estany, Montserrat; Medina-Bustos, Antonia; Aragay-Barbany, Josep M; Brugulat-Guiteras, Pilar; Tresserras-Gaju, Ricard

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the genesis of the Health Survey of Catalonia (Spain, 2010-2014) with its semiannual subsamples and explains the basic characteristics of its multistage sampling design. In comparison with previous surveys, the organizational advantages of this new statistical operation include rapid data availability and the ability to continuously monitor the population. The main benefits are timeliness in the production of indicators and the possibility of introducing new topics through the supplemental questionnaire as a function of needs. Limitations consist of the complexity of the sample design and the lack of longitudinal follow-up of the sample. Suitable sampling weights for each specific subsample are necessary for any statistical analysis of micro-data. Accuracy in the analysis of territorial disaggregation or population subgroups increases if annual samples are accumulated. PMID:24472532

  7. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  8. German health interview and examination survey for adults (DEGS) - design, objectives and implementation of the first data collection wave

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS) is part of the recently established national health monitoring conducted by the Robert Koch Institute. DEGS combines a nationally representative periodic health survey and a longitudinal study based on follow-up of survey participants. Funding is provided by the German Ministry of Health and supplemented for specific research topics from other sources. Methods/design The first DEGS wave of data collection (DEGS1) extended from November 2008 to December 2011. Overall, 8152 men and women participated. Of these, 3959 persons already participated in the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998 (GNHIES98) at which time they were 18–79 years of age. Another 4193 persons 18–79 years of age were recruited for DEGS1 in 2008–2011 based on two-stage stratified random sampling from local population registries. Health data and context variables were collected using standardized computer assisted personal interviews, self-administered questionnaires, and standardized measurements and tests. In order to keep survey results representative for the population aged 18–79 years, results will be weighted by survey-specific weighting factors considering sampling and drop-out probabilities as well as deviations between the design-weighted net sample and German population statistics 2010. Discussion DEGS aims to establish a nationally representative data base on health of adults in Germany. This health data platform will be used for continuous health reporting and health care research. The results will help to support health policy planning and evaluation. Repeated cross-sectional surveys will permit analyses of time trends in morbidity, functional capacity levels, disability, and health risks and resources. Follow-up of study participants will provide the opportunity to study trajectories of health and disability. A special focus lies on chronic diseases including asthma

  9. DEMOGRAPHIC AND HEALTH SURVEYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Demographic and Health Surveys are nationally representative household surveys with large sample sizes of between 5,000 and 30,000 households, typically. DHS surveys provide data for a wide range of monitoring and impact evaluation indicators in the areas of population, health, a...

  10. CHINA HEALTH AND NUTRITION SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The China Health and Nutrition Survey is designed to examine the effects of health, nutrition, and family planning policies and programs as they have been implemented by national and local governments. It is designed to examine how both the social and economic transformation of C...

  11. Telephone Survey Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casady, Robert J.

    The concepts, definitions, and notation that have evolved with the development of telephone survey design methodology are discussed and presented as a unified structure. This structure is then applied to some of the more well-known telephone survey designs and alternative designs are developed. The relative merits of the different survey designs…

  12. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  13. Design of the Nationwide Nursery School Survey on Child Health Throughout the Great East Japan Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Hiroko; Ishikuro, Mami; Kikuya, Masahiro; Chida, Shoichi; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Ono, Atsushi; Kato, Noriko; Yokoya, Susumu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Yamagata, Zentaro; Tanaka, Soichiro; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Kure, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Background The Great East Japan Earthquake inflicted severe damage on the Pacific coastal areas of northeast Japan. Although possible health impacts on aged or handicapped populations have been highlighted, little is known about how the serious disaster affected preschool children’s health. We conducted a nationwide nursery school survey to investigate preschool children’s physical development and health status throughout the disaster. Methods The survey was conducted from September to December 2012. We mailed three kinds of questionnaires to nursery schools in all 47 prefectures in Japan. Questionnaire “A” addressed nursery school information, and questionnaires “B1” and “B2” addressed individuals’ data. Our targets were children who were born from April 2, 2004, to April 1, 2005 (those who did not experience the disaster during their preschool days) and children who were born from April 2, 2006, to April 1, 2007 (those who experienced the disaster during their preschool days). The questionnaire inquired about disaster experiences, anthropometric measurements, and presence of diseases. Results In total, 3624 nursery schools from all 47 prefectures participated in the survey. We established two nationwide retrospective cohorts of preschool children; 53 747 children who were born from April 2, 2004, to April 1, 2005, and 69 004 children who were born from April 2, 2006, to April 1, 2007. Among the latter cohort, 1003 were reported to have specific personal experiences with the disaster. Conclusions With the large dataset, we expect to yield comprehensive study results about preschool children’s physical development and health status throughout the disaster. PMID:26460382

  14. Measuring health literacy in populations: illuminating the design and development process of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several measurement tools have been developed to measure health literacy. The tools vary in their approach and design, but few have focused on comprehensive health literacy in populations. This paper describes the design and development of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q), an innovative, comprehensive tool to measure health literacy in populations. Methods Based on a conceptual model and definition, the process involved item development, pre-testing, field-testing, external consultation, plain language check, and translation from English to Bulgarian, Dutch, German, Greek, Polish, and Spanish. Results The development process resulted in the HLS-EU-Q, which entailed two sections, a core health literacy section and a section on determinants and outcomes associated to health literacy. The health literacy section included 47 items addressing self-reported difficulties in accessing, understanding, appraising and applying information in tasks concerning decisions making in healthcare, disease prevention, and health promotion. The second section included items related to, health behaviour, health status, health service use, community participation, socio-demographic and socio-economic factors. Conclusions By illuminating the detailed steps in the design and development process of the HLS-EU-Q, it is the aim to provide a deeper understanding of its purpose, its capability and its limitations for others using the tool. By stimulating a wide application it is the vision that HLS-EU-Q will be validated in more countries to enhance the understanding of health literacy in different populations. PMID:24112855

  15. Designing for Dissemination Among Public Health Researchers: Findings From a National Survey in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Julie A.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Hoehner, Christine M.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We have described the practice of designing for dissemination among researchers in the United States with the intent of identifying gaps and areas for improvement. Methods. In 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 266 researchers using a search of the top 12 public health journals in PubMed and lists available from government-sponsored research. The sample involved scientists at universities, the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Results. In the pooled sample, 73% of respondents estimated they spent less than 10% of their time on dissemination. About half of respondents (53%) had a person or team in their unit dedicated to dissemination. Seventeen percent of all respondents used a framework or theory to plan their dissemination activities. One third of respondents (34%) always or usually involved stakeholders in the research process. Conclusions. The current data and the existing literature suggest considerable room for improvement in designing for dissemination. PMID:23865659

  16. The Norwegian Offender Mental Health and Addiction Study - Design and Implementation of a National Survey and Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bukten, Anne; Lund, Ingunn Olea; Rognli, Eline Borger; Stavseth, Marianne Riksheim; Lobmaier, Philipp; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Clausen, Thomas; Kunøe, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    The Norwegian prison inmates are burdened by problems before they enter prison. Few studies have managed to assess this burden and relate it to what occurs for the inmates once they leave the prison. The Norwegian Offender Mental Health and Addiction (NorMA) study is a large-scale longitudinal cohort study that combines national survey and registry data in order to understand mental health, substance use, and criminal activity before, during, and after custody among prisoners in Norway. The main goal of the study is to describe the criminal and health-related trajectories based on both survey and registry linkage information. Data were collected from 1,499 inmates in Norwegian prison facilities during 2013-2014. Of these, 741 inmates provided a valid personal identification number and constitute a cohort that will be examined retrospectively and prospectively, along with data from nationwide Norwegian registries. This study describes the design, procedures, and implementation of the ongoing NorMA study and provides an outline of the initial data. PMID:26648732

  17. The Norwegian Offender Mental Health and Addiction Study – Design and Implementation of a National Survey and Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bukten, Anne; Lund, Ingunn Olea; Rognli, Eline Borger; Stavseth, Marianne Riksheim; Lobmaier, Philipp; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Clausen, Thomas; Kunøe, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    The Norwegian prison inmates are burdened by problems before they enter prison. Few studies have managed to assess this burden and relate it to what occurs for the inmates once they leave the prison. The Norwegian Offender Mental Health and Addiction (NorMA) study is a large-scale longitudinal cohort study that combines national survey and registry data in order to understand mental health, substance use, and criminal activity before, during, and after custody among prisoners in Norway. The main goal of the study is to describe the criminal and health-related trajectories based on both survey and registry linkage information. Data were collected from 1,499 inmates in Norwegian prison facilities during 2013–2014. Of these, 741 inmates provided a valid personal identification number and constitute a cohort that will be examined retrospectively and prospectively, along with data from nationwide Norwegian registries. This study describes the design, procedures, and implementation of the ongoing NorMA study and provides an outline of the initial data. PMID:26648732

  18. NATIONAL PREGNANCY AND HEALTH SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Pregnancy and Health Survey conducted by NIDA is a nationwide hospital survey to determine the extent of drug abuse among pregnant women in the United States. The primary objective of the National Pregnancy and Health Survey (NPHS) was to produce national annual esti...

  19. Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP): a health survey in an East German region. Objectives and design of the oral health section.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Elke; Gesch, Dietmar; Biffar, Reiner; Bernhardt, Olaf; Kocher, Thomas; Splieth, Christian; Born, Gabriele; John, Ulrich

    2003-05-01

    The goal of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) was to estimate the prevalence of diseases, identify potential risk factors in a defined region in northeast Germany, and examine the particular living situation of this population after the reunification of East and West Germany. One of the main concerns of the SHIP design is the analysis of the relationships between dental, medical, social, and environmentally and behaviorally determined health factors. SHIP is a cross-sectional study (clinical findings and sociologic interviews). The sample was drawn in two steps: Thirty-two communities in the region were selected, and within these communities, a simple random sample was drawn from residence registries, stratified by gender and age. The final sample included 4,310 males and females, aged 20 to 79 years. This is equivalent to a participation rate of 68.8%. Data collection was completed in May 2001. The data collection and items comprised four parts: oral health examination, medical examination, health-related interview, and a health- and risk-factor-related questionnaire. The oral health examination included the teeth, periodontium, oral mucosa, morphology and function of the craniomandibular system, and prosthodontics. The medical examination included blood pressure measurements; electrocardiography; echocardiography; carotid, thyroid, and liver ultrasound examinations; neurologic screening; and blood and urine sampling. The computer-assisted interview consisted of questions on symptoms of disease, utilization of medical and dental services, self-assessment of general and oral health, health behavior and knowledge, and socioeconomic variables. The self-administered questionnaire comprised housing conditions, social network, work conditions, subjective well-being, and individual consequences of the German reunification. PMID:12795357

  20. Multidisciplinary eHealth Survey Evaluation Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karras, Bryant T.; Tufano, James T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development process of an evaluation framework for describing and comparing web survey tools. We believe that this approach will help shape the design, development, deployment, and evaluation of population-based health interventions. A conceptual framework for describing and evaluating web survey systems will enable the…

  1. THE GUATEMALAN SURVEY OF FAMILY HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Guatemalan Survey of Family Health, known as EGSF from its name in Spanish, was designed to examine the way in which rural Guatemalan families and individuals cope with childhood illness and pregnancy, and the role of ethnicity, poverty, and social support and health beliefs ...

  2. MEDICARE HEALTH OUTCOMES SURVEY (HOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) is the first Medicare managed care outcomes measure. CMS, in collaboration with NCQA, launched the Medicare HOS in the 1998 Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS?). The measure includes the most recent advances in summarizi...

  3. National Adolescent Student Health Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Education (Washington D.C.), 1988

    1988-01-01

    Results are reported from a national survey of teenaged youth on their attitudes toward a variety of health related issues. Topics covered were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; sexually transmitted diseases, violence, suicide, injury prevention, drug abuse, nutrition, and consumer education. (JD)

  4. HEALTH AND DIET SURVEY (HDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The FDA conducts this periodic omnibus survey of American consumers to track consumer attitudes, knowledge, and reported behaviors related to diet and health issues including cholesterol awareness of diet-disease risk factors, food label use, dietary supplement use, and awarenes...

  5. 1997 construction & design survey.

    PubMed

    Pinto, C

    1997-03-31

    Managed care might seem to be putting a damper on healthcare construction, but in fact it's one of several industry changes creating opportunities for architectural and design firms. One example of a trend toward making surroundings as pleasant as possible is the west campus expansion at East Texas Medical Center in Tyler (left). Designed and built by Ellerbe Becket and completed in 1995, the project, including a nine-story medical office building, features artwork and rooftop gardens. PMID:10165801

  6. WATERSHED BASED SURVEY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of watershed-based design and assessment tools will help to serve the multiple goals for water quality monitoring required under the Clean Water Act, including assessment of regional condition to meet Section 305(b), identification of impaired water bodies or wate...

  7. THIRD NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY (NHANES III)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), 1988-94, was conducted on a nationwide probability sample of approximately 33,994 persons 2 months and over. The survey was designed to obtain nationally representative information on the health and nutritio...

  8. How To Design Surveys. The Survey Kit, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Arlene

    The nine-volume Survey Kit is designed to help readers prepare and conduct surveys and become better users of survey results. All the books in the series contain instructional objectives, exercises and answers, examples of surveys in use, illustrations of survey questions, guidelines for action, checklists of "dos and don'ts," and annotated…

  9. Ambulance Design Survey 2011: A Summary Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y Tina; Kibira, Deogratias; Feeney, Allison Barnard; Marshall, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Current ambulance designs are ergonomically inefficient and often times unsafe for practical treatment response to medical emergencies. Thus, the patient compartment of a moving ambulance is a hazardous working environment. As a consequence, emergency medical services (EMS) workers suffer fatalities and injuries that far exceed those of the average work place in the United States. To reduce injury and mortality rates in ambulances, the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate has teamed with the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and BMT Designers & Planners in a joint project to produce science-based ambulance patient compartment design standards. This project will develop new crash-safety design standards and improved user-design interface guidance for patient compartments that are safer for EMS personnel and patients, and facilitate improved patient care. The project team has been working with practitioners, EMS workers’ organizations, and manufacturers to solicit needs and requirements to address related issues. This paper presents an analysis of practitioners’ concerns, needs, and requirements for improved designs elicited through the web-based survey of ambulance design, held by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This paper also introduces the survey, analyzes the survey results, and discusses recommendations for future ambulance patient compartments design. PMID:26401439

  10. Young women's reproductive health survey.

    PubMed

    Lewis, H

    1987-08-12

    A survey of reproductive health issues was conducted on 15 year old Hutt Valley secondary school girls by means of a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The prevalence of sexual intercourse in the sample was 29%. Sixteen percent of the sexually active respondents used no method of contraception. Knowledge of reproductive health facts and contraception was poor both amongst sexually experienced and inexperienced respondents. Twenty-six percent relied on peers for this information, with mothers, teachers and books being other important sources cited. Respondents requested more information on sexually transmitted diseases, contraception and sexual relationships. Most would like this information more readily accessible. Preferred sources of information mentioned were: parents, books, films/videos, family planning clinics and friends. PMID:3455514

  11. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits <10% of the stellar mass and (ii) 3D optical spectroscopy including both high-resolution ionized gas or stellar kinematic data for each galaxy and broad 320-725nm spectroscopy spanning [OII] 3727, Halpha, and Hbeta. RESOLVE is designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  12. Watershed-based survey designs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detenbeck, N.E.; Cincotta, D.; Denver, J.M.; Greenlee, S.K.; Olsen, A.R.; Pitchford, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Watershed-based sampling design and assessment tools help serve the multiple goals for water quality monitoring required under the Clean Water Act, including assessment of regional conditions to meet Section 305(b), identification of impaired water bodies or watersheds to meet Section 303(d), and development of empirical relationships between causes or sources of impairment and biological responses. Creation of GIS databases for hydrography, hydrologically corrected digital elevation models, and hydrologic derivatives such as watershed boundaries and upstream-downstream topology of subcatchments would provide a consistent seamless nationwide framework for these designs. The elements of a watershed-based sample framework can be represented either as a continuous infinite set defined by points along a linear stream network, or as a discrete set of watershed polygons. Watershed-based designs can be developed with existing probabilistic survey methods, including the use of unequal probability weighting, stratification, and two-stage frames for sampling. Case studies for monitoring of Atlantic Coastal Plain streams, West Virginia wadeable streams, and coastal Oregon streams illustrate three different approaches for selecting sites for watershed-based survey designs. ?? Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005.

  13. Nurse prescribing in mental health: national survey.

    PubMed

    Dobel-Ober, D; Brimblecombe, N; Bradley, E

    2010-08-01

    Mental health nurses can now train to become independent prescribers as well as supplementary prescribers. Independent nurse prescribing can potentially help to reorganize mental health services, increase access to medicines and improve service user information, satisfaction and concordance. However, mental health nursing has been slow to undertake prescribing roles, and there has been little work conducted to look at where nurse prescribing is proving successful, and those areas where it is less so. This survey was designed to collect information from directors of nursing in mental health trusts about the numbers of mental health prescribers in England, gather views about prescribing in practice, and elicit intentions with regards to the development of nurse prescribing. In some Trusts, the number of mental health nurse prescribers has increased to the point where wider impacts on workforce, the configuration of teams and services are inevitable. Currently, the way that prescribing is used within different organizations, services and teams varies and it is unclear which setting is most appropriate for the different modes of prescribing. Future work should focus on the impact of mental health nurse prescribing on service delivery, as well as on service users, colleagues and nurses themselves. PMID:20633075

  14. Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia.

    The 1992 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors (WSSAHB) was created to collect information regarding a variety of adolescent health behaviors among students in the state of Washington. It expands on two previous administrations of a student tobacco, alcohol, and other drug survey and includes questions about medical care, safety,…

  15. NATIONAL EMPLOYER HEALTH INSURANCE SURVEY (NEHIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Employer Health Insurance Survey (NEHIS) was developed to produce estimates on employer-sponsored health insurance data in the United States. The NEHIS was the first Federal survey to represent all employers in the United States by State and obtain information on all...

  16. Estimating health expenditure shares from household surveys

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Benjamin PC; Hanlon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To quantify the effects of household expenditure survey characteristics on the estimated share of a household’s expenditure devoted to health. Methods A search was conducted for all country surveys reporting data on health expenditure and total household expenditure. Data on total expenditure and health expenditure were extracted from the surveys to generate the health expenditure share (i.e. fraction of the household expenditure devoted to health). To do this the authors relied on survey microdata or survey reports to calculate the health expenditure share for the particular instrument involved. Health expenditure share was modelled as a function of the survey’s recall period, the number of health expenditure items, the number of total expenditure items, the data collection method and the placement of the health module within the survey. Data exists across space and time, so fixed effects for territory and year were included as well. The model was estimated by means of ordinary least squares regression with clustered standard errors. Findings A one-unit increase in the number of health expenditure questions was accompanied by a 1% increase in the estimated health expenditure share. A one-unit increase in the number of non-health expenditure questions resulted in a 0.2% decrease in the estimated share. Increasing the recall period by one month was accompanied by a 6% decrease in the health expenditure share. Conclusion The characteristics of a survey instrument examined in the study affect the estimate of the health expenditure share. Those characteristics need to be accounted for when comparing results across surveys within a territory and, ultimately, across territories. PMID:23825879

  17. Selection within households in health surveys

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Maria Cecilia Goi Porto; Escuder, Maria Mercedes Loureiro; Claro, Rafael Moreira; da Silva, Nilza Nunes

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the efficiency and accuracy of sampling designs including and excluding the sampling of individuals within sampled households in health surveys. METHODS From a population survey conducted in Baixada Santista Metropolitan Area, SP, Southeastern Brazil, lowlands between 2006 and 2007, 1,000 samples were drawn for each design and estimates for people aged 18 to 59 and 18 and over were calculated for each sample. In the first design, 40 census tracts, 12 households per sector, and one person per household were sampled. In the second, no sampling within the household was performed and 40 census sectors and 6 households for the 18 to 59-year old group and 5 or 6 for the 18 and over age group or more were sampled. Precision and bias of proportion estimates for 11 indicators were assessed in the two final sets of the 1000 selected samples with the two types of design. They were compared by means of relative measurements: coefficient of variation, bias/mean ratio, bias/standard error ratio, and relative mean square error. Comparison of costs contrasted basic cost per person, household cost, number of people, and households. RESULTS Bias was found to be negligible for both designs. A lower precision was found in the design including individuals sampling within households, and the costs were higher. CONCLUSIONS The design excluding individual sampling achieved higher levels of efficiency and accuracy and, accordingly, should be first choice for investigators. Sampling of household dwellers should be adopted when there are reasons related to the study subject that may lead to bias in individual responses if multiple dwellers answer the proposed questionnaire. PMID:24789641

  18. The California Health Interview Survey 2001: translation of a major survey for California's multiethnic population.

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Ninez A.; Lavarreda, Shana Alex; Yen, Wei; Brown, E. Richard; DiSogra, Charles; Satter, Delight E.

    2004-01-01

    The cultural and linguistic diversity of the U.S. population presents challenges to the design and implementation of population-based surveys that serve to inform public policies. Information derived from such surveys may be less than representative if groups with limited or no English language skills are not included. The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), first administered in 2001, is a population-based health survey of more than 55,000 California households. This article describes the process that the designers of CHIS 2001 underwent in culturally adapting the survey and translating it into an unprecedented number of languages: Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Khmer. The multiethnic and multilingual CHIS 2001 illustrates the importance of cultural and linguistic adaptation in raising the quality of population-based surveys, especially when the populations they intend to represent are as diverse as California's. PMID:15219795

  19. Curriculum Design in Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Simone C. O.; Colby, Holly; Juhlmann, Anne; Johaningsmeir, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    While health care providers are knowledgeable of health conditions and of the information patients need to make appropriate health decisions and follow health providers' recommendations, they lack information about adult teaching and learning and appropriate curriculum design. Adult educators can contribute more sophisticated skills in program…

  20. Rationale, design and respondent characteristics of the 2013–2014 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES 2013–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Lorna E.; Greene, Carolyn; Freeman, Amy; Snell, Elisabeth; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jesica S.; Frankel, Martin; Punsalang, Amado; Chernov, Claudia; Lurie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Mark; Koppaka, Ram; Perlman, Sharon E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Capacity to monitor non-communicable diseases (NCDs) at state or local levels is limited. Emerging approaches include using biomeasures and electronic health record (EHR) data. In 2004, New York City (NYC) performed a population-based health study on adult residents using biomeasures (NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Study, or NYC HANES), modeled after NHANES. A second NYC HANES was launched in 2013 to examine change over time, evaluate municipal policies, and validate a proposed EHR-based surveillance system. We describe the rationale and methods of NYC HANES 2013–2014. Methods NYC HANES was a population-based, cross-sectional survey of NYC adults using three-stage cluster sampling. Between August 2013 and June 2014, selected participants completed a health interview and physical exam (blood pressure, body mass index, and waist circumference). Fasting biomeasures included diabetes, lipid profiles, kidney function, environmental biomarkers, and select infectious diseases. Results Of the 3065 households approached, 2742 were eligible and 1827 were successfully screened (67%). A total of 1524 of eligible participants completed the survey (54%), for an overall response rate of 36%. Conclusion Completing a second NYC HANES a decade after the first study affords an opportunity to understand changes in prevalence, awareness and control of NCDs and evaluate municipal efforts to manage them. PMID:26844121

  1. HISPANIC HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY (HHANES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HHANES) was a nationwide probability sample of approximately 16,000 persons, 6 months-74 years of age. Hispanics were included in past health and nutrition examinations, but neither in sufficient numbers to produce estimates o...

  2. NATIONAL MATERNAL AND INFANT HEALTH SURVEY (NMIHS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS) provides data on maternal and infant health, including prenatal care, birth weight, fetal loss, and infant mortality. The objective of the NMIHS is to collect data needed by Federal, State, and private researchers to study fa...

  3. Survey design for detecting rare freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    A common objective when surveying freshwater mussels is to detect the presence of rare populations. In certain situations, such as when endangered or threatened species are potentially in the area of a proposed impact, the survey should be designed to ensure a high probability of detecting species presence. Linking survey design to probability of detecting species presence has been done for quantitative surveys, but commonly applied designs that are based on timed searches have not made that connection. I propose a semiquantitative survey design that links search area and search efficiency to probability of detecting species presence. The survey can be designed to protect against failing to detect populations above a threshold abundance (or density). I illustrate the design for surveys to detect clubshell (Pluerobema clava) and northern riffleshell (Epioblasma torulosa rangiana) in the Allegheny River. Monte Carlo simulation indicated that the proposed survey design performs well under a range of spatial distributions and low densities (<0.05 m2) where search area is sufficient to ensure that the probability of detecting species presence is predicted to be ???0.85. ?? 2006 by The North American Benthological Society.

