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1

Evaluating the Environmental Health Work Force. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains all materials pertinent to an intensive evaluation of the environmental health work force conducted in 1986 and 1987. The materials relate to a workshop that was one of the key tools used in conducting the study to estimate environmental health personnel supply, demand, and need. The report begins with an overview and…

Levine Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

2

Association of work-related stress with mental health problems in a special police force unit  

PubMed Central

Objectives Law and order enforcement tasks may expose special force police officers to significant psychosocial risk factors. The aim of this work is to investigate the relationship between job stress and the presence of mental health symptoms while controlling sociodemographical, occupational and personality variables in special force police officers. Method At different time points, 292 of 294 members of the ‘VI Reparto Mobile’, a special police force engaged exclusively in the enforcement of law and order, responded to our invitation to complete questionnaires for the assessment of personality traits, work-related stress (using the Demand–Control–Support (DCS) and the Effort–Reward–Imbalance (ERI) models) and mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and burnout. Results Regression analyses showed that lower levels of support and reward and higher levels of effort and overcommitment were associated with higher levels of mental health symptoms. Psychological screening revealed 21 (7.3%) likely cases of mild depression (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI?10). Officers who had experienced a discrepancy between work effort and rewards showed a marked increase in the risk of depression (OR 7.89, 95% CI 2.32 to 26.82) when compared with their counterparts who did not perceive themselves to be in a condition of distress. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that work-related stress may play a role in the development of mental health problems in police officers. The prevalence of mental health symptoms in the cohort investigated here was low, but not negligible in the case of depression. Since special forces police officers have to perform sensitive tasks for which a healthy psychological functioning is needed, the results of this study suggest that steps should be taken to prevent distress and improve the mental well-being of these workers. PMID:23872288

Garbarino, Sergio; Cuomo, Giovanni; Chiorri, Carlo; Magnavita, Nicola

2013-01-01

3

Report of recommendations: the Annapolis Coalition Conference on Behavioral Health Work Force Competencies.  

PubMed

In May 2004, the Annapolis Coalition on Behavioral Health Workforce Education convened a national meeting on the identification and assessment of competencies. The Conference on Behavioral Health Workforce Competencies brought leading consumer and family advocates together with other experts on competencies from diverse disciplines and specialties in the fields of both mental health care and substance use disorders treatment. Aided by experts on competency development in business and medicine, conference participants have generated 10 consensus recommendations to guide the future development of workforce competencies in behavioral health. This article outlines those recommendations. A collaborative effort to identify a set of core or common competencies is envisioned as a key strategy for advancing behavioral health education, training, and other workforce development initiatives. PMID:16082800

Hoge, Michael A; Morris, John A; Daniels, Allen S; Huey, Leighton Y; Stuart, Gail W; Adams, Neal; Paris, Manuel; Goplerud, Eric; Horgan, Constance M; Kaplan, Linda; Storti, Susan A; Dodge, Joan M

2005-01-01

4

[Hygienic aspects of the working conditions assessment and state of health of the workers of the railway departmental security forces].  

PubMed

There were performed a comprehensive hygienic evaluation of the working conditions of employment and analysis of morbidity with temporary disability (MTD) of the workers of the railway departmental security forces. There was proved a significant influence of accumulated period of work on MTD. The professional causality as of the respiratory diseases in shooters and dog handlers, as of diseases of the circulatory system in the administrative and managerial workers has been established. PMID:25051740

Anishchenko, E B; Trankovskaya, L V

2014-01-01

5

Work Force Planning for Public Power Utilities  

E-print Network

Work Force Planning for Public Power Utilities: Ensuring Resources to Meet Projected ............................................ 4 The Aging Work Force Still Challenges Public Power ........................... 6 Public Power Utilities Need to Do More to Prepare for Their Future Work Force Needs

6

Posttraumatic stress symptoms and work-related accomplishment as predictors of general health and medical utilization among Special Operations Forces personnel.  

PubMed

Research has established clear links among posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), somatic symptoms, and general health among conventional force military personnel. It is possible that the same relationships exist among Special Operations Force (SOF) personnel, but there are very few, if any, studies that examine these relationships. This study investigated correlates of general health and medical visits among SOF personnel and found that the interaction of somatic and PTSD symptoms was associated with worse health and more frequent medical visits. Follow-up analyses indicated that the interaction of avoidance symptoms with somatic symptoms was significantly associated with worse health, whereas the interaction of emotional numbing with somatic symptoms significantly contributed to increased medical visits. In addition, the results suggest that a sense of accomplishment among SOF personnel may serve as a protective factor against poor health. The results suggest developing interactions among SOF personnel that promote a sense of achievement to ultimately improve the health of the force. PMID:24469521

Bryan, Craig J; Stephenson, James A; Morrow, Chad E; Staal, Mark; Haskell, Jeremy

2014-02-01

7

Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

Reduction in Work Force ­ Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further information. The Ohio State University ­ Office of Human Resources Page 1 of 1 Policy 9.15 Reduction in Work

Howat, Ian M.

8

Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

Reduction in Work Force ­ Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further Dodd Hall, James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, OSU Ambulatory Services, OSU Harding

Howat, Ian M.

9

Magnetic force and work: an accessible example  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite their physics instructors’ arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented which can illustrate that all may not be what it seems when energy transfer and the magnetic force are involved. Excel and Python simulations of the process are also provided.

Gates, Joshua

2014-05-01

10

Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

Gates, Joshua

2014-01-01

11

Head Start Health Coordinators' Task Force Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Head Start Health Coordinator's Task Force (HCTF) was charged to study and make recommendations to strengthen Head Start's health component, which is a vital part of the child development program. Since its inception in 1965, Head Start has served over 12 million economically disadvantaged children. Through the health component, children have…

Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

12

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) (a) Definitions...the objective of a drug-free work force. While this clause...that include the nature of the work being performed under the contract...Contractor resources, and the risks to health, safety, or...

2010-10-01

13

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) (a) Definitions...the objective of a drug-free work force. While this clause...that include the nature of the work being performed under the contract...Contractor resources, and the risks to health, safety, or...

2011-10-01

14

Task Force on Health Care.  

PubMed

The five leading issues identified, in order of importance, were 1. The need for treatment outcome and efficacy data. 2. The need for changes in clinical and academic preparation of entry-level practitioners. 3. The lack of inclusion or use of services for communication and related disorders in public and private health care programs. 4. The need for greater professional autonomy within the health care system. 5. The need to improve services to underserved populations with communication and related disorders. This report was forwarded to key National Office staff and appropriate ASHA boards, councils, and committees for the purposes of determining its feasibility and developing a national plan for action. The feasibility and action plan will detail completed, ongoing and future activities of the Association related to each issue, recommendation, and strategy. Periodic review of the actions taken and progress achieved will be monitored by the Executive Board, other appropriate boards and councils, and designated National Office staff. The plan represents a progressive view of needed change for the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology within the context of the broader health care delivery system. PMID:8216494

1993-09-01

15

Creating a 21st century nursing work force: designing a bachelor of nursing program in response to the health reform agenda.  

PubMed

This paper demonstrates the processes of designing a nursing curriculum that integrates health care and educational reforms, regulatory requirements and the needs of a modern nursing workforce. In particular, the paper illustrates the application of a curriculum design process. In 2008, the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of South Australia completed the challenging task of designing and implementing a Bachelor of Nursing curriculum to ensure that nursing graduates meet projected health care delivery needs within the Australian context. Creating an educational experience necessary to support Graduates to attend to priorities associated with the projected Australian health demographic was challenging. Through the use of integrating themes, domains of nursing practice and attention to the health care needs and priorities of the population, the curriculum has been designed to produce nurses with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to contribute to new and innovative health care delivery in Australia. PMID:19942327

Andre, Kate; Barnes, Lynne

2010-04-01

16

Annual report on contractor work force restructuring, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work force restructuring and community transition activities at all sites. It outlines work force restructuring activity for FY 1997, changing separation patterns, cost savings and separation costs, program assessment, activities to mitigate restructuring impacts, community transition activities, status of displaced workers, lessons learned, and emerging issues in worker and community transition. Work force restructuring and community transition activities for defense nuclear sites are summarized, as are work force restructuring activities at non-defense sites.

NONE

1998-03-01

17

Reduction in Work Force Classified Civil Service Staff Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

Reduction in Work Force ­ Classified Civil Service Staff 9.20 Office of Human Resources Applies to internally by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department Definition Health System Includes Dodd Hall, James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, OSU

Howat, Ian M.

18

Individual and Work Factors Related to Perceived Work Ability and Labor Force Outcomes.  

PubMed

Perceived work ability refers to a worker's assessment of his or her ability to continue working in his or her job, given characteristics of the job along with his or her resources. Perceived work ability is a critical variable to study in the United States, given an aging workforce, trends to delay retirement, and U.S. policy considerations to delay the age at which full Social Security retirement benefits may be obtained. Based on the job demands-resources model, cognitive appraisal theory of stress, and push/pull factors related to retirement, we proposed and tested a conceptual model of antecedents and outcomes of perceived work ability using 3 independent samples of U.S. working adults. Data regarding workers' job characteristics were from self-report and Occupational Information Network measures. Results from relative importance analysis indicated that health and sense of control were consistently and most strongly related to work ability perceptions relative to other job demands and job and personal resources when perceived work ability was measured concurrently or 2 weeks later in samples with varying occupations. Job demands (along with health and sense of control) were most strongly related to work ability perceptions when perceived work ability was measured in a manufacturing worker sample 1.6 years later. Perceived work ability also predicted lagged labor force outcomes (absence, retirement, and disability leave) while controlling for other known predictors of each. Consistent indirect effects were observed from health status and sense of control to all 3 of these outcomes via perceived work ability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25314364

McGonagle, Alyssa K; Fisher, Gwenith G; Barnes-Farrell, Janet L; Grosch, James W

2014-10-13

19

40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section 35.936-14...ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must secure the...

2013-07-01

20

40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section 35.936-14...ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must secure the...

2012-07-01

21

40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section 35.936-14...ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must secure the...

2010-07-01

22

40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section 35.936-14...ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must secure the...

2011-07-01

23

The Culture-Work-Health Model and Work Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the role of organizational culture in the etiology of workplace stress through the framework of the Culture-Work- Health model. A review of relevant business and health literature indicates that culture is an important component of work stress and may be a key to creating effective organizational stress interventions. (SM)

Peterson, Michael; Wilson, John F.

2002-01-01

24

Putting Robots to Work with Force & Friction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the concept of pushing, as well as the relationship between force and mass. Students practice measurement skills using pan scales and rulers to make predictions about mass and distance. A LEGO® MINDSTORMS® NXT robot is used to test their hypotheses. By the end of the activity, students have a better understanding of robotics, mass and friction and the concept of predicting.

AMPS GK-12 Program,

25

Overeducated Americans in the Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work and adjustment to work are vital components of a smoothly functioning society. Currently, a growing imbalance between the collective level of educational attainment of American workers and the skill/knowledge requirements of existing jobs has created the potential for widespread social and economic problems in this country. Overeducation…

Blai, Boris, Jr.

26

Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

27

[Work as a promoter of health].  

PubMed

Studies on the relation between health and work tend to highlight the negative and pathological aspects, as if work produces only sickness and alienation. On the contrary, our proposal is to stress how work can also produce health. Based on Canguillem's concept of health, and from the contributions of the so-called "work clinics", we intend to analyze the purpose of work as a promoter of health. Canguilhem affirms that health is not adaptive, as such it does not involve adapting well to the world, but to the creation of tenets of life. For their part, the work clinics provide tools to approximate us to the know-how-to-do produced by workers in their daily work, namely not only how workers adapt to work, but how they create and recreate it permanently Thus, we can think work as a promoter of health where there is room for collective and personal creation, as well as recognition of workers in their activity. PMID:25388183

da Silva, Claudia Osorio; Ramminger, Tatiana

2014-12-01

28

Environmental education work force pipeline strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an educational program designed to provide a pool of highly qualified administrative, technical, and managerial graduates that are familiar with the Hanford Site and business operations. The program is designed to provide work experience and mentoring to a culturally diverse student base which enhances affirmative employment goals. Short-term and long-term objectives of the program are outlined in the report, and current objectives are discussed in more detail. Goals to be completed by the year 2003 are aimed at defining the criteria necessary to establish partnerships between schools, community organizations, and human resources departments. Actions to be implemented includes providing instructors and equipment, enhancing skills of local teachers, and establishing collaboration with human resources organizations. Long-term goals of the program are to ensure a constant supply of qualified, trained workers to support industry missions. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Ortega, S.U.; Jackson, E.R.

1992-11-01

29

Aging Work Force Brings New Look at Teacher Retirement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Higher salaries and improved working conditions have combined to make teaching a more attractive profession and to reduce teacher turnover rates. At the same time, however, the teaching work force has aged and faces problems in retirement programs. All levels of government should work with interested groups to find solutions to six major problems…

Auriemma, Frank V.; And Others

1992-01-01

30

The Labor Force Participation of Older Women: Retired? Working? Both?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noneconomic factors such as level of education, job flexibility in work hours, and physical stress appear to influence older women's labor force participation resulting in many retired women who are employed. Some women classified as retired work nearly as many hours as those employed, although many employed older women work part time. (Contains…

Hill, Elizabeth T.

2002-01-01

31

Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations  

PubMed Central

Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

2014-01-01

32

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section...SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free...

2010-10-01

33

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section...SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free...

2011-10-01

34

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section...SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free...

2013-10-01

35

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section...SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free...

2014-10-01

36

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section...SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free...

2012-10-01

37

Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but

W. H. Wolfe; J. E. Michalek; J. C. Miner; A. Rahe; J. Silva; W. F. Thomas; M. B. Lustik; W. D. Grubbs; R. H. Roegner; T. G. Karrison; D. E. Williams

1990-01-01

38

Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group is a community of practice that recognizes the interconnections between the health of ecosystems, wildlife, and humans and meets to facilitate the exchange of ideas, data, and research opportunities. Membership includes the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Sea Life Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Shasby, Mark

2009-01-01

39

Work done by Gravity Gravitational force near the  

E-print Network

. The work transforms the kinetic energy into a positive change of the potential energy of the field- apple potential energy, U Difference in U of a charge at two different points, initial i and final f is if UUU loses kinetic energy ­ we say that the work done by the gravitational force on the apple is negative

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

40

Bad Jobs, Bad Health? How Work and Working Conditions Contribute to Health Disparities  

PubMed Central

In this review, we touch on a broad array of ways that work is linked to health and health disparities for individuals and societies. First focusing on the health of individuals, we discuss the health differences between those who do and do not work for pay, and review key positive and negative exposures that can generate health disparities among the employed. These include both psychosocial factors like the benefits of a high status job or the burden of perceived job insecurity, as well as physical exposures to dangerous working conditions like asbestos or rotating shift work. We also provide a discussion of the ways differential exposure to these aspects of work contributes to social disparities in health within and across generations. Analytic complexities in assessing the link between work and health for individuals, such as health selection, are also discussed. We then touch on several contextual level associations between work and the health of populations, discussing the importance of the occupational structure in a given society, the policy environment that prevails there, and the oscillations of the macroeconomy for generating societal disparities in health. We close with a discussion of four areas and associated recommendations that draw on this corpus of knowledge but would push the research on work, health and inequality toward even greater scholarly and policy relevance. PMID:24187340

Burgard, Sarah A.; Lin, Katherine Y.

2013-01-01

41

Health and Safety Working with VDUs  

E-print Network

and work environment, as well as to the VDU, keyboard and other equipment. `Does my VDU affect my health persistent or even disabling. How can I avoid these aches, pains and disorders? Problems of this kind may interesting, but for others stress becomes worse. This can happen when a system does not work well or when

Sussex, University of

42

[Working conditions and health status of railway cashiers].  

PubMed

The paper presents the data of clinical and hygienic studies of railway cashiers' health. The main deleterious factors of their working conditions are poor microclimatic conditions, bacterial inoculation of the working area air, a forced working posture, and a high vocal load under mental stress. There is a significant prevalence of nervous, obstetric, gynecological, thyroid, and vocal diseases and oral dysbacteriosis among the workers of this professional group. There is evidence for the necessity of including the job of a railway cashier into the List of decreed contingents for periodical medical examinations. PMID:12934277

Pankova, V B; Kopirovski?, K M; Poliakova, V A; Gipp, E K; Andreeva, I V

2003-01-01

43

Dielectric elastomer transducers with enhanced force output and work density  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate that the force output and work density of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dielectric elastomer transducers can be significantly enhanced by the addition of high permittivity titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The nanocomposites are capable of maintaining the actuation strain performance of the pure PDMS at relatively low electric fields while increasing the force output and work density due to mechanical reinforcement. A model relating the Maxwell stress to the measured force from the actuator was used to determine the dielectric permittivity at high electric fields thus providing results that can be directly correlated to device performance. This approach toward higher work density materials should enable smaller, lighter, and less intrusive actuator systems ideal for biomedical and robotic devices in particular.

Stoyanov, Hristiyan; Brochu, Paul; Niu, Xiaofan; Della Gaspera, Enrico; Pei, Qibing

2012-06-01

44

Force identification of dynamic systems using virtual work principle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the key inverse problems for estimating dynamic forces acting on a structure is to determine the force expansion and the corresponding solving method. This paper presents a moving least square (MLS) method for fitting dynamic forces, which improves the existing traditional methods. The simulation results show that the force expansion order has a tiny effect on the types of forces, which indicates the MLS method's excellent ability for local approximation and noise immunity as well as good fitting function. Then, the differential equation of motion for the system is transformed into an integral equation by using the virtual work principle, which can eliminate the structural acceleration response without introducing the calculation error. Besides, the transformation derives an expression of velocity by integrating by parts, which diminishes the error propagation of the velocity. Hence, the integral equation of motion for the system has a strong constraint to noise with zero mean value. Finally, this paper puts forward an optimization method to solve the equation. The numerical stability can be enhanced as the matrix inversion calculation is avoided. Illustrative examples involving different types of forces demonstrate that the transformation of the differential equation proposed through virtual work principle can eliminate interference efficiently and is robust for dynamic calculation.

Xu, Xun; Ou, Jinping

2015-02-01

45

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT  

E-print Network

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT October 2008 © 2008 The Board of Trustees. Appendix 42 #12;2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Acknowledging the changing landscape of student mental health issues at Stanford and throughout the country, Provost John Etchemendy convened the Student Mental Health and Well

Prinz, Friedrich B.

46

Work, Obesity, and Occupational Safety and Health  

PubMed Central

There is increasing evidence that obesity and overweight may be related, in part, to adverse work conditions. In particular, the risk of obesity may increase in high-demand, low-control work environments, and for those who work long hours. In addition, obesity may modify the risk for vibration-induced injury and certain occupational musculoskeletal disorders. We hypothesized that obesity may also be a co–risk factor for the development of occupational asthma and cardiovascular disease that and it may modify the worker’s response to occupational stress, immune response to chemical exposures, and risk of disease from occupational neurotoxins. We developed 5 conceptual models of the interrelationship of work, obesity, and occupational safety and health and highlighted the ethical, legal, and social issues related to fuller consideration of obesity’s role in occupational health and safety. PMID:17267711

Schulte, Paul A.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Ostry, Aleck; Blanciforti, Laura A.; Cutlip, Robert G.; Krajnak, Kristine M.; Luster, Michael; Munson, Albert E.; O’Callaghan, James P.; Parks, Christine G.; Simeonova, Petia P.; Miller, Diane B.

2007-01-01

47

Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win–win for productivity and employees’ well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today’s U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis

2014-01-01

48

Spartanburg Technical College 1998 Work Force Development Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1998 Work Force Development Study focuses on Spartanburg Technical College's (STC's) (South Carolina) role in preparing new workers and training/retraining the current workforce. Surveys were mailed to employers in business and industry--the response rate was 10%. In addition, a series of focus groups, including various business, industry,…

Quinley, John W.; Cantrell, Jo Ellen

49

Delivering Alert Messages to Members of a Work Force  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Global Alert Resolution Network (GARNET) is a software system for delivering emergency alerts as well as less-urgent messages to members of the Goddard Space Flight Center work force via an intranet or the Internet, and can be adapted to similar use in other large organizations.

Loftis, Julia; Nickens, Stephanie; Pell, Melissa; Pell, Vince

2008-01-01

50

The Need for Work Force Education. Fastback 350.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational problems underlie the crisis in the high-tech workplace. Insufficient expenditures for workplace education result in low productivity. Technology requires a skilled work force; the chief competitive advantage for a nation will be its skilled workers. Workplace literacy has been a half-hearted effort. Investment of billions by U.S.…

Gordon, Edward E.

51

Work Force Preparation for Technician-Level Occupations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Tech Prep Associate Degree (TPAD) program must be clearly focused on technician-level occupations, which are expected to have the greatest occupational growth. Generally, the preparation required to enter the work force at the technician level is completion of an associate degree program that includes 50 percent theory and 50 percent applied…

Harmon, Hobart L.

52

Why do health labour market forces matter?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Human resources for health have been recognized as essential to the development of responsive and effective health systems. Low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve universal health coverage face human resource constraints – whether in the form of health worker shortages, maldistribution of workers or poor worker performance – that seriously undermine their ability to achieve well-functioning health systems. Although much has been written about the human resource crisis in the health sector, labour economic frameworks have seldom been applied to analyse the situation and little is known or understood about the operation of labour markets in low- and middle-income countries. Traditional approaches to addressing human resource constraints have focused on workforce planning: estimating health workforce requirements based on a country’s epidemiological and demographic profile and scaling up education and training capacities to narrow the gap between the “needed” number of health workers and the existing number. However, this approach neglects other important factors that influence human resource capacity, including labour market dynamics and the behavioural responses and preferences of the health workers themselves. This paper describes how labour market analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the factors behind human resource constraints in the health sector and to a more effective design of policies and interventions to address them. The premise is that a better understanding of the impact of health policies on health labour markets, and subsequently on the employment conditions of health workers, would be helpful in identifying an effective strategy towards the progressive attainment of universal health coverage. PMID:24347708

McPake, Barbara; Araújo, Edson Correia; Lemiere, Christophe; El Maghraby, Atef; Cometto, Giorgio

2013-01-01

53

Precarious employment, working hours, work-life conflict and health in hotel work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Precarious or temporary work is associated with adverse outcomes including low control over working hours, work-life conflict and stress. The rise in precarious employment is most marked in the service sector but little research has been done on its health effects in this sector. This study compares permanent and temporary workers in the hotel industry, where working hours are highly

Maria McNamara; Philip Bohle; Michael Quinlan

2011-01-01

54

Human Health Effects, Task Force Assessment, Preliminary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented in this preliminary report is one of seven assessments conducted by a special task force of Project Clean Air, the Human Health Effects Task Force. The reports summarize assessments of the state of knowledge on various air pollution problems, particularly in California, and make tentative recommendations as to what the University of…

Aronow, Wilbert S.; And Others

55

[Quality life of working health care professionals].  

PubMed

In this article the author presents the theoretical concepts of quality of life, labor satisfaction, and service professions. Then describes the politic-institution characteristics of the actual national context in which the professionals that work in the Health field, developed their daily work. Presents a proposal of indicators, specially constructed by the author to analyze the labor context, that are being used in different research projects she developed since the beginning on XXI century. Finally presents the necessity of generate project that considers protagonist points of view and allow the construct of diagnosis of the situation, that generate public policies to answer the problem. PMID:20038992

Tonon de Toscano, Graciela

2009-01-01

56

Maternal and Child Health Issues and Female Labor Force Participation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviewing health related "costs" of female labor force participation, this paper examines four highly salient maternal and child health issues. Discussion of acute illness in day care settings begins with an overview of studies on day care and illness and focuses on hepatitis A, appropriate sanitation, and indications of research on respiratory…

Howze, Dorothy C.; And Others

57

Physical work capacity of Bulgarian Air Force pilots.  

PubMed

A thorough study was performed on physical work capacity (PWC) of 135 males from the Bulgarian Air Force, aged 18 to 59 years. VO2max was measured directly by means of maximum cycle ergometry testing. The following mean values were obtained: 2.94, 3.03, 3.18 and 2.78 l.min-1 for the age groups 18-25, 35-40, 41-50 and above 50 years, respectively. The relative VO2max mean values per kg BW for the above age groups were 46.15, 35.89, 39.57 and 34.15 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively. The obtained data, even though not definitive, helped to develop standards for the evaluation of the physical work capacity of pilots. Comparison of our results with those of Bulgarian and foreign investigators has shown that the PWC of Bulgarian pilots is greater than the PWC of some heavy physical workers. It is similar to the norms of Andersen /1/ and Shvartz and Reibold /2/. In accordance the PWC of Bulgarian pilots below 29 years old and 40-49 years old is greater than the working norms for US Air Force personnel. For unknown reasons, the PWC of pilots 35-40 years old is lower than the generally accepted norms for this age group. Testing of the PWC of air force personnel has two general aeromedical goals--establishment of the cardiovascular fitness level and establishment of a baseline for comparison and improvement of PWC by implementation of physical fitness training programs. In the last few years a thorough study was carried out at the Bulgarian Institute of Aviation Medicine for determination of the PWC of Bulgarian Air Force personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8029529

Nancheva, R; Minkovski, L

1994-01-01

58

Joining Forces for Better Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a collaborative in Camden, New Jersey, that improves delivery and quality of mental health services for Head Start families. Reveals how the program addresses most of the social service and educational needs of the community through preventive intervention. Contains a description of each member's area of expertise and service. (SD)

Trott, Lauren

1996-01-01

59

Tragic choices in humanitarian health work.  

PubMed

Humanitarian healthcare work presents a range of ethical challenges for expatriate healthcare professionals, including tragic choices requiring the selection of a least-worst option. In this paper we examine a particular set of tragic choices related to the prioritization of care and allocation of scarce resources between individuals in situations of widespread and urgent health needs. Drawing on qualitative interviews with clinicians, we examine the nature of these choices. We offer recommendations to clinical teams and aid organizations for preparing and supporting frontline clinicians in their efforts to determine the least-worst option, and in their responsibility for making such choices. PMID:23469695

Hunt, Matthew R; Sinding, Christina; Schwartz, Lisa

2012-01-01

60

Masked Symptoms: Mid-Life Women, Health, and Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (1997) reveal that relatively few mid-life women offer ill health as a reason for leaving their job or downshifting to part-time employment, implying that the role of ill health may be inconsequential in effecting changing patterns in mid-life women's labour force activity. In contrast, interviews with 30…

Abramson, Zelda

2007-01-01

61

A Need-focused Approach to Air Force Engine Health Management Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the work that the author has done to develop a structure to help direct engine health management (EHM) research. It discusses the definitions of the relevant EHM terms, outlines the essential elements of an EHM system, deduces the aims of an EHM system through the contributions it can make to the top-level Air Force goals, and uses

R. A. Wade

2005-01-01

62

Employee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare  

E-print Network

** and sports facilities*** · Flu immunisation programme · Health promotion programmes · Occupational healthEmployee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare · Annual leave of up to 30 Use Policy) · Cycle-2-Work scheme · Discounts to local leisure facilities · On-site health club

Crowther, Paul

63

Working With the TO PROMOTE EYE HEALTH PROGRAMS AND EVENTS  

E-print Network

Tips for Working With the Media TO PROMOTE EYE HEALTH PROGRAMS AND EVENTS #12;Media Guide | 1 Media Guide Tips for Working With the Media To Promote Eye Health Programs and Events The media have about eye health in your community. Healthy vision programs benefit when the media help deliver health

Bandettini, Peter A.

64

The contribution of work engagement to self-perceived health, work ability, and sickness absence beyond health behaviors and work-related factors.  

E-print Network

??abstractObjective: To investigate whether work engagement influences self-perceived health, work ability, and sickness absence beyond health behaviors and work-related characteristics. Methods: Employees of two organizations… (more)

A. Rongen (Anne); S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); W.B. Schaufeli (Wilmar); A. Burdorf (Lex)

2014-01-01

65

Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1,299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer.

Wolfe, W.H.; Michalek, J.E.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA)); Rahe, A. (QuesTech Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Silva, J. (Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Thomas, W.F.; Lustik, M.B.; Grubbs, W.D.; Roegner, R.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA)); Karrison, T.G. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Williams, D.E. (Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-10-10

66

Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam. I. Physical health.  

PubMed

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer. PMID:2402041

Wolfe, W H; Michalek, J E; Miner, J C; Rahe, A; Silva, J; Thomas, W F; Grubbs, W D; Lustik, M B; Karrison, T G; Roegner, R H

1990-10-10

67

Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials  

E-print Network

legislative and regulatory frameworks to mitigate the potential health risks of nanomaterials and to help1 Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials 1. Introduction is expected to increase in the future. Health Canada helps protect and promote health by using existing

Carleton University

68

Forced migration and child health and mortality in Angola.  

PubMed

This study investigates the effects of forced migration on child survival and health in Angola. Using survey data collected in Luanda, Angola, in 2004, just two years after the end of that country's prolonged civil war, we compare three groups: migrants who moved primarily due to war, migrants whose moves were not directly related to war, and non-migrants. First, we examine the differences among the three groups in under-five mortality. Using an event-history approach, we find that hazards of child death in any given year were higher in families that experienced war-related migration in the same year or in the previous year, net of other factors. To assess longer-term effects of forced migration, we examine hazards of death of children who were born in Luanda, i.e., after migrants had reached their destinations. We again observe a disadvantage of forced migrants, but this disadvantage is explained by other characteristics. When looking at the place of delivery, number of antenatal consultations, and age-adequate immunization of children born in Luanda, we again detect a disadvantage of forced migrants relative to non-migrants, but now this disadvantage also extends to migrants who came to Luanda for reasons other than war. Finally, no differences across the three groups in child morbidity and related health care seeking behavior in the two weeks preceding the survey are found. We interpret these results within the context of the literature on short- and long-term effects of forced migration on child health. PMID:19879027

Avogo, Winfred Aweyire; Agadjanian, Victor

2010-01-01

69

[Perspectives of work, age, health, and labor market participation in Germany].  

PubMed

The German population is aging and shrinking. This will have a significant impact on the labor market, because labor supply will start to shrink. Consequently, there is a need to develop additional labor market resources. In this setting, a crucial issue is the health and employment of the older working population. This article discusses--on the basis of nine articles in this special issue--the health of the working population in the context of work, age, and labor participation. It shows the diversity of morbidity in the work force in general and particularly in older age, and it identifies older labor force groups with good health and those with bad health. The latter shows that "working while having a bad state of health" is today's reality. Labor market participation is less dependent on health than on the "work ability" and/or the "motivation to work" of older workers. The employment dynamics of an aging population will be a key issue in future political debate. A reliable knowledge base is needed for proper discussion, judgment, and action in the economic, political, and social fields. Current research is often focused on subtopics or on subgroups; however, a network of all the related scientific disciplines and the establishment of new comprehensive research approaches are needed in this area. PMID:23455551

Hasselhorn, H M; Rauch, A

2013-03-01

70

Work status and burn specific health after work-related burn injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work status is a valid indicator of post burn health. There is limited information on this issue after work-related burn injury. Aim: To investigate long-term health- and work status after work-related burns. Method: Eighty-six former patients treated for severe work-related burn injuries an average of 9.0 years previous to follow-up were questioned about their present work status. They were also

Johan Dyster-Aas; Morten Kildal; Mimmie Willebrand; Bengt Gerdin; Lisa Ekselius

71

Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Providers Working in Primary Health Care Units Concerning Emergency Contraception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The aim of the current study was to explore the extent of knowledge health care providers working in primary health care units in Aydin, Turkey, had about emergency contraception (EC), to determine whether they provide EC counseling, and to understand the barriers and misconceptions in this context. Methods: A total of 120 health care professionals working in primary health

Hilmiye Aksu; Mert Kucuk; Banu Karaoz

2010-01-01

72

Working with interpreters in mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ensure equality of access to health and social care services for all communities resident in Britain, services need to be appropriate and accessible. This requires ensuring that a range of policies is adhered to and that services are designed to make this possible. In a culturally diverse society, there will be people who are not fluent in the language

Rachel Tribe

2009-01-01

73

Living the reality of forced sex work: perspectives from young migrant women sex workers in northern Vietnam.  

