Sample records for health work force

  1. Evaluating the Environmental Health Work Force. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This report contains all materials pertinent to an intensive evaluation of the environmental health work force conducted in 1986 and 1987. The materials relate to a workshop that was one of the key tools used in conducting the study to estimate environmental health personnel supply, demand, and need. The report begins with an overview and…

  2. For the Health-Care Work Force, a Critical Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahn, Daniel W.; Wartman, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    The United States faces a looming shortage of many types of health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, dentists, pharmacists, and allied-health and public-health workers. There may also be a shortage of faculty members in the health sciences. The results will be felt acutely within the next 10 years. Colleges and health-science…

  3. Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Workplace Safety & Health Topics NIOSH Share Compartir Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work America's work force has changed ... about these issues and others facing women workers: Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work Job Area Agriculture Construction Health ...

  4. America's Changing Work Force: Statistics in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC.

    This booklet provides information about the demographics of the changing work force. It offers an at-a-glance profile of workers age 45 and older and considers likely changes in the work force of the future. The document includes topics such as the composition of the work force of today and tomorrow by age and sex, labor force participation rates,…

  5. Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    Reduction in Work Force ­ Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further information. The Ohio State University ­ Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 9.15 Reduction in Work

  6. Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    Reduction in Work Force ­ Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further of Human Resources. B. Reductions of staff represented by labor unions must be in accordance with terms

  7. On the work of internal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.; Brito, L.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the role of the internal forces and how their work changes the energy of a system. We illustrate the contribution of the internal work to the variation of the system’s energy, using a pure mechanical example, a thermodynamical system and an example from electromagnetism. We emphasize that internal energy variations related to the work of the internal forces should be pinpointed in the classroom and placed on the same footing as other internal energy variations such as those caused by temperature changes or by chemical reactions.

  8. Magnetic force and work: an accessible example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-05-01

    Despite their physics instructors’ arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented which can illustrate that all may not be what it seems when energy transfer and the magnetic force are involved. Excel and Python simulations of the process are also provided.

  9. Gendered work conditions, health, and work outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bond, Meg A; Punnett, Laura; Pyle, Jean L; Cazeca, Dianne; Cooperman, Manuela

    2004-01-01

    This cross-sectional study of nonfaculty university employees examined associations among gendered work conditions (e.g., sexism and discrimination), job demands, and employee job satisfaction and health. Organizational responsiveness and social support were examined as effect modifiers. Comparisons were made by gender and by the male-female ratio in each job category. The relationship of gendered conditions of work to outcomes differed on the basis of respondents' sex and the job sex ratio. Although the same predictors were hypothesized for job satisfaction, physical health, and psychological distress, there were some differing results. The strongest correlate of job satisfaction was social support; perceived sexism in the workplace also contributed for both men and women. Organizational factors associated with psychological distress differed between female- and male-dominated jobs. PMID:14700456

  10. Work Performed Against an Electric Force

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

    This page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, illustrates the concept of work against an electric force using the examples of the Van de Graaff generator and lightening. There are also shorter examples of the Xerox machine and electric charge on transparency sheets as well as links to sites relating to the Van de Graaff machine or lightening. This is an optional section from a much larger collection of resources title "From Stargazers to Starships". A French and Italian translations of this lesson are available.

  11. Towards a longer and better working life: a challenge of work force ageing.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this overview is to describe the background of work force ageing and its consequences in the society, to introduce concepts for the solutions, to emphasize the actions needed, to point out the new challenges for occupational health, to review the targets of work life improvements, and to highlight the new innovations needed. Work life must be lengthened for the sake of society. Early retirement and low employment rates of 55-64-years old employees make the dependency ratios an increasingly heavy burden. New innovations and concepts like promotion of work ability and age management training have been effective tools for the increase of employment rates and decrease of age discrimination in Finland. The increase of the prevalence and incidence rates of work-related symptoms and diseases during ageing is a serious challenge for occupational health experts. The better adjustments of the working life with the individual health is a crucial element for a longer career. The European working life has not improved markedly for workers over 45 years between 1996 and 2000. Therefore, evidence based concepts should be widely and effectively implemented and new innovations created. A better co-operation between macro-, meso and micro levels is necessary, social partners should create mutual programmes in work places and a new deal is needed between the generations. Life course approach combines the needs and possibilities of different generations. Age management takes into consideration the different strengths of the diverse work force. PMID:17017338

  12. Work Related Health AmongWork Related Health AmongWork Related Health Among Work Related Health Among California Veterinarians:California Veterinarians

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Danh

    Work Related Health AmongWork Related Health AmongWork Related Health Among Work Related Health Disorders and Skin CancerDisorders and Skin Cancer{{Disorders and Skin CancerDisorders and Skin Cancer kk of skin cancer?with any type of skin cancer?with any type of skin cancer?with any type of skin cancer? Wh

  13. Annual report on contractor work force restructuring, fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes work force restructuring and community transition activities at all sites. It outlines work force restructuring activity for FY 1997, changing separation patterns, cost savings and separation costs, program assessment, activities to mitigate restructuring impacts, community transition activities, status of displaced workers, lessons learned, and emerging issues in worker and community transition. Work force restructuring and community transition activities for defense nuclear sites are summarized, as are work force restructuring activities at non-defense sites.

  14. 40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section...Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must...officer's prior written approval for use of the force account method for (1) any step...

  15. 40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section...Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must...officer's prior written approval for use of the force account method for (1) any step...

  16. 40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section...Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must...officer's prior written approval for use of the force account method for (1) any step...

  17. 40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section...Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must...officer's prior written approval for use of the force account method for (1) any step...

  18. 40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section...Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must...officer's prior written approval for use of the force account method for (1) any step...

  19. Nurses' ratings of their health and professional work environments.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sharon J; Harris, Marcelline R; Pipe, Teri B; Stevens, Susanna R

    2010-06-01

    Interactions between nursing work environments and nurses' health are of growing significance, given the aging work force, nursing shortage, and workplace health risks. This study examined relationships among nurses' ratings of health behaviors, health status, and professional work environments. Registered nurses (N = 3,132) from five multi-state settings completed an electronic survey. Participants' general health ratings were good, yet stress levels remained the one consistent predictor of poorer health ratings and work environment ratings in regression models. Additionally, more than half of the participants reported being overweight, only 50% met physical activity standards, more than two thirds reported a history of back or needlestick injuries, and 44% and 62% reported experiencing verbal abuse by colleagues and patients, respectively. Contrary to other studies, professional work environment as measured in this study did not predict nurses' health ratings. Further study of the impact of stress on long-term health outcomes and work force retention, as well as on worksite health strategies, is needed. PMID:20677722

  20. Individual and work factors related to perceived work ability and labor force outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, Alyssa K; Fisher, Gwenith G; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L; Grosch, James W

    2015-03-01

    Perceived work ability refers to a worker's assessment of his or her ability to continue working in his or her job, given characteristics of the job along with his or her resources. Perceived work ability is a critical variable to study in the United States, given an aging workforce, trends to delay retirement, and U.S. policy considerations to delay the age at which full Social Security retirement benefits may be obtained. Based on the job demands-resources model, cognitive appraisal theory of stress, and push/pull factors related to retirement, we proposed and tested a conceptual model of antecedents and outcomes of perceived work ability using 3 independent samples of U.S. working adults. Data regarding workers' job characteristics were from self-report and Occupational Information Network measures. Results from relative importance analysis indicated that health and sense of control were consistently and most strongly related to work ability perceptions relative to other job demands and job and personal resources when perceived work ability was measured concurrently or 2 weeks later in samples with varying occupations. Job demands (along with health and sense of control) were most strongly related to work ability perceptions when perceived work ability was measured in a manufacturing worker sample 1.6 years later. Perceived work ability also predicted lagged labor force outcomes (absence, retirement, and disability leave) while controlling for other known predictors of each. Consistent indirect effects were observed from health status and sense of control to all 3 of these outcomes via perceived work ability. PMID:25314364

  1. Shift Work Linked to Health Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_152606.html Shift Work Linked to Health Problems Excess weight, sleep issues more common among those ... Medicine and Public Health, said in a Sleep Health journal news ... to experiencing sleep problems as their jobs require them to work night, ...

  2. Reduction in Work Force Classified Civil Service Staff Office of Human Resources

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    Reduction in Work Force ­ Classified Civil Service Staff 9.20 Office of Human Resources Applies to internally by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department by the Office of Human Resources. B. University Rules for the Classified Civil Service will be followed

  3. [Health work in MERCOSUR: a Brazilian approach].

    PubMed

    Machado, Maria Helena; Paula, Aïda El-Khoury de; Aguiar Filho, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    MERCOSUR Member Countries (Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Venezuela) have viewed the regional integration process and management of work and education in health as a concern for government, considering the health sector's specificities. Key issues are professional accreditation and harmonization of current legislation. This article discusses initiatives in the Permanent MERCOSUR Forum related to work in the health field. The Forum serves as a space for dialogue between various actors: Ministry of Health, health workers, and professional boards, with the aim of supporting the work by the Sub-Commission on Professional Development and Practice, under MERCOSUR Working Sub-Group 11, Health, aiding in the formulation of health management and education policies. The current challenge involves the creation of mechanisms for implementing joint actions to solve problems in the regulation of professional practice, especially in municipalities along the borders between MERCOSUR countries. PMID:17625655

  4. Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

    This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

  5. Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces on the vertical columns while restoration of collapsed roof takes place. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Passenger Car Shop, Southwest corner of Pratt & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  6. Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

  7. Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Wolfe; J. E. Michalek; J. C. Miner; A. Rahe; J. Silva; W. F. Thomas; M. B. Lustik; W. D. Grubbs; R. H. Roegner; T. G. Karrison; D. E. Williams

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but

  8. Allied Health and the World of Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinones, Mark A.

    1974-01-01

    Reviewing concepts in the world of work relevant to the health field, the paper suggests a framework for classifying occupational categories in terms of specific roles, responsibilities and achievement. (MW)

  9. 48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

  10. 48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

  11. 48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

  12. 48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

  13. 48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

  14. Reduction in Work Force Classified Civil Service Staff Policy 9.20

    E-print Network

    Howat, Ian M.

    Reduction in Work Force ­ Classified Civil Service Staff Policy 9.20 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Classified civil service staff 1 1 Reductions in workforce for Health System employees for the Classified Civil Service hr.osu.edu/policy/ccs Contacts Subject Office Telephone E-mail/URL Policy questions

  15. Cutting healthcare costs through work force reductions. Studies find what works and what doesn't.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M; Murphy, E C

    1996-07-01

    Restructuring to cut costs often involves work force reductions. Two recent studies of restructuring in healthcare organizations have found that how an organization reduces its work force is just as important as whether it does. Organizations that implemented across-the-board staff cuts achieved limited cost savings. They also experienced decreased clinical quality, reduced patient satisfaction, and increased staff turnover. However, organizations that reduced their work forces only after a thorough assessment of work processes and job roles achieved greater cost savings, improved clinical quality, higher patient satisfaction, and less staff turnover. PMID:10158697

  16. Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shasby, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group is a community of practice that recognizes the interconnections between the health of ecosystems, wildlife, and humans and meets to facilitate the exchange of ideas, data, and research opportunities. Membership includes the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Sea Life Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

  17. The effect of a severe health shock on work behavior: Evidence from different health care regimes.

    PubMed

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Kleinjans, Kristin J; Larsen, Mona

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we use the policy variation of two different types of health insurance in the US and in Denmark - employer-provided and universal insurance combined with substantial differences in expected and actual medical out-of-pocket expenditures - to explore the effect of new severe health shocks on the labor force participation of older workers. Our results not only provide insight into how relative disease risk affects labor force participation at older ages, but also into how different types of health care and health insurance systems affect individual decisions of labor force participation. Although employer-tied health insurance and greater out-of-pocket medical expenditures give US Americans greater incentives to continue to work, we find only small differences in the work response between the two countries. We provide compelling evidence that our somewhat counterintuitive finding is the result of differential mortality and baseline health differences coupled with distinct treatment regimes under the respective health care systems. PMID:25982868

  18. Force identification of dynamic systems using virtual work principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xun; Ou, Jinping

    2015-02-01

    One of the key inverse problems for estimating dynamic forces acting on a structure is to determine the force expansion and the corresponding solving method. This paper presents a moving least square (MLS) method for fitting dynamic forces, which improves the existing traditional methods. The simulation results show that the force expansion order has a tiny effect on the types of forces, which indicates the MLS method's excellent ability for local approximation and noise immunity as well as good fitting function. Then, the differential equation of motion for the system is transformed into an integral equation by using the virtual work principle, which can eliminate the structural acceleration response without introducing the calculation error. Besides, the transformation derives an expression of velocity by integrating by parts, which diminishes the error propagation of the velocity. Hence, the integral equation of motion for the system has a strong constraint to noise with zero mean value. Finally, this paper puts forward an optimization method to solve the equation. The numerical stability can be enhanced as the matrix inversion calculation is avoided. Illustrative examples involving different types of forces demonstrate that the transformation of the differential equation proposed through virtual work principle can eliminate interference efficiently and is robust for dynamic calculation.

  19. STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT

    E-print Network

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT October 2008 © 2008 The Board of Trustees. Appendix 42 #12;2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Acknowledging the changing landscape of student mental health issues at Stanford and throughout the country, Provost John Etchemendy convened the Student Mental Health and Well

  20. 14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

  1. 14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

  2. 14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

  3. 14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

  4. 14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

  5. Spartanburg Technical College 1998 Work Force Development Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinley, John W.; Cantrell, Jo Ellen

    The 1998 Work Force Development Study focuses on Spartanburg Technical College's (STC's) (South Carolina) role in preparing new workers and training/retraining the current workforce. Surveys were mailed to employers in business and industry--the response rate was 10%. In addition, a series of focus groups, including various business, industry,…

  6. The Aging Work Force: A Guide for Higher Education Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julius, Nancy B., Ed.; Krauss, Herbert H., Ed.

    This volume offers 15 papers on the "graying" of the college and university work force in the context of national demographic trends. The papers are arranged in groups which address: growing older, the graying of America, adapting to changing times, retirement and retirement planning, and the corporate example. The following papers are presented:…

  7. Delivering Alert Messages to Members of a Work Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftis, Julia; Nickens, Stephanie; Pell, Melissa; Pell, Vince

    2008-01-01

    Global Alert Resolution Network (GARNET) is a software system for delivering emergency alerts as well as less-urgent messages to members of the Goddard Space Flight Center work force via an intranet or the Internet, and can be adapted to similar use in other large organizations.

  8. The Need for Work Force Education. Fastback 350.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edward E.

    Educational problems underlie the crisis in the high-tech workplace. Insufficient expenditures for workplace education result in low productivity. Technology requires a skilled work force; the chief competitive advantage for a nation will be its skilled workers. Workplace literacy has been a half-hearted effort. Investment of billions by U.S.…

  9. Atomic force microscopy of work functions on the nanometer scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. O'Boyle; T. T. Hwang; H. K. Wickramasinghe

    1999-01-01

    The Kelvin probe force microscope, introduced some years ago, has opened up several avenues of investigation. In this letter, we demonstrate that the technique is capable of distinguishing constituents of a metal alloy through their work-function differences. The intermetallics in the alloy are clearly resolved. We discuss the basic principles of the measurement technique and present our results on aluminum\\/copper

  10. Why do health labour market forces matter?

    PubMed

    McPake, Barbara; Maeda, Akiko; Araújo, Edson Correia; Lemiere, Christophe; El Maghraby, Atef; Cometto, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Human resources for health have been recognized as essential to the development of responsive and effective health systems. Low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve universal health coverage face human resource constraints - whether in the form of health worker shortages, maldistribution of workers or poor worker performance - that seriously undermine their ability to achieve well-functioning health systems. Although much has been written about the human resource crisis in the health sector, labour economic frameworks have seldom been applied to analyse the situation and little is known or understood about the operation of labour markets in low- and middle-income countries. Traditional approaches to addressing human resource constraints have focused on workforce planning: estimating health workforce requirements based on a country's epidemiological and demographic profile and scaling up education and training capacities to narrow the gap between the "needed" number of health workers and the existing number. However, this approach neglects other important factors that influence human resource capacity, including labour market dynamics and the behavioural responses and preferences of the health workers themselves. This paper describes how labour market analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the factors behind human resource constraints in the health sector and to a more effective design of policies and interventions to address them. The premise is that a better understanding of the impact of health policies on health labour markets, and subsequently on the employment conditions of health workers, would be helpful in identifying an effective strategy towards the progressive attainment of universal health coverage. PMID:24347708

  11. Minimum Work Requirements for Admission Academic Department Degree Public Health Related Work Experience

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    Minimum Work Requirements for Admission Academic Department Degree Public Health Related Work _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ General Public Health M.P.H. Minimum 2 years' work experience and additional health professional training _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Health Policy and Management M.P.H. Health Care Management None M.P.H. Health Care Policy None M

  12. Maternal and Child Health Issues and Female Labor Force Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Dorothy C.; And Others

    Reviewing health related "costs" of female labor force participation, this paper examines four highly salient maternal and child health issues. Discussion of acute illness in day care settings begins with an overview of studies on day care and illness and focuses on hepatitis A, appropriate sanitation, and indications of research on respiratory…

  13. Power, muscular work, and external forces in cycling.

    PubMed

    de Groot, G; Welbergen, E; Clijsen, L; Clarijs, J; Cabri, J; Antonis, J

    1994-01-01

    Cycling performance is affected by the interaction of a number of variables, including environment, mechanical, and human factors. Engineers have focused on the development of more efficient bicycles. Kinesiologists have examined cycling performance from a human perspective. This paper summarizes only certain aspects of human ergonomics of cycling, especially those which are important for the recent current research in our departments. Power is a key to performance of physical work. During locomotion an imaginary flow of energy takes place from the metabolism to the environment, with some efficiency. The 'useful' mechanical muscle power output might be used to perform movements and to do work against the environment. The external power is defined as the sum of joint powers, each calculated as the product of the joint (net) moment and angular velocity. This definition of external power is closely related to the mean external power as applied to exercise physiology: the sum of joint powers reflects all mechanical power which in principle can be used to fulfil a certain task. In this paper, the flow of energy for cycling is traced quantitatively as far as possible. Studies on the total lower limb can give insight into the contribution of individual muscles to external power. The muscle velocity (positive or negative) is obtained from the positions and orientations of body segments and a bar linkage model of the lower limb. The muscle activity can be measured by electromyography. In this way, positive and negative work regions in individual muscles are identified. Synergy between active agonistic/antagonistic muscle groups occurs in order to deliver external power. Maximum power is influenced by body position, geometry of the bicycle and pedalling rate. This has to be interpreted in terms of the length-tension and force-velocity-power relationships of the involved muscles. Flat road and uphill cycling at different saddle-tube angles is simulated on an ergometer. The measured pedal forces (magnitude and direction) are only dependent on the intersegmental orientation of saddle tube, crank position, upper and lower leg, and foot. The changed direction of the gravitational force with respect to the saddle-tube does not interfere with the co-ordinated force production pattern. During locomotory cycling at constant speed the external power is mainly used to overcome the aerodynamic friction force. This force and the rolling resistance are determined by coasting down experiments, yielding the external power.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8112280

  14. When the work force shrinks, so does safety

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.E.

    1996-09-01

    The blues that accompany an organizational reduction in force can lead to safety hazards. Last May, two much-read association publications ran feature stories on the suffering that can result from downsizing. {open_quotes}Casualties of downsizing{close_quotes} were lamented in Robert W. Lucky`s IEEE Spectrum column. {open_quotes}Downsizing: a new form of abandonment{close_quotes} moaned the cover of the APA Monitor, the American Psychological Association`s monthly. For a number of reasons, when employees suffer, the workplace becomes less safe. Safety means more than not stepping into maintenance holes. Persons who work for a government or nonprofit entity are twice as likely to be threatened on the job as are employees of a for-profit business. Government workers constituted 18 percent of the work force but they accounted for 30 percent of homicide victims. Non-fatal assaults in the workplace are most commonly perpetrated by a fellow employee, not a stranger or someone known from outside work. There are other morale-related challenges to safety besides a disgruntled, imbalanced employee bringing a semiautomatic weapon to work. Some of these safety issues are discussed.

  15. Retirement age and the work force in general surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, O; Kwakawa, F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the age of retirement of general surgery Fellows of the American College of Surgeons from 1984 through 1995 and analyzes the potential effect on the work force in general surgery of age of retirement. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Data from the Fellowship files of the American College of Surgeons, the American Board of Medical Specialties, and the American Medical Association disclosed that the number of practicing general surgeons in the United States in 1994 was between 17,289 and 23,502, or approximately 7 general surgeons per 100,000 population in the United States. METHODS: The Fellowship files of the American College of Surgeons from 1984 through 1995 were searched for general surgeons who had written to ask for retirement status or who had died before retirement. Calculations were made of the effect of years in practice on the total general surgeon work force. All living retirees from 1984 to 1985 and 1994 to 1995 were questioned to learn the factors leading to a decision to retire. RESULTS: The average age of retirement for general surgeon Fellows has risen from 60.45 in 1984 to 62.97 in 1995. Because of increasing diversion of general surgery graduates into surgical specialties, total practice years are declining despite increasing length of practice time. The principal factors for retirement decisions in 1984 and 1985 were disability (26%), leisure time (20%), and unfavorable changes in surgery (29%). In 1994 and 1995, disability was a major factor in 14% of decisions, leisure time in 20%, and unfavorable changes in surgery in 56%. CONCLUSIONS: Fewer general surgeons enter the work force each year. Thus, despite working longer, the total number of years practiced by each cohort of new general surgeons has decreased. Images Figure 2. PMID:8857861

  16. The Air Force health study: an epidemiologic retrospective.

    PubMed

    Buffler, Patricia A; Ginevan, Michael E; Mandel, Jack S; Watkins, Deborah K

    2011-09-01

    In 1979, the U.S. Air Force announced that an epidemiologic study would be undertaken to determine whether the Air Force personnel involved in Operation Ranch Hand-the program responsible for herbicide spraying in Vietnam-had experienced adverse health effects as a result of that service. In January 1982 the Air Force Health Study (AFHS) protocol was approved and the 20 year matched cohort study consisting of independent mortality, morbidity and reproductive health components was initiated. This controversial study has been criticized regarding the study's potential scientific limitations as well as some of the administrative aspects of its conduct. Now, almost 30 years since the implementation of the AFHS and nearly a decade since the final follow up examinations, an appraisal of the study indicates that the results of the AFHS do not provide evidence of disease in the Ranch Hand veterans caused by their elevated levels of exposure to Agent Orange. PMID:21441038

  17. Workplace-based health and wellness programs: the intersection of aging, work, and health.

    PubMed

    Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie; James, Jacquelyn Boone; Matz-Costa, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Workplace-based health and wellness programs (HWPs) may be an obvious yet under-utilized strategy for promoting positive health-related behaviors among older workers and for increasing their ability to continue to work. Given the unprecedented number of older adults who extend their labor force attachment beyond traditional retirement ages, a new vision of older adults' economic security and overall quality-of-life should take into account the intersections of aging, work, and health. The purpose of this article is to: (a) discuss the workplace as an increasingly important setting that can expand the reach and effectiveness of health promotion efforts; (b) examine current knowledge of barriers and facilitators that can affect older workers' participation in workplace-based HWPs; and (c) suggest new incentive structures that may increase older workers' engagement in these programs. We develop a rationale for our proposition that sustained participation in HWPs may improve the health status of older workers and reduce health care costs. It is our conclusion that there is significant potential for workplace-based HWPs to support older adults who want to or need to work. PMID:26035602

  18. Masked Symptoms: Mid-Life Women, Health, and Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Zelda

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (1997) reveal that relatively few mid-life women offer ill health as a reason for leaving their job or downshifting to part-time employment, implying that the role of ill health may be inconsequential in effecting changing patterns in mid-life women's labour force activity. In contrast, interviews with 30…

  19. SIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern.

    E-print Network

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010. The SIU Student Health Initiative is a public education and policySIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern an interest in providing quality affordable healthcare to students and that a Student Insurance Task Force

  20. Working towards a national health information system in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bomba, B; Cooper, J; Miller, M

    1995-01-01

    One of the major administrative dilemmas facing the Australian national health care system is the need to reform practices associated with massive data-information overload. The current system is burdened with paper-based administrative forms, patient record files, referral notes and other manual methods of data organisation. An integrated computer-based information system may be perceived as an attractive solution to such burdens. However, computerisation must not be seen as a panacea with the possibility of exacerbating information overload and accentuating privacy concerns. Recent surveys in Australia [1] and the US [2] indicate a perceived causal link between computers and privacy invasion. Any moves toward a national health information system must counter this perception through macro-level education schemes of affected parties and micro-level mechanisms such as the establishment of hospital privacy officers. Such concerns may be viewed as a subset of the wider privacy debate, and information policy development should address such considerations to develop policies to prevent unauthorized access to personal information and to avoid the extraction and sale of sensitive health data. Conservative in nature and slow to change the health care sector may be forced to adopt more efficient work practices through the increasing proliferation of information technology (IT) in health care delivery and an escalating emphasis upon accountability and efficiency of the public health care dollar. The economic rationalist stance taken by governments in Australia and other nations generally will also force health care workers to adopt and develop more efficient information management practices, health indicators and best practice care methods than presently employed by this sector The benefits of a national health information system are far reaching, particularly in developing a more effective health care system through better identifying and understanding community health care trends and in applying IT to the efficient collection of data for the development of more appropriate performance measures and statistical indicators. A coherent and integrated approach is called for in the design of a national health information system which incorporates the necessary and requisite security features to meet privacy concerns. Protecting information privacy poses complex political, economic, technological, legal and social problems for systems developers and health care providers alike [2]. According to Brannigan [3] there are three components involved in the formulation and implementation of privacy: public policy (What level of privacy does society want?); legal structure (Does the law adequately provide for society's privacy requirements?); and technical (how much privacy can technical tools provide, at what cost, and with what effects on the system?). Examining technical tools alone, it is apparent that the necessary technologies are available in Australia to provide the security of medical records required by public policy. Such tools may include encryption, user and data authentication methods, authorisation schemes and mechanisms for the prevention of data inference. While none of these available measures are infallible, it is suitable for most applications where the encryption mechanism can provide protection for a given length of time. Australia needs to develop a coherent national health information infrastructure policy to ultimately avoid fragmented, duplicated and incompatible systems that rely on different standards and protocols. Such a policy will only work by addressing the key issue of patient privacy within a technological framework. The application of IT to health care systems is a sensitive social experiment affecting many professions including general practitioners, medical administrators, politicians, lawyers, computer specialists, privacy advocates and patients whose records will ultimately reside in the system. (abstract trun PMID:8591519

  1. A German survey of the abdominal transplantation surgical work force.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael N; Nadalin, Silvio; Schemmer, Peter; Pascher, Andreas; Kaiser, Gernot M; Braun, Felix; Becker, Thomas; Nashan, Björn; Guba, Markus

    2015-07-01

    This manuscript reports the results of a nationwide survey of transplant surgeons in Germany, including the demographics, training, position, individual case loads, center volumes, program structure, professional practice, grade of specialization, workload, work hours, salary, and career expectations. We contacted all 32 German transplant centers that perform liver, kidney, and pancreas transplantation. Surgeons engaged in transplantation were asked to reply to the survey. Eighty-five surgeons responded, with a mean age of 44 ± 8 years, 13% of whom were female. The median transplant frequency per active transplant surgeon was relatively low, with 16 liver transplants, 15 kidney transplants, and three pancreas transplants. The median reported center volumes were 45 liver transplants, 90 kidney transplants, and five pancreas transplants per year. Most of the surgeons reported a primary focus on hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery, and only 10% of effective work time was actually dedicated to perform transplant surgeries. The majority of respondents estimated their weekly work hours to be between 55 and 66 h. When asked about their career satisfaction and expectations, most respondents characterized their salaries as inappropriately low and their career prospects as inadequate. This survey provides a first impression of the transplant surgery work force in Germany. PMID:25800065

  2. Flexible work in call centres: Working hours, work-life conflict & health.

    PubMed

    Bohle, Philip; Willaby, Harold; Quinlan, Michael; McNamara, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Call-centre workers encounter major psychosocial pressures, including high work intensity and undesirable working hours. Little is known, however, about whether these pressures vary with employment status and how they affect work-life conflict and health. Questionnaire data were collected from 179 telephone operators in Sydney, Australia, of whom 124 (69.3%) were female and 54 (30.2%) were male. Ninety-three (52%) were permanent full-time workers, 37 (20.7%) were permanent part-time, and 49 (27.4%) were casual employees. Hypothesised structural relationships between employment status, working hours and work organisation, work-life conflict and health were tested using partial least squares modelling in PLS (Chin, 1998). The final model demonstrated satisfactory fit. It supported important elements of the hypothesised structure, although four of the proposed paths failed to reach significance and the fit was enhanced by adding a path. The final model indicated that casual workers reported more variable working hours which were relatively weakly associated with greater dissatisfaction with hours. The interaction of schedule control and variability of hours also predicted dissatisfaction with hours. Conversely, permanent workers reported greater work intensity, which was associated with both lower work schedule control and greater work-life conflict. Greater work-life conflict was associated with more fatigue and psychological symptoms. Labour market factors and the undesirability of longer hours in a stressful, high-intensity work environment appear to have contributed to the results. PMID:20696420

  3. Target: Alcohol Abuse in the Hard-to-Reach Work Force. Ideas and Resources for Responding to Problems of the Hard-to-Reach Work Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Informatics, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This guide is designed as a source of ideas and information for individuals and organizations interested in occupational alcoholism programs for the hard-to-reach work force. Following a brief overview of the problem and a report on progress in occupational alcoholism programming, a working definition of the hard-to-reach work force is offered;…

  4. New York Task Force on Racehorse Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    New York Task Force on Racehorse Health and Safety OFFICIAL REPORT Investigation of Equine at Aqueduct Race Track (hereinafter "Aqueduct") in Ozone Park, New York. In a letter dated March 14, 2012 from the Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

  5. Employee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    ** and sports facilities*** · Flu immunisation programme · Health promotion programmes · Occupational health · Occupational sick pay scheme · Sports and social association · Staff refectory facilities ConditionsEmployee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare · Annual leave of up to 30

  6. Mental Health Work Group Summary Report and Proposal

    E-print Network

    Shyy, Wei

    Mental Health Work Group Summary Report and Proposal September, 2005 The following is a summary report of the work completed by the Mental Health Work Group (MHWG) between September 2003 and September 2005. This report is followed by future recommendations for addressing the mental health needs

  7. Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.H.; Michalek, J.E.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA)); Rahe, A. (QuesTech Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Silva, J. (Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Thomas, W.F.; Lustik, M.B.; Grubbs, W.D.; Roegner, R.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA)); Karrison, T.G. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Williams, D.E. (Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-10-10

    The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1,299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer.

  8. Poverty and Health: Working with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Clare

    This book is concerned with the impact of poverty on health, focusing on families with young children in the United Kingdom. It draws together information from a wide range of disciplines to provide workers in the health and welfare fields with a better understanding of the complex interconnections between living conditions, lifestyles, and health

  9. Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Stephan

    Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts March 2014 Issued by;#12;Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts Contents 1 Scope 1 2 Definitions with the compensation fund or a licensed compensation insurer 5 4.2.4 Emergency procedures 5 4.2.5 Health and safety

  10. Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials

    E-print Network

    Carleton University

    legislative and regulatory frameworks to mitigate the potential health risks of nanomaterials and to help1 Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials 1. Introduction is expected to increase in the future. Health Canada helps protect and promote health by using existing

  11. How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan (Clinical Trials)

    MedlinePLUS

    How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan There are ways to learn if your health plan covers routine patient care costs in a clinical trial. Here are ... health plan’s decision. You can also read your health insurance policy to find out what steps you can ...

  12. Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    to promote public health and health policy but also to assume leadership positions within public healthTufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs is accepting

  13. Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    to promote public health and health policy but also to assume leadership positions within public healthTufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs is now accepting

  14. Massachusetts health care reform: is it working?

    PubMed

    McAdoo, Joshua; Irving, Julian; Deslich, Stacie; Coustasse, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Before 2006, Massachusetts had more than 500 000 residents who lacked health insurance. Governor Mitt Romney enacted landmark legislation requiring all residents to obtain health insurance. Also, the legislation established a health insurance exchange for the purpose of broadening the choices of insurance plans made available to individuals in the state. The purpose of this research was to assess the Massachusetts health care reform in terms of access, cost, and sustainability. The methodology used was a literature review from 2006 to 2013; a total of 43 references were used. Health reform resulted in additional overall state spending of $2.42 billion on Medicaid for Massachusetts. Since the 2006 reform, 401 000 additional residents have obtained insurance. The number of Massachusetts residents who had access to health care increased substantially after the health care reform was enacted, to 98.1% of residents. The Massachusetts health care reform has not saved money for the state; its funding has been covered by Federal spending. However, reform has been sustained over time because of the high percentage of state residents who have supported the state mandate to obtain health care coverage. PMID:24168866

  15. Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

    In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

  16. Rethinking Work: The Example of Consumers with Serious Mental Health Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabian, Ellen S.

    1999-01-01

    Participation rate of individuals with mental health disorders in competitive jobs lags far behind the rest of the population. Article examines three issues affecting their movement into the labor force: endorsing the value of work; focusing on careers, not jobs; and emphasizing strengths, not deficits. Discusses programs and policy strategies for…

  17. Living the reality of forced sex work: perspectives from young migrant women sex workers in northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Rushing, Rosanne; Watts, Charlotte; Rushing, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Young women are often lured or forced into selling sex as a result of migrating from rural to urban areas to find work. In this setting, they are exposed to high-risk situations, which may leave them vulnerable to exploitation. Using interviews with young migrant women currently working as sex workers in northern Vietnam, we recorded the perspectives of their initiation into sex work and life as a sex worker. The study found that high levels of forced sex and sexual exploitation were experienced by the majority of the young women interviewed. The young women describe their entry into sex work, first sexual experience (intercourse), violence, and condom negotiation and use. Although access to health care was available, the young women perceived the stigma attached to sex work as a barrier to receiving health care, and thus, preferred health education and care from peers. Health education programs focusing on peer education and support are essential for protecting and empowering these young women. In addition, policies and programs must work toward effective strategies to protect young migrant women. PMID:15973256

  18. Farm elders define health as the ability to work.

    PubMed

    Reed, Deborah B; Rayens, Mary Kay; Conley, Christina K; Westneat, Susan; Adkins, Sarah M

    2012-08-01

    Thirty percent of America's 2.2 million farms are operated by individuals older than 65 years. This study examined how older farmers define health and determined whether demographic characteristics, farm work, and physical and mental health status predict health definition. Data were collected via telephone and mailed surveys during the baseline wave of data collection in a longitudinal study of family farmers residing in two southern states (n=1,288). Nearly 42% defined health as the "ability to work" compared to a physical health-related definition. Predictors of defining health as the ability to work included being White, performing more farm tasks in the past week, taking prescription medications daily, and having minimal health-related limitations to farm work. Health behaviors are centered on the individual's perception of health. Understanding the defining attributes of health can support better approaches to health care and health promotion, particularly among rural subcultures such as farmers, whose identity is rooted in their work. PMID:22823476

  19. Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Providers Working in Primary Health Care Units Concerning Emergency Contraception

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hilmiye Aksu; Mert Kucuk; Banu Karaoz

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the current study was to explore the extent of knowledge health care providers working in primary health care units in Aydin, Turkey, had about emergency contraception (EC), to determine whether they provide EC counseling, and to understand the barriers and misconceptions in this context. Methods: A total of 120 health care professionals working in primary health

  20. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 2: Work Planning and Control

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 2: Work Planning and Control SOP Authorization(S): Other Information or References: Complete following four sections if requesting a Radiological Work } # of workers performing radiological activity: _______ Expected duration of radiological activity in hours

  1. Force Health Protection: the mission and political context of the longitudinal health record.

    PubMed

    Collmann, Jeff

    2009-05-01

    Drawing upon an extensive search of publically available literature and discussions at the "National Forum on the Future of the Defense Health Information System," this article documents the evolving mission and political context of the longitudinal health record (LHR) as an instrument for Force Health Protection (FHP). Because of the Gulf War syndrome controversy, the Department of Defense (DoD) launched an ambitious, complex series of programs designed to create a comprehensive, integrated defense health surveillance capability to assure FHP and keep faith with the American people. This "system of systems" includes individual component systems to perform specific functions such as disease surveillance, battlefield assessment, and patient care and consolidates these diverse types of information into centrally accessible archives that serve the interests of occupational health, preventive medicine, medical strategic planning, and longitudinal patient health care. After 25 years of effort and major accomplishments, progress toward a LHR remains uneven and controversy persists. PMID:19562957

  2. Welfare, work, and health care access predictors of low-income children's physical health outcomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen Shook Slack; Jane L. Holl; Joan Yoo; Laura B. Amsden; Emily Collins; Kerry Bolger

    2007-01-01

    This analysis examines whether young children's (N=494) general physical health is associated with parental employment, welfare receipt, and health care access within a low-income population transitioning from welfare to work. A latent physical health measure derived from survey and medical chart data is used to capture children's poor health, and parental ratings of child health are used to identify excellent

  3. Multicultural Group Work: A Force for Developing and Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Multicultural group work represents a powerful tool for helping and healing in the context of human diversity. This article summarizes multicultural group work, including task, psychoeducational, counseling, and psychotherapy groups, and describes a group work model for multicultural assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Group work

  4. Women's Health. Report of the Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report identifies a broad spectrum of issues affecting women's health and is divided into four sections: (1) social factors affecting women's health; (2) women's physical health and well-being; (3) health concerns of older women; and (4) issues related to alcohol, drug use and abuse, and the mental health of women. The Public Health Service…

  5. WORKING PAPER N 2013 01 Does job insecurity deteriorate health?

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    headaches or eyestrain and skin problems. As for other health variables, the impact of job insecurityWORKING PAPER N° 2013 ­ 01 Does job insecurity deteriorate health? A causal approach for Europe Eve Caroli Mathilde Godard JEL Codes: Keywords: Job insecurity; Health; Instrumental Variables PARIS

  6. 1. The work done by a conservative force on a particle moving between

    E-print Network

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    on the path taken by the particle. 2. The net work done by a conservative force on a particle moving around rest on a hill side. The steeper the hill, the larger the net force on the ball. (a) 1. Left of center, near the dark red lines. 2. Right of center, near the dark blue lines. 3. The force has the same

  7. Shift work and employee fatigue: implications for occupational health nursing.

    PubMed

    Yumang-Ross, Doreen J; Burns, Candace

    2014-06-01

    Long work hours and irregular shifts are part of the nation's 24-hour society and contribute to employee fatigue. Factors affecting employee fatigue are circadian rhythm, sleep quality and quantity, individual health, the environment, and work tasks. Employee fatigue contributes to accidents and injuries, and affects occupational performance, safety, and health. These findings should be used by occupational health nurses to address fatigue management and develop comprehensive fatigue management programs. PMID:24971821

  8. Home visits work for behavioral health patients.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    Whenbehavioral healthpatientswhohave been hospitalized are cared for in their home, hospital readmissions drop. PyscHealth's Home Intervention Project won a gold award from URAC. Program's goal is to increase compliance with post-hospital outpatient follow-up therapy and reduce rehospitalizations. PMID:19186491

  9. Computation of electrostatic forces by the virtual work method

    E-print Network

    Hiptmair, Ralf

    are the Maxwell stress tensor, the virtual work and the eggshell methods. In this project we study and compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2. Virtual Work Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.3. EggShell.7. Eggshell implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3. Equivalence between

  10. Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: II. Mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Michalek; W. H. Wolfe; J. C. Miner

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the current health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. This report compares the noncombat mortality of 1261 Ranch Hand veterans to that of a comparison population of 19,101 other Air Force veterans primarily involved in cargo missions

  11. Health, environment and working conditions in tobacco cultivation: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Riquinho, Deise Lisboa; Hennington, Elida Azevedo

    2012-06-01

    This study presents a review of the literature published between 1979 and 2010 on health and working conditions in tobacco cultivation, with particular emphasis on the Brazilian context. A review of computerized databases (PubMed, Scopus, WilsonWeb and Bireme/PAHO Virtual Health Library - Public Health) was carried out using the following search terms: tobacco, agricultural worker health, agricultural worker disease, working conditions, unsafe working conditions, occupational risk, occupational disease, and labor force. Articles published in English, Spanish and Portuguese were analyzed. Thirty-seven articles were selected from 214 references that were initially identified. Thirty-four additional publications (reports, etc.) were also analyzed. Among the many effects described in the literature, especially noteworthy are "green tobacco sickness," respiratory disorders, musculoskeletal injuries, mental disorders, and a negative environmental impact. Very few studies have been carried out in Brazil. PMID:22699649

  12. Beyond the Individual: Connecting Work Environment and Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deborah R. Gordon; Peter L. Schnall

    Work, so fundamental to basic survival and health, as well as to wealth, well-being, and positive social identity, has its darker and more costly side too.1 Work can negatively affect our health, an impact that goes well beyond the usual counts of injuries, accidents, and illnesses from exposure to toxic chemicals. The ways in which work is organized—particularly its pace,

  13. Work force ageing and expanding service sector: a double burden on productivity?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pekka Ilmakunnas; Seija Ilmakunnas

    2010-01-01

    Expansion of the service sector has often been considered as a threat to aggregate productivity. We examine whether work force ageing is a cause of further concern in the service sector, using matched employer–employee data from Finland. The results show hump-shaped relationships between average age of the work force and establishment productivity. The results vary somewhat across different service industries

  14. Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5-year

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5. Marianna Virtanen Finnish Institute of Occupational Health / Work and Mental Health Team Topeliuksenkatu 41 working hours on mental health. Method. We examined the association between long working hours and onset

  15. Blueprint for Business. Reaching a New Work Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Lyn A.; Erden, James Van; Mower, Eleanor; Patel, Apurva; Mitchell, Steve

    This guide is designed to help U.S. businesses successfully hire and retain individuals moving from welfare to work. Section 1 discusses the different circumstances created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 and how those changes affect business. Section 2 reviews bottom-line benefits realized by…

  16. After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

  17. Joint Task Force Andrew: the 44th Medical Brigade mental health staff officer's after action review.

    PubMed

    Holsenbeck, L S

    1994-03-01

    The massive Department of Defense deployment in support of Hurricane Andrew relief cast the military medical departments in a new role. Military medical personnel were challenged to apply the traditional principles of combat medicine to a noncombat environment, within the continental United States, within an existing health care infrastructure, in a role subordinate to local civilian health care agencies. As a medical "subject matter expert" assigned to the Joint Task Force Andrew Surgeon's staff, the author worked at the civil-military interface. The lessons learned in his role as a special staff officer should benefit any health care provider involved in disaster relief. They focus on problem areas peculiar to the disaster relief scenario. PMID:8041460

  18. How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan

    Cancer.gov

    Work closely with your doctor. Ask your doctor if there is someone on his or her staff who can help work with your health plan. This person might be a financial counselor or research coordinator. Or, this person might work in the hospital's patient finance department.