  4. Afghan Health Education Project: a community survey.

    PubMed

    Lipson, J G; Omidian, P A; Paul, S M

    1995-06-01

    This study assessed the health concerns and needs for health education in the Afghan refugee and immigrant community of the San Francisco Bay Area. The study used a telephone survey, seven community meetings and a survey administered to 196 Afghan families through face-to-face interviews. Data were analyzed qualitatively and statistically. Health problems of most concern are mental health problems and stress related to past refugee trauma and loss, current occupational and economic problems, and culture conflict. Physical health problems include heart disease, diabetes and dental problems. Needed health education topics include dealing with stress, heart health, nutrition, raising children in the United States (particularly adolescents), aging in the United States, and diabetes. Using coalition building and involving Afghans in their community assessment, we found that the Afghan community is eager for culture- and language-appropriate health education programs through videos, television, lectures, and written materials. Brief health education talks in community meetings and a health fair revealed enthusiasm and willingness to consider health promotion and disease-prevention practices. PMID:7596962

  5. Assessing response reliability of health interview surveys using reinterviews.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, S J; Harpham, T

    1993-01-01

    Data from interview surveys of households or health facilities are used to assess community parameters such as health status and factors related to the ability and willingness of individuals to pay for health services. Although the effect of sample size on confidence intervals is generally well understood by the survey designers and policy-makers who use the results, the typical survey is also subject to non-sampling errors whose magnitude may exceed that of the sampling errors. The non-sampling errors associated with surveys are only rarely assessed and reported, even though they may have a major effect on the interpretation of findings. The present study reports the non-sampling errors associated with a household survey in Sierra Leone by comparing the results of reinterviews with the responses given during the original interviews. Certain types of questions were subject to greater non-sampling errors than others. The findings should be of use to designers of similar surveys and to those who rely on such surveys for making policy decisions. PMID:8324853

  6. Development and Implementation of Culturally Tailored Offline Mobile Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    institutional review board (IRB) approvals in multiple countries carefully to allow for development, implementation, and feedback, (2) in addition to testing the content of survey instruments, allow time and consideration for testing the use of novel mHealth technology (hardware and software), (3) incorporate training for and feedback from project staff, LMIC partner staff, and research participants, and (4) change methods accordingly, including content, as mHealth technology usage influences and is influenced by the content and structure of the survey instrument. Lessons learned from early phases of LMIC research projects using emerging mHealth technologies are critical for informing subsequent research methods and study designs. PMID:27256208

  7. Korea Community Health Survey Data Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Wha; Ko, Yun Sil; Kim, Yoo Jin; Sung, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Hyo Jin; Choi, Hyung Yun; Sung, Changhyun; Jeong, Eunkyeong

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated the first nationwide survey, Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS), to provide data that could be used to plan, implement, monitor, and evaluate community health promotion and disease prevention programs. This community-based cross-sectional survey has been conducted by 253 community health centers, 35 community universities, and 1500 interviewers. The KCHS standardized questionnaire was developed jointly by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff, a working group of health indicators standardization subcommittee, and 16 metropolitan cities and provinces with 253 regional sites. The questionnaire covers a variety of topics related to health behaviors and prevention, which is used to assess the prevalence of personal health practices and behaviors related to the leading causes of disease, including smoking, alcohol use, drinking and driving, high blood pressure control, physical activity, weight control, quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, European Quality of Life-Visual Analogue Scale, Korean Instrumental Activities of Daily Living ), medical service, accident, injury, etc. The KCHS was administered by trained interviewers, and the quality control of the KCHS was improved by the introduction of a computer-assisted personal interview in 2010. The KCHS data allow a direct comparison of the differences of health issues among provinces. Furthermore, the provinces can use these data for their own cost-effective health interventions to improve health promotion and disease prevention. For users and researchers throughout the world, microdata (in the form of SAS files) and analytic guidelines can be downloaded from the KCHS website (http://KCHS.cdc.go.kr/) in Korean. PMID:26430619

  8. Geochemical surveys in the United States in relation to health.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tourtelot, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    Geochemical surveys in relation to health may be classified as having one, two or three dimensions. One-dimensional surveys examine relations between concentrations of elements such as Pb in soils and other media and burdens of the same elements in humans, at a given time. The spatial distributions of element concentrations are not investigated. The primary objective of two-dimensional surveys is to map the distributions of element concentrations, commonly according to stratified random sampling designs based on either conceptual landscape units or artificial sampling strata, but systematic sampling intervals have also been used. Political units have defined sample areas that coincide with the units used to accumulate epidemiological data. Element concentrations affected by point sources have also been mapped. Background values, location of natural or technological anomalies and the geographic scale of variation for several elements often are determined. Three-dimensional surveys result when two-dimensional surveys are repeated to detect environmental changes. -Author

  9. WATERSHED-BASED SURVEY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water-based sampling design and assessment tools help serve the multiple goals for water quality monitoring required under the Clean Water Act, including assessment of regional conditions to meet Section 305(b), identification if impaired water bodies or watersheds to meet Sectio...

  10. Quality of data in multiethnic health surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Pasick, R. J.; Stewart, S. L.; Bird, J. A.; D'Onofrio, C. N.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There has been insufficient research on the influence of ethno-cultural and language differences in public health surveys. Using data from three independent studies, the authors examine methods to assess data quality and to identify causes of problematic survey questions. METHODS: Qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this exploratory study, including secondary analyses of data from three baseline surveys (conducted in English, Spanish, Cantonese, Mandarin, and Vietnamese). Collection of additional data included interviews with investigators and interviewers; observations of item development; focus groups; think-aloud interviews; a test-retest assessment survey; and a pilot test of alternatively worded questions. RESULTS: The authors identify underlying causes for the 12 most problematic variables in three multiethnic surveys and describe them in terms of ethnic differences in reliability, validity, and cognitive processes (interpretation, memory retrieval, judgment formation, and response editing), and differences with regard to cultural appropriateness and translation problems. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple complex elements affect measurement in a multiethnic survey, many of which are neither readily observed nor understood through standard tests of data quality. Multiethnic survey questions are best evaluated using a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods that reveal different types and causes of problems. PMID:11889288

  11. Armchair Survey Sampling: An Aid in Teaching Survey Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, M. E.

    A fictitious community of 583 households was set up to simulate a survey population, and was used in two laboratory assignments where students "interviewed" householders by a quota sampling procedure and tested the performance of several probability sampling designs. (Author/JEG)

  12. Beliefs about breastfeeding: a statewide survey of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Barnett, E; Sienkiewicz, M; Roholt, S

    1995-03-01

    A statewide project was implemented in 1993 to increase breastfeeding among low-income women in North Carolina through improved institutional policies and practices and professional lactation-management skills. A survey designed to ascertain professional beliefs about breastfeeding was mailed to 31 hospitals and 25 public health agencies. A total of 2209 health professionals completed the survey and met the study selection criteria. Nutritionists and pediatricians were most likely to have positive beliefs about breastfeeding, whereas hospital nurses were most likely to have negative beliefs. Personal breastfeeding experience contributed to positive beliefs. Professionals were least convinced of the emotional benefits of breastfeeding. Those with negative beliefs were most likely to advocate complete infant weaning from the breast before nine months of age. Although most health professionals had positive beliefs about breastfeeding, differences by profession, work environment, and personal breastfeeding experience indicate the need for comprehensive training in lactation management, and improvements in hospital and public health clinic environments. PMID:7741946

  13. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey: The First National Survey of State Health Agency Employees

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Katie; Leider, Jonathon P.; Harper, Elizabeth; Castrucci, Brian C.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Liss-Levinson, Rivka; Jarris, Paul E.; Hunter, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Public health practitioners, policy makers, and researchers alike have called for more data on individual worker's perceptions about workplace environment, job satisfaction, and training needs for a quarter of a century. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) was created to answer that call. Objective: Characterize key components of the public health workforce, including demographics, workplace environment, perceptions about national trends, and perceived training needs. Design: A nationally representative survey of central office employees at state health agencies (SHAs) was conducted in 2014. Approximately 25 000 e-mail invitations to a Web-based survey were sent out to public health staff in 37 states, based on a stratified sampling approach. Balanced repeated replication weights were used to account for the complex sampling design. Setting and Participants: A total of 10 246 permanently employed SHA central office employees participated in PH WINS (46% response rate). Main Outcome Measures: Perceptions about training needs; workplace environment and job satisfaction; national initiatives and trends; and demographics. Results: Although the majority of staff said they were somewhat or very satisfied with their job (79%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 78-80), as well as their organization (65%; 95% CI, 64-66), more than 42% (95% CI, 41-43) were considering leaving their organization in the next year or retiring before 2020; 4% of those were considering leaving for another job elsewhere in governmental public health. The majority of public health staff at SHA central offices are female (72%; 95% CI, 71-73), non-Hispanic white (70%; 95% CI, 69-71), and older than 40 years (73%; 95% CI, 72-74). The greatest training needs include influencing policy development, preparing a budget, and training related to the social determinants of health. Conclusions: PH WINS represents the first nationally representative survey of SHA employees. It

  14. Statistical considerations in designing raptor surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Careful sampling design is required to obtain useful estimates of raptor abundance. Well-defined objectives, selection of appropriate sample units and sampling scheme, and attention to detail to reduce extraneous sources of variability and error are all important considerations in designing a raptor survey.

  15. Health inequalities in Armenia - analysis of survey results”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prevailing sociopolitical and economic obstacles have been implicated in the inadequate utilization and delivery of the Armenian health care system. Methods A random survey of 1,000 local residents, from all administrative regions of Armenia, concerned with health care services cost and satisfaction was conducted. Participation in the survey was voluntary and the information was collected using anonymous telephone interviews. Results The utilization of health care services was low, particularly in rural areas. This under-utilization of services correlated with low income of the population surveyed. The state funded health care services are inadequate to ensure availability of free-of-charge services even to economically disadvantaged groups. Continued reliance on direct out-of pocket and illicit payments, for medical services, are serious issues which plague healthcare, pharmaceutical and medical technology sectors of Armenia. Conclusions Restructuring of the health care system to implement a cost-effective approach to the prevention and treatment of diseases, especially disproportionately affect the poor, should be undertaken. Public payments, increasing the amount of subsidies for poor and lower income groups through a compulsory health insurance system should be evaluated and included as appropriate in this health system redesign. Current medical services reimbursement practices undermine the principle of equity in financing and access. Measures designed to improve healthcare access and affordability for poor and disadvantaged households should be enacted. PMID:22695079

  16. Indonesian survey looks at adolescent reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Achmad, S I; Westley, S B

    1999-10-01

    The Baseline Survey of Young Adult Reproductive Welfare in Indonesia, conducted from September to December 1998, provides information about young Indonesians on topics concerning work, education, marriage, family life, sexuality, fertility, and HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. The survey interviewed 4106 men and 3978 women aged 15-24 years in three provinces of Java. Survey findings showed that 42% of the women and 8% of the men are currently or have been married. There was a strong inverse relationship between marriage and schooling, which suggests that greater educational attainment and a higher average age at marriage are likely to go together. Although most young couples prefer to delay and space births, only half of currently married young women are using any type of contraception. These results indicate that there is a need for better reproductive health care as well as improved reproductive health education. Moreover, the current economic crisis has lead to a decline in the use of the private sector for health care. Instead, young people are using the less-expensive government services, and young women are turning to pharmacies and midwives rather than to private doctors to obtain contraceptives. These findings have several policy implications including the need for reproductive health programs that provide services needed by young people. PMID:12295693

  17. Strategies for joint geophysical survey design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, Alexis; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the use of multiple geophysical techniques to image the subsurface has become a popular option. Joint inversions of geophysical datasets are based on the assumption that the spatial variations of the different physical subsurface parameters exhibit structural similarities. In this work, we combine the benefits of joint inversions of geophysical datasets with recent innovations in optimized experimental design. These techniques maximize the data information content while minimizing the data acquisition costs. Experimental design has been used in geophysics over the last twenty years, but it has never been attempted to combine various geophysical imaging methods. We combine direct current geoelectrics, magnetotellurics and seismic refraction travel time tomography data to resolve synthetic 1D layered Earth models. An initial model for the subsurface structure can be taken from a priori geological information and an optimal joint geophysical survey can be designed around the initial model. Another typical scenario includes an existing data set from a past survey and a subsequent survey that is planned to optimally complement the existing data. Our results demonstrate that the joint design methodology provides optimized combinations of data sets that include only a few data points. Nevertheless, they allow constraining the subsurface models equally well as data from a densely sampled survey. Furthermore, we examine the dependency of optimized survey design on the a priori model assumptions. Finally, we apply the methodology to geoelectric and seismic field data collected along 2D profiles.

  18. Survey of adaptive control using Liapunov design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindorff, D. P.; Carroll, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A survey was made of the literature devoted to the synthesis of model-tracking adaptive systems based on application of Liapunov's second method. The basic synthesis procedure is introduced and a critical review of extensions made to the theory since 1966 is made. The extensions relate to design for relative stability, reduction of order techniques, design with disturbance, design with time variable parameters, multivariable systems, identification, and an adaptive observer.

  19. Survey Design for Large-Scale, Unstructured Resistivity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, D. J.; Casale, D.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the issues in designing data collection strategies for large-scale, poorly structured resistivity surveys. Existing or proposed applications for these types of surveys include carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery monitoring, monitoring of leachate from working or abandoned mines, and mineral surveys. Electrode locations are generally chosen by land access, utilities, roads, existing wells etc. Classical arrays such as the Wenner array or dipole-dipole arrays are not applicable if the electrodes cannot be placed in quasi-regular lines or grids. A new, far more generalized strategy is needed for building data collection schemes. Following the approach of earlier two-dimensional (2-D) survey designs, the proposed method begins by defining a base array. In (2-D) design, this base array is often a standard dipole-dipole array. For unstructured three-dimensional (3-D) design, determining this base array is a multi-step process. The first step is to determine a set of base dipoles with similar characteristics. For example, the base dipoles may consist of electrode pairs trending within 30 degrees of north and with a length between 100 and 250 m in length. These dipoles are then combined into a trial set of arrays. This trial set of arrays is reduced by applying a series of filters based on criteria such as separation between the dipoles. Using the base array set, additional arrays are added and tested to determine the overall improvement in resolution and to determine an optimal set of arrays. Examples of the design process are shown for a proposed carbon sequestration monitoring system.

  20. Health sciences libraries building survey, 1999–2009

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Logan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A survey was conducted of health sciences libraries to obtain information about newer buildings, additions, remodeling, and renovations. Method: An online survey was developed, and announcements of survey availability posted to three major email discussion lists: Medical Library Association (MLA), Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), and MEDLIB-L. Previous discussions of library building projects on email discussion lists, a literature review, personal communications, and the author's consulting experiences identified additional projects. Results: Seventy-eight health sciences library building projects at seventy-three institutions are reported. Twenty-two are newer facilities built within the last ten years; two are space expansions; forty-five are renovation projects; and nine are combinations of new and renovated space. Six institutions report multiple or ongoing renovation projects during the last ten years. Conclusions: The survey results confirm a continuing migration from print-based to digitally based collections and reveal trends in library space design. Some health sciences libraries report loss of space as they move toward creating space for “community” building. Libraries are becoming more proactive in using or retooling space for concentration, collaboration, contemplation, communication, and socialization. All are moving toward a clearer operational vision of the library as the institution's information nexus and not merely as a physical location with print collections. PMID:20428277

  1. Spatially balanced survey designs for natural resources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological resource monitoring programs typically require the use of a probability survey design to select locations or entities to be physically sampled in the field. The ecological resource of interest, the target population, occurs over a spatial domain and the sample selecte...

  2. Survey: Computer Usage in Design Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Ernest J.

    1983-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of chemical engineering departments regarding computer usage in senior design courses. Results are categorized according to: computer usage (use of process simulators, student-written programs, faculty-written or "canned" programs; costs (hard and soft money); and available software. Programs offered are listed in a…

  3. The XMM-LSS survey. Survey design and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Marguerite; Valtchanov, Ivan; Altieri, Bruno; Andreon, Stefano; Bolzonella, Micol; Bremer, Malcolm; Disseau, Ludovic; Dos Santos, Sergio; Gandhi, Poshak; Jean, Christophe; Pacaud, Florian; Read, Andrew; Refregier, Alexandre; Willis, Jon; Adami, Christophe; Alloin, Danielle; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chiappetti, Lucio; Cohen, Aaron; Detal, Alain; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Gosset, Eric; Hjorth, Jens; Jones, Laurence; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Lonsdale, Carol; Maccagni, Dario; Mazure, Alain; McBreen, Brian; McCracken, Henry; Mellier, Yannick; Ponman, Trevor; Quintana, Hernan; Rottgering, Huub; Smette, Alain; Surdej, Jean; Starck, Jean-Luc; Vigroux, Laurent; White, Simon

    2004-09-01

    The XMM Large Scale Structure survey (XMM-LSS) is a medium deep large area X-ray survey. Its goal is to extend large scale structure investigations attempted using ROSAT cluster samples to two redshift bins between 0survey design: the evolutionary study of the cluster cluster correlation function and of the cluster number density. The adopted observing configuration consists of an equatorial mosaic of 10 ks pointings, separated by 20^\\prime and covering 8° × 8°, giving a pointsource sensitivity of {\\sim } 5\\times 10^{-15}~{\\mathrm {erg~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}}} in the 0.5 2 keV band. This will yield more than 800 clusters of galaxies and a sample of X-ray AGN with a space density of about 300 deg-2. We present the expected cosmological implications of the survey in the context of LgrCDM models and cluster evolution. We give an overview of the first observational results. The XMM-LSS survey is associated with several other major surveys, ranging from the UV to the radio wavebands, which will provide the necessary resources for X-ray source identification and further statistical studies. In particular, the associated CFHTLS weak lensing and AMiBA Sunyaev Zel'dovich surveys over the entire XMM-LSS area will provide for the first time a comprehensive study of the mass distribution and of cluster physics in the universe on scales of a few hundred Mpc. We describe the main characteristics of our wavelet-based X-ray pipeline and source identification procedures, including the classification of the cluster candidates by means of a photometric redshift analysis. This permits the selection of suitable targets for spectroscopic follow-up. We present preliminary results from the first 25 XMM-LSS pointings: X-ray source properties, optical counterparts, and highlights from the first Magellan and VLT/FORS2 spectroscopic runs as well as preliminary results from the NIR search for z>1

  4. Vision Test Validation Study for the Health Examination Survey Among Youths 12-17 years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jean

    A validation study of the vision test battery used in the Health Examination Survey of 1966-1970 was conducted among 210 youths 12-17 years-old who had been part of the larger survey. The study was designed to discover the degree of correspondence between survey test results and clinical examination by an opthalmologist in determining the…

  5. A Survey of Health-Related Activities on Second Life

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Wilson, Kumanan; Morra, Dante

    2009-01-01

    Background Increasingly, governments, health care agencies, companies, and private groups have chosen Second Life as part of their Web 2.0 communication strategies. Second Life offers unique design features for disseminating health information, training health professionals, and enabling patient education for both academic and commercial health behavior research. Objectives This study aimed to survey and categorize the range of health-related activities on Second Life; to examine the design attributes of the most innovative and popular sites; and to assess the potential utility of Second Life for the dissemination of health information and for health behavior change. Methods We used three separate search strategies to identify health-related sites on Second Life. The first used the application’s search engine, entering both generic and select illness-specific keywords, to seek out sites. The second identified sites through a comprehensive review of print, blog, and media sources discussing health activities on Second Life. We then visited each site and used a snowball method to identify other health sites until we reached saturation (no new health sites were identified). The content, user experience, and chief purpose of each site were tabulated as well as basic site information, including user traffic data and site size. Results We found a wide range of health-related activities on Second Life, and a diverse group of users, including organizations, groups, and individuals. For many users, Second Life activities are a part of their Web 2.0 communication strategy. The most common type of health-related site in our sample (n = 68) were those whose principle aim was patient education or to increase awareness about health issues. The second most common type of site were support sites, followed by training sites, and marketing sites. Finally, a few sites were purpose-built to conduct research in SL or to recruit participants for real-life research. Conclusions Studies

  6. National Survey of Yoga Practitioners: Mental and Physical Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alyson; Friedmann, Erika; Bevans, Margaret; Thomas, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives to describe yoga practice and health characteristics of individuals who practice yoga, and to explore their beliefs regarding the effects of their yoga practice on their health. Design a cross-sectional design with anonymous online surveys Setting 4307 randomly selected individuals from 15 US Iyengar yoga studios (n = 18,160), representing 41 states; 1087 individuals responded, with 1045 (24.3%) surveys completed. Outcome Measures Freiberg Mindfulness Inventory, Mental Health Continuum (subjective well-being), Multi-factor Screener (diet), PROMIS sleep disturbance, fatigue, and social support, International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results Age: 19 to 87 years (M = 51.7 ± 11.7), 84.2% female, 89.2% white, 87.4% well educated (≥ bachelor’s degree). Mean years of yoga practice = 11.4 (± 7.5). BMI = 12.1–49.4 (M = 23.1 ± 3.9). Levels of obesity (4.9%), smoking (2%), and fruit and vegetable consumption (M = 6.1 ± 1.1) were favorable compared to national norms. 60% reported at least one chronic/serious health condition, yet most reported very good (46.3%) or excellent (38.8%) general health. Despite high levels of depression (24.8 %), nearly all were moderately mentally healthy (55.2%) or flourishing (43.8%). Participants agreed yoga improved: energy (84.5%), happiness (86.5%), social relationships (67%), sleep (68.5%), and weight (57.3%), and beliefs did not differ substantially according to race or gender. The more they practiced yoga, whether in years or in amount of class or home practice, the higher their odds of believing yoga improved their health. Conclusions Individuals who practice yoga are not free of health concerns, but most believe their health improved because of yoga. Yoga might be beneficial for a number of populations including elderly women and those with chronic health conditions. PMID:23876562

  7. NATIONAL SURVEY OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL HEALTH CARE NEEDS (CSHCN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) was sponsored and funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and Services. Administration. The survey was conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for D...

  8. International survey of occupational health nurses' roles in multidisciplinary teamwork in occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Kono, Keiko; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Peurala, Marjatta; Radford, Jennifer; Staun, Julie

    2014-07-01

    Access to occupational health services for primary prevention and control of work-related injuries and illnesses by the global workforce is limited (World Health Organization [WHO], 2013). From the WHO survey of 121 (61%) participating countries, only one-third of the responding countries provided occupational health services to more than 30% of their workers (2013). How services are provided in these countries is dependent on legal requirements and regulations, population, workforce characteristics, and culture, as well as an understanding of the impact of workplace hazards and worker health needs. Around the world, many occupational health services are provided by occupational health nurses independently or in collaboration with other disciplines' professionals. These services may be health protection, health promotion, or both, and are designed to reduce health risks, support productivity, improve workers' quality of life, and be cost-effective. Rantanen (2004) stated that basic occupational health services must increase rather than decline, especially as work becomes more complex; workforces become more dynamic and mobile, creating new models of work-places; and jobs become more precarious and temporary. To better understand occupational health services provided by occupational health nurses globally and how decisions are made to provide these services, this study examined the scope of services provided by a sample of participating occupational health nurses from various countries. PMID:25000546

  9. The Trojan Lifetime Champions Health Survey: Development, Validity, and Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, Shawn C.; Romano, Russell; Scholefield, Robin M.; Schroeder, E. Todd; Azen, Stanley P.; Salem, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Context Self-report questionnaires are an important method of evaluating lifespan health, exercise, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes among elite, competitive athletes. Few instruments, however, have undergone formal characterization of their psychometric properties within this population. Objective To evaluate the validity and reliability of a novel health and exercise questionnaire, the Trojan Lifetime Champions (TLC) Health Survey. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting A large National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants A total of 63 university alumni (age range, 24 to 84 years), including former varsity collegiate athletes and a control group of nonathletes. Intervention(s) Participants completed the TLC Health Survey twice at a mean interval of 23 days with randomization to the paper or electronic version of the instrument. Main Outcome Measure(s) Content validity, feasibility of administration, test-retest reliability, parallel-form reliability between paper and electronic forms, and estimates of systematic and typical error versus differences of clinical interest were assessed across a broad range of health, exercise, and HRQL measures. Results Correlation coefficients, including intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for continuous variables and κ agreement statistics for ordinal variables, for test-retest reliability averaged 0.86, 0.90, 0.80, and 0.74 for HRQL, lifetime health, recent health, and exercise variables, respectively. Correlation coefficients, again ICCs and κ, for parallel-form reliability (ie, equivalence) between paper and electronic versions averaged 0.90, 0.85, 0.85, and 0.81 for HRQL, lifetime health, recent health, and exercise variables, respectively. Typical measurement error was less than the a priori thresholds of clinical interest, and we found minimal evidence of systematic test-retest error. We found strong evidence of content validity, convergent

  10. Sex Education, First Sex and Sexual Health Outcomes in Adulthood: Findings from a Nationally Representative Sexual Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Ashling; Boduszek, Daniel; Kelleher, Caroline; McBride, Orla; Morgan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school sex education and sexual health behaviours at first sex and later in adulthood, using nationally representative data. Respondents were adults from the 2010 Irish Contraception and Crisis Pregnancy Survey, a cross-sectional survey designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating…

  11. NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY ON DISABILITY - (NHIS-D)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Health Interview Survey-Disability Survey was developed to collect data that can be used to understand disability, to develop public health policy, to produce simple prevalence estimates of selected health conditions, and to provide descriptive baseline statistics on the...