PubMed

Young women are often lured or forced into selling sex as a result of migrating from rural to urban areas to find work. In this setting, they are exposed to high-risk situations, which may leave them vulnerable to exploitation. Using interviews with young migrant women currently working as sex workers in northern Vietnam, we recorded the perspectives of their initiation into sex work and life as a sex worker. The study found that high levels of forced sex and sexual exploitation were experienced by the majority of the young women interviewed. The young women describe their entry into sex work, first sexual experience (intercourse), violence, and condom negotiation and use. Although access to health care was available, the young women perceived the stigma attached to sex work as a barrier to receiving health care, and thus, preferred health education and care from peers. Health education programs focusing on peer education and support are essential for protecting and empowering these young women. In addition, policies and programs must work toward effective strategies to protect young migrant women. PMID:15973256

Rushing, Rosanne; Watts, Charlotte; Rushing, Sharon

2005-01-01

74

Women's Health. Report of the Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues. Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report identifies a broad spectrum of issues affecting women's health and is divided into four sections: (1) social factors affecting women's health; (2) women's physical health and well-being; (3) health concerns of older women; and (4) issues related to alcohol, drug use and abuse, and the mental health of women. The Public Health Service…

Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

75

Multicultural Group Work: A Force for Developing and Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multicultural group work represents a powerful tool for helping and healing in the context of human diversity. This article summarizes multicultural group work, including task, psychoeducational, counseling, and psychotherapy groups, and describes a group work model for multicultural assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Group work

Anderson, Donald

2007-01-01

76

Forced migration: Health and human rights issues among refugee populations.  

PubMed

Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that is manifest in diverse contexts. In this article, we examine the situations that precipitate the movement of large numbers of people across several African countries, producing a unique type of undocumented migrant-the refugee. These refugee movements impact already fragile African health care systems and often involve human rights violations that are of particular concern, such as gender-based violence and child soldiers. We use examples from several countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current research, and our personal international experiences, we provide an overview of forced migration and discuss implications and opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice, and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

Lori, Jody R; Boyle, Joyceen S

2015-01-01

77

Beyond the Individual: Connecting Work Environment and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work, so fundamental to basic survival and health, as well as to wealth, well-being, and positive social identity, has its darker and more costly side too.1 Work can negatively affect our health, an impact that goes well beyond the usual counts of injuries, accidents, and illnesses from exposure to toxic chemicals. The ways in which work is organized—particularly its pace,

Deborah R. Gordon; Peter L. Schnall

78

Partnership work between Public Health and Health Psychology: introduction to a novel training programme  

PubMed Central

Background Public health services implement individual, community and population level interventions to change health behaviours, improve healthy life expectancy and reduce health inequalities. Understanding and changing health behaviour is complex. Integrating behaviour change theory and evidence into interventions has the potential to improve services. Methods Health Psychologists apply evidence and theories aimed at understanding and changing health behaviour. A Scottish programme is piloting the training of Health Psychologists within NHS contexts to address prominent public health challenges. Results This article outlines the details of this novel programme. Two projects are examined to illustrate the potential of partnership working between public health and health psychology. Conclusion In order to develop and improve behaviour change interventions and services, public health planners may want to consider developing and using the knowledge and skills of Health Psychologists. Supporting such training within public health contexts is a promising avenue to build critical NHS internal mass to tackle the major public health challenges ahead. PMID:21070643

2010-01-01

79

Work-function anisotropies as an origin of long-range surface forces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unusual effects noticed in previous force microscopy data are explained by a model based on work-function anisotropies and their associated patch charges. Measurable forces between macroscopic bodies can be due to the interaction of patch charges, with important consequences in the fields of surface forces, contact mechanics, adhesion, Schottky barriers, and the surface properties of insulators.

Burnham, N. A.; Colton, R. J.; Pollock, H. M.

1992-07-01

80

After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

2009-01-01

81

Blueprint for Business. Reaching a New Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to help U.S. businesses successfully hire and retain individuals moving from welfare to work. Section 1 discusses the different circumstances created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 and how those changes affect business. Section 2 reviews bottom-line benefits realized by…

Hogan, Lyn A.; Erden, James Van; Mower, Eleanor; Patel, Apurva; Mitchell, Steve

82

One Health in action: the work of the HAIRS group.  

PubMed

The Human Animal Infections and Risk Surveillance (HAIRS) group is a collaboration between a number of human and animal health organisations within the UK government. The group aims to provide a 'joined-up' response to emerging diseases that threaten the health of people or animals. Here, Dilys Morgan, who chairs the group, discusses its work, highlighting its response to Schmallenberg virus, and shows how a One Health approach can improve government responses to potential crises. PMID:25034681

Morgan, Dilys

2014-07-19

83

Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

2004-01-01

84

Gender, work roles and psychosocial work characteristics as determinants of health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to identify gender similarities and differences in psychosocial work characteristics for those in and out of paid employment, to inform research on possible health-related effects. Specifically five questions are addressed: do women report poorer work characteristics than men; are gender differences related to specific characteristics; do work characteristics differ between full- and part-time women workers and between

Sharon Matthews; Clyde Hertzman; Aleck Ostry; Chris Power

1998-01-01

85

Energetic costs of producing muscle work and force in a cyclical human bouncing task  

PubMed Central

Muscles expend energy to perform active work during locomotion, but they may also expend significant energy to produce force, for example when tendons perform much of the work passively. The relative contributions of work and force to overall energy expenditure are unknown. We therefore measured the mechanics and energetics of a cyclical bouncing task, designed to control for work and force. We hypothesized that near bouncing resonance, little work would be performed actively by muscle, but the cyclical production of force would cost substantial metabolic energy. Human subjects (n = 9) bounced vertically about the ankles at inversely proportional frequencies (1–4 Hz) and amplitudes (15–4 mm), such that the overall rate of work performed on the body remained approximately constant (0.30 ± 0.06 W/kg), but the forces varied considerably. We used parameter identification to estimate series elasticity of the triceps surae tendon, as well as the work performed actively by muscle and passively by tendon. Net metabolic energy expenditure for bouncing at 1 Hz was 1.15 ± 0.31 W/kg, attributable mainly to active muscle work with an efficiency of 24 ± 3%. But at 3 Hz (near resonance), most of the work was performed passively, so that active muscle work could account for only 40% of the net metabolic rate of 0.76 ± 0.28 W/kg. Near resonance, a cost for cyclical force that increased with both amplitude and frequency of force accounted for at least as much of the total energy expenditure as a cost for work. Series elasticity reduces the need for active work, but energy must still be expended for force production. PMID:21212245

Kuo, Arthur D.

2011-01-01

86

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. Methodology/Principal Findings 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. Conclusions The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions. PMID:22238619

Taylor-Robinson, David Carlton; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Orton, Lois; Moonan, May; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

2012-01-01

87

Recreation and Health Agencies: Working Together to Promote Physical Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Colorado Department of Health formed the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Prevention Coalition to address Colorado's problem with CVD. The article describes the work of the Coalition's Physical Activity Subcommittee, the Subcommittee's Exer-Deck tool to promote increased physical activity, and the training of professionals to work collaboratively…

Phillipp, JoAnn; Dusenbury, Linda J.

1994-01-01

88

Working-Class Jobs and New Parents' Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little research has explored linkages between work conditions and mental health in working-class employed parents. The current study aims to address this gap, employing hierarchical linear modeling techniques to examine how levels of and changes in job autonomy, job urgency, supervisor support, and coworker support predicted parents' depressive…

Perry-Jenkins, Maureen; Smith, JuliAnna Z.; Goldberg, Abbie E.; Logan, Jade

2011-01-01

89

Qualitative research and outcomes in health, social work and education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper is to outline ways in which qualitative research has a contribution to make to research on outcomes in Health, Social Work and Education. It is a methodology paper with a practical purpose. Large tracts of inquiry work (a broad term to cover research, evaluation, policy analysis, and practitioner research) are concerned with questions about the

Ian Shaw

2003-01-01

90

e-Labs and Work Objects: Towards Digital Health Economies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optimal provision of healthcare and public health services requires the synthesis of evidence from multiple disciplines. It is necessary to understand the genetic, environmental, behavioural and social determinants of disease and health-related states; to balance the effectiveness of interventions with their costs; to ensure the maximum safety and acceptability of interventions; and to provide fair access to care services for given populations. Ever expanding databases of knowledge and local health information, and the ability to employ computationally expensive methods, promises much for decisions to be both supported by best evidence and locally relevant. This promise will, however, not be realised without providing health professionals with the tools to make sense of this information rich environment and to collaborate across disciplines. We propose, as a solution to this problem, the e-Lab and Work Objects model as a sense-making platform for digital health economies - bringing together data, methods and people for timely health intelligence.

Ainsworth, John D.; Buchan, Iain E.

91

Health consequences of shift work and implications for structural design.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to perform a literature review on the health consequences of working rotating shifts and implications for structural design. A literature search was performed in June 2012 and a selection of the most relevant peer-review articles was included in the present review. Shift workers are more likely to suffer from a circadian sleep disorder characterized by sleepiness and insomnia. Shift work is associated with decreased productivity, impaired safety, diminished quality of life and adverse effects on health. Circadian disruption resulting from rotating shift work has also been associated with increased risk for metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. This article summarizes the known health effects of shift work and discusses how light can be used as a countermeasure to minimize circadian disruption at night while maintaining alertness. In the context of the lighted environment, implications for the design of newborn intensive care units are also discussed. PMID:23536025

Figueiro, M G; White, R D

2013-04-01

92

Work-Related Violence, Lifestyle, and Health among Special Education Teachers Working in Finnish Basic Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Studies have reported higher levels of absenteeism due to illness among special education teachers compared to other teachers, but it is not known which factors might contribute to this difference. We examined whether health, health behaviors, and exposure to violence at work differed between special education and general education…

Ervasti, Jenni; Kivimaki, Mika; Pentti, Jaana; Salmi, Venla; Suominen, Sakari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna

2012-01-01

93

The Health Care Labor Shortage: Report of the Health Care Labor Shortage Work Group.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A work group consisting of representatives of public agencies, education, the health care industry, and unions and professional associations was formed to examine education and training issues related to the shortage of health care workers in Washington state. The group concluded that the shortage of available workers in many health care…

Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

94

Effect of force and acoustic feedback on object-insertion work by teleoperation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The operating efficiency of teleoperation under stereoscopic video images has been reported to be inferior to that of using the naked eye at a real working environment. A human operator working at an actual work location is aided by force, tactile, and acoustic senses in addition to vision. Conventional teleoperated robots lack sense information, except vision, which may explain operators" inefficient cognition of the working space. Therefore, using stereoscopic video images, we intend to clarify effects of force and acoustic feedback information on the performance of the teleoperation work. Experiment 1 produces a system that can acquire touch-information by the site of the master robot; it elucidates the influence of force and acoustic feedback information in work. Human operators are required to pick up a cylindrical object and insert it into a hole. The experiment shows that feedback of simple touch-information by force and acoustic feedback was not effective to shorten the completion-time. Experiment 2, in force feedback conditions, directs a user to search a hole by sliding a cylindrical object on its surface. Experimental results indicate that the working efficiency was improved by force information using a sliding sense. Experiment 3 investigated effects of sound when the cylindrical object was oriented such that it could be inserted in a hole and the hole was approached in a state of contact. Experimental results demonstrate that working efficiency was not improved by presentation of acoustic information.

Cui, Zhenglie; Matsunaga, Katsuya; Shidoji, Kazunori

2004-05-01

95

Work organization and the health of bank employees.  

PubMed

The Brazilian banking sector has undergone an intense restructuring process and taken a leading position in the incorporation of new technologies and organizational innovations. Computerization in the industry, in association with forms of work organization, has resulted in changes that reflect on the workers' health. Based on the theoretical and methodological frameworks of historical and dialectical materialism, this qualitative study investigates the work conditions of bank employees in order to identify the extent to which changes in work organization interfere with these workers' health. Data were collected through interviews held with 11 bank employees. In addition to physical sickening due to occupational diseases directly related to work intensification, the results also show an increased incidence of mental suffering and a feeling of loss of professional identity. Work-related frustration, instability and concerns related to psychological pressure resulting from the need to achieve goals predominated in the reports. PMID:22699722

Silva, Juliana Lemos; Navarro, Vera Lucia

2012-01-01

96

Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries  

PubMed Central

Background Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 408 Nepalese migrants who had at least one period of work experience of at least six months in any of three Gulf countries: Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates (UAE). Face to face questionnaire interviews were conducted applying a convenience technique to select the study participants. Results Nepalese migrants in these Gulf countries were generally young men between 26-35 years of age. Unskilled construction jobs including labourer, scaffolder, plumber and carpenter were the most common jobs. Health problems were widespread and one quarter of study participants reported experiencing injuries or accidents at work within the last 12 months. The rates of health problems and accidents reported were very similar in the three countries. Only one third of the respondents were provided with insurance for health services by their employer. Lack of leave for illness, cost and fear of losing their job were the barriers to accessing health care services. The study found that construction and agricultural workers were more likely to experience accidents at their workplace and health problems than other workers. Conclusion The findings suggest important messages for the migration policy makers in Nepal. There is a lack of adequate information for the migrants making them aware of their health risks and rights in relation to health services in the destination countries and we suggest that the government of Nepal should be responsible for providing this information. Employers should provide orientation on possible health risks and appropriate training for preventive measures and all necessary access to health care services to all their workers. PMID:21443802

2011-01-01

97

Shift Work and Health: Current Problems and Preventive Actions  

PubMed Central

The paper gives an overview of the problems to be tackled nowadays by occupational health with regards to shift work as well as the main guidelines at organizational and medical levels on how to protect workers' health and well-being. Working time organization is becoming a key factor on account of new technologies, market globalization, economic competition, and extension of social services to general populations, all of which involve more and more people in continuous assistance and control of work processes over the 24 hours in a day. The large increase of epidemiological and clinical studies on this issue document the severity of this risk factor on human health and well being, at both social and psychophysical levels, starting from a disruption of biological circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycle and ending in several psychosomatic troubles and disorders, likely also including cancer, and extending to impairment of performance efficiency as well as family and social life. Appropriate interventions on the organization of shift schedules according to ergonomic criteria and careful health surveillance and social support for shift workers are important preventive and corrective measures that allow people to keep working without significant health impairment. PMID:22953171

2010-01-01

98

Health status and the labor force participation decisions of married couples  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the labor force participation decisions of married couples, and special attention is paid to a spouse’s health conditions affecting their own and the spouse’s labor force participation decision. I used the Health and Retirement...

Lin, Peng

2009-05-15

99

Work fluctuations for a Brownian particle driven by a correlated external random force.  

PubMed

We have considered the underdamped motion of a Brownian particle in the presence of a correlated external random force. The force is modeled by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. We investigate the fluctuations of the work done by the external force on the Brownian particle in a given time interval in the steady state. We calculate the large deviation functions as well as the complete asymptotic form of the probability density function of the performed work. We also discuss the symmetry properties of the large deviation functions for this system. Finally we perform numerical simulations and they are in a very good agreement with the analytic results. PMID:25493749

Pal, Arnab; Sabhapandit, Sanjib

2014-11-01

100

Job Tenure Declines as Work Force Changes. Special Labor Force Report 235.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report consists of an article from the December 1979 issues of the Monthly Labor Review, an explanatory note, and supplementary tables. The article considers these factors which determine the length of time a person works continuously for the same employer: age and sex, marital status of women, race, and occupation and industry. It is shown…

Sekscenski, Edward S.

1980-01-01

101

Accreditation of Health Educational Programs. Part II: Staff Working Papers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains a second set of working papers concerned with procedures of the accrediting agencies in the health fields, the accountability and social responsibility of accreditation, and the relationship of accreditation to certification, licensure, and registration. Texts of these papers are included: (1) "Dilemmas of Accreditation…

Study of Accreditation of Selected Health Educational Programs, Washington, DC.

102

The Role of Market Forces in the Delivery of Health Care: Issues for Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This edition of the Role of Market Forces program note suggests empirical and descriptive analyses required to complement new areas of health policy emphasis and direction. Eight areas and related questions involving health economics are outlined: (1) rural health care; (2) medical malpractice and insurance; (3) supply, productivity, and…

National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

103

Depression in Working Adults: Comparing the Costs and Health Outcomes of Working When Ill  

PubMed Central

Objective Working through a depressive illness can improve mental health but also carries risks and costs from reduced concentration, fatigue, and poor on-the-job performance. However, evidence-based recommendations for managing work attendance decisions, which benefit individuals and employers, are lacking. Therefore, this study has compared the costs and health outcomes of short-term absenteeism versus working while ill (“presenteeism”) amongst employed Australians reporting lifetime major depression. Methods Cohort simulation using state-transition Markov models simulated movement of a hypothetical cohort of workers, reporting lifetime major depression, between health states over one- and five-years according to probabilities derived from a quality epidemiological data source and existing clinical literature. Model outcomes were health service and employment-related costs, and quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs), captured for absenteeism relative to presenteeism, and stratified by occupation (blue versus white-collar). Results Per employee with depression, absenteeism produced higher mean costs than presenteeism over one- and five-years ($42,573/5-years for absenteeism, $37,791/5-years for presenteeism). However, overlapping confidence intervals rendered differences non-significant. Employment-related costs (lost productive time, job turnover), and antidepressant medication and service use costs of absenteeism and presenteeism were significantly higher for white-collar workers. Health outcomes differed for absenteeism versus presenteeism amongst white-collar workers only. Conclusions Costs and health outcomes for absenteeism and presenteeism were not significantly different; service use costs excepted. Significant variation by occupation type was identified. These findings provide the first occupation-specific cost evidence which can be used by clinicians, employees, and employers to review their management of depression-related work attendance, and may suggest encouraging employees to continue working is warranted. PMID:25181469

Cocker, Fiona; Nicholson, Jan M.; Graves, Nicholas; Oldenburg, Brian; Palmer, Andrew J.; Martin, Angela; Scott, Jenn; Venn, Alison; Sanderson, Kristy

2014-01-01

104

The work function of doped polyaniline nanoparticles observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The work function of polyaniline nanoparticles in the emeraldine base state was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy to be ˜270 meV higher than that of similar nanoparticles in the emeraldine salt state. Normal tapping mode atomic force microscopy could not be used to distinguish between the particles due to their similar morphologies and sizes. Moreover, other potential measurement systems, such as using zeta potentials, were not suitable for the measurement of surface charges of doped nanoparticles due to their encapsulation by interfering chemical groups. Kelvin probe force microscopy can be used to overcome these limitations and unambiguously distinguish between the bare and doped polyaniline nanoparticles.

Park, Jinsung; Bang, Doyeon; Jang, Kuewhan; Haam, Seungjoo; Yang, Jaemoon; Na, Sungsoo

2012-09-01

105

The impact of a worker health study on working conditions.  

PubMed

A research partnership of representatives from labor, academia, and public health enabled unionized San Francisco hotel workers to achieve important policy changes in workplace health and safety. Known as the "Housekeeping Study," the project took sixteen months to complete. A unique aspect of the project was that it utilized participatory action research methods, involving workers themselves as full participants in the study. A core group of 25 hotel room cleaners was involved in each phase of the project. The study developed health data which enabled room cleaners and their union to formulate and justify a contract proposal calling for a significant reduction in housekeeping workloads. The employer association agreed to a contract which reduced the maximum required room assignment from 15 rooms to 14 rooms per day in 14 San Francisco hotels. By lowering the maximum work assignment, these workers set a new standard which can potentially protect the health of room cleaners across the country. The project can serve as a model for worker and union participation in academic research, as well as for the application of research to improving working conditions, particularly for low-wage immigrant workers. PMID:12325285

Lee, Pam Tau; Krause, Niklas

2002-01-01

106

Health-related behaviours and sickness absence from work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives:To compare associations of health-related behaviours with self-certified and medically confirmed sickness absence, and to examine whether these associations can be explained by psychosocial and physical working conditions and occupational social class.Methods:The study included 5470 female and 1464 male employees of the City of Helsinki surveyed in 2000–2002. These data were linked to sickness absence records until the end of

M Laaksonen; K Piha; P Martikainen; O Rahkonen; E Lahelma

2009-01-01

107

Initial Report of the Task Force on Cultural Competence Education in the Health Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of the Task Force on Cultural Competence Education and represents the distillation of the Task Force's efforts to fulfill its legislative charge. The report is intended to facilitate a statewide conversation about the health services provided to New Mexico's multicultural citizenry. It…

New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2007

2007-01-01

108

Astronomy Resources for Intercurricular Elementary Science (ARIES): Exploring Motion and Forces. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"ARIES: Exploring Motion and Forces" is a physical science curriculum for students in grades 5-8 that employs 18 inquiry-centered, hands-on lessons called "explorations." The curriculum draws upon students' curiosity to explore phenomena, allowing for a discovery-based learning process. Group-centered lab work is designed to help students build an…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

2012-01-01

109

Valuing our differences. How to manage a culturally diverse work force.  

PubMed

How can we become aware of cultural blind spots that keep us from understanding one another? To adequately prepare for the new work force, healthcare organizations must establish work force diversity goals. Of course, goals by themselves will not empower minority workers. And if goals are perceived as "window dressing," resentment builds. Most organizations claim their hiring practices are not biased. One way to ensure that your hiring practices are unbiased is to ask important questions: Does the ethnic makeup of our work force resemble that of the community? If not, what can be done to strengthen our affirmative action programs? In a multicultural work force, misunderstandings are bound to arise because human behavior is conditioned by cultural factors. One way for an organization to identify problems that are culturally based is for supervisors and subordinates to meet informally to ensure that the organization is maximizing the minority worker's talents. Climate surveys and exit interviews are two other frequently used methods. Cultural diversity training programs can also make a difference in an organization. Some training programs help participants learn how culture influences the way we communicate. Knowledge of the cultural basis of how we interact is one factor in building bridges of understanding. PMID:10138587

Veninga, R L

1994-12-01

110

Preparing the Work Force for the 21st Century: 1998 Community Based Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help determine the community's work force training needs, Spartanburg Technical College (STC) completed an extensive research study. It included a survey of 1,501 high school juniors in Cherokee, Union, and Spartanburg counties in South Carolina; a survey of 293 area businesses and industries; focus groups representing 63 companies, elected…

Quinley, John W.; Cantrell, Jo Ellen

111

Making Child Care Work. Report to the 1987 Minnesota Legislature by the Child Care Task Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report makes recommendations to the 1987 Minnesota Legislature on some actions that can be taken to improve Minnesota's child care system and make it work more effectively. The first section of the report documents the growing need for child care, emphasizing the number of children in Minnesota, the number of women in the labor force, changes…

Moriarty, Sheila; And Others

112

Dental Work Force Strategies During a Period of Change and Uncertainty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both supply and demand influence the ability of the dental work force to adequately and efficiently provide dental care to a U.S. population growing in size and diversity. Major changes are occurring on both sides of the dental care market. Among factors shaping the demand for dental care are changing disease patterns, shifting population demographics, the extent and features of

L. Jackson Brown

113

For Work-Force Training, a Plan to Give College Credit Where It's Due  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After nearly three years of planning, Ohio's higher-education officials are finalizing an ambitious program to grant college credit for some technical courses offered at the state's adult-education centers. The program, called the Career-Technical Credit Transfer, is the latest in a string of state efforts to more closely link work-force training…

Sander, Libby

2008-01-01

114

Building a World-Class Work Force: A Vision for a New Century.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As society turns increasingly to education to provide remedies for economic and social ills and to prepare citizens for life and work in a rapidly changing world, the community college is emerging as a major force in U.S. education. Recent trends indicate that U.S. productivity is lagging behind that of other countries, most notably Japan. Japan's…

Feldman, Marvin

115

The Effects of Early Work Experience on Young Women's Labor Force Attachment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of longitudinal data on the employment histories of 1,386 women from age 16 to 28 found that mature women's labor force attachment was influenced by the timing, amount, and volatility of their early work experience, as well as by educational attainment, race, and giving birth. (Contains 58 references.) (SV)

Alon, Sigal; Donahoe, Debra; Tienda, Marta

2001-01-01

116

Profile of a Rural Area Work Force: The Wyoming Uranium Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide insights into policies relative to human resource investments and employment information channels, the study's objectives were to: (1) relate types of employment in Wyoming's uranium mines and mills to work force participants; (2) determine employee earnings and relate those earnings to employment categories and…

Dobbs, Thomas L.; Kiner, Phil E.

1974-01-01

117

The underdevelopment of health of working America: causes, consequences and possible solutions.  

PubMed Central

This article presents the health conditions of working America, and provides an analysis of the causes of that situation. It is postulated that the main health problems in the U.S. are due not to prevalent life styles-as the behavioralists indicate-but to the dramatic maldistribution of economic and political power in our society, with the absence of control by the majority of the U.S. population-the working and lower-middle classes-over the work process with which they are involved, the economic wealth that they produce, and the political institutions that they pay for. The production of goods and wealth as well as the political institutions of the United States are dominated and controlled by a minority of our population-the corporate and upper-middle classes. Empirical information is presented to support this postulate. In light of this explanation, it is asserted that a major public health task is to deliberately and actively contribute to the political mobilization of forces aimed at bringing about profound changes in the pattern of control of our working insitutions and of the distribution of wealth and political power, changes which seek to shift that control from the few to the many. PMID:937599

Navarro, V

1976-01-01

118

Work-Related Health Disorders among Saudi Computer Users  

PubMed Central

The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and eye and vision complaints among the computer users of King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SAUDIA), and Saudi Telecom Company (STC). Stratified random samples of the work stations and operators at each of the studied institutions were selected and the ergonomics of the work stations were assessed and the operators' health complaints were investigated. The average ergonomic score of the studied work station at STC, KAU, and SAUDIA was 81.5%, 73.3%, and 70.3, respectively. Most of the examined operators use computers daily for ? 7 hours, yet they had some average incidences of general complaints (e.g., headache, body fatigue, and lack of concentration) and relatively high level of incidences of eye and vision complaints and musculoskeletal complaints. The incidences of the complaints have been found to increase with the (a) decrease in work station ergonomic score, (b) progress of age and duration of employment, (c) smoking, (d) use of computers, (e) lack of work satisfaction, and (f) history of operators' previous ailments. It has been recommended to improve the ergonomics of the work stations, set up training programs, and conduct preplacement and periodical examinations for operators. PMID:25383379

Jomoah, Ibrahim M.

2014-01-01

119

76 FR 63927 - Interagency Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (ITFAR): An Update on A Public Health Action...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Resistance (ITFAR): An Update on A Public Health Action Plan to Combat Antimicrobial...accomplishing activities outlined in A Public Health Action Plan to Combat Antimicrobial...increasing importance of AR as a public health threat. The Task Force is...

2011-10-14

120

Forces Pushing Prescription Psychotropic Drugs in College Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A complex of forceful influences is greatly accelerating the use of what are usually referred to as "psychiatric drugs," although most prescribing is not done by psychiatrists. Many other clinicians, including other kinds of physicians, and recently psychologists, prescribe these medications. The influences contributing to this dramatic surge…

Whitaker, Leighton C.

2007-01-01

121

'The dangers attending these conditions are evident': Public Health and the Working Environment of Lancashire Textile Communities, c.1870-1939.  

PubMed

This article examines the position of the working environment within public health priorities and as a contributor to the health of a community. Using two Lancashire textile towns (Burnley and Blackburn) as case studies and drawing on a variety of sources, it highlights how, while legislation set the industry parameters for legal enforcement of working conditions, local public health priorities were pivotal in setting codes of practice. The complexities entwined with identifying the working environment as a cause of ill health and with improving it were entangled within the local community health context. In addition, the multiple understandings of Medical Officers of Health surrounding the remit of their responsibilities impacted the local health context. These did not always parallel national regulations. Indeed, it was these local, community specific forces that set the public health agenda, determined its path and the place of the working environment within this. PMID:24771979

Greenlees, Janet

2013-11-01

122

‘The dangers attending these conditions are evident’: Public Health and the Working Environment of Lancashire Textile Communities, c.1870–1939  

PubMed Central

This article examines the position of the working environment within public health priorities and as a contributor to the health of a community. Using two Lancashire textile towns (Burnley and Blackburn) as case studies and drawing on a variety of sources, it highlights how, while legislation set the industry parameters for legal enforcement of working conditions, local public health priorities were pivotal in setting codes of practice. The complexities entwined with identifying the working environment as a cause of ill health and with improving it were entangled within the local community health context. In addition, the multiple understandings of Medical Officers of Health surrounding the remit of their responsibilities impacted the local health context. These did not always parallel national regulations. Indeed, it was these local, community specific forces that set the public health agenda, determined its path and the place of the working environment within this. PMID:24771979

Greenlees, Janet

2013-01-01

123

Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work  

PubMed Central

As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers. PMID:18070333

Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

2007-01-01

124

Associations of work and health-related characteristics with intention to continue working after the age of 65 years.  

PubMed

This study examines the association of work and health-related characteristics with the intention to continue working after the age of 65 years. Data were from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2), a nationally representative population survey, including 1854 employees aged 45-64 years; 29.0% reported the intention to continue working after 65 years. Lower education, more adverse psychosocial working conditions and any physical disorder were negatively associated with this intention. Mental disorders were not associated. These findings highlight the importance of favourable working conditions and good physical health in relation to employees' intention to continue working after 65 years. PMID:25395396

Ten Have, Margreet; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; de Graaf, Ron

2015-02-01

125

Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting  

PubMed Central

Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that ‘core’ competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health ‘programme’ or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified. PMID:24427175

2013-01-01

126

Health and turnover of working mothers after childbirth via the work-family interface: an analysis across time.  

PubMed

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women's health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M; Clinch, C Randall; Arcury, Thomas A

2011-09-01

127

Health Care Reform and Medical Education: Forces toward Generalism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health care reforms will dramatically change the culture of medical schools in areas of patient care, research, and education programs. Academic medical centers must construct mutually beneficial partnerships that will position them to take advantage of the opportunities rather than leave them without the diversity of resources needed to make…

O'Neil, Edward H.; Seifer, Sarena D.

1995-01-01

128

Force health protection: 10 years of lessons learned by the Department of Defense.  

PubMed

The Department of Defense has applied lessons learned since the Persian Gulf War to develop the force health protection (FHP) strategy. The goal of this new, unified strategy is to protect the health of military members from medical and environmental hazards associated with military service to the maximum extent possible. FHP is an evolving strategy that seeks to balance the military health system's responsibilities to promote and sustain health and wellness throughout each person's military service; prevent acute and chronic illnesses and injuries during training and deployment; and rapidly stabilize, treat, and evacuate casualties. In addition, FHP demands a continuous assessment of the current and future health of military members through medical surveillance, longitudinal health studies, adequate medical record documentation, and clinical follow-up. Effective communication with military members, leaders, veterans, families, and the public regarding military members' health status and the health risks of military service is a key element of the FHP strategy. PMID:11901562

Trump, David H; Mazzuchi, John F; Riddle, James; Hyams, Kenneth C; Balough, Brian

2002-03-01

129

Health status of people with work-related musculoskeletal disorders in return to work programs: a Malaysian study.  