  19. Association of Returning to Work With Better Health in Working-Aged Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Lori; Wilson, Mike; Mustard, Cameron; Rourke, Sean B.; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Raboud, Janet; Lavis, John

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We systematically reviewed the literature on the impact of returning to work on health among working-aged adults. Methods. We searched 6 electronic databases in 2005. We selected longitudinal studies that documented a transition from unemployment to employment and included a comparison group. Two reviewers independently appraised the retrieved literature for potential relevance and methodological quality. Results. Eighteen studies met our inclusion criteria, including 1 randomized controlled trial. Fifteen studies revealed a beneficial effect of returning to work on health, either demonstrating a significant improvement in health after reemployment or a significant decline in health attributed to continued unemployment. We also found evidence for health selection, suggesting that poor health interferes with people’s ability to go back to work. Some evidence suggested that earlier reemployment may be associated with better health. Conclusions. Beneficial health effects of returning to work have been documented in a variety of populations, times, and settings. Return-to-work programs may improve not only financial situations but also health. PMID:22390520

  20. An integrative perspective on work-site health promotion.

    PubMed

    DeJoy, D M; Southern, D J

    1993-12-01

    The present paper argues that health promotion efforts, particularly those directed to resistant and high-risk workers, should be integrated into a corporate health strategy in which equal concern is expressed for individual lifestyle modification and the provision of safe and healthful working conditions. The current popularity of work-site health promotion is discussed, and the health promotion and occupational safety and health movements are compared and contrasted. Following this, ecologic models of health promotion are examined as a vehicle for addressing environmental and organizational influences, and this line of thinking is expanded into an integrative model of worker health. The proposed model features three interactive systems: (1) job demands and worker characteristics, (2) work environment, and (3) extraorganizational influences, and assigns an expanded role to environmental factors in promoting and protecting worker health. The principal goal of integrative programming is to devise complementary behavioral and environmental interventions that will have mutually reinforcing effects on workplace health problems. The remainder of the paper outlines the three phases of implementing such a program. PMID:8113926

  1. A Statistical Portrait of Working at Home in the U.K.: Evidence from the Labour Force Survey. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felstead, Alan; Jewson, Nick; Phizacklea, Annie; Walters, Sally

    The patterns, extent, and problems of working at home in the United Kingdom were examined through a multivariate analysis of data from the Labour Force Survey, which has questioned respondents about the location of their workplace since 1992. The numbers of people working "mainly" at home increased from 345,920 (1.5%) in 1981 to 680,612 (2.5%) in…

  2. Health status, work limitations, and return-to-work trajectories in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Côté, Pierre; Lee, Hyunmi; Severin, Colette; Vidmar, Marjan; Carnide, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to describe the health status and work limitations in injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders at 1 month post-injury, stratified by return-to-work status, and to document their return-to-work trajectories 6 months post-injury. Methods A sample of 632 workers with a back or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder, who filed a Workplace Safety and Insurance Board lost-time claim injury, participated in this prospective study. Participants were assessed at baseline (1 month post-injury) and at 6 months follow-up. Results One month post-injury, poor physical health, high levels of depressive symptoms and high work limitations are prevalent in workers, including in those with a sustained first return to work. Workers with a sustained first return to work report a better health status and fewer work limitations than those who experienced a recurrence of work absence or who never returned to work. Six months post-injury, the rate of recurrence of work absence in the trajectories of injured workers who have made at least one return to work attempt is high (38%), including the rate for workers with an initial sustained first return to work (27%). Conclusions There are return-to-work status specific health outcomes in injured workers. A sustained first return to work is not equivalent to a complete recovery from musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:17616838

  3. Changing Work, Changing Health: Can Real Work-Time Flexibility Promote Health Behaviors and Well-Being?

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Tranby, Eric; Huang, Qinlei

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates a change in the structuring of work time, using a natural experiment to test whether participation in a corporate initiative (Results Only Work Environment; ROWE) predicts corresponding changes in health-related outcomes. Drawing on job strain and stress process models, we theorize greater schedule control and reduced work-family conflict as key mechanisms linking this initiative with health outcomes. Longitudinal survey data from 659 employees at a corporate headquarters shows that ROWE predicts changes in health-related behaviors, including almost an extra hour of sleep on work nights. Increasing employees’ schedule control and reducing their work-family conflict are key mechanisms linking the ROWE innovation with changes in employees’ health behaviors; they also predict changes in well-being measures, providing indirect links between ROWE and well-being. This study demonstrates that organizational changes in the structuring of time can promote employee wellness, particularly in terms of prevention behaviors. PMID:22144731

  4. A Case for Generic Social Work in Health Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailis, Susan S.

    1985-01-01

    Examines the need for generic social work in health settings and the importance of role definition. Describes a practical application of such a role definition in regard to discharge planning. (Author/JAC)

  5. Work, health, and welfare: the association between working conditions, welfare states, and self-reported general health in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bambra, Clare; Lunau, Thorsten; Van der Wel, Kjetil A; Eikemo, Terje A; Dragano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    This article is the first to examine the association between self-reported general health and a wide range of working conditions at the European level and by type of welfare state regime. Data for 21,705 men and women ages 16 to 60 from 27 European countries were obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey. The influence of individual-level sociodemographic, physical, and psychosocial working conditions and of the organization of work were assessed in multilevel logistic regression analyses, with additional stratification by welfare state regime type (Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Eastern European, Scandinavian, and Southern). At the European level, we found that "not good" general health was more likely to be reported by workers more exposed to hazardous working conditions. Most notably, tiring working positions, job strain, and temporary job contracts were strongly associated with a higher likelihood of reporting "not good" health. Analysis by welfare state regime found that only tiring or painful working conditions were consistently associated with worse self-reported health in all regimes. There was no evidence that the Scandinavian welfare regime protected against the adverse health effects of poor working conditions. The article concludes by examining the implications for comparative occupational health research. PMID:24684087

  6. Incorporating Integrative Health Services in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gant, Larry; Benn, Rita; Gioia, Deborah; Seabury, Brett

    2009-01-01

    More than one third of Americans practice complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Social workers continue to provide most first-line health, mental health, and psychological referral and direct practice services in the United States, despite a lack of systematic education and training opportunities in CAM. Schools of social work are…

  7. Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

  8. Armed Forces VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Walter H.; Zerface, W. A., Ed.

    Armed Services VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work) is described as a cooperative program with the Department of Defense which (1) introduces career opportunities and training available through volunteer service enlistment, (2) will be provided to senior high schools at no cost, and (3) presents materials in both printed and microfilm…

  9. Strengthening health workforce capacity through work-based training

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although much attention has been given to increasing the number of health workers, less focus has been directed at developing models of training that address real-life workplace needs. Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) with funding support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed an eight-month modular, in-service work-based training program aimed at strengthening the capacity for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) in health service delivery. Methods This capacity building program, initiated in 2008, is offered to in-service health professionals working in Uganda. The purpose of the training is to strengthen the capacity to provide quality health services through hands-on training that allows for skills building with minimum work disruptions while encouraging greater involvement of other institutional staff to enhance continuity and sustainability. The hands-on training uses practical gaps and challenges at the workplace through a highly participatory process. Trainees work with other staff to design and implement ‘projects’ meant to address work-related priority problems, working closely with mentors. Trainees’ knowledge and skills are enhanced through short courses offered at specific intervals throughout the course. Results Overall, 143 trainees were admitted between 2008 and 2011. Of these, 120 (84%) from 66 institutions completed the training successfully. Of the trainees, 37% were Social Scientists, 34% were Medical/Nursing/Clinical Officers, 5.8% were Statisticians, while 23% belonged to other professions. Majority of the trainees (80%) were employed by Non-Government Organizations while 20% worked with the public health sector. Trainees implemented 66 projects which addressed issues such as improving access to health care services; reducing waiting time for patients; strengthening M&E systems; and improving data collection and reporting. The projects implemented aimed to improve trainees’ skills and competencies in M&E and CQI and the design of the projects was such that they could share these skills with other staff, with minimal interruptions of their work. Conclusions The modular, work-based training model strengthens the capacity of the health workforce through hands-on, real-life experiences in the work-setting and improves institutional capacity, thereby providing a practical example of health systems strengthening through health workforce capacity building. PMID:23347473

  10. Lifelong Learning NCES Task Force: Final Report, Volume I. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binkley, Marilyn; Hudson, Lisa; Knepper, Paula; Kolstad, Andy; Stowe, Peter; Wirt, John

    In September 1998, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) established a 1-year task force to review the NCES's role concerning lifelong learning. The eight-member task force established a working definition of lifelong learning ("a process or system through which individuals are able and willing to learn at all stages of life, from…

  11. Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

  12. Extrinsic Motivation as Correlates of Work Attitude of the Nigerian Police Force: Implications for Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igun, Sylvester Nosakhare

    2008-01-01

    The study examined Extrinsic motivation as correlates of work attitude of the Nigeria Police Force and its implications for counselling. 300 Police personnel were selected by random sampling technique from six departments that make up police force Headquarters, Abuja. The personnel were selected from each department using simple sampling…

  13. Working-Class Jobs and New Parents' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry-Jenkins, Maureen; Smith, JuliAnna Z.; Goldberg, Abbie E.; Logan, Jade

    2011-01-01

    Little research has explored linkages between work conditions and mental health in working-class employed parents. The current study aims to address this gap, employing hierarchical linear modeling techniques to examine how levels of and changes in job autonomy, job urgency, supervisor support, and coworker support predicted parents' depressive…

  14. Critically Reflective Work Behavior of Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Esther; Jaarsma, Debbie; Endedijk, Maaike; Mainhard, Tim; Lam, Ineke; Simons, Robert-Jan; van Beukelen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Better understanding of critically reflective work behavior (CRWB), an approach for work-related informal learning, is important in order to gain more profound insight in the continuing development of health care professionals. Methods: A survey, developed to measure CRWB and its predictors, was distributed to veterinary…

  15. Qualitative research and outcomes in health, social work and education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Shaw

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline ways in which qualitative research has a contribution to make to research on outcomes in Health, Social Work and Education. It is a methodology paper with a practical purpose. Large tracts of inquiry work (a broad term to cover research, evaluation, policy analysis, and practitioner research) are concerned with questions about the

  16. e-Labs and Work Objects: Towards Digital Health Economies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsworth, John D.; Buchan, Iain E.

    The optimal provision of healthcare and public health services requires the synthesis of evidence from multiple disciplines. It is necessary to understand the genetic, environmental, behavioural and social determinants of disease and health-related states; to balance the effectiveness of interventions with their costs; to ensure the maximum safety and acceptability of interventions; and to provide fair access to care services for given populations. Ever expanding databases of knowledge and local health information, and the ability to employ computationally expensive methods, promises much for decisions to be both supported by best evidence and locally relevant. This promise will, however, not be realised without providing health professionals with the tools to make sense of this information rich environment and to collaborate across disciplines. We propose, as a solution to this problem, the e-Lab and Work Objects model as a sense-making platform for digital health economies - bringing together data, methods and people for timely health intelligence.

  17. Home-based work, human capital accumulation and women's labor force participation 

    E-print Network

    Chutubtim, Piyaluk

    2006-10-30

    This dissertation examines the effect of changes in the stock of human capital on the labor force participation decision of women aged 25-54. Without the option of homebased work, some women choose to leave the labor market ...

  18. The Effects of Manipulation on the Acquisition of the Compensatory Concepts of Speed, Force, and Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Betsy Davidson; Raven, Ronald

    1971-01-01

    Students who viewed demonstrations or manipulated apparatus understood the relational concepts (of the form a/b = a'/b') of speed, force, and work better than a control group, but did not differ significantly from each other. (AL)

  19. Work-Related Violence, Lifestyle, and Health among Special Education Teachers Working in Finnish Basic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervasti, Jenni; Kivimaki, Mika; Pentti, Jaana; Salmi, Venla; Suominen, Sakari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies have reported higher levels of absenteeism due to illness among special education teachers compared to other teachers, but it is not known which factors might contribute to this difference. We examined whether health, health behaviors, and exposure to violence at work differed between special education and general education…

  20. Process Evaluation of an Integrated Health Promotion/Occupational Health Model in WellWorks-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Mary Kay; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; McLellan, Deborah; Combe, Candace; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Glorian

    2005-01-01

    Disparities in chronic disease risk by occupation call for new approaches to health promotion. WellWorks-2 was a randomized, controlled study comparing the effectiveness of a health promotion/occupational health program (HP/OHS) with a standard intervention (HP). Interventions in both studies were based on the same theoretical foundations. Results…

  1. Health status and the labor force participation decisions of married couples 

    E-print Network

    Lin, Peng

    2009-05-15

    This thesis examines the labor force participation decisions of married couples, and special attention is paid to a spouse’s health conditions affecting their own and the spouse’s labor force participation decision. I used the Health and Retirement...

  2. Subjective health status of day and shift-working policemen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. OTTMANN; M. J. KARVONEN; K.-H. SCHMIDT; P. KNAUTH; J. RUTENFRANZ

    1989-01-01

    To assess the subjective health status of day- and shift-working police officers, a questionnaire-based study was carried out All the day-workers had previous shift experience. To control the age factor the total population of 2659 shift-working and 1303 day-working police officers was divided into four ten-year age classes. Factor analysis revealed that all the symptoms included in the questionnaire could

  3. Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Refugee Children's Forced Repatriation: Social Workers' and Police Officers' Health and Job Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Johanna; Hansson, Jonas; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Ögren, Kenneth; Padyab, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    During the past ten years the number of unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children has dramatically increased in Sweden. Some of them are permitted to stay in the receiving country, but some are forced back to their country of origin. Social workers and police officers are involved in these forced repatriations, and such complex situations may cause stressful working conditions. This study aimed to bridge the gap in knowledge of the relationship between general mental health and working with unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children who are due for forced repatriation. In addition, the role of psychosocial job characteristics in such relationships was investigated. A questionnaire including sociodemographic characteristics, the Swedish Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire, and the 12-item General Mental Health Questionnaire were distributed nationally. Univariate and multivariable regression models were used. Poorer mental health was associated with working with unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children among social workers but not among police officers. Psychological job demand was a significant predictor for general mental health among social workers, while psychological job demand, decision latitude, and marital status were predictors among police officers. Findings are discussed with special regard to the context of social work and police professions in Sweden. PMID:26153185

  4. Experiences of Swedish community health nurses working with health promotion and a patient-held health record.

    PubMed

    Jerdén, Lars; Hillervik, Charlotte; Hansson, Ann-Christin; Flacking, Renée; Weinehall, Lars

    2006-12-01

    Community health nurses have a tradition of preventive care, and might therefore be a key group in the introduction of new health-promotion methods. The aim of this study was to describe Swedish community health nurses' experiences in working with health promotion and a patient-held record as an integrated tool in their health-promotion work. Interviews were performed with 12 nurses at primary healthcare centres in the county of Dalarna, Sweden. A qualitative content analysis applying aspects of the grounded theory approach was performed. Central to the analysis was the nurses' struggle for balance, in being both a doer of practical disease-oriented tasks and a health-promotion communicator. Descriptions of the nurses' struggles to balance their work were grouped into three themes: (i) working alone and as a part of a team; (ii) nurse-related and patient-related interests; and (iii) patient's responsibility and shared responsibility between patient and nurse. The findings indicated that the structural organization in the primary healthcare centres was important for the community health nurses' means to work with health promotion and the patient-held record. In addition, the community health nurses' cognitive and emotional needs also affected this balance. In conclusion, the struggle of community health nurses to find a balance between being doers and health-promotion communicators is valuable in understanding health promotion in primary health care. The study indicates that it is not enough to develop health-promotion methods acceptable to community health nurses. A comprehensive examination of working conditions and the content of daily work is needed to ensure an emphasis on health promotion, including long-term usage of patient-held records. PMID:17116154

  5. Gender, Work, and Health for Trans Health Providers: A Focus on Transmen

    PubMed Central

    MacDonnell, Judith A.; Grigorovich, Alisa

    2012-01-01

    Well-documented health research points to trans people's vulnerability to health inequities that are linked to deeply embedded structural and social determinants of health. Gender and work, as social determinants of health for trans people, both shape and are shaped by multiple factors such as support networks, social environments, income and social status, shelter, and personal health practices. There is a gap in the nursing literature in regards to research on work and health for diverse trans people and a virtual silence on the particular issues of trans-identified health providers. This qualitative study used comparative life history methodology and purposeful sampling to examine links among work, career, and health for transmen who are health providers. Semistructured interviews were completed with four Canadian transmen involved in health care professional and/or practice contexts with diverse professions, age, work, and transitioning experiences. Critical gender analysis showed that unique and gender-related critical events and influences shape continuities and discontinuities in their careerlives. This strength-based approach foregrounds how resilience and growth emerged through participants' articulation with everyday gender dynamics. These findings have implications for nursing research, education, and practice that include an understanding of how trans providers “do transgender work” and supporting them in that process. PMID:23316387

  6. Work organization and the health of bank employees.

    PubMed

    Silva, Juliana Lemos; Navarro, Vera Lucia

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilian banking sector has undergone an intense restructuring process and taken a leading position in the incorporation of new technologies and organizational innovations. Computerization in the industry, in association with forms of work organization, has resulted in changes that reflect on the workers' health. Based on the theoretical and methodological frameworks of historical and dialectical materialism, this qualitative study investigates the work conditions of bank employees in order to identify the extent to which changes in work organization interfere with these workers' health. Data were collected through interviews held with 11 bank employees. In addition to physical sickening due to occupational diseases directly related to work intensification, the results also show an increased incidence of mental suffering and a feeling of loss of professional identity. Work-related frustration, instability and concerns related to psychological pressure resulting from the need to achieve goals predominated in the reports. PMID:22699722

  7. A Guide for Health Professionals Working with Aboriginal Peoples: Executive Summary

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective to provide Canadian health professionals with a network of information and recommendations regarding Aboriginal health. Options health professionals working with Aboriginal individuals and communities in the area of women’s health care. Outcomes improved health status of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Appropriateness and accessibility of women’s health services for Aboriginal peoples. Improved communication and clinical skills of health professionals in the area of Aboriginal health. Improved quality of relationship between health professionals and Aboriginal individuals and communities. Improved quality of relationship between health care professionals and Aboriginal individuals and communities. Evidence recommendations are based on expert opinion and a review of the literature. Published references were identified by a Medline search of all review articles, randomized clinical control trials, meta-analyses, and practice guidelines from 1966 to February 1999, using the MeSH headings “Indians, North American or Eskimos” and “Health.”* Subsequently published articles were brought to the attention of the authors in the process of writing and reviewing the document. Ancillary and unpublished references were recommended by members of the SOGC Aboriginal Health Issues Committee and the panel of expert reviewers. Values information collected was reviewed by the principal author. The social, cultural, political, and historic context of Aboriginal peoples in Canada, systemic barriers regarding the publication of information by Aboriginal authors, the diversity of Aboriginal peoples in Canada, and the need for a culturally appropriate and balanced presentation were carefully considered in addition to more traditional scientific evaluation. The majority of information collected consisted of descriptive health and social information and such evaluation tools as the evidence guidelines of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health exam were not appropriate. Benefits, costs, and harms utilization of the information and recommendations by Canadian health professionals will enhance understanding, communication, and clinical skills in the area of Aboriginal health. The resulting enhancement of collaborative relationships between Aboriginal peoples and their women’s health providers may contribute to health services that are more appropriate, effective, efficient, and accessible for Aboriginal peoples in Canada. The educational process may require an initial investment of time from the health professional. Recommendations Recommendations were grouped according to four themes: sociocultural context, health concerns, cross-cultural understanding, and Aboriginal health resources. Health professionals are encouraged to learn the appropriate names, demographics, and traditional geographic territories and language groups of the various Aboriginal groups in Canada. In addition, sensitivity to the impact of colonization and current socioeconomic challenges to the health status of Aboriginal peoples is warranted. Health services for Aboriginal peoples should take place as close to home as possible. Governmental obligations and policies regarding determination are recognized. With respect to health concerns, holistic definitions of health, based on Aboriginal perspectives, are put forward. Aboriginal peoples continue to experience a disproportionate burden of health problems. Health professionals are encouraged to become familiar with several key areas of morbidity and mortality. Relationships between Aboriginal peoples and their care providers need to be based on a foundation of mutual respect. Gaps and barriers in the current health care system for Aboriginal peoples are identified. Health professionals are encouraged to work with Aboriginal individuals and communities to address these gaps and barriers. Aboriginal peoples require culturally appropriate health care, including treatment in their own languages when possible. This may require interpreters or Aboriginal health advocates.

  8. Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 408 Nepalese migrants who had at least one period of work experience of at least six months in any of three Gulf countries: Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates (UAE). Face to face questionnaire interviews were conducted applying a convenience technique to select the study participants. Results Nepalese migrants in these Gulf countries were generally young men between 26-35 years of age. Unskilled construction jobs including labourer, scaffolder, plumber and carpenter were the most common jobs. Health problems were widespread and one quarter of study participants reported experiencing injuries or accidents at work within the last 12 months. The rates of health problems and accidents reported were very similar in the three countries. Only one third of the respondents were provided with insurance for health services by their employer. Lack of leave for illness, cost and fear of losing their job were the barriers to accessing health care services. The study found that construction and agricultural workers were more likely to experience accidents at their workplace and health problems than other workers. Conclusion The findings suggest important messages for the migration policy makers in Nepal. There is a lack of adequate information for the migrants making them aware of their health risks and rights in relation to health services in the destination countries and we suggest that the government of Nepal should be responsible for providing this information. Employers should provide orientation on possible health risks and appropriate training for preventive measures and all necessary access to health care services to all their workers. PMID:21443802

  9. Shift Work and Health: Current Problems and Preventive Actions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the problems to be tackled nowadays by occupational health with regards to shift work as well as the main guidelines at organizational and medical levels on how to protect workers' health and well-being. Working time organization is becoming a key factor on account of new technologies, market globalization, economic competition, and extension of social services to general populations, all of which involve more and more people in continuous assistance and control of work processes over the 24 hours in a day. The large increase of epidemiological and clinical studies on this issue document the severity of this risk factor on human health and well being, at both social and psychophysical levels, starting from a disruption of biological circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycle and ending in several psychosomatic troubles and disorders, likely also including cancer, and extending to impairment of performance efficiency as well as family and social life. Appropriate interventions on the organization of shift schedules according to ergonomic criteria and careful health surveillance and social support for shift workers are important preventive and corrective measures that allow people to keep working without significant health impairment. PMID:22953171

  10. Physical and psychosocial work environment factors and their association with health outcomes in Danish ambulance personnel – a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reviews of the literature on the health and work environment of ambulance personnel have indicated an increased risk of work-related health problems in this occupation. The aim of this study was to compare health status and exposure to different work environmental factors among ambulance personnel and the core work force in Denmark. In addition, to examine the association between physical and psychosocial work environment factors and different measures of health among ambulance personnel. Methods Data were taken from a nationwide sample of ambulance personnel and fire fighters (n?=?1,691) and was compared to reference samples of the Danish work force. The questionnaire contained measures of physical and psychosocial work environment as well as measures of musculoskeletal pain, mental health, self-rated health and sleep quality. Results Ambulance personnel have half the prevalence of poor self-rated health compared to the core work force (5% vs. 10%). Levels of mental health were the same across the two samples whereas a substantially higher proportion of the ambulance personnel reported musculoskeletal pain (42% vs. 29%). The ambulance personnel had higher levels of emotional demands and meaningfulness of and commitment to work, and substantially lower levels of quantitative demands and influence at work. Only one out of ten aspects of physical work environment was consistently associated with higher levels of musculoskeletal pain. Emotional demands was the only psychosocial work factor that was associated with both poorer mental health and worse sleep quality. Conclusions Ambulance personnel have similar levels of mental health but substantially higher levels of musculoskeletal pain than the work force in general. They are more exposed to emotional demands and these demands are associated with higher levels of poor mental health and poor sleep quality. To improve work environment, attention should be paid to musculoskeletal problems and the presence of positive organizational support mechanisms that can prevent negative effects from the high levels of emotional demands. PMID:22824415

  11. Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only. PMID:16135246

  12. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Work Motivators: Implications for the Incoming Air Force Officer Workforce. Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephanie K.; Davis, Jason J.; Rate, Christopher

    This document contains three poster presentations from a conference on human resource development. "Intrinsic and Extrinsic Work Motivators: Implications for the Incoming Air Force Officer Workforce" (Stephanie K. Johnson, Jason J. Davis, Christopher Rate) reports on a study that explored the literature relating to work motivators to find Air…

  13. The Role of Market Forces in the Delivery of Health Care: Issues for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This edition of the Role of Market Forces program note suggests empirical and descriptive analyses required to complement new areas of health policy emphasis and direction. Eight areas and related questions involving health economics are outlined: (1) rural health care; (2) medical malpractice and insurance; (3) supply, productivity, and…

  14. Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J. Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D.; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees’ personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees’ work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design. PMID:25349460

  15. Caretaking as articulation work: the effects of taking up responsibility for a child with asthma on labor force participation.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Stefan; Freidin, Betina

    2007-10-01

    A well-established quantitative literature has documented the financial toll for women's caretaking. Still, we do not know much about the process by which women end up taking on an extensive caretaking role and what they do on a daily basis. Based on in-depth interviews with a convenience sample of fifty caretakers of school aged children with asthma and nine health professionals in the USA, this study examines how health professionals socialize mothers into an intensive caretaking role for their children with asthma, how mothers negotiated and perform that role, and the impact of care work on their labor force participation. Care providers assign broad caretaking tasks that require further articulation work to get the job done. Although mothers care for their children in varied ways, caring for a child with a chronic disease remains a time-consuming activity. Mothers pay a price for the indeterminate nature of articulation work by scaling back their involvement in the paid labor force. PMID:17590253

  16. Dairy Health. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students learn about dairy herd health, as well as how to gather, record, and interpret information. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize…

  17. Justice at Work, Job Stress, and Employee Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujishiro, Kaori; Heaney, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    A small but growing literature has documented an association between justice at work and employee health. However, the pathways and mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. This article proposes a conceptual framework that bridges the organizational justice, occupational stress, and occupational epidemiology literatures.…

  18. Black Women in the Labor Force. Facts on Working Women No. 97-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Between 1986 and 1996, the number of black women aged 16 and over in the United States increased from 11 million to 13 million. Labor force participation for black women rose during that time from 56.9 percent to 60.4 percent. In 1996 the total labor force population of black women was 7.9 million. Of these, 80 percent worked full time. Black…

  19. Working life and mental health - A challenge to psychiatry?

    PubMed Central

    LEVI, LENNART

    2005-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, "mental health problems and stress-related disorders are the biggest overall cause of early death in Europe". Some of the root causes of this morbidity and mortality are related to living and working conditions that are accessible to preventive and therapeutic interventions, individual as well as collective ones. A political mandate for such interventions is now developing. Members of the WPA Section on Occupational Psychiatry have contributed to this development and we now invite the readers to join the Section in its endeavours. PMID:16633507

  20. Presenteeism according to healthy behaviors, physical health, and work environment.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ray M; Aldana, Steven G; Pope, James E; Anderson, David R; Coberley, Carter R; Whitmer, R William

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the contribution that selected demographic characteristics, health behaviors, physical health outcomes, and workplace environmental factors have on presenteeism (on-the-job productivity loss attributed to poor health and other personal issues). Analyses are based on a cross-sectional survey administered to 3 geographically diverse US companies in 2010. Work-related factors had the greatest influence on presenteeism (eg, too much to do but not enough time to do it, insufficient technological support/resources). Personal problems and financial stress/concerns also contributed substantially to presenteeism. Factors with less contribution to presenteeism included physical limitations, depression or anxiety, inadequate job training, and problems with supervisors and coworkers. Presenteeism was greatest for those ages 30-49, women, separated/divorced/widowed employees, and those with a high school degree or some college. Clerical/office workers and service workers had higher presenteeism. Managers and professionals had the highest level of presenteeism related to having too much to do but too little time to do it, and transportation workers had the greatest presenteeism because of physical health limitations. Lowering presenteeism will require that employers have realistic expectations of workers, help workers prioritize, and provide sufficient technological support. Financial stress and concerns may warrant financial planning services. Health promotion interventions aimed at improving nutrition and physical and mental health also may contribute to reducing presenteeism. PMID:22856386

  1. [Global changes and trends in work safety and health].

    PubMed

    Pinnagoda, C

    1996-01-01

    A description is given of the occupational health and safety problems which are common to workers all over the world, where these must be tackled with a view to achieving coherent and ongoing occupational safety for workers in their jobs. Occupational safety and health will continue to be priorities in international collaboration. Although the nature of the problems and solutions vary as a function of real priorities and needs, it is necessary to place greater emphasis on the application of overall activities concerning safety and health so that measures can be made and policies taken whose development is sustainable. International standards must be turned into actions on a national and company level with the active participation of social workers. The tripartite consensus will continue to be necessary for drawing up plans of action adapted to local situations, with a view to introducing improvements in work centres. PMID:8998697

  2. The impact of a worker health study on working conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pam Tau; Krause, Niklas

    2002-01-01

    A research partnership of representatives from labor, academia, and public health enabled unionized San Francisco hotel workers to achieve important policy changes in workplace health and safety. Known as the "Housekeeping Study," the project took sixteen months to complete. A unique aspect of the project was that it utilized participatory action research methods, involving workers themselves as full participants in the study. A core group of 25 hotel room cleaners was involved in each phase of the project. The study developed health data which enabled room cleaners and their union to formulate and justify a contract proposal calling for a significant reduction in housekeeping workloads. The employer association agreed to a contract which reduced the maximum required room assignment from 15 rooms to 14 rooms per day in 14 San Francisco hotels. By lowering the maximum work assignment, these workers set a new standard which can potentially protect the health of room cleaners across the country. The project can serve as a model for worker and union participation in academic research, as well as for the application of research to improving working conditions, particularly for low-wage immigrant workers. PMID:12325285

  3. 76 FR 63927 - Interagency Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (ITFAR): An Update on A Public Health Action...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...Resistance (ITFAR): An Update on A Public Health Action Plan to Combat Antimicrobial...accomplishing activities outlined in A Public Health Action Plan to Combat Antimicrobial...increasing importance of AR as a public health threat. The Task Force is...

  4. Astronomy Resources for Intercurricular Elementary Science (ARIES): Exploring Motion and Forces. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "ARIES: Exploring Motion and Forces" is a physical science curriculum for students in grades 5-8 that employs 18 inquiry-centered, hands-on lessons called "explorations." The curriculum draws upon students' curiosity to explore phenomena, allowing for a discovery-based learning process. Group-centered lab work is designed to help students build an…

  5. The Effects of Early Work Experience on Young Women's Labor Force Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alon, Sigal; Donahoe, Debra; Tienda, Marta

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of longitudinal data on the employment histories of 1,386 women from age 16 to 28 found that mature women's labor force attachment was influenced by the timing, amount, and volatility of their early work experience, as well as by educational attainment, race, and giving birth. (Contains 58 references.) (SV)

  6. WORKING PAPER N 2008 -57 Labor force participation by the elderly

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    global unemployment. But many questions remain on the true effect on young workers of these policies in the employment rate of young workers and a decrease in their unemployment rate. Even controlling for the economicWORKING PAPER N° 2008 - 57 Labor force participation by the elderly and employment of the young

  7. Making Child Care Work. Report to the 1987 Minnesota Legislature by the Child Care Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Sheila; And Others

    This report makes recommendations to the 1987 Minnesota Legislature on some actions that can be taken to improve Minnesota's child care system and make it work more effectively. The first section of the report documents the growing need for child care, emphasizing the number of children in Minnesota, the number of women in the labor force, changes…

  8. Profile of a Rural Area Work Force: The Wyoming Uranium Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Thomas L.; Kiner, Phil E.

    1974-01-01

    Designed to provide insights into policies relative to human resource investments and employment information channels, the study's objectives were to: (1) relate types of employment in Wyoming's uranium mines and mills to work force participants; (2) determine employee earnings and relate those earnings to employment categories and…

  9. In search of the 'problem family': public health and social work in England and Wales 1940-70.

    PubMed

    Welshman, J

    1996-12-01

    Recent attempts to explain the decline of public health in England and Wales after 1948 have suggested that services had developed steadily but haphazardly in the interwar period, and that the lack of an underlying philosophy left Medical Officers of Health and their empires vulnerable to a range of forces that included the decline of infectious disease, the rise of hospital medicine, the growth of general practice, and the increasing professionalism of social work. Yet the argument that public health practitioners lagged behind contemporary thinking on social work in the 1950s deserves closer examination, and this article uses the rise and decline of the concept of the 'problem family' to examine the changing relationship between the two professional groups. It traces the emergence of the concept of the 'social problem group' in the 1930s, and considers why and how Medical Officers of Health and the Eugenics Society took up the idea of the 'problem family' after the Second world War. It charts how the Ministry of Health encouraged local authorities to use home helps and health visitors to tackle the 'problem family', and contrasts this medical approach with the casework methods developed by voluntary organizations and subsequently adopted by the social work profession. The article concludes that in revealing how Medical Officers of Health were out of touch with contemporary research and practice in social work, the issue of the 'problem family' helps to explain the decline of public health under the early National Health Service. PMID:11618731

  10. Forces Pushing Prescription Psychotropic Drugs in College Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Leighton C.