  12. School-Based Health Care State Policy Survey. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) surveys state public health and Medicaid offices every three years to assess state-level public policies and activities that promote the growth and sustainability of school-based health services. The FY2011 survey found 18 states (see map below) reporting investments explicitly dedicated…

  13. Developing a household survey tool for health equity: A practical guide in Islamic Republic of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Beheshtian, Maryam; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Malekafzali, Hossein; Bonakdar Esfahani, Shirin; Hosseiny Ghavamabad, Leila; Aghamohammadi, Saeideh; Nouri, Mahnaz; Kazemi, Elaheh; Zakeri, Mohammadreza; Sagha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: An obvious gradient in health outcomes has been implicated in many evidences relating to social and economic factors. Proper data are requested to convince policy-makers calling for intersectoral action for health. Recently, I.R. of Iran has come up with 52 health equity indicators to monitor health equity through the country. Conducting regular surveys on 14 out of 52 national health equity indicators is needed to provide a basis for the health inequality analysis through the country. We aimed to introduce a survey tool and its related protocols on health equity indicators. Methods: This study was conducted through addressing the literature and expertise of health and demographic surveys at the national and international levels. Also, we conducted technical and consultative committee meetings, a final consensus workshop and a pilot study to finalize the survey tool. Results: We defined the study design, sampling method, reliable questionnaires and instructions, data collection and supervision procedure. We also defined the data analysis protocol on health equity indicators, generated from non-routine data. Conclusion: A valid and reliable tool, which could be employed at the national and sub-national levels, was designed to measure health equity in Iran. Policy-makers can use this survey tool to generate useful information and evidence to design appropriate required intervention and reduce health inequality across the country. PMID:26913268

  14. Bacteriological survey of sixty health foods.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, W H; Wilson, C R; Poelma, P L; Romero, A; Mislivec, P B

    1979-01-01

    A bacteriological survey was performed on 1,960 food samples encompassing 60 types of health foods available in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. No consistent bacteriological distinction (aerobic plate counts, total coliform and fecal coliform most probable numbers) was observed between foods labeled as organic (raised on soil with compost or nonchemical fertilizer and without application of pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides) and their counterpart food types bearing no such label. Types and numbers of samples containing Salmonella were: sunflower seeds, 4; soy flour, 3; soy protein powder, 2; soy milk powder, 1; dried active yeast, 1; brewers' years, 1; rye flour, 1; brown rice, 1; and alfalfa seeds,1. The occurrence of this pathogen in three types of soybean products should warrant further investigation of soybean derivatives as potentially significant sources of Salmonella. PMID:572198

  15. A health survey of toll booth workers

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, P.; Orris, P.; Buckley, L. )

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of respiratory and other health problems in a cohort of highway toll booth workers was surveyed by mailed questionnaire. In a low proportion of respondents (43.2%), a high prevalence of central nervous system complaints (headaches, irritability, or anxiety, and unusual tiredness), mucous membrane irritation (eye irritation, nasal congestion, and dry throat), and musculoskeletal problems (joint and back pains) was found. We believe these symptoms are reflective of the acute irritant and central nervous system effects of exposure to motor vehicle exhaust. The musculoskeletal complaints are likely the result of bending, reaching, and leaning out of the toll booth. The need for in-depth evaluation of the ventilation systems and the ergonomic and job stressors of work at toll booths is suggested by these results.

  16. A review of national health surveys in India.

    PubMed

    Dandona, Rakhi; Pandey, Anamika; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-04-01

    Several rounds of national health surveys have generated a vast amount of data in India since 1992. We describe and compare the key health information gathered, assess the availability of health data in the public domain, and review publications resulting from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), the District Level Household Survey (DLHS) and the Annual Health Survey (AHS). We highlight issues that need attention to improve the usefulness of the surveys in monitoring changing trends in India's disease burden: (i) inadequate coverage of noncommunicable diseases, injuries and some major communicable diseases; (ii) modest comparability between surveys on the key themes of child and maternal mortality and immunization to understand trends over time; (iii) short time intervals between the most recent survey rounds; and (iv) delays in making individual-level data available for analysis in the public domain. We identified 337 publications using NFHS data, in contrast only 48 and three publications were using data from the DLHS and AHS respectively. As national surveys are resource-intensive, it would be prudent to maximize their benefits. We suggest that India plan for a single major national health survey at five-year intervals in consultation with key stakeholders. This could cover additional major causes of the disease burden and their risk factors, as well as causes of death and adult mortality rate estimation. If done in a standardized manner, such a survey would provide useable and timely data to inform health interventions and facilitate assessment of their impact on population health. PMID:27034522

  17. The Dark Energy Survey CCD imager design

    SciTech Connect

    Cease, H.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Guarino, V.; Kuk, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schultz, K.; Schmitt, R.L.; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Argonne

    2008-06-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is planning to use a 3 sq. deg. camera that houses a {approx} 0.5m diameter focal plane of 62 2kx4k CCDs. The camera vessel including the optical window cell, focal plate, focal plate mounts, cooling system and thermal controls is described. As part of the development of the mechanical and cooling design, a full scale prototype camera vessel has been constructed and is now being used for multi-CCD readout tests. Results from this prototype camera are described.

  18. Integrated survey and design for transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Simpson, K.D.

    1994-12-31

    Gathering and compiling information on the features and uses of the land within a proposed corridor provides the basis for selecting a route, obtaining easements, and designing and constructing a transmission line. Traditionally, gathering this information involved searches of existing maps and records to obtain the available information, which would then be supplemented with aerial photography to record current conditions. Ground surveys were performed to collect topographic data for design purposes. This information was manually transferred to drawings and other documents to show the terrain, environmentally sensitive areas, property ownership, and existing facilities. These drawing served as the base to which the transmission line right-of-way, structures, and other design information were added. As the design was completed, these drawings became the source of information for constructing the line and ultimately, the record of the facility. New technologies and the every growing need for instantly accessible information have resulted in changes in almost every step of gathering, storing and using information. Electronic data collection, global positioning systems (GPS), digitized terrain models, computerized design techniques, development of drawings using CAD, and graphical information systems (GIS) have individually resulted in significant advancements in this process. Combining these components into an integrated system, however, is truly revolutionizing transmission line engineering. This paper gives an overview of the survey and mapping information that is required for transmission line projects, review the traditional techniques that have been employed to obtain and utilize this information, and discuss the recent advances in the technology. Additionally, a system is presented that integrates the components in this process to achieve efficiency, minimize chances of errors, and provide improved access to project information.

  19. Design of future surveys: chapter 13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, Jonathan; Smith, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This brief chapter addresses two related issues: how effort should be allocated to different parts of the sampling plan and, given optimal allocation, how large a sample will be required to achieve the PRISM accuracy target. Simulations based on data collected to date showed that 2 plots per cluster on rapid surveys, 2 intensive camps per field crew-year, 2-4 intensive plots per intensive camp, and 2-3 rapid surveys per intensive plot is the most efficient allocation of resources. Using this design, we investigated how crew-years should be allocated to each region in order to meet the PRISM accuracy target most efficiently. The analysis indicated that 40-50 crew-years would achieve the accuracy target for 18-24 of the 26 species breeding widely in the Arctic. This analysis was based on assuming that two rounds of surveys were conducted and that a 50% decline occurred between them. We discuss the complexity of making these estimates and why they should be viewed as first approximations.

  20. Measuring population health: costs of alternative survey approaches in the Nouna Health and Demographic Surveillance System in rural Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Lietz, Henrike; Lingani, Moustapha; Sié, Ali; Sauerborn, Rainer; Souares, Aurelia; Tozan, Yesim

    2015-01-01

    Background There are more than 40 Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) sites in 19 different countries. The running costs of HDSS sites are high. The financing of HDSS activities is of major importance, and adding external health surveys to the HDSS is challenging. To investigate the ways of improving data quality and collection efficiency in the Nouna HDSS in Burkina Faso, the stand-alone data collection activities of the HDSS and the Household Morbidity Survey (HMS) were integrated, and the paper-based questionnaires were consolidated into a single tablet-based questionnaire, the Comprehensive Disease Assessment (CDA). Objective The aims of this study are to estimate and compare the implementation costs of the two different survey approaches for measuring population health. Design All financial costs of stand-alone (HDSS and HMS) and integrated (CDA) surveys were estimated from the perspective of the implementing agency. Fixed and variable costs of survey implementation and key cost drivers were identified. The costs per household visit were calculated for both survey approaches. Results While fixed costs of survey implementation were similar for the two survey approaches, there were considerable variations in variable costs, resulting in an estimated annual cost saving of about US$45,000 under the integrated survey approach. This was primarily because the costs of data management for the tablet-based CDA survey were considerably lower than for the paper-based stand-alone surveys. The cost per household visit from the integrated survey approach was US$21 compared with US$25 from the stand-alone surveys for collecting the same amount of information from 10,000 HDSS households. Conclusions The CDA tablet-based survey method appears to be feasible and efficient for collecting health and demographic data in the Nouna HDSS in rural Burkina Faso. The possibility of using the tablet-based data collection platform to improve the quality of population health

  1. Effects of an Introductory Letter on Response Rates to a Teen/Parent Telephone Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Susan I.; Mayer, Joni A.; Clapp, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a pilot study in preparation for a larger investigation that will rely on telephone surveys to assess select health behaviors of teens and their parents, with a focus on indoor tanning. This study used a randomized design to assess the impact of a presurvey letter on response rates to a telephone survey, as well as prevalence…

  2. Survey on Continuing Education Needs for Health Professionals: Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    The report documents the results of a 1967 survey of health professionals in the four-State Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mountain States Regional Medical Program (MS/RMP). Addressed to health professionals in each of the four States--Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Wyoming--the survey focuses primarily on the…

  3. HARRISBURG TRI-COUNTY HEALTH MANPOWER SURVEY REPORT. PRELIMINARY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RATNER, MURIEL

    THE HARRISBURG AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE COOPERATED WITH TWO HOSPITALS IN A SURVEY OF THE AREA'S NEEDS FOR HEALTH TECHNICIANS. DATA, COLLECTED BY QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEYS OF DOCTORS AND DENTISTS AND BY INTERVIEWS WITH ADMINISTRATORS OF HOSPITALS, NURSING HOMES AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS, INDICATED THAT (1) A 60-PERCENT INCREASE IN HEALTH MNAPOWER…

  4. Worksite Health Promotion Activities. 1992 National Survey. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

    The survey reported in this document examined worksite health promotion and disease prevention activities in 1,507 private worksites in the United States. Specificlly, the survey assessed policies, practices, services, facilities, information, and activities sponsored by employers to improve the health of their employees, and assessed health…

  5. The application of online surveys for workplace health research.

    PubMed

    Scriven, A; Smith-Ferrier, S

    2003-06-01

    Work has a synergistic relationship to health, and workplaces are increasingly the focus for both health promotion initiatives and health research. Electronic technologies are a common feature of many workplaces and as such are convenient low cost survey vehicles for the health researcher. The methods and the implications of employing Internet methods for health research are covered and a wide range of issues connected with online sampling and data collection are discussed. Because the workplace does not provide a neutral research environment, the security, anonymity and associated issues of using the two main forms of Internet surveys for workplace health research are examined and their advantages and disadvantages are debated. PMID:12852193

  6. Brief 75 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-03-05

    The 2014 survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2014. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.

  7. Brief 73 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-02-15

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2013. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.taoi_na

  8. Three-year cohort study of the role of environmental factors in the respiratory health of children in Hamilton, Ontario. Epidemiologic survey design, methods, and description of cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Pengelly, L.D.

    1986-06-01

    The relative importance of the effect of outdoor environmental factors (suspended particulates, sulphur dioxide) and indoor environmental factors (parental smoking, gas cooking), on the respiratory health of children is still unclear. To answer these questions, a 3-yr cohort analytic study has been conducted in Hamilton, Ontario between 1978 and 1981. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and indoor environmental factors was determined by an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Pulmonary function measures included both the forced expiratory maneuver and the single- and multiple-breath nitrogen washouts. Outdoor air quality was measured by a comprehensive network of suspended particulate and sulphur dioxide monitors. There were 3345 children 7 to 10 yr of age studied in the first year, a response rate of 95.4%, 3,727 in the second year, and 3168 in the third year; 75.6% of the initial cohort were studied in both Year 2 and Year 3. Comprehensive quality control in the study included measurement of the repeatability of both the questionnaire and pulmonary function data. Repeatability was acceptable except for variables derived from the single-breath nitrogen washout (correlation between initial and repeat closing volume vital capacity was 0.14). Cigarette smoking in Year 3 was reported in 4.8% of the children. The distribution of other covariables was not uniform, and the prevalence of parental smoking and gas cooking was greatest in the industrial area with the highest particulate pollution. Future analysis of these data will require the effect of these covariables to be distinguished from that caused by outdoor air pollution.

  9. The Design of Grids in Web Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Couper, Mick P.; Tourangeau, Roger; Conrad, Frederick G.; Zhang, Chan

    2014-01-01

    Grid or matrix questions are associated with a number of problems in Web surveys. In this paper, we present results from two experiments testing the design of grid questions to reduce breakoffs, missing data, and satisficing. The first examines dynamic elements to help guide respondent through the grid, and on splitting a larger grid into component pieces. The second manipulates the visual complexity of the grid and on simplifying the grid. We find that using dynamic feedback to guide respondents through a multi-question grid helps reduce missing data. Splitting the grids into component questions further reduces missing data and motivated underreporting. The visual complexity of the grid appeared to have little effect on performance. PMID:25258472

  10. Online Survey Design and Development: A Janus-Faced Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Claire; McLeod, Michael; Blythe, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    In this article we propose a "Janus-faced" approach to survey design--an approach that encourages researchers to consider how they can design and implement surveys more effectively using the latest web and database tools. Specifically, this approach encourages researchers to look two ways at once; attending to both the survey interface…

  11. Survey of rural, private wells. Statistical design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehnert, Edward; Schock, Susan C.

    1991-01-01

    Half of Illinois' 38 million acres were planted in corn and soybeans in 1988. On the 19 million acres planted in corn and soybeans, approximately 1 million tons of nitrogen fertilizer and 50 million pounds of pesticides were applied. Because groundwater is the water supply for over 90 percent of rural Illinois, the occurrence of agricultural chemicals in groundwater in Illinois is of interest to the agricultural community, the public, and regulatory agencies. The occurrence of agricultural chemicals in groundwater is well documented. However, the extent of this contamination still needs to be defined. This can be done by randomly sampling wells across a geographic area. Key elements of a random, water-well sampling program for regional groundwater quality include the overall statistical design of the program, definition of the sample population, selection of wells to be sampled, and analysis of survey results. These elements must be consistent with the purpose for conducting the program; otherwise, the program will not provide the desired information. The need to carefully design and conduct a sampling program becomes readily apparent when one considers the high cost of collecting and analyzing a sample. For a random sampling program conducted in Illinois, the key elements, as well as the limitations imposed by available information, are described.

  12. A review of national health surveys in India

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anamika; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several rounds of national health surveys have generated a vast amount of data in India since 1992. We describe and compare the key health information gathered, assess the availability of health data in the public domain, and review publications resulting from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), the District Level Household Survey (DLHS) and the Annual Health Survey (AHS). We highlight issues that need attention to improve the usefulness of the surveys in monitoring changing trends in India’s disease burden: (i) inadequate coverage of noncommunicable diseases, injuries and some major communicable diseases; (ii) modest comparability between surveys on the key themes of child and maternal mortality and immunization to understand trends over time; (iii) short time intervals between the most recent survey rounds; and (iv) delays in making individual-level data available for analysis in the public domain. We identified 337 publications using NFHS data, in contrast only 48 and three publications were using data from the DLHS and AHS respectively. As national surveys are resource-intensive, it would be prudent to maximize their benefits. We suggest that India plan for a single major national health survey at five-year intervals in consultation with key stakeholders. This could cover additional major causes of the disease burden and their risk factors, as well as causes of death and adult mortality rate estimation. If done in a standardized manner, such a survey would provide useable and timely data to inform health interventions and facilitate assessment of their impact on population health. PMID:27034522

  13. Asian American Field Survey: Re-Analysis of Health Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Karen L.; So, Alvin

    Data from the Asian American Field Survey of 1973 were examined to determine health problems, methods of seeking and paying for health services, health insurance coverage, and frequency of medical examinations among Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, Korean, and Samoan families in the United States. The analysis indicated that the Chinese reported the…

  14. The Health and Well-Being of Children in Rural Areas: A Portrait of the Nation 2007. The National Survey of Children's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) provides a unique resource with which to analyze the health status, health care use, activities, and family and community environments experienced by children in rural and urban areas. The NSCH was designed to measure the health and well-being of children from birth through age 17 in the United…

  15. Poor self-rated health and its associations with somatisation in two Australian national surveys

    PubMed Central

    Mewton, Louise; Andrews, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It is hypothesised that across two national surveys poor self-rated health will be independently associated with somatisation and will result in high rates of service use after adjusting for established diagnoses. Design Two cross-sectional population-based surveys were conducted in 1997 and 2007. The use of both surveys allowed replication of results. Setting Australia. Participants The 1997 and 2007 National Surveys of Mental Health and Well-Being were based on stratified, multistage area probability samples of persons living in private dwellings in Australia. The 1997 survey included 10 641 respondents aged 18–75 years, a response rate of 78%. The 2007 survey included 8841 respondents aged 16–85 years, a response rate of 60%. Main outcome measures Self-rated health. Results Approximately 15% of the Australian population rated their health as fair or poor in both surveys. The independent relationship between self-rated health and somatisation was replicated across both surveys in multivariate analyses. Individuals with negative self-rated health were 4.1 times as likely to screen positive for health anxiety (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.8 to 5.9) and 3.4 times as likely to be diagnosed with neurasthenia (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.2 to 5.2), when compared with individuals who rated their health positively. Individuals with negative self-rated health were also more likely to use health services after controlling for demographics and mental and physical illness. Conclusions These results confirm both of the study hypotheses: (1) that negative self-rated health was powerfully and independently associated with somatisation and (2) that this relationship manifested itself in high rates of service use, even after adjusting for an extensive range of demographics and psychiatric and physical conditions. PMID:23811174

  16. ADHD and Health Services Utilization in the National Health Interview Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuffe, Steven P.; Moore, Charity G.; McKeown, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Describe the general health, comorbidities and health service use among U.S. children with ADHD. Method: The 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) contained the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; used to determine probable ADHD), data on medical problems, overall health, and health care utilization. Results: Asthma…

  17. CONSUMER ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH PLANS SURVEY (CAHPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 5-year project has been used for consumers to identify the best health care plans and services for their needs. The goals of the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans (CAHPS?) are to (1) develop and test questionnaires that assess health plans and services, (2) produce easily ...

  18. Toward the intelligent use of health care consumer surveys.

    PubMed

    Allen, H M

    1995-01-01

    Consumer surveys are at a pivotal moment in health care. With demand for consumer-supplied data escalating in every sector of the industry, current opportunities for consumer surveys to demonstrate unique value in the marketplace are unparalleled. These opportunities, however, carry considerable risks, particularly with respect to performance report cards for competing health plans and providers. As investigators multiply in an area notably lacking in standardization, the chances increase that surveys will arrive at conflicting assessments of plans and providers. To resolve these inconsistencies, users will need to sharpen their understanding of the role of consumer surveys, the business and operational needs they can address, and how their results can be affected by methodology. This article discusses each of these issues with an eye toward promoting intelligent use of consumer surveys in the health care marketplace. PMID:10151590

  19. 1991 survey of recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, L T

    1992-01-01

    Twenty health sciences libraries reported building planning, expansion, or construction of new facilities in the association's second annual survey of recent building projects. Six projects are new, freestanding structures in which the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. Six other projects are part of new construction for separately administered units in which the library is a major tenant. The final eight projects involve additions to or renovations of existing space. Seven of these twenty libraries were still in projected, predesign, or design stages of awaiting funding approval; of those seven, five were not prepared to release the requested information. Six projects are reported here as illustrative of current building projects. Images PMID:1600420

  20. A survey of mental health nurses' experiences of stalking.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, R; Jones, J; Jackson, A; Smoyak, S

    2006-10-01

    Although an increasing amount of literature has appeared in recent years on the subject of stalking, little is known about mental health nurses' (MHNs) experiences of this phenomenon. The aims of the study were to investigate: (1) the incidence of stalking among a sample of MHNs in the UK; (2) who the perpetrators were; (3) the impact of stalking on MHNs; and (4) how MHNs manage their experiences. Employing a survey design, the British version of the Rutgers-Penn clinicians and stalking questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of 400 MHNs in the UK. Data were analysed by means of descriptive statistics and McNemar test. The findings reveal that: (1) 50% (n = 56) of MHNs who completed the questionnaire had been stalked; (2) on the whole, victims were female (78.6%) and stalkers males (82.1%); (3) stalkers were from a variety of social groups including mental health service users and MHNs; (4) victims were threatened, followed, physically assaulted and received unwanted communication; (5) MHNs reported a variety of stress-related (psychological and behavioural) responses to their experiences; and (6) employed a range of coping strategies. This study serves to raise awareness of a number of issues surrounding an under-reported phenomenon in mental health nursing and points to the need for further research to explore the reliability and consequences of the findings. PMID:16965475

  1. Design Effects and the Analysis of Survey Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folsom, Ralph E.; Williams, Rick L.

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), like most large national surveys, employs a complex stratified multistage unequal probability sample. The design provides a rigorous justification for extending survey results to the entire U.S. target population. Developments in the analysis of data from complex surveys which provide a…

  2. Design and Validation of the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKagan, S. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey (QMCS) is a 12-question survey of students' conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics. It is intended to be used to measure the relative effectiveness of different instructional methods in modern physics courses. In this paper, we describe the design and validation of the survey, a process that included…

  3. New Mexico Adolescent Health Risks Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antle, David

    To inform students of health risks (posed by behavior, environment, and genetics) and provide schools with collective risk appraisal information as a basis for planning/evaluating health and wellness initiatives, New Mexico administered the Teen Wellness Check in 1985 to 1,573 ninth-grade students from 7 New Mexico public schools. Subjects were…

  4. SURVEY OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION WORKFORCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Association of State and Territorial Public Health Nutrition Directors (ASTPHND), with support from a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), conducted a census of the professional and paraprofessional public health nutrition workforce in the sta...

  5. French Frigate Shoals reef health survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Coles, Steve L.; Rameyer, Robert

    2002-01-01

    French Frigate Shoals consists of a large (31 nm) fringing reef partially enclosing a lagoon. A basalt pinnacle (La Perouse Pinnacle) arises approximately halfway between the two ends of the arcs of the fringing reefs. Tern Island is situated at the northern end of the lagoon and is surrounded by a dredged ship channel. The lagoon becomes progressively shallower from west to east and harbors a variety of marine life including corals, fish, marine mammals, and sea turtles (Amerson 1971). In 2000, an interagency survey of the northwestern Hawaiian Islands was done to document the fauna and flora in FFS (Maragos and Gulko, 2002). During that survey, 38 stations were examined, and 41 species of stony corals were documented, the most of any of the NW Hawaiian islands (Maragos and Gulko 2002). In some of these stations, corals with abnormalities were observed. The present study aimed to expand on the 2000 survey to evaluate the lesions in areas where they were documented.

  6. Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Debra L.; Tonthat, Luong

    This report presents statistics from the 1999 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on selected health measures for children under 18 years of age, classified by sex, age, race/ethnicity, family structure, parent education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage, place of residence, region, and current health status. The NHIS…

  7. São Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey - a population-based epidemiological study of psychiatric morbidity in the São Paulo metropolitan area: aims, design and field implementation.

    PubMed

    Viana, Maria Carmen; Teixeira, Marlene Galativicis; Beraldi, Fidel; Bassani, Indaiá de Santana; Andrade, Laura Helena

    2009-12-01

    The São Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey is a population-based cross-sectional survey of psychiatric morbidity, assessing a probabilistic sample of household residents in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area, aged 18 years and over. Respondents were selected from a stratified multistage clustered area probability sample of households, covering all 39 municipalities, without replacement. Respondents were assessed using the World Mental Health Survey version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI), which was translated and adapted into the Brazilian-Portuguese language. Data was collected between May 2005 and April 2007 by trained lay interviewers. The World Mental Health Survey version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview comprises clinical and non-clinical sections, arranged as Part I and Part II, producing diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fourth Edition, and the International Classification of Diseases - 10th Revision. Mood, anxiety, impulse-control and substance use disorders, and suicide-related behavior, considered core disorders, as well as socio-demographic information, were assessed in all respondents. Non-clinical modules and non-core clinical sections (obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, gambling, eating disorders, neurasthenia, pre-menstrual disorders, psychotic symptoms and personality traits) were assessed in a sub-sample (2,942 respondents), composed by all respondents with at least one core disorder and a 25% random sample of those who were non-cases. A total of 5,037 individuals were interviewed, with a global response rate of 81.3%. Saliva samples were collected from 1,801 respondents, with DNA extracted stored pending further investigations. PMID:20098829

  8. National Natality Survey/National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS)

    Cancer.gov

    The survey provides data on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of mothers, prenatal care, pregnancy history, occupational background, health status of mother and infant, and types and sources of medical care received.