PubMed

This study examined the health status of injured workers with musculoskeletal disorders enrolled in the Malaysian Return to Work (RTW) program. The 102 participants were categorized into three RTW groups: Off-work (n = 30, 29.4%), Re-entry (n = 44, 43.1%), and Maintenance (n = 28, 27.5%). Overall health status, as measured by the SF-36 version 2, of the workers exhibited below average compared to the internationally established normative population, with their physical health component summary rated lower than mental health. Across the different groups, significant differences were found in role-physical, vitality, bodily pain, general health, and mental health. However, the mean values of these variables were higher in the Maintenance group and were found significant. The current health status of injured workers at Off-work and Re-entry phases was significantly low and warranted to be improved by involving other health professionals such as occupational therapists, ergonomists, and psychologists. PMID:23855610

Murad, Mohd Suleiman; O'Brien, Lisa; Farnworth, Louise; Chien, Chi-Wen

2013-07-01

130

Workgroup Report: Developing Environmental Health Indicators for European Children: World Health Organization Working Group  

PubMed Central

A working group coordinated by the World Health Organization developed a set of indicators to protect children’s health from environmental risks and to support current and future European policy needs. On the basis of identified policy needs, the group developed a core set of 29 indicators for implementation plus an extended set of eight additional indicators for future development, focusing on exposure, health effects, and action. As far as possible, the indicators were designed to use existing information and are flexible enough to be developed further to meet the needs of policy makers and changing health priorities. These indicators cover most of the priority topic areas specified in the Children’s Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) as adopted in the Fourth Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in 2004, and will be used to monitor the implementation of CEHAPE. This effort can be viewed as an integral part of the Global Initiative on Children’s Environmental Health Indicators, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002. PMID:17805431

Pond, Kathy; Kim, Rokho; Carroquino, Maria-Jose; Pirard, Philippe; Gore, Fiona; Cucu, Alexandra; Nemer, Leda; MacKay, Morag; Smedje, Greta; Georgellis, Antonis; Dalbokova, Dafina; Krzyzanowski, Michal

2007-01-01

131

The impact of work-limiting disability on labor force participation.  

PubMed

According to the justification hypothesis, non-employed individuals may over-report their level of work limitation, leading to biased census/survey estimates of the prevalence of severe disabilities and the associated labor force participation rate. For researchers studying policies which impact the disabled or elderly (e.g., Supplemental Security Income, Disability Insurance, and Early Retirement), this could lead to significant bias in key parameters of interest. Using the American Community Survey, we examine the potential for both inflated and deflated reported disability status and generate a general index of disability, which can be used to reduce the bias of these self-reports in other studies. We find that at least 4.8 million individuals have left the labor force because of a work-limiting disability, at least four times greater than the impact implied by our replication of previous models. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24307040

Webber, Douglas A; Bjelland, Melissa J

2015-03-01

132

Identifying vulnerable Asian Americans under Health Care Reform: working in small businesses and health care coverage.  

PubMed

Working in small businesses has been identified as a key factor for low coverage rates in immigrant communities. In this study, we identify specific cultural and socioeconomic predictors of Asian Americans who work in small businesses to identify subgroups at a greater disadvantage than others in obtaining health insurance. Logistic regression models were fitted using a sample of 3,819 Asian American small business owners and employers extracted from pooled 2005–2012 California Health Interview Survey data. We found that individuals with low income levels, Korean Americans, U.S.-born South Asian and Southeast Asian (other than Vietnamese) Americans, immigrants without citizenship (particularly those lacking a green card), and individuals with limited English proficiency had higher odds of lacking coverage. The odds of being uninsured did not differ between small business owners and employees. Based upon these key findings, we propose several strategies to expand coverage for Asian Americans working in small businesses and their most vulnerable subgroups. PMID:25418249

Cook, Won Kim; Tseng, Winston; Ko Chin, Kathy; John, Iyanrick; Chung, Corina

2014-11-01

133

Dynamic forces measurement of cables in structural health monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Now a day, cable plays a more and more important role in civil engineering. As an effective construction member, cable is used in many long-span spatial structures. The cable tension measurement is required in the construction control, assessment and long-term monitoring of cable-supported structures. Mostly, the detection uses the Fourier Transform to get the frequencies of the cable, and then applies the vibration-based cable tension theory to evaluate the cable tension. As a conventional method for cable tension measurement, the Fourier Transform can only be used in the static cable tension force test, but not dynamic cable tension test. The cable dynamic tension describes the load-deformation behavior of cables subjected to dynamic loading. It represents the intrinsic dynamic properties of cables. In order to get the dynamic cable force, time-frequency analysis must be done. In this paper, wavelet transform tool is used to analyze the signal, and obtain the cable tension dynamic change along with the time.

Song, Yu; Wang, Jianxin

2010-03-01

134

75 FR 52355 - Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group Reports...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group...The National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures is a collaborative...the following cross-cutting public health and chemical exposures...

2010-08-25

135

Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs  

MedlinePLUS

... Health (NIOSH) Share Compartir Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs October 2008 DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2009-106 Health care workers who handle hazardous drugs are at risk ...

136

The Occupational Safety of Health Professionals Working at Community and Family Health Centers  

PubMed Central

Background: Healthcare professionals encounter many medical risks while providing healthcare services to individuals and the community. Thus, occupational safety studies are very important in health care organizations. They involve studies performed to establish legal, technical, and medical measures that must be taken to prevent employees from sustaining physical or mental damage because of work hazards. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine if the occupational safety of health personnel at community and family health centers (CHC and FHC) has been achieved. Martials and Methods: The population of this cross-sectional study comprised 507 nurses, 199 physicians, and 237 other medical personnel working at a total of 18 family health centers (FHC) and community health centers (CHC) in Trabzon, Turkey. The sample consisted of a total of 418 nurses, 156 physicians, and 123 other medical personnel. Sampling method was not used, and the researchers tried to reach the whole population. Data were gathered with the Occupational Safety Scale (OSS) and a questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics and occupational safety. Results: According to the evaluations of all the medical personnel, the mean ± SD of total score of the OSS was 3.57 ± 0.98; of the OSS’s subscales, the mean ± SD of the health screening and registry systems was 2.76 ± 1.44, of occupational diseases and problems was 3.04 ± 1.3 and critical fields control was 3.12 ± 1.62. In addition, occupational safety was found more insufficient by nurses (F = 14.18; P < 0.001). Conclusions: All healthcare personnel, particularly nurses working in CHCs and FHCs found occupational safety to be insufficient as related to protective and supportive activities.

Ozturk, Havva; Babacan, Elif

2014-01-01

137

Perception and prevalence of work-related health hazards among health care workers in public health facilities in southern India.  

PubMed

Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are exposed to occupational related health hazards. Measuring worker perception and the prevalence of these hazards can help facilitate better risk management for HCWs, as these workers are envisaged to be the first point of contact, especially in resource poor settings. Objective: To describe the perception of occupational health hazards and self-reported exposure prevalence among HCWs in Southern India. Methods: We used cross sectional design with stratified random sampling of HCWs from different levels of health facilities and categories in a randomly selected district in Southern India. Data on perception and exposure prevalence were collected using a structured interview schedule developed by occupational health experts and administered by trained investigators. Results: A total of 482 HCWs participated. Thirty nine percent did not recognize work-related health hazards, but reported exposure to at least one hazard upon further probing. Among the 81·5% who reported exposure to biological hazard, 93·9% had direct skin contact with infectious materials. Among HCWs reporting needle stick injury, 70·5% had at least one in the previous three months. Ergonomic hazards included lifting heavy objects (42%) and standing for long hours (37%). Psychological hazards included negative feelings (20·3%) and verbal or physical abuse during work (20·5%). Conclusion: More than a third of HCWs failed to recognize work-related health hazards. Despite training in handling infectious materials, HCWs reported direct skin contact with infectious materials and needle stick injuries. Results indicate the need for training oriented toward behavioral change and provision of occupational health services. PMID:25482656

Senthil, Arasi; Anandh, Balasubramanian; Jayachandran, Palsamy; Thangavel, Gurusamy; Josephin, Diana; Yamini, Ravindran; Kalpana, Balakrishnan

2014-12-01

138

Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study—a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation  

PubMed Central

The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

2014-01-01

139

Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study-a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation.  

PubMed

The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

2014-12-01

140

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out"  

E-print Network

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out" Early Bird Pre-Conference Training Opportunity--Youth Mental Health First Aid USA Want to become a Youth Mental Health First Aider? This Early Bird Pre-Conference opportunity

Weber, David J.

141

Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia -MSN Health & Fitness -Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM  

E-print Network

Medications Health & Fitness Make msn.com your home page News Entertainment Sports Money Lifestyle More BingWorking-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia - MSN Health & Fitness - Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM

142

Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

2013-01-01

143

Phthalate Exposure and Health-Related Outcomes in Specific Types of Work Environment  

PubMed Central

Many toxic substances in the workplace can modify human health and quality of life and there is still insufficient data on respiratory outcomes in adults exposed to phthalates. The aim of this work was to assess in waste management workers from the Nitra region of Slovakia (n = 30) the extent of exposure to phthalates and health-related outcomes. Four urinary phthalate metabolites mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), monobutyl phthalate (MnBP), monoethyl phthalate (MEP) and monoisononyl phthalate (MiNP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Urinary concentration of MEHP was positively associated with ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity % (FEV1/FVC) (r = 0.431; p = 0.018) and MiNP with fat free mass index (FFMI) (r = 0.439; p = 0.015). The strongest predictor of pulmonary function was the pack/year index as smoking history that predicted a decrease of pulmonary parameters, the FEV1/FVC, % of predicted values of peak expiratory flow (PEF % of PV) and FEV1 % of PV. Unexpectedly, urinary MEHP and MINP were positively associated with pulmonary function expressed as PEF % of PV and FEV1/FVC. We hypothesize that occupational exposure to phthalates estimated from urinary metabolites (MEHP, MiNP) can modify pulmonary function on top of lifestyle factors. PMID:24865398

Kolena, Branislav; Petrovicova, Ida; Pilka, Tomas; Pucherova, Zuzana; Munk, Michal; Matula, Bohumil; Vankova, Viera; Petlus, Peter; Jenisova, Zita; Rozova, Zdenka; Wimmerova, Sona; Trnovec, Tomas

2014-01-01

144

Phthalate exposure and health-related outcomes in specific types of work environment.  

PubMed

Many toxic substances in the workplace can modify human health and quality of life and there is still insufficient data on respiratory outcomes in adults exposed to phthalates. The aim of this work was to assess in waste management workers from the Nitra region of Slovakia (n = 30) the extent of exposure to phthalates and health-related outcomes. Four urinary phthalate metabolites mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), monobutyl phthalate (MnBP), monoethyl phthalate (MEP) and monoisononyl phthalate (MiNP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Urinary concentration of MEHP was positively associated with ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity % (FEV1/FVC) (r = 0.431; p = 0.018) and MiNP with fat free mass index (FFMI) (r = 0.439; p = 0.015). The strongest predictor of pulmonary function was the pack/year index as smoking history that predicted a decrease of pulmonary parameters, the FEV1/FVC, % of predicted values of peak expiratory flow (PEF % of PV) and FEV1 % of PV. Unexpectedly, urinary MEHP and MINP were positively associated with pulmonary function expressed as PEF % of PV and FEV1/FVC. We hypothesize that occupational exposure to phthalates estimated from urinary metabolites (MEHP, MiNP) can modify pulmonary function on top of lifestyle factors. PMID:24865398

Kolena, Branislav; Petrovicova, Ida; Pilka, Tomas; Pucherova, Zuzana; Munk, Michal; Matula, Bohumil; Vankova, Viera; Petlus, Peter; Jenisova, Zita; Rozova, Zdenka; Wimmerova, Sona; Trnovec, Tomas

2014-06-01

145

Health Literacy: Critical Opportunities for Social Work Leadership in Health Care and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One-third of U. S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to…

Liechty, Janet M.

2011-01-01

146

Improving Work Functioning and Mental Health of Health Care Employees Using an E-Mental Health Approach to Workers' Health Surveillance: Pretest–Posttest Study  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health complaints are quite common in health care employees and can have adverse effects on work functioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate an e-mental health (EMH) approach to workers' health surveillance (WHS) for nurses and allied health professionals. Using the waiting-list group of a previous randomized controlled trial with high dropout and low compliance to the intervention, we studied the pre- and posteffects of the EMH approach in a larger group of participants. Methods We applied a pretest–posttest study design. The WHS consisted of online screening on impaired work functioning and mental health followed by online automatically generated personalized feedback, online tailored advice, and access to self-help EMH interventions. The effects on work functioning, stress, and work-related fatigue after 3 months were analyzed using paired t tests and effect sizes. Results One hundred and twenty-eight nurses and allied health professionals participated at pretest as well as posttest. Significant improvements were found on work functioning (p = 0.01) and work-related fatigue (p < 0.01). Work functioning had relevantly improved in 30% of participants. A small meaningful effect on stress was found (Cohen d = .23) in the participants who had logged onto an EMH intervention (20%, n = 26). Conclusion The EMH approach to WHS improves the work functioning and mental health of nurses and allied health professionals. However, because we found small effects and participation in the offered EMH interventions was low, there is ample room for improvement. PMID:25516815

Ketelaar, Sarah M.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Bolier, Linda; Smeets, Odile; Sluiter, Judith K.

2014-01-01

147

Scientific and popular health knowledge in the education work of community health agents in Rio de Janeiro shantytowns.  

PubMed

Health education for socially marginalized populations challenges the efficacy of existing strategies and methods, and the pertinence of the educational and philosophical principles that underpin them. The Brazilian Community Health Agents Initiative (CHAI) hires residents of deprived marginalized communities to undertake health promotion and education in their communities. The ultimate goal of the CHAI is to connect populations with the public healthcare system by promoting social re-affiliation, protecting civil rights and enhancing equity of access to health services. In this article, we present the education work of community health agents through interplay between popular and scientific health knowledge in nine Rio de Janeiro shantytowns. A critical ethnographic research design, using thematic analysis, allowed us to explore agents' education work to enhance family health literacy in shantytowns. Local culture and social practices inspire Agents to create original strategies to reconcile forms of health knowledge in their work. PMID:22717941

Zanchetta, M S; Kolawole Salami, B; Perreault, M; Leite, L C

2012-08-01

148

Promoting Positive Emotional Health of Children of Transient Armed Forces Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this research was to promote emotional health in a small primary school (n = 180), with a highly transient pupil population of armed forces children (Service children). Negative effects of pupil mobility have been found to relate to academic attainment (Dobson, Henthorne, & Lynas, 2000; Mott, 2002), but its effect on social and…

Eodanable, Miranda; Lauchlan, Fraser

2012-01-01

149

Welfare, Work, and Health Care Access Predictors of Low-Income Children’s Physical Health Outcomes  

PubMed Central

This analysis examines whether young children’s (N= 494) general physical health is associated with parental employment, welfare receipt, and health care access within a low-income population transitioning from welfare to work. A latent physical health measure derived from survey and medical chart data is used to capture children’s poor health, and parental ratings of child health are used to identify excellent health. Controlling for a host of factors associated with children’s health outcomes, results show that children of caregivers who are unemployed and off welfare have better health than children of caregivers who are working and off welfare. Children whose caregivers are unemployed and on welfare, or combining work and welfare, have health outcomes similar to children of caregivers who are working and off welfare. Health care access characteristics, such as gaps in health insurance coverage, source of primary care setting, and type of health insurance are associated with children’s general physical health. Implications of these results for state TANF programs are discussed. PMID:25505809

Slack, Kristen Shook; Holl, Jane L.; Yoo, Joan; Amsden, Laura B.; Collins, Emily; Bolger, Kerry

2009-01-01

150

Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: II. Mortality  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the current health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. This report compares the noncombat mortality of 1261 Ranch Hand veterans to that of a comparison population of 19,101 other Air Force veterans primarily involved in cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. The indirectly standardized all-cause death rate among Ranch Hands is 2.5 deaths per 1,000 person-years, the same as that among comparison subjects. After adjustment for age, rank, and occupation, the all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 1.0. In adjusted cause-specific analyses, the authors found no significant group differences regarding accidental, malignant neoplasm, and circulatory deaths. These data are not supportive to a hypothesis of increases mortality among Ranch Hands.

Michalek, J.E.; Wolfe, W.H.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

1990-10-10

151

To What Extent Do Financial Strain and Labour Force Status Explain Social Class Inequalities in Self-Rated Health? Analysis of 20 Countries in the European Social Survey  

PubMed Central

Introduction Nordic countries do not have the smallest health inequalities despite egalitarian social policies. A possible explanation for this is that drivers of class differences in health such as financial strain and labour force status remain socially patterned in Nordic countries. Methods Our analyses used data for working age (25–59) men (n?=?48,249) and women (n?=?52,654) for 20 countries from five rounds (2002–2010) of the European Social Survey. The outcome was self-rated health in 5 categories. Stratified by gender we used fixed effects linear regression models and marginal standardisation to instigate how countries varied in the degree to which class inequalities were attenuated by financial strain and labour force status. Results and Discussion Before adjustment, Nordic countries had large inequalities in self-rated health relative to other European countries. For example the regression coefficient for the difference in health between working class and professional men living in Norway was 0.34 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.42), while the comparable figure for Spain was 0.15 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.22). Adjusting for financial strain and labour force status led to attenuation of health inequalities in all countries. However, unlike some countries such as Spain, where after adjustment the regression coefficient for working class men was only 0.02 (95% CI ?0.05 to 0.10), health inequalities persisted after adjustment for Nordic countries. For Norway the adjusted coefficient was 0.17 (95% CI 0.10 to 0.25). Results for women and men were similar. However, in comparison to men, class inequalities tended to be stronger for women and more persistent after adjustment. Conclusions Adjusting for financial security and labour force status attenuates a high proportion of health inequalities in some counties, particularly Southern European countries, but attenuation in Nordic countries was modest and did not improve their relative position. PMID:25313462

Shaw, Richard J.; Benzeval, Michaela; Popham, Frank

2014-01-01

152

75 FR 73946 - Worker Safety and Health Program: Safety Conscious Work Environment  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Safety and Health Program: Safety Conscious Work Environment AGENCY: Office of the General...Regulatory Commission's ``Safety-Conscious Work Environment'' guidelines as a model...protect and encourage employees to raise work-related concerns. Second, not...

2010-11-30

153

Occupational Mental Health: A Study of Work-Related Mental Health among Clinical Nurses  

PubMed Central

Objective: This paper reports a study performed to investigate and assess the mental health as well as the demographic characteristics of nurses to examine their mental health status based on four physical, anxiety, social-function and depression items. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was accomplished on 86 nurses working at three hospitals, affiliated to Iranian health ministry, in Ilam city(western Iran) all the cases were selected by purposeful sampling method. Data was collected by a two-part questionnaire containing individual data and GHQ -28 Standardized Questionnaire. The GHO-28 was developed by Goldberg, in 1978, as a screening tool to detect those likely to have or be at risk of developing psychiatric disorders. The GHQ-28 is a 28-item measure of emotional distress in medical settings. Analysis was done by SPSS 18 software. Results: The majority of participants were females(50.6 vs.49.4) of 35-40 years old(27.2% ), 84 percent were married(vs.16%), 35.8 percent with 10-15 years of record(vs.33.3% less than 5), 22.2% with 5-10, and 8.6% with more than 15-years of work record. The majority of participants have worked in surgical wards of hospitals. The analysis of GHQ results showed that 43.2%(n=35) of participants were suspected to suffer from mental disorders(vs.56.8% n=46 healthy participants); of all the suspected cases, 12.3% were supposed to have physical symptoms, 16% anxiety symptoms, 42% social dysfunction, and 6.2% symptoms of depression. In general, the participants demonstrated a Mean±SD of mental health score equal to 23.65±9.43. Conclusion: Research results showed that the high prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among nurses is alarming. It was concluded that providing efficient adequate and appropriate support services for this group can result in more healthy nurses as well as promotion of public health. PMID:25386506

Taghinejad, Hamid; Kikhavani, Sattar; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Azadi, Arman

2014-01-01

154

Community partnerships for health information training: medical librarians working with health-care professionals and consumers in Tennessee.  

PubMed

In Tennessee, several medical library outreach projects have involved collaborative work with health-care professionals, public librarians, consumers, faith-based organizations and community service agencies. The authors are medical librarians who worked as consultants, trainers and project directors to promote health literacy using PubMed medline and other health information resources in the several funding projects described here. We explain the programmes briefly, focusing on lessons learned and suggestions for those who follow us. PMID:15186287

Stephenson, Priscilla L; Green, Brenda F; Wallace, Richard L; Earl, Martha F; Orick, Jan T; Taylor, Mary Virginia

2004-06-01

155

Mental Health Promotion and Work: Rumbalara Community's Roundtable Discussion 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between socioeconomic status and health is well established, with people at the lowest socioeconomic levels experiencing the highest rates of illnesses and death. While poverty, unemployment and limited access to adequate housing have a significant impact on the health and well being of the general population, Aboriginal people's…

Hoban, Rosemary

2002-01-01

156

Russia's College Students: Work and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the effect of secondary employment on the sense of well-being of students in full-time education shows that the degree of fatigue and emotional stress on the job is affected by gender, the students' assessment of their own health, and their disposition to take care of their health.

Ivanova, L. Iu.

2014-01-01

157

Equal health, equal work? The role of disability benefits in employment after controlling for health status.  

PubMed

In Spain, an individual can be considered legally disabled in one of the following two ways: by either receiving a disability support benefit and/or holding a certificate of disability. Having at least one of these official sanctions entitles the disabled person to a number of financial and tax advantages. However, only support benefits entail a monthly allowance and, at the same time, the individual is required to undertake a different job to that of his/her previous one. To jointly estimate (after controlling for the health characteristics of the disabling condition and for unobserved factors) the probability of receiving disability benefits and the probability of working, we make use of a newly released database of individuals with a certificate of disability. Additionally, we exploit the rich set of health measures that this database also provides. Our results show that the probability of working is 5 % lower (average treatment effect, ATE) for those disabled individuals receiving benefits. However, when we perform the estimation for individuals with differing degrees of disability, the disincentive effects of the benefits are only significant for individuals with the mildest level of disability (33-44 %) i.e. those who are on the threshold of being disabled. PMID:24647566

Frutos, Eva Maria Lopez; Castello, Judit Vall

2014-03-20

158

A Review of Health-Related Work Outcome Measures and Their Uses, and Recommended Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the growing recognition that work can contrib- ute to the development of musculoskeletal disorders, 1,8 there are almost no data on whether and how physicians investigate the contribution of work to patients' health status or the influence of health status on work perfor- mance. This is particularly true of primary care, where much of the medical care for patients

Benjamin C. Amick; Debra Lerner; William H. Rogers; Ted Rooney; Jeffrey N. Katz

2000-01-01

159

Distraction: an assessment of smartphone usage in health care work settings  

PubMed Central

Smartphone use in health care work settings presents both opportunities and challenges. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and overuse are not kept in check. This practice-focused research paper examines the current panorama of health software applications. Findings from existing research are consolidated to elucidate the level and effects of distraction in health care work settings due to smartphone use. A conceptual framework for crafting guidelines to regulate the use of smartphones in health care work settings is then presented. Finally, specific guidelines are delineated to assist in creating policies for the use of smartphones in a health care workplace. PMID:22969308

Gill, Preetinder S; Kamath, Ashwini; Gill, Tejkaran S

2012-01-01

160

Uranium mining and milling work force characteristics in the western US  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a survey of the socioeconomic characteristics associated with 11 uranium mine and mill operations in 5 Western States. Comparisons are made with the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews for coal mines and utility plants in eight Western States. Worker productivity also is compared with that in similar types of coal and uranium mining operations. We found that there existed no significant differences between the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews and the secondary employment impacts associated with uranium mines and mills when compared with those associated with coal mines and utility plants requiring similar skills at comparable locations. In addition, our survey includes a comparison of several characteristics associated with the households of basic and nonbasic work forces and concludes that significant changes have occurred in the last 5 yr. Accordingly, we recommend additional monitoring and updating of data used in several economic forecasting models to avoid unwarranted delays in achieving national energy goals.

Rapp, D.A.

1980-12-01

161

The mental health of the UK Armed Forces: where facts meet fiction  

PubMed Central

A substantial amount of research has been conducted into the mental health of the UK military in recent years. This article summarises the results of the various studies and offers possible explanations for differences in findings between the UK and other allied nations. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) rates are perhaps surprisingly low amongst British forces, with prevalence rates of around 4% in personnel who have deployed, rising to 6% in combat troops, despite the high tempo of operations in recent years. The rates in personnel currently on operations are consistently lower than these. Explanations for the lower PTSD prevalence in British troops include variations in combat exposures, demographic differences, higher leader to enlisted soldier ratios, shorter operational tour lengths and differences in access to long-term health care between countries. Delayed-onset PTSD was recently found to be more common than previously supposed, accounting for nearly half of all PTSD cases; however, many of these had sub-syndromal PTSD predating the onset of the full disorder. Rates of common mental health disorders in UK troops are similar or higher to those of the general population, and overall operational deployments are not associated with an increase in mental health problems in UK regular forces. However, there does appear to be a correlation between both deployment and increased alcohol misuse and post-deployment violence in combat troops. Unlike for regular forces, there is an overall association between deployment and mental health problems in Reservists. There have been growing concerns regarding mild traumatic brain injury, though this appears to be low in British troops with an overall prevalence of 4.4% in comparison with 15% in the US military. The current strategies for detection and treatment of mental health problems in British forces are also described. The stance of the UK military is that psychological welfare of troops is primarily a chain of command responsibility, aided by medical advice when necessary, and to this end uses third location decompression, stress briefings, and Trauma Risk Management approaches. Outpatient treatment is provided by Field Mental Health Teams and military Departments of Community Mental Health, whilst inpatient care is given in specific NHS hospitals. PMID:25206948

Hunt, Elizabeth J. F.; Wessely, Simon; Jones, Norman; Rona, Roberto J.; Greenberg, Neil

2014-01-01

162

The mental health of the UK Armed Forces: where facts meet fiction.  

PubMed

A substantial amount of research has been conducted into the mental health of the UK military in recent years. This article summarises the results of the various studies and offers possible explanations for differences in findings between the UK and other allied nations. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) rates are perhaps surprisingly low amongst British forces, with prevalence rates of around 4% in personnel who have deployed, rising to 6% in combat troops, despite the high tempo of operations in recent years. The rates in personnel currently on operations are consistently lower than these. Explanations for the lower PTSD prevalence in British troops include variations in combat exposures, demographic differences, higher leader to enlisted soldier ratios, shorter operational tour lengths and differences in access to long-term health care between countries. Delayed-onset PTSD was recently found to be more common than previously supposed, accounting for nearly half of all PTSD cases; however, many of these had sub-syndromal PTSD predating the onset of the full disorder. Rates of common mental health disorders in UK troops are similar or higher to those of the general population, and overall operational deployments are not associated with an increase in mental health problems in UK regular forces. However, there does appear to be a correlation between both deployment and increased alcohol misuse and post-deployment violence in combat troops. Unlike for regular forces, there is an overall association between deployment and mental health problems in Reservists. There have been growing concerns regarding mild traumatic brain injury, though this appears to be low in British troops with an overall prevalence of 4.4% in comparison with 15% in the US military. The current strategies for detection and treatment of mental health problems in British forces are also described. The stance of the UK military is that psychological welfare of troops is primarily a chain of command responsibility, aided by medical advice when necessary, and to this end uses third location decompression, stress briefings, and Trauma Risk Management approaches. Outpatient treatment is provided by Field Mental Health Teams and military Departments of Community Mental Health, whilst inpatient care is given in specific NHS hospitals. PMID:25206948

Hunt, Elizabeth J F; Wessely, Simon; Jones, Norman; Rona, Roberto J; Greenberg, Neil

2014-01-01

163

Which aspects of health differ between working and nonworking women with fibromyalgia? A cross-sectional study of work status and health  

PubMed Central

Background Women with fibromyalgia (FM) describe great difficulties in managing work. Reported work ability in women with FM varies from 34 to 77 percent in studies from different countries. Many factors are suggested to affect the ability to work in women with FM, including pain, fatigue, impaired physical capacity and activity limitations. However, it is difficult to define to which extent symptom severity can be compatible with work. The aim of this study was to investigate which aspects of health differ between working women with FM and nonworking women with FM. Methods A cross-sectional study of 129 women of working age with FM which included clinical assessment, structured interviews, questionnaires and performance-based tests. The women were categorized as working or nonworking. Aspects of health are presented according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results Working women with FM presented better health than nonworking women with FM in ratings of body function (FIQ pain p?health status were also significantly better in working women with FM than in nonworking women with FM (FIQ total, eight-item p?=?0.001 and SF-36 PCS p?working- and nonworking women in tests of physical capacity. FIQ pain was an independent explanatory factor for work in stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis (OR 0.95, CI 0.93- 0.98), p?Working women with FM reported better health than nonworking women with FM in terms of pain, fatigue, stiffness, depression, disease specific health status and physical aspects of quality of life, which represent body functions and overall health status. However, they were equally impaired in tests of physical capacity. Moderate pain levels were compatible with work, while severe pain appeared to compromise work. Fatigue was better tolerated, as women scoring severe levels of fatigue worked. PMID:23237146

2012-01-01

164

The Association between Childhood Abuse and Labor Force Outcomes in Young Adults: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the associations between childhood physical and sexual abuse and labor force outcomes in young adults and the possible mediating effects of educational attainment, current mental health, and physical health. Data from the Ontario Child Health Study (N = 1,893), a province-wide longitudinal study were analyzed. Controlling for childhood and demographic variables, severe childhood physical abuse was significantly associated

Masako Tanaka; Ellen Jamieson; Katholiki Georgiades; Eric K. Duku; Michael H. Boyle; Harriet L. MacMillan

2011-01-01

165

Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

2004-01-01

166

[Scientific work in the training of health personnel].  

PubMed

This document makes a series of statements about the limitations to scientific and technological development in Latin America and about recent trends in efforts to overcome them. The writer reviews the situation regarding health research in the Region and lists the respective shortcomings: "it is meager and disjointed, does not spring from the health problems of Latin American countries, and--like the training of health manpower, and of physicians in particular--is seen as entirely divorced from social reality, responding to outside influences that are sometimes entirely extraneous to the countries' own needs." She emphasizes that, while many health manpower training centers are striving to make their instruction more relevant to real life in their countries, no attempt is made to develop a scientific understanding of the health problems to which the educational process must be geared. She analyzes the role of research in student training and regards it as important to keep in mind that both research and instruction must aim for the same goal: development of science and technology in the service of the community. In closing, she asserts that the Latin American university must be committed to science in the service of society, which means that it must pass tha knowledge on to the population and join with it in the solution of its problems. PMID:467303

Rodríguez, M I

1979-01-01

167

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

This working paper synthesizes critical problems identified by interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry and places them in the context of work and family issues. At ...

Harrington, Mona

2004-12-10

168

RETURN TO WORK AND HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER BURN INJURY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Although severe burn injury is associated with long-term rehabilitation and disability, research on returning to work in burn patients is limited. The aims of this study were: (i) to explore injury- and personality-related predictors of returning to work, and (ii) to compare health-related quality of life and health outcome in working versus non-working individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Forty-eight

Johan Dyster-Aas; Morten Kildal; Mimmie Willebrand

2007-01-01

169

Labor Force Participation in Formal Work-Related Education in 2000-01. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2005-048  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of the many purposes education serves in society, one of the most important is to prepare people for work. In today's economy, education is important not just to help adults enter the labor market, but also to ensure that adults remain marketable throughout their working lives. This report examines how adults in the labor force use formal…

Hudson, Lisa; Bhandari, Rajika; Peter, Katharin; Bills, David B.