    2007-01-01

    A complex of forceful influences is greatly accelerating the use of what are usually referred to as "psychiatric drugs," although most prescribing is not done by psychiatrists. Many other clinicians, including other kinds of physicians, and recently psychologists, prescribe these medications. The influences contributing to this dramatic surge…

  11. Working in Australia's heat: health promotion concerns for health and productivity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhvir; Hanna, Elizabeth G; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-06-01

    This exploratory study describes the experiences arising from exposure to extreme summer heat, and the related health protection and promotion issues for working people in Australia. Twenty key informants representing different industry types and occupational groups or activities in Australia provided semi-structured interviews concerning: (i) perceptions of workplace heat exposure in the industry they represented, (ii) reported impacts on health and productivity, as well as (iii) actions taken to reduce exposure or effects of environmental heat exposure. All interviewees reported that excessive heat exposure presents a significant challenge for their industry or activity. People working in physically demanding jobs in temperatures>35°C frequently develop symptoms, and working beyond heat tolerance is common. To avoid potentially dangerous health impacts they must either slow down or change their work habits. Such health-preserving actions result in lost work capacity. Approximately one-third of baseline work productivity can be lost in physically demanding jobs when working at 40°C. Employers and workers consider that heat exposure is a 'natural hazard' in Australia that cannot easily be avoided and so must be accommodated or managed. Among participants in this study, the locus of responsibility for coping with heat lay with the individual, rather than the employer. Heat exposure during Australian summers commonly results in adverse health effects and productivity losses, although quantification studies are lacking. Lack of understanding of the hazardous nature of heat exposure exacerbates the serious risk of heat stress, as entrenched attitudinal barriers hamper amelioration or effective management of this increasing occupational health threat. Educational programmes and workplace heat guidelines are required. Without intervention, climate change in hot countries, such as Australia, can be expected to further exacerbate heat-related burden of disease and loss of productivity in many jobs. In light of projected continued global warming, and associated increase in heat waves, more attention needs to be given to environmental heat as a human health hazard in the Occupational Health and Safety arena. Without adoption of effective heat protective strategies economic output and fitness levels will diminish. Health protection and promotion activities should include strategies to reduce heat exposure, limit exposure duration, ensure access to hydration, and promote acclimatization and fitness programmes, and reorientate attitudes towards working in the heat. PMID:23690144

  12. Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers. PMID:18070333

  13. “Whistle While You Work”: A Historical Account of Some Associations Among Music, Work, and Health

    PubMed Central

    le Roux, Gordon Marc

    2005-01-01

    Music has long been a uniting force among workers. Music can improve team spirit and provide an enjoyable diversion, but it is most useful in expressing the true feelings of a sometimes desperate community. Over time, a variety of musical media have emerged to match the prevailing conditions at work: the folk songs of 19th-century handloom weavers, the songs of industrial Britain’s trade union members, the workers’ radio programs of the 1940s. Associations have arisen to encourage and coordinate musical activities among workers, and public awareness of the hazards of some occupations has been promoted through music. PMID:15961754

  14. Occupational health care for the 21st century: from health at work to workers' health.

    PubMed

    Vanhoorne, Michel N; Vanachter, Othmar V; De Ridder, Maurits P

    2006-01-01

    A survey of relevant national and international legislation and recommendations on occupational health (OH) organization revealed two fundamental approaches to OH: 1) the historically older labor approach, essentially seeing OH care as an obligation of the employer derived from the labor contract, and 2) an emerging health approach, including all workers and all aspects of health, A draft decree on OH in Flanders seeks to integrate the two approaches. It extends the scope of OH to all workers (not only employees), introduces holistic health surveillance, rejects the incapacity concept, provides for strong integration of health and workplace surveillance, and stresses ethics. Workers' satisfaction is seen as the first criterion in quality control. Systematic data collection and analysis, and when necessary, scientific research are recommended. Additional resources for OH services should be provided by stakeholders other than employers. PMID:16967837

  15. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work–Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

  16. Health Status of Women in the Armed Forces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Hoiberg; Jack F. White

    1992-01-01

    This article examines a study of the health status and attrition rates of three 5-year cohorts of U.S. Navy women (n = 119,167) who enlisted between 1973 and 1987. Comparisons also were conducted with women's data from other branches of the military. Results show that pregnancy-related conditions, primarily childbirth, were the leading reasons for a hospitalization, followed by genitourinary conditions

  17. Force

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Brownie

    2010-04-07

    Instructions: This is a webquest designed to help students understand force. It is specifically meant to teach the idea that the greater the force applied to an object the greater the change in speed or direction of the object depending on the mass. This is also known as Newton's Second Law of Motion. Lets Learn about Force! For this project your students will understand force. They will use Newton's second law to solve the problem presented. UT Core Curriculum: Science 3rd Grade. Standard 3- Students will understand the relationship between the force applied to an object and resulting motion of the ...

  18. [Work: disease and health. The role of occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Alessio, L

    2010-01-01

    To assess the role of Occupational Medicine in the promotion of workers'health over the last forty years, the author studied the evolution of this discipline from a clinical-diagnostic approach to the current emphasis on prevention. However, it is stressed that in Occupational Medicine even preventive measures are based on clinical methodology, as for example in health surveillance, where the main tasks are the identification of individual hyper-susceptibility and the assessment of early and reversible health effects due to occupational risks. Moreover, the traditional clinical-diagnostic approach is still of utmost importance. In fact, the classical occupational diseases do not present with the specific clinical features of the recent past. Instead, today it is necessary to evaluate whether occupational risk factors play a concomitant role in the origin of diseases that affect the general population. Moreover, new occupational diseases are emerging, due to the continuous changes in manufacturing processes and work organization. To assess the role that Occupational Medicine has played in the binomial expression "disease-health", topics which particularly suit the Author's cultural background are considered and are used as "indicators" of the various scientific, cultural, social, economic, and legislative aspects that contribute to the professional development of Occupational Physicians. Important results have been achieved over the last 40 years, however Occupational Physicians face new problems that impose a continuous updating process, not only on medical topics but also on the development of technological processes. The laws and the recommendations of the most prestigious national and international organizations and the principles of the ICOH Code of Ethics should guide Occupational Physicians in their profession and their actions must imply full professional independence. They must acquire and maintain the necessary competence for their duties and adequate conditions to carry out their tasks according to good practice and professional ethics. PMID:21298869

  19. Ib: MOTION 1-D: WORK, POTENTIALS & FORCES 1st year CLASSICAL MECHANICS MT06 PLR from RCED

    E-print Network

    Read, Peter L.

    Ib: MOTION 1-D: WORK, POTENTIALS & FORCES 1st year CLASSICAL MECHANICS MT06 PLR from RCED Topics covered: potential energy and forces derivable from a potential; work; stable and unstable equilibria. 1 Potential Energy Conservation of energy for motion under a constant gravitational attraction (ignoring air

  20. 75 FR 52355 - Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group Reports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ...Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group...The National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures is a collaborative...the following cross-cutting public health and chemical exposures...

  1. Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health (NIOSH) Share Compartir Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs October 2008 DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2009-106 Health care workers who handle hazardous drugs are at risk ...

  2. Identifying vulnerable Asian Americans under Health Care Reform: working in small businesses and health care coverage.

    PubMed

    Cook, Won Kim; Tseng, Winston; Ko Chin, Kathy; John, Iyanrick; Chung, Corina

    2014-11-01

    Working in small businesses has been identified as a key factor for low coverage rates in immigrant communities. In this study, we identify specific cultural and socioeconomic predictors of Asian Americans who work in small businesses to identify subgroups at a greater disadvantage than others in obtaining health insurance. Logistic regression models were fitted using a sample of 3,819 Asian American small business owners and employers extracted from pooled 2005–2012 California Health Interview Survey data. We found that individuals with low income levels, Korean Americans, U.S.-born South Asian and Southeast Asian (other than Vietnamese) Americans, immigrants without citizenship (particularly those lacking a green card), and individuals with limited English proficiency had higher odds of lacking coverage. The odds of being uninsured did not differ between small business owners and employees. Based upon these key findings, we propose several strategies to expand coverage for Asian Americans working in small businesses and their most vulnerable subgroups. PMID:25418249

  3. Perception of Weight and Health Status among Women Working at Health Centres of Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Dorosty, Ahmad Reza; Mehdikhani, Sepideh; Rahimi, Abbas; Koohdani, Fariba; Tehrani, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    Perception of body-weight status is an important determinant of weight-related behaviours and may affect the burden of weight disturbances as a public-health problem. No study has assessed self-perception of the weight status regarding body-fat distribution among health workers to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of the perception of weight and health status among 542 women working at health centres of Tehran. We assessed their perceived body-weight and health status and measured waist- and hip-circumference, weight, and height to calculate waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) as a measure of fat distribution and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2). Women reported their sociodemographic information, and the perceived weight and health status were compared with their actual fatness status, defined based on WHR and BMI, to determine misperception of weight status. Multivariate logistic regression models were performed to assess the predictive effects of various sociodemographic factors and actual fatness on the perception of weight and health status. The results showed that more than 40% of women with normal BMI overestimated their body-weight status while only 15.8% of these women had central obesity. BMI was the most important variable associated with misperceived weight status as normal-weight women had significantly more misperception (OR 8.16, 95% CI 4.82-13.82) than overweight/obese women. WHR did not show any significant relationships with perceived weight status. In addition, perception of health status was not associated with actual fatness indices. It is concluded, BMI was the main predictor of the perception of weight status in female employees. The importance of using body-fat distribution in the perceptions of weight and health status should be emphasized. PMID:24847594

  4. Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study—a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation

    PubMed Central

    Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

    2014-01-01

    The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

  5. Disparities in the Geography of Mental Health: Implications for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent theory and research on geographic disparities in mental health and their implications for social work. It focuses on work emerging from the fields of mental health geography, psychiatric epidemiology, and social work, arguing that a wide range of spatial disparities in mental health are important to understand but that…

  6. Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia -MSN Health & Fitness -Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM

    E-print Network

    Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia - MSN Health & Fitness - Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM Mental Health America has more about schizophrenia. SOURCE: Columbia University, news release, March 31

  7. Model Formulation: Health@HomeThe Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Moen; Patricia Flatley Brennan

    2005-01-01

    ObjectiveContemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in

  8. Promoting Positive Emotional Health of Children of Transient Armed Forces Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eodanable, Miranda; Lauchlan, Fraser

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research was to promote emotional health in a small primary school (n = 180), with a highly transient pupil population of armed forces children (Service children). Negative effects of pupil mobility have been found to relate to academic attainment (Dobson, Henthorne, & Lynas, 2000; Mott, 2002), but its effect on social and…

  9. Audit of work force restructuring at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-04-23

    The Department of Energy (Department) restructured its work force at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (Fernald Project) to reduce staffing levels and to modify the mix of workers` skills in response to budget cuts, facility closures, and changes in the Fernald Project`s mission. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the work force restructurings were effective in reducing staffing levels and in changing the mix of workers` skills. As of September 30, 1995, the restructurings were not effective in reducing staffing levels or in improving the mix of workers` skills. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) spent $2.9 million to separate 255 employees in October 1993. However, by September 30, 1994, all but 14 of the employees separated were either rehired or replaced by new employees with similar skills. The second restructuring began in October 1994 and is not expected to be completed until May 1996. The Department expects the second restructuring to reduce FERMCO`s work force by 476 employees at a cost of $12.9 million. However, since the second restructuring began, FERMCO has hired 265 new employees and at September 30, 1995, had open job announcements seeking 82 additional employees. Many of these new employees have essentially the same skills as employees who separated under the two restructurings. The Department`s objectives were not met because the Fernald Area Office did not (1) require FERMCO to perform the skills analysis necessary to identify which employees were needed to perform the Fernald Project`s current mission, and (2) effectively monitor FERMCO`s restructuring efforts to ensure that the Department`s objectives were met.

  10. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

  11. Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: II. Mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Michalek, J.E.; Wolfe, W.H.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

    1990-10-10

    The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the current health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. This report compares the noncombat mortality of 1261 Ranch Hand veterans to that of a comparison population of 19,101 other Air Force veterans primarily involved in cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. The indirectly standardized all-cause death rate among Ranch Hands is 2.5 deaths per 1,000 person-years, the same as that among comparison subjects. After adjustment for age, rank, and occupation, the all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 1.0. In adjusted cause-specific analyses, the authors found no significant group differences regarding accidental, malignant neoplasm, and circulatory deaths. These data are not supportive to a hypothesis of increases mortality among Ranch Hands.

  12. Working on wellness (WOW): A worksite health promotion intervention programme

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Insufficient PA has been shown to cluster with other CVD risk factors including insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, overweight, increased serum cholesterol concentrations and elevated blood pressure. This paper describes the development of Working on Wellness (WOW), a worksite intervention program incorporating motivational interviewing by wellness specialists, targeting employees at risk. In addition, we describe the evaluation the effectiveness of the intervention among employees at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods The intervention mapping (IM) protocol was used in the planning and design of WOW. Focus group discussions and interviews with employees and managers identified the importance of addressing risk factors for CVD at the worksite. Based on the employees’ preference for individual counselling, and previous evidence of the effectiveness of this approach in the worksite setting, we decided to use motivational interviewing as part of the intervention strategy. Thus, as a cluster-randomised, controlled control trial, employees at increased risk for CVD (N?=?928) will be assigned to a control or an intervention group, based on company random allocation. The sessions will include motivational interviewing techniques, comprised of two face-to-face and four telephonic sessions, with the primary aim to increase habitual levels of PA. Measures will take place at baseline, 6 and 12?months. Secondary outcomes include changes in nutritional habits, serum cholesterol and glucose concentrations, blood pressure and BMI. In addition, healthcare expenditure and absenteeism will be measured for the economic evaluation. Analysis of variance will be performed to determine whether there were significant changes in physical activity habits in the intervention and control groups at 6 and 12?months. Discussion The formative work on which this intervention is based suggests that the strategy of targeting employees at increased risk for CVD is preferred. Importantly, this study extends the work of a previous, similar study, Health Under Construction, in a different setting. Finally, this study will allow an economic evaluation of the intervention that will be an important outcome for health care funders, who ultimately will be responsible for implementation of such an intervention. Trial registration United States Clinical Trails Register NCT 01494207 PMID:22625844

  13. Mental health evaluations of U.S. Air Force basic military training and technical training students.

    PubMed

    Englert, David R; Hunter, Christopher L; Sweeney, Bryan J

    2003-11-01

    A 2000 report by Staal, Cigrang, and Fiedler and a 1998 report by Cigrang, Carbone, Todd, and Fiedler described the attrition of U. S. Air Force basic military trainees due to mental health disorders for the year 1997. This article looks at the population of Air Force basic military trainees and technical training school students located at the same base during the year 2001. In addition, we look at the effect of allowing basic trainees and those in technical school to refer themselves for mental health evaluations as opposed to only evaluating those referred by secondary sources. Primary results of the data analysis suggest that mental health-related separation rates for calendar year 2001 basic military trainees are consistent with past years at 4.2%. For both basic trainees and technical school training students, adjustment disorders and depressive disorders are the top diagnostic categories related to recommendation for separation. PMID:14680046

  14. Public health works: blood donation in urban China.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vincanne; Erwin, Kathleen; Le, Phuoc V

    2009-02-01

    Recent shifts in the global health infrastructure warrant consideration of the value and effectiveness of national public health campaigns. These shifts include the globalization of pharmaceutical research, the rise of NGO-funded health interventions, and the rise of biosecurity models of international health. We argue that although these trends have arisen as worthwhile responses to actual health needs, it is important to remember the key role that public health campaigns can play in the promotion of national health, especially in developing nations. Focusing on an example set by China in response to a public health crisis surrounding the national need for a clean and adequate blood supply and the inadvertent spread of HIV by way of blood donation in the early 1990's, we argue that there is an important role for strong national public health programs. We also identify the key factors that enabled China's response to this burgeoning epidemic to be, in the end, largely successful. PMID:19058887

  15. Public Health Works: Blood Donation in Urban China

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Vincanne; Erwin, Kathleen; Le, Phuoc V

    2009-01-01

    Recent shifts in the global health infrastructure warrant consideration of the value and effectiveness of national public health campaigns. These shifts include the globalization of pharmaceutical research, the rise of NGO-funded health interventions, and the rise of biosecurity models of international health. We argue that although these trends have arisen as worthwhile responses to actual health needs, it is important to remember the key role that public health campaigns can play in the promotion of national health, especially in developing nations. Focusing on an example set by China in response to a public health crisis surrounding the national need for a clean and adequate blood supply and the inadvertent spread of HIV by way of blood donation in the early 19902, we argue that there is an important role for strong national public health programs. We also identify the key factors that enabled China’s response to this bourgeoning epidemic to be, in the end, largely successful. PMID:19058887

  16. Crisis as opportunity: international health work during the economic depression.

    PubMed

    Borowy, Iris

    2008-01-01

    The economic depression of the 1930s represented the most important economic and social crisis of its time. Surprisingly, its effect on health did not show in available morbidity and mortality rates. In 1932, the League of Nations Health Organisation embarked on a six-point program addressing statistical methods of measuring the effect and its influence on mental health and nutrition and establishing ways to safeguard public health through more efficient health systems. Some of these studies resulted in considerations of general relevance beyond crisis management. Unexpectedly, the crisis offered an opportunity to reconsider key concepts of individual and public health. PMID:19230333

  17. Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

  18. The Trouble with Health Savings Accounts: A Social Work Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, conservatives have promoted health savings accounts (HSAs) as a way of addressing the growing cost of health insurance. HSAs were introduced under the Medical Modernization Act of 2003 as "an alternative to traditional health insurance." They are at the heart of an effort to replace the current system of insurance with…

  19. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...Contracts 970.5223-1 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work...

  20. 48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...Contracts 970.5223-1 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work...

  1. Health Services Management in the Health Administration Curriculum. Report by the Curriculum Task Force on Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Univ. Programs in Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    Critical decisions that need to be made by faculties of health administration education programs when developing and assessing the health services management portion of the curriculum are identified. Decisions should draw from the information available concerning professional target roles of graduates, graduate behavior expected, resources for…

  2. Self-Rated Health as a Predictor of Disability Retirement – The Contribution of Ill-Health and Working Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pietiläinen, Olli; Laaksonen, Mikko; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero

    2011-01-01

    Objective Self-rated health is a generic health indicator predicting mortality, many diseases, and need for care. We examined self-rated health as a predictor of subsequent disability retirement, and ill-health and working conditions as potential explanations for the association. Methods Self-rated health and the covariates were obtained from the Helsinki Health Study baseline mail surveys in 2000–2002 conducted among municipal employees aged 40–60 years (n?=?6525). Data for disability retirement events (n?=?625) along with diagnoses were linked from the Finnish Centre for Pensions, with a follow-up by the end of 2010. Hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using competing risks models. Results Less than good self-rated health predicted disability retirement due to all causes among both women (HR?=?4.60, 95% CI?=?3.84–5.51) and men (HR?=?3.83, 95% CI?=?2.64–5.56), as well as due to musculoskeletal diseases (HR?=?5.17, 95% CI?=?4.02–6.66) and mental disorders (HR?=?4.80, 95% CI?=?3.50–6.59) among women and men pooled. Ill-health and physical working conditions partly explained the found associations, which nevertheless remained after the adjustments. Among the measures of ill-health limiting long-standing illness explained the association most in all-cause disability retirement and disability retirements due to musculoskeletal diseases, whereas common mental disorders explained the association most in disability retirements due to mental health disorders. Among working conditions physical work load and hazardous exposures at work explained the association most, although much less than ill-health. Conclusions Self-rated health is a strong predictor of disability retirement. This can be partly explained by ill-health and working conditions. Poor self-rated health provides a useful marker for increased risk of work disability and subsequent disability retirement. PMID:21949830

  3. Pride and confidence at work: potential predictors of occupational health in a hospital setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerstin Nilsson; Anna Hertting; Inga-Lill Petterson; Töres Theorell

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study focuses on determinants of a healthy work environment in two departments in a Swedish university hospital. The study is based on previously conducted longitudinal studies at the hospital (1994–2001), concerning working conditions and health outcomes among health care personnel in conjunction with downsizing processes. Overall, there was a general negative trend in relation to mental health, as

  4. Health Visitors Work in a Multiethnic Society: a Qualitative Study of Social Exclusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. BOWES; T. MEEHAN DOMOKOS

    1998-01-01

    Health visiting is adopting an enabling model of practice, which may promote social inclusion, but is under pressure to justify itself. The article focuses on health visitors' work with Pakistani women and comparable white women in Glasgow, examining the nature of health visiting and women's responses to it. Health visitors' perspectives involve the apprecia- tion of cultural differences, building relationships

  5. Between the Cracks: Access to Physical Health Care in Children of the Working Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Barbara J.; Wang, Shirley J.; Kwasman, Alan; Green, Delores

    This study examined the demographic and psychological characteristics of the parents of a group of children with no access to health care, due to their status as "working poor" and thus denied either public or private health insurance whose children were referred for treatment for an acute health problem by a volunteer health care program for…

  6. Health consumption as work: the home pregnancy test as a domesticated health tool.

    PubMed

    Childerhose, Janet E; Macdonald, Margaret E

    2013-06-01

    A growing array of biomedical goods and services has become central to the North American experience of navigating illness and pursuing good health. Yet despite the utility of consumption as an analytical framework within the social sciences, the selection, purchase, and use of biomedical goods and services has been understudied. By using the home pregnancy test as a case study, we suggest new approaches to thinking about the consumption of these goods and services. We chose the home pregnancy test because it is the best-known example of a mass-produced diagnostic tool used by consumers. We draw on two sources of data for this qualitative analysis: a set of stories submitted between 2003 and 2005 by women and men to an online exhibit mounted by the National Institutes of Health called "A Thin Blue Line: The History of the Pregnancy Test Kit," which we analysed between 2006 and 2007; and web sampling conducted in 2009 and 2010 of personal web and video logs of women and men who have posted stories and opinions about their experiences with contemporary home pregnancy testing products. We adapt the term "domestication" from Science and Technology Studies scholarship to describe the movement of diagnostic devices into homes for use by consumers. Specifically, we propose that the consumption of domesticated biomedical devices, goods, and services should be theorized as work performed by consumers, in two senses: as a form of tool use that allows non-experts to produce diagnostic knowledge about their own bodies and health; and as the ongoing biopolitical work that is expected of citizens to produce healthy bodies. Our paper draws attention to these understudied phenomena, while suggesting new approaches to theorizing the social and cultural elements of goods and services for health. PMID:23608088

  7. A novel approach for mental health disease management: the Air Force Medical Service's interdisciplinary model.

    PubMed

    Runyan, Christine N; Fonseca, Vincent P; Meyer, John G; Oordt, Mark S; Talcott, G Wayne

    2003-01-01

    Mental health disorders are one of the most substantial public health problems affecting society today, accounting for roughly 15% of the overall burden of disease from all causes in the United States. Although primary care (PC) has the potential to be the frontline for recognition and management of behavioral health conditions, this has been a challenge historically. In order to more effectively address the broad scope of behavioral health needs, the Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) established a new model of behavioral health care. Through a series of coordinated steps, the AFMS ultimately placed trained behavioral health providers into PC clinics to serve as consultants to PC providers (PCPs). Behavioral Health Consultants (BHCs) provide focused assessments, present healthcare options to patients, and deliver brief collaborative interventions in the PC setting. BHCs see patients at the request of the PCP, in 15-30-min appointments. In the pilot study, patients averaged 1.6 visits to the BHC. Over 70% of patients fell into six categories of presenting problems: situational reactions, depressive disorders, adjustment disorders, anxiety disorders, health promotion, and obesity. Patient data (n = 76) suggest 97% of patients seen were either "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with BHC services, and 100% of the PCPs (n = 23, 68% response rate) were highly satisfied and indicated they would "definitely recommend" others use BHC services for their patients. Both the implications and the limitations of this pilot study are discussed. PMID:14570386

  8. Forces

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation depicts what forces are and how they can change the motion and shape of objects in an animated slide show. This resource also includes an interactive test and review of the material, and can be downloaded for offline use.

  9. Correlates of Injury-forced Work Reduction for Massage Therapists and Bodywork Practitioners†

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Gary; Monos, Christopher; Boyer, Ed; Davis, Kathleen; Flanagan, Richard; Lopez, Andrea; Tatum, Donna S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Injury-forced work reduction (IFWR) has been acknowledged as an all-too-common occurrence for massage therapists and bodywork practitioners (M & Bs). However, little prior research has specifically investigated demographic, work attitude, and perceptual correlates of IFWR among M & Bs. Purpose To test two hypotheses, H1 and H2. H1 is that the accumulated cost variables set ( e.g., accumulated costs, continuing education costs) will account for a significant amount of IFWR variance beyond control/demographic (e.g., social desirability response bias, gender, years in practice, highest education level) and work attitude/perception variables (e.g., job satisfaction, affective occupation commitment, occupation identification, limited occupation alternatives) sets. H2 is that the two exhaustion variables (i.e., physical exhaustion, work exhaustion) set will account for significant IFWR variance beyond control/demographic, work attitude/perception, and accumulated cost variables sets. Research Design and Participants An online survey sample of 2,079 complete-data M & Bs was collected. Stepwise regression analysis was used to test the study hypotheses. The research design first controlled for control/demographic (Step1) and work attitude/perception variables sets (Step 2), before then testing for the successive incremental impact of two variable sets, accumulated costs (Step 3) and exhaustion variables (Step 4) for explaining IFWR. Results Results supported both study hypotheses: accumulated cost variables set (H1) and exhaustion variables set (H2) each significantly explained IFWR after the control/demographic and work attitude/perception variables sets. The most important correlate for explaining IFWR was higher physical exhaustion, but work exhaustion was also significant. It is not just physical “wear and tear”, but also “mental fatigue”, that can lead to IFWR for M & Bs. Being female, having more years in practice, and having higher continuing education costs were also significant correlates of IFWR. Conclusions Lower overall levels of work exhaustion, physical exhaustion, and IFWR were found in the present sample. However, since both types of exhaustion significantly and positively impact IFWR, taking sufficient time between massages and, if possible, varying one’s massage technique to replenish one’s physical and mental energy seem important. Failure to take required continuing education units, due to high costs, also increases risk for IFWR. Study limitations and future research issues are discussed. PMID:24000304

  10. Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Careers Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents ... to technicians and therapists. The NIH Office of Science Education has a Web site that lists and ...

  11. Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform

    E-print Network

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2011-01-01

    Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% ...

  12. The mental health of the UK Armed Forces: where facts meet fiction

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Elizabeth J. F.; Wessely, Simon; Jones, Norman; Rona, Roberto J.; Greenberg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    A substantial amount of research has been conducted into the mental health of the UK military in recent years. This article summarises the results of the various studies and offers possible explanations for differences in findings between the UK and other allied nations. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) rates are perhaps surprisingly low amongst British forces, with prevalence rates of around 4% in personnel who have deployed, rising to 6% in combat troops, despite the high tempo of operations in recent years. The rates in personnel currently on operations are consistently lower than these. Explanations for the lower PTSD prevalence in British troops include variations in combat exposures, demographic differences, higher leader to enlisted soldier ratios, shorter operational tour lengths and differences in access to long-term health care between countries. Delayed-onset PTSD was recently found to be more common than previously supposed, accounting for nearly half of all PTSD cases; however, many of these had sub-syndromal PTSD predating the onset of the full disorder. Rates of common mental health disorders in UK troops are similar or higher to those of the general population, and overall operational deployments are not associated with an increase in mental health problems in UK regular forces. However, there does appear to be a correlation between both deployment and increased alcohol misuse and post-deployment violence in combat troops. Unlike for regular forces, there is an overall association between deployment and mental health problems in Reservists. There have been growing concerns regarding mild traumatic brain injury, though this appears to be low in British troops with an overall prevalence of 4.4% in comparison with 15% in the US military. The current strategies for detection and treatment of mental health problems in British forces are also described. The stance of the UK military is that psychological welfare of troops is primarily a chain of command responsibility, aided by medical advice when necessary, and to this end uses third location decompression, stress briefings, and Trauma Risk Management approaches. Outpatient treatment is provided by Field Mental Health Teams and military Departments of Community Mental Health, whilst inpatient care is given in specific NHS hospitals. PMID:25206948

  13. An Exploration of the Working Alliance in Mental Health Case Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondrat, David C.; Early, Theresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The working alliance between clients and helpers has been identified as a common factor of treatment effectiveness, yet very little research has explored variables associated with working alliance between mental health case managers and their consumers. This study explored the potential covariates of working alliance within community mental health

  14. A Review of Health-Related Work Outcome Measures and Their Uses, and Recommended Measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin C. Amick; Debra Lerner; William H. Rogers; Ted Rooney; Jeffrey N. Katz

    2000-01-01

    Despite the growing recognition that work can contrib- ute to the development of musculoskeletal disorders, 1,8 there are almost no data on whether and how physicians investigate the contribution of work to patients' health status or the influence of health status on work perfor- mance. This is particularly true of primary care, where much of the medical care for patients

  15. Go For IT!: A Resource for Building America's Information Technology Work Force

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Commerce, partly as a result of the response to its recently published America's New Deficit: The Shortage of Information Technology Workers (discussed in the October 17, 1997 Scout Report), has created this site to aid in building and maintaining an information technology workforce. The key to the site is an IT work force program database, which lists education, employment, and training programs. The database is searchable by type of program, geography, sponsorship agency, and keyword. For an overview of the over 170 programs in the database at present, simply click on the Search button without using any of the options. Each entry contains address and contact information for the IT program, a hyperlink when available, and a detailed description of the program. The site will act as a resource clearinghouse for educators, companies, organizations, and individuals. Go for IT! actively solicits new programs for the database.

  16. Uranium mining and milling work force characteristics in the western US

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, D.A.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of the socioeconomic characteristics associated with 11 uranium mine and mill operations in 5 Western States. Comparisons are made with the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews for coal mines and utility plants in eight Western States. Worker productivity also is compared with that in similar types of coal and uranium mining operations. We found that there existed no significant differences between the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews and the secondary employment impacts associated with uranium mines and mills when compared with those associated with coal mines and utility plants requiring similar skills at comparable locations. In addition, our survey includes a comparison of several characteristics associated with the households of basic and nonbasic work forces and concludes that significant changes have occurred in the last 5 yr. Accordingly, we recommend additional monitoring and updating of data used in several economic forecasting models to avoid unwarranted delays in achieving national energy goals.

  17. Distraction: an assessment of smartphone usage in health care work settings

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Preetinder S; Kamath, Ashwini; Gill, Tejkaran S

    2012-01-01

    Smartphone use in health care work settings presents both opportunities and challenges. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and overuse are not kept in check. This practice-focused research paper examines the current panorama of health software applications. Findings from existing research are consolidated to elucidate the level and effects of distraction in health care work settings due to smartphone use. A conceptual framework for crafting guidelines to regulate the use of smartphones in health care work settings is then presented. Finally, specific guidelines are delineated to assist in creating policies for the use of smartphones in a health care workplace. PMID:22969308

  18. Child Health Inequality: Framing a Social Work Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Virginia Rondero; Montana, Salvador; Clarke, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies acknowledge that the well-being of our nation hinges on the health of its people. There is specific concern about children because they represent the future. Ignoring children's health needs can compromise their educational preparedness, occupational pursuits, productivity, and longevity. Current science demonstrates that…

  19. Mental Health Promotion and Work: Rumbalara Community's Roundtable Discussion 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoban, Rosemary

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between socioeconomic status and health is well established, with people at the lowest socioeconomic levels experiencing the highest rates of illnesses and death. While poverty, unemployment and limited access to adequate housing have a significant impact on the health and well being of the general population, Aboriginal people's…

  20. Spanning the Chasm: Corporate and Academic Cooperation To Improve Work-Force Preparation. Task Force on High-Performance Work and Workers: The Academic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum, Washington, DC.

    This study, conducted by a task force that interviewed corporate and campus officials at 10 corporations and 12 universities and colleges during 1994-96, examined how well undergraduate, graduate, and professional students in the United States are being prepared to meet the demands of the modern high-performance workplace. The study found…

  1. One health and force health protection during foreign humanitarian assistance operations: 2010 Pakistan flood relief.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ronald L

    2013-01-01

    Restrictions on the number of troops that could enter Pakistan in support of the 2010 flood relief efforts limited the type and number of deployed medical personnel. Although this created the potential for mission gaps, the assigned personnel were able to perform additional functions beyond those normally associated with their particular health specialty to help close these gaps, which was largely made possible due to prior cross-training and predeployment refresher training. Given the rapid and unpredictable nature of disaster response, future foreign humanitarian assistance operations may face similar issues with assigned personnel. Promotion of the One Health concept through instruction and training will help to increase awareness among US Army Medical Department personnel about the roles and functions of health specialties, facilitate the identification of critical gaps during deployments, and provide personnel with the knowledge and skills needed to address them. PMID:23277449

  2. Comparison of United States (NIOSH Lifting Guidelines) and European (ECSC Force Limits) Recommendations for Manual Work Limits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANDRIS FREIVALDS

    1987-01-01

    In the early 1980's two different guidelines for manual lifting were established: the NIOSH Work Practices Guide for Manual Lifting and the European Coal and Steel Community's Force Limits in Manual Work. A comparison of the two guidelines indicates some discrepancies in their predictive capabilities and a significant nonlinear relationship between the two limits. These discrepancies may be explained by

  3. Work Readiness: A New Promise in Minnesota's Education. Report of the Commissioner's Task Force on Education for Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    This report contains the recommendations made by Minnesota's Task Force on Education for Employment, which was established in 1986 to evaluate how well that state's K-12 educational system is preparing all students for work and whether students have equal access to work-related learning experiences. The following recommendations are made: (1) the…

  4. First Lady praises California for work in health care debate.

    PubMed

    Clinton, H R

    1993-01-01

    Hillary Rodham Clinton called California's health care delivery system a model for the nation during a live teleconference at the CAHHS Annual Meeting Oct. 13 in San Diego. In her first-ever address before a state hospital association, the first lady told nearly 1,000 people that California "has its own place of honor in the health care debate" and praised the state for being "years ahead of Washington (D.C.) in recognizing what's right about American health care." What follows is the transcript from her address. PMID:10130730

  5. The Australian Defence Force Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study: design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Hooff, Miranda Van; McFarlane, Alexander C.; Davies, Christopher E.; Searle, Amelia K.; Fairweather-Schmidt, A. Kate; Verhagen, Alan; Benassi, Helen; Hodson, Stephanie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Australian Defence Force (ADF) Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study (MHPWS) is the first study of mental disorder prevalence in an entire military population. Objective The MHPWS aims to establish mental disorder prevalence, refine current ADF mental health screening methods, and identify specific occupational factors that influence mental health. This paper describes the design, sampling strategies, and methodology used in this study. Method At Phase 1, approximately half of all regular Navy, Army, and Air Force personnel (n=24,481) completed self-report questionnaires. At Phase 2, a stratified sub-sample (n=1,798) completed a structured diagnostic interview to detect mental disorder. Based on data from non-responders, data were weighted to represent the entire ADF population (n=50,049). Results One in five ADF members met criteria for a 12-month mental disorder (22%). The most common disorder category was anxiety disorders (14.8%), followed by affective (9.5%) and alcohol disorders (5.2%). At risk ADF sub-groups were Army personnel, and those in the lower ranks. Deployment status did not have an impact on mental disorder rates. Conclusion This study has important implications for mental health service delivery for Australian and international military personnel as well as contemporary veterans. PMID:25206944

  6. School of Social Work Combined M.S.W. and M.P.H. Health Promotion Track (School of

    E-print Network

    Caughman, John

    School of Social Work Combined M.S.W. and M.P.H. Health Promotion Track (School of Community Health to complete at least 119 credits, which consists of 69 credits of Social Work and 50 credits of Public Health credits. SAMPLE COURSE OF STUDY: MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK/MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM ­ Health Promotion

  7. INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ FOOD SYSTEMS FOR HEALTH: FINDING INTERVENTIONS THAT WORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a short report of a “safari” held in conjunction with the International Congress of Nutrition in September, 2005, in Futululu, St. Lucia, South Africa. Participants were several members of the International Union of Nutritional Sciences Task Force on Indigenous Peoples’ Food Systems and Nutr...

  8. Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

  9. [Forecasting decrease in performance and health disorders under exposure to work intensity factors in accordance with work conditions class].

    PubMed

    Iushkova, O I; Matiukhin, V V; Bukhtiiarov, I V; Poroshenko, A S; Kapustina, A V; Kalinina, S A; Lagutina, G N

    2014-01-01

    Results of complex physiologic and ergonomic, clinical and functional studies helped to justify approaches to quantitative evaluation and assessment of posssible decrease in performance and health disorders in workers in accordance with work conditions class of mental work. Linear regression dependence was established between work intensity class and performance decrease. The linear regression equation obtained enables to calculate a percentage of performance decrease in various work intensity classes. Intensive direct correlation was revealed between work intensity value and a percentage of individuals with diagnosed occupationally induced diseases. PMID:25069271

  10. Different contexts, different effects? Work time and mental health in the United States and Germany.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, Sibyl; Schunck, Reinhard; Schömann, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    This paper takes a comparative approach to the topic of work time and health, asking whether weekly work hours matter for mental health. We hypothesize that these relationships differ within the United States and Germany, given the more regulated work time environments within Germany and the greater incentives to work long hours in the United States. We further hypothesize that German women will experience greatest penalties to long hours. We use data from the German Socioeconomic Panel and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine hours effects on mental health score at midlife. The results support our initial hypothesis. In Germany, longer work time is associated with worse mental health, while in the United States, as seen in previous research, the associations are more complex. Our results do not show greater mental health penalties for German women and suggest instead a selection effect into work hours operating by gender. PMID:25722127

  11. Health behavior, quality of work life, and organizational effectiveness in the lumber industry.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, S I; Sussman, S; Dent, C W; Severson, H H; Stoddard, J L

    1999-08-01

    A major incentive for work-site health promotion activities has been the promise of increased company profitability. Some critics have challenged the economic argument based on distal outcomes such as increased employee longevity and less morbidity later in life. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between employee health behavior, quality of work life, and proximal organizationally valued outcomes. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of employees working at Pacific Lumber Company (N = 146), the largest single-site lumber mill in California. Although employee sleep patterns predicted health care utilization and psychological well-being, for the most part employee health behaviors were not strong predictors of proximal organizational effectiveness factors. However, quality-of-work-life factors significantly predicted organizational commitment, absenteeism, and tardiness frequency. The findings suggest the value of improving the system of work in which employees are embedded as part of comprehensive work-site health promotion efforts. PMID:10435239

  12. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

  13. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

  14. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

  15. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

  16. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...establish and enforce occupational safety and health standards applicable to...

  17. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...establish and enforce occupational safety and health standards applicable to...

  18. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

  19. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...establish and enforce occupational safety and health standards applicable to...

  20. Characterization of the 1986 coal-mining work force. Information Circular/1988

    SciTech Connect

    Butani, S.J.; Bartholomew, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    In 1986, the Bureau of Mines conducted a probability sample survey, Mining Industry Population Survey, to measure such employee characteristics as occupation; principal equipment operated; work location at the mine; present job, present company, and total mining experience; job-related training during the last 2 years; age; sex; race; and education. The population estimates are necessary to properly analyze the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) injury (includes illness and fatality data) statistics; that is, to compare and contrast injury rates for various subpopulations in order to identify those groups that are exhibiting higher than average injury rates. The report uses the survey's results to characterize the U.S. coal mining workforce from March through September 1986.

  1. Serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin levels in Air Force health study participants - preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-24

    In 1978, the US Air Force responded to a congressional mandate to initiate an epidemiologic study of the possible health effects of exposure to herbicides and their 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) contaminants in Air Force veterans who served in the Ranch Hand defoliation operation during the Vietnam conflict. Accordingly, the Air Force conducted a nonconcurrent prospective study, the Air Force Health Study, of all 1267 members of the Ranch Hand unit and a series of matched controls. This phase of the Air Force study focused on measuring serum TCDD levels in 150 Ranch Hand veterans and 50 controls. All participants were enlisted men; the Ranch Hand veterans had been either herbicide loaders or herbicide specialists in Vietnam. The demographic and health characteristics of Ranch Hand personnel and controls were similar; however, their serum TCDD levels differed markedly.