  9. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, V M

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries. Images PMID:10550027

  10. Health Research Facilities: A survey of Doctorate-Granting Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atelsek, Frank J.; Gomberg, Irene L.

    The survey data cover three broad categories: (1) the status of existing health research facilities at doctorate-granting institutions (including their current value, adequacy, and condition); (2) the volume of new construction in progress; and (3) the additions to health research facilities anticipated during the next 5 years…

  11. The Illinois 9th Grade Adolescent Health Survey. Full Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    A survey was conducted in Illinois to identify the risk of certain health problems among adolescents; to determine the health status of Illinois youth in relation to the Surgeon General's "Healthy People 2000 Objectives" and monitor progress toward national and state goals; and to help those working at national, state, and local levels develop…

  12. Taking the Pulse of Undergraduate Health Psychology: A Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brack, Amy Badura; Kesitilwe, Kutlo; Ware, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a random national survey of 100 doctoral, 100 comprehensive, and 100 baccalaureate institutions to determine the current state of the undergraduate health psychology course. We found clear evidence of a maturing course with much greater commonality in name (health psychology), theoretical foundation (the biopsychosocial model), and…

  13. NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY (NHANES) 1999-2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  14. Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report presents results pertaining to mental health from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. This report presents national estimates of the prevalence of past year mental disorders and past year mental health…

  15. EPIDEMIOLOGY and Health Care Reform The National Health Survey of 1935-1936

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The National Health Survey undertaken in 1935 and 1936 was the largest morbidity survey until that time. It was also the first national survey to focus on chronic disease and disability. The decision to conduct a survey of this magnitude was part of the larger strategy to reform health care in the United States. The focus on morbidity allowed reformers to argue that the health status of Americans was poor, despite falling mortality rates that suggested the opposite. The focus on chronic disease morbidity proved to be an especially effective way of demonstrating the poor health of the population and the strong links between poverty and illness. The survey, undertaken by a small group of reform-minded epidemiologists led by Edgar Sydenstricker, was made possible by the close interaction during the Depression of agencies and actors in the public health and social welfare sectors, a collaboration which produced new ways of thinking about disease burdens. PMID:21233434

  16. Using the Internet for surveys and health research.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther; Wyatt, Jeremy

    2002-01-01

    This paper concerns the use of the Internet in the research process, from identifying research issues through qualitative research, through using the Web for surveys and clinical trials, to pre-publishing and publishing research results. Material published on the Internet may be a valuable resource for researchers desiring to understand people and the social and cultural contexts within which they live outside of experimental settings, with due emphasis on the interpretations, experiences, and views of 'real world' people. Reviews of information posted by consumers on the Internet may help to identify health beliefs, common topics, motives, information, and emotional needs of patients, and point to areas where research is needed. The Internet can further be used for survey research. Internet-based surveys may be conducted by means of interactive interviews or by questionnaires designed for self-completion. Electronic one-to-one interviews can be conducted via e-mail or using chat rooms. Questionnaires can be administered by e-mail (e.g. using mailing lists), by posting to newsgroups, and on the Web using fill-in forms. In "open" web-based surveys, selection bias occurs due to the non-representative nature of the Internet population, and (more importantly) through self-selection of participants, i.e. the non-representative nature of respondents, also called the 'volunteer effect'. A synopsis of important techniques and tips for implementing Web-based surveys is given. Ethical issues involved in any type of online research are discussed. Internet addresses for finding methods and protocols are provided. The Web is also being used to assist in the identification and conduction of clinical trials. For example, the web can be used by researchers doing a systematic review who are looking for unpublished trials. Finally, the web is used for two distinct types of electronic publication. Type 1 publication is unrefereed publication of protocols or work in progress (a 'post

  17. Relationship between Health Literacy, Health-Related Behaviors and Health Status: A Survey of Elderly Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Bing; Liu, Liu; Li, Yan-Fei; Chen, Yan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the large volume of research dedicated to health-related behavior change, chronic disease costs continue to rise, thus creating a major public health burden. Health literacy, the ability to seek, understand, and utilize health information, has been identified as an important factor in the course of chronic conditions. Little research has been conducted on the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in elderly Chinese. The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between health literacy and health-related behaviors and health status in China. Methods: The subjects enrolled in this study were selected based on a stratified cluster random sampling design. Information involving >4500 older adults in 44 pension institutions in Urumqi, Changji, Karamay, and Shihezi of Xinjiang between September 2011 and June 2012 was collected. The Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (China Health Education Centre, 2008) and a Scale of the General Status were administered and the information was obtained through face-to-face inquiries by investigators. A total of 1452 respondents met the inclusion criteria. A total of 1452 questionnaires were issued and the valid response rate was 96.14% (1396 of 1452). Factors affecting health literacy and the relationship to health literacy were identified by one-way ANOVA and a multiple linear regression model. Results: The average health literacy level of the elderly in nursing homes was relatively low (71.74 ± 28.35 points). There were significant differences in the health literacy score among the factors of age, gender, race, education level, household income, marital conditions, and former occupation (p < 0.001). The health literacy score was significantly associated with smoking, drinking, physical exercise, and health examination (p < 0.001). The elderly with higher health literacy scores were significantly less likely to have risky behaviors (smoking, regular

  18. Gamified Design for Health Workshop.

    PubMed

    Giunti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Increasing lifespans for chronic disease sufferers means a population of young patients who require lifestyle intervention from an early age. For multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, social problems begin with the decline of cognitive skills and their quality of life is affected. In this workshop, organizers will propose participants to work on different gamification design approachs to solve MS patients' engagement problem. Participants will obtain skills that can be extrapolated to other conditions that require patients change to adopt a different behavior. At the end, participants will present their proposed gamification design and discuss and comment each solution, assessing potential unintended outcomes and advantages. PMID:27332273

  19. Health literacy among young adults: a short survey tool for public health and health promotion research.

    PubMed

    Abel, Thomas; Hofmann, Karen; Ackermann, Sabine; Bucher, Sabine; Sakarya, Sibel

    2015-09-01

    Health literacy (HL) is context-specific. In public health and health promotion, HL in the private realm refers to individuals' knowledge and skills to prevent disease and to promote health in everyday life. However, there is a scarcity of measurement tools explicitly geared to private realm contexts. Our aim was to develop and test a short survey tool that captures different dimensions of HL in the context of family and friends. We used cross-sectional data from the Swiss Federal Surveys of Adolescents from 2010 to 2011, comprising 7983 males and 366 females between 18 and 25 years. HL was assessed through a set of eight items (self-reports). We used principal component analysis to explore the underlying factor structure among these items in the male sample and confirmatory factor analysis to verify the factor structure in the female sample. The results showed that the tested item set represented dimensions of functional, interactive and critical HL. Two sub-dimensions, understanding versus finding health-relevant information, denoted functional HL. Interactive and critical HL were each represented with two items. A sum score based on all eight items (Cronbach's α: 0.64) showed expected positive associations with own and parental education among males and females (p < 0.05). The short item set appears to be a feasible measurement tool to assess HL in the private realm. Its broader application in survey studies may help to improve our understanding of how this form of HL is distributed in the general population. PMID:24482542

  1. Designing community surveys to provide a basis for noise policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    After examining reports from a large number of social surveys, two areas were identified where methodological improvements in the surveys would be especially useful for public policy. The two study areas are: the definition of noise indexes and the assessment of noise impact. Improvements in the designs of surveys are recommended which would increase the validity and reliability of the noise indexes. Changes in interview questions and sample designs are proposed which would enable surveys to provide measures of noise impact which are directly relevant for public policy.

  2. National workplace health promotion surveys: the Affordable Care Act and future surveys.

    PubMed

    DeJoy, David M; Dyal, Mari-Amanda; Padilla, Heather M; Wilson, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    This commentary reviews findings from the four previous national surveys of workplace health promotion activities (1985, 1992, 1999, and 2004, respectively) and offers recommendations for future surveys mandated under the Affordable Care Act of 2010. Future surveys should place greater emphasis on assessing program quality, reach, and effectiveness. Both employer and employee input should be sought. In addition, sampling plans should differentiate worksites from employers, and results should include public as well as private sector organizations. Ideas are offered for addressing these limitations and for creating a sustainable survey process and multifunctional database of results. PMID:24380423

  3. Penetration and adoption of health information technology (IT) in Thailand's community health centers (CHCs): a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kijsanayotin, Boonchai; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Speedie, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    A universal healthcare coverage program has been implemented in Thailand since 2001 and the Thailand Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) is restructuring its health information systems to support the management of this reform. The MOPH believes that health information technology (IT) is fundamental to the development of an effective health information system, and that users' adoption of health IT is one of the most important factors to the success of health IT implementation projects. However, there is no national data available regarding the penetration and adoption of health IT in Thai community health centers (CHCs). This cross sectional survey was designed to study the penetration and adoption of health IT in the country's community health centers. A random sample of 1,607 regionally stratified CHC's from a total of 9,806 CHCs was selected. With an 82% response rate, the data showed that people who worked in CHCs were currently heavy users of health IT. They exhibited high IT acceptance and positive attitudes toward using health IT. CHCs' staff was less resistant to adopt health IT than previously anticipated. These results are similar in all of the country's geographic regions. Health IT is pervasive in CHCs across the country and penetrates all regions. PMID:17911896

  4. The effect of survey method on survey participation: Analysis of data from the Health Survey for England 2006 and the Boost Survey for London

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a need for local level health data for local government and health bodies, for health surveillance and planning and monitoring of policies and interventions. The Health Survey for England (HSE) is a nationally-representative survey of the English population living in private households, but sub-national analyses can be performed only at a regional level because of sample size. A boost of the HSE was commissioned to address the need for local level data in London but a different mode of data collection was used to maximise participant numbers for a given cost. This study examines the effects on survey and item response of the different survey modes. Methods Household and individual level data are collected in HSE primarily through interviews plus individual measures through a nurse visit. For the London Boost, brief household level data were collected through interviews and individual level data through a longer self-completion questionnaire left by the interviewer and collected later. Sampling and recruitment methods were identical, and both surveys were conducted by the same organisation. There was no nurse visit in the London Boost. Data were analysed to assess the effects of differential response rates, item non-response, and characteristics of respondents. Results Household response rates were higher in the 'Boost' (61%) than 'Core' (HSE participants in London) sample (58%), but the individual response rate was considerably higher in the Core (85%) than Boost (65%). There were few differences in participant characteristics between the Core and Boost samples, with the exception of ethnicity and educational qualifications. Item non-response was similar for both samples, except for educational level. Differences in ethnicity were corrected with non-response weights, but differences in educational qualifications persisted after non-response weights were applied. When item non-response was added to those reporting no qualification, participants

  5. Designing occupancy studies: general advice and allocating survey effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2005-01-01

    1. The fraction of sampling units in a landscape where a target species is present (occupancy) is an extensively used concept in ecology. Yet in many applications the species will not always be detected in a sampling unit even when present, resulting in biased estimates of occupancy. Given that sampling units are surveyed repeatedly within a relatively short timeframe, a number of similar methods have now been developed to provide unbiased occupancy estimates. However, practical guidance on the efficient design of occupancy studies has been lacking. 2. In this paper we comment on a number of general issues related to designing occupancy studies, including the need for clear objectives that are explicitly linked to science or management, selection of sampling units, timing of repeat surveys and allocation of survey effort. Advice on the number of repeat surveys per sampling unit is considered in terms of the variance of the occupancy estimator, for three possible study designs. 3. We recommend that sampling units should be surveyed a minimum of three times when detection probability is high (> 0.5 survey-1), unless a removal design is used. 4. We found that an optimal removal design will generally be the most efficient, but we suggest it may be less robust to assumption violations than a standard design. 5. Our results suggest that for a rare species it is more efficient to survey more sampling units less intensively, while for a common species fewer sampling units should be surveyed more intensively. 6. Synthesis and applications. Reliable inferences can only result from quality data. To make the best use of logistical resources, study objectives must be clearly defined; sampling units must be selected, and repeated surveys timed appropriately; and a sufficient number of repeated surveys must be conducted. Failure to do so may compromise the integrity of the study. The guidance given here on study design issues is particularly applicable to studies of species

  6. Village health survey of Sina Mala, Gongola State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J S; Dixon, R A

    1993-09-01

    A survey of the environment, life-style, and health status, knowledge, attitudes and practices in the village of Sina Mala was carried out prior to the introduction of a village health post by a church-run rural health programme. In addition to the perceived needs of the villagers for a school, easier access to medicine and external assistance with well drilling, the study identified the need to train traditional midwives in hygienic delivery, to make local health workers more aware of onchocerciasis and to educate the community on sanitation and hygiene, including the harmful effects of the guinea corn beer. PMID:7839910

  7. Women's Health in the Baccalaureate Nursing School Curriculum: Report of a Survey and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Nursing Research (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This report presents the analytical results of a survey of U.S. baccalaureate nursing schools conducted during 1999 by the American Colleges of Nursing with a description of the extent of women's health content in the curriculum and selected recommendations designed to strengthen this content. Additional resources are included that describe the…

  8. Variance estimation for systematic designs in spatial surveys.

    PubMed

    Fewster, R M

    2011-12-01

    In spatial surveys for estimating the density of objects in a survey region, systematic designs will generally yield lower variance than random designs. However, estimating the systematic variance is well known to be a difficult problem. Existing methods tend to overestimate the variance, so although the variance is genuinely reduced, it is over-reported, and the gain from the more efficient design is lost. The current approaches to estimating a systematic variance for spatial surveys are to approximate the systematic design by a random design, or approximate it by a stratified design. Previous work has shown that approximation by a random design can perform very poorly, while approximation by a stratified design is an improvement but can still be severely biased in some situations. We develop a new estimator based on modeling the encounter process over space. The new "striplet" estimator has negligible bias and excellent precision in a wide range of simulation scenarios, including strip-sampling, distance-sampling, and quadrat-sampling surveys, and including populations that are highly trended or have strong aggregation of objects. We apply the new estimator to survey data for the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, and find that the reported coefficient of variation for estimated density is 20% using approximation by a random design, 17% using approximation by a stratified design, and 11% using the new striplet estimator. This large reduction in reported variance is verified by simulation. PMID:21534940

  9. Survey of adaptive control using Liapunov design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindorff, D. P.; Carroll, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the literature in which Liapunov's second method is used in determining the control law is presented, with emphasis placed on the model-tracking adaptive control problem. Forty references are listed. Following a brief tutorial exposition of the adaptive control problem, the techniques for treating reduction of order, disturbance and time-varying parameters, multivariable systems, identification, and adaptive observers are discussed. The method is critically evaluated, particularly with respect to possibilities for application.

  10. Designing surveys for tests of gravity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2011-12-28

    Modified gravity theories may provide an alternative to dark energy to explain cosmic acceleration. We argue that the observational programme developed to test dark energy needs to be augmented to capture new tests of gravity on astrophysical scales. Several distinct signatures of gravity theories exist outside the 'linear' regime, especially owing to the screening mechanism that operates inside halos such as the Milky Way to ensure that gravity tests in the solar system are satisfied. This opens up several decades in length scale and classes of galaxies at low redshift that can be exploited by surveys. While theoretical work on models of gravity is in the early stages, we can already identify new regimes that cosmological surveys could target to test gravity. These include: (i) a small-scale component that focuses on the interior and vicinity of galaxy and cluster halos, (ii) spectroscopy of low-redshift galaxies, especially galaxies smaller than the Milky Way, in environments that range from voids to clusters, and (iii) a programme of combining lensing and dynamical information, from imaging and spectroscopic surveys, respectively, on the same (or statistically identical) sample of galaxies. PMID:22084295

  11. Recruitment of mental health survey participants using Internet advertising: content, characteristics and cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Batterham, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    Postal and telephone survey research is threatened by declining response rates and high cost. Online recruitment is becoming more popular, although there is little empirical evidence about its cost-effectiveness or the representativeness of online samples. There is also limited research on optimal strategies for developing advertising content for online recruitment. The present study aimed to assess these aspects of online recruitment. Two mental health surveys used advertisements within a social network website (Facebook) to recruit adult Australian participants. The initial survey used advertisements linking directly to an external survey website, and recruited 1283 participants at $9.82 per completed survey. A subsequent survey used advertisements linking to a Facebook page that featured links to the external survey, recruiting 610 participants at $1.51 per completion. Both surveys were more cost-effective than similar postal surveys conducted previously, which averaged $19.10 per completion. Online and postal surveys both had somewhat unrepresentative samples. However, online surveys tended to be more successful in recruiting hard-to-reach populations. Advertising using "problem" terminology was more effective than "positive" terminology, while there was no significant effect of altruistic versus self-gain terminology. Online recruitment is efficient, flexible and cost-effective, suggesting that online recruitment has considerable potential for specific research designs. PMID:24615785

  12. Survey of Fashion Design Employers. Volume IX, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aurand, Cecilia; Lucas, John A.

    A survey was conducted to determine the availability of internship opportunities for fashion design students at Harper College and to measure the value of Harper design graduates to their employers. A sample of 279 manufacturers, contacts, and retail stores employing fashion designers were identified in the Chicago metropolitan area and after two…

  13. Neglected Value of Small Population-based Surveys: A Comparison with Demographic and Health Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Langston, Anne C.; Sarriot, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We believe that global health practice and evaluation operate with misleading assumptions about lack of reliability of small population-based health surveys (district level and below), leading managers and decision-makers to under-use this valuable information and programmatic tool and to rely on health information from large national surveys when neither timing nor available data meet their needs. This paper uses a unique opportunity for comparison between a knowledge, practice, and coverage (KPC) household survey and Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey (RDHS) carried out in overlapping timeframes to disprove these enduring suspicions. Our analysis shows that the KPC provides coverage estimates consistent with the RDHS estimates for the same geographic areas. We discuss cases of divergence between estimates. Application of the Lives Saved Tool to the KPC results also yields child mortality estimates comparable with DHS-measured mortality. We draw three main lessons from the study and conclude with recommendations for challenging unfounded assumptions against the value of small household coverage surveys, which can be a key resource in the arsenal of local health programmers. PMID:25995729

  14. Neglected value of small population-based surveys: a comparison with demographic and health survey data.

    PubMed

    Langston, Anne C; Prosnitz, Debra M; Sarriot, Eric G

    2015-03-01

    We believe that global health practice and evaluation operate with misleading assumptions about lack of reliability of small population-based health surveys (district level and below), leading managers and decision-makers to under-use this valuable information and programmatic tool and to rely on health information from large national surveys when neither timing nor available data meet their needs. This paper uses a unique opportunity for comparison between a knowledge, practice, and coverage (KPC) household survey and Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey (RDHS) carried out in overlapping timeframes to disprove these enduring suspicions. Our analysis shows that the KPC provides coverage estimates consistent with the RDHS estimates for the same geographic areas. We discuss cases of divergence between estimates. Application of the Lives Saved Tool to the KPC results also yields child mortality estimates comparable with DHS-measured mortality. We draw three main lessons from the study and conclude with recommendations for challenging unfounded assumptions against the value of small household coverage surveys, which can be a key resource in the arsenal of local health programmers. PMID:25995729

  15. A survey of spacecraft thermal design solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, R.; Wegrich, R.; Pierce, E.; Patterson, W.

    1991-01-01

    A number of thermal projects are outlined giving a perspective on the scope and depth of activities in the thermal control group. A set of designs are presented in a form to illustrate some of the more innovative work. Design configurations, solution techniques, and flight anomalies are discussed. Activities include the instruments of the Hubble Space Telescope, Space Station Freedom, and Spacelab.

  16. Rapid surveys for program evaluation: design and implementation of an experiment in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, K; Bilsborrow, R E; Olmedo, C; Carrasco, R

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents details from the field test of two rapid surveys in Ecuador in 1995. It focuses on how the surveys were designed and implemented, including descriptions of the sampling procedures, the preparation and use of preprogrammed palmtop computers for data entry, the selection criteria for the interviewing team, and how the training was designed. Lessons are drawn that will assist health professionals plan and carry out better rapid data collection in the future. The objective of the study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of data gathered during the rapid surveys as compared with a recent "gold standard" national survey. A two-way factorial design was used to control for differences in sampling (probability versus quasi-probability) and methods of data collection (paper versus palmtop computer). Few differences were detected between the surveys done on palmtops as compared to paper ones, but urban and rural differentials in contraceptive use were less pronounced in the rapid surveys than in the earlier, national survey. This suggests that caution should be exercised in interpreting the disaggregated data in these rapid surveys. In-depth interviews revealed two features of the rapid surveys that were especially popular: the palmtops for their speed of data entry, and the short questionnaire for its "low impact" on a respondent's time. The common belief that computers would disturb respondents was not found to be the case. Even with no computer experience, the interviewers rapidly mastered the new technology. PMID:10517097

  17. Use of multispectral data in design of forest sample surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, S. J.; Wensel, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The use of multispectral data in design of forest sample surveys using a computer software package is described. The system allows evaluation of a number of alternative sampling systems and, with appropriate cost data, estimates the implementation cost for each.

  18. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey ORIGINAL DESIGN SUBMITTED BY PEABODY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey ORIGINAL DESIGN SUBMITTED BY PEABODY AND STEARNS (FROM THE ORIGINAL IN THE LIBRARY OF THE VOLTA BUREAU) - Volta Bureau, 1537 Thirty-fifth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. Canada's health promotion survey as a milestone in public health research.

    PubMed

    Rootman, Irving; Warren, Reg; Catlin, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This commentary describes the contribution of the 1985 Canadian National Health Promotion Survey to the development of public health research and policy-making in Canada and argues that on the basis of that contribution, it should be considered to be a public health research milestone. In terms of research, among its contributions which subsequently have been adopted in other survey studies were: going beyond risk factors to operationalize concepts implicit in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion; empowering users to participate in knowledge translation, sharing and transfer; ensuring sufficient sample sizes for each jurisdiction to be able to confidently generalize to its population; establishing a model as well as questions for subsequent health surveys; encouraging widespread use of data through making them available early; and developing and using an explicit social marketing strategy to reach target audiences, including the general public. With regard to policy-making, among its contributions which have been adopted were: using survey data to develop and enhance healthy public policy initiatives; encouraging researchers to work with policy-makers in developing policies; using survey data to contribute to the evaluation of public health initiatives; engaging policy-makers in the development of surveys; and encouraging the use of survey data for advocacy. PMID:21370775

  20. 75 FR 62636 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Health Benefits Handbook Satisfaction Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Health Benefits Handbook Satisfaction Survey) Activity... forms of information technology. Title: Veterans Health Benefits Handbook Satisfaction Survey, VA Form... benefits information contained in Veterans Health Benefits handbook. DATES: Written comments...

  1. The Dark Energy Survey instrument design

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    We describe a new project, the Dark Energy Survey (DES), aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, to a statistical precision of {approx}5%, with four complementary techniques. The survey will use a new 3 sq. deg. mosaic camera (DECam) mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4m telescope at the Cerro-Tololo International Observatory (CTIO). DECam includes a large mosaic camera, a five element optical corrector, four filters (g,r,i,z), and the associated infrastructure for operation in the prime focus cage. The focal plane consists of 62 2K x 4K CCD modules (0.27''/pixel) arranged in a hexagon inscribed within the 2.2 deg. diameter field of view. We plan to use the 250 micron thick fully-depleted CCDs that have been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). At Fermilab, we will establish a packaging factory to produce four-side buttable modules for the LBNL devices, as well as to test and grade the CCDs. R&D is underway and delivery of DECam to CTIO is scheduled for 2009.