2005-01-01

170

Working towards Men's Health: Findings from the Sefton Men's Health Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas. Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training…

Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve; McCullagh, Jo; Hacking, Sue

2010-01-01

171

Health Workforce and International Migration: Can New Zealand Compete? OECD Health Working Papers No. 33  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines health workforce and migration policies in New Zealand, with a special focus on the international recruitment of doctors and nurses. The health workforce in New Zealand, as in all OECD countries, plays a central role in the health system. Nonetheless, maybe more than for any other OECD country, the health workforce in New…

Zurn, Pascal; Dumont, Jean-Christophe

2008-01-01

172

Angus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Angus Council Social Work Department  

E-print Network

Angus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Partners Angus Council Social Work Department Tayside Primary Care NHS Trust Overview A review of mental health services and Tayside Primary Care Trust have operated a joint community mental health service for older people

Mottram, Nigel

173

Information and Health. Report on a Working Group (Luxembourg, Belgium, November 4-7, 1980).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Working Group, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO), proposed a clearer definition of the essential role of health information and suggested the most appropriate means of communication between governments and the mass media, between the media and health services, and between patients and doctors. The Group urged all WHO Member States…

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

174

Health Science Technology Education (HSTE). A Working Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document outlines the model that was jointly developed by representatives of the Texas Education Agency and University of Texas at Austin (UTA) to inject the state's existing health science technology education (HSTE) program with tech prep components and Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) competencies. Presented…

McCarty, Sally; And Others

175

The Primary Health Worker, Working Guide, Guidelines for Training, Guidellnes for Adaptation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This working guide outlines the structure and content of training for the primary health worker (PHW) on the basis of the most common health problems of communities in developing countries. Part 1 is intended for use by the PHW as a learning text and reference in his work. It covers thirty-four problems considered to be most common which are…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

176

Ethics in Humanitarian Aid Work: Learning From the Narratives of Humanitarian Health Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little analysis has been made of ethical challenges encountered by health care professionals (HCPs) participating in humanitarian aid work. This is a qualitative study drawing on Grounded Theory analysis of 20 interviews with health care professionals who have provided humanitarian assistance. We collected the stories of ethical challenges reported by expatriate HCPs who participated in humanitarian and development work. Analysis

Lisa Schwartz; Christina Sinding; Matthew Hunt; Laurie Elit; Lynda Redwood-Campbell; Naomi Adelson; Lori Luther; Jennifer Ranford; Sonya DeLaat

2010-01-01

177

Introducing Health Impact Assessment: an analysis of political and administrative intersectoral working methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Intersectoral Action for Health (IAH) and its Health Impact Assessment (HIA) tool are built on collaboration between actors and sectors, requiring multidimensional and horizontal way of working. The study aims to analyse the enablers and barriers when such a new way of working and tool have been initiated to replace a traditional, vertical operation at the local level in

L. N. Mannheimer; G. Gulis; J. Lehto; P. Ostlin

2006-01-01

178

1--2013 Magellan Health Services Working with insurance companies and  

E-print Network

1--2013© Magellan Health Services Working with insurance companies and personal finances after information may provide some tips on how to effectively work with your insurance company to file any necessary #12;2--2013© Magellan Health Services one estimate to make sure you have been given a fair ballpark

Oklahoma, University of

179

The mental health of the UK Armed Forces in the 21st century: resilience in the face of adversity.  

PubMed

The recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have attracted considerable political and media interest in the mental health of UK military personnel. As a result of the close operational collaboration between US and UK forces, there have inevitably been many comparisons drawn between the mental health status of the two forces. Considerable research activity suggests that the mental health of UK forces appear to have remained relatively resilient in spite of their considerable exposure to traumatic events; one stark exception to this is the high rates of alcohol misuse which seem to be related to deployment. This paper explores the recently published literature relating to UK military forces and attempts to draw conclusions about the reasons for the apparent resilience shown by the majority of the regular forces. PMID:24574105

MacManus, Deirdre; Jones, N; Wessely, S; Fear, N T; Jones, E; Greenberg, N

2014-06-01

180

Rethinking work-health models for the new global economy: a qualitative analysis of emerging dimensions of work.  

PubMed

Technology change, rising international trade and investment, and increased competition are changing the organization, distribution and nature of work in industrialized countries. To enhance productivity, employers are striving to increase innovation while minimizing costs. This is leading to an intensification of work demands on core employees and the outsourcing or casualization of more marginal tasks, often to contingent workers. The two prevailing models of work and health - demand-control and effort-reward imbalance - may not capture the full range of experiences of workers in today's increasingly flexible and competitive economies. To explore this proposition, we conducted a secondary qualitative analysis of interviews with 120 American workers [6]. Our analysis identifies aspects of work affecting the quality of workers' experiences that are largely overlooked by popular work-health models: the nature of social interactions with customers and clients; workers' belief in, and perception of, the importance of the product of their work. We suggest that the quality of work experiences is partly determined by the objective characteristics of the work environment, but also by the fit of the work environment with the worker's needs, interests, desires and personality, something not adequately captured in current models. PMID:15328458

Polanyi, Michael; Tompa, Emile

2004-01-01

181

THE CRITICAL CARE WORK ENVIRONMENT AND NURSE-REPORTED HEALTH CARE–ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS  

PubMed Central

Background Critically ill patients are susceptible to health care–associated infections because of their illnesses and the need for intravenous access and invasive monitoring. The critical care work environment may influence the likelihood of infection in these patients. Objective To determine whether or not the critical care nurse work environment is predictive of nurse-reported health care–associated infections. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional design was used with linked nurse and hospital survey data. Nurses assessed the critical care work environment and provided the frequencies of ventilator-associated pneumonias, urinary tract infections, and infections associated with central catheters. Logistic regression models were used to determine if critical care work environments were predictive of nurse-reported frequent health care–associated infections, with controls for nurse and hospital characteristics. Results The final sample consisted of 3217 critical care nurses in 320 hospitals. Compared with nurses working in poor work environments, nurses working in better work environments were 36% to 41% less likely to report that health care–associated infections occurred frequently. Conclusion Health care–associated infections are less likely in favorable critical care work environments. These findings, based on the largest sample of critical care nurses to date, substantiate efforts to focus on the quality of the work environment as a way to minimize the frequency of health care–associated infections. PMID:24186818

Kelly, Deena; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

2014-01-01

182

The stigma of mental health problems and other barriers to care in the UK Armed Forces  

PubMed Central

Background As with the general population, a proportion of military personnel with mental health problems do not seek help. As the military is a profession at high risk of occupational psychiatric injury, understanding barriers to help-seeking is a priority. Method Participants were drawn from a large UK military health study. Participants undertook a telephone interview including the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ); a short measure of PTSD (Primary Care PTSD, PC-PTSD); a series of questions about service utilisation; and barriers to care. The response rate was 76% (821 participants). Results The most common barriers to care reported are those relating to the anticipated public stigma associated with consulting for a mental health problem. In addition, participants reported barriers in the practicalities of consulting such as scheduling an appointment and having time off for treatment. Barriers to care did not appear to be diminished after people leave the Armed Forces. Veterans report additional barriers to care of not knowing where to find help and a concern that their employer would blame them for their problems. Those with mental health problems, such as PTSD, report significantly more barriers to care than those who do not have a diagnosis of a mental disorder. Conclusions Despite recent efforts to de-stigmatise mental disorders in the military, anticipated stigma and practical barriers to consulting stand in the way of access to care for some Service personnel. Further interventions to reduce stigma and ensuring that Service personnel have access to high quality confidential assessment and treatment remain priorities for the UK Armed Forces. PMID:21310027

2011-01-01

183

Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Work-Rest Cycles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BHP Program Element Goal: Identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration and return to terrestrial life. BHP Requirements: a) Characterize and assess risks (e.g., likelihood and consequences). b) Develop tools and technologies to prevent, monitor, and treat adverse outcomes. c) Inform standards. d) Develop technologies to: 1) reduce risks and human systems resource requirements (e.g., crew time, mass, volume, power) and 2) ensure effective human-system integration across exploration mission.

Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra

2011-01-01

184

Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In\\u000a the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper\\u000a aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A

Suresh Joshi; Padam Simkhada; Gordon J Prescott

2011-01-01

185

Is living near a coking works harmful to health? A study of industrial air pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To determine whether there was excess ill health in people living near a coking works, and if so whether it was related to exposure to coking works' emissions. DESIGN--Populations varying in proximity to the coking works were compared with control populations. Health data were correlated with available environmental data. METHODS--Analysis of routinely collected mortality, cancer registration, and birth statistics; community

R S Bhopal; P Phillimore; S Moffatt; C Foy

1994-01-01

186

Is lifelong knee joint force from work, home, and sport related to knee osteoarthritis?  

PubMed

Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the "cumulative peak force index", a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA. PMID:22848225

Ratzlaff, Charles R; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A

2012-01-01

187

Constrained choices? Linking employees' and spouses' work time to health behaviors.  

PubMed

There are extensive literatures on work conditions and health and on family contexts and health, but less research asking how a spouse or partners' work conditions may affect health behaviors. Drawing on the constrained choices framework, we theorized health behaviors as a product of one's own time and spouses' work time as well as gender expectations. We examined fast food consumption and exercise behaviors using survey data from 429 employees in an Information Technology (IT) division of a U.S. Fortune 500 firm and from their spouses. We found fast food consumption is affected by men's work hours-both male employees' own work hours and the hours worked by husbands of women respondents-in a nonlinear way. The groups most likely to eat fast food are men working 50 h/week and women whose husbands work 45-50 h/week. Second, exercise is better explained if work time is conceptualized at the couple, rather than individual, level. In particular, neo-traditional arrangements (where husbands work longer than their wives) constrain women's ability to engage in exercise but increase odds of men exercising. Women in couples where both partners are working long hours have the highest odds of exercise. In addition, women working long hours with high schedule control are more apt to exercise and men working long hours whose wives have high schedule flexibility are as well. Our findings suggest different health behaviors may have distinct antecedents but gendered work-family expectations shape time allocations in ways that promote men's and constrain women's health behaviors. They also suggest the need to expand the constrained choices framework to recognize that long hours may encourage exercise if both partners are looking to sustain long work hours and that work resources, specifically schedule control, of one partner may expand the choices of the other. PMID:25531550

Fan, Wen; Lam, Jack; Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; King, Rosalind; McHale, Susan

2015-02-01

188

Effects of war exposure on Air Force personnel’s mental health, job burnout and other organizational related outcomes  

PubMed Central

Longitudinal data from a stratified representative sample of U.S. Air Force personnel (N = 1009) deployed to the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations were analyzed in this study. Using structural equation models, we examined the effects of war exposure on traumatic experiences, Post Traumatic Stress (PTS) symptoms, resource loss, and on subsequent functioning, perceived health, and on job and organizationally relevant outcomes. The job and organizational outcomes included job burnout, job involvement, job strain, job satisfaction, work-family conflict, organizational commitment, deployment readiness, and intention to reenlist. We found that deployment to the theater of the war increased risk of exposure to trauma, which in turn, predicted elevated PTS symptoms and resource loss. PTS symptoms predicted later loss of resources and deterioration in perceived health and functioning. In turn, resource loss predicted negative job and organizational outcomes. Exposure to trauma fully mediated the effects of deployment to the theater of war on PTS symptoms and resource loss and had additional significant indirect effects on several job and organizational relevant outcomes. For returning veterans, deployment to the theater of war, exposure to trauma, PTS symptoms, and resource loss represents a ‘cascading’ chain of events that over time results in a decline of health and functioning as well as in adverse job and organizationally relevant outcomes that may affect organizational effectiveness. PMID:21280941

Vinokur, Amiram D.; Pierce, Penny F.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Hobfoll, Stevan E.; Galea, Sandro

2011-01-01

189

Psychosocial Work Characteristics Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Functioning in Rural Women: The Wisconsin Rural Women's Health Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between psychosocial work characteristics and health functioning and cardiovascular disease risk factors among rural women of central Wisconsin and compare psychosocial work characteristics between farm and nonfarm women. Methods: Stratified sampling was used to select a…

Chikani, Vatsal; Reding, Douglas; Gunderson, Paul; McCarty, Catherine A.

2005-01-01

190

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Circulatory System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the cardiovascular system.

2012-11-20

191

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Nervous System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the nervous system.

2012-11-20

192

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Immune Cells  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the immune system.

2012-11-20

193

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Digestive System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the digestive system.

2012-11-20

194

Physical demands of work and health complaints among women working late in pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health complaints before, during and after pregnancy were collected from 2251 women in Montreal who had been in paid employment beyond the twenty-seventh week of their first or second pregnancy. Complaints of breathlessness, fatigue, back pain, varicose veins and haemorrhoids increased during pregnancy, the proportion of women reporting these symptoms being greatest in the third trimester. Complaints at this stage

NICOLA CHERRY

1987-01-01

195

How the health and community development sectors are combining forces to improve health and well-being.  

PubMed

The root causes of poor health experienced by many who live in low-income neighborhoods-such as the lack of access to health care, limited food choices, and exposure to environmental hazards-are well documented, but often go beyond the scope of the health care delivery system. But that is beginning to change. The health sector has begun to collaborate with the community development sector, which for decades has been working in low-income neighborhoods. Encouraging local and national examples of these new partnerships abound. They include an effort in Seattle, Washington, to reduce exposure to allergens and irritants among low-income asthmatic children, and a $500 million federal program to finance the operation of grocery stores in what have previously been urban "food deserts." To nurture such efforts, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Federal Reserve System, and others have sponsored a series of "healthy community" forums in US cities. In this article we explore the growing partnerships between the health and community development sectors as well as the challenges they face, and we offer policy recommendations that might help them succeed. PMID:22068394

Braunstein, Sandra; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

2011-11-01

196

Determinants of child and forced marriage in Morocco: stakeholder perspectives on health, policies and human rights  

PubMed Central

Background In Morocco, the social and legal framework surrounding sexual and reproductive health has transformed greatly in the past decade, especially with the introduction of the new Family Law or Moudawana. Yet, despite raising the minimum age of marriage for girls and stipulating equal rights in the family, child and forced marriage is widespread. The objective of this research study was to explore perspectives of a broad range of professionals on factors that contribute to the occurrence of child and forced marriage in Morocco. Methods A qualitative approach was used to generate both primary and secondary data for the analysis. Primary data consist of individual semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 22 professionals from various sectors: health, legal, education, NGO’s and government. Sources of secondary data include academic papers, government and NGO reports, various legal documents and media reports. Data were analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis. Results Four major themes arose from the data, indicating that the following elements contribute to child and forced marriage: (1) the legal and social divergence in conceptualizing forced and child marriage; (2) the impact of legislation; (3) the role of education; and (4) the economic factor. Emphasis was especially placed on the new Family Code or Moudawana as having the greatest influence on advancement of women's rights in the sphere of marriage. However, participants pointed out that embedded patriarchal attitudes and behaviours limit its effectiveness. Conclusion The study provided a comprehensive understanding of the factors that compound the problem of child and forced marriage in Morocco. From the viewpoint of professionals, who are closely involved in tackling the issue, policy measures and the law have the greatest potential to bring child and forced marriage to a halt. However, the implementation of new legal tools is facing barriers and resistance. Additionally, the legal and policy framework should go hand in hand with both education and increased economic opportunities. Education and awareness-raising of all ages is considered essential, seeing that parents and the extended family play a huge role in marrying off girls and young women. PMID:24131501

2013-01-01

197

Analysis of long- and short-range contribution to adhesion work in cardiac fibroblasts: An atomic force microscopy study.  

PubMed

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) and Poisson statistic were used to analyze the detachment work recorded during the removal of gold-covered microspheres from cardiac fibroblasts. The effect of Cytochalasin D, a disruptor of the actin cytoskeleton, on cell adhesion was also tested. The adhesion work was assessed using a Poisson analysis also derived from single-cell force spectroscopy retracting curves. The use of Poisson analysis to get adhesion work from AFM curves is quite a novel method, and in this case, proved to be effective to study the short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work. This method avoids the difficult identification of minor peaks in the AFM retracting curves by creating what can be considered an average adhesion work. Even though the effect of actin depolymerisation is well documented, its use revealed that control cardiac fibroblasts (CT) exhibit a work of adhesion at least 5 times higher than that of the Cytochalasin treated cells. However, our results indicate that in both cells short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work are nearly equal and the same heterogeneity index describes both cells. Therefore, we infer that the different adhesion behaviors might be explained by the presence of fewer membrane adhesion molecules available at the AFM tip-cell interface under circumstances where the actin cytoskeleton has been disrupted. PMID:25686942

Sbaizero, O; DelFavero, G; Martinelli, V; Long, C S; Mestroni, L

2015-04-01

198

Persistent work-life conflict and health satisfaction - A representative longitudinal study in Switzerland  

PubMed Central

Background The objectives of the present study were (1) to track work-life conflict in Switzerland during the years 2002 to 2008 and (2) to analyse the relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction, examining whether long-term work-life conflict leads to poor health satisfaction. Methods The study is based on a representative longitudinal database (Swiss Household Panel), covering a six-year period containing seven waves of data collection. The sample includes 1261 persons, with 636 men and 625 women. Data was analysed by multi-level mixed models and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Results In the overall sample, there was no linear increase or decrease of work-life conflict detected, in either its time-based or strain-based form. People with higher education were more often found to have a strong work-life conflict (time- and strain-based), and more men demonstrated a strong time-based work-life conflict than women (12.2% vs. 5%). A negative relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction over time was found. People reporting strong work-life conflict at every wave reported lower health satisfaction than people with consistently weak work-life conflict. However, the health satisfaction of those with a continuously strong work-life conflict did not decrease during the study period. Conclusions Both time-based and strain-based work-life conflict are strongly correlated to health satisfaction. However, no evidence was found for a persistent work-life conflict leading to poor health satisfaction. PMID:21529345

2011-01-01

199

Gendered emotion work around physical health problems in mid- and later-life marriages.  

PubMed

The provision and receipt of emotion work-defined as intentional activities done to promote another's emotional well-being-are central dimensions of marriage. However, emotion work in response to physical health problems is a largely unexplored, yet likely important, aspect of the marital experience. We analyze dyadic in-depth interviews with husbands and wives in 21 mid- to later-life couples to examine the ways that health-impaired people and their spouses provide, interpret, and explain emotion work. Because physical health problems, emotion work, and marital dynamics are gendered, we consider how these processes differ for women and men. We find that wives provide emotion work regardless of their own health status. Husbands provide emotion work less consistently, typically only when the husbands see themselves as their wife's primary source of stability or when the husbands view their marriage as balanced. Notions of traditional masculinity preclude some husbands from providing emotion work even when their wife is health-impaired. This study articulates emotion work around physical health problems as one factor that sustains and exacerbates gender inequalities in marriage with implications for emotional and physical well-being. PMID:25661852

Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Reczek, Corinne; Umberson, Debra

2015-01-01

200

Gendered emotion work around physical health problems in mid- and later-life marriages?  

PubMed Central

The provision and receipt of emotion work—defined as intentional activities done to promote another’s emotional well-being—are central dimensions of marriage. However, emotion work in response to physical health problems is a largely unexplored, yet likely important, aspect of the marital experience. We analyze dyadic in-depth interviews with husbands and wives in 21 mid-to later-life couples to examine the ways that health-impaired people and their spouses provide, interpret, and explain emotion work. Because physical health problems, emotion work, and marital dynamics are gendered, we consider how these processes differ for women and men. We find that wives provide emotion work regardless of their own health status. Husbands provide emotion work less consistently, typically only when the husbands see themselves as their wife’s primary source of stability or when the husbands view their marriage as balanced. Notions of traditional masculinity preclude some husbands from providing emotion work even when their wife is health-impaired. This study articulates emotion work around physical health problems as one factor that sustains and exacerbates gender inequalities in marriage with implications for emotional and physical well-being. PMID:25661852

Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Reczek, Corinne; Umberson, Debra

2015-01-01

201

Connecting Public Health IT Systems with Enacted Work: Report of an Ethnographic Study  

PubMed Central

As part of a larger project to improve information transfer within public health settings, we studied the information workflow associated with communicable disease (CD) activities in a local health department. As part of that study we examined a newly adopted online system used for reporting CD data to the state department of public health. An information workflow analysis was performed using the ethnographic methods of interviews and observations. In addition to providing a detailed description of the context of CD reporting activities in a local health department, our study uncovered a mismatch between the newly piloted electronic reporting system and the CD work as enacted by health department personnel. PMID:18999077

Turner, Anne M.; Ramey, Judy; Lee, E. Sally

2008-01-01

202

Star wars and strategic defense initiatives: work activity and health symptoms of unionized bank tellers during work reorganization.  

PubMed

Work activity and health symptoms of bank tellers whose work was undergoing reorganization were examined during a university-union study of the health effects of work in women's traditional jobs. Data were gathered through collective and individual interviews, analysis of work activity, and a questionnaire administered to 305 tellers. Employees worked in a standing posture over 80 percent of the time. More than two-thirds frequently suffered pain in back, legs, and feet. The average teller had been involved in 3.7 robberies as a direct victim and six as a witness. Work required feats of memory and concentration. In order to meet job demands, tellers engaged in supportive activities and teamwork. The introduction of individualized objectives threatened the employees' ability to collaborate and induced distress. More than twice as many tellers as other female workers in Québec experience psychological distress (Ilfeld scale), related to: robbery during the past two years (odds ratio = 1.7; confidence interval = 1.0-2.9); difficult relations with superiors (O.R. = 2.6; C.I. = 1.3-5.3); and full-time work (O.R. = 2.3; C.I. = 1.3-3.9). Diverse methods enriched the analysis, and union participation allowed the proposal of concrete correction measures. PMID:9285277

Seifert, A M; Messing, K; Dumais, L

1997-01-01

203

First aid at work The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as  

E-print Network

First aid at work The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as amended) Guidance approval of the amended Regulations. First aid at work (Advance copy) 1 #12;© Crown copyright 2013 First to this guidance. First aid at work (Advance copy) 2 #12;Contents Preface Introduction Regulation 1 Citation

Romano, Daniela

204

Information needs and seeking behaviour among health professionals working at public hospital and health centres in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Universal access to information for health professionals is a need to achieve “health for all strategy.” A large proportion of the population including health professionals have limited access to health information in resource limited countries. The aim of this study is to assess information needs among Ethiopian health professionals. Methods A cross sectional quantitative study design complemented with qualitative method was conducted among 350 health care workers in Feburary26-June5/2012. Pretested self-administered questionnaire and observation checklist were used to collect data on different variables. Data entry and data analysis were done using Epi-Info version 3.5.1 and by SPSS version19, respectively. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were applied to describe study objectives and identify the determinants of information seeking behaviours respectively. Odds ratio with 95% CI was used to assess the association between a factor and an outcome variable. Results The majority of the respondents acknowledged the need of health information to their routine activities. About 54.0% of respondents lacked access to health information. Only 42.8% of respondents have access to internet sources. Important barriers to access information were geographical, organizational, personal, economic, educational status and time. About 58.0% of the respondents accessed information by referring their hard copies and asking senior staff. Age, sex, income, computer literacy and access, patient size, work experience and working site were significantly associated with information needs and seeking behaviour. Conclusions The health information seeking behaviour of health professional was significant. The heaklth facilities had neither informationcenter such as library, nor internet facilities. Conducting training on managing health information, accessing computer and improving infrastructures are important interventions to facilitate evidence based descions. PMID:24373296

2013-01-01

205

The Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness. Final Report and Working Papers. Volume One.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Volume One of a report by the Arizona Board of Regents' independent citizen commission to examine the performance of the state's three public universities presents background material on the formation of the task force, a final report, and a summary of recommendations. It then presents 27 working papers in two sections. Section 1, Ethnic Minority…

Arizona Board of Regents, Phoenix.

206

A Measurement of the Effectiveness of the Airway Science Program To Meet Federal Aviation Administration Work Force Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines why the Airway Science Program, initiated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to develop college-educated and technically prepared personnel for FAA employment (primarily for air traffic control), has failed to meet its work force goals. Research data were gathered from interviews with Airway Science Program…

Bowen, Brent D.

207

A conceptual model of work and health disparities in the United States.  

PubMed

Recent research in medicine and public health highlights differences in health related to race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender. These inequalities, often labeled "disparities," are pervasive and pertain to the major causes of morbidity, mortality, and lost life years. Often ignored in discussions of health disparities is the complex role of work, including not only occupational exposures and working conditions, but also benefits associated with work, effects of work on families and communities, and policies that determine where and how people work. The authors argue that work should be considered explicitly as a determinant of health disparities. Their conceptual model and empirical evidence, built on previous contributions, describe how work contributes to disparities in health on multiple levels. The examples focus on the United States, but many of the key conceptual features can also be applied to other countries. The model emphasizes behaviors and characteristics of institutions rather than individual workers. This approach avoids a focus on individual responsibility alone, which may lead to victim blaming and failure to emphasize policies and institutional factors that affect large populations and systematically create and maintain racial, gender, and socioeconomic disparities in health. PMID:16524164

Lipscomb, Hester J; Loomis, Dana; McDonald, Mary Anne; Argue, Robin A; Wing, Steve

2006-01-01

208

Microsatellite based, on-orbit servicing work at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-orbit servicing can dramatically reduce the life cycle cost, and increase the utility, of expensive space assets. However, previous servicing attempts have generally been too large, complex, and expensive to be effective. Newer, streamlined approaches, such as the Air Force's Modular On-orbit Servicing (MOS) concept, might make on-orbit servicing feasible. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing many of

Richard W. Madison; Kirtland AFB

2000-01-01

209

Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force White Paper #2 -- Uses of Uncensored Data  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: (1) reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors; (2) minimize the levels of, and potential for, exposure to beryllium; and (3) establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease. On January 4, 2001, DOE issued DOE G 440.1-7A, Implementation Guide for use with 10 CFR 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing the CBDPP. That guide describes methods and techniques that DOE considers acceptable in complying with the Rule. In 2005 a draft DOE Technical Standard ''Management of Items and Areas Containing Low Levels of Beryllium'' (SAFT 0103; hereafter referred to as the ''TS'') was circulated for comment (http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/tsdrafts/saft-0103.pdf). DOE technical standards are voluntary consensus standards developed when industry standards do not exist (see http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/index.html for more information). DOE does not require its field elements to implement DOE technical standards, but field elements may choose to adopt these standards to meet specific needs. This beryllium TS is intended to provide best practices and lessons learned for manageing items and areas that contain low levels of beryllium, which has been a costly and technically challenging component of CBDPPs. The TS is also intended to provide guidance for determining if the Rule's housekeeping and release criteria are met. On challenge the TS addressed was the statistical interpretation of data sets with non-detected results, a topic for which no strong consensus exists. Among the many comments on the draft TS was a suggestion that certain of the statistical comparisons described in the TS could be better implemented if analytical results, even when below a reporting limit, were to be reported by analytical laboratories. See Appendix 1 for a review of terminology related to reporting limits. The Beryllium Health and Safety Committee (BHSC) formed a Sampling and Analysis Subcommittee (SAS) in 2003. The SAS established a working group on accreditation and reporting limits. By 2006 it had become evident that the issues extended to data reporting as a whole. The SAS proposed to the BHSC the formation of a Data Reporting Task Force (DRTF) to consider issues related to data reporting. The BHSC Board agreed, and requested that the DRTF generate a white paper, to be offered by the BHSC to potential interested parties such as the DOE policy office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy. It was noted that additional products could include detailed guidance and potentially a journal article in the future. The SAS proposed that DRTF membership represent the affected disciplines (chemists, industrial hygiene professionals and statisticians, and the DOE office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy). The BHSC Board decided that DRTF membership should come from DOE sites, since the focus would be on reporting in the context of the TS and the Rule. The DRTF came into existence in late 2006. The DRTF membership includes industrial hygienists, analytical chemists and laboratory managers, members of the regulatory and oversight community, and environmental statisticians. A first White Paper, ''Summary of Issues and Path Forward'', was reviewed by the BHSC in March 2007 and issued by the DRTF in June 2007. It describes the charter of the DRTF, introduces some basic terminology (reproduced here in Appendix 1), lays out the issues the DRTF is expected to address, and describes a path forward for the DRTF's work. This first White Paper is available through the BHSC web site. This White Paper presents recommendations developed by the DRTF following the process laid out in that first White Pap

MacQueen, D H

2007-10-10

210

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

Interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry have identified a range of broadly-felt critical problems. This document synthesizes these problems and places them in the context of work and ...

Harrington, Mona

211

Preparing Social Work Students for Interprofessional Practice in Geriatric Health Care: Insights from Two Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several interprofessional education projects have addressed training allied health students for effective teamwork in geriatrics, few curriculum evaluation studies have examined differences in learning outcomes between interprofessional and traditional uniprofessional approaches, especially for social work students. This paper compares…

Bonifas, Robin P.; Gray, Amanda K.

2013-01-01

212

Associations between working memory, health literacy, and recall of the signs of stroke among older adults.  

PubMed

Stroke remains a major cause of mortality and disability among older adults. Although early treatment after stroke is known to reduce both mortality and disability, the first step in seeking early treatment is dependent on the rapid recognition of the signs of stroke. Recall of the signs of stroke may be dependent on factors that exist before the stroke itself. Although it is known that both working memory and health literacy decline with advancing age, these factors have not been thoroughly examined with respect to recall of the signs of stroke. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to investigate associations between working memory, health literacy, and recall of the signs of stroke among older adults. Community dwelling older adults (?65 years of age) were recruited from two senior centers. Fifty-six participants meeting inclusion criteria provided demographic and health information and were asked to read a public service brochure listing the five warning signs of stroke. Working memory was then assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale 3rd Edition Working Memory Index. Health literacy was assessed by the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Participants' recall of the five warning signs of stroke was evaluated. The mean age was 80.4 years. The mean number of the signs of stroke recalled was 2.9 ± 1.33. Working memory and health literacy were positively correlated with recall of the signs of stroke (r = .38, p < 0.01; r = .44, p < 0.01). In a simultaneous regression, only health literacy remained a significant predictor of recall. There was no statistically significant interaction between working memory and health literacy. Findings from this study indicate that working memory and health literacy were associated with successful recall of the warning signs of stroke in older adults. Further studies are needed to determine if programs that include cognitive and literacy assessments could identify older adults who need additional support to learn and recall the signs of stroke. PMID:22955236

Ganzer, Christine A; Insel, Kathleen C; Ritter, Leslie S

2012-10-01

213

Working with Our Communities: Moving from Service to Scholarship in the Health Professions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: As faculty at health professionals schools have become increasingly engaged with their communities in partnerships to improve health, new questions have arisen about faculty rewards for such activites. To sustain the community work of their faculty, institutions need to reconceptualize faculty rewards, promotion, and tenure that are relevant to community activities. Historical perspective: Scholarship has evolved since the 17th

CHERYL A. MAURANA; MARIE WOLFF; BARBRA J. BECK; DEBORAH E. SIMPSON

2001-01-01

214

Working across Boundaries: Clinical Outcomes for an Integrated Mental Health Service for People with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The Mental Health Service for People with Learning Disabilities (MHSPLD) is a service development in keeping with UK government policy that promotes cross agency working and access to mainstream mental health services for people with intellectual disabilities. We aimed to show whether the service model brought about improvements in…

Hall, I.; Parkes, C.; Samuels, S.; Hassiotis, A.

2006-01-01

215

Mental Health Workforce Change through Social Work Education: A California Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2004 California Mental Health Services Act requires large-scale system change in the public mental health system through a shift to recovery-oriented services for diverse populations. This article describes an innovative strategy for workforce recruitment and retention to create and sustain these systemic changes. The California Social Work

Foster, Gwen; Morris, Meghan Brenna; Sirojudin, Sirojudin

2013-01-01

216

Bachelor of Social Work Students and Mental Health Stigma: Understanding Student Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bachelor-level social work students (n = 198) at a midsized Midwestern public university were surveyed to evaluate their attitudes toward those with mental health concerns. Additionally, students were surveyed regarding their willingness to seek treatment for their own mental health needs. Results of the analyses suggest that the majority of…

Zellmann, Karen T.; Madden, Elissa E.; Aguiniga, Donna M.