  2. SIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern.

    E-print Network

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    . Fact Sheet 1. Students want health coverage that is fully compliant with the Affordable Care Act (ACASIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern even if they could afford it. 8. As students are having more difficulty finding affordable health care

  3. What Can Education Teach Child Mental Health Services? Practitioners' Perceptions of Training and Joint Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vostanis, Panos; O'Reilly, Michelle; Taylor, Helen; Day, Crispin; Street, Cathy; Wolpert, Miranda; Edwards, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The importance of joint working between educational and child mental health professionals is well documented but there are numerous challenges and only limited training models. While the evidence base and training programmes for educationalists regarding child mental health is growing, training mental health professionals about education is more…

  4. Angus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Angus Council Social Work Department

    E-print Network

    Mottram, Nigel

    Angus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Partners Angus Council Social Work Department Tayside Primary Care NHS Trust Overview A review of mental health services and Tayside Primary Care Trust have operated a joint community mental health service for older people

  5. New frontiers for diagnostic testing: taking advantage of forces changing health care.

    PubMed

    Allawi, S J; Hill, B T; Shah, N R

    1998-01-01

    The transformation of the health-care industry holds great economic potential for laboratory diagnostic testing providers who understand the five market forces driving change and who are shaping their own roles in the emerging market. Because of these trends, provider-based laboratories (PBLs) are competing with independent laboratories (ILs) for the latter's traditional client base--outpatients and nonpatients. PBLs will continue to service acute care patients while becoming more IL-like in logistics, sales, customer service, and marketing. Forced to compete on price, ILs have engaged in mega-mergers and will try to break into acute care via joint ventures. The ILs will need to choose their markets carefully, solidly integrate with parent organizations, and find ways to be profit centers. Consumers' demands also are forcing change. Consumers want accurate, legible bills and simplified eligibility determination and registration. They want an emphasis on prevention and wellness, which means that diagnostic testing must address early identification and monitoring of high-risk groups. To realize cost-efficiencies under whole-life capitation, laboratory networks must be part of a completely integrated health-care system. The laboratory of the future will be multicentered, without walls, and with quick access to information through technology. PMID:10178702

  6. Substance use disorder in the context of LGBT health: a social work perspective.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Anthony; Beatty, Rodger L; Friedman, M Reuel

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of public and private funding of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health research, the state of integration of LGBT health issues into the academic and professional training programs of health care practitioners, and the larger social reality experienced by LGBT people profoundly affect substance use and substance use disorders in those populations. This analysis uses a social work perspective and considers the current state of research, professional training, and social oppression as they affect the health of LGBT people. Suggestions for action are offered that may improve the health of LGBT peoples and the practice of social work. PMID:23731425

  7. Associations of psychosocial working conditions with self-rated general health and mental health among municipal employees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikko Laaksonen; Ossi Rahkonen; Pekka Martikainen; Eero Lahelma

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To examine associations of job demands and job control, procedural and relational organizational fairness, and physical work load with self-rated general health and mental health. In addition, the effect of occupational class on these associations is examined. Methods: The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study baseline surveys in 2001–2002. Respondents to cross-sectional postal surveys were middle-aged employees

  8. [Fragments of a health work genealogy: genealogy as a research technique].

    PubMed

    Nardi, Henrique Caetano; Tittoni, Jaqueline; Giannechini, Letícia; Ramminger, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    The article aims to explore the influence of health work in subjectification processes. The notion of history commonly used in health-related scientific output is based on an evolutionist and developmental logic. As a counterpoint, the genealogical approach used in this article and based on Michel Foucault highlights the notions of discontinuity, event, and the production of truth as tools to rethink the ethical and political implications involved in the production of knowledge, practices, and subjects. To illustrate these aspects we sketch a health work genealogy, specifically in the field of mental health and HIV/AIDS work. PMID:16021242

  9. [Human resources and health work: challenges for a research agenda].

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ada Avila; Belisário, Soraya Almeida; Campos, Francisco Eduardo; D'Avila, Luciana Souza

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses several key concepts for human resources policy in health in the context of Latin America's regional integration efforts. The article focuses on different concepts of integration to emphasize the analytical distinction between regional and conceptual integration. It also presents labor and human resources concepts before discussing, in the final analysis, the challenges that a common research agenda faces in the context of current health sector reforms in Latin America. The conclusion emphasizes the need to develop a technology and research system capable of supporting the agenda for exchange between MERCOSUR member countries. PMID:17625646

  10. Impact of School Staff Health on Work Productivity in Secondary Schools in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alker, Heather J.; Wang, Monica L.; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school…

  11. HIV and Sexual Health Working Group Guidelines on HIV and AIDS

    E-print Network

    Talbot, James P.

    1 July 2008 HIV and Sexual Health Working Group Guidelines on HIV and AIDS #12;2 Guidelines on HIV and AIDS These Guidelines have been prepared by the University's HIV and Sexual Health Working Group, which that will help Colleges and University institutions to establish their own specific policy on HIV and AIDS

  12. Health Workforce and International Migration: Can New Zealand Compete? OECD Health Working Papers No. 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurn, Pascal; Dumont, Jean-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines health workforce and migration policies in New Zealand, with a special focus on the international recruitment of doctors and nurses. The health workforce in New Zealand, as in all OECD countries, plays a central role in the health system. Nonetheless, maybe more than for any other OECD country, the health workforce in New…

  13. Towards a New Model of Work Based Learning in Health and Social Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela M. Irwin

    Wenger's (1998) conception of social participation as a process of learning is the most difficult, yet essential, characteristic of health related work based learning programmes to capture. Informed by a socio-cultural perspective, this integrative model of work based learning applies to any participant at any level in any work context. Background The resurgence of vocational and work based learning in

  14. Work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chorus, A; Miedema, H; Wevers, C; van der Linden, S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess separate and combined effects of work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).?METHODS—A cross sectional study was conducted in a Dutch nationwide random sample of 720 patients with RA. Information about work factors and behavioural coping was collected by a self-administered postal questionnaire. A broad variety of work factors and coping styles were evaluated separately and in combination using multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for sociodemographic and disease related variables. Attributable and preventable fractions were calculated from the combined analyses to assess the relative importance of the contributing factors.?RESULTS—Additional job training, equal career opportunities, letting the disease influence the choice of the current job position, and informing colleagues about having the disease were negatively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of decreasing the risk was adjusting job demands which accounted for 63% of the patients still in the labour force. Decreasing activities and diverting attention in order to cope with pain, and pacing in order to cope with limitations were the coping styles which were positively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of increasing the risk of withdrawal was pacing which accounted for 67% of the withdrawals.?CONCLUSION—Work factors are potentially important modifiable risk factors for withdrawal from the labour force in patients with RA. Behavioural coping is also relevant.?? PMID:11602473

  15. The incidence of medically reported work-related ill health in the UK construction industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Stocks; R. McNamee; M. Carder; R. M. Agius

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveSelf-reported work-related ill health (SWI) data show a high incidence of occupational ill health and a high burden of cancer attributable to occupational factors in the UK construction industry. However, there is little information on the incidence of medically reported work-related ill health (WRI) within this industry. This study aims to examine the incidence of WRI within the UK construction

  16. Working with the private sector for child health.

    PubMed

    Waters, Hugh; Hatt, Laurel; Peters, David

    2003-06-01

    Private sector providers are the most commonly consulted source of care for child illnesses in many countries, offering significant opportunities to expand the reach of essential child health services and products. Yet collaboration with private providers presents major challenges - the suitability and quality of the services they provide is often questionable and governments' capacity to regulate them is limited. This article assesses the actual and potential contributions of the private sector to child health, and classifies and evaluates public sector strategies to promote and rationalize the contributions of private sector actors. Governments and international organizations can use a variety of strategies to collaborate with and influence private sector actors to improve child health - including contracting, regulating, financing and social marketing, training, coordinating and informing the public. These mutually reinforcing strategies can both improve the quality of services currently delivered in the private sector, and expand and rationalize the coverage of these services. One lesson from this review is that the private sector is very heterogeneous. At the country level, feasible strategies depend on the potential of the different components of the private sector and the capacity of governments and their partners for collaboration. To date, experience with private sector strategies offers considerable promise for children's health, but also raises many questions about the feasibility and impact of these strategies. Where possible, future interventions should be designed as experiments, with careful assessment of the intervention design and the environment in which they are implemented. PMID:12740317

  17. The Health of First Year Students. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, J. Paul

    This study examined the self-assessed health status of college freshmen at York University (Ontario, Canada), a large commuter university in metropolitan Toronto, through an end-of-year survey of 1,856 first-year students. Results were compared with responses of undergraduate students at six other Canadian universities and with findings from the…

  18. Working together: spatial synchrony in the force and actin dynamics of podosome first neighbors.

    PubMed

    Proag, Amsha; Bouissou, Anaïs; Mangeat, Thomas; Voituriez, Raphaël; Delobelle, Patrick; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Poincloux, Renaud

    2015-04-28

    Podosomes are mechanosensitive adhesion cell structures that are capable of applying protrusive forces onto the extracellular environment. We have recently developed a method dedicated to the evaluation of the nanoscale forces that podosomes generate to protrude into the extracellular matrix. It consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the nanometer deformations produced by macrophages on a compliant Formvar membrane and has been called protrusion force microscopy (PFM). Here we perform time-lapse PFM experiments and investigate spatial correlations of force dynamics between podosome pairs. We use an automated procedure based on finite element simulations that extends the analysis of PFM experimental data to take into account podosome architecture and organization. We show that protrusion force varies in a synchronous manner for podosome first neighbors, a result that correlates with phase synchrony of core F-actin temporal oscillations. This dynamic spatial coordination between podosomes suggests a short-range interaction that regulates their mechanical activity. PMID:25791988

  19. The relationships between mothers' work pathways and physical and mental health.

    PubMed

    Frech, Adrianne; Damaske, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work, and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers' diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1979 (N = 2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first birth is associated with significantly better health at age 40 than part-time work, paid work interrupted by unemployment, and unpaid work in the home. Part-time workers with little unemployment report significantly better health at age 40 than mothers experiencing persistent unemployment. These relationships remain after accounting for the unequal selection of more advantaged mothers into full-time, continuous employment, suggesting full-time workers benefit from cumulating advantages across the life course and reiterating the need to disentangle health benefits associated with work from those associated with pre-pregnancy characteristics. PMID:23197483

  20. [The working process in the Family Health Strategy and its repercussions on the health-disease process].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Helena Eri; de Carvalho Junior, Daniel Alvão

    2012-09-01

    This study analyzes the perceptions that health workers engaged in the Family Heath Strategy (FHS) of the Federal District (FD) have of their own work process and its repercussions on the health-illness process. It is a cross-sectional descriptive survey carried out with a sample of 243 FHS/FD workers: 139 community health agents, 47 nursing assistants, 41 nurses, and 11 doctors. Four previously validated scales were used (Evaluation of Work Context, Human Cost at Work, Pain and Pleasure, Work Inventory and Risk of illness). The results revealed a highly Taylorised type of work process management typified by a sharp work distinction between formulators and performers, highly repetitive work tasks, performance supervision and very weak formal communication between the various hierarchical levels. These factors have seriously impaired the re-regulation of the work process by confronting current objective and subjective realities with pre-existing norms. In conclusion, the Taylorised work processes, the precarious working conditions and the specific difficulties associated with providing care to families and communities in their own territories are highly stressful and debilitating and underscore the need for improved management of the respective work processes. PMID:22996891

  1. How the health and community development sectors are combining forces to improve health and well-being.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Sandra; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

    2011-11-01

    The root causes of poor health experienced by many who live in low-income neighborhoods-such as the lack of access to health care, limited food choices, and exposure to environmental hazards-are well documented, but often go beyond the scope of the health care delivery system. But that is beginning to change. The health sector has begun to collaborate with the community development sector, which for decades has been working in low-income neighborhoods. Encouraging local and national examples of these new partnerships abound. They include an effort in Seattle, Washington, to reduce exposure to allergens and irritants among low-income asthmatic children, and a $500 million federal program to finance the operation of grocery stores in what have previously been urban "food deserts." To nurture such efforts, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Federal Reserve System, and others have sponsored a series of "healthy community" forums in US cities. In this article we explore the growing partnerships between the health and community development sectors as well as the challenges they face, and we offer policy recommendations that might help them succeed. PMID:22068394

  2. Competing conceptualizations of decent work at the intersection of health, social and economic discourses.

    PubMed

    Di Ruggiero, Erica; Cohen, Joanna E; Cole, Donald C; Forman, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), decent work is critical to economic and social progress and well-being. The ILO's Decent Work Agenda outlines four directions (creating jobs, guaranteeing rights at work, extending social protection, promoting social dialogue) (ILO, 2015). While the Agenda's existence may imply consensus about its meaning, we contend that several conceptualizations of decent work exist in the global policy arena. Different institutional perspectives must be negotiated, and political, economic, social and health considerations balanced in its pursuit. This paper reports findings from a critical discourse analysis of 10 policy texts that aimed to reveal different health, economic, and social claims about decent work and how these are shaped by the work policy agendas of the ILO, World Health Organization, and World Bank. Themes emerging from the discourse analysis include the: challenges and realities of promoting "one" agenda; complex intersection between decent work, health and health equity concepts; emphasis on economic and pro-market interests versus the social dimensions of work; and, relative emphasis on individual versus collective responsibility for decent work. To our knowledge, this is a first attempt to contrast different conceptualizations of decent work involving these institutions. Our findings suggest that decent work is a contested notion, and that more than one "agenda" is operating in the face of vested institutional interests. Broader discourses are contributing to a reframing of decent work in economic, social and/or health terms and these are impacting which dimensions of work are taken up in policy texts over others. Results show how the language of economics acts as a disciplinary and regulatory power and its role as a normalizing discourse. We call for research that deepens understanding of how a social, economic and health phenomenon like work is discursively re-interpreted through different global institutional interests. PMID:25864148

  3. Work-based social networks and health status among Japanese employees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E Suzuki; S Takao; S V Subramanian; H Doi; I Kawachi

    2009-01-01

    Background:Despite the worldwide trend towards more time being spent at work by employed people, few studies have examined the independent influences of work-based versus home-based social networks on employees’ health. We examined the association between work-based social networks and health status by controlling for home-based social networks in a cross-sectional study.Methods:By employing a two-stage stratified random sampling procedure, 1105 employees

  4. Is living near a coking works harmful to health? A study of industrial air pollution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R S Bhopal; P Phillimore; S Moffatt; C Foy

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether there was excess ill health in people living near a coking works, and if so whether it was related to exposure to coking works' emissions. DESIGN--Populations varying in proximity to the coking works were compared with control populations. Health data were correlated with available environmental data. METHODS--Analysis of routinely collected mortality, cancer registration, and birth statistics; community

  5. Black Women in the Labor Force. Facts on Working Women No. 90-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    During the 1980s, the population of black women aged 16 years and older in the United States increased by 17.2%, and labor force participation for black women increased by 29%. In 1987, black women accounted for 50% of total black employment. The unemployment rate for black teenagers in 1990 was 30% (versus 10.8% for all black women). Labor force

  6. How Can Magnetic Forces Do Work? Investigating the Problem with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students' reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been…

  7. Optical forces in nanoplasmonic systems: how do they work, what can they be useful for?

    PubMed

    Raziman, T V; Wolke, R J; Martin, O J F

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we share our vision for a future nanofactory, where plasmonic trapping is used to control the different manufacturing steps associated with the transformation of initial nanostructures to produce complex compounds. All the different functions existing in a traditional factory can be translated at the nanoscale using the optical forces produced by plasmonic nanostructures. A detailed knowledge of optical forces in plasmonic nanostructures is however essential to design such a nanofactory. To this end, we review the numerical techniques for computing optical forces on nanostructures immersed in a strong optical field and show under which conditions approximate solutions, like the dipole approximation, can be used in a satisfactory manner. Internal optical forces on realistic plasmonic antennas are investigated and the reconfiguration of a Fano-resonant plasmonic system using such internal forces is also studied in detail. PMID:25743413

  8. Empowerment in the field of health promotion: recognizing challenges in working toward equity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Nicole S; Murphy, Jill; Coser, Larissa

    2014-12-01

    Over the last 25 years, the language of empowerment has been woven into the guiding missions and descriptions of institutions, funding and projects globally. Although theoretical understandings of empowerment within the domain of health promotion remain contentious, we have little idea of how a shift toward an empowerment agenda has affected the daily work of those in the field of health promotion. A systematic examination of the implementation of the empowerment agenda is important as it can help us understand how redistributive agendas are received within the multiple institutional contexts in which health promotion work is carried out. The goal of this study, therefore, was to try to understand the empowerment agenda within the context of everyday health promotion. We conducted semi-structured interviews with health promoters from a variety of geographical regions, institutional backgrounds, and job capacities. Essentially we found that empowerment remains conceptually dear to health promoters' understanding of their work, yet at the same time, mainstreaming empowerment is at odds with central trends and initiatives that govern this work. We argue that many of the stumbling blocks that have hindered this specific agenda are actually central stumbling blocks for the wider field of health promotion. We examine some of the barriers to implementing transformational change. Overcoming the primary limitations uncovered in this exploration of empowerment is actually crucial to progressive work in health promotion in general, particularly work that would seek to lessen inequities. PMID:24812101

  9. Psychosocial Work Characteristics Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Functioning in Rural Women: The Wisconsin Rural Women's Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikani, Vatsal; Reding, Douglas; Gunderson, Paul; McCarty, Catherine A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between psychosocial work characteristics and health functioning and cardiovascular disease risk factors among rural women of central Wisconsin and compare psychosocial work characteristics between farm and nonfarm women. Methods: Stratified sampling was used to select a…

  10. Making EMRs really work: the Southeast Health Center experience.

    PubMed

    Townes, P G; Benson, D S; Johnston, P; Vaughn, C

    2000-04-01

    While electronic medical records (EMRs) have long held the promise of improved efficiency and quality, they have not yet made significant inroads into ambulatory care. One reason may be attempted EMR implementation in "old paradigm" clinic models. Southeast Health Center (SEHC) in Indianapolis, Indiana, began by reengineering its clinic procedures; only then did staff look for a computerized record. Because the new clinic model meshed nicely with the design of a relatively new EMR, a joint project was undertaken to test this EMR in SEHC's unique environment. This article details the reengineering, EMR implementation, project dynamics, results, and lessons learned. PMID:10848392

  11. Integration of peer specialists working in mental health service settings.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Wendy; Bellinger, Jillian; Stevens-Manser, Stacey; Kaufman, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Peer specialists are people in recovery employed to share their experiences to promote the recovery of others affected by mental illness. Examining workplace integration indicators that predict the job satisfaction of peer specialists employed in a variety of behavioral health settings is critical to ensure the retention and effectiveness of this viable workforce. A survey of Texas Certified Peer Specialists (n = 86) examined workplace integration indicators. Results suggest that supervisor's understanding of the peer specialist job role has a significant impact on job satisfaction. Better workforce integration may be achieved through targeted efforts to educate supervisors about peer specialist job roles. PMID:25672842

  12. Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Work-Rest Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    BHP Program Element Goal: Identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration and return to terrestrial life. BHP Requirements: a) Characterize and assess risks (e.g., likelihood and consequences). b) Develop tools and technologies to prevent, monitor, and treat adverse outcomes. c) Inform standards. d) Develop technologies to: 1) reduce risks and human systems resource requirements (e.g., crew time, mass, volume, power) and 2) ensure effective human-system integration across exploration mission.

  13. A Measurement of the Effectiveness of the Airway Science Program To Meet Federal Aviation Administration Work Force Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Brent D.

    This paper examines why the Airway Science Program, initiated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to develop college-educated and technically prepared personnel for FAA employment (primarily for air traffic control), has failed to meet its work force goals. Research data were gathered from interviews with Airway Science Program…

  14. Force, Velocity, and Work: The Effects of Different Contexts on Students' Understanding of Vector Concepts Using Isomorphic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2014-01-01

    In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test…

  15. Transforming consumer health informatics through a patient work framework: connecting patients to context.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Rupa S; Holden, Richard J; Novak, Laurie L; Veinot, Tiffany C

    2015-01-01

    Designing patient-centered consumer health informatics (CHI) applications requires understanding and creating alignment with patients' and their family members' health-related activities, referred to here as 'patient work'. A patient work approach to CHI draws on medical social science and human factors engineering models and simultaneously attends to patients, their family members, activities, and context. A patient work approach extends existing approaches to CHI design that are responsive to patients' biomedical realities and personal skills and behaviors. It focuses on the embeddedness of patients' health management in larger processes and contexts and prioritizes patients' perspectives on illness management. Future research is required to advance (1) theories of patient work, (2) methods for assessing patient work, and (3) techniques for translating knowledge of patient work into CHI application design. Advancing a patient work approach within CHI is integral to developing and deploying consumer-facing technologies that are integrated with patients' everyday lives. PMID:25125685

  16. Kids Health: How the Body Works - Nervous System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-11-20

    How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the nervous system.

  17. Kids Health: How the Body Works - Immune Cells

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-11-20

    How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the immune system.

  18. Kids Health: How the Body Works - Respiratory System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-11-20

    How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the respiratory system.

  19. Kids Health: How the Body Works - Circulatory System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-11-20

    How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the cardiovascular system.

  20. Kids Health: How the Body Works - Muscular System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-11-20

    How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the muscular system.

  1. Occupational Health and Safety Checklist Home Based Work

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    . Chemicals Identify chemical hazards associated with work and any control measures required to prevent injury. Have relevant material safety data sheets available. Slip/trip hazards Check all steps, mats, floor surfaces for slip/trip hazards and rectify. First aid Ensure adequate first aid products are readily

  2. Kids Health: How the Body Works - Endocrine System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-11-20

    How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the endocrine system.

  3. Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Lindsay R.; Shippee, Tetyana P.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women's health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective…

  4. First aid at work The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as

    E-print Network

    Romano, Daniela

    First aid at work The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as amended) Guidance approval of the amended Regulations. First aid at work (Advance copy) 1 #12;© Crown copyright 2013 First to this guidance. First aid at work (Advance copy) 2 #12;Contents Preface Introduction Regulation 1 Citation

  5. Making Program Assessment Work: A Profile of the U.S. Air Force Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millis, Barbara J.; Lowe, James K.; Aretz, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the three levels of course and program assessment present at the U.S. Air Force Academy, including assessment at the course, departmental, and institutional levels. Points out common elements useful to all assessment efforts. (EV)

  6. Indonesian experts' perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Setiyawati, Diana; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Mental health is a critical issue in Indonesia, since its population ranks among the top five in the world and the prevalence of common mental disorders is 11.6% of the adult population. However, the need to build an effective mental health-care system that is accessible to the whole population has only been recently addressed. The Aceh tsunami in 2004 brought to the forefront an unexpected window of opportunity to build a mental health-care system. Integration of mental health care into primary health care is a key strategy to close the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. Existing integration of psychologists into primary health care is a big step to meet the shortage of mental health-care specialists. As primary mental health care is an emerging field, the perspectives of Indonesian experts on Indonesian mental health care are needed to develop a curriculum for training psychologists to work in primary health care. In this study, data have been collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 Indonesian mental health experts, and three focus group discussions with 26 psychologists. Overall, experts agreed that to be able to work in primary health-care psychologists should have roles and training ranging from clinical to advocacy skills. Participants also agreed that psychologists should work in the community and contribute to primary health care as service providers and that strong collaborations between psychologists and other primary health-care providers are the key; these can be developed partly through referral and by respecting each other's unique strengths. PMID:25750806

  7. Information needs and seeking behaviour among health professionals working at public hospital and health centres in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Universal access to information for health professionals is a need to achieve “health for all strategy.” A large proportion of the population including health professionals have limited access to health information in resource limited countries. The aim of this study is to assess information needs among Ethiopian health professionals. Methods A cross sectional quantitative study design complemented with qualitative method was conducted among 350 health care workers in Feburary26-June5/2012. Pretested self-administered questionnaire and observation checklist were used to collect data on different variables. Data entry and data analysis were done using Epi-Info version 3.5.1 and by SPSS version19, respectively. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were applied to describe study objectives and identify the determinants of information seeking behaviours respectively. Odds ratio with 95% CI was used to assess the association between a factor and an outcome variable. Results The majority of the respondents acknowledged the need of health information to their routine activities. About 54.0% of respondents lacked access to health information. Only 42.8% of respondents have access to internet sources. Important barriers to access information were geographical, organizational, personal, economic, educational status and time. About 58.0% of the respondents accessed information by referring their hard copies and asking senior staff. Age, sex, income, computer literacy and access, patient size, work experience and working site were significantly associated with information needs and seeking behaviour. Conclusions The health information seeking behaviour of health professional was significant. The heaklth facilities had neither informationcenter such as library, nor internet facilities. Conducting training on managing health information, accessing computer and improving infrastructures are important interventions to facilitate evidence based descions. PMID:24373296

  8. Health promotion and surveillance: the establishment of an IUHPE global working group.

    PubMed

    Campostrini, Stefano; McQueen, David V; Evans, Linnea

    2009-12-01

    Following a series of international meetings on behavioral monitoring and surveillance, in 2007 the Italian Ministry of Health (Ministerio della Salute) and the Institute for Health (Istituto Superiore della Sanità) hosted the 5(th) International Conference on Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance (BRFS) in Rome. A key focus of the conference was on how current surveillance systems could be applied to the field of health promotion, particularly in building the evidence base for health promotion practice. As a result of these discussions, the World Alliance for Risk Factor Surveillance (WARFS), an IUHPE Global Working Group, was formed to work toward providing knowledge and expertise in surveillance as a tool for advancing health promotion. For those IUHPE members interested in participation, this article provides an overview on the strategic direction of WARFS and the newly formed sub-working groups. PMID:20028670

  9. Human health and the water environment: using the DPSEEA framework to identify the driving forces of disease.

    PubMed

    Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-01-15

    There is a growing awareness of global forces that threaten human health via the water environment. A better understanding of the dynamic between human health and the water environment would enable prediction of the significant driving forces and effective strategies for coping with or preventing them. This report details the use of the Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (DPSEEA) framework to explore the linkage between water-related diseases and their significant driving forces. The DPSEEA frameworks indicate that a select group of driving forces, including population growth, agriculture, infrastructure (dams and irrigation), and climate change, is at the root cause of key global disease burdens. Construction of the DPSEEA frameworks also allows for the evaluation of public health interventions. Sanitation was found to be a widely applicable and effective intervention, targeting the driver/pressure linkage of most of the water-related diseases examined. Ultimately, the DPSEEA frameworks offer a platform for constituents in both the health and environmental fields to collaborate and commit to a common goal targeting the same driving forces. PMID:24036221

  10. [Lime workers' perception of work-related health-disease process, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Silva, Cheila Portela; Rodrigues, Angelo Brito; Dias, Maria Socorro de Araújo

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the perception of lime factory workers regarding work-related health-disease process. Data were collected from ten workers through non-structured observation and semi-structured interviews conducted in lime factories in the state of Ceará, Northeastern Brazil, in December 2005. Lime workers did not perceive themselves as being at risk for serious health outcomes, which has led them not to develop health promotion actions. PMID:17923907

  11. Preparing Social Work Students for Interprofessional Practice in Geriatric Health Care: Insights from Two Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifas, Robin P.; Gray, Amanda K.

    2013-01-01

    Although several interprofessional education projects have addressed training allied health students for effective teamwork in geriatrics, few curriculum evaluation studies have examined differences in learning outcomes between interprofessional and traditional uniprofessional approaches, especially for social work students. This paper compares…

  12. Health and safety consequences of shift work in the food processing industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL J. SMITH; MICHAEL J. COLLIGAN; DONALD L. TASTO

    1982-01-01

    Both a questionnaire survey and an evaluation of health and safety records were used to characterize the health and safety consequences of day versus afternoon, night and rotating shifts for approximately 1000 food processing workers. Relative to the day workers, the results indicated that those on shift work, particularly rotating and night shifts, showed greater adverse effects. These included poorer

  13. Working in permanent hypoxia for fire protection--impact on health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Angerer; Dennis Nowak

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. A new technique to prevent fires is continuous exchange of oxygen with nitrogen which leads to an oxygen concentration of between 15% and 13% in the ambient air. This paper reviews the effect of short-term, intermittent hypoxia on health and performance of people working in such atmospheres. Methods. We reviewed the effect of ambient air hypoxia on human health

  14. Liaison Problems among Infant Psychiatry, Psychology, Pediatrics, Nursing, and Social Work in Infant Mental Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bry, Thea

    Discussed are attempts made by staff at the Community Mental Health Center of the New Jersey School of Medicine to develop an ongoing working relationship with pediatric neonatologists, house staff, and nursing staff in order to promote their attunement to mental health needs and obtain access to their expertise. After a description of the center…

  15. The Health of Women at Work. A Bibliography. Occasional Papers No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Vilma R.

    Both English and foreign language articles and books, most of them published since 1950, are cited in this bibliography on the health of women in the workplace. Citations were selected to represent the efforts that have been made by health professionals, statisticians, historians, and social scientists in this area. The designation "at work"…

  16. Mental Health Workforce Change through Social Work Education: A California Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Gwen; Morris, Meghan Brenna; Sirojudin, Sirojudin

    2013-01-01

    The 2004 California Mental Health Services Act requires large-scale system change in the public mental health system through a shift to recovery-oriented services for diverse populations. This article describes an innovative strategy for workforce recruitment and retention to create and sustain these systemic changes. The California Social Work

  17. Bachelor of Social Work Students and Mental Health Stigma: Understanding Student Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellmann, Karen T.; Madden, Elissa E.; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Bachelor-level social work students (n = 198) at a midsized Midwestern public university were surveyed to evaluate their attitudes toward those with mental health concerns. Additionally, students were surveyed regarding their willingness to seek treatment for their own mental health needs. Results of the analyses suggest that the majority of…

  18. The Community Health Worker. Working Guide. Guidelines for Training. Guidelines for Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This book is a revised and enlarged edition of "The Primary Health Worker," a standard teaching text and reference manual developed for community health workers and their trainers and supervisors. The new edition has been updated with practical knowledge gained during the extensive field use of the previous work. The book also incorporates new…

  19. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

  20. The work of language interpretation in health care: complex, challenging, exhausting, and often invisible.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Liz; Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K; Estrada, Robin Dawson

    2011-04-01

    The value of qualified language interpretation services for limited-English-proficient patients is gaining increasing recognition by policy makers and researchers in the United States. Yet the actual work experiences of health care interpreters have not been adequately studied. The purpose of this qualitative research was to explore the work experiences of formal and informal interpreters (n = 27). The core narrative finding from the interview data was the complex, challenging, exhausting, and often invisible work of language interpretation. Critical examination of health care interpreters' complex work and interactions with patients, providers, and administrators is needed to provide more effective and integrated services for limited-English proficient patients. PMID:21317402

  1. Health Inequalities among Workers with a Foreign Background in Sweden: Do Working Conditions Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Dunlavy, Andrea C.; Rostila, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Employment and working conditions are key social determinants of health, yet current information is lacking regarding relationships between foreign background status, working conditions and health among workers in Sweden. This study utilized cross-sectional data from the 2010 Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Level of Living Survey for Foreign Born Persons and their Children (LNU-UFB) to assess whether or not health inequalities exist between native Swedish and foreign background workers and if exposure to adverse psychosocial and physical working conditions contributes to the risk for poor health among foreign background workers. A sub-sample of 4,021 employed individuals aged 18–65 was analyzed using logistic regression. Eastern European, Latin American and Other Non-Western workers had an increased risk of both poor self-rated health and mental distress compared to native Swedish workers. Exposure to adverse working conditions only minimally influenced the risk of poor health. Further research should examine workers who are less integrated or who have less secure labor market attachments and also investigate how additional working conditions may influence associations between health and foreign background status. PMID:23846669

  2. Consumer Health: Does Advertising Work on You? and Evaluating a Product's Health Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Carolyn C.

    This paper describes lessons for teaching middle and high school students how to determine if they are influenced by the power of advertising and how to evaluate a product's health claims. To determine the influence of advertising, teachers have high school students discuss what their latest health product/service purchase was, why they bought it,…

  3. Psychosocial work characteristics and self rated health in four post-communist countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H Pikhart; M Bobak; J Siegrist; A Pajak; S Rywik; J Kyshegyi; A Gostautas; Z Skodova; M Marmot

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVESTo examine whether psychosocial factors at work are related to self rated health in post-communist countries.DESIGN AND SETTINGSRandom samples of men and women in five communities in four countries were sent a postal questionnaire (Poland, Czech Republic and Lithuania) or were invited to an interview (Hungary). Working subjects (n=3941) reported their self rated health in the past 12 months

  4. Productivity loss in the workforce: associations with health, work demands, and individual characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seyed Mohammad Alavinia; Duco Molenaar; Alex Burdorf

    2009-01-01

    Background Decreasedproductivityatworkisanimportantconsequenceofthepresence of health problems at work. Methods The study population consisted of 2,252 workers in 24 different companies in The Netherlands in 2005-2006 (response 56%). Self-reported loss of productivity on the previous workday was measured on a 10-point numerical rating scale by the Quantity and Qualitymethod.Logisticregressionanalysiswasusedtoexploretheassociationsbetween work demands, health problems, individual characteristics, and lifestyle factors with the occurrence of

  5. UNRWA and the health of Palestinian refugees. United Nations Relief and Works Agency.

    PubMed

    Lilienfield, L S; Rose, J C; Corn, M

    1986-08-28

    The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine refugees (UNRWA) has provided health, education, and welfare services since 1949. A team of physicians from Georgetown University visited UNRWA Health Centers and refugee camps in Jordan, Lebanon, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip, as well as some affiliated hospitals. Living conditions of refugees vary widely. In Jordan and the West Bank, fewer than one third live in camps, whereas in the Gaza Strip and Lebanon, conditions are more crowded. Effective programs for health education, maternal and child health, and immunization have markedly improved the health of the refugees over the years of UNRWA's operation. The general health of the population is good, primarily as a result of wise emphasis on public health and preventive medicine measures. PMID:3736649

  6. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and...

  7. 48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and...

  8. 41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

  9. 41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

  10. 41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

  11. 41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

  12. 41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

  13. Fertility and Female Work Force Participation in Bangladesh: Causality and Cointegration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Hossain; Clement A. Tisdell

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the causal links between fertility and female labor force participation in Bangladesh over the period 1974-2000 by specifying a bivariate and several trivariate models in a vector error correction framework. The three trivariate models alternatively include average age at first marriage for females, per capita GDP and infant mortality rate, which control for the effects of other

  14. Computation of electromagnetic force densities: Maxwell stress tensor vs. virtual work principle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francois Henrotte; Kay Hameyer

    2004-01-01

    A couple of fundamental formulae are demonstrated in this paper, which allow a systematic algebraic derivation of local electromagnetic forces in any material, starting from the expression of the energy density of that material. The derivation can be achieved in terms of vector and tensor analysis notions exclusively, provided the distinction is properly made between fields that are `flux densities'

  15. Computation of electromagnetic force densities: Maxwell stress tensor vs. virtual work principle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François Henrotte; Kay Hameyer

    2004-01-01

    A couple of fundamental formulae are demonstrated in this paper, which allow a systematic algebraic derivation of local electromagnetic forces in any material, starting from the expression of the energy density of that material. The derivation can be achieved in terms of vector and tensor analysis notions exclusively, provided the distinction is properly made between fields that are ‘flux densities’

  16. Social work services in home health care: challenges for the new prospective payment system era.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Seon

    2002-01-01

    The implementation of the Prospective Payment System (PPS) provides a unique opportunity for social workers to be better integrated into home health care. To do so, it is important for social workers to define their roles and eliminate any barriers to providing social workers services, which may improve patient outcomes. Two focus groups with home health nurses (n = 10) and social workers (n = 8) were conducted in a large urban home health agency to define social work roles and identify barriers to providing social work services. This paper categorizes the barriers to providing social work services into informational, systems/organizational, and inter-professional barriers and presents possible solutions to these barriers as home health agencies strive to provide care under PPS. PMID:12371790

  17. The Relationships between Mothers' Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frech, Adrianne; Damaske, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work, and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers' diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1979 (N = 2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first…

  18. Effects of vacation from work on health and well-being: Lots of fun, quickly gone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica de Bloom; Sabine A. E. Geurts; Toon W. Taris; Sabine Sonnentag; Carolina de Weerth; Michiel A. J. Kompier

    2010-01-01

    Although vacation from work provides a valuable opportunity for recovery, few studies have met the requirements for assessing its effects. These include taking measurements well ahead of the vacation, during the vacation and at several points in time afterwards. Our study on vacation (after-) effects focused on two related questions: (1) Do health and well-being of working individuals improve during

  19. Partner Violence and Survivors' Chronic Health Problems: Informing Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macy, Rebecca J.; Ferron, Joelle; Crosby, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Although most social work professionals may expect that women who experience partner violence will sustain acute physical injuries, social workers may be less knowledgeable about the chronic health problems with which violence survivors often struggle. To inform social work practice, we reviewed and synthesized the recently published research on…

  20. Work Stressors, Health and Sense of Coherence in UK Academic Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinman, Gail

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships between job-specific stressors and psychological and physical health symptoms in academic employees working in UK universities. The study also tests the main and moderating role played by sense of coherence (SOC: Antonovsky, 1987 in work stress process). SOC is described as a generalised resistance…

  1. Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models. PMID:23327287

  2. Working on the Edge: Stresses and Rewards of Work in a Front-line Mental Health Service.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Gillian Elaine; Smith, Joanna Christina Elizabeth; Parker, Pamela Anne; Boxall, Matthew James Christian

    2014-07-18

    This study sought to investigate frontline mental health professionals' perceptions of work stress and the rewards and demands associated with their work. Locally known as 'linkworkers', and from a variety of professional backgrounds, these staff worked mainly in general practice settings. Individual interviews were conducted with nine linkworkers, and the interview transcripts were analysed thematically. The main themes identified were the following: demands, coping, individual resilience, ownership and creativity, boundaries, secure base and service philosophy and ethos. Themes, categories and sub categories were presented and discussed with seven of the linkworkers in two focus groups. Focus group transcripts were analysed, and additional themes of recognizing limitations, disillusionment and the dilemma of setting boundaries were identified. These themes overlapped with those previously identified but were associated with service changes over time. The themes of ownership and creativity and service philosophy and ethos are significant, not only in relation to their impact on individual linkworkers but also in terms of their relevance for establishing and maintaining morale, engagement and a reflective culture within a service. The relevance of this work to accessible and newly developing mental health services is considered. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25044605

  3. Cellular Tug-of-War: Forces at Work and DNA Stretching in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Brian; Kilfoil, Maria L.