  2. White Blood Cell, Neutrophil, and Lymphocyte Counts in Individuals in the Evacuation Zone Designated by the Government After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident: The Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Akira; Ohira, Tetsuya; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Ohtsuru, Akira; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kobashi, Gen; Ozasa, Kotaro; Yasumura, Seiji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Lymphocytes are susceptible to damage from radiation, and the white blood cell (WBC) count, including counts of neutrophils and lymphocytes, is a useful method of dosimetry. According to the basic survey of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (FHMS), among 13 localities where evacuation was recommended, Iitate and Namie had more individuals with external radiation exposure of more than 5 mSv than the other evacuation areas. We analyzed whether or not WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts decreased after the disaster. Methods The subjects of this study were 45 278 men and women aged 20 to 99 years (18 953 men and 26 325 women; mean age 56 years) in the evacuation zone who participated in the Comprehensive Health Check (CHC) from June 2011 to the end of March 2012. Results Significant differences were detected in the mean values of WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts, and for the proportion of individuals under the minimum standard for WBC and neutrophil counts, among the 13 localities. However, the distribution of individuals at each 200-cell/µL increment in lymphocyte count were similar in these areas, and the WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts did not decrease in Iitate or Namie specifically. Conclusions No marked effects of radiation exposure on the distribution of WBC counts, including neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were detected within one year after the disaster in the evacuation zone. PMID:25311030

  3. A national survey of infant feeding in Asian families: summary of findings relevant to oral health.

    PubMed

    Watt, R G

    2000-01-01

    In 1994 the Department of Health commissioned a survey of early feeding practices within the Asian community. The survey conducted by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) was designed to assess from a nationally representative sample of infants from the Bangladeshi, Indian and Pakistani communities from across England their feeding practices from birth to 15 months. A small sample of White infants were also included in the sample although they cannot be considered as nationally representative of the majority White population in England. Data was collected from 2382 mothers in total. The survey was carried out between 1994 and 1996 and was published in 1997. This article will summarise the main findings relevant to oral health. These include patterns of breastfeeding, use of bottles, care and advice on infant feeding, weaning practices and drinks consumption. Implications for oral health promotion are considered. PMID:10697340

  4. [Population surveys as management tools and health care models].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Flávia Reis de; Narvai, Paulo Capel

    2013-12-01

    The article briefly systematizes health care models, emphasizes the role of population surveys as a management tool and analyzes the specific case of the Brazilian Oral Health Survey (SBBrasil 2010) and its contribution to the consolidation process of health care models consistent with the principles of the Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Public Health Care System). While in legal terms SUS corresponds to a health care model, in actual practice the public policy planning and health action, the system gives rise to a care model which is not the result of legal texts or theoretical formulations, but rather the praxis of the personnel involved. Bearing in mind that the management of day-to-day health affairs is a privileged space for the production and consolidation of health care models, it is necessary to stimulate and support the development of technical and operational skills which are different from those required for the management of care related to individual demands. PMID:24626592

  5. Insomnia Associated with Valerian and Melatonin Usage in the 2002 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bliwise, Donald L.; Ansari, Farzaneh Pour

    2007-01-01

    Study Objective: Many people use dietary supplements or herbal products to help them sleep. We analyzed the associations between melatonin use and insomnia and between valerian use and insomnia in a representative sample of the United States population. Design and Participants: The data reported upon here were collected in the 2002 Alternative Health/Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey. This was a survey of 31,044 personal interviews that constituted an age-representative and socioeconomically representative sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Results: Of the survey sample, 5.9% used valerian and 5.2% used melatonin. Of those using valerian, 29.9% endorsed insomnia as 1 reason for CAM use, and, of melatonin users, 27.5% endorsed insomnia as 1 reason for CAM use. Relatively greater use occurred in individuals under age 60 years. The decision to use such substances was made in consultation with a health care provider less than half of the time. Conclusions: Large segments of the United States population used valerian or melatonin for insomnia within the year preceding the survey, and usage typically fell outside the purview of the health care system. Citation: Bliwise DL; Ansari FP. Insomnia associated with valerian and melatonin usage in the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. SLEEP 2007;30(7):881-884. PMID:17682659

  6. Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

  7. An Overview of Ophthalmologic Survey Methodology in the 2008-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyung Chul; Choi, Won; Lee, Hyo Seok; Kim, Sang-Duck; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Chan Yun; Park, Ki Ho; Park, Young Jeung; Baek, Seung-Hee; Song, Su Jeong; Shin, Jae Pil; Yang, Suk-Woo; Yu, Seung-Young; Lee, Jong Soo; Lim, Key Hwan; Oh, Kyung Won

    2015-01-01

    The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) is a national program designed to assess the health and nutritional status of the noninstitutionalized population of South Korea. The KNHANES was initiated in 1998 and has been conducted annually since 2007. Starting in the latter half of 2008, ophthalmologic examinations were included in the survey in order to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of common eye diseases such as visual impairment, refractive errors, strabismus, blepharoptosis, cataract, pterygium, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye disease, and color vision deficiency. The measurements included in the ophthalmic questionnaire and examination methods were modified in the KNHANES IV, V, and VI. In this article, we provide detailed information about the methodology of the ophthalmic examinations in KNHANES in order to aid in further investigations related to major eye diseases in South Korea. PMID:26635451

  8. An Overview of Ophthalmologic Survey Methodology in the 2008-2015 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyung Chul; Choi, Won; Lee, Hyo Seok; Kim, Sang-Duck; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Chan Yun; Park, Ki Ho; Park, Young Jeung; Baek, Seung-Hee; Song, Su Jeong; Shin, Jae Pil; Yang, Suk-Woo; Yu, Seung-Young; Lee, Jong Soo; Lim, Key Hwan; Oh, Kyung Won; Kang, Se Woong

    2015-12-01

    The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) is a national program designed to assess the health and nutritional status of the noninstitutionalized population of South Korea. The KNHANES was initiated in 1998 and has been conducted annually since 2007. Starting in the latter half of 2008, ophthalmologic examinations were included in the survey in order to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of common eye diseases such as visual impairment, refractive errors, strabismus, blepharoptosis, cataract, pterygium, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, dry eye disease, and color vision deficiency. The measurements included in the ophthalmic questionnaire and examination methods were modified in the KNHANES IV, V, and VI. In this article, we provide detailed information about the methodology of the ophthalmic examinations in KNHANES in order to aid in further investigations related to major eye diseases in South Korea. PMID:26635451

  9. Surveying clinicians by web: current issues in design and administration.

    PubMed

    Dykema, Jennifer; Jones, Nathan R; Piché, Tara; Stevenson, John

    2013-09-01

    The versatility, speed, and reduced costs with which web surveys can be conducted with clinicians are often offset by low response rates. Drawing on best practices and general recommendations in the literature, we provide an evidence-based overview of methods for conducting online surveys with providers. We highlight important advantages and disadvantages of conducting provider surveys online and include a review of differences in response rates between web and mail surveys of clinicians. When administered online, design-based features affect rates of survey participation and data quality. We examine features likely to have an impact including sample frames, incentives, contacts (type, timing, and content), mixed-mode approaches, and questionnaire length. We make several recommendations regarding optimal web-based designs, but more empirical research is needed, particularly with regard to identifying which combinations of incentive and contact approaches yield the highest response rates and are the most cost-effective. PMID:23975760

  10. Imperial County baseline health survey potential impact of geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, M.

    1981-06-01

    The survey purpose, methods, and statistical methods are presented. Results are discussed according to: area differences in background variables, area differences in health variables, area differences in annoyance reactions, and comparison of symptom frequencies with age, smoking, and drinking. Included in appendices are tables of data, enumeration forms, the questionnaire, interviewer cards, and interviewer instructions. (MHR)

  11. SECOND NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY (NHANES II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, NHANES II, is a nationwide probability sample of 27,801 persons from 6 months 74 years of age. From this sample, 25,286 people were interviewed and 20,322 people were examined, resulting in an overall response rate of 7...

  12. NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY (NHANES I)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES I) was conducted on a nationwide probability sample of approximately 32,000 persons 1-74 years of age. The NHANES I sample was selected so that certain population groups thought to be at high risk of malnutrition ...

  13. Health Education as a Component of an Epidemiologic Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Beverly; Williams, Phyllis M.

    1983-01-01

    Health education was an important part of the screening phase of a large epidemiological survey of school children's blood pressure. After children's height, weight, and blood pressure were measured, they were directed to displays of educational materials which explained the cardiovascular system and stressed the importance of blood pressure…

  14. Mental Health Training and the Hospice Community: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Charles A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes a national survey of the hospice community. Results indicated that the hospice community is attempting to meet the mental health training needs of its paid staff members and volunteers. However, more than half expressed a need for further training and a more systematic and comprehensive curriculum. (Author)

  15. Post-disaster mental health need assessment surveys - the challenge of improved future research.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Ronald C; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-12-01

    Disasters are very common occurrences, becoming increasingly prevalent throughout the world. The number of natural disasters either affecting more than 100 people or resulting in a call for international assistance, increased from roughly 100 per year worldwide in the late 1960s, to over 500 per year in the past decade. Population growth, environmental degradation, and global warming all play parts in accounting for these increases. There is also the possibility of a pandemic. This paper and associated journal issue focuses on the topic of growing worldwide importance: mental health needs assessment in the wake of large-scale disasters. Although natural and human-made disasters are known to have substantial effects on the mental health of the people who experience them, research shows that the prevalence of post-disaster psychopathology varies enormously from one disaster to another in ways that are difficult to predict merely by knowing the objective circumstances of the disaster. Mental health needs assessment surveys are consequently carried out after many large-scale natural and human-made disasters to provide information for service planners on the nature and magnitude of need for services. These surveys vary greatly, though, in the rigor with which they assess disaster-related stressors and post-disaster mental illness. Synthesis of findings across surveys is hampered by these inconsistencies. The typically limited focus of these surveys with regard to the inclusion of risk factors, follow-up assessments, and evaluations of treatment, also limit insights from these surveys concerning post-disaster mental illness and treatment response. The papers in this issue discuss methodological issues in the design and implementation of post-disaster mental health needs assessment surveys aimed at improving on the quality of previous such surveys. The many recommendations in these papers will hopefully help to foster improvements in the next generation of post

  16. Optical Design for a Survey X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.; McClelland, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    Optical design trades are underway at the Goddard Space Flight Center to define a telescope for an x-ray survey mission. Top-level science objectives of the mission include the study of x-ray transients, surveying and long-term monitoring of compact objects in nearby galaxies, as well as both deep and wide-field x-ray surveys. In this paper we consider Wolter, Wolter-Schwarzschild, and modified Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope designs as basic building blocks for the tightly nested survey telescope. Design principles and dominating aberrations of individual telescopes and nested telescopes are discussed and we compare the off-axis optical performance at 1.0 KeV and 4.0 KeV across a 1.0-degree full field-of-view.

  17. Privacy by design in personal health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Anders

    2015-06-01

    The concept of privacy by design is becoming increasingly popular among regulators of information and communications technologies. This paper aims at analysing and discussing the ethical implications of this concept for personal health monitoring. I assume a privacy theory of restricted access and limited control. On the basis of this theory, I suggest a version of the concept of privacy by design that constitutes a middle road between what I call broad privacy by design and narrow privacy by design. The key feature of this approach is that it attempts to balance automated privacy protection and autonomously chosen privacy protection in a way that is context-sensitive. In personal health monitoring, this approach implies that in some contexts like medication assistance and monitoring of specific health parameters one single automatic option is legitimate, while in some other contexts, for example monitoring in which relatives are receivers of health-relevant information rather than health care professionals, a multi-choice approach stressing autonomy is warranted. PMID:23978898

  18. Instructional design strategies for health behavior change.

    PubMed

    Kinzie, Mable B

    2005-01-01

    To help health educators build upon the best of different health behavior change theories, this paper offers a unified set of instructional design strategies for health education interventions. This set draws upon the recommendations of Rosenstock (Health Belief Model), Bandura (Social Cognitive Theory), and Dearing (Diffusion Theory), and uses a modified Events of Instruction framework (adapted from Robert Gagne): gain attention (convey health threats and benefits), present stimulus material (tailor message to audience knowledge and values, demonstrate observable effectiveness, make behaviors easy-to-understand and do), provide guidance (use trustworthy models to demonstrate), elicit performance and provide feedback (to enhance trialability, develop proficiency and self-efficacy), enhance retention and transfer (provide social supports and deliver behavioral cues). Sample applications of these strategies are provided. A brief review of research on adolescent smoking prevention enables consideration of the frequency with which these strategies are used, and possible patterns between strategy use and behavioral outcomes. PMID:15590217

  19. Designing online health services for patients.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Bradley H; Slack, Warner V

    2016-01-01

    Patients are increasingly interacting with their healthcare system through online health services, such as patient portals and telehealth programs. Recently, Shabrabani and Mizrachi provided data outlining factors that are most important for users or potential users of these online services. The authors conclude convincingly that while online health services have great potential to be helpful to their users, they could be better designed. As patients and their families play an increasingly active role in their health care, online health services should be made easier for them to use and better suited to their health-related needs. Further, the online services should be more welcoming to people of all literacy levels and from all socioeconomic backgrounds. PMID:27307985

  20. Results of the 2004 National Worksite Health Promotion Survey

    PubMed Central

    Linnan, Laura; Bowling, Mike; Childress, Jennifer; Lindsay, Garry; Blakey, Carter; Pronk, Stephanie; Wieker, Sharon; Royall, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We examined worksite health promotion programs, policies, and services to monitor the achievement of the Healthy People 2010 worksite-related goal of 75% of worksites offering a comprehensive worksite health promotion program. Methods. We conducted a nationally representative, cross-sectional telephone survey of worksite health promotion programs stratified by worksite size and industry type. Techniques appropriate for analyzing complex surveys were used to compute point estimates, confidence intervals, and multivariate statistics. Results. Worksites with more than 750 employees consistently offered more programs, policies, and services than did smaller worksites. Only 6.9% of responding worksites offered a comprehensive worksite health promotion program. Sites with a staff person dedicated to and responsible for health promotion were significantly more likely to offer a comprehensive program, and sites in the agriculture and mining or financial services sector were significantly less likely than those in other industry sectors to offer such a program. Conclusions. Increasing the number, quality, and types of health promotion programs at worksites, especially smaller worksites, remains an important public health goal. PMID:18048790

  1. Quantifying bias in a health survey: modeling total survey error in the national immunization survey.

    PubMed

    Molinari, NoelleAngelique M; Wolter, Kirk M; Skalland, Benjamin; Montgomery, Robert; Khare, Meena; Smith, Philip J; Barron, Martin L; Copeland, Kennon; Santos, Kathleen; Singleton, James A

    2011-02-28

    Random-digit-dial telephone surveys are experiencing both declining response rates and increasing under-coverage due to the prevalence of households that substitute a wireless telephone for their residential landline telephone. These changes increase the potential for bias in survey estimates and heighten the need for survey researchers to evaluate the sources and magnitudes of potential bias. We apply a Monte Carlo simulation-based approach to assess bias in the NIS, a land-line telephone survey of 19-35 month-old children used to obtain national vaccination coverage estimates. We develop a model describing the survey stages at which component nonsampling error may be introduced due to nonresponse and under-coverage. We use that model and components of error estimated in special studies to quantify the extent to which noncoverage and nonresponse may bias the vaccination coverage estimates obtained from the NIS and present a distribution of the total survey error. Results indicated that the total error followed a normal distribution with mean of 1.72 per cent(95 per cent CI: 1.71, 1.74 per cent) and final adjusted survey weights corrected for this error. Although small, the largest contributor to error in terms of magnitude was nonresponse of immunization providers. The total error was most sensitive to declines in coverage due to cell phone only households. These results indicate that, while response rates and coverage may be declining, total survey error is quite small. Since response rates have historically been used to proxy for total survey error, the finding that these rates do not accurately reflect bias is important for evaluation of survey data. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21294147

  2. Contraceptive Use, United States, 1982. Vital & Health Statistics. Data from the National Survey of Family Growth, Series 23, No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosher, William D.; Bachrach, Christine A.

    The National Survey of Family Growth is a periodic survey administered to women between the ages of 15 and 44 years and designed to produce national estimates of statistics on fertility, family planning, and aspects of maternal and child health that are closely related to childbearing. This report describes findings from the 1982 National Survey…

  3. Magnetic resonance elastography hardware design: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tse, Z T H; Janssen, H; Hamed, A; Ristic, M; Young, I; Lamperth, M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique capable of measuring the shear modulus of tissue. A suspected tumour can be identified by comparing its properties with those of tissues surrounding it; this can be achieved even in deep-lying areas as long as mechanical excitation is possible. This would allow non-invasive methods for cancer-related diagnosis in areas not accessible with conventional palpation. An actuating mechanism is required to generate the necessary tissue displacements directly on the patient in the scanner and three different approaches, in terms of actuator action and position, exist to derive stiffness measurements. However, the magnetic resonance (MR) environment places considerable constraints on the design of such devices, such as the possibility of mutual interference between electrical components, the scanner field, and radio frequency pulses, and the physical space restrictions of the scanner bore. This paper presents a review of the current solutions that have been developed for MRE devices giving particular consideration to the design criteria including the required vibration frequency and amplitude in different applications, the issue of MR compatibility, actuation principles, design complexity, and scanner synchronization issues. The future challenges in this field are also described. PMID:19499839

  4. Reliability and Validity of a New Survey to Assess Global Health Competencies of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Mirella; Pottie, Kevin; Welch, Vivian; Labonte, Ron; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Borkhoff, Cornelia M.; Kristjansson, Elizabeth A.; Tugwell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Health professionals are paying increased attention to issues of global health. However, there are no current competency assessment tools appropriate for evaluating their competency in global health. This study aims to assess the validity and reliability of a global health competency survey for different health disciplines. Methods: A total of 429 students participated in the Global Health Competency Survey, drawn from family medicine residency, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy programs of five universities in Ontario, Canada. The surveys were evaluated for face and content validity and reliability. Results: Factor analysis was used to identify the main factors to be included in the reliability analysis. Content validity was supported with one floor effect in the “racial/ethnic disparities” variable (36.1%), and few ceiling effects. Seven of the twenty-two variables performed the best (between 34% and 59.6%). For the overall rating score, no participants had floor or ceiling effects. Five factors were identified which accounted for 95% of the variance. Cronbach’s alpha was >0.8 indicating that the survey items had good internal consistency and represent a homogeneous construct. Conclusion: The Global Health Competency Survey demonstrated good internal consistency and validity. PMID:23283032

  5. Who cares about health inequalities? Cross-country evidence from the World Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    King, Nicholas B; Harper, Sam; Young, Meredith E

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of health inequalities within and between countries is a global health priority, but little is known about the determinants of popular support for this goal. We used data from the World Health Survey to assess individual preferences for prioritizing reductions in health and health care inequalities. We used descriptive tables and regression analysis to study the determinants of preferences for reducing health inequalities as the primary health system goal. Determinants included individual socio-demographic characteristics (age, sex, urban residence, education, marital status, household income, self-rated health, health care use, satisfaction with health care system) and country-level characteristics [gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, disability-free life expectancy, equality in child mortality, income inequality, health and public health expenditures]. We used logistic regression to assess the likelihood that individuals ranked minimizing inequalities first, and rank-ordered logistic regression to compare the ranking of other priorities against minimizing health inequalities. Individuals tended to prioritize health system goals related to overall improvement (improving population health and health care responsiveness) over those related to equality and fairness (minimizing inequalities in health and responsiveness, and promoting fairness of financial contribution). Individuals in countries with higher GDP per capita, life expectancy, and equality in child mortality were more likely to prioritize minimizing health inequalities. PMID:23059735

  6. Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: Modular baseline health surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Mirko S.; Divall, Mark J.; Krieger, Gary R.; Schmidlin, Sandro; Magassouba, Mohamed L.; Knoblauch, Astrid M.; Singer, Burton H.; Utzinger, Juerg

    2012-02-15

    The quantitative assessment of health impacts has been identified as a crucial feature for realising the full potential of health impact assessment (HIA). In settings where demographic and health data are notoriously scarce, but there is a broad range of ascertainable ecological, environmental, epidemiological and socioeconomic information, a diverse toolkit of data collection strategies becomes relevant for the mainly small-area impacts of interest. We present a modular, cross-sectional baseline health survey study design, which has been developed for HIA of industrial development projects in the humid tropics. The modular nature of our toolkit allows our methodology to be readily adapted to the prevailing eco-epidemiological characteristics of a given project setting. Central to our design is a broad set of key performance indicators, covering a multiplicity of health outcomes and determinants at different levels and scales. We present experience and key findings from our modular baseline health survey methodology employed in 14 selected sentinel sites within an iron ore mining project in the Republic of Guinea. We argue that our methodology is a generic example of rapid evidence assembly in difficult-to-reach localities, where improvement of the predictive validity of the assessment and establishment of a benchmark for longitudinal monitoring of project impacts and mitigation efforts is needed.

  7. Socioeconomic Inequalities in Mental Health of Adult Population: Serbian National Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Santric-Milicevic, Milena; Jankovic, Janko; Trajkovic, Goran; Terzic-Supic, Zorica; Babic, Uros; Petrovic, Marija

    2016-01-01

    Background: The global burden of mental disorders is rising. In Serbia, anxiety is the leading cause of disability-adjusted life years. Serbia has no mental health survey at the population level. The information on prevalence of mental disorders and related socioeconomic inequalities are valuable for mental care improvement. Aims: To explore the prevalence of mental health disorders and socioeconomic inequalities in mental health of adult Serbian population, and to explore whether age years and employment status interact with mental health in urban and rural settlements. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: This study is an additional analysis of Serbian Health Survey 2006 that was carried out with standardized household questionnaires at the representative sample of 7673 randomly selected households – 15563 adults. The response rate was 93%. A multivariate logistic regression modeling highlighted the predictors of the 5 item Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5), and of chronic anxiety or depression within eight independent variables (age, gender, type of settlement, marital status and self-perceived health, education, employment status and Wealth Index). The significance level in descriptive statistics, chi square analysis and bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions was set at p<0.05. Results: Chronic anxiety or depression was seen in 4.9% of the respondents, and poor MHI-5 in 47% of respondents. Low education (Odds Ratios 1.32; 95% confidence intervals=1.16–1.51), unemployment (1.36; 1.18–1.56), single status (1.34; 1.23–1.45), and Wealth Index middle class (1.20; 1.08–1.32) or poor (1.33; 1.21–1.47) were significantly related with poor MHI-5. Unemployed persons in urban settlements had higher odds for poormMHI-5 than unemployed in rural areas (0.73; 0.59–0.89). Single (1.50; 1.26–1.78), unemployed (1.39; 1.07–1.80) and inactive respondents (1.42; 1.10–1.83) had a higher odds of chronic anxiety or depression than married

  8. The Adequacy of Household Survey Data for Evaluating the Nongroup Health Insurance Market

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Joel C; Monheit, Alan C; Brownlee, Susan; Schneider, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of household survey estimates of the size and composition of the nonelderly population covered by nongroup health insurance. Data Sources/Study Setting Health insurance enrollment statistics reported to New Jersey insurance regulators. Household data from the following sources: the 2002 Current Population Survey (CPS)-March Demographic Supplement, the 1997 and 1999 National Surveys of America's Families (NSAF), the 2001 New Jersey Family Health Survey (NJFHS), a 2002 survey of known nongroup health insurance enrollees, a small 2004 survey testing alternative health insurance question wording. Study Design To assess the extent of bias in estimates of the size of the nongroup health insurance market in New Jersey, enrollment trends are compared between official enrollment statistics reported by insurance carriers to state insurance regulators with estimates from three general population household surveys. Next, to evaluate possible bias in the demographic and socioeconomic composition of the New Jersey nongroup market, distributions of characteristics of the enrolled population are contrasted among general household surveys and a survey of known nongroup subscribers. Finally, based on inferences drawn from these comparisons, alternative health insurance question wording was developed and tested in a local survey to test the potential for misreporting enrollment in nongroup coverage in a low-income population. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data for nonelderly New Jersey residents from the 2002 CPS (n = 5,028) and the 1997 and 1999 NSAF (n = 6,467 and 7,272, respectively) were obtained from public sources. The 2001 NJFHS (n = 5,580 nonelderly) was conducted for a sample drawn by random digit dialing and employed computer-assisted telephone interviews and trained, professional interviewers. Sampling weights are used to adjust for under-coverage of households without telephones and other factors. In addition, a modified version of

  9. A survey of spacecraft thermal design solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, R.; Wegrich, R.; Pierce, E.; Patterson, W.

    1991-01-01

    A review of activities at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center in the heat transfer and thermodynamics disciplines as well as attendant fluid mechanics, transport phenomena, and computer science applications is presented. Attention is focused on recent activities including the Hubble Space Telescope, and large space instruments, particularly telescope thermal control systems such as those flown aboard Spacelab 2 and the Astro missions. Emphasis is placed on defining the thermal control features, unique design schemes, and performance of selected programs. Results obtained both by ground testing and analytical means, as well as flight and postflight data are presented.

  10. The Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HANES) Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnier, Isadore I.

    1976-01-01

    Outlines Public Health Service preliminary findings in a study designed to establish health and nutrition baseline data for future comparison and for government food policies. Data collected include caloric and nutrient intake from recollection, nutrient content of blood and urine, examination for incipient malnutrition, and bone and body…

  11. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: Contributing Data on Aging and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Vicki L.; Harris, Tamara

    1994-01-01

    Describes third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), noting that upper age limit was removed and that older black, Mexican American, and white populations were oversampled. Sees NHANES III component for older adults providing multidimensional overview of physical and functional health status (osteoporosis; arthritis;…

  12. Our Environment, Our Health: A Community-Based Participatory Environmental Health Survey in Richmond, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Alison; Lopez, Andrea; Malloy, Nile; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a health survey conducted by a community-based participatory research partnership between academic researchers and community organizers to consider environmental health and environmental justice issues in four neighborhoods of Richmond, California, a low-income community of color living along the fence line of a major oil…

  13. Design Optimization of Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Eric B.

    2014-03-06

    Sensor networks drive decisions. Approach: Design networks to minimize the expected total cost (in a statistical sense, i.e. Bayes Risk) associated with making wrong decisions and with installing maintaining and running the sensor network itself. Search for optimal solutions using Monte-Carlo-Sampling-Adapted Genetic Algorithm. Applications include structural health monitoring and surveillance.