2014-01-01

217

The Community Health Worker. Working Guide. Guidelines for Training. Guidelines for Adaptation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a revised and enlarged edition of "The Primary Health Worker," a standard teaching text and reference manual developed for community health workers and their trainers and supervisors. The new edition has been updated with practical knowledge gained during the extensive field use of the previous work. The book also incorporates new…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

218

Clocking in: The Organization of Work Time and Health in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article assesses the health implications of emerging patterns in the organization of work time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we examine general mental and physical health (SF-12 scores), psychological distress (CESD score), clinical levels of obesity, and the presence of medical conditions, at age 40.…

Kleiner, Sibyl; Pavalko, Eliza K.

2010-01-01

219

[Complex evaluation of work conditions and health state of oil industry workers].  

PubMed

The authors studied influence of occupational environment and work process factors on health of workers engaged into oil extraction. Analysis covered 7487 oil industry workers. Locomotory system and peripheral nervous system diseases, arterial hypertension, ENT diseases, gastro-intestinal disorders appeared to play leading role in the morbidity structure revealed. The studies helped to specify measures to preserve the oil workers health. PMID:19810182

Gimranova, G G; Bakiirov, A B; Karimova, L K

2009-01-01

220

Mental health status among married working women residing in Bhubaneswar city, India: a psychosocial survey.  

PubMed

Mental health is a major public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the mental health status and its correlates among married working women residing in Bhubaneswar city of Odisha, India. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 240 households involving 240 married working women following a multistage cluster random sampling design. Using the predesigned, pretested interview schedule and self-reporting questionnaire, all relevant information was collected. Our study revealed that 32.9% of study respondents had poor mental health and only about 10% of these women had sought any kind of mental health services. Logistic regression analysis showed that 3 predictors such as favourable attitude of colleagues, sharing their own problems with husband, and spending time for yoga/meditation/exercise had significant positive impact on the mental health status of married working women. A preventive program regarding various aspects of mental health for married working women at workplace as well as community level could be a useful strategy in reducing this public health problem. PMID:24800258

Panigrahi, Ansuman; Padhy, Aditya Prasad; Panigrahi, Madhulita

2014-01-01

221

Mental Health Status among Married Working Women Residing in Bhubaneswar City, India: A Psychosocial Survey  

PubMed Central

Mental health is a major public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the mental health status and its correlates among married working women residing in Bhubaneswar city of Odisha, India. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 240 households involving 240 married working women following a multistage cluster random sampling design. Using the predesigned, pretested interview schedule and self-reporting questionnaire, all relevant information was collected. Our study revealed that 32.9% of study respondents had poor mental health and only about 10% of these women had sought any kind of mental health services. Logistic regression analysis showed that 3 predictors such as favourable attitude of colleagues, sharing their own problems with husband, and spending time for yoga/meditation/exercise had significant positive impact on the mental health status of married working women. A preventive program regarding various aspects of mental health for married working women at workplace as well as community level could be a useful strategy in reducing this public health problem. PMID:24800258

Panigrahi, Ansuman; Padhy, Aditya Prasad; Panigrahi, Madhulita

2014-01-01

222

The Health of Women at Work. A Bibliography. Occasional Papers No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both English and foreign language articles and books, most of them published since 1950, are cited in this bibliography on the health of women in the workplace. Citations were selected to represent the efforts that have been made by health professionals, statisticians, historians, and social scientists in this area. The designation "at work"…

Hunt, Vilma R.

223

Work-Related Health Limitations, Education, and the Risk of Marital Disruption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite progress in identifying the covariates of divorce, there remain substantial gaps in the knowledge. One of these gaps is the relationship between health and risk of marital dissolution. I extend prior research by examining the linkages between work-related health limitations and divorce using 25 years of data (N = 7919) taken from the 1979…

Teachman, Jay

2010-01-01

224

Masculinities fathering and health: The experiences of African-Caribbean and white working class fathers  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a developing body of research that investigates the links between masculinities and men's health experiences, but the links between masculinities and the health of fathers has been a neglected focus for research in the UK. This paper presents some of the findings drawn from a parent study which investigated African-Caribbean and white working class fathers’ experiences of fathering,

Robert Alan Williams

2007-01-01

225

The relations between psychosocial factors at work and health status among workers in home care organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A considerable proportion of sickness absence and disability pension is caused by subjective health complaints, especially\\u000a low back pain (LBP). In recent years focus has been on psychosocial characteristics of work as potential risk factors. The\\u000a aim of this study is to examine the relations between psychosocial work aspects and subjective health complaints, LBP, and\\u000a need for recovery. A total

Hege R. Eriksen; Camilla Ihlebæk; Jeroen P. Jansen; Alex Burdorf

2006-01-01

226

Psychosocial work characteristics and self rated health in four post-communist countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVESTo examine whether psychosocial factors at work are related to self rated health in post-communist countries.DESIGN AND SETTINGSRandom samples of men and women in five communities in four countries were sent a postal questionnaire (Poland, Czech Republic and Lithuania) or were invited to an interview (Hungary). Working subjects (n=3941) reported their self rated health in the past 12 months

H Pikhart; M Bobak; J Siegrist; A Pajak; S Rywik; J Kyshegyi; A Gostautas; Z Skodova; M Marmot

2001-01-01

227

Health effects of supplemental work from home in the European Union.  

PubMed

Internationalization and technological developments have changed the work organization in developed and developing industrial economies. Information and communication technologies, such as computers and smartphones, are increasingly used, allowing more temporal and spatial flexibility of work. This may lead to an increase in supplemental work, i.e. constant availability or working in addition to contractually agreed work hours. This in turn extends work hours and leads to work hours in evenings and weekends, causing interferences of work hours with biological and social rhythms for sleep, recovery and social interaction. However, empirical findings on the effects of supplemental work and work hours on occupational health are rather scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between (1) work-related contacts outside of regular work hours and (2) working in the free time with self-reported work-related health impairments in the fourth and fifth European Working Conditions Surveys (EWCS 2005, EWCS 2010). Out of these cross-sectional, large-scale surveys, data on n?=?22?836 and n?=?34?399 employed workers were used for weighted logistic regression analyses. About half of the sample reported at least occasional supplemental work. The results showed an increased risk of reporting at least one health problem for employees who had been contacted by their employer (EWCS 2005), or worked in their free time to meet work demands (EWCS 2010) in the last 12 months, compared to those reporting no supplemental work or work-related contacts during free time. These results were controlled for demographic variables, physical and mental work load, worker autonomy, and several work hours characteristics (e.g. hours per week, unusual and variable hours). The risk of reporting health problems was increased by being contacted both sometimes (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.14-1.39) and often (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.25), whereas the frequency of working in the free time showed a clear dose-response effect (sometimes: OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.24; often: OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.47-1.75), both compared to the category "never". The findings, thus, indicate that even a small amount of supplemental work beyond contractually agreed work hours may increase the risk of work-related health impairments. Working in the free time was associated with a substantial risk increase and might be a better indicator for actual work load than being contacted by the employer outside of contractually agreed work hours. Thus, in order to minimize negative health effects, availability requirements for employees outside their regular work hours should be minimized. While these effects definitely need further study, especially regarding a quantification of actual supplemental work and its temporal location, addressing the company culture and using incentives and policies might be options to reduce the amount of supplemental work and maintain the risks of health impairments in the working population at a lower level. PMID:25229274

Arlinghaus, Anna; Nachreiner, Friedhelm

2014-12-01

228

Human health and the water environment: using the DPSEEA framework to identify the driving forces of disease.  

PubMed

There is a growing awareness of global forces that threaten human health via the water environment. A better understanding of the dynamic between human health and the water environment would enable prediction of the significant driving forces and effective strategies for coping with or preventing them. This report details the use of the Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (DPSEEA) framework to explore the linkage between water-related diseases and their significant driving forces. The DPSEEA frameworks indicate that a select group of driving forces, including population growth, agriculture, infrastructure (dams and irrigation), and climate change, is at the root cause of key global disease burdens. Construction of the DPSEEA frameworks also allows for the evaluation of public health interventions. Sanitation was found to be a widely applicable and effective intervention, targeting the driver/pressure linkage of most of the water-related diseases examined. Ultimately, the DPSEEA frameworks offer a platform for constituents in both the health and environmental fields to collaborate and commit to a common goal targeting the same driving forces. PMID:24036221

Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Bartram, Jamie

2014-01-15

229

Working with refugees: Health education and communication issues in a child health clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To explore the views of a group of Turkish and Kurdish women refugees about child feeding issues and communication with health professionals in a child health clinic.Design This was a qualitative study using focus groups.Setting A four partner general practice surgery in North London with a large Turkish and Kurdish refugee practice population.Method Three focus groups were set up

Rhiannon England; Kathy Doughty; Sevtap Genc; Zeynep Putkeli

2003-01-01

230

Contractual conditions, working conditions and their impact on health and well-being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given changes in the labour market in past decades, it is of interest to evaluate whether and how contractual and working\\u000a conditions affect health and psychological well-being in society today. We consider the effects of contractual and working\\u000a conditions on self-assessed health and psychological well-being using twelve waves (1991\\/1992–2002\\/2003) of the British Household\\u000a Panel Survey. For self-assessed health, the dependent

Silvana RoboneAndrew; Andrew M. Jones; Nigel Rice

2011-01-01

231

Labor force participation and health-related quality of life in HIV-positive men who have sex with men: The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Too many people with HIV have left the job market permanently and those with reduced work capacity have been unable to keep their jobs. There is a need to examine the health effects of labor force participation in people with HIV. This study presents longitudinal data from 1,415 HIV-positive men who have sex with men taking part in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Generalized Estimating Equations show that employment is associated with better physical and mental health quality of life and suggests that there may be an adaptation process to the experience of unemployment. Post-hoc analyses also suggest that people who are more physically vulnerable may undergo steeper health declines due to job loss than those who are generally healthier. However, this may also be the result of a selection effect whereby poor physical health contributes to unemployment. Policies that promote labor force participation may not only increase employment rates but also improve the health of people living with HIV. PMID:22814570

Rueda, Sergio; Raboud, Janet; Plankey, Michael; Ostrow, David; Mustard, Cameron; Rourke, Sean B.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Bekele, Tsegaye; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Lavis, John; Detels, Roger; Silvestre, Anthony J.

2013-01-01

232

Development of a Unified Code of Ethics for the Health Education Profession: A Report of the National Task Force on Ethics in Health Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development, over many years, of a unified code of ethics designed to represent the professional needs of various health education professionals working in the field. The code of ethics for the health education profession is included. It focuses on responsibility to: the public; the profession; employers; health education delivery:…

Capwell, Ellen M.; Smith, Becky J.; Shirreffs, Janet; Olsen, Larry K.

2000-01-01

233

Work Stressors, Health and Sense of Coherence in UK Academic Employees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This cross-sectional study examined relationships between job-specific stressors and psychological and physical health symptoms in academic employees working in UK universities. The study also tests the main and moderating role played by sense of coherence (SOC: Antonovsky, 1987 in work stress process). SOC is described as a generalised resistance…

Kinman, Gail

2008-01-01

234

The Orthodontist, Our Friend: World of Work Project: Fifth Grade: Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document is one of the teaching units developed by the Utah World of Work Project, designed to integrate career awareness into the regular curriculum at the elementary level. The fifth grade guide is tied to the health education area and focuses on the work of the orthodontist in terms of understanding what an orthodontist does, learning what…

Anderson, Nancy

235

Perceptions of Health Promotion and Cancer Prevention among Adults in Working-Class Occupations and Neighborhoods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A social-contextual approach to cancer prevention among participants associated with the working class may result in behavior-change messages that are more relevant to them and contribute to a reduction in health disparities among classes. This article reports findings from a qualitative study of adults in working-class occupations and/or living…

Goldman, Roberta E.; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Hunt, Mary Kay; Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores; Emmons, Karen M.; Gagne, Joshua; Sorensen, Glorian

2008-01-01

236

The Outsourcing of Health, Sport and Physical Educational Work: A State of Play  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The outsourcing of health, sport and physical educational (HSPE) work has been a feature of physical education (PE) "futures talk" for over 20 years. However, HSPE work outsourcing has been the focus of little empirical research and only occasional commentary. That small amount of empirical research that has been conducted has been…

Williams, Benjamin James; Hay, Peter James; Macdonald, Doune

2011-01-01

237

The outsourcing of health, sport and physical educational work: a state of play  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The outsourcing of health, sport and physical educational (HSPE) work has been a feature of physical education (PE) ‘futures talk’ for over 20 years. However, HSPE work outsourcing has been the focus of little empirical research and only occasional commentary. That small amount of empirical research that has been conducted has been narrow in scope, focusing exclusively on primary

Benjamin James Williams; Peter James Hay; Doune Macdonald

2011-01-01

238

Partner Violence and Survivors' Chronic Health Problems: Informing Social Work Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most social work professionals may expect that women who experience partner violence will sustain acute physical injuries, social workers may be less knowledgeable about the chronic health problems with which violence survivors often struggle. To inform social work practice, we reviewed and synthesized the recently published research on…

Macy, Rebecca J.; Ferron, Joelle; Crosby, Carmen

2009-01-01

239

The health effects of work and family role characteristics: Gender and race comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have documented the benefits of work and family roles for both physical and mental health. A number of these studies have suggested that work and family roles are beneficial to the degree that they entail rewarding relationships and activities. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 10633; 17 percent African-American), this paper examines

Beth Rushing; Annette Schwabe

1995-01-01

240

Working on the Edge: Stresses and Rewards of Work in a Front-line Mental Health Service.  

PubMed

This study sought to investigate frontline mental health professionals' perceptions of work stress and the rewards and demands associated with their work. Locally known as 'linkworkers', and from a variety of professional backgrounds, these staff worked mainly in general practice settings. Individual interviews were conducted with nine linkworkers, and the interview transcripts were analysed thematically. The main themes identified were the following: demands, coping, individual resilience, ownership and creativity, boundaries, secure base and service philosophy and ethos. Themes, categories and sub categories were presented and discussed with seven of the linkworkers in two focus groups. Focus group transcripts were analysed, and additional themes of recognizing limitations, disillusionment and the dilemma of setting boundaries were identified. These themes overlapped with those previously identified but were associated with service changes over time. The themes of ownership and creativity and service philosophy and ethos are significant, not only in relation to their impact on individual linkworkers but also in terms of their relevance for establishing and maintaining morale, engagement and a reflective culture within a service. The relevance of this work to accessible and newly developing mental health services is considered. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25044605

Bowden, Gillian Elaine; Smith, Joanna Christina Elizabeth; Parker, Pamela Anne; Boxall, Matthew James Christian

2014-07-18

241

Video: Animals; Electric Current; Force; Science Activities. Learning in Science Project. Working Papers 51-54.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four papers to be used in conjunction with video-tapes developed by the Learning in Science Project are presented. Topic areas of the papers focus on: (1) animals; (2) electric current; (3) force; and (4) science activities. The first paper presents transcripts of class discussions focusing on the scientific meaning of the word animal. The second…

Bell, Beverley; And Others

242

Time for Results: The Governors' 1991 Report on Education. Supporting Works. Task Force on College Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Task Force on College Quality was charged with gathering research, reviewing literature and drawing on testimony on assessment of college effectiveness and state policies on improving higher education. Three papers are presented: (1) "College Quality: Measuring What Students Learn in Higher Education" (Jean G. McDonald); (2) "The State Role in…

National Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

243

Wives' Relative Wages, Husbands' Paid Work Hours, and Wives' Labor-Force Exit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Economic theories predict that women are more likely to exit the labor force if their partners' earnings are higher and if their own wage rate is lower. In this article, I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,254) and discrete-time event-history analysis to show that wives' relative wages are more predictive of their exit than are…

Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons

2011-01-01

244

Perspectives: Reforming American Higher Education--Implications for a Vibrant Work Force and a Healthy Democracy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The forces of globalization are finally hitting American postsecondary education. For nearly three decades, since the 1983 publication of "A Nation At Risk" launched a sustained focus on the mediocre, if not failing, K-12 system, American postsecondary education has avoided the accountability spotlight. Postsecondary policy debates have focused…

Kolb, Charles

2011-01-01

245

The emerging health care world: implications for social work practice and education.  

PubMed

Dramatic changes in patient care delivery have been stimulated by advances in technology and new approaches to the financing of health care. Traditionally, the American health care system has been based on a paradigm of unpredictable acute simple disease, a model that has become inappropriate as increasing numbers of patients are presenting with multiple, chronic health problems. Because chronic illnesses are determined by many factors, such as an individual's social, psychological, and physical environment; genetic makeup; and health care accessibility factors, the hospital, once the dominant organization in health care, must become part of a primary care network of community-oriented delivery systems focused on chronic disease management. In this model, the social worker treats the patient throughout the continuum of care. Therefore, dynamic training that addresses the changing health care environment will be needed. In addition, social workers will need to work as members of a team in addressing the needs of patients for preventive, curative, and rehabilitative services. PMID:8840830

Berkman, B

1996-09-01

246

Working conditions, visual fatigue, and mental health among systems analysts in São Paulo, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Aims: To evaluate the association between working conditions and visual fatigue and mental health among systems analysts living in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out by a multidisciplinary team. It included: ergonomic analysis of work, individual and group interviews, and 553 self applied questionnaires in two enterprises. The comparison population numbered 136 workers in different occupations. Results: The study population mainly comprised young males. Among systems analysts, visual fatigue was associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment and workstation, low level of worker participation, being a woman, and subject's attitude of fascination by the computer. Nervousness and intellectual performance were associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment, work environment, and tools. Continuing education and leisure were protective factors. Work interfering in family life was associated with mental workload, difficulties with clients, strict deadlines, subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, and finding solutions of work problems outside work. Family support, satisfaction in life and work, and adequate work environment and tools were protective factors. Work interfering in personal life was associated with subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, strict deadlines, inadequate equipment, and high level of work participation. Satisfaction in life and work and continuing education were protective factors. The comparison population did not share common working factors with the systems analysts in the regression analysis. Conclusions: The main health effects of systems analysts' work were expressed by machine anthropomorphism, being very demanding, mental acceleration, mental absorption, and difficulty in dealing with emotions. PMID:14691269

Rocha, L; Debert-Ribeiro, M

2004-01-01

247

[The value of using administrative data in public health research: the Continuous Working Life Sample].  

PubMed

The use of administrative data is common practice in public health research. The present field note describes the Continuous Working Life Sample (CWLS) and its use in health research. The CWLS is built on records generated by all contacts with the social security system (work contracts, disability, etc.), plus tax data (monetary gains, income, etc.) and census data (level of education, country of birth, etc.), but does not allow individuals to be identified. The CWLS was started in 2004 with 4% (1.1 million persons) of the total population who were either contributors to or beneficiaries of the social security system. The information on the individuals in the CWLS is updated annually and lost individuals are replaced. This continuous design allows the construction of a cohort with information on working life and financial status and evaluation of their relationship with work disability. Future connection with clinical records would enable analysis of other health-related outcomes. PMID:24698033

López, María Andrée; Benavides, Fernando G; Alonso, Jordi; Espallargues, Mireia; Durán, Xavier; Martínez, José Miguel

2014-01-01

248

[The meaning of work for professionals in a substitute mental health service].  

PubMed

The Psychosocial Care Center is seeing as a new strategy to address patients with mental disorders in that is has special features in everyday work that directly influence the practices developed by health professionals working in the area. To learn about the meaning of work for professionals working in a Psychosocial Care Center in the city of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, a qualitative case study was conducted that included recorded interviews with 13 professionals from different categories. For data analysis, the technique of content analysis was used, and the results were as follows: professionals working in psychosocial care centers are satisfied with the new model of mental health care based on the anti-asylum proposal, and work fulfillment is due to the achievement of socially integrating individuals with mental disorders and helping them achieve autonomy. PMID:24601144

Araújo, Meiriele Tavares; Montenegro, Lívia Cozer; Alves, Marília; Brito, Maria José Menezes

2013-06-01

249

Voice Problems at Work: A Challenge for Occupational Safety and Health Arrangement  

Microsoft Academic Search

In modern societies about one third of the labor force are working in professions in which voice is the primary tool. Voice problems are common in general, but they are even more common in professions in which there is heavy vocal loading, i.e. professions that do not only require prolonged voice use, but also involve extra loading factors such as

Erkki Vilkman

2000-01-01

250

Networking between community health programs: a team-work approach to improving health service provision  

PubMed Central

Background Networking between non-government organisations in the health sector is recognised as an effective method of improving service delivery. The Uttarakhand Cluster was established in 2008 as a collaboration of community health programs in rural north India with the aim of building capacity, increasing visibility and improving linkages with the government. This qualitative research, conducted between 2011-2012, examined the factors contributing to formation and sustainability of this clustering approach. Methods Annual focus group discussions, indicator surveys and participant observation were used to document and observe the factors involved in the formation and sustainability of an NGO network in North India. Results The analysis demonstrated that relationships were central to the formation and sustainability of the cluster. The elements of small group relationships: forming, storming, norming and performing emerged as a helpful way to describe the phases which have contributed to the functioning of this network with common values, strong leadership, resource sharing and visible progress encouraging the ongoing commitment of programs to the network goals. Conclusions In conclusion, this case study demonstrates an example of a successful and effective network of community health programs. The development of relationships was seen to be to be an important part of promoting effective resource sharing, training opportunities, government networking and resource mobilisation and will be important for other health networks to consider. PMID:25015212

2014-01-01

251

Self-Employment, Work–Family Fit and Mental Health Among Female Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce to investigate the effects of work type on women’s lives. Specifically,\\u000a we hypothesized that self-employed women have better work–family fit than organizationally employed women. We also hypothesized\\u000a that as a result of better work–family fit, self-employed women would report better mental health than organizationally employed\\u000a women. The analysis shows limited

Robert Tuttle; Michael Garr

2009-01-01

252

Virtue and health--finding meaning and joy in working life.  

PubMed

The perspective of this investigation is the humanistic caring tradition of caring science where caritas motive, i.e. charity and love, constitutes the basic motive and suffering the basic category of caring, i.e. Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. The concept of virtue is used in accordance with Aristotle's theory of virtue and fragments of theory are added to the study from Arendt. The aim of the study was to investigate the meaning of virtues for worker's health and to develop a theoretical model of the inner health domains. The investigation comprises an empirical study using focus-group interviews for the collection of data. The participants were 16 employees, in four focus groups, in the wood-processing industry. The study was conducted from September 1999 to January 2000. Hermeneutical interpretation has been used in the search for a deeper understanding of the connection between virtue and health in working life. Abduction is the conclusion method, which is used in this study. The result is presented at four levels of interpretation and the final findings constitutes four theses which comprise the virtues of pride, generosity, love and honesty as important in working life and a theoretical model comprising three dimensions: the innermost dimension, the middle dimension and the outer dimension. These dimensions reflect health as becoming. By means of virtues it is possible to find the way to the inner domains of health. Pride as a virtue and how it is heeded at work, is decisive in determining whether health becomes discernable in working life and the value, i.e. found in pride is decisive when it comes to the employee's conception of the meaning of work. The study shows that the connection between health and virtue is important to recognize. This approach points out underlying values that effects worker's health. PMID:17559437

Wärnå, Carola; Lindholm, Lisbet; Eriksson, Katie

2007-06-01

253

Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine’s Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

2004-01-01

254

Evaluation of Work Place Stress in Health University Workers: A Study from Rural India  

PubMed Central

Background: Healthcare providers being over-worked and under staffed are prone to poor mental health. Unhealthy work place compounds it further. Aims: This study was aimed at to assess the mental health status of a medical university employee with special reference to work place stressors. Settings and design: A cross-sectional study was designed and carried out at a Rural Health University. Materials and Methods: Both the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12 and Holmes–Rahe Scale were used to evaluate 406 participants. Statistical analysis: Multivariate analysis, correlation, and ANOVA by SPSS 11.0. Results: The minimum age of the participant was 19 years and the maximum 64 years, with an average age at 35.09 years. On the GHQ scale 239(58.9%) recorded psychiatric morbidity out of which 201(49.5%) had moderate and 38(9.3%) severe morbidity. Doctors were the highest stressed group (P ? 0.04). Prominent work environmental stressors were poor departmental reorganization, lack of cohesiveness in department, difficult superiors and juniors (P ? 0.001, Pearson correlation). Stressors associated with work organization and work nature were: noninvolvement in departmental decision making and lack of proper feedback; along with; work load, lack of clarity in job, and a erratic work schedule (P ? 0.001 on Pearson correlation). Harassment, favoritism, discrimination, and lack of self-expression (P ? 0.003) were other factors responsible for work dissatisfaction. Conclusions: A high stress level was detected in the study population. The principal stressors were work environment related. Poor work culture was found to lead to job dissatisfaction among majority. PMID:21687380

Mishra, Badrinarayan; Mehta, SC; Sinha, Nidhi Dinesh; Shukla, Sushil Kumar; Ahmed, Nadeem; Kawatra, Abhishek

2011-01-01

255

Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses.  

PubMed

Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

2015-01-01

256

Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses  

PubMed Central

Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

2015-01-01

257

WORKING PAPER N 2012 37 Mandatory labels, taxes and market forces: An empirical  

E-print Network

labelling and taxation of fat as prom- ising tools to control the growth of food-related chronic disease blancs and dessert yogurts, we separately identify consumer preferences for fat and front-of- pack fat of Paris 1, the ERS Conference on scanner data and food policy, the IRDES workshop on health policy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

258

Promoting occupational safety and health for working children through microfinance programming.  

PubMed

Microfinance programs are recognized as a way of improving incomes and creating employment for large numbers of low-income families, but there are concerns that working conditions within these informal microenterprises are far from ideal. For example, when families receive loans to expand a microenterprise, children may make up the labor shortfall until the family can afford to hire adult workers. Through the Promoting and Protecting the Interests of Children who Work (PPIC-Work) project being carried out in Egypt, a set of interventions that can not only improve working conditions, but can also be integrated into standard microfinance programs has been developed. By working with and through self-financing microfinance programs, the PPIC-Work approach provides a way of improving occupational safety and health not only for children working in microenterprises but also for large numbers of children and adults working in the informal sector more generally. PMID:20465063

Carothers, Richard; Breslin, Curtis; Denomy, Jennifer; Foad, Mamdouh

2010-01-01

259

Sex-role orientation, marital status and mental health in working women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a The objectives of this study were to make a men-women comparison as to the effects of job stress and sex-role orientation\\u000a on mental health and to determine if marital status modifies effects of job stress and sex-role orientation on mental health\\u000a in women. Subjects were 644 men and 301 women who were working at two private companies and one

M. Mori; Y. Nakashima; Y. Yamazaki; H. Kurita

2002-01-01

260

Cool aid? Health, wellbeing and place in the work of Bono and U2.  

PubMed

Through a discussion of the sounds and statements of Bono and U2, this paper explores the ways in which music can work in particular spatial contexts, contributing towards both personal and population-wide health and wellbeing. We engage critically with the idea of celebrity diplomacy, and look beyond this notion to suggest ways in which the production, circulation and consumption of music warrants greater attention within the unfolding domain of health geography. PMID:20970367

Andrews, Gavin J; Kearns, Robin A; Kingsbury, Paul; Carr, Edward R

2011-01-01

261

Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior  

PubMed Central

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

262

Daily positive spillover and crossover from mothers' work to youth health.  

PubMed

Prior research shows that employees' work experiences can "spill over" into their family lives and "cross over" to affect family members. Expanding on studies that emphasize negative implications of work for family life, this study examined positive work-to-family spillover and positive and negative crossover between mothers and their children. Participants were 174 mothers in the extended care (nursing home) industry and their children (ages 9-17), both of whom completed daily diaries on the same 8 consecutive evenings. On each workday, mothers reported whether they had a positive experience at work, youth reported on their mothers' positive and negative mood after work, and youth rated their own mental (positive and negative affect) and physical health (physical health symptoms, sleep quality, sleep duration). Results of 2-level models showed that mothers' positive mood after work, on average, was directly related to youth reports of more positive affect, better sleep quality, and longer sleep duration. In addition, mothers with more positive work experiences, on average, displayed less negative mood after work, and in turn, adolescents reported less negative affect and fewer physical health symptoms. Results are discussed in terms of daily family system dynamics. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25243577

Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; McHale, Susan M; Hammer, Leslie B; Buxton, Orfeu M

2014-12-01

263

Soft Skills and the Minority Work Force: A Guide for Informed Discussion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication analyzes issues that lead to a working definition of soft working skills. Data come from research by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. At a workshop, scholars, practitioners, and representatives from various job sites discussed the impact of soft skills on access to jobs and long-term employment among minority…

Conrad, Cecilia A.

264

Health-related factors associated with mode of travel to work.  

PubMed

Active commuting (AC) to the workplace is a potential strategy for incorporating physical activity into daily life and is associated with health benefits. This study examined the association between health-related factors and mode of travel to the workplace. Methods. A volunteer convenience sample of employed adults completed an online survey regarding demographics, health-related factors, and the number of times/week walking, biking, driving, and using public transit to work (dichotomized as no walk/bike/drive/PT and walk/bike/drive/PT 1 + x/week). Logistic regression was used to predict the likelihood of each mode of transport and meeting PA recommendations from AC according to demographics and health-related factors. Results. The sample (n = 1175) was aged 43.5 ± 11.4 years and was primarily White (92.7%) and female (67.9%). Respondents reported walking (7.3%), biking (14.4%), taking public transit (20.3%), and driving (78.3%) to work at least one time/week. Among those reporting AC, 9.6% met PA recommendations from AC alone. Mode of travel to work was associated with several demographic and health-related factors, including age, number of chronic diseases, weight status, and AC beliefs. Discussion. Mode of transportation to the workplace and health-related factors such as disease or weight status should be considered in future interventions targeting AC. PMID:23533450

Bopp, Melissa; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Campbell, Matthew E

2013-01-01

265

[Institutional abuse in the health work environment: proposals to change this reality].  