    2013-03-01

    In the microscopic world of the cell dominated by thermal noise, a cell must be able to successfully segregate its DNA with high fidelity in order to pass its genetic information on to its progeny. In this process of mitosis in eukaryotes, driving forces act on the cytoskeleton-based architecture called the mitotic spindle to promote this division. Our preliminary data demonstrates that the dynamics of this process in yeast cells is universal. Moreover, the dynamics suggest an increasing load as the chromosomes are pulled apart. To investigate this, we use three-dimensional imaging to track the dynamics of the poles of this architecture and the points of attachment to chromosomes simultaneously and with high spatial resolution. We analyze the relative motions of chromosomes as they are organized before segregation and as they are pulled apart, using this data to investigate the force-response behavior of this cytoskeleton-chromosome polymer system.

  4. Worker participation in an integrated health promotion/health protection program: results from the WellWorks project.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, G; Stoddard, A; Ockene, J K; Hunt, M K; Youngstrom, R

    1996-05-01

    According to prior reports, blue-collar workers are less likely to participate in worksite health promotion programs than are white-collar workers. This study examined worker participation in the WellWorks worksite cancer prevention intervention, which integrated health promotion and health protection. Analyses were conducted to assess relationships among participation in health promotion and health protection programs, and workers' perceptions of management changes to reduce potential occupational exposures. Results indicate that blue-collar workers were less likely to report participating in health promotion activities than white-collar workers. A significant association was observed between participation in nutrition- and exposure-related activities, suggesting that participation in programs to reduce exposures to occupational hazards might contribute to blue-collar workers' participation in health promotion activities. Furthermore, when workers were aware of changes their employer had made to reduce exposures to occupational hazards, they were more likely to participate in both smoking control and nutrition activities, even when controlling for job category. These findings have clear implications for future worksite cancer prevention efforts. PMID:8744872

  5. Type of Work Matters: Women's Labor Force Participation and the Child Sex Ratio in Turkey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GÜnseli Berik; Cihan Bilginsoy

    2000-01-01

    Province-level census data for 1985 and 1990 from Turkey are used to examine the effect of the economic value of women on the 0–9 cohort population sex ratio. The sex ratio is interpreted as an indicator of the relative life chances of girls, reflecting their relative neglect in the household. We test two hypotheses: women’s labor force participation lowers the

  6. Home-based work, human capital accumulation and women's labor force participation

    E-print Network

    Chutubtim, Piyaluk

    2006-10-30

    -Hendrey (2002)?s Specification Using Census 2000??????????????????????. 81 5 Estimates of Rates of Wage Growth, by Experience, Race, Education and Occupation ?????????????????????????. 82 6 Percentage of Women Returning to the Labor Market after... Having a Child ??????????????????????????? 84 7 The Number of Women with Children and the Assigned Years Out of the Labor Force per Child ????????????????... 85 8 Estimates of Rates of Decay, by Age and Occupation ????????.. 86 9 Women...

  7. This work is supported in part by Wright Laboratory Avionics Director-ate, Air Force Material Command, USAF, under grant #F33615-94-1-

    E-print Network

    Wood, David A.

    . This work is supported in part by Wright Laboratory Avionics Director- ate, Air Force Material representing the official policies or endorse- ments, either expressed or implied, of the Wright Laboratory,babak,markhill,david}@cs.wisc.edu . This work is supported in part by Wright Laboratory Avionics Directorate, Air Force Material Command, USAF

  8. This work is supported in part by Wright Laboratory Avionics Director ate, Air Force Material Command, USAF, under grant #F33615941

    E-print Network

    Hill, Mark D.

    . This work is supported in part by Wright Laboratory Avionics Director­ ate, Air Force Material representing the official policies or endorse­ ments, either expressed or implied, of the Wright Laboratory,babak,markhill,david}@cs.wisc.edu . This work is supported in part by Wright Laboratory Avionics Directorate, Air Force Material Command, USAF

  9. WORK LIFE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH: THE EXPERIENCES OF THAI WOMEN IN DEPRIVED COMMUNITIES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darunee Jongudomkarn; Bernice West

    2004-01-01

    I discuss women's work life and the psychological health of women in low-income communities in Northeast Thailand. Previous research has shown that low-income women are part of a disadvantaged group who struggle against several problems in their everyday life, and who work hard to survive. These women worked as either manual laborers in agriculture or factories or as self-employed vendors,

  10. Supervisory behaviour as a predictor of return to work in employees absent from work due to mental health problems

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuijsen, K; Verbeek, J; de Boer, A G E M; Blonk, R; van Dijk, F J H

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To study supervisory behaviour as a predictive factor for return to work of employees absent due to mental health problems; and to explore the association between conditional factors and supervisory behaviour. Methods: Eighty five supervisors of employees were interviewed by telephone. Questionnaires providing information on person related factors, depressive symptoms, and sickness absence were sent to the employees at baseline, three months, six months, and after one year. Three aspects of supervisory behaviour during the period of absence were measured: communication with the employee, promoting gradual return to work, and consulting of other professionals. Results: Better communication between supervisor and employee was associated with time to full return to work in non-depressed employees. For employees with a high level of depressive symptoms, this association could not be established. Consulting other professionals more often was associated with a longer duration of the sickness absence for both full and partial return to work. If sickness absence had financial consequences for the department, the supervisor was more likely to communicate frequently with the employee. Supervisors who were responsible for return to work in their organisation were more likely to communicate better and to consult more often with other professionals. Conclusion: Supervisors should communicate more frequently with employees during sickness absence as well as hold follow up meetings more often as this is associated with a faster return to work in those employees. PMID:15377767

  11. Nontraditional work factors in farmworker adolescent populations: implications for health research and interventions.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sara R; Cooper, Sharon P; Felknor, Sarah S; Santana, Vilma S; Fischer, Frida M; Shipp, Eva M; Vela Acosta, Martha S

    2005-01-01

    Agriculture has been documented to be one of the most hazardous work environments for both adults and children. Adolescents may be especially vulnerable to adverse health effects from agricultural exposures due to the rapid growth and development experienced during those years. Separating the occupational, economic, and social issues in this population is difficult. Weak regulatory protection, lack of compliance with existing regulations, and gaps in service provision characterize the working conditions of adolescent farmworkers. Although there is increasing research on the impact of work organization on mental and physical health in adult working populations, there is a scarcity of research focused on this concept in young workers--and it remains virtually unaddressed in young farmworkers. Work characteristics of the informal work sector, better delineated in international literature, should be considered when planning research or interventions in this at-risk population. Further, the population of adolescent farmworkers is diverse, and research strategies and interventions need to be targeted and tailored to the heterogeneous groups. This article addresses some of the nontraditional work factors associated with the less-than-formal work organization and environments in the farmworker adolescent population and how these factors may inform the planning of research and interventions. Specifically, mobility, cultural patterns and social networks, alternative sampling strategies, alternative delivery of health care and education, and involvement of a wide range of players in the work environment of adolescent farmworkers should all be considered when conducting research or planning programs for this population. PMID:16350332

  12. International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators.

    PubMed

    Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Kallioniemi, Marja; Lundqvist, Peter; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Stallones, Lorann; Brumby, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective. PMID:23844791

  13. Social stressors at work, sleep quality and psychosomatic health complaints--a longitudinal ambulatory field study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Diana; Elfering, Achim

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that occupational stress increases psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The present longitudinal actigraphy field study investigated the role of sleep quality--objectively assessed sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and sleep fragmentation, and subjectively assessed sleep quality--as a mediator in the relationship between stressful work conditions at time 1 and psychosomatic health complaints at time 2. A longitudinal hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were positively related to objectively assessed sleep fragmentation and to psychosomatic health complaints. Moreover, objectively assessed sleep fragmentation mediated the effect of social stressors at work on psychosomatic health complaints. Contrary to our expectations, social stressors at work were not related to other sleep quality parameters (i.e. sleep-onset latency, sleep efficiency and subjectively assessed sleep quality) during follow-up. Sleep fragmentation is discussed as an important consequence of social stressors at work that increase the risk of psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. PMID:23824588

  14. Networking between community health programs: a team-work approach to improving health service provision

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Networking between non-government organisations in the health sector is recognised as an effective method of improving service delivery. The Uttarakhand Cluster was established in 2008 as a collaboration of community health programs in rural north India with the aim of building capacity, increasing visibility and improving linkages with the government. This qualitative research, conducted between 2011-2012, examined the factors contributing to formation and sustainability of this clustering approach. Methods Annual focus group discussions, indicator surveys and participant observation were used to document and observe the factors involved in the formation and sustainability of an NGO network in North India. Results The analysis demonstrated that relationships were central to the formation and sustainability of the cluster. The elements of small group relationships: forming, storming, norming and performing emerged as a helpful way to describe the phases which have contributed to the functioning of this network with common values, strong leadership, resource sharing and visible progress encouraging the ongoing commitment of programs to the network goals. Conclusions In conclusion, this case study demonstrates an example of a successful and effective network of community health programs. The development of relationships was seen to be to be an important part of promoting effective resource sharing, training opportunities, government networking and resource mobilisation and will be important for other health networks to consider. PMID:25015212

  15. CFD analysis and experimental work on water impact forces on transverse sections of planing craft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Tveitnes; K. S. Varyani; A. C. Fairlie-Clarke

    The water entry problem has been studied using both CFD analysis and model experimental work. The CFD results from this study are compared with the experimental results and with results obtained by others from experimental work and from numerical and semi-analytical methods. This comparison shows good agreement between the present CFD results and those obtained by other methods for estimating

  16. Investigating shoulder muscle loading and exerted forces during wall painting tasks: influence of gender, work height and paint tool design.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Patricia M; Chopp, Jaclyn N; Dickerson, Clark R

    2014-07-01

    The task of wall painting produces considerable risk to the workers, both male and female, primarily in the development of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Insufficient information is currently available regarding the potential benefits of using different paint roller designs or the possible adverse effects of painting at different work heights. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of gender, work height, and paint tool design on shoulder muscle activity and exerted forces during wall painting. Ten young adults, five male and five female, were recruited to perform simulated wall painting at three different work heights with three different paint roller designs while upper extremity muscle activity and horizontal push force were recorded. Results demonstrated that for female participants, significantly greater total average (p = 0.007) and integrated (p = 0.047) muscle activity was present while using the conventional and curly flex paint roller designs compared to the proposed design in which the load was distributed between both hands. Additionally, for both genders, the high working height imposed greater muscular demands compared to middle and low heights. These findings suggest that, if possible, avoid painting at extreme heights (low or high) and that for female painters, consider a roller that requires the use of two hands; this will reduce fatigue onset and subsequently mitigate potential musculoskeletal shoulder injury risks. PMID:24636728

  17. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

  18. Organizational influences on the work life conflict and health of shiftworkers.

    PubMed

    Pisarski, Anne; Lawrence, Sandra A; Bohle, Philip; Brook, Christine

    2008-09-01

    This study examined organizational factors affecting the impact of shiftwork on work life conflict and subjective health. A model was proposed in which support from supervisors, support from colleagues, and team identity influence time-based work life conflict through two mediating variables: team climate and control over the working environment. Reduced conflict, in turn, produces enhanced psychological well-being and diminished physical symptoms. A structural equation model based on survey data from 530 nurses supported the proposed model. It also identified unpredicted direct links between team identity and physical symptoms, and between supervisor support and both control over the work environment and psychological well-being. The results indicate that organizational interventions focused on social support, team identity, team climate, and control can diminish the negative effects of shiftwork on work life conflict and health in shiftworkers. PMID:18304516

  19. Health services market testing--the experience of the community services review team in British Forces Germany.

    PubMed

    Leach, A J; Whitmore, M K; Schofield, J; Morris, G

    1996-06-01

    During 1993-1995 the health services in British Forces Germany were subjected to a market testing process by which the primary, community and acute health services for the British Servicemen and women, their families and attached civilian staff, a population of 70,000, were put out to competitive tender with the then current provider, the Defence Medical Services, as one tenderer for the contract. This paper outlines the methodology developed by the Health Alliance Community Services Review team in formulating a successful bid. It is considered that the process outlined could be of value to those involved in future market tests, commissioning projects or performance improvement programmes. PMID:8819035

  20. Stress and burnout among healthcare professionals working in a mental health setting in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Yang, Suyi; Meredith, Pamela; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2015-06-01

    International literature suggests that the experience of high levels of stress by healthcare professionals has been associated with decreased work efficiency and high rates of staff turnover. The aims of this study are to identify the extent of stress and burnout experienced by healthcare professionals working in a mental health setting in Singapore and to identify demographic characteristics and work situations associated with this stress and burnout. A total of 220 Singaporean mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey, which included measures of stress, burnout (exhaustion and disengagement), participants' demographic details, and working situation. Independent t-tests and one-way ANOVAs were used to examine between-group differences in the dependent variables (stress and burnout). Analyses revealed that healthcare professionals below the age of 25, those with less than five years experience, and those with the lowest annual income, reported the highest levels of stress and burnout. No significant differences were found with other demographic or work situation variables. Findings suggest that healthcare professionals working in a mental health setting in Singapore are experiencing relatively high levels of stress and burnout. It is important that clinicians, administrators and policy makers take proactive steps to develop programs aimed at reducing stress and burnout for healthcare professionals. These programs are likely to also increase the well-being and resilience of healthcare professionals and improve the quality of mental health services in Singapore. PMID:25922279

  1. Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

  2. Combining care and work: Health and stress effects in male and female academics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marrie H. J. Bekker; Peter F. de Jong; Fred R. H. Zijlstra; Bart A. J. van Landeghem

    2000-01-01

    This study contributed to an explanation of mixed results (beneficial vs. detrimental health effects) in studies on multiple\\u000a roles. We hypothesized that self-reported health in working parents might be good, whereas their heavy total workload might\\u000a be reflected in relatively high scores on more unobtrusive stress measures. Participants were 54 university workers including\\u000a a group with children (16 women and

  3. Walking to work in Canada: health benefits, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Kitchen; Allison Williams; James Chowhan

    2011-01-01

    Background  There is mounting concern over increasing rates of physical inactivity and overweight\\/obesity among children and adult in\\u000a Canada. There is a clear link between the amount of walking a person does and his or her health. The purpose of this paper\\u000a is to assess the health factors, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations of walking to work among adults\\u000a in Canada.

  4. Sex-role orientation, marital status and mental health in working women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Mori; Y. Nakashima; Y. Yamazaki; H. Kurita

    2002-01-01

    Summary  \\u000a The objectives of this study were to make a men-women comparison as to the effects of job stress and sex-role orientation\\u000a on mental health and to determine if marital status modifies effects of job stress and sex-role orientation on mental health\\u000a in women. Subjects were 644 men and 301 women who were working at two private companies and one

  5. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in senior farmers: safety and health considerations.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Shalome; Culp, Kennith; Donham, Kelley

    2014-08-01

    Aging farmers are at high risk musculoskeletal disorders due to occupational exposures. The development of musculoskeletal conditions can increase older farmers' risk for additional injuries because many older farmers continue to work past typical retirement age. Occupational health nurses with agricultural expertise can assist farmers by evaluating their health and safety needs. Possible interventions include ergonomic improvements in farm equipment, safety improvements in farm environment, and referrals to programs that assist older farmers in modifying their farms to improve safety. PMID:25191676

  6. Piezoresistive cantilever working in a shear force mode for in situ characterization of exposed micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Andrzej; Kopiec, Daniel; Janus, Pawe?; Ekwi?ska, Magdalena; P?uska, Mariusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method of characterization micro- and nanostructures defined in a photolithography process. To implement this method a measurement system composed of an atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a system for maskless lithography was developed. This integration enables exposed patterns to be examined in situ, without any necessity for a developing process. The microscope works in a shear force mode, uses a cantilever with a piezoresistive method of detecting deflection and can be used for measuring surfaces with high aspect ratio by applying an appropriate technology of sharpening in a focused ion beam process. The cantilever fabrication process, its calibration and examination procedures are presented. Finally, the AFM images of structures scanned directly after exposure are shown.

  7. Work History, Labor Force Attachment, and Earnings Differences between the Races and Sexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Corcoran; Greg J. Duncan

    1979-01-01

    This article uses a new data set to investigate the extent to which differences in work history, on-the-job training, absenteeism, and self-imposed restrictions on work hours and location account for wage differences between the sexes and races. As expected, white men generally had more education and training and less absenteeism and fewer restrictions than black men and women of both

  8. Health-Related Factors Associated with Mode of Travel to Work

    PubMed Central

    Bopp, Melissa; Kaczynski, Andrew T.; Campbell, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    Active commuting (AC) to the workplace is a potential strategy for incorporating physical activity into daily life and is associated with health benefits. This study examined the association between health-related factors and mode of travel to the workplace. Methods. A volunteer convenience sample of employed adults completed an online survey regarding demographics, health-related factors, and the number of times/week walking, biking, driving, and using public transit to work (dichotomized as no walk/bike/drive/PT and walk/bike/drive/PT 1 + x/week). Logistic regression was used to predict the likelihood of each mode of transport and meeting PA recommendations from AC according to demographics and health-related factors. Results. The sample (n = 1175) was aged 43.5 ± 11.4 years and was primarily White (92.7%) and female (67.9%). Respondents reported walking (7.3%), biking (14.4%), taking public transit (20.3%), and driving (78.3%) to work at least one time/week. Among those reporting AC, 9.6% met PA recommendations from AC alone. Mode of travel to work was associated with several demographic and health-related factors, including age, number of chronic diseases, weight status, and AC beliefs. Discussion. Mode of transportation to the workplace and health-related factors such as disease or weight status should be considered in future interventions targeting AC. PMID:23533450

  9. Being out of Work and Health among Younger Japanese Men: A Panel Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    KAN, Mari

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of being out of work, which is in a broader category of unemployment, on the physical and mental health of younger Japanese men using panel data. A fixed effects model, widely used to control for unobserved individual heterogeneity in panel data analysis, was used for this analysis. Using the first through the fifth waves of the Japanese Life Course Panel Survey, the first wave of which was conducted with people aged 20–40?yrs in 2007, it is found that being out of work has no observable effect on self-assessed physical health. However, being out of work has a negative effect on mental health as measured by the five-item version of the Mental Health Inventory. It is difficult to clearly distinguish the direction of causality even after controlling for individual heterogeneity that is constant over time. An analysis was done with a sub-sample to mitigate a possible reverse causality. The results consistently show that being out of work has a negative effect on mental health. PMID:23955652

  10. Socio-demographic and work setting correlates of poor mental health in a population sample of working Victorians: application in evidence-based intervention priority setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. LaMontagne; R. M. DSouza; C. B. Shann

    2012-01-01

    Interventions to promote mental health in the workplace are rapidly gaining acceptability as a means to prevent, screen, treat and effectively manage the growing disease burden of depression and anxiety among working people. The objective of this study was to identify socio-demographic and work setting correlates of poor mental health to consider alongside other evidence in priority setting for workplace

  11. Leadership, organizational climate, and working alliance in a children's mental health service system.

    PubMed

    Green, Amy E; Albanese, Brian J; Cafri, Guy; Aarons, Gregory A

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the relationships of transformational leadership and organizational climate with working alliance, in a children's mental health service system. Using multilevel structural equation modeling, the effect of leadership on working alliance was mediated by organizational climate. These results suggest that supervisors may be able to impact quality of care through improving workplace climate. Organizational factors should be considered in efforts to improve public sector services. Understanding these issues is important for program leaders, mental health service providers, and consumers because they can affect both the way services are delivered and ultimately, clinical outcomes. PMID:24323137

  12. Swedish physicians' perspectives on work and the medical care system--II: The cases of child and maternal health physicians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew C. Twaddle

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the results of focused interviews with child health and maternal health physicians in the public ambulatory care sector of a large Swedish city to describe (1) the organization of their work activities, (2) their perspectives on their work, and (3) their perspectives on the medical care system. Child health physicians (who were attached to a major teaching

  13. The public health nursing work environment: review of the research literature.

    PubMed

    Dingley, Jacquelyn; Yoder, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) work to address critical health issues at the individual, family, and population levels. In recent years, a global nursing shortage has posed a significant challenge to the recruitment and retention of PHNs. Hospital-based research has shown that a healthy and productive work environment is vital to successful nursing recruitment and retention. Specific organizational characteristics have been linked to job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job vacancies, and turnover rates. Although it is presumed that similarities exist between the public health and acute care nursing work environments, further evaluation is required. This literature review was conducted to identify studies that characterize the PHN work environment. An online database search was conducted to identify prospective PHN studies published between 2000 and 2010. Definitions were established for screening purposes. Twenty-nine PHN studies in the United States and abroad met criteria for inclusion in this review. Satisfaction with teamwork and job autonomy generally was reported. However, inadequate PHN staffing was described as a concern, with problems magnified during prolonged response to public health emergencies. Insufficient control over PHN practice was reported as well. Perceptions regarding other work environment characteristics were mixed or were not measured in detail. More in-depth research is recommended with the ultimate goal of improving PHN recruitment and retention. PMID:23392207

  14. "Deaf Health Talks" DHCC is a community partner of the NCDHR, working with RRCD's R.E.A.P

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Topic: Women's Health: Stay Healthy at Any Age" Presenter: Kim Kelstone, CI/CT Date: Thursday, Feb. 28 women's health. Kim (interpreter and nursing student) will discuss in American Sign Language: · current"Deaf Health Talks" DHCC is a community partner of the NCDHR, working with RRCD's R.E.A.P Health

  15. Hazarding health: experiences of body, work, and risk among factory women in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Root, Robin

    2009-10-01

    In the 1970s, Malaysia launched an export-oriented development strategy as a means of financing the nation's modernization. The success of the strategy hinged significantly on intensive recruitment of women for factory employment. I draw on descriptive qualitative research, including interviews (51), surveys (106), and ethnography in Malaysia to investigate factory women's experiences of work and work-related health risks. Discourse analysis surfaced a latent consciousness of bodily changes in relation to work. A grounded theory analysis showed a compromised access to occupational risk knowledge that may bear negatively on women's well-being and the role women's new labor identities played in mediating the meanings of work and risks. Given the predominance of women workers in low-end manufacturing globally, I aimed to contribute to theoretical and applied understandings of gender, globalization, and health. PMID:19742364

  16. The influence of the work environment on cardiovascular health: a historical, conceptual, and methodological perspective.

    PubMed

    Kasl, S V

    1996-01-01

    The framework of psychosocial epidemiology is used to examine research developments that characterize the accumulation of knowledge regarding the role of the work environment in cardiovascular health and disease. The discussion of current programs of research focuses on the work of T. Theorell and R. Karasek (1996) and J. Siegrist (1996) as exemplars of European and American studies that have contributed the most to the understanding of occupational cardiovascular health. It is argued that researchers need to maintain and nurture relatively broad conceptual models of etiology because cardiovascular disease involves multiple biomedical risk factors and because specific aspects of the work environment are embedded in a large, complex matrix of other psychosocial influences. At the same time, investigators need to push ahead with focused research strategies to clarify the precise nature of the work environmental risk factors that emerge in the broad, somewhat imprecise epidemiologic study designs. PMID:9547033

  17. Job autonomy, its predispositions and its relation to work outcomes in community health centers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Yung-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Tien-Tse

    2013-06-01

    It has been debated that employees in a government or public ownership agency may perceive less need for growth opportunities or high-powered incentives than is the case for employees in private organizations. This study examined employees' job autonomy in government-run community health centers, its predispositions and its relation to their work outcomes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Taiwan. From 230 responding community health centers, 1380 staff members responded to the self-completed, structured questionnaire. Structural equation modeling revealed that employees' job autonomy has positive work outcomes: greater work satisfaction, and less intent to transfer and intentions to leave. In addition, job autonomy was related to employees' higher education levels, medical profession, permanent employment and serving smaller populations. Moreover, employees' age, educational levels, medical profession and employment status were found to be related to their work satisfaction, intent to transfer and intent to leave. PMID:22200896

  18. Work Force Education: Beyond Technical Skills. Trends and Issues Alert No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    This brief suggests that during the past 2 decades, the skills needed to succeed in the workplace have changed significantly. Technical skills remain important, but, increasingly, employers recognize another category of skills crucial to a worker's ability to work "smarter, not harder." These "soft,""core,""nontechnical,""essential,""generic," and…

  19. Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: occupational work force mortality study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Acquavella; L. D. Wiggs; R. J. Waxweiler; D. G. Macdonell; G. S. Wilkinson

    1982-01-01

    This report documents work performed in support of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. We compared total and cause-specific mortality for Pantex Plant workers employed between 1951 and December 31, 1978, with expected mortalities based on US death rates. We observed significantly fewer deaths than expected from all causes of death:

  20. European Working Time Directive and doctors’ health: a systematic review of the available epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Jareño, Maria Cruz; Demou, Evangelia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Sanati, Kaveh A; Škerjanc, Alenka; Reis, Pedro G; Helimäki-Aro, Ritva; Macdonald, Ewan B; Serra, Consol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarise the available scientific evidence on the health effects of exposure to working beyond the limit number of hours established by the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on physicians. Design A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE. Study selection, quality appraisal and data extraction were carried out by independent pairs of researchers using pre-established criteria. Setting Physicians of any medical, surgical or community specialty, working in any possible setting (hospitals, primary healthcare, etc), as well as trainees, residents, junior house officers or postgraduate interns, were included. Participants The total number of participants was 14?338. Primary and secondary outcome measures Health effects classified under the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results Over 3000 citations and 110 full articles were reviewed. From these, 11 studies of high or intermediate quality carried out in North America, Europe and Japan met the inclusion criteria. Six studies included medical residents, junior doctors or house officers and the five others included medical specialists or consultants, medical, dental, and general practitioners and hospital physicians. Evidence of an association was found between percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents with extended long working hours (LWH)/days or very LWH/weeks. The evidence was insufficient for mood disorders and general health. No studies on other health outcomes were identified. Conclusions LWH could increase the risk of percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents, and possibly other incidents at work through the same pathway. While associations are clear, the existing evidence does not allow for an established causal or ‘dose–response’ relationship between LWH and incidents at work, or for a threshold number of extended hours above which there is a significantly higher risk and the hours physicians could work and remain safe and healthy. Policymakers should consider safety issues when working on relaxing EWTD for doctors. PMID:25001394

  1. A Work-Systems Analysis of Compliance With Universal Precautions Among Health Care Workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. DeJoy; Robyn R. M. Gershon; Lawrence R. Murphy; Mark G. Wilson

    1996-01-01

    Universal precautions are work practices designed to protect health care workers from occupational exposure to HIV and other bloodborne pathogens. However, despite aggressive dissemination efforts by CDC and regulatory action by OSHA, compliance remains less than satisfactory. This article argues that the minimization of risk from bloodborne pathogens requires a multilevel or work-systems perspective that considers individual, job\\/task, and environmental\\/organizational

  2. A LISREL analysis of work-related risk factors and health complaints in the nursing profession

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josephine A. Engels; Allard J. van der Beek

    1998-01-01

    Objectives:   To fit a model which describes the complex interaction between various work-related factors and both musculoskeletal and psychosomatic\\u000a complaints of nurses simultaneously and to compare the results with those of two LISREL models, in which the health outcome\\u000a variables are analyzed separately in terms of their correlation with the same set of work-related factors. Materials and methods: Nurses (n?=?718)

  3. Combining work and family in the Netherlands: blessing or burden for one's mental health?

    PubMed

    Oomens, Shirley; Geurts, Sabine; Scheepers, Peer

    2007-01-01

    In this article we study which characteristics of combining work and family put people at risk for mental illness. Two alternative perspectives on the impact of multiple social roles on mental health are tested: the role accumulation perspective and the role strain perspective. Both perspectives are studied with data from a cross-sectional national survey held among a large, representative sample of Dutch people (N=1008). Multivariate analyses provided support for both perspectives. Having more social roles was related to better mental health. We also found a positive mental health effect of having a full-time job in combination with having children. However, having a partner who contributes less to household duties or having a job with low decision latitude or lower skill discretion was related to mental illness. So, certain aspects of social roles may also threaten people's mental health. Overall, our findings do not support the idea that combining work and family is necessarily a burden and harmful for people's mental health. Whether multiple social roles are a blessing or burden for people's mental health seems to depend on the characteristics of the social roles. PMID:17673292

  4. The ethics of engaged presence: a framework for health professionals in humanitarian assistance and development work.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Matthew R; Schwartz, Lisa; Sinding, Christina; Elit, Laurie

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we present an ethics framework for health practice in humanitarian and development work: the ethics of engaged presence. The ethics of engaged presence framework aims to articulate in a systematic fashion approaches and orientations that support the engagement of expatriate health care professionals in ways that align with diverse obligations and responsibilities, and promote respectful and effective action and relationships. Drawn from a range of sources, the framework provides a vocabulary and narrative structure for examining the moral dimensions of providing development or humanitarian health assistance to individuals and communities, and working with and alongside local and international actors. The elements also help minimize or avoid certain miscalculations and harms. Emphasis is placed on the shared humanity of those who provide and those who receive assistance, acknowledgement of limits and risks related to the contributions of expatriate health care professionals, and the importance of providing skillful and relevant assistance. These elements articulate a moral posture for expatriate health care professionals that contributes to orienting the practice of clinicians in ways that reflect respect, humility, and solidarity. Health care professionals whose understanding and actions are consistent with the ethics of engaged presence will be oriented toward introspection and reflective practice and toward developing, sustaining and promoting collaborative partnerships. PMID:23279367

  5. 75 FR 4043 - Science Advisory Board; Draft Report of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Oceans and Health Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ...tasked to consider the following questions and any others that the Working...What are the right ocean health science questions, products and services for NOAA...Are there additional ocean health science issues that should be...

  6. [Health status and its effects on the work of national education nurses].

    PubMed

    Batt, A; Le Duff, F; Trouve, F; Bideau, C; Brunet, N; Chermeux, H; Drean, M P; Guyot, M C; Le Bras, L; Le Parc, B; Le Peru, I; Lefebvre, A; Lesellier, F; Perrot, M F; Sansoucy, M A; Trepos, M F

    1999-12-01

    This study presents a pedagogical work carried out with a group of 13 school nurses of the Academy of Rennes, as part of a course in survey methodology. A descriptive survey aiming to achieve a better understanding of experienced health status of nurses, and of its repercussions on the execution of their missions, was implemented during the course, as a result of the demand and the expertise of the participants. Overall, nurses report to be in good health. However, one can not underestimate the existence of a group at risk (5% of the sample) that often suffers somatic troubles accompanied by sleep disorders and anxiety, as these risks concern primarily permanent staff nurses working in boarding establishments, with half of them falling into this category. A demand for regular monitoring of their health was clearly expressed through the study. This may be the object of a subsequent study by an academic team. PMID:10798175

  7. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for educational psychologists’ work

    PubMed Central

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists’ work with children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Mothers of 40 children with ASD aged eight to 12 years were interviewed using a structured protocol based on the ICF framework. The Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorder (DISCO) was completed with a subset of 19 mothers. Internal consistency and inter-rater reliability of the interview assessments were found to be acceptable and there was evidence for concurrent and discriminant validity. Despite some limitations, initial support for the utility of the ICF model suggests its potential value across educational, health and care fields. Further consideration of its relevance to educational psychologists in new areas of multi-agency working is warranted.

  8. "Joined on Rather than Joined up?" Primary Mental Health Work in Scottish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddart, Paula

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Primary mental health workers have been based in West Lothian schools since 2003 to act as links between the community and hospital-based services. The research programme this paper describes aimed to examine how this model worked and its impact for children and their families. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on interviews…

  9. Social Work and Public Health: Comparing Graduates from a Dual-Degree Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Betty J.; Wyatt, Jamie; Chiasson, Emily; Geron, Scott Miyake; Bachman, Sally

    2006-01-01

    This study compared dual-degree master of social work/master of public health (MSW/MPH) and MSW-only graduates with 3 or more years of postgraduate experience. Thirty graduates from an MSW/MPH program were matched with 30 MSW-only graduates. All subjects were randomly selected from the alumni directory and interviewed via telephone. Results showed…

  10. Protected work refusals under Section 105(c)(1) of the Mine Safety and Health Act

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Biddle; T. C. Means; P. K. Levine

    2009-01-01

    The Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission has had to define the parameters of when miners have the right to refuse to work because of unsafe or unhealthful mine conditions. Although the emergent law creates a reasonable and equitable balance between mine safety and mine discipline, neither the commission nor the courts has set a standard for how severe

  11. “Joined on rather than joined up?” Primary mental health work in Scottish schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula Huddart

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – Primary mental health workers have been based in West Lothian schools since 2003 to act as links between the community and hospital-based services. The research programme this paper describes aimed to examine how this model worked and its impact for children and their families. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper reports on interviews with secondary school staff, the link workers

  12. Health promoting schools: lessons from working intersectorally with primary schools in Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillip Williams; Ros Weston; Jenny McWhirter; Erica James; Deborah Moore; Bernie Coulter; Cheryl Titheridge; Jan Halverson; Jane Potter

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for those who seek to aid schools in becoming more active in health promotion. The lessons provided have been gleaned by working with a network of schools in a socially disadvantaged region over a period of three years. The project began because of concern about high rates of adult heart disease. There are how 15 primdry

  13. Wisconsin Healthy & Ready to Work: A Series of Materials Supporting Youth with Special Health Care Needs

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Wisconsin Healthy & Ready to Work: A Series of Materials Supporting Youth with Special Health Care Needs The Power of Peer Mentoring WISCONSIN COUNCIL ON DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES Waisman Center University of Wisconsin­Madison University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities #12;Wisconsin

  14. Non-Production Benefits of Education: Crime, Health, and Good Citizenship. NBER Working Paper No. 16722

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochner, Lance

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of work suggests that education offers a wide-range of benefits that extend beyond increases in labor market productivity. Improvements in education can lower crime, improve health, and increase voting and democratic participation. This chapter reviews recent developments on these "non-production" benefits of education with an…

  15. A Survey of 63 Australian Occupational Therapists Working in Youth Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Hardaker; Elizabeth Halcomb; Rhonda Griffiths; Natalie Bolzan; Karen Arblaster

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic and employment characteristics of Australian occupational therapists working in youth mental health and explore the relationship between these characteristics and the occupational therapist's role. Sixty-three occupational therapists completed a postal survey during 2006–2007. Numerical data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The majority

  16. Evaluation of School Health Programmes. Report on a Working Group. Bucharest, 2-5 August 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    A discussion of the health services in the schools of eight European countries is presented in this report. The care of the preschool child is also examined. The working group assigned to this task considered different methods of evaluation, including those measuring quantity and quality of services and, in addition, discussed statistical means…

  17. Work-Based Learning in Health: Evaluating the Experience of Learners, Community Agencies and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    This paper evaluates a case-study work-based learning (WBL) programme for final year health studies undergraduates, analysing key characteristics, and reporting benefits and tensions that result. It triangulates evidence from learners, community agencies and teachers. Cross-fertilisation of ideas between the academy and community agencies, and the…

  18. Employment and Health among Older Black Women: Implications for Their Economic Status. Working Paper No. 177.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Diane Robinson

    Recognizing that the economic well-being of older black females is associated with current employment as well as previous work history, this study attempts to determine the extent to which health status influences workforce participation or non-participation by older females, and to ascertain if there are significant differences by race. The study…

  19. High performance work systems: the gap between policy and practice in health care reform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra G. Leggat; Timothy Bartram; Pauline Stanton

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – Studies of high-performing organisations have consistently reported a positive relationship between high performance work systems (HPWS) and performance outcomes. Although many of these studies have been conducted in manufacturing, similar findings of a positive correlation between aspects of HPWS and improved care delivery and patient outcomes have been reported in international health care studies. The purpose of this

  20. ‘Recovery work’ and ‘magic’ among long-term mental health service-users

    PubMed Central

    Laws, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Based on an extended period of qualitative research with mental health service-users in north-east England, this article considers the various forms of ‘magical work’ and ‘recovery work’ that emerge in the lives of people living with severe mental health problems. Given the now sizeable body of literature which seeks to problematize traditional conceptual boundaries of work, the article asks to what extent these hidden and unusual work-forms might also be considered legitimate members of the category. Rather than argue for the expansion of the construct to accommodate these activities, the paper attempts simply to problematize the extent to which so-called ‘mad’ forms of work are irresolvably different to more conventional forms of occupation. In challenging notions of the psychiatric patient as inevitably inactive, new vocabularies for service-user work are explored. Concluding remarks are also directed to recent policy debates concerning ‘back-to-work’ welfare reform for long-term out of work service-users. PMID:24223439

  1. Preferences for working in rural clinics among trainee health professionals in Uganda: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health facilities require teams of health workers with complementary skills and responsibilities to efficiently provide quality care. In low-income countries, failure to attract and retain health workers in rural areas reduces population access to health services and undermines facility performance, resulting in poor health outcomes. It is important that governments consider health worker preferences in crafting policies to address attraction and retention in underserved areas. Methods We investigated preferences for job characteristics among final year medical, nursing, pharmacy, and laboratory students at select universities in Uganda. Participants were administered a cadre-specific discrete choice experiment that elicited preferences for attributes of potential job postings they were likely to pursue after graduation. Job attributes included salary, facility quality, housing, length of commitment, manager support, training tuition, and dual practice opportunities. Mixed logit models were used to estimate stated preferences for these attributes. Results Data were collected from 246 medical students, 132 nursing students, 50 pharmacy students and 57 laboratory students. For all student-groups, choice of job posting was strongly influenced by salary, facility quality and manager support, relative to other attributes. For medical and laboratory students, tuition support for future training was also important, while pharmacy students valued opportunities for dual practice. Conclusions In Uganda, financial and non-financial incentives may be effective in attracting health workers to underserved areas. Our findings contribute to mounting evidence that salary is not the only important factor health workers consider when deciding where to work. Better quality facilities and supportive managers were important to all students. Similarities in preferences for these factors suggest that team-based, facility-level strategies for attracting health workers may be appropriate. Improving facility quality and training managers to be more supportive of facility staff may be particularly cost-effective, as investments are borne once while benefits accrue to a range of health workers at the facility. PMID:22824497

  2. Research workshop to research work: initial steps in establishing health research systems on Malaita, Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Atoifi Adventist Hospital is a 90 bed general hospital in East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands providing services to the population of subsistence villagers of the region. Health professionals at the hospital and attached College of Nursing have considerable human capacity and willingness to undertake health research. However they are constrained by limited research experience, training opportunities, research systems, physical infrastructure and access to resources. This brief commentary describes an 'Introduction to Health Research' workshop delivered at Atoifi Adventist Hospital in September 2009 and efforts to move from 'research workshop' to 'research work'. The Approach Using a participatory-action research approach underpinned by decolonising methodologies, staff from Atoifi Adventist Hospital and James Cook University (Queensland, Australia) collaboratively designed, implemented and evaluated a health research workshop. Basic health research principles and methods were presented using active learning methodologies. Following the workshop, Atoifi Adventist Hospital and Atoifi College of Nursing staff, other professionals and community members reported an increased awareness and understanding of health research. The formation of a local Research Committee, improved ethics review procedures and the identification of local research mentors followed the week long workshop. The workshop has acted as a catalyst for research activity, increasing structural and human resource capacity for local health professionals and community leaders to engage in research. Discussion and Conclusions Participants from a variety of educational backgrounds participated in, and received benefit from, a responsive, culturally and linguistically accessible health research workshop. Improving health research systems at a remote hospital and aligning these with local and national research agendas is establishing a base to strengthen public health research and practice on Malaita, Solomon Islands. PMID:21034512

  3. The role of acceptance and job control in mental health, job satisfaction, and work performance.

    PubMed

    Bond, Frank W; Bunce, David

    2003-12-01

    Acceptance, the willingness to experience thoughts, feelings, and physiological sensations without having to control them or let them determine one's actions, is a major individual determinant of mental health and behavioral effectiveness in a more recent theory of psychopathology. This 2-wave panel study examined the ability of acceptance also to explain mental health, job satisfaction, and performance in the work domain. The authors hypothesized that acceptance would predict these 3 outcomes 1 year later in a sample of customer service center workers in the United Kingdom (N = 412). Results indicated that acceptance predicted mental health and an objective measure of performance over and above job control, negative affectivity, and locus of control. These beneficial effects of having more job control were enhanced when people had higher levels of acceptance. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical relevance of this individual characteristic to occupational health and performance. PMID:14640816

  4. Experiences of a health team working in a new urban settlement area in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Bulut, A; Uzel, N; Kutluay, T; Neyzi, O

    1991-10-01

    A project aiming at creating a model for comprehensive maternal and child health care for urban underdeveloped areas was started in a new settlement area of migrants in the vicinity of Istanbul. The project had an impact on health care status, particularly among infants and children, but the results indicated that more effort was needed to reach the mothers. It was noted that building space and the appearance of the work place influenced the prestige of the team. Absentee problems could be partly surmounted by repeated home visits. Based on this experience, it was concluded that health services in underdeveloped areas need to be supported by non medical personnel to act as home visitors and as mediators between the community and the health team. It was also concluded that an established recording system to include both clinical data and attendance is needed to define the cases who need special care. PMID:1955576

  5. The importance of full-time work for urban adults' mental and physical health.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Lisa; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Santilli, Alycia; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2012-11-01

    Unemployment and underemployment have adverse mental and physical health consequences, such as increased stress and depression. Health damaging behaviors like unhealthy eating, smoking, and alcohol use may be used to cope, contributing to chronic disease risk. In this adverse economic climate, it is vital to understand the health implications of unemployment and underemployment as well as underlying mechanisms. A randomized household survey of adults in six low resource communities was conducted in New Haven, Connecticut in 2009, yielding a sample of 1205 (73% participation) racially diverse adults (61% Black, 20% Latino, 12% White) ages 18-65 (61% women). We used ANOVA to test group differences and structural equation modeling to test mediation. 14.5% were unemployed and looking for work, 18.4% worked part-time, 38.2% worked full-time. Those employed full-time reported the least damaging psychological factors and health behaviors: lowest levels of stress and depression, most healthy and least unhealthy eating, most physical activity, and lowest levels of smoking and drinking. Those employed part-time fell in the middle, and those unemployed fell on the unhealthy end of all psychological and behavioral factors. Stress significantly mediated the associations of full-time employment with frequency of unhealthy eating and physical activity, and amount of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. Depression significantly mediated the association of full-time employment with frequency of healthy eating. Compared to <10% nationwide, rates of unemployment in this sample were high. Both those unemployed and employed part-time reported adverse health behaviors as compared to those employed full-time, partially mediated by heightened stress and depression. It is vital for the health and well-being of the nation to increase not simply employment, but specifically full-time employment. Provision of mental health services to those unemployed and underemployed should be a priority to promote healthier lifestyles and prevent costly future chronic disease. PMID:22858166

  6. The Discipline's Escalating Whisper: Social Work and Black Men's Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Daphne C.; Hawkins, Jaclynn; Mitchell, Jamie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Though sparse in previous years, research on the mental health of Black men has recently experienced a gradual increase in social work journals. This article systematically organizes and critically examines peer-reviewed, social work evidence on the mental health of Black men. Methods: Twenty-two peer-reviewed articles from social work

  7. 20 CFR 645.260 - What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs? 645.260...GOVERNING WELFARE-TO-WORK GRANTS General Program...260 What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs? (a)...