  14. Lifestyle Assessment: Part 4. The Halton Health Promotion Survey

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, R.; Albert, W.; Wilson, D. M. C.; Ciliska, D.; Evans, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    In the Region of Halton, a health promotion data base was developed to assist with planning for local services and programs. Three data sources were used: preventable mortality, preventable morbidity, and the prevalence of modifiable risk among community members. Existing information was used for the first two sources, and the community was surveyed for the last. A survey version of the FANTASTIC Lifestyle Checklist was mailed to a random sample of 1,200 households. FANTASTIC showed itself to be a reliable lifestyle construct with two major factors: a group of psychosocial behaviors, and a set of “bad habits”.

  15. Methods of estimating or accounting for neighborhood associations with health using complex survey data.

    PubMed

    Brumback, Babette A; Cai, Zhuangyu; Dailey, Amy B

    2014-05-15

    Reasons for health disparities may include neighborhood-level factors, such as availability of health services, social norms, and environmental determinants, as well as individual-level factors. Investigating health inequalities using nationally or locally representative data often requires an approach that can accommodate a complex sampling design, in which individuals have unequal probabilities of selection into the study. The goal of the present article is to review and compare methods of estimating or accounting for neighborhood influences with complex survey data. We considered 3 types of methods, each generalized for use with complex survey data: ordinary regression, conditional likelihood regression, and generalized linear mixed-model regression. The relative strengths and weaknesses of each method differ from one study to another; we provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of each method theoretically, in terms of the nature of the estimable associations and the plausibility of the assumptions required for validity, and also practically, via a simulation study and 2 epidemiologic data analyses. The first analysis addresses determinants of repeat mammography screening use using data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey. The second analysis addresses disparities in preventive oral health care using data from the 2008 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey. PMID:24723000

  16. Methods and results for small area estimation using smoking data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Ha, Neung Soo; Lahiri, Partha; Parsons, Van

    2014-09-28

    The National Health Interview Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, is designed to provide reliable design-based estimates for a wide range of health-related variables for national and four major geographical regions of the USA. However, state-level or substate-level estimates are likely to be unreliable because they are based on small sample sizes. In this paper, we compare the efficiency of different area-level models in estimating smoking prevalence for the 50 US states and the District of Columbia. Our study is based on survey data from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey in conjunction with a number of potentially related auxiliary variables obtained from the American Community Survey, an ongoing large complex survey conducted by the US Census. A major portion of this study is devoted to the investigation of several methods for estimating survey sampling variances needed to implement an area-level hierarchical model. Based on our findings, a hierarchical Bayesian method that uses a survey-adjusted random sampling variance model to capture the complex survey sampling variability appears to be somewhat superior to the other considered area-level models in accounting for small sample behavior of estimated survey sampling variances. Several diagnostic procedures are presented to compare the proposed methods. PMID:24910281

  17. Thinking Inside the Box: The Health Cube Paradigm for Health and Wellness Program Evaluation and Design

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Appropriately constructed health promotions can improve population health. The authors developed a practical model for designing, evaluating, and improving initiatives to provide optimal value. Three independent model dimensions (impact, engagement, and sustainability) and the resultant three-dimensional paradigm were described using hypothetical case studies, including a walking challenge, a health risk assessment survey, and an individual condition management program. The 3-dimensional model is illustrated and the dimensions are defined. Calculation of a 3-dimensional score for program comparisons, refinements, and measurement is explained. Program 1, the walking challenge, had high engagement and impact, but limited sustainability. Program 2, the health risk assessment survey, had high engagement and sustainability but limited impact. Program 3, the on-site condition management program, had measurable impact and sustainability but limited engagement, because of a lack of program capacity. Each initiative, though successful in 2 dimensions, lacked sufficient evolution along the third axis for optimal value. Calculation of a 3-dimensional score is useful for health promotion program development comparison and refinements, and overall measurement of program success. (Population Health Management 2013;16:291–295) PMID:23869538

  18. Mental Health Technologies: Designing With Consumers.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Simone; Matthews, Ben; Bidargaddi, Niranjan; Jones, Gabrielle; Lawn, Sharon; Venning, Anthony; Collin, Philippa

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the promise of e-mental and well-being interventions, little supporting literature exists to guide their design and the evaluation of their effectiveness. Both participatory design (PD) and design thinking (DT) have emerged as approaches that hold significant potential for supporting design in this space. Each approach is difficult to definitively circumscribe, and as such has been enacted as a process, a mind-set, specific practices/techniques, or a combination thereof. At its core, however, PD is a design research tradition that emphasizes egalitarian partnerships with end users. In contrast, DT is in the process of becoming a management concept tied to innovation with strong roots in business and education. From a health researcher viewpoint, while PD can be reduced to a number of replicable stages that involve particular methods, techniques, and outputs, projects often take vastly different forms and effective PD projects and practice have traditionally required technology-specific (eg, computer science) and domain-specific (eg, an application domain, such as patient support services) knowledge. In contrast, DT offers a practical off-the-shelf toolkit of approaches that at face value have more potential to have a quick impact and be successfully applied by novice practitioners (and those looking to include a more human-centered focus in their work). Via 2 case studies we explore the continuum of similarities and differences between PD and DT in order to provide an initial recommendation for what health researchers might reasonably expect from each in terms of process and outcome in the design of e-mental health interventions. We suggest that the sensibilities that DT shares with PD (ie, deep engagement and collaboration with end users and an inclusive and multidisciplinary practice) are precisely the aspects of DT that must be emphasized in any application to mental health provision and that any technology development process must

  19. Mental Health Technologies: Designing With Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Ben; Bidargaddi, Niranjan; Jones, Gabrielle; Lawn, Sharon; Venning, Anthony; Collin, Philippa

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the promise of e-mental and well-being interventions, little supporting literature exists to guide their design and the evaluation of their effectiveness. Both participatory design (PD) and design thinking (DT) have emerged as approaches that hold significant potential for supporting design in this space. Each approach is difficult to definitively circumscribe, and as such has been enacted as a process, a mind-set, specific practices/techniques, or a combination thereof. At its core, however, PD is a design research tradition that emphasizes egalitarian partnerships with end users. In contrast, DT is in the process of becoming a management concept tied to innovation with strong roots in business and education. From a health researcher viewpoint, while PD can be reduced to a number of replicable stages that involve particular methods, techniques, and outputs, projects often take vastly different forms and effective PD projects and practice have traditionally required technology-specific (eg, computer science) and domain-specific (eg, an application domain, such as patient support services) knowledge. In contrast, DT offers a practical off-the-shelf toolkit of approaches that at face value have more potential to have a quick impact and be successfully applied by novice practitioners (and those looking to include a more human-centered focus in their work). Via 2 case studies we explore the continuum of similarities and differences between PD and DT in order to provide an initial recommendation for what health researchers might reasonably expect from each in terms of process and outcome in the design of e-mental health interventions. We suggest that the sensibilities that DT shares with PD (ie, deep engagement and collaboration with end users and an inclusive and multidisciplinary practice) are precisely the aspects of DT that must be emphasized in any application to mental health provision and that any technology development process must

  20. The prisoner as patient - a health services satisfaction survey

    PubMed Central

    Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Rustad, Åse-Bente; Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Background There is evidence for higher morbidity among prison inmates than in the general population. Despite this, patient satisfaction with the prison health services is scarcely investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate patient satisfaction with prison health services in Norway and to analyze possible patient and service effects. Methods The survey took part in 29 prisons in the southern and central part of Norway, representing 62% of the total prison capacity in Norway. A total of 1,150 prison inmates with prison health services experiences completed a satisfaction questionnaire (90% response rate). The patients' satisfaction was measured on a 12-item index. Multilevel analyses were used to analyze both patient and service characteristics as predictors of satisfaction. Results The study revealed high levels of dissatisfaction with prison health services. There were substantial differences between services, with between-service-variance accounting for 9% of the total variance. Satisfaction was significantly associated with a senior staff member's evaluation of the health services possessing adequate resources and the quality of drug abuse treatment. At the patient level, satisfaction was significantly associated with older age, frequent consultations and better self-perceived health. Conclusion Prison inmates' satisfaction with the health services provided are low compared with patient satisfaction measured in other health areas. The substantial differences observed between services - even when adjusting for several known factors associated with patient satisfaction - indicate a potential for quality improvement. PMID:19785736

  1. Bolivia 1998: results from the Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    2000-09-01

    This document presents the results of the Bolivia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), or Encuesta Nacional de Demografia y Salud 1998, conducted by the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, La Paz, Bolivia, within the framework of the DHS Program of Macro International. Data were collected from 12,109 households and complete interviews were conducted with 11,187 women aged 15-49. A male survey was also conducted, which collected data from 3780 men aged 15-64. The information collected include the following: 1) general characteristics of the population, 2) fertility, 3) fertility preferences, 4) current contraceptive use, 5) contraception, 6) marital and contraceptive status, 7) postpartum variables, 8) infant mortality, 9) health: disease prevention and treatment, and 10) nutritional status: anthropometric measures. PMID:11020937

  2. Health insurance and subjective health status: data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure survey.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, P; Clancy, C M; Gold, M R; Nutting, P A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The relationship between health insurance and subjective health status was investigated. It was hypothesized that persons without health insurance would have lower levels of subjective health status than those with health insurance and that this relationship would hold for both poor and nonpoor persons. METHODS. Data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey were analyzed to examine the relationship between health insurance and self-reported health status. The analysis controlled for sociodemographic and attitudinal variables and medical conditions. RESULTS. Persons without health insurance had significantly lower levels of subjective health status than did persons with insurance. This adverse effect persisted after adjustments were made for the effects of age, sex, race, income, attitude toward the value of medical care and health insurance, and medical conditions. The detrimental effect of lacking health insurance on subjective health status was present for persons at all income levels and was greater than the effect on subjective health status found for 2 of the 11 reported medical conditions. CONCLUSIONS. Lacking health insurance is associated with clinically significant lower levels of subjective health status in both poor and non-poor persons. PMID:8363006

  3. The Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), a novel infrastructure for population health research: rationale and methods

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence-based public health requires the existence of reliable information systems for priority setting and evaluation of interventions. Existing data systems in the United States are either too crude (e.g., vital statistics), rely on administrative data (e.g., Medicare) or, because of their national scope (e.g., NHANES), lack the discriminatory power to assess specific needs and to evaluate community health activities at the state and local level. This manuscript describes the rationale and methods of the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), a novel infrastructure for population health research. Methods/Design The program consists of a series of independent annual surveys gathering health-related data on representative samples of state residents and communities. Two-stage cluster sampling is used to select households and recruit approximately 800-1,000 adult participants (21-74 years old) each year. Recruitment and initial interviews are done at the household; additional interviews and physical exams are conducted at permanent or mobile examination centers. Individual survey data include physical, mental, and oral health history, health literacy, demographics, behavioral, lifestyle, occupational, and household characteristics as well as health care access and utilization. The physical exam includes blood pressure, anthropometry, bioimpedance, spirometry, urine collection and blood draws. Serum, plasma, and buffy coats (for DNA extraction) are stored in a biorepository for future studies. Every household is geocoded for linkage with existing contextual data including community level measures of the social and physical environment; local neighborhood characteristics are also recorded using an audit tool. Participants are re-contacted bi-annually by phone for health history updates. Discussion SHOW generates data to assess health disparities across state communities as well as trends on prevalence of health outcomes and determinants. SHOW also serves

  4. Scenario-based design: A method for connecting information system design with public health operations and emergency management

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Turner, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    Responding to public health emergencies requires rapid and accurate assessment of workforce availability under adverse and changing circumstances. However, public health information systems to support resource management during both routine and emergency operations are currently lacking. We applied scenario-based design as an approach to engage public health practitioners in the creation and validation of an information design to support routine and emergency public health activities. Methods: Using semi-structured interviews we identified the information needs and activities of senior public health managers of a large municipal health department during routine and emergency operations. Results: Interview analysis identified twenty-five information needs for public health operations management. The identified information needs were used in conjunction with scenario-based design to create twenty-five scenarios of use and a public health manager persona. Scenarios of use and persona were validated and modified based on follow-up surveys with study participants. Scenarios were used to test and gain feedback on a pilot information system. Conclusion: The method of scenario-based design was applied to represent the resource management needs of senior-level public health managers under routine and disaster settings. Scenario-based design can be a useful tool for engaging public health practitioners in the design process and to validate an information system design. PMID:21807120

  5. Outcome of recruitment and report on participation rate in the New Mexico Elder Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Romero, L J; Lindeman, R D; Hundley, R; Koehler, K M; Baumgartner, R N; Allen, A S; Schade, D S; LaRue, A; Ortiz, I E; Garry, P J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the outcome of recruitment and participation rate in the New Mexico Elder Health Survey. This survey is the first community based epidemiological survey to examine health and health related issues of elderly (65 years or older) Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites in Bernalillo County (Albuquerque), New Mexico. This survey was conducted from May 1993 to September 1995. Subjects (N=2200) were randomly selected from the list of 50,700 Medicare recipients residing in Bernalillo County and stratified by ethnicity and gender. Hispanics were identified using a computer program that selects Hispanic surname patterns and ethnicity was verified by self report. Subjects participated in a home interview, followed by an interview and examination in a senior health clinic. Use of the Medicare list resulted in 75.7% (N=1666) of subjects being contacted. Of the 1666 subjects available, 1130 (67.8%) completed a home interview and 883 (54%) completed the full examination. There were no significant differences in participation by ethnicity, but there were significant differences by gender, with women less likely to participate. The mean age of participants was 74 years, age range 65 to 100. Hispanic elderly demonstrated greater economic poverty and lower levels of formal education. Our survey results show that the elderly and Hispanic elderly can be successfully recruited to participate in a research study. This paper is the first to summarize the details of the survey design, present the results of recruitment and participation, and describe the survey participants. PMID:9926905

  6. A systematic review of Demographic and Health Surveys: data availability and utilization for research

    PubMed Central

    Choi, YoonJoung; Bird, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To systematically review the public health literature to assess trends in the use of Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data for research from 1984 to 2010 and to describe the relationship between data availability and data utilization. Methods The MEASURE DHS web site was searched for information on all population-based surveys completed under the DHS project between 1984 and 2010. The information collected included the country, type of survey, survey design, fieldwork period and certain special features, such as inclusion of biomarkers. A search of PubMed was also conducted to identify peer-reviewed articles published during 2010 that analysed DHS data and included an English-language abstract. Trends in data availability and in the use of DHS data for research were assessed through descriptive, graphical and bivariate linear regression analyses. Findings In total, 236 household surveys under the DHS project were completed across 84 countries during 2010. The number of surveys per year has remained constant, although the scope of the survey questions has expanded. The inclusion criteria were met by 1117 peer-reviewed publications. The number of publications has increased progressively over the last quarter century, with an average annual increment of 4.3 (95% confidence interval, CI: 3.2–5.3) publications. Trends in the number of peer-reviewed publications based on the use of DHS data were highly correlated with trends in funding for health by the Government of the United States of America and globally. Conclusion Published peer-reviewed articles analysing DHS data, which have increased progressively in number over the last quarter century, have made a substantial contribution to the public health evidence base in developing countries. PMID:22893744

  7. A SUCCESSFUL BROADBAND SURVEY FOR GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULAE. I. SURVEY DESIGN AND CANDIDATE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2012-04-01

    Giant Ly{alpha} nebulae (or Ly{alpha} 'blobs') are likely sites of ongoing massive galaxy formation, but the rarity of these powerful sources has made it difficult to form a coherent picture of their properties, ionization mechanisms, and space density. Systematic narrowband Ly{alpha} nebula surveys are ongoing, but the small redshift range covered and the observational expense limit the comoving volume that can be probed by even the largest of these surveys and pose a significant problem when searching for such rare sources. We have developed a systematic search technique designed to find large Ly{alpha} nebulae at 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 within deep broadband imaging and have carried out a survey of the 9.4 deg{sup 2} NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field. With a total survey comoving volume of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} h{sup -3}{sub 70} Mpc{sup 3}, this is the largest volume survey for Ly{alpha} nebulae ever undertaken. In this first paper in the series, we present the details of the survey design and a systematically selected sample of 79 candidates, which includes one previously discovered Ly{alpha} nebula.

  8. Health literacy in Europe: comparative results of the European health literacy survey (HLS-EU)

    PubMed Central

    Pelikan, Jürgen M.; Röthlin, Florian; Ganahl, Kristin; Slonska, Zofia; Doyle, Gerardine; Fullam, James; Kondilis, Barbara; Agrafiotis, Demosthenes; Uiters, Ellen; Falcon, Maria; Mensing, Monika; Tchamov, Kancho; van den Broucke, Stephan; Brand, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy concerns the capacities of people to meet the complex demands of health in modern society. In spite of the growing attention for the concept among European health policymakers, researchers and practitioners, information about the status of health literacy in Europe remains scarce. This article presents selected findings from the first European comparative survey on health literacy in populations. Methods: The European health literacy survey (HLS-EU) was conducted in eight countries: Austria, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland and Spain (n = 1000 per country, n = 8000 total sample). Data collection was based on Eurobarometer standards and the implementation of the HLS-EU-Q (questionnaire) in computer-assisted or paper-assisted personal interviews. Results: The HLS-EU-Q constructed four levels of health literacy: insufficient, problematic, sufficient and excellent. At least 1 in 10 (12%) respondents showed insufficient health literacy and almost 1 in 2 (47%) had limited (insufficient or problematic) health literacy. However, the distribution of levels differed substantially across countries (29–62%). Subgroups within the population, defined by financial deprivation, low social status, low education or old age, had higher proportions of people with limited health literacy, suggesting the presence of a social gradient which was also confirmed by raw bivariate correlations and a multivariate linear regression model. Discussion: Limited health literacy represents an important challenge for health policies and practices across Europe, but to a different degree for different countries. The social gradient in health literacy must be taken into account when developing public health strategies to improve health equity in Europe. PMID:25843827

  9. First National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing: survey design and methods for the allergen and endotoxin components.

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Patrick J; Friedman, Warren; Marker, David A; Clickner, Robert; Rogers, John W; Viet, Susan M; Muilenberg, Michael L; Thorne, Peter S; Arbes, Samuel J; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2002-01-01

    From July 1998 to August 1999, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences conducted the first National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing. The purpose of the survey was to assess children's potential household exposure to lead, allergens, and bacterial endotoxins. We surveyed a sample of 831 homes, representing 96 million permanently occupied, noninstitutional housing units that permit resident children. We administered questionnaires to household members, made home observations, and took environmental samples. This article provides general background information on the survey, an overview of the survey design, and a description of the data collection and laboratory methods pertaining to the allergen and endotoxin components. We collected dust samples from a bed, the bedroom floor, a sofa or chair, the living room floor, the kitchen floor, and a basement floor and analyzed them for cockroach allergen Bla g 1, the dust mite allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1, the cat allergen Fel d 1, the dog allergen Can f 1, the rodent allergens Rat n 1 and mouse urinary protein, allergens of the fungus Alternaria alternata, and endotoxin. This article provides the essential context for subsequent reports that will describe the prevalence of allergens and endotoxin in U.S. households, their distribution by various housing characteristics, and their associations with allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis. PMID:12003758

  10. Research on seismic survey design for doubly complex areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Yin, Cheng; Wu, Ming-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Pan, Shu-Lin

    2012-06-01

    The complex geological conditions in doubly complex areas tend to result in difficult surface survey operations and poor target layer imaging in the subsurface which has a great impact on seismic data quality. In this paper, we propose an optimal crooked line survey method for decreasing the surface survey operational difficulties and improving the sub-layer event continuity. The method concentrates on the surface shooting conditions, first, selecting the proper shot positions based on the specific surface topographic features to reduce the shot difficulties and then optimizing the receiver positioning to meet the prerequisite that the subsurface reflection points remain in a straight line. Using this method cannot only lower the shooting difficulty of rough surface condition areas but also overcome the subsurface reflection point bending problem appearing in the traditional crooked line survey method. On the other hand, we use local infill shooting rather than conventional overall infill shooting to improve sublayer event continuity and uniformity with lower survey operation cost. A model has been calculated and processed with the proposed optimal crooked line survey and local infill shooting design method workflow and the results show that this new method can work for seismic surveys in double complex areas.

  11. Multidisciplinary aerospace design optimization: Survey of recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing complexity of engineering systems has sparked increasing interest in multidisciplinary optimization (MDO). This paper presents a survey of recent publications in the field of aerospace where interest in MDO has been particularly intense. The two main challenges of MDO are computational expense and organizational complexity. Accordingly the survey is focussed on various ways different researchers use to deal with these challenges. The survey is organized by a breakdown of MDO into its conceptual components. Accordingly, the survey includes sections on Mathematical Modeling, Design-oriented Analysis, Approximation Concepts, Optimization Procedures, System Sensitivity, and Human Interface. With the authors' main expertise being in the structures area, the bulk of the references focus on the interaction of the structures discipline with other disciplines. In particular, two sections at the end focus on two such interactions that have recently been pursued with a particular vigor: Simultaneous Optimization of Structures and Aerodynamics, and Simultaneous Optimization of Structures Combined With Active Control.

  12. Tracking Psychosocial Health in Adults with Epilepsy—Estimates from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kobau, R; Cui, W; Kadima, N; Zack, MM; Sajatovic, M; Kaiboriboon, K; Jobst, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides population-based estimates of psychosocial health among U.S. adults with epilepsy from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Methods Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the prevalence of the following measures of psychosocial health among adults with and those without epilepsy: 1) the Kessler-6 scale of Serious Psychological Distress; 2) cognitive limitation; the extent of impairments associated with psychological problems; and work limitation; 3) Social participation; and 4) the Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System Global Health scale. Results Compared with adults without epilepsy, adults with epilepsy, especially those with active epilepsy, reported significantly worse psychological health, more cognitive impairment, difficulty in participating in some social activities, and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Conclusions These disparities in psychosocial health in U.S. adults with epilepsy serve as baseline national estimates of their HRQOL, consistent with Healthy People 2020 national objectives on HRQOL. PMID:25305435

  13. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

    PubMed Central

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  14. Survey design and extent estimates for the National Lakes Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a National Lake Assessment (NLA) in the conterminous USA in 2007 as part of a national assessment of aquatic resources using probability based survey designs. The USEPA Office of Water led the assessment, in cooperation with...

  15. Use of multispectral data in design of forest sample surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, S. J.; Wensel, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    The use of multispectral data in design of forest sample surveys using a computer software package, WILLIAM, is described. The system allows evaluation of a number of alternative sampling systems and, with appropriate cost data, estimates the implementation cost for each.

  16. Engaging Students in Survey Design and Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sole, Marla A.

    2015-01-01

    Every day, people use data to make decisions that affect their personal and professional lives, trusting that the data are correct. Many times, however, the data are inaccurate, as a result of a flaw in the design or methodology of the survey used to collect the data. Researchers agree that only questions that are clearly worded, unambiguous, free…

  17. The Alabama Adolescent Health Survey: Health Knowledge and Behaviors of Grade 8 and 10 Students. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Stephen; Adcock, Anthony

    The Alabama Adolescent Health Survey was a comprehensive survey of the knowledge and behaviors of eighth- and tenth-grade students in the public schools. The sample consisted of 3,803 students from school systems that were rural, metropolitan, and mixed. The survey measured student attitudes toward, and knowledge of: (1) mental health; (2)…

  18. Reproductive health risk behavior survey of Colombian high school students.

    PubMed

    Becher, J C; Garcia, J G; Kaplan, D W; Gil, A R; Li, J; Main, D; Herrera, J A; Arias, L; Bromet, A

    1999-03-01

    A survey on the reproductive health risk behaviors of adolescent students in Colombia was conducted. 230 9th and 11th graders participated in a survey using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's self-administered Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The sample was composed of 62% females and 38% males, aged 13-18 years. It was found that 29% had engaged in sexual intercourse; among these, 13% were 9th graders and 43% were 11th graders. Increasing age and male gender were significantly correlated with past sexual activity. Older males have more prevalent sexual activity than older females, while younger adolescents showed no gender differences. Male gender was significantly associated with early age of initiation of intercourse. Furthermore, 48% reported using contraception during their last sexual encounter, of which 63% used an effective method (condom, oral contraception, withdrawal) and 37% used a method of low or unknown efficacy. Use of alcohol prior to the last sexual intercourse accounted for 14%. The majority of the participants had discussed or received information on HIV infection at school (92%) or from family (77%). Results showed unmet health needs of the adolescent groups and lower frequency of contraceptive use. PMID:10195806

  19. CONTINUING SURVEY OF FOOD INTAKES BY INDIVIDUALS (CSFII) AND THE DIET AND HEALTH KNOWLEDGE SURVEY (DHKS), 1994-96

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Continuing Survey Of Food Intakes By Individuals (CSFII) And The Diet And Health Knowledge Survey (DHKS), popularly known as the What We Eat in America Survey, were conducted by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The CSFII 19...