PubMed

Abuse, understood as the non-provisioning of fundamental rights, can affect workers' life quality and undermine their professional environments. This assay discusses institutional abuse and its effects on the work environment, and makes some proposals as to how alleviate them by stimulating the members of the health interdisciplinary team to improve and acknowledge their potential to transform and improve a reality perceived as unhealthy. It is essential that the health team strengthens its relationships and knowledge, reduces uneasiness, makes its routine flexible, and assesses specificities. This will allow making proposals in partnership for the improvement of inter- and intrapersonal relationships in health institutions, eventually building solidarity. PMID:19068587

Costenaro, Regina Gema Santini; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Fereira, Carla Lizandra de Lima

2008-09-01

266

Work Stress and Risk Factors For Health Management Trainees in Canakkale, Turkey  

PubMed Central

Aim: This study aims to investigate the general mental health situation, work-related stress and risk factors of health management trainees. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on Health Management Musters students (N=96) in Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University Health Sciences Institute, May-June 2014. A total of 58 students who voluntarily participated in the study were reached (60.42%). Participants completed a 22-question sociodemographic survey form and a 12-item General Health Questionnaire in a face-to-face interview. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 20.0. Results: The average age of participants was 36.4±6.2 (Min:24-Max:62) years. Thirty five of the participants were female (60.3%), 23 were male (39.7%). The number of people using cigarettes and alcohol were 23 (39.7%) and 9 (15.8%) respectively. In our study group according to GHQ scale 32 people (55.2%) were in the group at risk of depression. Eighty-six percent of participants reported experiencing work stress. The most frequently reported sources of stress were superiors (56.8%), work itself (41.3%), and work colleagues (25.8%). There was no significant difference between those at risk of depression and those not at risk in terms of gender, marital status, educational level, age, work-related factors (daily work, computer use, duration of sitting at desk), sleep duration, presence of chronic disease, substance use (cigarettes, alcohol), regular exercise, regular meals, fast-food consumption, sufficient family time and vacations (p>0.05). Conclusions: Our study results indicated that majority of participants reported experiencing work stress with more than half at high risk of developing depression. The most reported risk factors were superiors, the work itself and colleagues in the present study. Psychosocial risk factors at work environment should be investigated in terms of psychological, sociological and ergonomics in more detail to reduce the risk of health management trainees experiencing work stress and mental health problems. PMID:25568633

Tan??man, Beyhan; Cevizci, Sibel; Çelik, Merve; Sevim, Sezgin

2014-01-01

267

Job Burnout, Work Engagement and Self-reported Treatment for Health Conditions in South Africa.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study being reported here was to investigate the relationship of job burnout and work engagement with self-reported received treatment for health conditions (cardiovascular condition, high cholesterol, depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome), while controlling for age, gender, smoking and alcohol use. The sample comprised 7895 employees from a broad range of economic sectors in the South African working population. A cross-sectional survey design was used for the study. Structural equation modelling methods were implemented with a weighted least squares approach. The results showed that job burnout had a positive relationship with self-reported received treatment for depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome. Work engagement did not have any significant negative or positive relationships with the treatment for these health conditions. The results of this study make stakeholders aware of the relationship between job burnout, work engagement and self-reported treatment for health conditions. Evidence for increased reporting of treatment for ill-health conditions due to burnout was found. Therefore, attempts should be made to manage job burnout to prevent ill-health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24723548

de Beer, Leon T; Pienaar, Jaco; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

2014-04-10

268

Health perceptions of local community works: network women describe how flows of energy and space of action generate health and ill health.  

PubMed

This paper presents a theoretical model on how flows of energy and space of action generate health and ill health in a local community work. Local community work was assessed through a case study of women's networks in a peripheral region of northern Sweden. The aim of the study was to analyse what participation in women's networks can mean for the members health perceptions. A purposeful selection of women's networks was made for the purpose of carrying out a qualitative follow-up study. Grounded theory was used to analyse the data and to generate a theoretical model. The meaning of participation in networks proved to be plural, as both health-deteriorating and health-promotive mechanisms were found. Two core categories "flows of energy" and "a space of action" as well as the four ancillary categories: social relations within the network; increased awareness of gender and power; becoming visible; and material prerequisites for networking were grounded in the data. We suggest that under certain circumstances local community work can be of crucial importance for health promotion. PMID:15912012

Gustafsson-Larsson, Susanne; Hammarström, Anne

2005-01-01

269

An institutional ethnography inquiry of health care work in special education: a research protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Special education for children with chronic health conditions or disabilities requires the integration of health care work with education. This phenomenon occurs in an understudied and challenging context for integrated care despite policies and protocols that outline work processes in this context. We are interested in an approach to inquiry that will allow us to address gaps in current literature and practices in integrated care, and move towards informing policy. Study design and data collection methods Institutional ethnography is an approach to inquiry that maps the actualities of what individuals do at an everyday local level, while examining this work activity in relation to the sociopolitical context. It has been used to change policy and local practice by highlighting disjunctures between policy and actuality. We are adopting institutional ethnography and its three common methods of data collection: document collection, interviews, and observation/shadowing. Informants to this inquiry are chosen from school-based teams, family-centred units and constellations of clinical professionals. Methods of analysis We are following work processes, verbally and visually mapping what is done and by whom. It is important to note that work includes ‘unofficial’ work, including the work of families and others who may not be assigned an official work role in a policy or protocol. The mediating role of texts in work processes is also being mapped in order to link the local work to the high-level social coordinators. To begin, analysis focuses on local, or micro-level, work processes; next, analysis identifies and explains the macro-level coordination of the local work (i.e. social and political structures). Conclusion A primary outcome of this study will be the creation of verbal and visual maps that demonstrate the social organisation of work processes occurring in the health care-special education interface. These maps will make invisible work visible, highlight disjunctures between policy and practice and identify opportunities for change. They will be useful for critical knowledge translation purposes, providing parents and professionals with an awareness of how their individual work fits in to the larger picture of integrating health care work in special education. PMID:24179456

Ng, Stella; Stooke, Rosamund; Regan, Sandra; Hibbert, Kathryn; Schryer, Catherine; Phelan, Shanon; Lingard, Lorelei

2013-01-01

270

3 CFR - White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...policy proposals that can be of special importance to middle-class working families. The...in addition to regular meetings, shall conduct outreach with representatives of labor, business, nonprofit organizations, State and...

2010-01-01

271

Work History, Labor Force Attachment, and Earnings Differences between the Races and Sexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article uses a new data set to investigate the extent to which differences in work history, on-the-job training, absenteeism, and self-imposed restrictions on work hours and location account for wage differences between the sexes and races. As expected, white men generally had more education and training and less absenteeism and fewer restrictions than black men and women of both

Mary Corcoran; Greg J. Duncan

1979-01-01

272

Reflections on working for Senator Edward Kennedy, a vital ally in the effort to improve mental health access and care.  

PubMed

The author worked as a health policy fellow in the office of Senator Edward M. Kennedy in 1999. These reflections on that experience provide a description of the ambience of working on health policy issues in the US Congress, how the author utilized his community psychiatric knowledge and skills to assist in the process of developing and promoting various health and mental health related issues, and what it was like working in the Kennedy office. In the wake of his death, the Senator's long and influential career and especially his role in advancing health and mental health access and care improvement cannot be overstated. PMID:20091425

Pollack, David A

2010-04-01

273

Views and experiences of mental health nurses working with undergraduate assistants in nursing in an acute mental health setting.  

PubMed

Undergraduate nurses are employed as assistants in nursing (AIN) in inpatient mental health settings; however, there is a paucity of published research exploring registered nurses' (RN) views about the AIN role in these settings. This qualitative study documents the views and experiences of RN working with undergraduate AIN. Fifty structured face-to-face interviews were analysed, and the results are discussed in three sections. The first section outlines RN perceptions of qualities and skills required of AIN in mental health, and the responses primarily focus on communication skills, initiative, and willingness to learn. The second section targets factors in the workplace that might enhance the interest of AIN in a mental health nursing career; the responses emphasize their need to work with experienced staff. The last section outlines RN expectations of AIN, most of which are met and involve physical observations and technical tasks; less fulfilled activities primarily cluster around interactions with patients. Findings highlight the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on undergraduate nursing students as AIN in mental health settings. Communication skills, personal initiative, safety training to prevent violence, and education to increase knowledge and awareness about mental illness, diagnosis, and mental status-related skills were all important concerns articulated by RN. PMID:22176587

Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Mannix, Judy; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

2012-04-01

274

Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the final report of National Black Health Providers Task Force (NBHPTF) on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The first chapter of the report recounts the history of the NBHPTF and its objectives. In the second chapter epidemiological evidence is presented to demonstrate the need for a suggested 20 year plan aimed at controlling…

Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

275

75 FR 4043 - Science Advisory Board; Draft Report of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Oceans and Health Working...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Report of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Oceans and Health Working Group AGENCY: Office...availability of the draft report of the SAB Oceans and Health Working Group (here called...opportunities to enhance NOAA's ongoing ocean health efforts and their impacts on...

2010-01-26

276

Hazarding health: experiences of body, work, and risk among factory women in Malaysia.  

PubMed

In the 1970s, Malaysia launched an export-oriented development strategy as a means of financing the nation's modernization. The success of the strategy hinged significantly on intensive recruitment of women for factory employment. I draw on descriptive qualitative research, including interviews (51), surveys (106), and ethnography in Malaysia to investigate factory women's experiences of work and work-related health risks. Discourse analysis surfaced a latent consciousness of bodily changes in relation to work. A grounded theory analysis showed a compromised access to occupational risk knowledge that may bear negatively on women's well-being and the role women's new labor identities played in mediating the meanings of work and risks. Given the predominance of women workers in low-end manufacturing globally, I aimed to contribute to theoretical and applied understandings of gender, globalization, and health. PMID:19742364

Root, Robin

2009-10-01

277

Special operations forces and counterproliferation: The interagency process at work. Study project  

SciTech Connect

The threat of use of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in the United States or against American vital interests overseas is real. Combating the proliferation of WMD has become a high priority for the U.S. Government. Within Department of Defense Counterproliferation Initiative (DOD CPI) of 1993 Special Operations Forces (SOF) have become pivotal players in the creation of a full range of military options to counter this threat. SOF provides the National Command Authority (NCA) with flexible and responsive options. In order to successfully execute any type of CP related special operation, the interagency process must be fully engaged and synchronized. This study assesses the nature of the threat, reviews the evolution of the DOD CPI, and focuses on the use of SOF as an instrument of U.S. policy. Specifically this study explores the connectivity of the interagency process to support a U.S. SOF Counterproliferation mission.

Bakken, H.L.

1996-04-01

278

Youth with Disabilities in Transition: Health Insurance Options and Obstacles. Healthy & Ready To Work (HRTW) Policy Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper highlights the public and private health insurance options for young people with disabilities or chronic health conditions including several recent Federal initiatives to increase access to health care for working adults with disabilities. Discussion of public health insurance eligibility and coverage focuses on aspects of Medicaid and…

Schulzinger, Rhoda

279

Hazarding Health: Experiences of Body, Work, and Risk Among Factory Women in Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 1970s, Malaysia launched an export-oriented development strategy as a means of financing the nation's modernization. The success of the strategy hinged significantly on intensive recruitment of women for factory employment. I draw on descriptive qualitative research, including interviews (51), surveys (106), and ethnography in Malaysia to investigate factory women's experiences of work and work-related health risks. Discourse analysis

Robin Root

2009-01-01

280

European Working Time Directive and doctors’ health: a systematic review of the available epidemiological evidence  

PubMed Central

Objective To summarise the available scientific evidence on the health effects of exposure to working beyond the limit number of hours established by the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on physicians. Design A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE. Study selection, quality appraisal and data extraction were carried out by independent pairs of researchers using pre-established criteria. Setting Physicians of any medical, surgical or community specialty, working in any possible setting (hospitals, primary healthcare, etc), as well as trainees, residents, junior house officers or postgraduate interns, were included. Participants The total number of participants was 14?338. Primary and secondary outcome measures Health effects classified under the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results Over 3000 citations and 110 full articles were reviewed. From these, 11 studies of high or intermediate quality carried out in North America, Europe and Japan met the inclusion criteria. Six studies included medical residents, junior doctors or house officers and the five others included medical specialists or consultants, medical, dental, and general practitioners and hospital physicians. Evidence of an association was found between percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents with extended long working hours (LWH)/days or very LWH/weeks. The evidence was insufficient for mood disorders and general health. No studies on other health outcomes were identified. Conclusions LWH could increase the risk of percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents, and possibly other incidents at work through the same pathway. While associations are clear, the existing evidence does not allow for an established causal or ‘dose–response’ relationship between LWH and incidents at work, or for a threshold number of extended hours above which there is a significantly higher risk and the hours physicians could work and remain safe and healthy. Policymakers should consider safety issues when working on relaxing EWTD for doctors. PMID:25001394

Rodriguez-Jareño, Maria Cruz; Demou, Evangelia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Sanati, Kaveh A; Škerjanc, Alenka; Reis, Pedro G; Helimäki-Aro, Ritva; Macdonald, Ewan B; Serra, Consol

2014-01-01

281

Allied health professionals' intention to work for the National Health Service: a study of stayers, leavers and returners.  

PubMed

While there has been a recent squeeze on staff costs, it continues to be important to offer graduating clinical staff National Health Service (NHS) employment in order to maintain the long-term strength of the service. In addition, the experiences of the Canadian nursing profession suggest that complacency about an improving recruitment situation can lead to problems. Consequently, the objective of this study was to identify what influences allied health professionals' (AHPs) intention to work for the NHS. A postal survey was sent to members of four Allied Health Professions equally (N = 4800), targeting Stayers in, Leavers from, and Returners to, the NHS. One thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine questionnaires were returned giving an overall response rate of 40%. Stayers' intention to remain in the NHS was influenced by continuing professional development opportunities, confidence that they can find NHS work, commitment to their profession, a sense of moral obligation and a belief that other people important to them think it is a good idea. Returners' intention is influenced by similar factors as Stayers. Leavers are influenced by similar factors as Stayers/Returners but to a lesser extent. The study shows that perceptions of various NHS work characteristics, which lead to reasonably positive attitudes towards the NHS, do not necessarily translate into intention to work for it. The study also shows that intention to work for the NHS is not solely dependent on perceptions of NHS jobs and that career-decision-making is a social process, with the opinions of people who are important to AHPs also influencing career decisions. PMID:20424271

Coombs, Crispin; Arnold, John; Loan-Clarke, John; Bosley, Sara; Martin, Caroline

2010-05-01

282

Participatory research revealing the work and occupational health hazards of cooperative recyclers in Brazil.  

PubMed

Although informal waste collectors are sometimes organized in cooperatives, their working conditions remain extremely precarious and unsafe. The paper discusses the findings of action oriented, participatory qualitative research with several recycling groups in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. During workshops with the recyclers mapping, acting, and drawing methods helped reveal health hazards from collection, separation and transportation of recyclable materials. Major health problems relate to chemical and biological hazards, musculoskeletal damage, mechanical trauma and poor emotional wellbeing. The recent federal legislation on solid waste management opens new avenues for the inclusion of recycling cooperatives in selective waste collection. Nevertheless, we express the need to consider the distinctive characteristics and vulnerabilities of recycling groups, when developing safer work environments in these social businesses. We also suggest that the workspace be ergonomically organized and that public awareness campaigns about selective waste collection are conducted regularly to increase the quality of source separation. The introduction of electric hand pushed carts can further reduce health strains. This research has produced a better understanding of the work of the recyclers and related health risks. The interactive qualitative research methodology has allowed for the co-creation and mobilization of specific knowledge on health and safety in recycling cooperatives. PMID:24084672

Gutberlet, Jutta; Baeder, Angela M; Pontuschka, Nídia N; Felipone, Sonia M N; Dos Santos, Tereza L F

2013-10-01

283

Participatory Research Revealing the Work and Occupational Health Hazards of Cooperative Recyclers in Brazil  

PubMed Central

Although informal waste collectors are sometimes organized in cooperatives, their working conditions remain extremely precarious and unsafe. The paper discusses the findings of action oriented, participatory qualitative research with several recycling groups in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. During workshops with the recyclers mapping, acting, and drawing methods helped reveal health hazards from collection, separation and transportation of recyclable materials. Major health problems relate to chemical and biological hazards, musculoskeletal damage, mechanical trauma and poor emotional wellbeing. The recent federal legislation on solid waste management opens new avenues for the inclusion of recycling cooperatives in selective waste collection. Nevertheless, we express the need to consider the distinctive characteristics and vulnerabilities of recycling groups, when developing safer work environments in these social businesses. We also suggest that the workspace be ergonomically organized and that public awareness campaigns about selective waste collection are conducted regularly to increase the quality of source separation. The introduction of electric hand pushed carts can further reduce health strains. This research has produced a better understanding of the work of the recyclers and related health risks. The interactive qualitative research methodology has allowed for the co-creation and mobilization of specific knowledge on health and safety in recycling cooperatives. PMID:24084672

Gutberlet, Jutta; Baeder, Angela M.; Pontuschka, Nídia N.; Felipone, Sonia M. N.; dos Santos, Tereza L. F.

2013-01-01

284

Length of Working Life for Men and Women, 1970. Special Labor Force Report 187. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that data from 1970 working life tables indicate that since 1960 worklife expectancy has continued to edge downward for men and to lengthen for women, this report briefly discusses continuing trends in the worklife of men and women from 1900 through 1970. Women's worklife is presented in terms of single women; mothers; widowed, divorced,…

Fullerton, Howard N., Jr.; Byrne, James J.

285

Work Force Education: Beyond Technical Skills. Trends and Issues Alert No. 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brief suggests that during the past 2 decades, the skills needed to succeed in the workplace have changed significantly. Technical skills remain important, but, increasingly, employers recognize another category of skills crucial to a worker's ability to work "smarter, not harder." These "soft,""core,""nontechnical,""essential,""generic," and…

Imel, Susan

286

Occupational Stress and Health of Women LPN's and LSW's: Final Project Report. Working Paper No. 202.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined work and non-workplace sources of stress in the lives of women (N=403) currently employed as health-care providers. Female licensed practical nurses and social workers were sampled because they met the three criteria determined upon for the study; that is, they were all in high-stress occupations; women predominate in those…

Barnett, Rosalind C.; And Others

287

Establishing the computer-patient working alliance in automated health behavior change interventions  

E-print Network

1 Establishing the computer-patient working alliance in automated health behavior change interventions Timothy Bickmore Boston University School of Medicine Boston Medical Center, DOB #1102 720-020 Cambridge, MA 02139 Journal department for consideration: Original Article Corresponding Author: Timothy

288

Contribution of Self-Compassion to Competence and Mental Health in Social Work Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the potential contribution of self-compassion to perceived competence and mental health in master's of social work students (N=65). It was hypothesized that the components of self-compassion (i.e., mindfulness, common humanity, self-kindness, overidentification, isolation, and self-judgment) would impact perceived competence…

Ying, Yu-Wen

2009-01-01

289

Childhood family relationships, marital and work conflict, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the associations among childhood family relationships, adult conflict in marriage and work relationships, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants. The sample consisted of 135 married Mexican immigrants recruited from an ESL program in Southern California. Structural equation modeling was used to test theoretical hypotheses. The model revealed that dysfunctional childhood family relationships predicted dissatisfaction and

Silvia J. Santos; Lisa M. Bohon

1998-01-01

290

Relative Weight, Smoking, and Mental Health as Predictors of Sickness and Absence From Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports a longitudinal study of relative weight, smoking, and mental health as predictors of medically certified sickness and unauthorized absence from work among student nurses (N = 185). Information about smoking, relative weight, and self-reports of somatic complaints and social dysfunction was obtained prior to the 33-month period over which sickness and absence were recorded. Multiple regression was

Katharine R. Parkes

1987-01-01

291

Introduction to the special issue: work-family research in occupational health psychology.  

PubMed

In this introduction, the authors discuss work-family research in the context of occupational health psychology (OHP), describe the special contributions of articles in this special issue, and outline directions for the next generation of research in the field of OHP. PMID:10526834

Westman, M; Piotrkowski, C S

1999-10-01

292

The Social Patterning of Work-Related Insecurity and Its Health Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the association between work-related insecurity and health, with a focus on how this relationship is moderated by social location (gender, age and race). Drawing on longitudinal data from a Canadian labour market survey (1999-2004) the findings show that certain groups have a higher prevalence of exposure to certain types of…

Scott-Marshall, Heather

2010-01-01

293

Non-Production Benefits of Education: Crime, Health, and Good Citizenship. NBER Working Paper No. 16722  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A growing body of work suggests that education offers a wide-range of benefits that extend beyond increases in labor market productivity. Improvements in education can lower crime, improve health, and increase voting and democratic participation. This chapter reviews recent developments on these "non-production" benefits of education with an…

Lochner, Lance

2011-01-01

294

"Joined on Rather than Joined up?" Primary Mental Health Work in Scottish Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Primary mental health workers have been based in West Lothian schools since 2003 to act as links between the community and hospital-based services. The research programme this paper describes aimed to examine how this model worked and its impact for children and their families. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on interviews…

Huddart, Paula

2007-01-01

295

PARTNERING, LEAN CONSTRUCTION AND HEALTH AND SAFETY WORK ON THE CONSTRUCTION SITE: CO-PLAYERS OR  

E-print Network

concepts and H&S at the construction industry level (Focus group interviews with different actors in the construction industry) 45 #12;3. Gathering of examples of practice with new cooperation concepPARTNERING, LEAN CONSTRUCTION AND HEALTH AND SAFETY WORK ON THE CONSTRUCTION SITE: CO

Hansen, René Rydhof

296

A Social Network Approach to Working With Elderly Clients: Training Manual for Mental Health Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual, geared for mental health professionals, demonstrates that social network intervention provides an excellent framework and set of tools for working with the multiple problems of older adults. Social networks are "family" groupings of client, family members, friends and other community supports. The intervention focusses on bonding and…

Paley, Evelyn S., Ed.; Dea, Timothy Patrick, Ed.

297

Barriers to Maternal Workforce Participation and Relationship between Paid Work and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Families of children with disabilities experience extra financial strains, and mothers are frequently unable to participate in paid work because of caregiving obligations. Methods: A mailed survey and follow-up phone calls were used to gather data about mother's health, workforce participation and barriers to inclusion in the workplace…

Bourke-Taylor, H.; Howie, L.; Law, M.

2011-01-01

298

‘Recovery work’ and ‘magic’ among long-term mental health service-users  

PubMed Central

Based on an extended period of qualitative research with mental health service-users in north-east England, this article considers the various forms of ‘magical work’ and ‘recovery work’ that emerge in the lives of people living with severe mental health problems. Given the now sizeable body of literature which seeks to problematize traditional conceptual boundaries of work, the article asks to what extent these hidden and unusual work-forms might also be considered legitimate members of the category. Rather than argue for the expansion of the construct to accommodate these activities, the paper attempts simply to problematize the extent to which so-called ‘mad’ forms of work are irresolvably different to more conventional forms of occupation. In challenging notions of the psychiatric patient as inevitably inactive, new vocabularies for service-user work are explored. Concluding remarks are also directed to recent policy debates concerning ‘back-to-work’ welfare reform for long-term out of work service-users. PMID:24223439

Laws, Jennifer

2013-01-01

299

Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: Clinical intervention science and stress biology research join forces  

PubMed Central

Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child’s body, alterations which may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathology and for society, and we recommend that stress-biology research and intervention science join forces to tackle the problem. We examine the evidence base in relation to stress-sensitive measures for the body (inflammatory reactions, telomere erosion, epigenetic methylation, and gene expression) and brain (mental disorders, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological testing). We also review promising interventions for families, couples, and children that have been designed to reduce the effects of childhood violence exposure. We invite intervention scientists and stress-biology researchers to collaborate in adding stress-biology measures to randomized clinical trials of interventions intended to reduce effects of violence exposure and other traumas on young people. PMID:24342859

Moffitt, Terrie E.

2013-01-01

300

Children working on the streets in Brazil: predictors of mental health problems.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine which factors predict higher risk for mental health problems in children working on the streets. We studied a sample of families that had at least one child working on the streets, from October 2008 to March 2009. The instruments applied were the parent version strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) for children and caregivers, the WorldSAFE core questionnaire, the global assessment of relational functioning scale (GARF), the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school-age children (K-SADS), and a socio-demographic questionnaire. 191 children between 7 and 14 years of age were analyzed; 126 (66%) were working on the streets, and 65 were siblings who did not work on the streets. Multivariate analysis showed that mental health problems in the caregivers, violent behaviors of the caregivers toward the children, absence of a partner living in the house, and lower levels of family functioning increased the risk of mental health problems in the children. Caregivers reported severe forms of physical punishment against their children in 62% of cases. Caregivers who had suffered sexual abuse and emotional negligence in childhood were more violent with their children. Factors that increased risk for mental health symptoms in these children were caregivers' psychopathology, physical punishment at home, single-parent structure, and poor family functioning. Work on the streets did not influence the children's mental health, when multiple risk factors were considered; family characteristics were the most significant in this sample. PMID:23073672

Maciel, Mariana R; Mello, Andrea F; Fossaluza, Victor; Nobrega, Luciana P; Cividanes, Giuliana C; Mari, Jair J; Mello, Marcelo F

2013-03-01

301

MSW Social Work Experience 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca. Evaluation of AB3632,  

E-print Network

1 MSW Social Work Experience Consultant 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca consisting mainly of skid row alcoholics who were overflow from the main county hospital. MSW Social Work care center for their children. Prior to MSW Social Work 11973-1976. Casemanagement. L.A. County Health

Ahmad, Sajjad

302

Force generation and work production by covalently cross-linked actin-myosin cross-bridges in rabbit muscle fibers.  

PubMed Central

To separate a fraction of the myosin cross-bridges that are attached to the thin filaments and that participate in the mechanical responses, muscle fibers were cross-linked with 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide and then immersed in high-salt relaxing solution (HSRS) of 0.6 M ionic strength for detaching the unlinked myosin heads. The mechanical properties and force-generating ability of the cross-linked cross-bridges were tested with step length changes (L-steps) and temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 6-10 degrees C to 30-40 degrees C. After partial cross-linking, when instantaneous stiffness in HSRS was 25-40% of that in rigor, the mechanical behavior of the fibers was similar to that during active contraction. The kinetics of the T-jump-induced tension transients as well as the rate of the fast phase of tension recovery after length steps were close to those in unlinked fibers during activation. Under feedback force control, the T-jump initiated fiber shortening by up to 4 nm/half-sarcomere. Work produced by a cross-linked myosin head after the T-jump was up to 30 x 10(-21) J. When the extent of cross-linking was increased and fiber stiffness in HSRS approached that in rigor, the fibers lost their viscoelastic properties and ability to generate force with a rise in temperature. PMID:8519956

Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

1995-01-01

303

[The contemporary relationship between work, qualification and recognition: repercussions on the Unified Health System (SUS) workers].  

PubMed

This paper discusses the relationship between work, qualification and recognition as it occurs in the field of health today, specifically considering the employability of technical workers in the Unified Health System, the way they perceive the employment relationship with respect to their self-esteem regarding their subjectivities. Based on a review of the relevant literature, the subject is treated in the wider context of ongoing changes in the workplace, which are associated with intensification, flexibility and precariousness of labor relations, with repercussions on the specific aspects mentioned. An attempt is made to establish a critical dialogue with the analytical aspect that emphasizes daily work as a privileged forum for overcoming the contradictions that characterize the field of work and education in the SUS nowadays. The text emphasizes the following issues: analysis of the relationship between work and education from the perspective of the concept of skill; the broadening of the meaning of health work; and a critical evaluation of policies that end up making the workers liable for the quality of services rendered. PMID:23752526

Vieira, Monica; Chinelli, Filippina

2013-06-01

304

Health Conditions and Factors Related to the Work Ability of Teachers  

PubMed Central

This is a cross-sectional study conducted with 258 teachers from nine state schools in two municipalities of São Paulo state with the purpose of assessing their work ability. A questionnaire with socio-demographic and health/work conditions data and the Work Ability Index (WAI) was performed. Most teachers were females, 41.9?yr old on average (SD 9.4), and with an undergraduate degree (95.7%). The work ability was considered good for 42.6% and moderate/low for 35.3%. In linear regressions models, which used the two domain model, the significant variables for a decrease in WAI were: individual perception of a worsening in the health situation (p<0001), having children (p=0.0003 / p=0.0001), difficulty in sleeping well at night (p=0.0009 / p=0.0014), history of physical pain in the previous six months (p<0.0001 / p<0.0001), being a teacher with a contract (p=0.0007) and working as a teacher for a longer time. (p=0.0183). Public investments on the work conditions of teachers are important to recover and to maintain their work ability. PMID:24429517

VEDOVATO, Tatiana Giovanelli; MONTEIRO, Inês

2014-01-01

305

A joining of forces. The promise of community health information management systems (CHIMSs).  

PubMed

Every time you buy a bag of Frito-Lay corn chips, information regarding your purchase becomes part of a customer database within hours. America's snack food "needs" are analyzed and decisions are made about filling the shelves of every corner convenience store in the nation with exactly the right product. This system has saved the company more than $20 million a year through increased efficiency. But when you buy a diagnostic test to identify a potentially life-threatening condition, results can remain unavailable for days. If we can bring computerized efficiencies to marketing corn chips, why aren't we doing it for healthcare? Imagine--managers of community health systems who know their customers' needs so precisely that they "fill the shelves" of local "convenience health stops" with exactly the right services to maximize the health of the customers. As a by-product, they save a few million dollars per year in costs. Managers of other industries use information technology to deliver the right product or service to customers at just the right time, to differentiate their services by adding value, to compete effectively on cost and/or quality. Many members of the healthcare industry, where only 2.6 percent of expenditures go to information systems (compared to 5 percent in manufacturing and 7 percent in banking) and where the basic unit of work--the patient record--is still a manual process, are years behind in their thinking about how information systems can make their business better. PMID:10130480

Hendren, S

1993-11-01

306

Home-based work, human capital accumulation and women's labor force participation  

E-print Network

though these workers may forgo fringe benefits that they would have received if they worked in a workplace, these benefits may not very important to the home-based workers because they can receive such benefits from their spouse?s employers... such as having elders, having children and having a disabled spouse. I did not use the identical set of variables because the dummy variable for rural area is not available in the U.S. Census. The result of a universal logit model is shown in Table 4...

Chutubtim, Piyaluk

2006-10-30

307

[Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire to Brazilian nurses].  

PubMed

Study aiming to cross-culturally adapt the instrument Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ) and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version for nurses. The adaptation process followed the Process of Translation of World Health Organization. Data for the evaluation of the psychometric properties were collected in a teaching public hospital of Ribeirão Preto in 2011. The evaluated psychometric properties were: face validity and content (group of experts), reliability by Cronbach's alpha and test-retest stability. In the evaluation of psychometric properties, the internal consistency of the HPQ adapted version, Cronbach's alpha was 0.94 for the section A and 0.86 for section B of the instrument. In analyzing the agreement of test-retest stability, the agreements were positive and statistically significant. Thus, the HPQ adapted version proved valid and reliable in the sample studied. PMID:24626359

de Campos, Mônica Chiodi-Toscano; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Santos, Jair Licio Ferreira

2013-12-01

308

The health consequences of maquiladora work: women on the US-Mexican border.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. As more US companies take jobs to Mexico, complaints are growing that the assembly plants (maquiladoras) exert adverse effects on workers' health. This study assessed the health of female electronic and garment maquiladora workers, comparing them with women employed in services and non-wage earners. METHODS. A survey was administered to 480 women living in Tijuana in 1990. The sample was stratified by occupation and length of employment. Functional impediments, nervousness, depression, and sense of control were used as outcome variables, controlling for other confounders. RESULTS. Despite working longer hours, receiving lower wages, and having less decision latitude and education, maquiladora workers were not worse off than service workers. Maquiladora workers reported similar incidences of depression and lack of control over life. Electronics workers, especially, had lower incidences of nervousness and functional impediments, after controlling for other confounders. Also, maquiladora work did not add an extra health burden compared with non-wage earners. CONCLUSIONS. The adverse effects of maquiladoras previously reported may have been exaggerated. Subjective factors, including negative attitudes toward economic adversity and work dissatisfaction, were stronger predictors of health than were objective indicators. PMID:8417604

Guendelman, S; Silberg, M J

1993-01-01

309

eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop  

PubMed Central

Background The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. Objective The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. Methods A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. Results The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. Conclusions This paper describes the health care professionals’ competencies and requirements needed for the use of eHealth technologies to support elderly adults to age in place. In addition, this paper underscores the need for further discussion of the changing role of health care professionals working in home care within the context of emerging eHealth care technologies. The findings are of value to local and central government, health care professionals, service delivery organizations, and commissioners of care to use this paper as a framework to conduct and develop competencies for health care professionals working with eHealth technologies. PMID:25075233

Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D

2013-01-01

310

Working conditions, adverse events and mental health problems in a sample of 949 German teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives:  The aim of this study was (1) to explore in detail the working load of teachers, (2) to analyse the extent of negative or\\u000a threatening school-related events teachers are confronted with, and (3) to evaluate mental health strain by applying the general\\u000a health questionnaire (GHQ).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A sample of 949 teachers in 10 grammar schools (German: Gymnasien) and 79 secondary modern

Joachim Bauer; Thomas Unterbrink; Anna Hack; Ruth Pfeifer; Veronika Buhl-Grießhaber; Udo Müller; Helmut Wesche; Markus Frommhold; Reingard Seibt; Klaus Scheuch; Michael Wirsching

2007-01-01

311

Health Status and Health Care Utilization Among New York City Home Attendants: An Illustration of the Needs of Working Poor, Immigrant Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the health needs and health care utilization patterns of home attendants and their families have been studied as an illustration of those likely to be found among working poor, immigrant women and their children. Despite tremendous growth in the number of immigrants, studies to date provide only limited information regarding the specific health needs and patterns of

Beth C. Weitzman; Carolyn A. Berry

1992-01-01

312

Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have conducted work terms in the fields of experimental  

E-print Network

Medical & Health Physics Coop Program Students from the Medical & Health Physics Coop Program have, cancer centres, private industry and government ministries and agencies. Coop Jobs have Included: Medical Safety Student Assistant in Medical Imaging Examples of Medical & Health Physics Coop Work Term Duties

Hitchcock, Adam P.