  8. 20 CFR 645.260 - What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs? 645.260...GOVERNING WELFARE-TO-WORK GRANTS General Program...260 What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs? (a)...

  9. MSW Social Work Experience 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca. Evaluation of AB3632,

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    1 MSW Social Work Experience Consultant 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca consisting mainly of skid row alcoholics who were overflow from the main county hospital. MSW Social Work care center for their children. Prior to MSW Social Work 11973-1976. Casemanagement. L.A. County Health

  10. Qualities and practices of professional social work leadership in an interdisciplinary mental health service: an action learning approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David McNabb; Michael Webster

    2010-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, health service restructuring in New Zealand has strengthened managerialism, arguably detracting from professional considerations. Professional leaders without line-management responsibilities have replaced social work departments headed by a professional social worker. An emerging social work contribution to interdisciplinary leadership in mental health settings aims to advance quality of service and fill social work leadership gaps resulting from structural

  11. Job satisfaction among public health professionals working in public sector: a cross sectional study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Job satisfaction largely determines the productivity and efficiency of human resource for health. It literally depicts the extent to which professionals like or dislike their jobs. Job satisfaction is said to be linked with the employee’s work environment, job responsibilities and powers and time pressure; the determinants which affect employee’s organizational commitment and consequently the quality of services. The objective of the study was to determine the level of and factors influencing job satisfaction among public health professionals in the public sector. Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted in Islamabad, Pakistan. Sample size was universal including 73 public health professionals, with postgraduate qualifications and working in government departments of Islamabad. A validated structured questionnaire was used to collect data from April to October 2011. Results Overall satisfaction rate was 41% only, while 45% were somewhat satisfied and 14% of professionals highly dissatisfied with their jobs. For those who were not satisfied, working environment, job description and time pressure were the major causes. Other factors influencing the level of satisfaction were low salaries, lack of training opportunities, improper supervision and inadequate financial rewards. Conclusion Our study documented a relatively low level of overall satisfaction among workers in public sector health care organizations. Considering the factors responsible for this state of affairs, urgent and concrete strategies must be developed to address the concerns of public health professionals as they represent a highly sensitive domain of health system of Pakistan. Improving the overall work environment, review of job descriptions and better remuneration might bring about a positive change. PMID:23298253

  12. Partnership working and outcomes: do health and social care partnerships deliver for users and carers?

    PubMed

    Petch, Alison; Cook, Ailsa; Miller, Emma

    2013-11-01

    Working in partnership, both across social care and health and with service users, has been a persistent theme of the health and social care modernisation agenda in the United Kingdom. Despite a relatively underdeveloped evidence base, the development of health and social care partnerships has continued to feature in recent policy and legislative initiatives in the United Kingdom. At the same time there has been a major shift in focus towards the outcomes that support services deliver. A central question remaining is whether the policy initiatives driving the development of health and social care partnerships are delivering improved outcomes, particularly the outcomes valued by people who use services. This article outlines research designed to explore this issue across 15 health and social care partnerships in England and Scotland, building from previous research by the Social Policy Research Unit based at the University of York. It sought to assess the extent to which health and social care partnerships deliver the outcomes that people who use services value, and to determine the features of partnership working associated with the delivery of these outcomes. A robust outcomes framework was defined, which provided the basis for interviews with those receiving support from partnerships. Working with three user-researcher organisations, interviews were completed with 230 individuals in 2006. On the basis of this, some service users were able to identify features of partnership that particularly contributed to improved outcomes. These included continuity of staff and sufficient staff and a range of resources, including the availability of long-term and preventative services. Given the definitional and methodological complexity surrounding partnership working, and the challenges of attribution, the study faced some limitations in its ability to make wider inferences about partnership and outcomes. A theory of change should be employed in future studies of this type. PMID:23656413

  13. Flexible workspace design and ergonomics training: impacts on the psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, and work effectiveness among knowledge workers.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Michelle M; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; O'Neill, Michael J; Schleifer, Lawrence M

    2008-07-01

    A macroergonomics intervention consisting of flexible workspace design and ergonomics training was conducted to examine the effects on psychosocial work environment, musculoskeletal health, and work effectiveness in a computer-based office setting. Knowledge workers were assigned to one of four conditions: flexible workspace (n=121), ergonomics training (n=92), flexible workspace+ergonomics training (n=31), and a no-intervention control (n=45). Outcome measures were collected 2 months prior to the intervention and 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Overall, the study results indicated positive, significant effects on the outcome variables for the two intervention groups compared to the control group, including work-related musculoskeletal discomfort, job control, environmental satisfaction, sense of community, ergonomic climate, communication and collaboration, and business process efficiency (time and costs). However, attrition of workers in the ergonomics training condition precluded an evaluation of the effects of this intervention. This study suggests that a macroergonomics intervention is effective among knowledge workers in office settings. PMID:18462704

  14. How the circadian rhythm affects sleep, wakefulness, and overall health: background for understanding shift work disorder.

    PubMed

    Krystal, Andrew D

    2012-02-01

    It is estimated that 15 to 25% of the U.S. labor force works night, evening, or rotating shifts. These non-traditional schedules can affect the circadian rhythm, a self-sustained rhythm of biological processes that plays an important role in modulating sleep/wake function, resulting in circadian rhythm sleep disorder, shift work type, usually referred to as shift work disorder. The disorder consists of a constant or recurrent pattern of sleep interruption that results in insomnia when sleep is needed and excessive sleepiness during waking hours. Clinicians need more information about the role of the circadian rhythm in human functioning as well as the pathophysiology, prevalence, and consequences of shift work disorder, so that they can recognize and diagnose this problem in clinical practice. PMID:22401482

  15. Forced sexual intercourse and associated health-risk behaviors among female college students in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brener, N D; McMahon, P M; Warren, C W; Douglas, K A

    1999-04-01

    This study analyzed data from the 1995 National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) to assess the prevalence of lifetime rape among female college students and to examine the association between rape and health-risk behaviors. The NCHRBS used a mail questionnaire to assess health-risk behaviors among a nationally representative sample of undergraduate students. Twenty percent of female students reported ever having been forced to have sexual intercourse, most often during adolescence. When analyses controlled for demographic characteristics, female students who had ever been raped were significantly more likely than those who had not to report a wide range of health-risk behaviors. These results highlight a need to improve rape prevention and treatment programs for female adolescents. PMID:10224736

  16. Casual Dock Work: Profile of Diseases and Injuries and Perception of Influence on Health

    PubMed Central

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; de Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Borges, Anelise Miritz; Piexak, Diéssica Roggia

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the profile of diseases and injuries that affect casual dock workers and identify casual dock workers’ perceptions of positive and negative work influences on their health. This study consisted of two phases. The first phase was a quantitative study composed of a retrospective analysis, conducted with 953 medical records. The second phase of the research is a non-random sample with 51 casual dock workers. Data analysis was performed with SPSS 19.0. The average age of the casual dock workers was 48.7. Concerning working time, the majority had more than 19.6 years of dock work experience. In the first phase, 527 pathologic diagnoses were identified. The diagnoses that affected the musculoskeletal system (15.8%, N = 152; p < 0.01) were highlighted. Consequences to physical health produced by accidents stood out, with fracture registration predominating (12.8%, N = 122; p < 0.05). Significant differences were found for positive work influence on the cardiovascular system and family health. It was concluded that the diagnoses obtained are related to the influence of dock work perception and have motivated an introduction of preventive measures. PMID:24557521

  17. Rural speech-language pathologists' perceptions of working with allied health assistants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rachael; Byrne, Nicole; Mitchell, Rebecca; Ferguson, Alison

    2013-12-01

    Workforce shortages are forecast for speech-language pathology in Australia, and will have a more significant impact on rural and remote areas than on metropolitan areas. Allied health (AH) disciplines such as physiotherapy and occupational therapy address the problem of workforce shortages and growing clinical demand by employing allied health assistants (AHAs) to provide clinical and administrative support to AH professionals. Currently, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) don't work with discipline-specific allied health assistants in all states of Australia (e.g., New South Wales). This paper aims to provide insight into the perceptions of SLPs in one Australian state (NSW) regarding working with AHAs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight rural SLPs. Qualitative analysis indicated that participants perceived they had deficits in skills and knowledge required to work with AHAs and identified further training needs. Participants perceived the SLP role to be misunderstood and were concerned about poor consultation regarding the introduction of AHAs into the profession. Ambivalence was evident in overall perceptions of working with AHAs, and tasks performed. While previous research identified benefits of working with AHAs, results from this study suggest that significant professional, economic, and organizational issues need addressing before such a change should be implemented in speech-language pathology. PMID:23390889

  18. Women of Hispanic Origin in the Labor Force. Facts on Working Women No. 89-1 = La mujer de origen hispano en la fuerza laboral. Facts on Working Women Num. 89-1S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Data on Hispanic women in the labor force between 1978 and 1988 show the following: (1) 6.5 percent of the women in the work force in 1988 were of Hispanic origin (3.6 million); (2) the median age of Hispanic women was 26.1 years, 2-5 years younger than Black or White women; (3) 66 percent of Hispanic women participate in the labor force, a higher…

  19. Effectiveness of activity-based group work in community mental health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Alison; Bannigan, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Activity-based group work is widely used by occupational therapists in mental health settings (Lloyd, King, & Bassett, 2002), but the evidence to support this intervention is unclear. We therefore conducted a systematic review focused on the question, "Is activity-based group work effective in helping people with severe and enduring mental illness in community settings improve their functional ability and/or reduce their mental health symptoms?" We used a wide-ranging search strategy, including electronic searching, hand searching, citation searching, and use of gray literature, and identified 136 potentially relevant papers. After assessment of relevance and quality, only 3 articles met the minimum criteria. Heterogeneity and flaws in quality meant it was not possible to make specific inferences for practice from the studies. Large-scale rigorous research, in the form of randomized controlled trials, is urgently needed to identify whether activity-based group work is effective. PMID:21675331

  20. Managing motivation and developing job satisfaction in the health care work environment.

    PubMed

    Timmreck, T C

    2001-09-01

    Motivation relies on internal/intrinsic and external factors to stimulate work-related behavior. This article presents an overview of Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory and reports on the results of a study of 99 health service midmanagers. The participants completed a survey asking whether they believe in motivational factors and if they use them. Several of Herzberg's motivational factors were included (achievement, recognition, work itself, responsibility, advancement) plus several other motivational factors including money/pay, self-interest, seek a higher standard of living. Negative factors included guilt, threats, power, and control. This article presents motivation factors, such as achievement, recognition, work itself, responsibility, advancement, growth, self-interest, pay, and belief in successful outcome, that were presented to 99 mid-level health services administrators. PMID:11556553

  1. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  2. Understanding the bond-energy, hardness, and adhesive force from the phase diagram via the electron work function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hao; Huang, Xiaochen; Li, Dongyang

    2014-11-01

    Properties of metallic materials are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior. However, relevant theoretical treatment involving quantum mechanics is complicated and difficult to be applied in materials design. Electron work function (EWF) has been demonstrated to be a simple but fundamental parameter which well correlates properties of materials with their electron behavior and could thus be used to predict material properties from the aspect of electron activities in a relatively easy manner. In this article, we propose a method to extract the electron work functions of binary solid solutions or alloys from their phase diagrams and use this simple approach to predict their mechanical strength and surface properties, such as adhesion. Two alloys, Fe-Ni and Cu-Zn, are used as samples for the study. EWFs extracted from phase diagrams show same trends as experimentally observed ones, based on which hardness and surface adhesive force of the alloys are predicted. This new methodology provides an alternative approach to predict material properties based on the work function, which is extractable from the phase diagram. This work may also help maximize the power of phase diagram for materials design and development.

  3. HHS announces Text4Health task force recommendations and global partnership:

    Cancer.gov

    Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced new recommendations to support health text messaging and mobile health (mHealth) programs. The department has been actively exploring means to capitalize on the rapid proliferation of mobile phone technology and platforms, such as text messaging, to develop programs and/or partnerships with the overall aim of improving public health outcomes.

  4. Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have conducted work terms in the fields of experimental

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have, cancer centres, private industry and government ministries and agencies. Coop Jobs have Included: Medical Safety Student Assistant in Medical Imaging Examples of Medical & Health Physics Coop Work Term Duties

  5. [Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire to Brazilian nurses].

    PubMed

    de Campos, Mônica Chiodi-Toscano; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Santos, Jair Licio Ferreira

    2013-12-01

    Study aiming to cross-culturally adapt the instrument Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ) and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version for nurses. The adaptation process followed the Process of Translation of World Health Organization. Data for the evaluation of the psychometric properties were collected in a teaching public hospital of Ribeirão Preto in 2011. The evaluated psychometric properties were: face validity and content (group of experts), reliability by Cronbach's alpha and test-retest stability. In the evaluation of psychometric properties, the internal consistency of the HPQ adapted version, Cronbach's alpha was 0.94 for the section A and 0.86 for section B of the instrument. In analyzing the agreement of test-retest stability, the agreements were positive and statistically significant. Thus, the HPQ adapted version proved valid and reliable in the sample studied. PMID:24626359

  6. Addressing the migration of health professionals: the role of working conditions and educational placements.

    PubMed

    Witt, Julia

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the global health-worker shortage, which could undermine the Millennium Development Goal to halt and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS. The current situation suggests that long-term solutions to shortages can only be found by addressing the problem from a global perspective; that is, to eliminate shortages through substantial investments in training and retaining health workers in developed and developing countries, and not through policies that do not work towards solving this underlying problem, such as ones that restrict migration. PMID:19922691

  7. Occupational and public health considerations for work-hour limitations policy regarding public health workers during response to natural and human-caused disasters.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Murray R

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the occupational health considerations that might impact the health and wellbeing of public health workers during responses to natural (eg, floods and hurricanes) and human-caused (eg, terrorism, war, and shootings) disasters. There are a number of articles in the medical literature that argue the impact of how working long hours by house staff physicians, nurses, and first-responders may pose health and safety concerns regarding the patients being treated. The question examined here is how working long hours may pose health and/or safety concerns for the public health workers themselves, as well as to those in the communities they serve. The health problems related to sleep deprivation are reviewed. Current policies and legislations regarding work-hour limitations are examined. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:23140062

  8. Informal work, unemployment and health in Brazilian metropolitan areas, 1998 and 2003.

    PubMed

    Giatti, Luana; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; César, Cibele Comini

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates whether employment with no social security, as well as short and long term unemployment are associated with worse health among Brazilians. The representative study sample was taken from two National Health Surveys and included men aged between 15 and 64 who lived in one of the eight metropolitan regions of Brazil in 1998 (n = 31,870) and 2003 (n = 32,887). Both surveys showed that full and part time workers with no social security, as well as those in short and long term (> 12 months) unemployment had worse health indicators, regardless of age or schooling, when compared with full-time workers (> 40 hours/week) who had some form of social security through their employment. Hepatic cirrhosis was the disease most strongly associated with labor market status. Its prevalence was higher among individuals in long term unemployment and those with no social security. Labor market status was also negatively associated with the use of health care services, especially medical visits. The present study shows that the absence of social security at work, unemployment and length of unemployment, characterize heterogeneous groups of individuals in relation to health. Results reinforce the need to incorporate labor market status in research into health inequalities. PMID:18949241

  9. Work and its role in shaping the social gradient in health.

    PubMed

    Clougherty, Jane E; Souza, Kerry; Cullen, Mark R

    2010-02-01

    Adults with better jobs enjoy better health: job title was, in fact, the social gradient metric first used to study the relationship between social class and chronic disease etiology, a core finding now replicated in most developed countries. What has been less well proved is whether this correlation is causal, and if so, through what mechanisms. During the past decade, much research has been directed at these issues. Best evidence in 2009 suggests that occupation does affect health. Most recent research on the relationship has been directed at disentangling the pathways through which lower-status work leads to adverse health outcomes. This review focuses on six areas of recent progress: (1) the role of status in a hierarchical occupational system; (2) the roles of psychosocial job stressors; (3) effects of workplace physical and chemical hazard exposures; (4) evidence that work organization matters as a contextual factor; (5) implications for the gradient of new forms of nonstandard or "precarious" employment such as contract and shift work; and (6) emerging evidence that women may be impacted differently by adverse working conditions, and possibly more strongly, than men. PMID:20201870

  10. Association between work-related health problems and job insecurity in permanent and temporary employees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This research was conducted with an aim of determining the correlation between job insecurity and an employee’s work-related health problems among permanent and temporary workers. Methods Using the data from the First Korean Working Conditions Survey conducted in 2006, a total of 7,071 workers, excluding employers and the self-employed, were analyzed. Work-related health problems were categorized as backache, headache, abdominal pain, muscular pain, stress, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety or depression. Each problem was then analyzed for its relationship to job insecurity through logistic regression analysis. Results Among the 7,071 workers, 5,294 (74.9%) were permanent workers and 1,777 (25.1%) were temporary workers. For the permanent workers, presence of high or moderate job insecurity appeared more closely linked to backache, headache, abdominal pain, muscular pain, stress, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, and depression compared to absence of job insecurity. However, for the temporary workers, only depression appeared to be associated with the presence of high job insecurity. Conclusion The study showed that the presence of job insecurity is correlated with work-related health problems. The deleterious effects of job insecurity appeared to be stronger in permanent than temporary workers. Additional research should investigate ways to effectively reduce job insecurity. PMID:24472497

  11. Work and its role in shaping the social gradient in health

    PubMed Central

    Clougherty, Jane E.; Souza, Kerry; Cullen, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Adults with better jobs enjoy better health: job title was, in fact, the social gradient metric first used to study the relationship between social class and chronic disease etiology, a core finding now replicated in most developed countries. What has been less well proved is whether this correlation is causal, and if so, through what mechanisms. During the past decade, much research has been directed at these issues.Best evidence in2009 suggests that occupation does affect health. Most recent research on the relationship has been directed at disentangling the pathways through which lower-status work leads to adverse health outcomes. This review focuses on six areas of recent progress: (1) the role of status in a hierarchical occupational system; (2) the roles of psychosocial job stressors; (3) effects of workplace physical and chemical hazard exposures; (4) evidence that work organization matters as a contextual factor; (5) implications for the gradient of new forms of nonstandard or “precarious” employment such as contract and shift work; and (6) emerging evidence that women may be impacted differently by adverse working conditions, and possibly more strongly, than men. PMID:20201870

  12. Traumatic events, other operational stressors and physical and mental health reported by Australian Defence Force personnel following peacekeeping and war-like deployments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between stressful events on warlike deployments and subsequent mental health problems has been established. Less is known about the effects of stressful events on peacekeeping deployments. Methods Two cross sectional studies of the Australian Defence Force were used to contrast the prevalence of exposures reported by a group deployed on a peacekeeping operation (Bougainville, n?=?1704) and those reported by a group deployed on operations which included warlike and non-warlike exposures (East Timor, n?=?1333). A principal components analysis was used to identify groupings of non-traumatic exposures on deployment. Multiple regression models were used to assess the association between self-reported objective and subjective exposures, stressors on deployment and subsequent physical and mental health outcomes. Results The principal components analysis produced four groups of non-traumatic stressors which were consistent between the peacekeeping and more warlike deployments. These were labelled ‘separation’, ‘different culture’, ‘other people’ and ‘work frustration’. Higher levels of traumatic and non-traumatic exposures were reported by veterans of East Timor compared to Bougainville. Higher levels of subjective traumatic exposures were associated with increased rates of PTSD in East Timor veterans and more physical and psychological health symptoms in both deployed groups. In Bougainville and East Timor veterans some non-traumatic deployment stressors were also associated with worse health outcomes. Conclusion Strategies to best prepare, identify and treat those exposed to traumatic events and other stressors on deployment should be considered for Defence personnel deployed on both warlike and peacekeeping operations. PMID:22830494

  13. Walking to work in Canada: health benefits, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is mounting concern over increasing rates of physical inactivity and overweight/obesity among children and adult in Canada. There is a clear link between the amount of walking a person does and his or her health. The purpose of this paper is to assess the health factors, socio-economic characteristics and urban-regional variations of walking to work among adults in Canada. Methods Data is drawn from two cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey: 2001 and 2005. The study population is divided into three groups: non-walkers, lower-duration walkers and high-duration walkers. Logistic regression modeling tests the association between levels of walking and health related outcomes (diabetes, high blood pressure, stress, BMI, physical activity), socio-economic characteristics (sex, age, income, education) and place of residence (selected Census Metropolitan Areas). Results In 2005, the presence of diabetes and high blood pressure was not associated with any form of walking. Adults within the normal weight range were more likely to be high-duration walkers. Females and younger people were more likely to be lower-duration walkers but less likely to be high-duration walkers. There was a strong association between SES (particularly relative disadvantage) and walking to work. In both 2001 and 2005, the conditions influencing walking to work were especially prevalent in Canada's largest city, Toronto, as well as in several small to medium sized urban areas including Halifax, Kingston, Hamilton, Regina, Calgary and Victoria. Conclusion A number of strategies can be followed to increase levels of walking in Canada. It is clear that for many people walking to work is not possible. However, strategies can be developed to encourage adults to incorporate walking into their daily work and commuting routines. These include mass transit walking and workplace walking programs. PMID:21463527

  14. The Gay Men's Task Force: the impact of peer education on the sexual health behaviour of homosexual men in Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, L.; Hart, G.; Flowers, P.; Frankis, J.; Der G., J

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of a peer education intervention, based in the "gay" bars of Glasgow, which sought to reduce sexual risk behaviours for HIV infection and increase use of a dedicated homosexual men's sexual health service, and in particular increase the uptake of hepatitis B vaccination. Design: Self completed questionnaires administered to men who have sex with men (MSM) in Glasgow's gay bars. Subjects: 1442 men completed questionnaires in January 1999, 7 months after the end of the 9 month sexual health intervention. Main outcome measures: Self reported contact with the peer education intervention, reported behaviour change, and reported sexual health service use. Results: The Gay Men's Task Force (GMTF) symbol was recognised by 42% of the men surveyed. Among men who reported speaking with peer educators 49% reported thinking about their sexual behaviour and 26% reported changing their sexual behaviour. Logistic regressions demonstrated higher levels of HIV testing, hepatitis B vaccination, and use of sexual health services among men who reported contact with the intervention. These men were more likely to have used the homosexual specific sexual health service. Peer education dose effects were suggested, with the likelihood of HIV testing, hepatitis B vaccination, and use of sexual health services being greater among men who reported talking to peer educators more than once. Conclusion: The intervention had a direct impact on Glasgow's homosexual men and reached men of all ages and social classes. Higher levels of sexual health service use and uptake of specific services among men who had contact with the intervention are suggestive of an intervention effect. Peer education, as a form of health outreach, appears to be an effective intervention tool in terms of the uptake of sexual health services, but is less effective in achieving actual sexual behaviour change among homosexual men. Key Words: homosexual men; peer education; sexual behaviour; sexual health service use PMID:11714941

  15. Astronautical Hygiene - A New Discipline to Protect the Health of Astronauts Working in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, J. R.

    This paper outlines the rationale for a new scientific discipline namely astronautical hygiene. Astronautical hygiene is an applied science that utilises a knowledge of space toxicology, space medicine, astronautics, occupational hygiene etc. to identify the hazards, assess the exposure risks to health, and thereby determine the measures to mitigate exposure to protect the health of astronauts during living and working in space. This paper describes the nature of the hazards (i.e. physical, chemical, microbial and psychological) encountered during space flight. It discusses exposure risk assessment and the use of sampling techniques to assess astronaut health risks. This paper then discusses the measures used to mitigate exposure to the exposure hazards during space exploration. A case study of the application of the principles of astronautical hygiene to control lunar dust exposure is then described.

  16. Health of the American Indian. Report of a Regional Task Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michal, Mary L.; And Others

    Good health is the result of such factors as sanitation, adequate housing and clothing, nutritional food, and a health delivery system which protects against contagious diseases by immunization, provides for early detection and treatment, provides health education to promote practices that will prevent diseases, and gives services in a culturally…

  17. RISK ASSESSMENT New and Expectant Mothers The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999) include specific

    E-print Network

    Barker, Jon

    1999-01-01

    RISK ASSESSMENT ­ New and Expectant Mothers The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations to the health and safety of the employee? Yes No If there is a risk, please contact Health & Safety for further their employer they are pregnant they are required to conduct a risk assessment and take any appropriate measures

  18. The Effect of Child Health Insurance Access on Schooling: Evidence from Public Insurance Expansions. NBER Working Paper No. 20178

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohodes, Sarah; Kleiner, Samuel; Lovenheim, Michael F.; Grossman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Public health insurance programs comprise a large share of federal and state government expenditure, and these programs are due to be expanded as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act. Despite a large literature on the effects of these programs on health care utilization and health outcomes, little prior work has examined the long-term effects of…

  19. Investigating the exercise-prescription practices of nurses working in inpatient mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Robert; Happell, Brenda; Reaburn, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Nurses working in mental health are well positioned to prescribe exercise to people with mental illness. However, little is known regarding their exercise-prescription practices. We examined the self-reported physical activity and exercise-prescription practices of nurses working in inpatient mental health facilities. Thirty-four nurses completed the Exercise in Mental Illness Questionnaire - Health Practitioner Version. Non-parametric bivariate statistics revealed no relationship between nurses' self-reported physical activity participation and the frequency of exercise prescription for people with mental illness. Exercise-prescription parameters used by nurses are consistent with those recommended for both the general population and for people with mental illness. A substantial number of barriers to effective exercise prescription, including lack of training, systemic issues (such as prioritization and lack of time), and lack of consumer motivation, impact on the prescription of exercise for people with mental illness. Addressing the barriers to exercise prescription could improve the proportion of nurses who routinely prescribe exercise. Collaboration with exercise professionals, such as accredited exercise physiologists or physiotherapists, might improve knowledge of evidence-based exercise-prescription practices for people with mental illness, thereby improving both physical and mental health outcomes for this vulnerable population. PMID:25639383

  20. Why work kills. A brief history of occupational safety and health in the United States.

    PubMed

    Berman, D M

    1977-01-01

    In the early 20th century, U.S. monopoly corporations responded to the movement against work accidents by setting up a business-controlled "compensation-safety establishment," which kept down compensation costs but did little to improve working conditions. The "establishment" was able to keep the issue of occupational safety and health out of public debate until the late 1960's through its control of research, education, compensation, and government appointments in the area, and by creating the public impression that the problems of occupational disease were almost nonexistent. Despite the occurrence of sporadic rank-and-file uprisings, unions have been seriously involved in health and safety only since the late 1960's, when they mobilized in an effort to pass the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. The passage of the OSHA law was made possible by the help of progressive professionals, worker dissatisfaction, the new environmental consciousness, and a general climate of social unrest. Although the corporate elite, through the "compensation-safety establishment," has been able to dominate the operation of the federal institutions created by the new law, the question of occupational health and safety is now on the permanent agenda of workers, unions, and the public. PMID:137881

  1. How can occupational health services in Sweden contribute to work ability?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lisa; Sjöström, John; Antonsson, Ann-Beth

    2012-01-01

    Occupational health service in Sweden is often described as an important and strategic resource to reduce work-related diseases, improve work ability and successfully assess improvement of the workplace. However, not much research has been done on how OHS contribute to reduced absence due to work-related illness or improvement of the work ability of employees. In our study, the ambition has been to describe how OHS can contribute and give effects in client companies. Fifteen companies considered to be good examples were selected in cooperation with the social partners. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with representatives of the company and OHS. The results show that efficient collaboration depend strongly on the relationship between the OHS and the company, and were highly correlated with a continuously dialogue and contact. Good occupational safety and health management at company level was a key factor for effective use of OHS. The strategic collaborations also often led to that OHSs contribution was gradually shifted from a reactive or medical focus to a more proactive approach. Several of the interviewed OHSs also held this strategy to work more with prevention, and focusing on "treating the organization", not the individual, leaving the executive measures to the company. PMID:22317176

  2. Relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca

    2014-02-01

    Employee turnover is a large and expensive problem in the long-term care environment. Stated intention to leave is a reliable indicator of likely turnover, but actual predictors, especially for nursing assistants, have been incompletely investigated. This quantitative study identifies the relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,589 employees in 18 for-profit nursing homes. A working condition index for the number of beneficial job features was constructed. Poisson regression modeling found that employees who reported four positive features were 77% less likely to state strong intention to leave (PR = 0.23, p < .001). The strength of relationship between working conditions and intention to leave was slightly mediated by employee mental health. Effective workplace intervention programs must address work organization features to reduce employee intention to leave. Healthy workplaces should build better interpersonal relationships, show respect for employee work, and involve employees in decision-making processes. PMID:24652941

  3. Associations between Exercise and Health Behaviors in a Community Sample of Working Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerri N. Boutelle; David M. Murray; Robert W. Jeffery; Deborah J. Hennrikus; Harry A. Lando

    2000-01-01

    Background. The present study examined the associations between leisure-time exercise and a range of health behaviors and reports of illness and injury in a sample of community working adults.Methods. The study population included 4907 women and 4136 men who completed surveys in 24 worksites in the Minneapolis–St. Paul metropolitan area.Results. Participants in the study were ranked by gender according to

  4. Risk of adverse health outcomes associated with frequency and duration of deployment with the Australian Defence Force.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Jonathan; McFarlane, Alexander; McGuire, Annabel; Treloar, Susan; Waller, Michael; Dobson, Annette

    2011-02-01

    The operational tempo of the Australian Defence Force has increased over the last two decades. We examine the relationship between health of personnel and the frequency and duration of their deployment. Self-reported health measures (number of symptoms, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist) were compared for people who had never deployed to those who had deployed only once and for those who had deployed at least twice with at least one deployment to East Timor and one deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq. Comparisons were also made between people who had deployed for at least one month and those who had deployed for longer periods. Frequency of deployment but not duration of deployment was associated with poorer health. PMID:21366074

  5. Work improvement and occupational safety and health management systems: common features and research needs.

    PubMed

    Kogi, Kazutaka

    2002-04-01

    There is a growing trend in re-orientating occupational health research towards risk management. Such a trend is accelerated by the increasing attention to occupational safety and health management systems. The trend, also seen in many Asian countries, is offering new opportunities for strengthening primary prevention. Useful examples are provided from recent work improvement projects dealing with technology transfer, small workplaces and rural areas. Common features of both these work improvement projects and accepted occupational risk management principles are reviewed based on recent experiences in Asian countries. Such features seem highly relevant in examining the occupational health research strategies. These experiences clearly show that locally adjusted procedures for risk assessment and control must be developed. There are new research needs concerning (a) the effective ways to encourage voluntary control at the workplace; (b) practical methods for local risk assessment; and (c) the types of participatory steps leading to continual improvements in the varying local context. Criteria of action-oriented research that can contribute to more effective risk control in different settings are discussed. Six relevant criteria may be mentioned: (a) adaptive risk management; (b) work/risk relationships; (c) action-oriented risk assessment; (d) use of collective expertise; (e) participation of local people; and (f) mutual learning. It appears crucial to stimulate research into the practical risk control procedures adjusted to the local situation. PMID:12064553

  6. Establishing the computer-patient working alliance in automated health behavior change interventions.

    PubMed

    Bickmore, Timothy; Gruber, Amanda; Picard, Rosalind

    2005-10-01

    Current user interfaces for automated patient and consumer health care systems can be improved by leveraging the results of several decades of research into effective patient-provider communication skills. A research project is presented in which several such "relational" skills - including empathy, social dialogue, nonverbal immediacy behaviors, and other behaviors to build and maintain good working relationships over multiple interactions - are explicitly designed into a computer interface within the context of a longitudinal health behavior change intervention for physical activity adoption. Results of a comparison among 33 subjects interacting near-daily with the relational system and 27 interacting near-daily with an identical system with the relational behaviors ablated, each for 30 days indicate, that the use of relational behaviors by the system significantly increases working alliance and desire to continue working with the system. Comparison of the above groups to another group of 31 subjects interacting with a control system near-daily for 30 days also indicated a significant increase in proactive viewing of health information. PMID:16198215

  7. Booster Breaks in the workplace: participants’ perspectives on health-promoting work breaks

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Wendell C.; King, Kathryn E.; Shegog, Ross; Paxton, Raheem J.; Evans-Hudnall, Gina L.; Rempel, David M.; Chen, Vincent; Yancey, Antronette K.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing sedentary work has been associated with greater cardiovascular and metabolic risk, as well as premature mortality. Interrupting the sedentary workday with health-promoting work breaks can counter these negative health effects. To examine the potential sustainability of work-break programs, we assessed the acceptance of these breaks among participants in a Booster Break program. We analyzed qualitative responses from 35 participants across five worksites where one 15-min physical activity break was taken each workday. Two worksites completed a 1-year intervention and three worksites completed a 6-month intervention. Responses to two open-ended questions about the acceptance and feasibility of Booster Breaks were obtained from a survey administered after the intervention. Three themes for benefits and two themes for barriers were identified. The benefit themes were (i) reduced stress and promoted enjoyment, (ii) increased health awareness and facilitated behavior change, and (iii) enhanced workplace social interaction. The barrier themes were the need for (iv) greater variety in Booster Break routines and (v) greater management support. This study provides empirical support for the acceptance and feasibility of Booster Breaks during the workday. Emphasizing the benefits and minimizing the barriers are strategies that can be used to implement Booster Breaks in other workplaces. PMID:23466367

  8. Understanding partnership practice in primary health as pedagogic work: what can Vygotsky's theory of learning offer?

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Primary health policy in Australia has followed international trends in promoting models of care based on partnership between professionals and health service users. This reform agenda has significant practice implications, and has been widely adopted in areas of primary health that involve supporting families with children. Existing research shows that achieving partnership in practice is associated with three specific challenges: uncertainty regarding the role of professional expertise, tension between immediate needs and longer-term capacity development in families, and the need for challenge while maintaining relationships based on trust. Recently, pedagogic or learning-focussed elements of partnership practice have been identified, but there have been no systematic attempts to link theories of learning with the practices and challenges of primary health-care professionals working with families in a pedagogic role. This paper explores key concepts of Vygotsky's theory of learning (including mediation, the zone of proximal development, internalisation, and double stimulation), showing how pedagogic concepts can provide a bridge between the policy rhetoric of partnership and primary health practice. The use of this theory to address the three key challenges is explicitly discussed. PMID:24215942

  9. Understanding dissatisfied users: developing a framework for comprehending criticisms of health care work.

    PubMed

    Coyle, J

    1999-09-01

    Recent government proposals have underlined the importance of ascertaining users' views of health care. Traditionally these have been obtained through satisfaction surveys. However, researchers argue that the focus of attention should now shift to exploring dissatisfaction because it highlights more clearly any problems in lay-practitioner relationships. Research has shown that dissatisfaction is a complex social construct which is underpinned by a range of values, beliefs, attitudes and experiences. The aim of this paper is to provide insights into the meaning of dissatisfaction by exploring how dissatisfied users attribute cause, responsibility and blame for their untoward experiences. Forty-one people were identified from a household survey of user views as experiencing problems with their health care. They were interviewed in depth, and a grounded theory approach was used to construct a framework inductively from their accounts. This identified a number of normative expectations through which health work was routinely criticized; these included respondents casting aspersions on the professional integrity of health care practitioners and preserving their own moral identity through demonstrating competence, knowledge, rationality, reasonableness and concern for others. Moreover, it is argued that these patterns help practitioners to understand how dissatisfied users' perceive subsequent health care encounters. PMID:10499230

  10. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes…

  11. [Analysis of workplace health promotion and its effect on work ability and health-related quality of life in a medium-sized business].