  20. Survey Says? A Primer on Web-based Survey Design and Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Pannucci, Christopher J.; Kasten, Steven J.; Haase, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    The internet has changed the way in which we gather and interpret information. While books were once the exclusive bearers of data, knowledge is now only a keystroke away. The internet has also facilitated the synthesis of new knowledge. Specifically, it has become a tool through which medical research is conducted. A review of the literature reveals that in the past year, over one-hundred medical publications have been based on web-based survey data alone. Due to emerging internet technologies, web-based surveys can now be launched with little computer knowledge. They may also be self-administered, eliminating personnel requirements. Ultimately, an investigator may build, implement, and analyze survey results with speed and efficiency, obviating the need for mass mailings and data processing. All of these qualities have rendered telephone and mail-based surveys virtually obsolete. Despite these capabilities, web-based survey techniques are not without their limitations, namely recall and response biases. When used properly, however, web-based surveys can greatly simplify the research process. This article discusses the implications of web-based surveys and provides guidelines for their effective design and distribution. PMID:21701347

  1. The China Health and Nutrition Survey, 1989–2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Zhai, Fengying; Du, Shufa; Popkin, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) began in 1989 with the goal of creating a multilevel method of data collection from individuals and households and their communities to understand how the wide-ranging social and economic changes in China affect a wide array of nutrition and health-related outcomes. Initiated with a partial sample in 1989, the full survey runs from 1991 to 2011, and this issue documents the CHNS history. The CHNS cohort includes new household formation and replacement communities and households; all household members are studied. Furthermore in-depth community data are collected. The sample began with eight provinces and added a ninth, Heilongjiang, in 1997 and three autonomous cities, Beijing, Shanghai, and Chongqing, in 2011. The in-depth community contextual measures have allowed us to create a unique measure of urbanicity that captures major dimensions of modernization across all 288 communities currently in the CHNS sample. The standardized, validated urbanicity measure captures the changes in 12 dimensions: population density; economic activity; traditional markets; modern markets; transportation infrastructure; sanitation; communications; housing; education; diversity; health infrastructure; and social services. Each is based on numerous measures applicable to each dimension. They are used jointly and separately in hundreds of studies. PMID:24341753

  2. Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Executive Summary For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win–win for productivity and employees’ well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today’s U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

  3. Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Hammer, Leslie B; Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win-win for productivity and employees' well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today's U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

  4. Optimum structural design with plate bending elements - A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Prasad, B.

    1981-01-01

    A survey is presented of recently published papers in the field of optimum structural design of plates, largely with respect to the minimum-weight design of plates subject to such constraints as fundamental frequency maximization. It is shown that, due to the availability of powerful computers, the trend in optimum plate design is away from methods tailored to specific geometry and loads and toward methods that can be easily programmed for any kind of plate, such as finite element methods. A corresponding shift is seen in optimization from variational techniques to numerical optimization algorithms. Among the topics covered are fully stressed design and optimality criteria, mathematical programming, smooth and ribbed designs, design against plastic collapse, buckling constraints, and vibration constraints.

  5. A survey of oral health, Qalyub Project, Egypt*

    PubMed Central

    Wheatcroft, M. G.; Klimt, C. R.

    1959-01-01

    This report presents the results of an oral health survey of 4324 individuals in three villages near Cairo, Egypt. The results show that the incidence of dental decay (expressed as the number of carious teeth per individual) in this group of Egyptians was lower than that reported for the over-all population of the USA, and that the prevalence of periodontal disease in the group studied was about three times as high as that reported in the USA. There was a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of asymptomatic enlargement of the parotid glands and the occurrence of angular cheilosis in the same individuals. Other forms of oral disease were observed infrequently. Water samples from the survey area were assayed for fluorides and were shown to contain fluoride levels below that considered to give protection against dental caries. PMID:13638795

  6. Metamodels for Computer-Based Engineering Design: Survey and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Timothy W.; Peplinski, Jesse; Koch, Patrick N.; Allen, Janet K.

    1997-01-01

    The use of statistical techniques to build approximations of expensive computer analysis codes pervades much of todays engineering design. These statistical approximations, or metamodels, are used to replace the actual expensive computer analyses, facilitating multidisciplinary, multiobjective optimization and concept exploration. In this paper we review several of these techniques including design of experiments, response surface methodology, Taguchi methods, neural networks, inductive learning, and kriging. We survey their existing application in engineering design and then address the dangers of applying traditional statistical techniques to approximate deterministic computer analysis codes. We conclude with recommendations for the appropriate use of statistical approximation techniques in given situations and how common pitfalls can be avoided.

  7. Health and morbidity survey, Seychelles, 1956-57

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, A. J. W.

    1960-01-01

    Adequate knowledge of existing health and morbidity conditions is the basis for all planning of future health services. For this reason, a health and morbidity survey of the population of the Seychelles was carried out in 1956-57 under the joint auspices of the Seychelles Government and the World Health Organization. Statistical sampling methods were used and the information was obtained by the household interview method. Health, morbidity and relevant demographic data were thus disclosed for the first time for Seychelles. Basic information was obtained on: general morbidity of the population, including dental and nutritional status, malnutrition, incidence of intestinal diseases and other easily diagnosable conditions; growth and weight curves of children up to the age of 16; haemoglobin levels; erythrocyte sedimentation rates; general living conditions such as housing and overcrowding, social status and latrine arrangements; the connexion of soil pollution with the incidence of amoebiasis and helminthiasis; and lastly, the incidence of the sickle cell trait, eosinophilia and positive serological reactions to the Chediak test (for manifest or latent syphilis). The findings are presented with a minimum of remarks and interpretation. PMID:13833401

  8. District nurses' involvement in mental health: an exploratory survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo; Knight, Denise

    2006-04-01

    This article reports on a survey of district nurses' involvement in mental health interventions in one county. Seventy-nine questionnaires were sent and 46 were returned. Descriptive analysis was carried out using statistical software. The DNs reported encountering a wide range of mental health issues and interventions in practice: dementia, anxiety and depression featured highly. Over half (55%) of the respondents reported involvement in bereavement counselling, and 28% and 23% of respondents reported encountering anxiety management, and problem solving and alcohol advice respectively. A large proportion, however, reported no involvement in mental health interventions. Among the psychiatric professionals, district nurses tended to have most frequent contacts with social workers. GPs were the most likely person to whom DNs made referrals, followed by community psychiatric nurses. Despite the apparent awareness of the values of psychosocial interventions, DNs were equally influenced by the medical model of treatment. In order to realize the potential contribution of district nurses in mental health interventions, there is a need for primary care teams to foster a closer working relationship with mental health specialist services. PMID:16723902

  9. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers to Reference Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W.N.; Burke, D.L.; Claver, C.F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K.H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D.K.; Jacoby, S.H.; Jones, R.L.; Kahn, S.M.; Kantor, J.P.; Krabbendam, V.; Lupton, R.H.; Monet, D.G.; Pinto, P.A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T.L.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, Michael A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /LSST Corp. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NOAO, Tucson /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Santa Cruz /Harvard U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Illinois U., Urbana

    2011-10-14

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg{sup 2} field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg{sup 2} with {delta} < +34.5{sup o}, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320-1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the

  10. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope: From Science Drivers To Reference Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezic, Z.; Axelrod, T.; Brandt, W. N.; Burke, D. L.; Claver, C. F.; Connolly, A.; Cook, K. H.; Gee, P.; Gilmore, D. K.; Jacoby, S. H.; Jones, R. L.; Kahn, S. M.; Kantor, J. P.; Krabbendam, V. V.; Lupton, R. H.; Monet, D. G.; Pinto, P. A.; Saha, A.; Schalk, T. L.; Schneider, D. P.; Strauss, M. A.; Stubbs, C. W.; Sweeney, D.; Szalay, A.; Thaler, J. J.; Tyson, J. A.; LSST Collaboration

    2008-06-01

    In the history of astronomy, major advances in our understanding of the Universe have come from dramatic improvements in our ability to accurately measure astronomical quantities. Aided by rapid progress in information technology, current sky surveys are changing the way we view and study the Universe. Next-generation surveys will maintain this revolutionary progress. We focus here on the most ambitious survey currently planned in the visible band, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: constraining dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. It will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain multiple images covering the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachón in Northern Chile. The current baseline design, with an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg2 field of view, and a 3,200 Megapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 square degrees of sky to be covered using pairs of 15-second exposures in two photometric bands every three nights on average. The system is designed to yield high image quality, as well as superb astrometric and photometric accuracy. The survey area will include 30,000 deg2 with δ<+34.5°, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320--1050 nm. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg2 region about 1000 times in the six bands during the anticipated 10 years of operation. These data will result in databases including 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars, and will serve the majority of science programs. The remaining 10% of the observing time will be allocated to special programs such as Very Deep and Very Fast time domain surveys. We describe how the LSST science drivers led to

  11. Assessment of Tooth Wear Among Glass Factory Workers: WHO 2013 Oral Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Nagesh; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Bapat, Salil; Gupta, Vivek Vardhan

    2015-01-01

    Background Glass factory workers are often exposed to the hazardous environment that leads to deleterious oral health and subsequently, general health. We planned to determine the effects of the particulates present in the milieu on the tooth wear among workers. Aim To assess tooth wear among glass factory workers in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Settings and Design A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 936 glass workers in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India from January-June 2014. Materials and Methods A survey proforma was designed for tooth wear evaluation with the help of WHO Oral Health Assessment form 2013 (for adults). Information regarding oral health practices, adverse habits and dietary habits, demographic details was gathered and clinical parameters were recorded. Statistical Analysis The Chi–square test, t–test, One-way Analysis of Variance and a Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Results The most prevalent form of erosion was enamel erosion (589, 62.93%) with few subjects of deeper dentinal erosion and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). Dental erosion was found to be higher among males compared to females. Years of experience and educational status were identified as best predictors for dental erosion. Conclusion It was concluded that there was considerable evidence of dental erosion found among the factory workers. Due to ignorance on social, cultural and health aspects, professional approach with regular dental care services for detection of early symptoms and planning of preventive strategies is warranted. PMID:26436050

  12. Health Status of Children: A Review of Surveys, 1963-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabot, Marion Johnson; And Others

    This overview of health and illness among children and youth in the United States is based on national studies conducted between 1963 and 1972. Major sources of data were four on-going surveys of health conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW): (1) the health interview survey relies on household interviews for information on…

  13. Challenges and barriers to health care and overall health in older residents of Alaska: evidence from a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Foutz, Julia D.; Cohen, Steven A.; Cook, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 1970 to 2010, the Alaskan population increased from 302,583 to 698,473. During that time, the growth rate of Alaskan seniors (65+) was 4 times higher than their national counterparts. Ageing in Alaska requires confronting unique environmental, sociodemographic and infrastructural challenges, including an extreme climate, geographical isolation and less developed health care infrastructure compared to the continental US. Objective The objective of this analysis is to compare the health needs of Alaskan seniors to those in the continental US. Design We abstracted 315,161 records of individuals age 65+ from the 2013 and 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, of which 1,852 were residents of Alaska. To compare residents of Alaska to residents of the 48 contiguous states we used generalized linear models which allowed us to adjust for demographic differences and survey weighting procedures. We examined 3 primary outcomes – general health status, health care coverage status and length of time since last routine check-up. Results Alaskan seniors were 59% less likely to have had a routine check-up in the past year and 12% less likely to report excellent health status than comparable seniors in the contiguous US. Conclusions Given the growth rate of Alaskan seniors and inherent health care challenges this vulnerable population faces, future research should examine the specific pathways through which these disparities occur and inform policies to ensure that all US seniors, regardless of geographical location, have access to high-quality health services. PMID:27056177

  14. Factors influencing the effectiveness of mailed health surveys.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, G H; Longmate, J; Branch, L G

    1992-01-01

    The authors investigated sources of bias in health surveys by examining responses to their 1989 questionnaire mailed to 1,255 Massachusetts men who were eligible for dental care provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. After a maximum of three mailings and one telephone call to nonrespondents, a total of 1,049 veterans had responded out of 1,228 finally determined to be eligible, a response rate of 85 percent. The investigators found that small differences in univariate estimates would have occurred had the field phase been terminated after the first mailing, which had a response rate of 61 percent. To evaluate multivariate distributions, they duplicated their previously published logistic regression model for sources of dental care, using only those who responded to the first and second mailings. Although model fits would have been substantively the same had the field phase been terminated after the first or the second mailings, analysis of parameter estimates and their statistical significances suggested bias that would have led to different substantive conclusions, in some instances. Another potential source of bias in surveys was found to be item omission. Fifty-eight percent of respondents answered all 46 survey questions, and 90 percent answered at least 91 percent of the questions. Fewer questions were answered by those whose responses were received last, but trends regarding missing data by age or education were not statistically significant. Although the survey using this methodology met all objectives, subject nonresponses, the ineligibility of potential respondents, item nonresponses, and skewed distributions of outcome variables combined to reduce the statistical power to detect differences among groups or to alter the analysis of the differences. These factors need to be planned for by investigators undertaking similar surveys. PMID:1410240

  15. [Blinding trachoma: results of a prevalence survey in 8 health districts in CAR].

    PubMed

    Yaya, G; Kemata, B; Youfegan Baanam, M; Bobossi-Serengbe, G

    2015-10-01

    Support of visual disabilities in terms of preventive and curative treatment, is a priority for public health in Central African Republic. The lack of recent and reliable data on ocular pathologies in general including trachoma particularly, has led health authorities, in collaboration with partners to undertake an epidemiological investigation to determine the mapping. This study was designed to assess the importance of endemicity in the most sensitive groups within population, including children of 1 to 9 years old. Eight from sixteen health districts in the country, were selected for this survey as a first step. The data collected will assess the real needs in medical and surgical care to develop an appropriate strategic plan of support for this condition on a large scale. This is a cross-sectional descriptive survey carried out in one month, from November 23 to December 26, 2011 in eight health prefectures of the country. The sampling frame was the population of eight health districts. The exhaustive list of villages and demographic data from the national census conducted in December 2003, adjusted by the rate of annual increase of 2.5%has been used. The administrative headquarters of the places of the visited districts leaders were excluded from the sampling frame. A random survey in clusters at two levels made from formed bases. Twenty villages (clusters) in each health district have been drawn according to the proportional probability to the size of the totals cumulative. 12,800 children of both sexes, aged 1 to 9 years have been identified in this investigation and 11,287 were actually examined, or 88.2 %, sex ratio is significantly 1.11. The proportion by age group of the children sampled is stackable to the general population. 26.9 % of TF and 5.9 % TI have been diagnosed. Six from eight districts surveyed are endemic. Three of them had respectively rates of 32.3 %, 47.1 % and 54.3 %. PMID:26277710

  16. A Survey of Current Rotorcraft Propulsion Health Monitoring Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Simon, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    A brief review is presented on the state-of-the-art in rotorcraft engine health monitoring technologies including summaries on current practices in the area of sensors, data acquisition, monitoring and analysis. Also, presented are guidelines for verification and validation of Health Usage Monitoring System (HUMS) and specifically for maintenance credits to extend part life. Finally, a number of new efforts in HUMS are summarized as well as lessons learned and future challenges. In particular, gaps are identified to supporting maintenance credits to extend rotorcraft engine part life. A number of data sources were consulted and include results from a survey from the HUMS community, Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) documents, American Helicopter Society (AHS) papers, as well as references from Defence Science & Technology Organization (DSTO), Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  17. Nicaragua 1998: results from the Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    2000-06-01

    This article presents summary statistics gathered from the 1998 Nicaragua Demographic and Health Survey (Encuesta Nicaraguense de Demografia y Salud 1998, ENDESA-98). Data from the nationally representative ENDESA-98 were collected from 11,528 households. Interviews were conducted with 13,634 women aged 15-49 years and 2912 men aged 15-59 years between December 1, 1997, and May 31, 1998. The statistics presented were on fertility trends, fertility differentials, age-specific fertility, fertility preferences, current contraceptive use, contraception, marital and contraceptive status, differentials in median age at first birth, postpartum variables, and infant mortality. In addition, statistical data on the health and nutritional status of children were also presented. PMID:10907282

  18. Austin Powers bites back: a cross sectional comparison of US and English national oral health surveys

    PubMed Central

    Tsakos, Georgios; Sheiham, Aubrey; Marmot, Michael G; Kawachi, Ichiro; Watt, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare oral health in the US and England and to assess levels of educational and income related oral health inequalities between both countries. Design Cross sectional analysis of US and English national surveys. Setting Non-institutionalised adults living in their own homes. Participants Oral health measures and socioeconomic indicators were assessed in nationally representative samples: the Adult Dental Health Survey 2009 for England, and the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-08. Adults aged ≥25 years were included in analyses with samples of 8719 (England) and 9786 (US) for analyses by education, and 7184 (England) and 9094 (US) for analyses by income. Main outcome measures Number of missing teeth, self rated oral health, and oral impacts on daily life were outcomes. Educational attainment and household income were used as socioeconomic indicators. Age standardised estimates of oral health were compared between countries and across educational and income groups. Regression models were fitted, and relative and absolute inequalities were measured using the relative index of inequality (RII) and the slope index of inequality (SII). Results The mean number of missing teeth was significantly higher in the US (7.31 (standard error 0.15)) than in England (6.97 (0.09)), while oral impacts were higher in England. There was evidence of significant social gradients in oral health in both countries, although differences in oral health by socioeconomic position varied according to the oral health measure used. Consistently higher RII and SII values were found in the US than in England, particularly for self rated oral health. RII estimates for self rated oral health by education were 3.67 (95% confidence interval 3.23 to 4.17) in the US and 1.83 (1.59 to 2.11) in England. In turn, SII values were 42.55 (38.14 to 46.96) in the US and 18.43 (14.01 to 22.85) in England. Conclusions The oral health of US citizens is not better than

  19. U.S. Physicians’ Views on Financing Options to Expand Health Insurance Coverage: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Woolhandler, Steffie; Bose-Kolanu, Anjali; Germann, Antonio; Bor, David H.; Himmelstein, David U.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physician opinion can influence the prospects for health care reform, yet there are few recent data on physician views on reform proposals or access to medical care in the United States. OBJECTIVE To assess physician views on financing options for expanding health care coverage and on access to health care. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS Nationally representative mail survey conducted between March 2007 and October 2007 of U.S. physicians engaged in direct patient care. MEASUREMENTS Rated support for reform options including financial incentives to induce individuals to purchase health insurance and single-payer national health insurance; rated views of several dimensions of access to care. MAIN RESULTS 1,675 of 3,300 physicians responded (50.8%). Only 9% of physicians preferred the current employer-based financing system. Forty-nine percent favored either tax incentives or penalties to encourage the purchase of medical insurance, and 42% preferred a government-run, taxpayer-financed single-payer national health insurance program. The majority of respondents believed that all Americans should receive needed medical care regardless of ability to pay (89%); 33% believed that the uninsured currently have access to needed care. Nearly one fifth of respondents (19.3%) believed that even the insured lack access to needed care. Views about access were independently associated with support for single-payer national health insurance. CONCLUSIONS The vast majority of physicians surveyed supported a change in the health care financing system. While a plurality support the use of financial incentives, a substantial proportion support single payer national health insurance. These findings challenge the perception that fundamental restructuring of the U.S. health care financing system receives little acceptance by physicians. PMID:19184240

  20. Are People with Intellectual Disabilities Represented in European Public Health Surveys?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linehan, Christine; Walsh, P. N.; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H. M. J.; Kerr, M. P.; Dawson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that people with intellectual disabilities experience secondary health conditions and report inequities in health status and access to health systems. Reliable information is essential to identify health disparities. A review of health interview and health examination surveys conducted in 17 European countries was…

  1. Relaxation practice for health in the United States: findings from the National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Kyoung Othelia; Yeo, Younsook

    2013-06-01

    Despite the popularity of relaxation practices as mind-body therapy in the United States, little is known about those who practice these techniques. Using cross-sectional data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey Alternative Medicine Supplement, this study examined potential correlates of engagement in relaxation practices, including sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, medical conditions, physical activity, drinking, smoking, and prayer for health. Individuals who engaged in relaxation practices were less likely to be older, male, Hispanic, high income, or residents in the South and Midwest. They were more likely to be college-educated, uninsured, and have one to two chronic conditions. Those with higher psychological distress and with asthma and pulmonary diseases practiced relaxation techniques more than individuals without these conditions. Findings suggest that relaxation practice is associated with lifestyles habits such as regular physical activity and prayer for health. Thus, relaxation practice has the potential to enhance health behaviors and lifestyle change. PMID:23463812

  2. Survey report; health needs of the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Raymond, S U

    1989-01-01

    Sustainability of development assistance programs depends greatly on the perceptions of priorities by recipient countries. A written survey was sent by the Catholic University of America's Institute for International Health and Development to 66 ministers of health in low-income and middle-income countries to assess their views of priority problems in health sector development. Response rate was 33%, coming from countries with highly diverse gross national products (GNPs), growth rates, mortality rates and life expectancies. Nevertheless, there was widespread agreement about priorities: 1) meeting costs of health care; 2) improving health care management and administration; and 3) extending communicable disease control. Communicable disease control and child health programs were more important to low-income countries than to middle-income countries. Costs, management and administration and the control of noncommunicable diseases were predicted to increase in importance. In demographics, urbanization, overall population growth and shift of workers from agriculture to industry and services were seen as the major problems of the past, and urbanization and the aging of populations accompanied by increasing life expectancies the major challenges of the future. Highest predicted training needs were for system managers and paramedical personnel. Government budgets, user fees and donor agencies were seen as the most important sources of past funding, with social security systems and fee-based payments increasing in importance in the future. The role of donor agencies would increase as would the need for more responsiveness. Future uncertainties include national economic growth, environmental problems, issues in ethics and changes in disease and technology. PMID:12342422

  3. USE OF ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS INDICES FOR ORAL HEALTH SURVEY

    PubMed Central

    Nakas, Enita; Tiro, Alisa; Vrazalica, Lejla Redzepagic; Hadzihasanovic, Dzana; Dzemidzic, Vildana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study is to compare incidence of orthodontic malocclusion based on occlusal indices and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), and to evaluate the most commonly used method among the dentists for orthodontic treatment in Sarajevo. Material and Methods: The sample consisted of 110 (31 female and 79 male)subjects older than 16 years with complete permanent dentition. Subjects were examined according to Occlusal Index (Angle classification of malocclusion, overjet, overbite, dental arch crowding and tooth rotation) and IOTN index. We conduct survey regarding which indexes are used in deciding on orthodontic treatment need, among primary health care and Orthodontist. Results: The present study show differences between the presence of malocclusion and treatment need as assessed by these two used indices. Based on the survey that we conduct all primary health care doctors use Occlusal Index to decide need for orthodontic treatment, more than 95% of orthodontic specialist use Occlusal Index for treatment need estimation. Conclusion: When measuring and grading treatment needs we should rely on Index of orthodontic treatment need. In such high demand for orthodontic treatment need it is necessary to establish need for the orthodontic treatment as fundamental, so that individuals with greatest treatment need can be assigned priority. PMID:27147922

  4. Improving radiation survey data using CADD/CAE (computer-aided design and drafting computer-aided engineering)

    SciTech Connect

    Palau, G.L.; Tarpinian, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A new application of computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) and computer-aided engineering (CAE) at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) cleanup is improving the quality of radiation survey data taken in the plant. The use of CADD/CAE-generated survey maps has increased both the accuracy of survey data and the capability to perform analyses with these data. In addition, health physics technician manhours and radiation exposure can be reduced in situations where the CADD/CAE-generated drawings are used for survey mapping.