313

Work and its role in shaping the social gradient in health  

PubMed Central

Adults with better jobs enjoy better health: job title was, in fact, the social gradient metric first used to study the relationship between social class and chronic disease etiology, a core finding now replicated in most developed countries. What has been less well proved is whether this correlation is causal, and if so, through what mechanisms. During the past decade, much research has been directed at these issues.Best evidence in2009 suggests that occupation does affect health. Most recent research on the relationship has been directed at disentangling the pathways through which lower-status work leads to adverse health outcomes. This review focuses on six areas of recent progress: (1) the role of status in a hierarchical occupational system; (2) the roles of psychosocial job stressors; (3) effects of workplace physical and chemical hazard exposures; (4) evidence that work organization matters as a contextual factor; (5) implications for the gradient of new forms of nonstandard or “precarious” employment such as contract and shift work; and (6) emerging evidence that women may be impacted differently by adverse working conditions, and possibly more strongly, than men. PMID:20201870

Clougherty, Jane E.; Souza, Kerry; Cullen, Mark R.

2013-01-01

314

Association between work-related health problems and job insecurity in permanent and temporary employees  

PubMed Central

Objectives This research was conducted with an aim of determining the correlation between job insecurity and an employee’s work-related health problems among permanent and temporary workers. Methods Using the data from the First Korean Working Conditions Survey conducted in 2006, a total of 7,071 workers, excluding employers and the self-employed, were analyzed. Work-related health problems were categorized as backache, headache, abdominal pain, muscular pain, stress, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety or depression. Each problem was then analyzed for its relationship to job insecurity through logistic regression analysis. Results Among the 7,071 workers, 5,294 (74.9%) were permanent workers and 1,777 (25.1%) were temporary workers. For the permanent workers, presence of high or moderate job insecurity appeared more closely linked to backache, headache, abdominal pain, muscular pain, stress, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, and depression compared to absence of job insecurity. However, for the temporary workers, only depression appeared to be associated with the presence of high job insecurity. Conclusion The study showed that the presence of job insecurity is correlated with work-related health problems. The deleterious effects of job insecurity appeared to be stronger in permanent than temporary workers. Additional research should investigate ways to effectively reduce job insecurity. PMID:24472497

2013-01-01

315

Proceedings: The Conference of the University/Urban Schools National Task Force: What Works in Urban Schools (3rd, San Francisco, CA, July 9-10, 1982).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proceedings of the University/Urban Schools Task Force conference on what works in urban schools are summarized in this report. The future direction of the Task Force, articulated by conference participants, is described as a move toward the conceptualization and design of programs to teach thinking skills versus programs that mainly teach subject…

Bossone, Richard M., Ed.

316

HHS announces Text4Health task force recommendations and global partnership:  

Cancer.gov

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced new recommendations to support health text messaging and mobile health (mHealth) programs. The department has been actively exploring means to capitalize on the rapid proliferation of mobile phone technology and platforms, such as text messaging, to develop programs and/or partnerships with the overall aim of improving public health outcomes.

317

Health plan implementation of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force A and B recommendations--Colorado, 2010.  

PubMed

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is aimed at expanding access to health care and lowering cost barriers to seeking and receiving care, particularly high-value preventive care. The legislation requires Medicare and all qualified commercial health plans (except grandfathered individual and employer-sponsored plans) to cover routine preventive services graded A and B by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) at no cost to the consumer, along with recommended immunizations and additional preventive care and screenings for women. In 2009, Colorado passed a law with similar USPTF A and B service coverage requirements. To determine how Colorado health plans had interpreted the state and federal law, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) interviewed representatives of commercial health plans serving Colorado residents. The results of those interviews indicated that different health plans interpreted certain USPSTF recommendations differently, including tobacco screening and pharmacotherapy, colorectal cancer screening, and obesity screening and counseling. One health plan communicated the scope, eligibility criteria, and content of the new preventive services coverage to its members or providers. The differences in interpretation of the USPSTF recommendations and limited communication to consumers or health-care providers in Colorado might be repeated in other states. To ensure optimal consumer and health-care provider utilization of preventive service benefits, the preventive services supported by USPSTF A and B recommendations should be clearly defined in health plan benefit language, with processes put in place for consistent implementation and eligibility criteria communicated to both consumers and providers. The experience in Colorado shows that public health organizations can play a key role in successfully implementing PPACA prevention services provisions. PMID:21976117

2011-10-01

318

Factors influencing the work passion of Chinese community health service workers: an investigation in five provinces  

PubMed Central

Background After the implementation of new healthcare reform, Chinese government paid increasing attention to developing community health service (CHS). The current focus is mainly on cultivating community general practitioners but paying less attention to the working status and occupational demands of in-service CHS workers. Work passion is playing an important role for medical workers. With work passion, CHS workers’ team will become more stable and more effective, ensuring the sustainable development of CHS system. At present, the work passion of CHS workers is relatively low. Studying on influencing factors of work passion of CHS workers, promoting their work passion, and making them keep enthusiasm for work are significant. Methods A total of 100 CHS organizations were sampled randomly in 10 cities from 5 Chinese provinces for this study. A total of 3450 CHS workers from these CHS institutions took part in the surveys. Questionnaires were used to collect data, including socio-demographic information, work passion and opinion on influencing causes, and work-related satisfaction. Pearson chi-square statistical method was used to identify the factors related to CHS workers’ work passion. Binary logistic regression was performed to determine the significant factors that influence CHS workers’ work passion. Results A total of 38.77% of those who accomplished the questionnaire expressed that they didn’t have passion for current work. The related factors that influence CHS workers’ work passion are (1) socio-demographic factors such as age, and years of employment, and (2) other work-related factors such as learning and training opportunities, compensation packages, work stress, and personal development opportunities. CHS workers were most dissatisfied with the balance between remuneration and workload, job promotion opportunities. Conclusions Based on the results, the government should concern for CHS workers’ working status and work-related demands, pay more attention and meet their demands for reasonable compensation packages and self-development, balance the income and workload, provide more learning and training opportunities and personal development opportunities for CHS workers, in order to promote CHS workers’ work satisfaction, improve their work passion and enthusiasm. PMID:24885642

2014-01-01

319

Work structure in the chronic care setting: possible consequences for nurses' mental health.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to add to the body of knowledge on nurses' work environment in order to better understand their collective experience and the reasons for their mental health issues. A psychodynamic approach to work was used. The results show that the main source of nurses' dissatisfaction with their work is the perceived failure of management and other professionals to accord them due recognition, autonomy, and professional power. This situation is largely the result of an inappropriate organization of nurses' work, with nursing responsibilities unmatched by their degree of recognition, autonomy, and power. The author concludes that the organization of nursing must be transformed, not only to lower the rate of absenteeism but also to improve nursing care and enhance the professionalization of nursing. PMID:18947099

Alderson, Marie

2008-09-01

320

Periodic health examination, 1995 update: 3. Screening for visual problems among elderly patients. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations to family physicians for screening elderly patients (over 65 years of age) for visual impairment and its common clinical causes. OPTIONS: Visual acuity screening with Snellen sight chart, funduscopy, retinal photography, tonometry and perimetry. OUTCOMES: Delay or prevention of visual deterioration or blindness. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search for relevant articles published between January 1986 and December 1993 was undertaken, the bibliographies of the articles were scrutinized for additional articles, and experts were consulted. The highest available level of evidence was used in making recommendations. VALUES: The evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. Preservation of vision was given the highest value in accordance with other guidelines regarding eyesight. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Potential benefits are to maintain or improve visual acuity. Potential for harm to patients is minimal. Limited data are available on costs. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is fair evidence to include in the periodic health examination visual acuity testing with a Snellen sight chart and funduscopy or retinal photography in elderly patients with diabetes of at least 5 years' duration (grade B recommendation). The place of funduscopy in the detection of age-related macular degeneration and glaucomatous changes is controversial. For patients at high risk for glaucoma (positive family history, black race, severe myopia or diabetes) it would be prudent to have a periodic assessment by an ophthalmologist. VALIDATION: Recommendations differ from those of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Optometric Association. Recommendations for glaucoma screening are similar to those of the US Preventive Services Task Force. Present recommendations have been reviewed by experts in ophthalmology and optometry. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the task force, which is funded by Health Canada and the National Health Research and Development Program. The principal author (C.P.) was supported in part by the Educational Centre for Aging and Health, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. PMID:7736372

1995-01-01

321

The Gutenberg Health Study: measuring psychosocial factors at work and predicting health and work-related outcomes with the ERI and the COPSOQ questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background Several instruments have been developed to assess psychosocial workload. We compared two of these instruments, the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) with regard to congruent validity and internal validity. Methods This analysis is based on a population-based sample of the baseline examination of 2,783 employees from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS). About half of the participants completed the ERI questionnaire (n?=?1,342), the other half completed the COPSOQ (n?=?1,441). First, the two samples were compared and descriptive analyses were carried out calculating mean values for both instruments in general, then separately for age, gender and main occupational groups. Second, we analyzed the relationship between ERI and COPSOQ scales on the workplace situation and on the workplace outcomes: job satisfaction, general health, burnout, satisfaction with life, by applying stepwise logistic regression analysis. Results and discussion For the majority of occupations, high effort as reflected by the ERI corresponded with high demands as reflected by the COPSOQ. Comparably, high reward (according to ERI) yielded a good agreement with high “influence and development” (according to COPSOQ). However, we could also find differences between ERI and COPSOQ concerning the intensity of psychosocial workload in some occupations (e.g., physicians/pharmacists or warehouse managers/warehousemen/transport workers). These differences point to differing theoretical concepts of ERI and COPSOQ. When the ability of ERI and COPSOQ was examined to determine the associations with health and work outcomes, burnout could be better predicted by the COPSOQ; this might be due to the fact that COPSOQ comprises the constructs “work-privacy conflict” and “emotional demand”, which are closely related to burnout. However, methodological differences between these instruments limit their direct comparability. Conclusions The ERI and COPSOQ instrument yielded similar results for most occupational groups. The slightly stronger association between psychosocial workload as assessed by COPSOQ and burnout might be explained by its broader approach. The ability of the ERI and COPSOQ instrument to reflect relevant risk factors for clinically manifest disorders (e.g., coronary heart disease) will be derived from subsequent prospective analyses of the GHS with the follow-up data. PMID:23734632

2013-01-01

322

Leaving Family for Work: Ambivalence and Mental Health Among Mexican Migrant Farmworker Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men migrating to the United States from Mexico and Central America confront opposing family norms. They need to leave their\\u000a families to gain family economic security; yet, leaving renders their families vulnerable. We examined the mental health implications\\u000a of the opposing family norms inherent in migration using an ambivalence framework. We interviewed 60 Latino migrant farmworkers\\u000a working in North Carolina.

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Sara A. Quandt; Julie Early; Janeth Tapia; Christopher N. Graham; Thomas A. Arcury

2006-01-01

323

A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-print Network

txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand...; and collaborations between local, state, and federal governmental agencies to help restore the watershed. To guide these efforts, the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership (ACWP) was established in 2003. The partnership is made up of more than 700 people...

Wythe, K.

2010-01-01

324

A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health  

E-print Network

txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand...; and collaborations between local, state, and federal governmental agencies to help restore the watershed. To guide these efforts, the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership (ACWP) was established in 2003. The partnership is made up of more than 700 people...

Wythe, Kathy

2010-01-01

325

[Influence of work factors on health state in personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects].  

PubMed

Complex of occupational studies and medical, statistical research helped to reveal climate, geographic and other factors influencing health state of personnel servicing military nuclear technical objects. Considering peculiarities of occupational activities in various specialists, the authors specified measures to improve medical service for nuclear technical military officers directly working with nuclear ammunition. Practical application of the measures helped to gain 1.5-1.7 times improvement in morbidity parameters among nuclear technical military officers. PMID:25069272

Poluboiarinov, V N; Iusov, I G; Ivanchenko, A V; Turlakov, Iu S

2014-01-01

326

The challenges of joint working: lessons from the Supporting People Health Pilot evaluation  

PubMed Central

Purpose This paper reports the findings of the evaluation of the Supporting People Health Pilots programme, which was established to demonstrate the policy links between housing support services and health and social care services by encouraging the development of integrated services. The paper highlights the challenges of working across housing, health and social care boundaries. Method The evaluation of the six health pilots rested on two main sources of data collection: Quarterly Project Evaluation Reports collected process data as well as reporting progress against aims and objectives. Semi-structured interviews—conducted across all key professional stakeholder groups and agencies and with people who used services—explored their experiences of these new services. Results The ability of pilots to work across organisational boundaries to achieve their aims and objectives was associated not only with agencies sharing an understanding of the purpose of the joint venture, a history of joint working and clear and efficient governance arrangements but on two other characteristics: the extent and nature of statutory sector participation and, whether or not the service is defined by a history of voluntary sector involvement. In particular the pilots demonstrated how voluntary sector agencies appeared to be less constrained by organisational priorities and professional agenda and more able to respond flexibly to meet the complex needs of individuals. Conclusion and discussion The pilots demonstrate that integrating services to support people with complex needs works best when the service is determined by the characteristics of those who use the service rather than pre-existing organisational structures. PMID:18043723

Cameron, Ailsa; Macdonald, Geraldine; Turner, William; Lloyd, Liz

2007-01-01

327

Imagining the Flowers, but Working the Rich and Heavy Clay: Participation and Empowerment in Action Research for Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participation of the "target group" is a key concept in working on empowerment in health education. However, it raises many questions and is not without struggle. I will discuss the findings from a study into the state of the art of empowerment in health education, which includes a literature review and the analysis of eight Dutch health-promotion…

Jacobs, Gaby

2006-01-01

328

RISK ASSESSMENT New and Expectant Mothers The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999) include specific  

E-print Network

RISK ASSESSMENT ­ New and Expectant Mothers The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations to the health and safety of the employee? Yes No If there is a risk, please contact Health & Safety for further their employer they are pregnant they are required to conduct a risk assessment and take any appropriate measures

Barker, Jon

329

[Workers' Health Referral Centers and reporting of work-related injuries in Brazil].  

PubMed

This study examines the contribution of Workers' Health Referral Centers (CEREST) to the reporting of severe work-related injuries and those involving exposure to biological materials in the Brazilian National Health Reporting System (SINAN), under the Unified National Health System (SUS). The study used data from the Form-SUS and SINAN databases, aggregated for the CEREST coverage areas. Valid data were obtained for 125 CEREST (23 State and 102 regional). A majority of the CEREST were assessed as fully installed. The increase in the reporting of severe work-related accidents was greater when staffing was consistent with the demand, and when teams responded to external demands, including those of the media. For exposures to biological material, CEREST with good physical installations, those that responded to media demands, and those with trained personnel in the sentinel network showed a higher increase in reporting. Infrastructure, staff numbers and training, and responding to external demands are important for increasing notification of work-related accidents and should be prioritized in order to reduce the major underreporting of such accidents. PMID:22267074

Galdino, Adriana; Santana, Vilma Sousa; Ferrite, Silvia

2012-01-01

330

Disability, Work and Cash Benefits.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 13 papers from a workshop convened to explore the causes of work disability and the types of interventions that might enable individuals to remain at work, return to work, or enter the work force for the first time, despite having chronic health conditions or impairments. Following an overview of the papers by editors Jerry L.…

Mashaw, Jerry L., Ed.; And Others

331

Traumatic events, other operational stressors and physical and mental health reported by Australian Defence Force personnel following peacekeeping and war-like deployments  

PubMed Central

Background The association between stressful events on warlike deployments and subsequent mental health problems has been established. Less is known about the effects of stressful events on peacekeeping deployments. Methods Two cross sectional studies of the Australian Defence Force were used to contrast the prevalence of exposures reported by a group deployed on a peacekeeping operation (Bougainville, n?=?1704) and those reported by a group deployed on operations which included warlike and non-warlike exposures (East Timor, n?=?1333). A principal components analysis was used to identify groupings of non-traumatic exposures on deployment. Multiple regression models were used to assess the association between self-reported objective and subjective exposures, stressors on deployment and subsequent physical and mental health outcomes. Results The principal components analysis produced four groups of non-traumatic stressors which were consistent between the peacekeeping and more warlike deployments. These were labelled ‘separation’, ‘different culture’, ‘other people’ and ‘work frustration’. Higher levels of traumatic and non-traumatic exposures were reported by veterans of East Timor compared to Bougainville. Higher levels of subjective traumatic exposures were associated with increased rates of PTSD in East Timor veterans and more physical and psychological health symptoms in both deployed groups. In Bougainville and East Timor veterans some non-traumatic deployment stressors were also associated with worse health outcomes. Conclusion Strategies to best prepare, identify and treat those exposed to traumatic events and other stressors on deployment should be considered for Defence personnel deployed on both warlike and peacekeeping operations. PMID:22830494

2012-01-01

332

Labor Force  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

2012-01-01

333

Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes…

Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

2015-01-01

334

Multiple forces working in unison: the case of rapid improvement of vital statistics in South Africa post-1996.  

PubMed

In a period of about five years, from 1997 to 2002, South Africa remarkably improved the coverage and production of its vital statistics. This period witnessed the entrance of South Africa into the select league of countries that publish statistics on multiple causes of death and that make use automatic coding of causes of death. These achievements were accomplished through multiple forces working in unison. Some of the important factors contributing to the achievement were lessons learned from study tours to Australia, Sweden and the U.S.A. The paper describes these lessons and how they were adapted to suit the South African reality. Comparison is made between the status of demographic statistics by the end of apartheid and in the post-apartheid era. Stakeholder relationships that shaped the transformation of demographic statistics in the new South Africa are also discussed. PMID:20039594

Bah, Sulaiman

2009-01-01

335

Health of the American Indian. Report of a Regional Task Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Good health is the result of such factors as sanitation, adequate housing and clothing, nutritional food, and a health delivery system which protects against contagious diseases by immunization, provides for early detection and treatment, provides health education to promote practices that will prevent diseases, and gives services in a culturally…

Michal, Mary L.; And Others

336

Women Who Work, Part 2: Married Women in the Labour Force: The Influence of Age, Education, Child-Bearing Status and Residence. Special Labour Force Studies Series B, No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To followup an earlier study of the relative importance of age, education, and marital status as variables influencing female participation in the labor force, this research attempts to measure the relative importance of similar factors in determining whether or not a woman works or wishes to work. Particular emphasis was given to such…

Allingham, John D.; Spencer, Byron G.

337

Adolescent ADHD and Adult Physical and Mental Health, Work Performance, and Financial Stress  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: There is a scarcity of longitudinal studies of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) followed until adulthood. We studied the relationship between ADHD in adolescence and impaired general physical health, impaired general mental health, antisocial personality disorder, impaired work performance, and high financial stress in adulthood. METHODS: A prospective design incorporated 6 assessments of participants spanning mean ages from 14 to 37 years. Two baseline assessments were taken between ages 14 and 16 years, and 5 outcome assessments were taken at mean age 37 years. Participants were assessed with structured interviews and questionnaires. The participants were from a community sample of individuals initially drawn in 1975 and followed to a mean age of 37 years in 2009. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ADHD in adolescence as related to internal stress in adulthood were 1.82 (95% CI = 1.01–3.25; P < .05) for impaired general physical health, 2.36 (95% CI = 1.23–4.51; P < .01) for impaired general mental health, and 3.28 (95% CI = 1.51–7.13; P < .01) for antisocial personality disorder. The adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs for ADHD in adolescence as related to external stress were 2.46 (95% CI = 1.37–4.43; P < .01) for impaired work performance and 3.33 (95% CI = 1.70–6.55; P < .001) for high financial stress. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should focus on early diagnosis and treatment of adolescent ADHD because it is a major predictor of an array of physical, mental, work, and financial problems in adulthood. PMID:23230074

Brook, David W.; Zhang, Chenshu; Seltzer, Nathan; Finch, Stephen J.

2013-01-01

338

What elements of the work environment are most responsible for health worker dissatisfaction in rural primary care clinics in Tanzania?  

PubMed Central

Background In countries with high maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality, reliable access to quality healthcare in rural areas is essential to save lives. Health workers who are satisfied with their jobs are more likely to remain in rural posts. Understanding what factors influence health workers’ satisfaction can help determine where resources should be focused. Although there is a growing body of research assessing health worker satisfaction in hospitals, less is known about health worker satisfaction in rural, primary health clinics. This study explores the workplace satisfaction of health workers in primary health clinics in rural Tanzania. Methods Overall, 70 health workers in rural Tanzania participated in a self-administered job satisfaction survey. We calculated mean ratings for 17 aspects of the work environment. We used principal components analysis (PCA) to identify groupings of these variables. We then examined the bivariate associations between health workers demographics and clinic characteristics and each of the satisfaction scales. Results Results showed that 73.9% of health workers strongly agreed that they were satisfied with their job; however, only 11.6% strongly agreed that they were satisfied with their level of pay and 2.9% with the availability of equipment and supplies. Two categories of factors emerged from the PCA: the tools and infrastructure to provide care, and supportive interpersonal environment. Nurses and medical attendants (compared to clinical officers) and older health workers had higher satisfaction scale ratings. Conclusions Two dimensions of health workers’ work environment, namely infrastructure and supportive interpersonal work environment, explained much of the variation in satisfaction among rural Tanzanian health workers in primary health clinics. Health workers were generally more satisfied with supportive interpersonal relationships than with the infrastructure. Human resource policies should consider how to improve these two aspects of work as a means for improving health worker morale and potentially rural attrition. Trial registration (ISRCTN 17107760) PMID:25086596

2014-01-01

339

Validating a work group climate assessment tool for improving the performance of public health organizations  

PubMed Central

Background This article describes the validation of an instrument to measure work group climate in public health organizations in developing countries. The instrument, the Work Group Climate Assessment Tool (WCA), was applied in Brazil, Mozambique, and Guinea to assess the intermediate outcomes of a program to develop leadership for performance improvement. Data were collected from 305 individuals in 42 work groups, who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Methods The WCA was initially validated using Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient and exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a second validation study to refine the initial analyses to account for nested data, to provide item-level psychometrics, and to establish construct validity. Analyses included eigenvalue decomposition analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and validity and reliability analyses. Results This study confirmed the validity and reliability of the WCA across work groups with different demographic characteristics (gender, education, management level, and geographical location). The study showed that there is agreement between the theoretical construct of work climate and the items in the WCA tool across different populations. The WCA captures a single perception of climate rather than individual sub-scales of clarity, support, and challenge. Conclusion The WCA is useful for comparing the climates of different work groups, tracking the changes in climate in a single work group over time, or examining differences among individuals' perceptions of their work group climate. Application of the WCA before and after a leadership development process can help work groups hold a discussion about current climate and select a target for improvement. The WCA provides work groups with a tool to take ownership of their own group climate through a process that is simple and objective and that protects individual confidentiality. PMID:16223447

Perry, Cary; LeMay, Nancy; Rodway, Greg; Tracy, Allison; Galer, Joan

2005-01-01

340

Ergonomic work analysis as a tool of prevention for the occupational safety and health management system.  

PubMed

This paper introduces the Ergonomic Work Analysis as a relevant instrument to identify the risks in occupational environments through the investigation of factors that influence the relationship between the worker and the productive process. It draws a parallel between the several aspects of risk identification in traditional tools of Health and Safety Management and the factors embraced by the Ergonomic Work Analysis, showing that the ergonomic methodology is able to go deeper in the scenarios of possible incident causes. This deepening enables the establishment of a relationship between the work context and the upcoming damage to the physical integrity of the worker. It acts as a complementary instrument in the traditional approach to the risk management. In order to explain the application of this methodology in a preventive way, it is presented a case study of a coal mill inspector in a siderurgic company. PMID:22317219

de Miranda Prottes, Verônica; Oliveira, Nádia Cristina; de Oliveira Andrade, Alessandra Barbosa

2012-01-01

341

WORKING PAPER N 2013 38 Child health and use of health care services in France: Evidence on  

E-print Network

of income in child anthropometric measurements. Whenever possible, we compare our results for France the correlation between household income, child general health, specific health problems, anthropometric. In addition, income is strongly correlated with anthropometric characteristics. The use of health care

Boyer, Edmond

342

The relationship between health promoting resources and work participation in a sample reporting musculoskeletal pain from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, HUNT 3, Norway  

PubMed Central

Background Musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is one of the most frequent causes of sick leave from work, and is a common and potentially disabling condition. This study is based on the salutogenic perspective and investigates the relationship between personal, social, and functional health resources and work participation in a population reporting MSP. Method Analysis was performed on cross sectional data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, HUNT 3, in Norway. The sample of n= 6702 was extracted from HUNT 3, including a total of N= 50807 participants. Self-reported health (SRH) and, personal, social, and functional resources were assessed by a questionnaire. Reported sick leave was collected by interview at the point of time when the data were collected, from October 2006 until June 2008. Results Logistic regression analysis demonstrated statistically significant differences between the work group and sick leave group in self-rated health, work support, work control, work load, and feeling strong, and the model predicted 68% of the cases correctly. Females had a lower statistically significant probability (B= ?.53) to be in the work group then men when suffering from MSP, with odds of 41%. Conclusion There was a statistically significant relationship between health promoting resources such as SRH, feeling strong, absence of neuroticism, work load, work control, and work participation in MSP population. PMID:23509959

2013-01-01

343

'Between the demands of truth and government': health practitioners, trust and immunisation work.  

PubMed

Applied and theoretical work on health governance and governmentality has often not engaged with the perspectives of practitioners and, in particular, with their understandings about trust. In this paper, we address these absences through looking at a critical technology of governmentality--child immunisation. We do this, first, by examining theoretical links between risk, trust and knowledge in relation to the governance of health. We then draw on findings from our secondary analysis of qualitative data based on interviews with key actors in primary care in Scotland charged with the delivery of a particular immunisation--the MMR vaccine. While many practitioners, like parents, have typically perceived immunisation--along with other public health initiatives-as obligatory and as part of 'good citizenship', we argue that in relation to MMR and in the context of clinical governance, practitioners are having to engage in complex negotiations about knowledge and trust--negotiations that are at the heart of governing health at a distance. PMID:16046042

Brownlie, Julie; Howson, Alexandra

2006-01-01

344

Australia's model work health and safety regulations and medical fitness requirements for professional divers.  

PubMed

In my recent roles as Education Officer for SPUMS and also SPUMS representative on Standards Australia, there were frequent queries regarding the requirements for professional diving medicals in Australia. The requirements for Australia have been set by Australian Federal Government Legislation: Australian model work health and safety regulations (4 November 2011). The legislation requires the medical practitioner providing certification of divers to be registered in Australia. In keeping with this legislation, the 2014 version of Australian/New Zealand Standard 2299.1 will separate the medical requirements for divers depending in which country they are working. New Zealand has a centralised registry and health review system for its professional diver medicals, whereas this is not the case in Australia. In the new Australian model work, health and safety regulations, the section on Diving work commences on page 177, section 4.8. The legislation requires that all occupational divers receive a "current certificate of medical fitness to dive by a doctor with appropriate training in underwater medicine". By the legislated reference to AS2299.1:2007,2 the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society is referred to as the appropriate body to provide information on training courses in diving medicine for medical practitioners. The following is offered for guidance, and the linkages for this mandate are as follows: (The page numbers referred to are in the model work, health and safety regulations) Definition of "appropriate training in underwater medicine" (Page 4): Appropriate training in underwater medicine means training that results in knowledge of the matters specified in clause M3 of Appendix M to AS/NZS 2299.1:2007 (Occupational diving operations-Standard operational practice). The requirement for workers to hold a "current certificate of medical fitness" (Page 177, clause 168) Division 2 General diving work - Fitness and competence of worker 168 Person conducting business or undertaking must ensure fitness of workers. A person conducting a business or undertaking at a workplace must not direct or allow a worker to carry out general diving work or undergo training for general diving work unless the worker holds a current certificate of medical fitness. Definition of "fitness criteria" (Page 19): Fitness criteria, in relation to diving work, means the fitness criteria specified in clause M4 of Appendix M to AS/NZS 2299.1:2007 (Occupational diving operations- standard operational practice) M 4.1 General: The following bodily systems Paragraphs M 4.2 to M 4.14) should be evaluated from the diver's history and the medical examination. Where relevant, numerical values are given for certain medical fitness requirements. The paragraphs M 4.2 to M 4.14 then cover a comprehensive assessment of body systems that can only be carried out with a medical assessment which includes a physical examination. Definition of "current" (Page 15): Current certificate of medical fitness means a certificate of medical fitness that: (a) was issued within the past 12 months; and (b) has not expired or been revoked. Requirement that the certificate is issued by a registered medical practitioner with "appropriate training in underwater medicine" (Page 178, clause 169); 169 Certificate of medical fitness. A certificate of medical fitness must: be issued by a registered medical practitioner with appropriate training in underwater medicine. and (E) Definition of "registered medical practitioner" (Page 39): Registered medical practitioner means a person registered under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law to practise in the medical profession (other than as a student). PMID:25596840

Smart, David

2014-12-01

345

Environmental Health Research Recommendations from the Inter-Environmental Health Sciences Core Center Working Group on Unconventional Natural Gas Drilling Operations  

PubMed Central

Background: Unconventional natural gas drilling operations (UNGDO) (which include hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling) supply an energy source that is potentially cleaner than liquid or solid fossil fuels and may provide a route to energy independence. However, significant concerns have arisen due to the lack of research on the public health impact of UNGDO. Objectives: Environmental Health Sciences Core Centers (EHSCCs), funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), formed a working group to review the literature on the potential public health impact of UNGDO and to make recommendations for needed research. Discussion: The Inter-EHSCC Working Group concluded that a potential for water and air pollution exists that might endanger public health, and that the social fabric of communities could be impacted by the rapid emergence of drilling operations. The working group recommends research to inform how potential risks could be mitigated. Conclusions: Research on exposure and health outcomes related to UNGDO is urgently needed, and community engagement is essential in the design of such studies. Citation: Penning TM, Breysse PN, Gray K, Howarth M, Yan B. 2014. Environmental health research recommendations from the Inter-Environmental Health Sciences Core Center Working Group on Unconventional Natural Gas Drilling Operations. Environ Health Perspect 122:1155–1159;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408207 PMID:25036093

Breysse, Patrick N.; Gray, Kathleen; Howarth, Marilyn; Yan, Beizhan

2014-01-01

346

The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals  

PubMed Central

Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental) health and work performance. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a three arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals. Two strategies for this WHS mental module will be compared along with data from a control group. Additionally, the cost effectiveness of the approaches will be evaluated from a societal perspective. Methods The study is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial consisting of three arms (two intervention groups, 1 control group) with randomization at ward level. The study population consists of 86 departments in one Dutch academic medical center with a total of 1731 nurses and allied health professionals. At baseline, after three months and after six months of follow-up, outcomes will be assessed by online questionnaires. In both intervention arms, participants will complete a screening to detect problems in mental health and work functioning and receive feedback on their screening results. In cases of impairments in mental health or work functioning in the first intervention arm, a consultation with an occupational physician will be offered. The second intervention arm offers a choice of self-help e-mental health interventions, which will be tailored based on each individual's mental health state and work functioning. The primary outcomes will be help-seeking behavior and work functioning. Secondary outcomes will be mental health and wellbeing. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness in both intervention arms will be assessed, and a process evaluation will be performed. Discussion When it is proven effective compared to a control group, a WHS mental module for nurses and allied health professionals could be implemented and used on a regular basis by occupational health services in hospitals to improve employees' mental health and work functioning. Trial Registration NTR2786 PMID:21569282

2011-01-01

347

Relating the Stored Magnetic Energy of a Parallel-Plate Inductor to the Work of External Forces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Idealized models are often used in introductory physics courses. For one, such models involve simple mathematics, which is a definite plus since complex mathematical manipulations quickly become an obstacle rather than a tool for a beginner. Idealized models facilitate a student's understanding and grasp of a given physical phenomenon, yet they convey the essential elements of a sometimes intricate and abstract physical concept. It is thus worthwhile to use available models, or to develop new ones, for use in the introductory classroom. Early discussions of electric energy storage within the framework of the infinite parallel-plate capacitor model are an excellent case in point. In this case one can show, through relatively simple mathematical manipulations, that the work done by an external agent in order to increase the separation between the plates is equal to the corresponding change in the electrical energy of the system. The purpose of this paper is to show that a similar model can also be used to discuss magnetic energy storage based on a calculation of the work done by the external forces that act on the system, a subject that is greatly neglected at the introductory level. We examine this system next.