    PubMed

    Biallas, B; Froböse, I; Zöller, M; Wilke, C

    2015-05-01

    This study analyses the effect of workplace health promotion on work ability and health-related quality of life in white-collar and blue-collar workers in a medium-sized business. The intervention group contains 75 subjects with a mean age of 36.6±10.63 years (55 men, 20 women). The participation rate is 47%. White-collar workers show improvement in their health-related quality of life regarding physical and psychological aspects and work ability. Physically inactive employees show improvement in their health-related quality of life regarding physical and psychological aspects as well as context. Active employees only show significant improvement in terms of work ability. In conclusion, the promotion of exercise in the context of occupational health promotion has a positive effect on quality of life and work ability of employees and, thus, is a benefit for both the individual as well as the business itself. PMID:24810235

  12. What elements of the work environment are most responsible for health worker dissatisfaction in rural primary care clinics in Tanzania?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In countries with high maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality, reliable access to quality healthcare in rural areas is essential to save lives. Health workers who are satisfied with their jobs are more likely to remain in rural posts. Understanding what factors influence health workers’ satisfaction can help determine where resources should be focused. Although there is a growing body of research assessing health worker satisfaction in hospitals, less is known about health worker satisfaction in rural, primary health clinics. This study explores the workplace satisfaction of health workers in primary health clinics in rural Tanzania. Methods Overall, 70 health workers in rural Tanzania participated in a self-administered job satisfaction survey. We calculated mean ratings for 17 aspects of the work environment. We used principal components analysis (PCA) to identify groupings of these variables. We then examined the bivariate associations between health workers demographics and clinic characteristics and each of the satisfaction scales. Results Results showed that 73.9% of health workers strongly agreed that they were satisfied with their job; however, only 11.6% strongly agreed that they were satisfied with their level of pay and 2.9% with the availability of equipment and supplies. Two categories of factors emerged from the PCA: the tools and infrastructure to provide care, and supportive interpersonal environment. Nurses and medical attendants (compared to clinical officers) and older health workers had higher satisfaction scale ratings. Conclusions Two dimensions of health workers’ work environment, namely infrastructure and supportive interpersonal work environment, explained much of the variation in satisfaction among rural Tanzanian health workers in primary health clinics. Health workers were generally more satisfied with supportive interpersonal relationships than with the infrastructure. Human resource policies should consider how to improve these two aspects of work as a means for improving health worker morale and potentially rural attrition. Trial registration (ISRCTN 17107760) PMID:25086596

  13. Adolescent ADHD and Adult Physical and Mental Health, Work Performance, and Financial Stress

    PubMed Central

    Brook, David W.; Zhang, Chenshu; Seltzer, Nathan; Finch, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is a scarcity of longitudinal studies of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) followed until adulthood. We studied the relationship between ADHD in adolescence and impaired general physical health, impaired general mental health, antisocial personality disorder, impaired work performance, and high financial stress in adulthood. METHODS: A prospective design incorporated 6 assessments of participants spanning mean ages from 14 to 37 years. Two baseline assessments were taken between ages 14 and 16 years, and 5 outcome assessments were taken at mean age 37 years. Participants were assessed with structured interviews and questionnaires. The participants were from a community sample of individuals initially drawn in 1975 and followed to a mean age of 37 years in 2009. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ADHD in adolescence as related to internal stress in adulthood were 1.82 (95% CI = 1.01–3.25; P < .05) for impaired general physical health, 2.36 (95% CI = 1.23–4.51; P < .01) for impaired general mental health, and 3.28 (95% CI = 1.51–7.13; P < .01) for antisocial personality disorder. The adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs for ADHD in adolescence as related to external stress were 2.46 (95% CI = 1.37–4.43; P < .01) for impaired work performance and 3.33 (95% CI = 1.70–6.55; P < .001) for high financial stress. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should focus on early diagnosis and treatment of adolescent ADHD because it is a major predictor of an array of physical, mental, work, and financial problems in adulthood. PMID:23230074

  14. Errorless learning for training individuals with schizophrenia at a community mental health setting providing work experience.

    PubMed

    Kern, Robert S; Liberman, Robert P; Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Green, Michael F

    2009-07-01

    The effects of errorless learning (EL) on work performance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with conventional job training in a community mental health fellowship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job tasks based on principles of EL, such as error reduction and automation of task performance. CI participants received training common to other community-based entry-level jobs that included verbal instruction, a visual demonstration, independent practice, and corrective feedback. Participants were scheduled to work 2 hours per week for 12 weeks. For both groups, job training occurred during the first 2 weeks at the worksite. Work performance (assessed using the Work Behavior Inventory, WBI) and personal well-being (self-esteem, job satisfaction, and work stress) were assessed at weeks 2, 4, and 12. Job tenure was defined as the number of weeks on the job or total number of hours worked prior to quitting or study end. The EL group performed better than the CI group on the Work Quality Scale from the WBI, and the group differences were relatively consistent over time. Results from the survival analyses of job tenure revealed a non-significant trend favoring EL. There were no group differences on self-esteem, job satisfaction, or work stress. The findings provide modest support for the extensions of EL to community settings for enhancing work performance. PMID:18326529

  15. Use of the Air Force Post-Deployment Health Reassessment for the Identification of Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Public Health Implications for Suicide Prevention

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Michael D.; Knox, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Military members are required to complete the Post-Deployment Health Assessment on return from deployment and the Post-Deployment Health Reassessment (PHDRA) 90 to 180 days later, and we assessed the PDHRA’s sensitivity and specificity in identifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression after a military deployment among US Air Force personnel. Methods. We computed the PDHRA’s sensitivity and specificity for depression and PTSD and developed a structural model to suggest possible improvements to it. Results. For depression, sensitivity and specificity were 0.704 and 0.651, respectively; for PTSD, they were 0.774 and 0.650, respectively. Several variables produced significant direct effects on depression and trauma, suggesting that modifications could increase its sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions. The PDHRA was moderately effective in identifying airmen with depression and PTSD. It identified behavioral health concerns in many airmen who did not develop a diagnostic mental health condition. Its low level of specificity may result in reduced barriers to care and increased support services, key components of a public health approach to suicide prevention, for airmen experiencing subacute levels of distress after deployment, which may, in part, account for lower suicide rates among airmen after deployment. PMID:22390604

  16. Environmental Health Research Recommendations from the Inter-Environmental Health Sciences Core Center Working Group on Unconventional Natural Gas Drilling Operations

    PubMed Central

    Breysse, Patrick N.; Gray, Kathleen; Howarth, Marilyn; Yan, Beizhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Unconventional natural gas drilling operations (UNGDO) (which include hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling) supply an energy source that is potentially cleaner than liquid or solid fossil fuels and may provide a route to energy independence. However, significant concerns have arisen due to the lack of research on the public health impact of UNGDO. Objectives: Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers (EHSCCs), funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), formed a working group to review the literature on the potential public health impact of UNGDO and to make recommendations for needed research. Discussion: The Inter-EHSCC Working Group concluded that a potential for water and air pollution exists that might endanger public health, and that the social fabric of communities could be impacted by the rapid emergence of drilling operations. The working group recommends research to inform how potential risks could be mitigated. Conclusions: Research on exposure and health outcomes related to UNGDO is urgently needed, and community engagement is essential in the design of such studies. Citation: Penning TM, Breysse PN, Gray K, Howarth M, Yan B. 2014. Environmental health research recommendations from the Inter-Environmental Health Sciences Core Center Working Group on Unconventional Natural Gas Drilling Operations. Environ Health Perspect 122:1155–1159;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408207 PMID:25036093

  17. [Return to work of a pacemaker bearing worker: the relationship between health problems and electromagnetic interferences].

    PubMed

    Taino, G; Frigerio, F

    2004-01-01

    The potential effects of electromagnetic fields is a problem that interest the public opinion, as the modern society expose all people to electromagnetic non ionizing radiations. The problem has a particular and important meaning facing the return to normal life and work conditions of a cardiopatic subject bearing a pacemaker (PM) or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Electromagnetic interferences can produce temporary or permanent malfunctions in these devices. Checking for the absence of electromagnetic interferences is necessary considering that correct functioning of these medical devices is essential for the life of the bearer. Precautions normally adopted by these subjects are generally adequate to ensure protection from interferences present in life environment; for occupational environment, there is often lack of adequate information, also due to late involving of the doctor specialist in occupational health. This work intends to study in depth a specific job, a carpentry-workshop with welding activities, starting with a case of a PM bearer who asked a doctor specialist in occupational health to evaluate the problems involved in his return to work. Electric and magnetic fields produced by equipments present in the workshop were measured and compared to data supplied by the literature to evaluate the possibility of interactions in the normally functioning of implanted electronic devices. On the basis of our experience, we have found some criterions for specific risk assessement to adopt for the definition of operative protocols for return to work of PM or ICD carriers, also considering the lack of specific procedures and indications for the doctor specialist in occupational health. The collected information and data from the literature suggest that welding can be a risk for a subject with PM; as observed in experimental conditions, electromagnetic radiations can alter particular sensitive devices and those with uncorrected settings. PMID:15270435

  18. WORKING PAPER N 2013 38 Child health and use of health care services in France: Evidence on

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    of income in child anthropometric measurements. Whenever possible, we compare our results for France the correlation between household income, child general health, specific health problems, anthropometric. In addition, income is strongly correlated with anthropometric characteristics. The use of health care

  19. An Integrative, Multilevel, and Transdisciplinary Research Approach to Challenges of Work, Family, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Jeremy W.; Kelly, Erin L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Almeida, David M.; Dearing, James W.; King, Rosalind B.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing a need for rigorous, experimental research to support the efforts of workplaces and policymakers in improving the health and wellbeing of employees and their families, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention formed the Work, Family & Health Network (WFHN). The WFHN is implementing an innovative multisite study with a rigorous experimental design (adaptive randomization, control groups), comprehensive multilevel measures, a novel and theoretically based intervention targeting the psychosocial work environment, and translational activities. This paper describes challenges and benefits of designing a multilevel and transdisciplinary research network that includes an effectiveness study to assess intervention effects on employees, families, and managers; a daily diary study to examine effects on family functioning and daily stress; a process study to understand intervention implementation; and translational research to understand and inform diffusion of innovation. Challenges were both conceptual and logistical, spanning all aspects of study design and implementation. In dealing with these challenges, however, the WFHN developed innovative, transdisciplinary, multi-method approaches to conducting workplace research that will benefit both the research and business communities. PMID:24618878

  20. Associations between strain in domestic work and self-rated health: A study of employed women in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CARIN STALAND-NYMAN; KRISTINA ALEXANDERSON; GUNNEL HENSING

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between strain in domestic work and self-rated health among employed women in Sweden, using two different methods of measuring strain in domestic work. Methods: Questionnaire data were collected on health and living conditions in paid and unpaid work for employed women (n51,417), aged 17-64 years. ''Domestic job strain'' was

  1. 'Between the demands of truth and government': health practitioners, trust and immunisation work.

    PubMed

    Brownlie, Julie; Howson, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    Applied and theoretical work on health governance and governmentality has often not engaged with the perspectives of practitioners and, in particular, with their understandings about trust. In this paper, we address these absences through looking at a critical technology of governmentality--child immunisation. We do this, first, by examining theoretical links between risk, trust and knowledge in relation to the governance of health. We then draw on findings from our secondary analysis of qualitative data based on interviews with key actors in primary care in Scotland charged with the delivery of a particular immunisation--the MMR vaccine. While many practitioners, like parents, have typically perceived immunisation--along with other public health initiatives-as obligatory and as part of 'good citizenship', we argue that in relation to MMR and in the context of clinical governance, practitioners are having to engage in complex negotiations about knowledge and trust--negotiations that are at the heart of governing health at a distance. PMID:16046042

  2. “He forced me to love him”: putting violence on adolescent sexual health agendas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katharine Wood; Fidelia Maforah; Rachel Jewkes

    1998-01-01

    Violence against women within sexual relationships is a neglected area in public health despite the fact that, in partially defining women's capacity to protect themselves against STDs, pregnancy and unwanted sexual intercourse, it directly affects female reproductive health. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study conducted among Xhosa-speaking adolescent women in South Africa which revealed male violent and

  3. A Study of the Participation of Women in the Health Care Industry Labor Force. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebowitz, Ann, Ed.

    A study was conducted to explore the relationship between socioeconomic and personal circumstances of women in health occupations and their labor market behavior. Using a conceptual framework (the Life Patterning Process), discussions were held in six states with a total of 279 women representing five health occupations: registered nurses,…

  4. Markets for individual health insurance: can we make them work with incentives to purchase insurance?

    PubMed

    Swartz, K

    2001-01-01

    Simple income-based incentives to purchase health insurance (tax credits or deductions, or subsidies) are unlikely to succeed in significantly reducing the number of uninsured because income is not a good predictor of the extent to which individuals use medical service. Proposals to provide incentives to low-income people so they will purchase individual health insurance need to address the inherent tension between the interests of low-risk and high-risk people who rely on individual coverage. If carriers are forced to cover all applicants and to community rate premiums, low-risk people will drop coverage or not apply for it because premiums will exceed their expected need for insurance. Concern for people who currently have access to individual coverage calls for careful examination of options to permit incentive programs to succeed with the individual insurance markets. In particular, attention should focus on using alternatives to simple income-based subsidies to spread the burden of high-risk people's costs broadly, rather than impose the costs on low-risk people who purchase individual coverage. This paper describes three such alternatives. One uses risk adjustments and two rely on reinsurance so that carriers are compensated for the higher costs of covering high-risk people who use incentives to buy insurance. One alternative also permits risk selection by insurance carriers. PMID:11529511

  5. The US Air Force Suicide Prevention Program: Implications for Public Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Pflanz, Steven; Talcott, Gerald W.; Campise, Rick L.; Lavigne, Jill E.; Bajorska, Alina; Tu, Xin; Caine, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of the US Air Force Suicide Prevention Program (AFSPP) in reducing suicide, and we measured the extent to which air force installations implemented the program. Methods. We determined the AFSPP's impact on suicide rates in the air force by applying an intervention regression model to data from 1981 through 2008, providing 16 years of data before the program's 1997 launch and 11 years of data after launch. Also, we measured implementation of program components at 2 points in time: during a 2004 increase in suicide rates, and 2 years afterward. Results. Suicide rates in the air force were significantly lower after the AFSPP was launched than before, except during 2004. We also determined that the program was being implemented less rigorously in 2004. Conclusions. The AFSPP effectively prevented suicides in the US Air Force. The long-term effectiveness of this program depends upon extensive implementation and effective monitoring of implementation. Suicides can be reduced through a multilayered, overlapping approach that encompasses key prevention domains and tracks implementation of program activities. PMID:20466973

  6. Undocumented Migrants in Canada: A scope literature review on health, access to services, and working conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Christine; Gastaldo, Denise

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that there are 30 to 40 million undocumented workers worldwide. Although undocumented migration has become an issue of high international relevance, it has been strikingly understudied in Canada, especially with respect to its impact on health. The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of undocumentedness in Canada through a scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish between 2002 and 2008. The specific aims are to: i) summarize and disseminate current academic and community-based findings on the health, service access and working conditions of undocumented migrants in Canada; ii) examine the sources and use of evidence; iii) identify significant gaps in existing knowledge; iv) set recommendations for policy and research, including considerations on transnationalism, ethics, interdisciplinary approaches, gender differences, resilience, and impact on the children of non-status parents. PMID:19657739

  7. Postpartum care of the mother and newborn: a practical guide. Technical Working Group, World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    This paper defines the needs of women and their newborns, and classifies a number of practices common in postpartum care. It is a summary of the report, Postpartum Care of the Mother and Newborn: A Practical Guide, which was developed by a Technical Working Group of the World Health Organization and published in 1998. The report takes a comprehensive view of maternal and newborn needs during the postpartum period, examining major maternal and neonatal health challenges, nutrition and breastfeeding, birth spacing, immunization, HIV/AIDS, and the essential elements of care and service provision. The document lists recommendations, and classifies common practices in the postpartum period, dividing them into four categories: those which are useful, those which are harmful, those for which insufficient evidence exists, and those which are frequently used inappropriately. PMID:10655832

  8. Barriers to Mental Health Service Use Among Workers With Depression and Work Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article estimates the decrease in workplace productivity losses associated with removal of three types of barriers to mental health service use among workers with depression. Methods: A model of productivity losses based on the results of a population-based survey of Canadian workers was used to estimate the impact of three types of barriers to mental health service use among workers with depression. Results: Removing the service need recognition barrier is associated with a 33% decrease in work productivity losses. There is a 49% decrease when all three barriers are removed. Conclusions: Our results suggest recognizing the need for treatment is only one barrier to service use; attitudinal and structural barriers should also be considered. The greatest decrease in productivity losses is observed with the removal of all three barriers. PMID:26147540

  9. Scale Refinement and Initial Evaluation of a Behavioral Health Function Measurement Tool for Work Disability Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M.; Chan, Leighton; Rasch, Elizabeth K.; Brandt, Diane E.; Jette, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To use item response theory (IRT) data simulations to construct and perform initial psychometric testing of a newly developed instrument, the Social Security Administration Behavioral Health Function (SSA-BH) instrument, that aims to assess behavioral health functioning relevant to the context of work. Design Cross-sectional survey followed by item response theory (IRT) calibration data simulations Setting Community Participants A sample of individuals applying for SSA disability benefits, claimants (N=1015), and a normative comparative sample of US adults (N=1000) Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure Social Security Administration Behavioral Health Function (SSA-BH) measurement instrument Results Item response theory analyses supported the unidimensionality of four SSA-BH scales: Mood and Emotions (35 items), Self-Efficacy (23 items), Social Interactions (6 items), and Behavioral Control (15 items). All SSA-BH scales demonstrated strong psychometric properties including reliability, accuracy, and breadth of coverage. High correlations of the simulated 5- or 10- item CATs with the full item bank indicated robust ability of the CAT approach to comprehensively characterize behavioral health function along four distinct dimensions. Conclusions Initial testing and evaluation of the SSA-BH instrument demonstrated good accuracy, reliability, and content coverage along all four scales. Behavioral function profiles of SSA claimants were generated and compared to age and sex matched norms along four scales: Mood and Emotions, Behavioral Control, Social Interactions, and Self-Efficacy. Utilizing the CAT based approach offers the ability to collect standardized, comprehensive functional information about claimants in an efficient way, which may prove useful in the context of the SSA’s work disability programs. PMID:23542404

  10. Championing mental health at work: emerging practice from innovative projects in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark; Tilford, Sylvia; Branney, Peter; Kinsella, Karina

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the value of participatory approaches within interventions aimed at promoting mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. Specifically the paper explores data from the thematic evaluation of the Mental Health and Employment project strand within the Altogether Better programme being implemented in England in the Yorkshire and Humber region, which was funded through the BIG Lottery and aimed to empower people across the region to lead better lives. The evaluation combined a systematic evidence review with semi-structured interviews across mental health and employment projects. Drawing on both evaluation elements, the paper examines the potential of workplace-based 'business champions' to facilitate organizational culture change within enterprises within a deprived regional socio-economic environment. First, the paper identifies key policy drivers for interventions around mental health and employment, summarizes evidence review findings and describes the range of activities within three projects. The role of the 'business champion' emerged as crucial to these interventions and therefore, secondly, the paper examines how champions' potential to make a difference depends on the work settings and their existing roles, skills and motivation. In particular, champions can proactively coordinate project strands, embed the project, encourage participation, raise awareness, encourage changes to work procedures and strengthen networks and partnerships. The paper explores how these processes can facilitate changes in organizational culture. Challenges of implementation are identified, including achieving leverage with senior management, handover of ownership to fellow employees, assessing impact and sustainability. Finally, implications for policy and practice are discussed, and conclusions drawn concerning the roles of champions within different workplace environments. PMID:23300189

  11. Work, Diabetes and Obesity: A Seven Year Follow-Up Study among Danish Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Kjeld; Cleal, Bryan; Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The rise in prevalence of diabetes is alarming and research ascribes most of the increase to lifestyle. However, little knowledge exists about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study estimates the importance of work and lifestyle as risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus among healthcare workers and explores the association of work factors and obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. Methods Questionnaire-based prospective cohort study among 7,305 health care workers followed for seven years in the Danish National Diabetes Register. We used bivariate comparisons to give an unadjusted estimate of associations, followed by adjusted survival analysis and logistic regression models to estimate the influences of potential risk factors related to job, health and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity. Results During seven years of follow up, 3.5% of participants developed diabetes, associated with obesity (HR ?=? 6.53; 95% CI 4.68–9.10), overweight (HR ?=? 2.89; CI 2.11–3.96) age 50–69 y (HR ?=? 2.27; 95% CI 1.57–3.43) and high quality of leadership (HR ?=? 1.60; CI 1.19–2.16). Obesity at baseline was most common among the youngest employees, and was mainly associated with developing diabetes (OR ?=? 3.84; CI 2.85–5.17), impaired physical capacity and physical inactivity. In the occupational setting, obesity was associated with shift work, severe musculoskeletal pain, low influence, but also by good management, fewer role conflicts and a positive work-life balance. Looking only at non-smokers, removed the influence of age and pain. However, non-smokers also had higher depression scores and more role conflicts. Conclusions Confirming obesity as the strongest risk factor for developing diabetes, the present study identified few occupational risk factors. However, obesity, the key risk factor for diabetes, had a more variable relation with work than did diabetes. PMID:25068830

  12. Is health, measured by work ability index, affected by 12-hour rotating shift schedules?

    PubMed

    Yong, Mei; Nasterlack, Michael; Pluto, Rolf-Peter; Elmerich, Kathrin; Karl, Dorothee; Knauth, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Two forms of continuously forward rotating 12-h shift schedules exist at BASF's Ludwigshafen site. These shift schedules were compared with a daytime working system to investigate potential differential effects on employee's health status assessed with the Work Ability Index (WAI). In the 3 x 12 system, a 12-h day shift is followed 24 h later by a 12-h night shift, and after a day off the employee returns to the day shift. The 4 x 12 schedule follows the same pattern except that there are 2 days off between the night and next day shift. A total of 924 participants (278 3 x 12 and 321 4 x 12 shiftworkers and 325 day workers) were recruited. A self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information about shiftwork schedule, demographic characteristics, and lifestyle and social factors, and the WAI was applied. The outcomes of interest were the WAI sum score and its seven dimensions. In examining the relationship with the WAI categories, a Proportional Odds Model (POM) was used to identify the potential determinants. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the impact of age on single dimensions of WAI after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Increasing age and obesity (BMI > or = 30) were the only significant determinants of poorer WAI. Although a positive association was found linking the second WAI dimension (work ability in relation to job demands) with age, an inverse association was demonstrated consistently between age and the third and fourth WAI dimensions, i.e., number of diagnosed diseases and estimated work impairment due to disease, after adjustment for potential confounders. The age-dependency was moderate overall, but seemed to be stronger among shift- than day workers, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant differential impact of the working time systems on the WAI sum score or on the individual WAI dimensions. Thus, there is no indication of an excessive adverse health impact of these shift schedules compared to day work, to the extent that health can be measured by the WAI. PMID:20636221

  13. Predictors of work-related stress among nurses working in primary and secondary health care levels in Dammam, Eastern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Makhaita, Huda M.; Sabra, Amr A.; Hafez, Ahmed S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Work-related stress (WRS) is an insidious and persistent part of everyday life related to the response of people to work environment. Nursing is a strenuous job and WRS is prevalent among nurses. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of WRS among nurses working in primary and secondary health care levels in Dammam, Eastern Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in 17 primary health care centers (PHCCs) representing the primary level of health care and? Medical Tower Complex (MTC) representing the secondary health care level in Dammam city. The total number of nurses included in the study was 637 nurses (144 in PHCCs) and (493 MTC). Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, which was developed based on the pertinent literature. It included two main parts: Sociodemographic and job characteristics of nurses and 31 WRS questions. Results: The overall prevalence of WRS among all studied nurses was 45.5%; 43.1% and 46.2% in primary and secondary levels, respectively. In the primary level, there was a statistical significant association between WRS and being married (85.5%), and having living three children and more (53.2%). Moreover, younger age group 20-<30 years (79.4%), Saudi nationality (86.8%), being married (74.6%), having nonbachelor degree (83.3%), work shifts (89.5%), and working in surgical department (46.5%) were the significant associating factors with the occurrence of WRS among nurses in secondary levels. Young age was the only predicting factor for WRS in primary care level. While being female, Saudi, married, with work shifts, and working in surgical department were found to predict WRS in the secondary level. Recommendations: Appropriate strategy in health care organization to investigate stress in health care settings is recommended. Moreover, interventional programs to identify, and relieve sources and effects of stress should be developed. PMID:24987275

  14. The Experiences of Violence and Occupational Health Risks of Sex Workers Working in Brothels in Ankara

    PubMed Central

    Odaba??, Aysun Balseven; ?ahinoglu, Serap; Genç, Yasemin; Bilge, Ya?ar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to reveal and discuss occupational health risks, violence against sex workers working in brothels and their working conditions in Ankara. Materials and Methods: The study included 138 sex workers. Data were collected at face to face interviews with a questionnaire composed of 40 questions about socio-demographic features, familial characteristics, reasons for becoming a sex worker, experiences of violence and occupational health risks. Results: Twenty-two point five percent of the women were aged 21–30 years and 39.9% were aged 31–40 years. The mean time of education was 5.9±3.5 (0–14) years. Forty-eight point five percent of the women were exposed to physical abuse and 13% of the women had been exposed to sexual abuse in their childhood. Fifty-five point eight percent of the women reported that their clients always used condoms, but 97.1% of the women noted that their clients insisted on not using a condom. Fourteen point five percent and 70.3% of the women were exposed to physical and verbal violence respectively from their clients. Ten point one percent of the women suffered sexual assault while working. Conclusion: Sex workers, like other people, should have human rights, all types of violence that they face should be eliminated and the social conditions they are exposed to should be improved. Sexually transmitted diseases, the most important health risk of sex workers, should be considered as occupational diseases in the new regulations. PMID:25206986

  15. What's the difference between the Higher Diploma in Safety, Health and Welfare at Work, the Graduate Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health, and the MSc in Occupational Safety and

    E-print Network

    What's the difference between the Higher Diploma in Safety, Health and Welfare at Work, the Graduate Diploma in Occupational Safety and Health, and the MSc in Occupational Safety and Health? AD May 2010 Since 2007-8, the Centre for Safety and Health at Work in the UCD School of Public Health

  16. Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility. Proceedings of a Conference (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 23-26, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Denis, Gerald C., Ed.

    This document contains a list of planning committee members, institute participants, an introduction by Gerald C. St. Denis a program agenda, and institute presentations from this conference. The following presentations are included: (1) "Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility" (Stanley F. Battle); (2)…

  17. Roles of Participatory Action-oriented Programs in Promoting Safety and Health at Work

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Reflecting the current international trends toward proactive risk assessment and control at work with practical procedures, participatory action-oriented approaches are gaining importance in various sectors. The roles of these approaches in promoting the safety and health at work are discussed based on their recent experiences in preventing work-related risks and improving the quality of work life, particularly in small-scale workplaces. The emphasis placed on the primary prevention at the initiative of workers and managers is commonly notable. Participatory steps, built on local good practices, can lead to many workplace improvements when the focus is on locally feasible low-cost options in multiple aspects. The design and use of locally adjusted action toolkits play a key role in facilitating these improvements in each local situation. The effectiveness of participatory approaches relying on these toolkits is demonstrated by their spread to many sectors and by various intervention studies. In the local context, networks of trainers are essential in sustaining the improvement activities. With the adequate support of networks of trainers trained in the use of these toolkits, participatory approaches will continue to be the key factor for proactive risk management in various work settings. PMID:23019528

  18. The influence of work, household structure, and social, personal and material resources on gender differences in health: an analysis of the 1994 Canadian National Population Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Walters, Vivienne; McDonough, Peggy; Strohschein, Lisa

    2002-03-01

    Data from the 1994 Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS) do not confirm the widespread assumption that women experience considerably more ill health than men. The patterns vary by condition and age and at many ages, the health of women and men is more similar than is often assumed. However, we should not minimize the gender differences that do exist and in this paper we focus on three health problems which are more common among women: distress, migraine and arthritis/rheumatism. We consider to what extent work, household structure and social, personal and material resources explain these gender differences in health. Analysis of the distributions of paid work conditions, household circumstances and resources reveal mostly minor differences by gender and differences in exposure to these circumstances contribute little to understanding gender differences in health. There is also little evidence that greater vulnerability is a generalized health response of women to paid and household circumstances. We find limited evidence that social, personal and material resources are involved in pathways linking work and home circumstances to health in ways that differ between the sexes. In conclusion, we consider some reasons for the lack of support for our explanatory model: the measures available in the NPHS data set which contains little information on the household itself; the difficulty of separating 'gender' from the social and material conditions of men's and women's lives; and changes in women's and men's roles which may have led to a narrowing of differences in health. PMID:11999486

  19. MORBILIDAD DE LA MUJER TRABAJADORA, SERVICIO DE SALUD CONCEPCIÓN, CHILE MORBIDITY IN WORKING WOMAN, CONCEPCION HEALTH SERVICE JURISDICTION, CHILE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALEXANDRA TORRES AGUAYO; TATIANA PARAVIC KLIJN

    This is a descriptive and correlation study. Its general objective is to know the causes of morbidity of the work- ing women who reside in the area of jurisdiction of the Health Service of Concepción and to analyze the exist- ing differences according to personal characteristic and work. To achieve this, it has been considered the totality of the working

  20. Review and Response to the Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report presents the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) review of and response to the final report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The response includes a statement of NHLBI's involvement in health research, and descriptions of what steps can be taken to solve the…

  1. Epidemiologic investigation of health effects in Air Force personnel following exposure to herbicides. Summary mortality update, 1989. Interim report 1979-1987

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Wolfe; J. E. Michalek; J. C. Miner

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Air Force Health Study is to determine whether those individuals involved in the spraying of herbicides in Vietnam during the Ranch Hand operation have experienced any adverse health effects as a result of their participation in that program. The study is designed to evaluate both the mortality (death) and morbidity (disease) in these individuals over a

  2. Work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees in finland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Torsten Winter; Eva Roos; Ossi Rahkonen; Pekka Martikainen; Eero Lahelma

    2006-01-01

    Work-family conflicts are common, but their effects on health are not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the\\u000a associations between work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees. In addition, the effect\\u000a of social background factors on the association between work-family conflicts and self-rated health were examined. The data\\u000a were based on cross-sectional postal surveys,

  3. Force, velocity, and work: The effects of different contexts on students' understanding of vector concepts using isomorphic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2014-12-01

    In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test with no physical context, and a test with mechanics contexts. For this study, we administered the items twice to students who were finishing an introductory mechanics course at a large private university in Mexico. The first time, we administered the two 12-item tests to 608 students. In the second, we only tested the items for which we had found differences in students' performances that were difficult to explain, and in this case, we asked them to show their reasoning in written form. In the first administration, we detected no significant difference between the medians obtained in the tests; however, we did identify significant differences in some of the items. For each item we analyze the type of difference found between the tests in the selection of the correct answer, the most common error on each of the tests, and the differences in the selection of incorrect answers. We also investigate the causes of the different context effects. Based on these analyses, we establish specific recommendations for the instruction of vector concepts in an introductory mechanics course. In the Supplemental Material we include both tests for other researchers studying vector learning, and for physics teachers who teach this material.

  4. Women in novel occupational roles: mental health trends in the UK Armed Forces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto J Rona; Nicola T Fear; Lisa Hull; Simon Wessely

    2006-01-01

    Methods Two cross-sectional studies based on random samples of the Armed Forces were used to assess the effects of deployment to the Gulf and Iraq Wars. We selected for the analyses all the women and a 20% random sample of men who completed a questionnaire stratified by rank. We assessed psychological distress, number of symptoms, post-traumatic stress reaction (PTSR), chronic

  5. Employment as a Health Determinant for Working-age, Dually-eligible People with Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Hall, Jean P.; Kurth, Noelle K.; Hunt, Suzanne L.

    2013-04-01

    Background: Individuals with disabilities are a health disparity population with high rates of risk factors, lower overall health status, and greater health care costs. The interacting effect of employment, health and disability has not been...

  6. Increasing community health worker productivity and effectiveness: a review of the influence of the work environment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly recognized as a critical link in improving access to services and achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals. Given the financial and human resources constraints in developing countries, CHWs are expected to do more without necessarily receiving the needed support to do their jobs well. How much can be expected of CHWs before work overload and reduced organizational support negatively affect their productivity, the quality of services, and in turn the effectiveness of the community-based programmes that rely on them? This article presents policy-makers and programme managers with key considerations for a model to improve the work environment as an important approach to increase CHW productivity and, ultimately, the effectiveness of community-based strategies. Methods A desk review of selective published and unpublished articles and reports on CHW programs in developing countries was conducted to analyse and organize findings on the elements that influence CHW productivity. The search was not exhaustive but rather was meant to gather information on general themes that run through the various documents to generate perspectives on the issue and provide evidence on which to formulate ideas. After an initial search for key terminology related to CHW productivity, a snowball technique was used where a reference in one article led to the discovery of additional documents and reports. Results CHW productivity is determined in large part by the conditions under which they work. Attention to the provision of an enabling work environment for CHWs is essential for achieving high levels of productivity. We present a model in which the work environment encompasses four essential elements—workload, supportive supervision, supplies and equipment, and respect from the community and the health system—that affect the productivity of CHWs. We propose that when CHWs have a manageable workload in terms of a realistic number of tasks and clients, an organized manner of carrying out these tasks, a reasonable geographic distance to cover, the needed supplies and equipment, a supportive supervisor, and respect and acceptance from the community and the health system, they can function more productively and contribute to an effective community-based strategy. Conclusions As more countries look to scale up CHW programmes or shift additional tasks to CHWs, it is critical to pay attention to the elements that affect CHW productivity during programme design as well as implementation. An enabling work environment is crucial to maximize CHW productivity. Policy-makers, programme managers, and other stakeholders need to carefully consider how the productivity elements related to the work environment are defined and incorporated in the overall CHW strategy. Establishing a balance among the four elements that constitute a CHW’s work environment will help make great strides in improving the effectiveness and quality of the services provided by CHWs. PMID:23017131

  7. A work-systems analysis of compliance with universal precautions among health care workers.

    PubMed

    DeJoy, D M; Gershon, R R; Murphy, L R; Wilson, M G

    1996-05-01

    Universal precautions are work practices designed to protect health care workers from occupational exposure to HIV and other bloodborne pathogens. However, despite aggressive dissemination efforts by CDC and regulatory action by OSHA, compliance remains less than satisfactory. This article argues that the minimization of risk from bloodborne pathogens requires a multilevel or work-systems perspective that considers individual, job/task, and environmental/organizational factors. The available literature on universal precautions suggests the potential of such an approach and provides insight into the limited success of current worker-focused mitigation efforts. In particular, specific opportunities exist to develop and apply engineering controls, to improve the design and organization of jobs and tasks, and to create organizations that facilitate and reinforce safe behavior. PMID:8744870

  8. A qualitative study of factors affecting mental health amongst low-income working mothers in Bangalore, India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-income urban working mothers face many challenges in their domestic, environmental, and working conditions that may affect their mental health. In India, a high prevalence of mental health disorders has been recorded in young women, but there has been little research to examine the factors that affect their mental health at home and work. Methods Through a primarily qualitative approach, we studied the relationship between work, caring for family, spousal support, stress relief strategies and mental health amongst forty eight low-income working mothers residing in urban slums across Bangalore, India. Participants were construction workers, domestic workers, factory workers and fruit and vegetable street vendors. Qualitative data analysis themes included state of mental health, factors that affected mental health positively or negatively, manifestations and consequences of stress and depression, and stress mitigators. Results Even in our small sample of women, we found evidence of extreme depression, including suicidal ideation and attempted suicide. Women who have an alcoholic and/or abusive husband, experience intimate partner violence, are raising children with special needs, and lack adequate support for child care appear to be more susceptible to severe and prolonged periods of depression and suicide attempts. Factors that pointed towards reduced anxiety and depression were social support from family, friends and colleagues and fulfilment from work. Conclusion This qualitative study raises concerns that low-income working mothers in urban areas in India are at high risk for depression, and identifies common factors that create and mitigate stress in this population group. We discuss implications of the findings for supporting the mental health of urban working women in the Indian context. The development of the national mental health policy in India and its subsequent implementation should draw on existing research documenting factors associated with negative mental health amongst specific population groups in order to ensure greater impact. PMID:24502531

  9. [Health appraisal for work adjustment of freshmen employees--information on health checkup just after entering the corporation and condition in the next fiscal year].