  5. Population Health Considerations for Pediatric Asthma: Findings from the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Byrd, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a prevalent and costly chronic condition. Optimal management enables secondary and tertiary prevention. The goal was to identify population health considerations for pediatric asthma in California to inform the development of quality improvement interventions. California Health Interview Survey 2011-2012 is a random-digit dial telephone survey conducted in 5 languages. It includes 44,000 households from all 58 counties in California. This study assessed factors related to symptom control and health care use in children ages 2-11 years with asthma. An estimated 492,385 (9.6%) of children in California currently have asthma. Urban and rural residents face comparable asthma disease burdens. School-age male children as well as Asian and African American children are disproportionately affected. Asthma causes significant morbidity, with poorer health status, high utilization of emergency care, and the need for daily medication use. Only 38% of children with asthma have a recent asthma management plan. Half of all children with asthma did not receive influenza immunization in the past year, although this reflects the overall low rate of influenza vaccination. Parents of children with asthma frequently utilize the Internet for health information and communication with their child's health care provider. Children with asthma in California face several population-level challenges, including poor health status, low influenza vaccination rates, high use of emergency care, and suboptimal use of health literacy tools. Focusing on improved care coordination and preventive care for high-risk groups is especially urgent given the expansion of public health insurance and impending shortages in the primary care workforce. (Population Health Management 2016;19:145-151). PMID:26103063

  6. Oral health survey and oral health questionnaire for high school students in Tibet, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to identify the oral health status as well as oral health practices and access for care of graduating senior high school Tibetan students in Shannan prefecture of Tibet. Methods Based on standards of the 3rd Chinese National Oral Epidemiological Survey and WHO Oral Health Surveys, 1907 graduating students from three senior high schools were examined for caries, periodontitis, dental fluorosis, and oral hygiene status. The questionnaire to the students addressed oral health practices and present access to oral medical services. Results Dental caries prevalence (39.96%) and mean DMFT (0.97) were high in Tibetan students. In community periodontal indexes, the detection rate of gingivitis and dental calculus were 59.50% and 62.64%, respectively. Oral hygiene index-simplified was 0.69, with 0.36 and 0.33 in debris index-simplified and calculus index-simplified, respectively. Community dental fluorosis index was 0.29, with 8.13% in prevalence rate. The questionnaire showed students had poor oral health practices and unawareness for their needs for oral health services. It was also noted that the local area provides inadequate oral medical services. Conclusions Tibetan students had higher prevalence of dental diseases and lower awareness of oral health needs. The main reasons were geographical environment, dietary habit, students’ attitude to oral health, and lack of oral health promotion and education. Oral health education and local dentists training should be strengthened to get effective prevention of dental diseases. PMID:24884668

  7. Job loss from poor health, smoking and obesity: a national prospective survey in France

    PubMed Central

    Jusot, F; Khlat, M; Rochereau, T; Serme, C

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Health selection into unemployment may be either direct or operate by reference to health-related behaviours rather than health per se (indirect selection). Panel data are desirable to investigate selection effects, and the two types of selection processes may be concurrent. We examine jointly the roles of health and health-related behaviours as precursors of unemployment, in order to disentangle direct from indirect selection processes. Design: The data of a multi-round nationally representative health survey in France were analysed longitudinally, based on three data collection rounds: 1992–5, 1996–8 and 2000–2. Following employees salaried in the private sector and aged 30–54 years at baseline, we explored through logistic regression the influence of non-optimal self-rated health, smoking and obesity on the risk of being found unemployed 4 years later. Results: After adjustment for self-rated health, obesity was found to be a significant precursor of unemployment in women, and heavy smoking had that role in men. After adjustment for smoking and obesity, poor health at baseline was found to be a significant precursor of unemployment in both genders. Conclusion: Those findings confirm the intrinsic role of poor health and of health-related behaviours as precursors of unemployment, with gender-specific patterns for the latter. Public policy prescriptions regarding employees’ protection from job insecurities should integrate appropriate accommodations of health limitations, and the personal factors underlying unfavourable work and health behaviours should be investigated, in order to thwart indirect selection phenomena. PMID:18339826

  8. A survey on methods of design features identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowik, C.; Kalinowski, K.; Paprocka, I.; Kempa, W.

    2015-11-01

    currently identified feature. In the IFR method system designer defines a set of features and sets a collection of recognition process parameters. It allows to unambiguously identifying individual features in automatic or semiautomatic way directly in CAD system or in an external application to which the part model might be transferred. Additionally a user is able to define non-geometrical information such as: overall dimensions, surface roughness etc. In this paper a survey on methods of features identification and recognition is presented especially in context of AFR methods.

  9. Associations of Spontaneous Self-Affirmation with Health Care Experiences and Health Information Seeking in National Survey of US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Jennifer M.; Howell, Jennifer L.; Emanuel, Amber S.; Klein, William M. P.; Ferrer, Rebecca A.; Harris, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Self-affirming—such as by reflecting on one's strengths and values—reduces defensiveness to threatening information, reduces negative effects of stereotype threat, and promotes prosociality. These outcomes may promote physical health, highlighting a need to examine the role of self-affirmation in medical and health contexts. Design Data were collected as part of the nationally representative, cross-sectional, 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey. Items were completed by 2,731 respondents. Main Outcome Measures Respondents answered questions about spontaneous self-affirmation tendencies, perceptions of providers and health care, involvement in medical appointments, health information seeking, and engagement in medical research. Results Spontaneous self-affirmation was associated with more positive perceptions of communication with one's provider, better perceived quality of care, greater likelihood of asking questions in a medical appointment, greater information seeking for oneself, and multiple indices of surrogate information seeking (i.e., seeking information for others). Four of eight significant associations remained significant when controlling for optimism. The associations of self-affirmation with aspects of the patient-provider relationship were not modified by factors likely to be associated with stereotype threat (e.g., race or BMI). Conclusion Spontaneous self-affirmation was related to positive outcomes in health contexts. Experimental research is needed to further explore the causal nature of these associations. PMID:26315683

  10. CONTINUING SURVEY OF FOOD INTAKES BY INDIVIDUALS (CSFII) AND THE DIET AND HEALTH KNOWLEDGE SURVEY (DHKS), 1989-91

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII), conducted as three separate 1-year surveys in 1989, 1990, and 1991, was designed to measure what Americans eat and drink. Information from the surveys is used to develop nutrition education programs, to assess dietary ...

  11. Barriers to mental health care in Japan: results from the World Mental Health Japan Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kanehara, Akiko; Umeda, Maki; Kawakami, Norito

    2014-01-01

    Aim The reasons for accessing and maintaining access to mental health services in Japan may be unique in those of other countries. Using the World Health Organization World Mental Health Japan survey data, this study investigated the prevalence of sociodemographic correlates of barriers for the use of, reasons for delayed access to, and reasons for dropping out from mental health care in a Japanese community-based sample. Methods An interview survey was conducted with a random sample of residents living in 11 communities across Japan during the years 2002–2006. Data from 4,130 participants were analyzed. Results The most frequently reported reason for not seeking mental health care was a low perceived need (63.9%). The most common reason for delaying access to help was the wish to handle the problem on one's own (68.8%), while the most common reason for dropping out of care was also a low perceived need (54.2%). Being a woman and of younger age were key sociodemographic barriers to the use of mental health services. Conclusion Low perceived need was a major reason for not seeking, delay in using, and dropout from mental health services in Japan. In addition, low perceived need and structural barriers were more frequently reported than attitudinal barriers, with the exception of a desire to handle the problem on one's own. These findings suggest that to improve therapist-patient communication and quality of mental health care, as well as mental health literacy education in the community, might improve access to care in Japan. PMID:25523280

  12. AIDS Knowledge and Attitudes, Provisional Data from the National Health Interview Survey: United States, August 1987. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics. No. 146.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Deborah A.; And Others

    This document presents provisional data for all Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) questionnaire items from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for August 1987. It notes that the AIDS questionnaire was designed to provide baseline estimates of public knowledge and attitudes about AIDS transmission, the prevention of AIDS virus…

  13. Health equity in the New Zealand health care system: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In all countries people experience different social circumstances that result in avoidable differences in health. In New Zealand, Māori, Pacific peoples, and those with lower socioeconomic status experience higher levels of chronic illness, which is the leading cause of mortality, morbidity and inequitable health outcomes. Whilst the health system can enable a fairer distribution of good health, limited national data is available to measure health equity. Therefore, we sought to find out whether health services in New Zealand were equitable by measuring the level of development of components of chronic care management systems across district health boards. Variation in provision by geography, condition or ethnicity can be interpreted as inequitable. Methods A national survey of district health boards (DHBs) was undertaken on macro approaches to chronic condition management with detail on cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke and diabetes. Additional data from expert informant interviews on program reach and the cultural needs of Māori and Pacific peoples was sought. Survey data were analyzed on dimensions of health equity relevant to strategic planning and program delivery. Results are presented as descriptive statistics and free text. Interviews were transcribed and NVivo 8 software supported a general inductive approach to identify common themes. Results Survey responses were received from the majority of DHBs (15/21), some PHOs (21/84) and 31 expert informants. Measuring, monitoring and targeting equity is not systematically undertaken. The Health Equity Assessment Tool is used in strategic planning but not in decisions about implementing or monitoring disease programs. Variable implementation of evidence-based practices in disease management and multiple funding streams made program implementation difficult. Equity for Māori is embedded in policy, this is not so for other ethnic groups or

  14. A Survey on Ambient Intelligence in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Acampora, Giovanni; Cook, Diane J.; Rashidi, Parisa; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient Intelligence (AmI) is a new paradigm in information technology aimed at empowering people’s capabilities by the means of digital environments that are sensitive, adaptive, and responsive to human needs, habits, gestures, and emotions. This futuristic vision of daily environment will enable innovative human-machine interactions characterized by pervasive, unobtrusive and anticipatory communications. Such innovative interaction paradigms make ambient intelligence technology a suitable candidate for developing various real life solutions, including in the health care domain. This survey will discuss the emergence of ambient intelligence (AmI) techniques in the health care domain, in order to provide the research community with the necessary background. We will examine the infrastructure and technology required for achieving the vision of ambient intelligence, such as smart environments and wearable medical devices. We will summarize of the state of the art artificial intelligence methodologies used for developing AmI system in the health care domain, including various learning techniques (for learning from user interaction), reasoning techniques (for reasoning about users’ goals and intensions) and planning techniques (for planning activities and interactions). We will also discuss how AmI technology might support people affected by various physical or mental disabilities or chronic disease. Finally, we will point to some of the successful case studies in the area and we will look at the current and future challenges to draw upon the possible future research paths. PMID:24431472

  15. Results from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Applied Studies.

    This report presents the first information from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. Prior to 2002, the survey was called the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA). This initial report on the 2002 data…

  16. Overview of Findings from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Applied Studies.

    This report presents the first information from the 2002 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. Prior to 2002, the survey was called the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA). This brief Overview report provides a…

  17. Health system responsiveness after health sector evolution plan (HSEP): An inpatient survey in Kermanshah in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Farid; Karami-Matin, Behzad; Rezaei, Satar; Rajabi-Gilan, Nader; Soofi, Moslem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Responsiveness is one of the three main goals of the health system introduced by World Health Organization. This study aimed at examining health system responsiveness after Health Sector Evolution Plan in Kermanshah, Western Iran. Methods: A sample of 335 hospitalized patients was selected using proportionate allocation to population size method in the city of Kermanshah (Iran) in 2015. World Health Survey (WHS) questionnaire was used to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and principal component analysis by STATA 12. Results: The overall health system responsiveness score was 72.6. The best and worst performance for domains of dignity and autonomy were 82.2 and 62.5, respectively. Socio-demographic variables of the patients had no significant effect on the total health system responsiveness score. The principal component analysis findings indicated that 68% of the variance of the overall responsiveness score was explained by four components. Conclusion: The overall responsiveness score of each of the domains was higher than that of other similar previous studies in Iran. Although it is difficult to reach a conclusion, our findings may show better responsiveness of the health system compared to the previous reports PMID:27493931

  18. Design Strategy for Flexible Health Sciences Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, John; Best, Gordon

    1970-01-01

    A statistical analysis of spatial allocations in university teaching hospitals and medical schools in three countries supports the hypothesis that on the “macro” level of major functional zones there is a considerable degree of invariance in space ratios, despite wide divergence in size, organization, and operating policies. On the basis of these findings a model is developed that makes it possible to predict, from a variety of indicators of space “needs,” the total area of a health sciences facility defined by levels of support servicing. The outputs of the model are seen as the inputs to a design strategy for potentially flexible medical facilities served by a communication lattice capable of indefinite extension. Images Fig. 9 PMID:5494269

  19. U.S. HEALTH AND NUTRITION: SAS SURVEY PROCEDURES AND NHANES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is used to evaluate the health and nutrition of the United States. It is composed of cross-sectional, nationally representative health examination surveys of the U.S. civilian, non-institutionalized population. A complex, stratified, mult...

  20. How does living with HIV impact on women's mental health? Voices from a global survey

    PubMed Central

    Orza, Luisa; Bewley, Susan; Logie, Carmen H; Crone, Elizabeth Tyler; Moroz, Svetlana; Strachan, Sophie; Vazquez, Marijo; Welbourn, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women living with HIV experience a disproportionate burden of mental health issues. To date, global guidelines contain insufficient guidance on mental health support, particularly regarding perinatal care. The aim of this article is to describe the extent and impact of mental health issues as experienced by women living with HIV on their sexual and reproductive health and human rights (SRH&HR). Methods A global, mixed-methods, user-led and designed survey on SRH&HR of women living with HIV was conducted using snowball sampling, containing an optional section exploring mental health issues. Statistical quantitative data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple linear regression analysis for the mental health responses. Thematic analysis of open free-text responses was performed for qualitative data. Results A total of 832 respondents from 94 countries participated in the online survey with 489 responses to the optional mental health section. Of the respondents, 82% reported depression symptoms and 78% rejection. One-fifth reported mental health issues before HIV diagnosis. Respondents reported experiencing a 3.5-fold higher number of mental health issues after diagnosis (8.71 vs 2.48, t[488]=23.00, p<0.001). Nearly half (n=224; 45.8%) had multiple socially disadvantaged identities (SDIs). The number of SDIs was positively correlated with experiencing mental health issues (p<0.05). Women described how mental health issues affected their ability to enjoy their right to sexual and reproductive health and to access services. These included depression, rejection and social exclusion, sleep problems, intersectional stigma, challenges with sexual and intimate relationships, substance use and sexual risk, reproductive health barriers and human rights (HR) violations. Respondents recommended that policymakers and clinicians provide psychological support and counselling, funding for peer support and interventions to challenge gender

  1. Educating physicians about women's health. Survey of Canadian family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, M. A.; Sorbie, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which women's health issues are taught in the 2-year core curriculum of Canadian family medicine residency programs and whether educators think their current teaching of women's health is adequate. DESIGN: Mailed survey using a questionnaire. PARTICIPANTS: All program and unit directors of the 16 Canadian family medicine residency training programs were surveyed. Replies were received from 63% (10 of 16) of program directors and 79% (55 of 70) of unit directors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Percentage of programs teaching specific women's health topics from a list of 21 possible topics; percentage offering educational opportunities with sexual assault teams and women's shelters; participants' assessment of the adequacy of current teaching in each training program; plans to increase women's health education. RESULTS: Topics such as violence against women and medical conditions more common among women were taught in more than 80% of programs, but poverty and the health care concerns of Native and immigrant women were included in fewer than 40% of programs. Half of the program directors indicated that residents were given educational opportunities with sexual assault teams or women's shelters. Unit directors gave a lower estimate. Most (90%) program directors thought their current teaching of women's health issues was inadequate and had plans to increase it, as did 64% of unit directors. CONCLUSION: Violence against women and the traditional medical topics of osteoporosis, weight disorders, and reproductive and breast cancer are frequently taught in family medicine training programs. However, the social and cultural aspects of health are addressed less often. It is encouraging that many family medicine programs plan to increase their teaching of women's health. PMID:8038635

  2. A survey of oral health in a Sudanese population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess the oral health status and risk factors for dental caries and periodontal disease among Sudanese adults resident in Khartoum State. To date, this information was not available to health policy planners in Sudan. Methods A descriptive population-based survey of Sudanese adults aged ≥ 16 years was conducted. After stratified sampling, 1,888 adult patients from public dental hospitals and dental health centres scattered across Khartoum State, including different ethnic groups present in Sudan, were examined in 2009-10. Data were collected using patient interviews and clinical examinations. Dental status was recorded using the DMFT index, community periodontal index (CPI), and a validated tooth wear index. Results Caries prevalence was high, with 87.7% of teeth examined having untreated decay. Periodontal disease increased in extent and severity with age. For 25.8% of adults, tooth wear was mild; 8.7% had moderate and 1% severe toothwear. Multivariate analysis revealed that decay was less prevalent in older age groups but more prevalent in southern tribes and frequent problem based attenders; western tribes and people with dry mouths who presented with less than18 sound, untreated natural teeth (SUNT). Older age groups were more likely to present with tooth wear; increasing age and gender were associated with having periodontal pocketing ≥ 4 mm. Conclusions The prevalence of untreated caries and periodontal disease was high in this population. There appear to be some barriers to restorative dental care, with frequent use of dental extractions to treat caries and limited use of restorative dentistry. Implementation of population-based strategies tailored to the circumstances of Sudanese population is important to improve oral health status in Sudan. PMID:22364514

  3. SEDS: The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Survey Design, Photometry, and Deep IRAC Source Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Arendt, A.; Barmby, P.; Barro, G; Bell, E. F.; Bouwens, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Croton, D.; Dave, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Egami, E.; Faber, S.; Finlator, K.; Grogin, N. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hernquist, L.; Hora, J. L.; Illingworth, G.; Kashlinsky, A; Koekmoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Moseley, H.

    2013-01-01

    The Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) is a very deep infrared survey within five well-known extragalactic science fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the Hubble Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. SEDS covers a total area of 1.46 deg(exp 2) to a depth of 26 AB mag (3sigma) in both of the warm Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands at 3.6 and 4.5 micron. Because of its uniform depth of coverage in so many widely-separated fields, SEDS is subject to roughly 25% smaller errors due to cosmic variance than a single-field survey of the same size. SEDS was designed to detect and characterize galaxies from intermediate to high redshifts (z = 2-7) with a built-in means of assessing the impact of cosmic variance on the individual fields. Because the full SEDS depth was accumulated in at least three separate visits to each field, typically with six-month intervals between visits, SEDS also furnishes an opportunity to assess the infrared variability of faint objects. This paper describes the SEDS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. Deep IRAC counts for the more than 300,000 galaxies detected by SEDS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. Discrete IRAC sources contribute 5.6 +/- 1.0 and 4.4 +/- 0.8 nW / square m/sr at 3.6 and 4.5 micron to the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB). IRAC sources cannot contribute more than half of the total CIB flux estimated from DIRBE data. Barring an unexpected error in the DIRBE flux estimates, half the CIB flux must therefore come from a diffuse component.

  4. Knowledge of the health consequences of tobacco smoking: a cross-sectional survey of Vietnamese adults

    PubMed Central

    Minh An, Dao Thi; Van Minh, Hoang; Huong, Le Thi; Giang, Kim Bao; Xuan, Le Thi Thanh; Thi Hai, Phan; Quynh Nga, Pham; Hsia, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Background Although substantial efforts have been made to curtail smoking in Vietnam, the 2010 Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) revealed that the proportion of male adults currently smoking remains high at 47.4%. Objectives To determine the level of, and characteristics associated with, knowledge of the health consequences of smoking among Vietnamese adults. Design GATS 2010 was designed to survey a nationally representative sample of Vietnamese men and women aged 15 and older drawn from 11,142 households using a two-stage sampling design. Descriptive statistics were calculated and multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between postulated exposure factors (age, education, access to information, ethnic group etc.) and knowledge on health risks. Results General knowledge on the health risks of active smoking (AS) and exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) was good (90% and 83%, respectively). However, knowledge on specific diseases related to tobacco smoking (stroke, heart attack, and lung cancer) appeared to be lower (51.5%). Non-smokers had a significantly higher likelihood of demonstrating better knowledge on health risks related to AS (OR 1.6) and SHS (OR 1.7) than smokers. Adults with secondary education, college education or above also had significantly higher levels knowledge of AS/SHS health risks than those with primary education (AS: ORs 1.6, 1.7, and 1.9, respectively, and SHS: ORs 2.4, 3.9, and 5.7 respectively). Increasing age was positively associated with knowledge of the health consequences of SHS, and access to information was significantly associated with knowledge of AS/SHS health risks (ORs 2.3 and 1.9 respectively). Otherwise, non-Kinh ethnic groups had significantly less knowledge on health risks of AS/SHS than Kinh ethnic groups. Conclusions It may be necessary to target tobacco prevention programs to specific subgroups including current smokers, adults with low education, non-Kinh ethnics in order to increase their

  5. Use of multivariate measures of disability in health surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, J R; Patrick, D L; Peach, H

    1983-01-01

    It has been claimed that the aggregation of information from several areas of life into a small set of global measures has certain advantages for describing disability. Global measures of disability were constructed from a modified version of an existing health survey instrument and the sickness impact profile (SIP) and their properties were tested. The disability items grouped satisfactorily into five global measures (physical, psychosocial, eating, communication, and work). All disability measures (global and original category scores) were poor predictors of service use by individuals but were related as expected to age and number of medical conditions. The global measures generally had lower standard errors and better repeatability. All scores exhibit J-shaped distributions for cross sectional data but the change in global measures over time was consistent with the normal distribution. Preferably, both global and category measures should be used for comparing changes over time between groups of individuals. PMID:6655420

  6. Health risk behavior among Thai youth: national survey 2013.

    PubMed

    Sirirassamee, Tawima; Sirirassamee, Buppha

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to establish the prevalence of risky health behaviors among Thai youth and to characterize the prevalence of these behaviors by gender, age group, educational status, and region. We analyzed data from a population-based, nationally representative, cross-sectional survey of 938 youth aged between 13 and 24 years, sampled from Bangkok and 4 regions of Thailand. The 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System questionnaire was used to measure youth risk behaviors. This study finds that 15.9% of respondents had engaged in physical fights, and 8.1% had been cyber bullied. The prevalence of current cigarette smoking, alcohol, and marijuana use were 22.3%, 27.9%, and 2.3%, respectively. The prevalence of risky behaviors among Thai youth were found to be high, including behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence, unsafe sexual behaviors, and cigarette and alcohol consumption. PMID:25183211

  7. Use of multivariate measures of disability in health surveys.

    PubMed

    Charlton, J R; Patrick, D L; Peach, H

    1983-12-01

    It has been claimed that the aggregation of information from several areas of life into a small set of global measures has certain advantages for describing disability. Global measures of disability were constructed from a modified version of an existing health survey instrument and the sickness impact profile (SIP) and their properties were tested. The disability items grouped satisfactorily into five global measures (physical, psychosocial, eating, communication, and work). All disability measures (global and original category scores) were poor predictors of service use by individuals but were related as expected to age and number of medical conditions. The global measures generally had lower standard errors and better repeatability. All scores exhibit J-shaped distributions for cross sectional data but the change in global measures over time was consistent with the normal distribution. Preferably, both global and category measures should be used for comparing changes over time between groups of individuals. PMID:6655420

  8. A survey of health care benefits in the apparel industry.

    PubMed

    Moore, W B

    1985-09-01

    Each day as Americans prepare to begin their days, many put on their clothing often without a thought as to how or where it was manufactured. The manufacture of clothing in the United States is a labor intensive industry pressed by competition in foreign countries where labor is abundant and less expensive; therefore, the manufacturers must look for every opportunity to reduce their costs. The survey presented here reviews the health benefit plans in the apparel industry and current initiatives for cost reduction. The results are interesting, for they give the hospital administrator vital information on the types of programs that might be in place in local manufacturers and the method of cost containment expected in this industry. PMID:10273751

  9. Design Considerations: Falcon M Dwarf Habitable Exoplanet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsgrove, Daniel; Novotny, Steven; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Chun, Francis; Tippets, Roger; O'Shea, Patrick; Miller, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Falcon Telescope Network (FTN) is an assemblage of twelve automated 20-inch telescopes positioned around the globe, controlled from the Cadet Space Operations Center (CSOC) at the US Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Five of the 12 sites are currently installed, with full operational capability expected by the end of 2016. Though optimized for studying near-earth objects to accomplish its primary mission of Space Situational Awareness (SSA), the Falcon telescopes are in many ways similar to those used by ongoing and planned exoplanet transit surveys targeting individual M dwarf stars (e.g., MEarth, APACHE, SPECULOOS). The network's worldwide geographic distribution provides additional potential advantages. We have performed analytical and empirical studies exploring the viability of employing the FTN for a future survey of nearby late-type M dwarfs tailored to detect transits of 1-2REarth exoplanets in habitable-zone orbits . We present empirical results on photometric precision derived from data collected with multiple Falcon telescopes on a set of nearby (< 25 pc) M dwarfs using infrared filters and a range of exposure times, as well as sample light curves created from images gathered during known transits of varying transit depths. An investigation of survey design parameters is also described, including an analysis of site-specific weather data, anticipated telescope time allocation and the percentage of nearby M dwarfs with sufficient check stars within the Falcons' 11' x 11' field-of-view required to perform effective differential photometry. The results of this ongoing effort will inform the likelihood of discovering one (or more) habitable-zone exoplanets given current occurrence rate estimates over a nominal five-year campaign, and will dictate specific survey design features in preparation for initiating project execution when the FTN begins full-scale automated operations.

  10. HIV testing in national population-based surveys: experience from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod; Vaessen, Martin; Boerma, J. Ties; Arnold, Fred; Way, Ann; Barrere, Bernard; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth; Sangha, Jasbir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the methods used in the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to collect nationally representative data on the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and assess the value of such data to country HIV surveillance systems. METHODS: During 2001-04, national samples of adult women and men in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mali, Kenya, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia were tested for HIV. Dried blood spot samples were collected for HIV testing, following internationally accepted ethical standards. The results for each country are presented by age, sex, and urban versus rural residence. To estimate the effects of non-response, HIV prevalence among non-responding males and females was predicted using multivariate statistical models for those who were tested, with a common set of predictor variables. RESULTS: Rates of HIV testing varied from 70% among Kenyan men to 92% among women in Burkina Faso and Cameroon. Despite large differences in HIV prevalence between the surveys (1-16%), fairly consistent patterns of HIV infection were observed by age, sex and urban versus rural residence, with considerably higher rates in urban areas and in women, especially at younger ages. Analysis of non-response bias indicates that although predicted HIV prevalence tended to be higher in non-tested males and females than in those tested, the overall effects of non-response on the observed national estimates of HIV prevalence are insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Population-based surveys can provide reliable, direct estimates of national and regional HIV seroprevalence among men and women irrespective of pregnancy status. Survey data greatly enhance surveillance systems and the accuracy of national estimates in generalized epidemics. PMID:16878227