    PubMed

    Sugita, M; Fukui, T; Tatemichi, M; Minowa, H; Ikegami, Y; Miyawaki, Y; Ishizuka, Y; Izuno, T

    1995-03-01

    In 1990, 365 (males: 197, females: 168) freshmen employees at the headquarters of a large corporation were examined just after being hired in order to observe their health status. We collected (1) data of physical examinations and questionnaires for symptoms as an ordinary health checkup, (2) information on work adjustment, life patterns, and personal characteristics through interviews conducted by ten public health nurses, and (3) personal records, e.g. birth year. Statistical analyses revealed some notable findings as follows: (1) subjects with higher blood pressure had higher scores of extrovert personality among males, (2) female subjects with greater body mass index had higher scores in such manifestations of personal characteristics such as aggression and discontent with superiors, (3) higher scores of personal characteristics were noted among female subjects working in technical sections, (4) positive correlation between the scores of work adjustment and personal characteristics, (5) higher scores of undesirable life patterns among males and of work maladjustment among elder females, (6) unbalanced meal quality of subjects from rural areas, (7) higher mental tension among younger males from rural areas, and (8) higher scores of dependency and lower morale among younger female subjects. Information on health problems was collected over the 1.5 yrs that followed. More problems were detected among females than among males and among younger females than among elder females. Longitudinal analysis was carried out from just after entry into the company for approximately 1.5 yrs. Health problems in females could be predicted by the data on personal characteristics and work adjustment just after entry. Risk of health problems in male freshmen employees with hobbies and unhealthy drinking habits over the 1.5 yrs that followed was higher than in others. It was concluded that a health interview for freshmen employees by public health nurses is valuable for health care, obtaining information regarding work adjustment, life patterns, and personal characteristics. PMID:7749991

  10. Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

    Authored and curated by David P. Stern, these web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

  11. Working in light vehicles--a review and conceptual model for occupational health and safety.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Rwth; Lamontagne, Anthony D; Sim, Malcolm

    2007-09-01

    Occupational light vehicle (OLV) use is the leading cause of work related traumatic deaths in Westernised countries. Previous research has focused primarily on narrow contexts of OLV-use such as corporate fleet vehicles. We have proposed a comprehensive systems model for OLV-use to provide a framework for identifying research needs and proposing policy and practice interventions. This model presents the worker as the locus of injury at the centre of work- and road-related determinants of injury. Using this model, we reviewed existing knowledge and found most studies focused only on company car drivers, neglecting OLV-users in non-traditional employment arrangements and those using other vehicle types. Environmental exposures, work design factors and risk and protective factors for the wider OLV-user population are inadequately researched. Neither road- nor work-related policy appropriately addresses OLV-use, and population surveillance relies largely on inadequate workers compensation insurance data. This review demonstrates that there are significant gaps in understanding the problem of OLV-use and a need for further research integrating public health, insurance and road safety responses. The model provides a framework for understanding the theory of OLV-use OHS and guidance for urgently needed intervention research, policy and practice. PMID:17854576

  12. Relationships between health status and working conditions and personalities among VDT workers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Torii, J; Shinkai, S; Watanabe, T

    1993-05-01

    A total of 486 visual display terminal (VDT) workers were surveyed on their health status, working conditions, type A state, and depression state through questionnaires. They were also divided into three groups by self-assessment: technocentered (TC), technoanxious (TA), and neither (N). The weekly working hours and daily VDT operating hours of the type A group were longer than those of non-type A group. Type A subjects had more symptoms than non-type A subjects. The mean weekly working hours of depressive group was 61.3 hr, much longer than that of the others. The TC subjects worked daily with the VDT for longer hours than the other subjects. The TA subjects felt most dissatisfied with their computer training (TC, 47.4%; N, 64.5%; TA, 91.7%). Awkward VDT operators were more often in the TA group (36.1%) than in the others (TC, 3.8%; N, 10.5%). The TA subjects had a higher previous history of duodenal ulcer than the others (TA, 13.9%; N, 4.6%; TC, 3.8%). PMID:8495667

  13. Stress and law enforcers: testing the relationship between law enforcement work stressors and health-related issues

    PubMed Central

    Avdija, Avdi S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between law enforcement work-related stressors and health issues. Specifically, this study attempts to determine the effects of stress-producing factors (e.g. vigorous activities at work, shift change, perceived danger associated with police work, etc.) on physiological health-related issues (e.g. the number of reported health issues, high blood pressure, back pain, and headaches) and psychosocial behavior problems (e.g. alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking) among police officers. The analyses are based on a total 1632 law enforcement officers, who represent 51 police agencies in the three major cities, New York City, Dallas Texas, and Minneapolis, USA. The research findings that emerged from this study show that the number of days in vigorous activities and perceived physiological demands have the strongest influence on the number of health-related issues. Working without a partner and frequent shift changes had the strongest influence on alcohol consumption by police officers. PMID:25750831

  14. Lifestyle, harassment at work and self-assessed health of female flight attendants, nurses and teachers1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holmfridur K. Gunnarsdottir; Herdis Sveinsdottir; Jon Gunnar Bernburg; Hildur Fridriksdottir; Kristinn Tomasson

    2004-01-01

    Health-related lifestyle, harassment at work, and self-assessed health of female flight attendants in comparison to that of female nurses and female primary school teachers were surveyed. A higher proportion of flight attendants than nurses or teachers were smokers, 26% vs. 15% and 17% respectively; and consumed alcohol at least once a week, 40% vs. 21% and 16%. Repeated sexual harassment

  15. Biographical work and returning to employment Isabelle Ville 324 Sociology of Health & Illness -Vol.27 N3 -2005

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    and social experience of chronic illness. Numerous studies have shown that, far from confining themselvesBiographical work and returning to employment ­ Isabelle Ville 324 Sociology of Health & Illness ­ Isabelle Ville 325 Sociology of Health & Illness - Vol.27 N°3 - 2005 national governments have made

  16. Increasing child and adolescent mental health content in undergraduate occupational therapy, social work and nursing programs: Lessons learnt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mathijs Lucassen; Iain Doherty; Sally Merry

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the perceived usefulness of a CD-Rom based child and adolescent mental health teaching resource distributed to educators from undergraduate nursing, occupational therapy and social work programs, and identifies the barriers to incorporating specialist mental health content into comprehensive degree level courses. Specially selected educators from throughout New Zealand responded to a questionnaire about the resource. Results from

  17. Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

    2014-01-01

    Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work

  18. Do soldiers seek more mental health care after deployment? Analysis of mental health consultations in the Netherlands Armed Forces following deployment to Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Taal, Elisabeth (Liesbeth) M.; Vermetten, Eric; van Schaik, Digna (Anneke) J. F.; Leenstra, Tjalling

    2014-01-01

    Background Military deployment to combat zones puts military personnel to a number of physical and mental challenges that may adversely affect mental health. Until now, few studies have been performed in Europe on mental health utilization after military deployment. Objective We compared the incidence of mental health consultations with the Military Mental Health Service (MMHS) of military deployed to Afghanistan to that of non-deployed military personnel. Method We assessed utilization of the MMHS by the full cohort of the Netherlands Armed Forces enlisted between 2008 and 2010 through linkage of mental health and human resource information systems. Results The total population consisted of 50,508 military (18,233 deployed, 32,275 non-deployed), who accounted for 1,906 new consultations with the MMHS. The follow-up was limited to the first 2 years following deployment. We observed higher mental health care utilization in deployed vs. non-deployed military personnel; hazard ratio (HR), adjusted for sex, military branch and time in service, 1.84 [95% CI 1.61–2.11] in the first and 1.28 [1.09–1.49] in the second year after deployment. An increased risk of adjustment disorders (HR 2.59 [2.02–3.32] and 1.74 [1.30–2.32]) and of anxiety disorders (2.22 [1.52–3.25] and 2.28 [1.50–3.45]) including posttraumatic stress disorder (5.15 [2.55–10.40] and 5.28 [2.42–11.50]), but not of mood disorders (1.33 [0.90–1.97] and 1.11 [0.68–1.82]), was observed in deployed personnel in the first- and second-year post-deployment, respectively. Military personnel deployed in a unit with a higher risk of confrontation with potentially traumatic events had a higher HR (2.13 [1.84–2.47] and 1.40 [1.18–1.67]). Conclusions Though absolute risk was low, in the first and second year following deployment to Afghanistan there was an 80 and 30% higher risk for mental health problems resulting in a consultation with the Dutch MMHS compared to military never deployed to Afghanistan. These observations underscore the need for an adequate mental health infrastructure for those returning from deployment. PMID:25206952

  19. Compiled by: Neighborhood Health Division Neighborhood Social Work; 5/2013 240 Parsons Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43215, (614) 645-6807 or 645-3111.

    E-print Network

    Federally Qualified Health Centers ...................5 Services for Veterans OnlyMay 2013 Compiled by: Neighborhood Health Division ­ Neighborhood Social Work; 5/2013 240 Parsons RESOURCES Health, Vision & Dental Care for Adults with Limited Incomes CONTENTS: Free Clinics (By Day

  20. Scand J Work Environ Health . Author manuscript Incidence of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow in repetitive work

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at the elbow in repetitive work Alexis Descatha 1 * , Annette Leclerc 1 , Jean-Fran ois Chastangç 1 , Yves working conditions and ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow (UNEE) has not been the object of much study ; Risk Factors ; Workplace ; psychology Author Keywords elbow ; repetitive work ; ulnar nerve entrapment

  1. What do we know about the non-work determinants of workers' mental health? A systematic review of longitudinal studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the past years, cumulative evidence has convincingly demonstrated that the work environment is a critical determinant of workers' mental health. Nevertheless, much less attention has been dedicated towards understanding the pathways through which other pivotal life environments might also concomitantly intervene, along with the work environment, to bring about mental health outcomes in the workforce. The aim of this study consisted in conducting a systematic review examining the relative contribution of non-work determinants to the prediction of workers' mental health in order to bridge that gap in knowledge. Methods We searched electronic databases and bibliographies up to 2008 for observational longitudinal studies jointly investigating work and non-work determinants of workers' mental health. A narrative synthesis (MOOSE) was performed to synthesize data and provide an assessment of study conceptual and methodological quality. Results Thirteen studies were selected for evaluation. Seven of these were of relatively high methodological quality. Assessment of study conceptual quality yielded modest analytical breadth and depth in the ways studies conceptualized the non-work domain as defined by family, network and community/society-level indicators. We found evidence of moderate strength supporting a causal association between social support from the networks and workers' mental health, but insufficient evidence of specific indicator involvement for other analytical levels considered (i.e., family, community/society). Conclusions Largely underinvestigated, non-work determinants are important to the prediction of workers' mental health. More longitudinal studies concomitantly investigating work and non-work determinants of workers' mental health are warranted to better inform healthy workplace research, intervention, and policy. PMID:21645393

  2. Development of an Instrument to Measure Behavioral Health Function for Work Disability: Item Pool Construction and Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Ni, Pengsheng; Haley, Stephen M.; Jette, Alan M.; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M.; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E.; Rasch, Elizabeth K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a broad set of claimant-reported items to assess behavioral health functioning relevant to the Social Security disability determination processes, and to evaluate the underlying structure of behavioral health functioning for use in development of a new functional assessment instrument. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Community. Participants Item pools of behavioral health functioning were developed, refined, and field-tested in a sample of persons applying for Social Security disability benefits (N=1015) who reported difficulties working due to mental or both mental and physical conditions. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure Social Security Administration Behavioral Health (SSA-BH) measurement instrument Results Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) specified that a 4-factor model (self-efficacy, mood and emotions, behavioral control, and social interactions) had the optimal fit with the data and was also consistent with our hypothesized conceptual framework for characterizing behavioral health functioning. When the items within each of the four scales were tested in CFA, the fit statistics indicated adequate support for characterizing behavioral health as a unidimensional construct along these four distinct scales of function. Conclusion This work represents a significant advance both conceptually and psychometrically in assessment methodologies for work related behavioral health. The measurement of behavioral health functioning relevant to the context of work requires the assessment of multiple dimensions of behavioral health functioning. Specifically, we identified a 4-factor model solution that represented key domains of work related behavioral health functioning. These results guided the development and scale formation of a new SSA-BH instrument. PMID:23548542

  3. Discrimination by health care workers versus discrimination by others: countervailing forces on HCV treatment intentions.

    PubMed

    Brener, Loren; Horwitz, Robyn; von Hippel, Courtney; Bryant, Joanne; Treloar, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health burden. Despite recent advances in HCV treatment, uptake remains low, particularly amongst people who inject drugs. HCV-related stigma and discrimination are common, especially within the health care sector. This research examines a more nuanced approach for how HCV-related stigma and discrimination impacts treatment access and uptake. Based on a social identity framework, we explore whether perceived HCV-related discrimination is associated with attempts to remove the stigma of being HCV-positive via HCV treatment intentions. Based on the results of prior research it was also hypothesised that the source of discrimination (health care workers versus others), and whether the discrimination is perceived to be directed to oneself or to the HCV-positive group, will differentially impact treatment intentions. The sample consisted of 416 people living with HCV in New South Wales, Australia, who acquired HCV from injecting drugs. Participants were asked about their experiences of perceived discrimination directed towards themselves versus their HCV-positive group and perceived discrimination within the health care sector. Findings indicate that discrimination towards the self is a more powerful indicator of treatment intentions than discrimination aimed at the HCV-positive group. This finding is consistent with social identity theory suggesting that people from low status groups are motivated to change their stigmatised status when it is possible to do so. The source of the perceived discrimination also matters, however, as participants who report experiencing discrimination from health workers have lowered intentions to engage with HCV treatment in the future. In combination, the results indicate that while perceived discrimination is commonly understood to act as a barrier to treatment uptake, the relationship is actually more complex than previously conceptualised. PMID:24889417

  4. Ergonomics work stations decreases the health impairment and saves electrical energy at the woodworking workshop in Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sudiajeng, Lilik; Adiputra, Nyoman; Leibbrandt, Richard

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to assess the positive effect of the ergonomics work station on the health impairment and electrical energy usage at the woodworking workshop in Bali, Indonesia. Woodworking workshops are dangerous, particularly when they are used improperly. Workers are exposed to health hazards that cause health impairment and inefficiencies in their work conditions. A preliminary study at a woodworking workshop at the Bali State Polytechnic showed that the work station was not suitable to body size of the participants and caused awkward postures. In addition, there was also an inappropriate physical work environment. Both inappropriate work station and physical work environment caused participants to be less active and motivated. This paper reports on an experimental study into the effects of an ergonomic intervention at this workshop. The participants were 2 groups of male students with 10 participants in each group. The first group performed the task with the original work station as a control group, while the second group performed the task with the new work station. The study found a significant difference between groups (p < 0.05) both for the health impairment and the electrical energy usage. The ergonomics intervention on the work station decreased the working heart rate (16.7%), the total score of musculoskeletal disorders (17.3%), and the total score of psychological fatigue (21.5%). Furthermore, it also decreased the electrical energy usage (38.7%). This shows that an ergonomics intervention on work station decreased the health impairment and saved electrical energy usage. It also protected the workers from woodworking hazards and allowed participants to perform their tasks in healthy, safe, convenient and efficient work conditions. PMID:25665197

  5. Top 10 Ways to Make Your Health Benefits Work for You

    MedlinePLUS

    ... billed the service properly. 5. Understand Your Plan’s Mental Health and Substance Use Coverage Many health plans provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorder benefits. If a plan ...

  6. Working

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

  7. Education and health among U.S. working-age adults: a detailed portrait across the full educational attainment spectrum.

    PubMed

    Zajacova, Anna; Hummer, Robert A; Rogers, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    This article presents detailed estimates of relative and absolute health inequalities among U.S. working-age adults by educational attainment, including six postsecondary schooling levels. We also estimate the impact of several sets of mediating variables on the education-health gradient. Data from the 1997-2009 National Health Interview Survey (N = 178,103) show remarkable health differentials. For example, high school graduates have 3.5 times the odds of reporting "worse" health than do adults with professional or doctoral degrees. The probability of fair or poor health in mid-adulthood is less than 5 percent for adults with the highest levels of education but over 20 percent for adults without a high school diploma. The probability of reporting excellent health in the mid-forties is below 25 percent among high school graduates but over 50 percent for those adults who have professional degrees. These health differences characterize all the demographic subgroups examined in this study. Our results show that economic indicators and health behaviors explain about 40 percent of the education-health relationship. In the United States, adults with the highest educational degrees enjoy a wide array of benefits, including much more favorable self-rated health, compared to their less-educated counterparts. PMID:22582892

  8. Gastrointestinal illnesses among French forces deployed to Djibouti: French military health surveillance, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, Lénaïck; Decam, Christophe; Pommier de Santi, Vincent; Darar, Houssein Y; Dia, Aïssata; Nevin, Remington L; Romand, Olivier; Bougère, Jacques; Deparis, Xavier; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2010-10-01

    Despite an increase in foreign tourism and in the numbers of foreign military personnel deployed to Djibouti, little is known about the risk of gastrointestinal illness in this country in eastern Africa. To assess risk and to describe common features of gastrointestinal illnesses, reports of illness derived from military health surveillance data collected during 2005-2009 among French service members deployed to Djibouti were reviewed. Diarrhea was the most common problem; it had an annual incidence ranging from 260 to 349 cases per 1,000 person-years. The risk was higher among soldiers deployed short-term (four months) than among soldiers deployed long-term (two years). This five-year review of French health surveillance data documents a significant burden of diarrhea among French soldiers in Djibouti. The identification of factors associated with risk may permit efficient targeting of interventions to reduce morbidity from gastrointestinal illness. PMID:20889897

  9. Gastrointestinal Illnesses among French Forces Deployed to Djibouti: French Military Health Surveillance, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, Lénaïck; Decam, Christophe; de Santi, Vincent Pommier; Darar, Houssein Y.; Dia, Aïssata; Nevin, Remington L.; Romand, Olivier; Bougère, Jacques; Deparis, Xavier; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Despite an increase in foreign tourism and in the numbers of foreign military personnel deployed to Djibouti, little is known about the risk of gastrointestinal illness in this country in eastern Africa. To assess risk and to describe common features of gastrointestinal illnesses, reports of illness derived from military health surveillance data collected during 2005–2009 among French service members deployed to Djibouti were reviewed. Diarrhea was the most common problem; it had an annual incidence ranging from 260 to 349 cases per 1,000 person-years. The risk was higher among soldiers deployed short-term (four months) than among soldiers deployed long-term (two years). This five-year review of French health surveillance data documents a significant burden of diarrhea among French soldiers in Djibouti. The identification of factors associated with risk may permit efficient targeting of interventions to reduce morbidity from gastrointestinal illness. PMID:20889897

  10. THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETED FOR ANY INJURY,WORK RELATED ILL HEALTH, DANGEROUS OCCURRENCE AND NEAR MISS IN RESPECT OF STAFF, STUDENTS, CONTRACTORS AND VISITORS

    E-print Network

    THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETED FOR ANY INJURY,WORK RELATED ILL HEALTH, DANGEROUS OCCURRENCE AND NEAR or manager may do so on their behalf. Dangerous Work related Accident Occurrence ill health Near Miss Full;SECTION 2 ACCIDENT RECORD GUIDANCE This section concerns details of the injury, work related ill health

  11. When do gain-framed health messages work better than fear appeals?

    PubMed

    Wansink, Brian; Pope, Lizzy

    2015-01-01

    Past literature reviews of gain-framed versus loss-based health messages have been inconsistent and inconclusive. To resolve this and provide a clearer pattern, this review focuses on the individual or person-specific characteristics of target audiences. The results indicate that by answering the following four questions about a target audience, one can predict whether a gain-framed or a loss-based health message will be more effective. 1) Is there a low (versus high) level of involvement in the issue? 2) Is there a high (versus low) certainty of the outcome? 3) Is there a low (versus high) preference for risk? 4) Is there a heuristic (versus piecemeal) processing style? The profiling of audiences on these factors has two distinct benefits; it resolves many of the seeming inconsistencies in past positive-negative and gain-loss message research (such as fear appeals working better with experts than nonexperts) and it helps predict which type of message will be most effective with a given audience. PMID:26024053

  12. Working together to make Indigenous health care curricula everybody's business: a graduate attribute teaching innovation report.

    PubMed

    Virdun, Claudia; Gray, Joanne; Sherwood, Juanita; Power, Tamara; Phillips, Angela; Parker, Nicola; Jackson, Debra

    2013-12-01

    Previously there has been commitment to the idea that Indigenous curricula should be taught by Indigenous academic staff, whereas now there is increasing recognition of the need for all academic staff to have confidence in enabling Indigenous cultural competency for nursing and other health professional students. In this way, Indigenous content can be threaded throughout a curriculum and raised in many teaching and learning situations, rather than being siloed into particular subjects and with particular staff. There are many sensitivities around this change, with potential implications for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and staff, and for the quality of teaching and learning experiences. This paper reports on a collaborative process that was used to reconceptualise how Indigenous health care curricula would be positioned throughout a programme and who would or could work with students in this area. Effective leadership, establishing a truly collaborative environment, acknowledging fears and perceived inadequacies, and creating safe spaces for sharing and learning were crucial in effecting this change. PMID:24621295

  13. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-03-12

    This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

  14. Validity of the work productivity and activity impairment questionnaire - general health version in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Zhang; Nick Bansback; Annelies Boonen; Adam Young; Amitabh Singh; Aslam H Anis

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) questionnaire is a well validated instrument to measure impairments in work and activities. However, its validation among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been well established. The present study's purpose is to evaluate the construct validity of the WPAI-general health version among RA patients and its ability to differentiate between RA

  15. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.] [eds.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies.

  16. Treatment of psychiatric disorders onboard an aircraft carrier assisted with psychotropic medication: a retrospective review describing one aspect of Navy Force health protection.

    PubMed

    Wood, Dennis Patrick; Walker, Errika; Moses, Kennett; Gilleran, Louis

    2006-04-01

    Navy clinical psychologists, assigned to aircraft carriers, are playing an increasing role in not only implementing Navy force health protection, but also in further specializing the delivery of mental health evaluation, treatment, and disposition services at the "tip of the spear." An aircraft carrier's medical department, augmented with a clinical psychologist, is now better able to coordinate diagnostic, psychotropic, and psychotherapeutic treatments for both shipboard and air wing personnel. This retrospective review reports the outcomes of a 6-month treatment program for personnel, assigned to the USS Constellation (CV-64), who were prescribed a psychotropic medication while receiving psychotherapy. We concluded that psychotropic medications can be safely and effectively used onboard an aircraft carrier. Furthermore, personnel prescribed psychotropic medication successfully completed their assigned duties and obtained recommendations for advancement and retention. Lastly, our medical department proactively fulfilled the Navy force health protection tenet of preserving a healthy and fit force. PMID:16673746

  17. The Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977: Preserving a law that works

    SciTech Connect

    McAteer, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    The wisdom of the past has been that dead miners make the best lobbyists for mine safety laws. Today, this view suggests a troubling question: What happens to mine safety laws when the terrible disasters that produced legislation are rare? We should be grateful that the question is timely. It means that decades of progressively stronger laws have finally made a difference for miners, their families, and their communities. But this hard-won success has had one ironic result: Some people are tempted to believe that a strong statute is no longer necessary. In fact, the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act) should be preserved. Mining remains a high-risk industry, and tomarrow`s miners, just like today`s, need the protection of this well-crafted and effective law. Recent legislation (H.R. 1834) seemed to view the Mine Act as a relic of the past. It would have repealed the statute, a prospect that should trouble anyone familiar with the statute`s success. As introduced, the bill would have regulated mining under a scaled-back version of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act), and eliminated the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) as well. A host of important enforcement tools would have vanished in the process, including MSHA`s right of entry into mines, certain mandatory inspections, most civil fines, and the use of withdrawal orders except in cases of imminent danger. The bill would have made it far more difficult to issue effective safety and health standards and to preserve existing standards. Miners and their unions, as well as some industry representatives, rightly raised concerns about the bill. Now is a good time, then, to review what federal mine safety laws have achieved and how they did it. Working conditions in America`s mines are, indeed, better. They are better because of the current law and the legislation that preceded it, as representatives of the mining industry acknowledge.

  18. Child Health and Young Adult Outcomes. NBER Working Paper No. 14482

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet; Stabile, Mark; Manivong, Phongsack; Roos, Leslie L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown a strong connection between birth weight and future child outcomes. But this research has not asked how insults to child health after birth affect long-term outcomes, whether health at birth matters primarily because it predicts future health or through some other mechanism, or whether health insults matter more at some…

  19. Health impact assessment of the Merseyside local transport plan … work in progress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kate Ardern

    2000-01-01

    1. Project Description I am conducting a health impact assessment of the Local Transport Plan on behalf of the Merseyside Transport, Health and Environment Forum, using the methods and procedures set out in The Merseyside Guidelines for Health Impact Assessment. This will include implementation of the recommendations of the health impact assessment of the Merseyside Integrated Transport Strategy (MERITS), and

  20. "Working Together, Unlimited Things Can Happen": CDC, Tribes, Colleges Strive to Improve Native Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selden, Ron

    2004-01-01

    The article focuses on the overall health of American Indians. Native people living on reservations and in urban areas face a broad array of health problems. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta is committed to improving the health of Native Americans. CDC is one of the agencies within the U.S. Department of Health and Human…

  1. Personnel's Health Surveillance at Work: Effect of Age, Body Mass Index, and Shift Work on Mental Workload and Work Ability Index

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Shahram; Akbari, Jafar; Kazemi, Meghdad; Mououdi, Mohammad Amin; Mahaki, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Two great changes in developed countries are taking place: populations are ageing and becoming increasingly overweight. Combination of these factors with shift work is a risk factor for work ability and mental workload that are dynamic processes which change greatly throughout an individual's work life. The aim of this study was to investigate mental workload and work ability in textile workers and to identify factors which affect work ability and mental workload. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out among 194 male workers in textile industry. Employees based on their job group and work conditions have been divided into 6 categories. They completed work ability index and mental workload questionnaires during three work shifts. Body mass index (BMI) and demographic details were recorded. Results. All of the participants rated their work ability as moderate with high mental workload. The mean WAI and mental workload in age group were significant. The mean BMI was 25.5?kg/m2 (standard deviation 4.1) and the mean age was 40.22 years. There was a statistically significant correlation between work ability index and shift work. Conclusions. Unlike the previous study, a decrease point in WAI started in early age that may be due to life-style work and another psychological factor; on the other hand, NASA-TLX revealed high score in six subscales that can be another reason for low WAI. PMID:23956756

  2. "GotFlu Channel": An Online Syndromic Surveillance Tool Supporting College Health Practice and Public Health Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Valerie; Shick-Porter, Melodie; Moore, Deborah; Grant, Darrell; Wolfe, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Develop a tool to ease the burden of H1N1 influenza on a campus clinic by promoting self-care, generating medical notes, and identifying vulnerable students. Participants: Students at Brock University, a mid-sized urban campus; Brock's Student Health Services; and Niagara Public Health. Methods: Students accessed a controlled portal of…

  3. Does Health Insurance Coverage Lead to Better Health and Educational Outcomes? Evidence from Rural China. NBER Working Paper No. 16417

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yuyu; Jin, Ginger Zhe

    2010-01-01

    Many governments advocate nationwide health insurance coverage but the effects of such a program are less known in developing countries. We use part of the 2006 China Agricultural Census (CAC) to examine whether the recent health insurance coverage in rural China has affected children mortality, pregnancy mortality, and the school enrollment of…

  4. What Do District Health Managers in Ghana Use Their Working Time for? A Case Study of Three Districts

    PubMed Central

    Bonenberger, Marc; Aikins, Moses; Akweongo, Patricia; Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Wyss, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Background Ineffective district health management potentially impacts on health system performance and service delivery. However, little is known about district health managing practices and time allocation in resource-constrained health systems. Therefore, a time use study was conducted in order to understand current time use practices of district health managers in Ghana. Methods All 21 district health managers working in three districts of the Eastern Region were included in the study and followed for a period of three months. Daily retrospective interviews about their time use were conducted, covering 1182 person-days of observation. Total time use of the sample population was assessed as well as time use stratified by managerial position. Differences of time use over time were also evaluated. Results District health managers used most of their working time for data management (16.6%), attending workshops (12.3%), financial management (8.7%), training of staff (7.1%), drug and supply management (5.0%), and travelling (9.6%). The study found significant variations of time use across the managerial cadres as well as high weekly variations of time use impulsed mainly by a national vertical program. Conclusions District health managers in Ghana use substantial amounts of their working time in only few activities and vertical programs greatly influence their time use. Our findings suggest that efficiency gains are possible for district health managers. However, these are unlikely to be achieved without improvements within the general health system, as inefficiencies seem to be largely caused by external factors. PMID:26068907

  5. Application and Evaluation of Portable Field Instruments for Measuring Forced Expiratory Volume of Children and Adults in Environmental Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Robert M.; Kozel, Walter M.; Penley, Robert L.; Ward, George H.; Chapman, Robert S.

    1974-01-01

    In support of Health Effects Research Studies, pulmonary function tests are periodically administered to a large number of children. The ventilatory performance of these children is being evaluated by measuring the 0.75-sec forced expiratory volume (FEV0.75) with a waterless mechanical volume spirometer used in conjunction with an electronic timing unit. During a 1-yr testing period, operation with the volume spirometer and the EPA designed electronic timing unit proved to be highly successful. The volume spirometer was found to be more advantageous in conducting tests at remote field stations than the water spirometer and other electronic instruments which measure flow rate with a transducer element. The volume spirometer is lightweight, easy to operate, and has the capability of easy and accurate field calibration when used in conjunction with the electronic timing unit. Presently the volume spirometer and EPA designed electronic timing package are employed in all Community Health and Surveillance System (CHESS) pulmonary function testing studies. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2.FIGURE 3. PMID:4470917

  6. Mental disorders and mental health problems among recruit trainees, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Patrick; Hu, Zheng; Rohrbeck, Patricia

    2013-07-01

    Annual counts and rates of incident diagnoses of mental disorders or mental health problems have increased in the U.S. military active component since 2000, but less is known about recruit trainees. From 2000 to 2012, 49,999 active component recruit trainees were diagnosed with at least one mental disorder, and 7,917 had multiple mental disorder diagnoses. Annual incidence rates of at least one mental disorder decreased by approximately 37.4 percent over the last 13 years. Approximately 80.5 percent of all incident mental disorder diagnoses were attributable to adjustment disorders, depression and "other" mental disorders. Rates of incident mental disorder diagnoses were higher in females than males. Even though the Army had the highest overall incidence rates of mental disorders, the Air Force had slightly higher rates for adjustment disorder, and the Navy had higher rates of alcohol abuse-related disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, other psychoses, and personality disorders. These findings document differences in the mental disorders experienced by recruit trainees compared to members of the active component of the U.S. military overall. Continued focus on detection and treatment of mental health issues during basic training is warranted. PMID:23927060

  7. Linking credentialed skills, social class, working conditions and self-reported health: a focus on health inequality-generating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vanroelen, Christophe; Levecque, Katia; Moors, Guy; Louckx, Fred

    2010-09-01

    In this study, focus is on the mechanisms linking credentialed skills and social class relations to five dimensions of occupational stressors and three self-reported health outcomes: persistent fatigue, musculoskeletal complaints and emotional wellbeing. We test for direct health associations of skills/class. Moreover, indirect health associations of skills/class, through differential exposure to occupational stressors and effect modifications of the occupational stressors, are tested. A modified LISREL analysis is applied to a representative cross-sectional sample of 11,099 Flemish wage-earners. The direct health effects of credentialed skills/class are limited, but they are clearly indirectly related to the self-reported health outcomes through differential exposure to occupational stressors. The indirect mechanisms point to both reinforcing and moderating effects on socio-economic health inequalities. Two cases of effect modification are also observed: social class modifying the association between control and persistent fatigue; and skills affecting the association between the quality of social relations and emotional wellbeing. Differential exposure to occupational stressors is a crucial mechanism linking skills/class to socio-economic health inequalities. Direct effects and effect modification of class/skills are relevant, but of limited importance. One of the effect modifications found suggests that a specific focus on contradictory class positions might be warranted in future research. PMID:20887630

  8. Should health care providers be forced to apologise after things go wrong?

    PubMed

    McLennan, Stuart; Walker, Simon; Rich, Leigh E

    2014-12-01

    The issue of apologising to patients harmed by adverse events has been a subject of interest and debate within medicine, politics, and the law since the early 1980s. Although apology serves several important social roles, including recognising the victims of harm, providing an opportunity for redress, and repairing relationships, compelled apologies ring hollow and ultimately undermine these goals. Apologies that stem from external authorities' edicts rather than an offender's own self-criticism and moral reflection are inauthentic and contribute to a "moral flabbiness" that stunts the moral development of both individual providers and the medical profession. Following a discussion of a recent case from New Zealand in which a midwife was required to apologise not only to the parents but also to the baby, it is argued that rather than requiring health care providers to apologise, authorities should instead train, foster, and support the capacity of providers to apologise voluntarily. PMID:25096170

  9. Impact of IT on health care professionals: changes in work and the productivity paradox.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M A

    1998-05-01

    Health care organizations are under increasing pressure to become more efficient while at the same time maintaining or improving the quality of care. Information technology (IT), with its potential to increase efficiency, accuracy and accessibility of information, has been expected to play an important role in supporting these changes. We report the impact of patient care information systems on health care professionals in five community hospitals. The study framework incorporated both quality of care in Donabedian's elements of structure-process-outcome and Grusec's three levels of IT impact: direct substitution, proceduralization and new capabilities. The study results suggest that, for specific tasks, IT increased efficiency and productivity--a single employee was able to complete more tasks. However, this produced other consequences not predicted. Participants noted this change did not 'free up time' to spend with patients, but meant there were potentially more opportunities to provide services and more tasks to complete. Other effects included: reduced job satisfaction as more time was spent on the computer; less frequent interactions with patients and for shorter duration; and an increasingly 'visible' accountability as performance was easily monitored. There were also changes in roles and responsibilities as the computer enabled tasks to be carried out from a number of locations and by a variety of personnel. When innovations are introduced into organizations there are both expected and unexpected consequences. Increased awareness of the interactive relationship between computer users and the technology helps organizations better understand why results do, or do not, occur. One must look beyond just simply increasing productivity by replacing manual tasks with automated ones, to examining how the changes influence the nature of work and relationships within the organization. PMID:10181380

  10. Influence of spirituality on cool down reactions, work engagement, and life satisfaction in anthroposophic health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Büssing, Arndt; Lötzke, Désirée; Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between "cool down reactions" (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53?±?10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals). They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to "cool down reactions." Significant predictors of "cool down reactions" were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R (2) = 0.20). In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R (2) = 0.35) by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of "cool down reactions," work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals' "cool down reactions," but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work. PMID:25694789

  11. Influence of Spirituality on Cool Down Reactions, Work Engagement, and Life Satisfaction in Anthroposophic Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between “cool down reactions” (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53?±?10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals). They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to “cool down reactions.” Significant predictors of “cool down reactions” were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R2 = 0.20). In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R2 = 0.35) by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of “cool down reactions,” work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals' “cool down reactions,” but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work. PMID:25694789

  12. Task Force on Responsible Decisions about Alcohol, Interim Report Number 1. Summary, Technical Document, and Reports on Working Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    In 1974, the Education Commission of the States (ECS) began to develop an innovative program to involve the total education system in seeking solutions to one of society's oldest problems--alcoholism. This report reviews the first year's activities of the task force, presents preliminary findings and outlines goals for the coming year. To provide…

  13. PUK20 IMPACT OF SOLIFENACIN ON QUALITY OF LIFE, MEDICAL CARE USE, WORK PRODUCTIVITY, AND HEALTH UTILITY IN THE ELDERLY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Les L. Noe; Thomas S. Marshall; Lawrence Rasouliyan; M. Christopher Runken; Norman R. Zinner

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL), resource utilization, work and activity impair- ment, and health utility among elderly OAB subjects receiving 12 weeks of solifenacin succinate (SOL) therapy, after switching from tolterodine tartrate extended-release (TOL) due to residual urgency episodes. METHODS: This was a prospective, multi-center, open-label US study assessing the efficacy and safety of SOL

  14. Part-Time Work and Hurried Adolescence: The Links between Work Intensity, Social Activities, Health Behaviors, and Substance Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safron, Deborah J.; Schulenberg, John E.; Bachman Jerald G.

    2002-01-01

    This study examines adolescents' part-time work intensity and its relation to participation in various activities as well as substance use. Two theoretical perspectives are considered: the "time trade-off perspective"; and "the precocious development perspective." Results provide evidence for a combination of both perspectives. (Author)

  15. GotFlu Channel: An Online Syndromic Surveillance Tool Supporting College Health Practice and Public Health Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valerie Jaeger; Melodie Shick-Porter; Deborah Moore; Darrell Grant; Valerie Wolfe

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Develop a tool to ease the burden of H1N1 influenza on a campus clinic by promoting self-care, generating medical notes, and identifying vulnerable students. Participants: Students at Brock University, a mid-sized urban campus; Brock's Student Health Services; and Niagara Public Health. Methods: Students accessed a controlled portal of Brock's Web site and self-identified onset\\/offset of influenza-like symptoms. Daily sign-in

  16. Methods for recruiting white, black, and hispanic working-class women and men to a study of physical and social hazards at work: the United for Health study.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Elizabeth M; Hartman, Cathy; Quinn, Margaret M; Stoddard, Anne M; Krieger, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Despite research on work and health having a long-standing concern about unjust exposures and inequitable burdens of disease, there are few studies that document the joint distribution and health effects of physical and psychosocial hazards (e.g., noise, dusts, fumes, and job strain) and social hazards (e.g., racial discrimination and gender harassment) encountered at work. Also, there is a paucity of data on how these exposures, singly and combined, are distributed in relation to sociodemographic characteristics including race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic position, and nativity. This article presents a conceptual model for redressing these knowledge gaps and describes recruitment strategies and the characteristics of study participants in the United for Health study. Working with labor unions, the authors recruited 14 (67%) of 21 worksites from manufacturing, meat processing, retail, and transportation, and 1,282 workers (72% response rate), of whom 62 percent were men, 36 percent were women, 39 percent were black, 23 percent were Hispanic, 25 percent were white, 31% earned less than a living wage, 40 percent were below the poverty level, and 23 percent had less than a high school education. PMID:17436989

  17. Identification of health risks in workers staying and working on the terrains contaminated with depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Milacic, Snezana; Simic, Jadranko

    2009-05-01

    This study investigated health risks in workers residing and working in terrains contaminated by low ionizing radiation doses which originated from ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU). The studied population was composed of two test groups (T-I, T-II) who were occasionally exposed to DU, and two referent (R-I, R-II) groups not exposed at any time to DU. All of them were evaluated for the following: complete clinical examination and blood count, presence of immature forms and blasts, leukocyte alkaline phosphatase activity and cytogenetic tests. The probability of onset of the characteristic complete biomarkers--chromosomal aberrations, was analyzed using logarithmic function of the Poisson regression. The estimated function of the density of probabilities of Poisson distribution of the chromosomal aberrations in the test group T-II was drastically different from the corresponding distribution of the referent group R-I and to a somewhat lesser extent from the group R-II; Wilcoxon test exactly confirms the presence of a significant difference between the reference group R-II and test group T-II, p < 0.05. The damages to chromosomes and cells were highest in the test group T-II of workers additionally occupationally exposed to DU. The group of workers T-I, who had been exposed to DU working on contaminated terrain, have had certain risks of cell and chromosome damages, and that risk was not greater than the risk to the referent group R-II of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. PMID:19531923

  18. Causes and Consequences of Early Life Health. NBER Working Paper No. 15637

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Anne; Paxson, Christina

    2010-01-01

    We examine the consequences of childhood health for economic and health outcomes in adulthood, using height as a marker of health in childhood. After reviewing previous evidence, we present a conceptual framework that highlights data limitations and methodological problems associated with the study of this topic. We present estimates of the…

  19. The Potential of School-Linked Centers To Promote Adolescent Health and Development. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    The future of school-linked adolescent health centers cannot be determined without further evaluation. The recent development of school-linked health centers stems from concerns about the special health needs of adolescents. Currently there are 125 school-based and school-linked centers in operation. Characteristics include the following: (1) most…

  20. Mental Health Problems in Early Childhood Can Impair Learning and Behavior for Life. Working Paper #6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Significant mental health problems can and do occur in young children. In some cases, these problems can have serious consequences for early learning, social competence, and lifelong health. Furthermore, the foundations of many mental health problems that endure through adulthood are established early in life through the interaction of genetic…