Gauthier, N.

2007-11-01

348

All part of the job? The contribution of the psychosocial and physical work environment to health inequalities in Europe and the European health divide.  

PubMed

This study is the first to examine the contribution of both psychosocial and physical risk factors to occupational inequalities in self-assessed health in Europe. Data from 27 countries were obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey for men and women aged 16 to 60 (n = 21,803). Multilevel logistic regression analyses (random intercept) were applied, estimating odds ratios of reporting less than good health. Analyses indicate that physical working conditions account for a substantial proportion of occupational inequalities in health in both Central/Eastern and Western Europe. Physical, rather than psychosocial, working conditions seem to have the largest effect on self-assessed health in manual classes. For example, controlling for physical working conditions reduced the inequalities in the prevalence of"less than good health" between the lowest (semi- and unskilled manual workers) and highest (higher controllers) occupational groups in Europe by almost 50 percent (Odds Ratio 1.87, 95% Confidence Interval 1.62-2.16 to 1.42, 1.23-1.65). Physical working conditions contribute substantially to health inequalities across "post-industrial" Europe, with women in manual occupations being particularly vulnerable, especially those living in Central/Eastern Europe. An increased political and academic focus on physical working conditions is needed to explain and potentially reduce occupational inequalities in health. PMID:24919305

Toch, Marlen; Bambra, Clare; Lunau, Thorsten; van der Wel, Kjetil A; Witvliet, Margot I; Dragano, Nico; Eikemo, Terje A

2014-01-01

349

Gender, Empowerment, and Health: What Is It? How Does It Work?  

PubMed Central

As the HIV/AIDS epidemic has progressed, the role of gender inequality in its transmission has become increasingly apparent. Nearly half of those living with the virus worldwide are women, and women's subordination to men increases their risk of infection and makes it harder for them to access treatment once infected. Men, too, suffer from harmful gender norms-the expectation that they will behave in ways that heighten their risk of HIV infection and that they will be cavalier about seeking health care increases their vulnerability to the disease. In the Middle East and North Africa, HIV infection rates are low, but changing gender norms have the potential to accelerate the spread of the disease if gender inequality is not addressed. Improving women's education, workforce participation, and social and political opportunities is crucial to strengthening health in the region. Work with men to shift gender imbalances is a further important task for the region's policymakers and civil society groups. PMID:19553784

Ehrhardt, Anke A.; Sawires, Sharif; McGovern, Terry; Peacock, Dean; Weston, Mark

2011-01-01

350

Undocumented Migrants in Canada: A scope literature review on health, access to services, and working conditions  

PubMed Central

It is estimated that there are 30 to 40 million undocumented workers worldwide. Although undocumented migration has become an issue of high international relevance, it has been strikingly understudied in Canada, especially with respect to its impact on health. The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of undocumentedness in Canada through a scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish between 2002 and 2008. The specific aims are to: i) summarize and disseminate current academic and community-based findings on the health, service access and working conditions of undocumented migrants in Canada; ii) examine the sources and use of evidence; iii) identify significant gaps in existing knowledge; iv) set recommendations for policy and research, including considerations on transnationalism, ethics, interdisciplinary approaches, gender differences, resilience, and impact on the children of non-status parents. PMID:19657739

Carrasco, Christine; Gastaldo, Denise

2011-01-01

351

[Work regulation in the context of new public versus private relations in health].  

PubMed

This work discusses the management of the work relations in the context of the new systems of public vs. private relation in health, having as reference the experience of the habilitation of Social Organizations (SO), responsible for the administration of a group of hospitals in the state of São Paulo. The urgency in this kind of management supported on the legal figure of the SO has implications in the management of Human Resources in Health (HRH) through the adoption of flexibilization mechanisms which include ways of selection, hiring and dismissal, payment rules and functional progression similar to the actions adopted by the market. The establishment of this sort of administration refers to the new paradigm proposed by the managerial administrative reform which suggests the exhaustion of the bureaucratic model to promote adjustment of the public administration to the transformations originated in the new stage of internationalization of the economy and its unfolding in the work world, as well as to the new standards of requirements of performance of the public field. Aspects related to the management of HHR are approached in the two ruling modalities in the Secretaria de Estado da Saúde de São Paulo: Direct Administration Hospitals (DAH) and units organized under the SO model (SOH). PMID:20802882

Barbosa, Nelson Bezerra

2010-08-01

352

The Effect of the Children's Health Insurance Program on Pediatricians' Work Hours  

PubMed Central

Objective Our study examines changes in physicians' work hours in response to a coverage expansion. Methods We use as a natural experiment the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which was established in 1997 and significantly expanded children's eligibility for public health insurance coverage. The magnitude of the CHIP expansion varied across states and over time, allowing its effects to be identified using a state-year fixed effects model. We focus on pediatricians, and we measure their self-reported work hours using multiple waves (pre- and post-CHIP) of the physician survey component of the Community Tracking Study. To address endogeneity concerns, we instrument for CHIP enrollment using key program features (income eligibility cutoffs and waiting times). Results We find a large negative relationship between the magnitude of a state's CHIP expansion and trends in pediatricians' work hours. This relationship could be due to key supply-side features of CHIP, including relatively low provider reimbursements and heavy use of managed care tools. PMID:24753962

He, Fang; White, Chapin

2013-01-01

353

Scale Refinement and Initial Evaluation of a Behavioral Health Function Measurement Tool for Work Disability Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Objectives To use item response theory (IRT) data simulations to construct and perform initial psychometric testing of a newly developed instrument, the Social Security Administration Behavioral Health Function (SSA-BH) instrument, that aims to assess behavioral health functioning relevant to the context of work. Design Cross-sectional survey followed by item response theory (IRT) calibration data simulations Setting Community Participants A sample of individuals applying for SSA disability benefits, claimants (N=1015), and a normative comparative sample of US adults (N=1000) Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure Social Security Administration Behavioral Health Function (SSA-BH) measurement instrument Results Item response theory analyses supported the unidimensionality of four SSA-BH scales: Mood and Emotions (35 items), Self-Efficacy (23 items), Social Interactions (6 items), and Behavioral Control (15 items). All SSA-BH scales demonstrated strong psychometric properties including reliability, accuracy, and breadth of coverage. High correlations of the simulated 5- or 10- item CATs with the full item bank indicated robust ability of the CAT approach to comprehensively characterize behavioral health function along four distinct dimensions. Conclusions Initial testing and evaluation of the SSA-BH instrument demonstrated good accuracy, reliability, and content coverage along all four scales. Behavioral function profiles of SSA claimants were generated and compared to age and sex matched norms along four scales: Mood and Emotions, Behavioral Control, Social Interactions, and Self-Efficacy. Utilizing the CAT based approach offers the ability to collect standardized, comprehensive functional information about claimants in an efficient way, which may prove useful in the context of the SSA’s work disability programs. PMID:23542404

Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M.; Chan, Leighton; Rasch, Elizabeth K.; Brandt, Diane E.; Jette, Alan M.

2014-01-01

354

Work, Diabetes and Obesity: A Seven Year Follow-Up Study among Danish Health Care Workers  

PubMed Central

Objectives The rise in prevalence of diabetes is alarming and research ascribes most of the increase to lifestyle. However, little knowledge exists about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study estimates the importance of work and lifestyle as risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus among healthcare workers and explores the association of work factors and obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. Methods Questionnaire-based prospective cohort study among 7,305 health care workers followed for seven years in the Danish National Diabetes Register. We used bivariate comparisons to give an unadjusted estimate of associations, followed by adjusted survival analysis and logistic regression models to estimate the influences of potential risk factors related to job, health and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity. Results During seven years of follow up, 3.5% of participants developed diabetes, associated with obesity (HR ?=? 6.53; 95% CI 4.68–9.10), overweight (HR ?=? 2.89; CI 2.11–3.96) age 50–69 y (HR ?=? 2.27; 95% CI 1.57–3.43) and high quality of leadership (HR ?=? 1.60; CI 1.19–2.16). Obesity at baseline was most common among the youngest employees, and was mainly associated with developing diabetes (OR ?=? 3.84; CI 2.85–5.17), impaired physical capacity and physical inactivity. In the occupational setting, obesity was associated with shift work, severe musculoskeletal pain, low influence, but also by good management, fewer role conflicts and a positive work-life balance. Looking only at non-smokers, removed the influence of age and pain. However, non-smokers also had higher depression scores and more role conflicts. Conclusions Confirming obesity as the strongest risk factor for developing diabetes, the present study identified few occupational risk factors. However, obesity, the key risk factor for diabetes, had a more variable relation with work than did diabetes. PMID:25068830

Poulsen, Kjeld; Cleal, Bryan; Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars L.

2014-01-01

355

Granal stacking of thylakoid membranes in higher plant chloroplasts: the physicochemical forces at work and the functional consequences that ensue.  

PubMed

The formation of grana in chloroplasts of higher plants is examined in terms of the subtle interplay of physicochemical forces of attraction and repulsion. The attractive forces between two adjacent membranes comprise (1) van der Waals attraction that depends on the abundance and type of atoms in each membrane, on the distance between the membranes and on the dielectric constant, (2) depletion attraction that generates local order by granal stacking at the expense of greater disorder (i.e. entropy) in the stroma, and (3) an electrostatic attraction of opposite charges located on adjacent membranes. The repulsive forces comprise (1) electrostatic repulsion due to the net negative charge on the outer surface of thylakoid membranes, (2) hydration repulsion that operates at small separations between thylakoid membranes due to layers of bound water molecules, and (3) steric hindrance due to bulky protrusions of Photosystem I (PSI) and ATP synthase into the stroma. In addition, specific interactions may occur, but they await experimental demonstration. Although grana are not essential for photosynthesis, they are ubiquitous in higher plants. Grana may have been selected during evolution for the functional advantages that they confer on higher plants. The functional consequences of grana stacking include (1) enhancement of light capture through a vastly increased area-to-volume ratio and connectivity of several PSIIs with large functional antenna size, (2) the ability to control the lateral separation of PSI from PSII and, therefore, the balanced distribution of excitation energy between two photosystems working in series, (3) the reversible fine-tuning of energy distribution between the photosystems by State 1-State 2 transitions, (4) the ability to regulate light-harvesting via controlled thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy, detected as non-photochemical quenching, (5) dynamic flexibility in the light reactions mediated by a granal structure in response to regulation by a trans-thylakoid pH gradient, (6) delaying the premature degradation of D1 and D2 reaction-centre protein(s) in PSII by harbouring photoinactived PSIIs in appressed granal domains, (7) enhancement of the rate of non-cyclic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as well as the regulation of non-cyclic vs. cyclic ATP synthesis, and (8) the potential increase of photosynthetic capacity for a given composition of chloroplast constituents in full sunlight, concomitantly with enhancement of photochemical efficiency in canopy shade. Hence chloroplast ultrastructure and function are intimately intertwined. PMID:16307126

Chow, Wah Soon; Kim, Eun-Ha; Horton, Peter; Anderson, Jan M

2005-12-01

356

Work stress, work motivation and their effects on job satisfaction in community health workers: a cross-sectional survey in China  

PubMed Central

Objective It is well documented that both work stress and work motivation are key determinants of job satisfaction. The aim of this study was to examine levels of work stress and motivation and their contribution to job satisfaction among community health workers in Heilongjiang Province, China. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Heilongjiang Province, China. Participants The participants were 930 community health workers from six cities in Heilongjiang Province. Primary and secondary outcome measures Multistage sampling procedures were used to measure socioeconomic and demographic status, work stress, work motivation and job satisfaction. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess key determinants of job satisfaction. Results There were significant differences in some subscales of work stress and work motivation by some of the socioeconomic characteristics. Levels of overall stress perception and scores on all five work stress subscales were higher in dissatisfied workers relative to satisfied workers. However, levels of overall motivation perception and scores on the career development, responsibility and recognition motivation subscales were higher in satisfied respondents relative to dissatisfied respondents. The main determinants of job satisfaction were occupation; age; title; income; the career development, and wages and benefits subscales of work stress; and the recognition, responsibility and financial subscales of work motivation. Conclusions The findings indicated considerable room for improvement in job satisfaction among community health workers in Heilongjiang Province in China. Healthcare managers and policymakers should take both work stress and motivation into consideration, as two subscales of work stress and one subscale of work motivation negatively influenced job satisfaction and two subscales of work motivation positively influenced job satisfaction. PMID:24902730

Li, Li; Hu, Hongyan; Zhou, Hao; He, Changzhi; Fan, Lihua; Liu, Xinyan; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Heng; Sun, Tao

2014-01-01

357

Is health, measured by work ability index, affected by 12-hour rotating shift schedules?  

PubMed

Two forms of continuously forward rotating 12-h shift schedules exist at BASF's Ludwigshafen site. These shift schedules were compared with a daytime working system to investigate potential differential effects on employee's health status assessed with the Work Ability Index (WAI). In the 3 x 12 system, a 12-h day shift is followed 24 h later by a 12-h night shift, and after a day off the employee returns to the day shift. The 4 x 12 schedule follows the same pattern except that there are 2 days off between the night and next day shift. A total of 924 participants (278 3 x 12 and 321 4 x 12 shiftworkers and 325 day workers) were recruited. A self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain information about shiftwork schedule, demographic characteristics, and lifestyle and social factors, and the WAI was applied. The outcomes of interest were the WAI sum score and its seven dimensions. In examining the relationship with the WAI categories, a Proportional Odds Model (POM) was used to identify the potential determinants. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the impact of age on single dimensions of WAI after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Increasing age and obesity (BMI > or = 30) were the only significant determinants of poorer WAI. Although a positive association was found linking the second WAI dimension (work ability in relation to job demands) with age, an inverse association was demonstrated consistently between age and the third and fourth WAI dimensions, i.e., number of diagnosed diseases and estimated work impairment due to disease, after adjustment for potential confounders. The age-dependency was moderate overall, but seemed to be stronger among shift- than day workers, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant differential impact of the working time systems on the WAI sum score or on the individual WAI dimensions. Thus, there is no indication of an excessive adverse health impact of these shift schedules compared to day work, to the extent that health can be measured by the WAI. PMID:20636221

Yong, Mei; Nasterlack, Michael; Pluto, Rolf-Peter; Elmerich, Kathrin; Karl, Dorothee; Knauth, Peter

2010-07-01

358

Public Health Preparedness and Response to Chemical and Radiological Incidents: Functions, Practices, and Areas for Future Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 66 page report released in August 2009 looks into the world of public health emergency preparedness, and for those persons who work in the fields of emergency response policy, public health, or security studies, this work will be most timely. Authored by five researchers at the RAND Corporation this technical report looks into "the roles of the public health service in emergency preparedness and its response to chemical and radiological incidents." The report is divided into four chapters, two appendices, and a references section. As events like nuclear plant accidents, chemical terrorism, and other related occurrences can have tremendous implications for public health, the report is most valuable.

Latourrette, Tom

359

Burnout among women: associations with demographic\\/socio-economic, work, life-style and health factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  This study examined the occurrence of low\\/high burnout among women and the demographic\\/socio-economic, work, life-style, and\\u000a health “correlates” of high burnout. The sample consisted of 6.000 randomly selected women from the general population, of\\u000a which 3.591 participated. The design was cross-sectional. The univariate analyses showed that about 21% of the women had high\\u000a burnout, and compared to those with low

J. J. F. Soares; G. Grossi; Ö. Sundin

2007-01-01

360

[Influence of hazardous work conditions of chemical production on health state of the aged workers].  

PubMed

Influence of hazardous work conditions of chemical production on health state of the aged workers. When compared with the group aged under 45 years, prevalence of nervous, cardiovascular and locomotor diseases is 1.5-4 times higher in workers aged over 45 and engaged into main occupations (device operators, operators, fitters) in production of organic glass, dichloroethane, polyurethane foam and subjected continuously to chemicals 2 and more times exceeding MAC. The authors suggest ways to reduce risk of occupationally mediated diseases in aged workers presenting 30-60% of the workshop staffers in the industries studied. PMID:19663179

Kaliaganov, P I; Troshin, V V; Smetanina, O I; Gobeeva, O V; Frolova, S V; Ashirova, S A

2009-01-01

361

A Study of the Participation of Women in the Health Care Industry Labor Force. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to explore the relationship between socioeconomic and personal circumstances of women in health occupations and their labor market behavior. Using a conceptual framework (the Life Patterning Process), discussions were held in six states with a total of 279 women representing five health occupations: registered nurses,…

Lebowitz, Ann, Ed.

362

Public Health Education in Florida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report documents issues related to the work of the Florida Comprehensive Health Professions Education Plan. Public health education prepares students for initial employment or advancement in a number of positions. While the public health work force is primarily employed in various units in local, state, and federal governments, industry also…

Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

363

Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility. Proceedings of a Conference (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, March 23-26, 1986).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains a list of planning committee members, institute participants, an introduction by Gerald C. St. Denis a program agenda, and institute presentations from this conference. The following presentations are included: (1) "Social Factors in the Health of Families: A Public Health Social Work Responsibility" (Stanley F. Battle); (2)…

St. Denis, Gerald C., Ed.

364

Factors associated with forced sex among women accessing health services in rural Haiti: implications for the prevention of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goals of the current study were to: (1) estimate the prevalence of forced sex among women accessing services at a women's health clinic in rural Haiti; and (2) examine factors associated with forced sex in this population. Based on data from a case-control study of risk factors for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), a cross-sectional analysis to examine factors associated

M. C. Smith Fawzi; W. Lambert; J. M. Singler; Y. Tanagho; F. Léandre; P. Nevil; D. Bertrand; M. S. Claude; J. Bertrand; M. Louissaint; L. Jeannis; J. S. Mukherjee; S. Goldie; J. J. Salazar; P. E. Farmer

2005-01-01

365

Work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees in finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work-family conflicts are common, but their effects on health are not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the\\u000a associations between work-family conflicts and self-rated health among middle-aged municipal employees. In addition, the effect\\u000a of social background factors on the association between work-family conflicts and self-rated health were examined. The data\\u000a were based on cross-sectional postal surveys,

Torsten Winter; Eva Roos; Ossi Rahkonen; Pekka Martikainen; Eero Lahelma

2006-01-01

366

Increasing community health worker productivity and effectiveness: a review of the influence of the work environment  

PubMed Central

Background Community health workers (CHWs) are increasingly recognized as a critical link in improving access to services and achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals. Given the financial and human resources constraints in developing countries, CHWs are expected to do more without necessarily receiving the needed support to do their jobs well. How much can be expected of CHWs before work overload and reduced organizational support negatively affect their productivity, the quality of services, and in turn the effectiveness of the community-based programmes that rely on them? This article presents policy-makers and programme managers with key considerations for a model to improve the work environment as an important approach to increase CHW productivity and, ultimately, the effectiveness of community-based strategies. Methods A desk review of selective published and unpublished articles and reports on CHW programs in developing countries was conducted to analyse and organize findings on the elements that influence CHW productivity. The search was not exhaustive but rather was meant to gather information on general themes that run through the various documents to generate perspectives on the issue and provide evidence on which to formulate ideas. After an initial search for key terminology related to CHW productivity, a snowball technique was used where a reference in one article led to the discovery of additional documents and reports. Results CHW productivity is determined in large part by the conditions under which they work. Attention to the provision of an enabling work environment for CHWs is essential for achieving high levels of productivity. We present a model in which the work environment encompasses four essential elements—workload, supportive supervision, supplies and equipment, and respect from the community and the health system—that affect the productivity of CHWs. We propose that when CHWs have a manageable workload in terms of a realistic number of tasks and clients, an organized manner of carrying out these tasks, a reasonable geographic distance to cover, the needed supplies and equipment, a supportive supervisor, and respect and acceptance from the community and the health system, they can function more productively and contribute to an effective community-based strategy. Conclusions As more countries look to scale up CHW programmes or shift additional tasks to CHWs, it is critical to pay attention to the elements that affect CHW productivity during programme design as well as implementation. An enabling work environment is crucial to maximize CHW productivity. Policy-makers, programme managers, and other stakeholders need to carefully consider how the productivity elements related to the work environment are defined and incorporated in the overall CHW strategy. Establishing a balance among the four elements that constitute a CHW’s work environment will help make great strides in improving the effectiveness and quality of the services provided by CHWs. PMID:23017131

2012-01-01

367

A qualitative study of factors affecting mental health amongst low-income working mothers in Bangalore, India  

PubMed Central

Background Low-income urban working mothers face many challenges in their domestic, environmental, and working conditions that may affect their mental health. In India, a high prevalence of mental health disorders has been recorded in young women, but there has been little research to examine the factors that affect their mental health at home and work. Methods Through a primarily qualitative approach, we studied the relationship between work, caring for family, spousal support, stress relief strategies and mental health amongst forty eight low-income working mothers residing in urban slums across Bangalore, India. Participants were construction workers, domestic workers, factory workers and fruit and vegetable street vendors. Qualitative data analysis themes included state of mental health, factors that affected mental health positively or negatively, manifestations and consequences of stress and depression, and stress mitigators. Results Even in our small sample of women, we found evidence of extreme depression, including suicidal ideation and attempted suicide. Women who have an alcoholic and/or abusive husband, experience intimate partner violence, are raising children with special needs, and lack adequate support for child care appear to be more susceptible to severe and prolonged periods of depression and suicide attempts. Factors that pointed towards reduced anxiety and depression were social support from family, friends and colleagues and fulfilment from work. Conclusion This qualitative study raises concerns that low-income working mothers in urban areas in India are at high risk for depression, and identifies common factors that create and mitigate stress in this population group. We discuss implications of the findings for supporting the mental health of urban working women in the Indian context. The development of the national mental health policy in India and its subsequent implementation should draw on existing research documenting factors associated with negative mental health amongst specific population groups in order to ensure greater impact. PMID:24502531

2014-01-01

368

Women Who Work: Part I, the Relative Importance of Age, Education and Marital Status for Participation in the Labour Force. Special Labour Force Studies No. 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is intended to provide a systematic treatment of some hypotheses relating to labor force participation determinants, and an illustration of the relative importance of age, education, and marital status for female participation. Marital status, education, and age have all been shown to affect participation rates. On an impressionistic…

Allingham, John D.

369

E-care as craftsmanship: virtuous work, skilled engagement, and information technology in health care.  

PubMed

Contemporary health care relies on electronic devices. These technologies are not ethically neutral but change the practice of care. In light of Sennett's work and that of other thinkers (Dewey, Dreyfus, Borgmann) one worry is that "e-care"--care by means of new information and communication technologies--does not promote skilful and careful engagement with patients and hence is neither conducive to the quality of care nor to the virtues of the care worker. Attending to the kinds of knowledge involved in care work and their moral significance, this paper explores what "craftsmanship" means in the context of medicine and health care and discusses whether today the care giver's craftsmanship is eroded. It is argued that this is a real danger, especially under modern conditions and in the case of telecare, but that whether it happens, and to what extent it happens, depends on whether in a specific practice and given a specific technology e-carers can develop the know-how and skill to engage more intensely with those under their care and to cooperate with their co-workers. PMID:23338289

Coeckelbergh, Mark

2013-11-01

370

Gender inequalities in occupational health related to the unequal distribution of working and employment conditions: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Introduction Gender inequalities exist in work life, but little is known about their presence in relation to factors examined in occupation health settings. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize the working and employment conditions described as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health in studies related to occupational health published between 1999 and 2010. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken of studies available in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Sociological Abstracts, LILACS, EconLit and CINAHL between 1999 and 2010. Epidemiologic studies were selected by applying a set of inclusion criteria to the title, abstract, and complete text. The quality of the studies was also assessed. Selected studies were qualitatively analysed, resulting in a compilation of all differences between women and men in the prevalence of exposure to working and employment conditions and work-related health problems as outcomes. Results Most of the 30 studies included were conducted in Europe (n=19) and had a cross-sectional design (n=24). The most common topic analysed was related to the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards (n=8). Employed women had more job insecurity, lower control, worse contractual working conditions and poorer self-perceived physical and mental health than men did. Conversely, employed men had a higher degree of physically demanding work, lower support, higher levels of effort-reward imbalance, higher job status, were more exposed to noise and worked longer hours than women did. Conclusions This systematic review has identified a set of working and employment conditions as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health from the occupational health literature. These results may be useful to policy makers seeking to reduce gender inequalities in occupational health, and to researchers wishing to analyse these determinants in greater depth. PMID:23915121

2013-01-01

371

The relationship between parental labor force participation and adolescents' dietary intake and risks to cardiovascular health  

E-print Network

Data from a pilot study on the dietary intake, health behaviors, and the presence of coronary heart disease risk factors among 14-and 15-year old Texas adolescents was used in the analyses of this thesis. Adolescent participants underwent...

Godwin, Anne Louise

2012-06-07

372

Integration of primary health services: being put together does not mean they will work together  

PubMed Central

Background This paper reports on an Australian experience of co-locating a range of different primary health services into one building, with the aim of providing integrated services. It discusses some of the early challenges involved with moving services together and reasons why collaborative and integrated working relationships to improve the clients’ journey, may remain elusive. Methods Ethnographic observational data was collected within a GP plus site as part of day-to-day interactions between the research officer and health professionals. This involved observations of team processes within and across teams at the site. Observations were thematically analysed using a social anthropological approach. Results Three main themes arose from the analysis: Infrastructural impediments to collaboration; Territorialism; and Interprofessional practice (IPP) simply not on the agenda. The experience of this setting demonstrates that dedicated staff and resources are needed to keep IPP on the agenda of health service organisations. This is especially important where organisations are attempting to implement new models of collaborative and co-located services. Furthermore, it shows that establishing IPP within newly co-located services is a process that needs time to develop, as part of teams building trust with each other in new circumstances, in order to eventually build a new cultural identity for the co-located services. Conclusions Co-located health service systems can be complex, with competing priorities and differing strategic plans and performance indicators to meet. This, coupled with the tendency for policy makers to move on to their next issue of focus, and to shift resources in the process, means that adequate time and resources for IPP are often overlooked. Shared interprofessional student placements may be one way forward. PMID:24479605

2014-01-01

373

Review and Response to the Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) review of and response to the final report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The response includes a statement of NHLBI's involvement in health research, and descriptions of what steps can be taken to solve the…

Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

374

Scientific and Popular Health Knowledge in the Education Work of Community Health Agents in Rio de Janeiro Shantytowns  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health education for socially marginalized populations challenges the efficacy of existing strategies and methods, and the pertinence of the educational and philosophical principles that underpin them. The Brazilian Community Health Agents Initiative (CHAI) hires residents of deprived marginalized communities to undertake health promotion and…

Zanchetta, M. S.; Kolawole Salami, B.; Perreault, M.; Leite, L. C.

2012-01-01

375

Utility of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) for Educational Psychologists' Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite embracing a bio-psycho-social perspective, the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) assessment framework has had limited application to date with children who have special educational needs (SEN). This study examines its utility for educational psychologists' work

Aljunied, Mariam; Frederickson, Norah

2014-01-01

376

The persisting effect of unemployment on health and social well-being in men early in working life  

Microsoft Academic Search

In our studies of the effects of unemployment in the early working life of men in a British national birth cohort we have shown elsewhere that this experience was part of a longer term accumulation of social and health disadvantage. This present study asks whether men's unemployment also inflicted potential longterm damage to future socio–economic chances and health. We therefore

M. E. J Wadsworth; S. M Montgomery; M. J Bartley

1999-01-01

377

Effectiveness of a Worksite Mindfulness-Related Multi-Component Health Promotion Intervention on Work Engagement and Mental Health: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a worksite mindfulness-related multi-component health promotion intervention on work engagement, mental health, need for recovery and mindfulness. Methods In a randomized controlled trial design, 257 workers of two research institutes participated. The intervention group (n?=?129) received a targeted mindfulness-related training, followed by e-coaching. The total duration of the intervention was 6 months. Data on work engagement, mental health, need for recovery and mindfulness were collected using questionnaires at baseline and after 6 and 12 months follow-up. Effects were analyzed using linear mixed effect models. Results There were no significant differences in work engagement, mental health, need for recovery and mindfulness between the intervention and control group after either 6- or 12-months follow-up. Additional analyses in mindfulness-related training compliance subgroups (high and low compliance versus the control group as a reference) and subgroups based on baseline work engagement scores showed no significant differences either. Conclusions This study did not show an effect of this worksite mindfulness-related multi-component health promotion intervention on work engagement, mental health, need for recovery and mindfulness after 6 and 12 months. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR2199 PMID:24489648

van Berkel, Jantien; Boot, Cécile R. L.; Proper, Karin I.; Bongers, Paulien M.; van der Beek, Allard J.

2014-01-01

378

Workshop to identify critical windows of exposure for children's health: reproductive health in children and adolescents work group summary.  

PubMed Central

This work group report addresses the central question: What are the critical windows during development (preconception through puberty) when exposure to xenobiotics may have the greatest adverse impact on subsequent reproductive health? The reproductive system develops in stages, with sex-specific organogenesis occurring prenatally and further maturational events occurring in the perinatal period and at puberty. Complex endocrine signals as well as other regulatory factors (genetics, growth factors) are involved at all stages. Evidence from animal models and human studies indicates that many specific events can be perturbed by a variety of toxicants, with endocrine-mediated mechanisms being the more widely studied. Prioritized research needs include basic studies on the cellular-molecular and endocrine regulation of sexual differentiation and development; increased efforts regarding potential adverse effects on development in females, including breast development; expanded animal studies on different classes of chemicals, comparing responses during development (prenatal and postnatal) with responses in adults; and, more extensive explorations regarding the reproductive biology and toxicology of puberty in humans. PMID:10852850

Lemasters, G K; Perreault, S D; Hales, B F; Hatch, M; Hirshfield, A N; Hughes, C L; Kimmel, G L; Lamb, J C; Pryor, J L; Rubin, C; Seed, J G

2000-01-01

379

Factors associated with shift work disorder in nurses working with rapid-rotation schedules in Japan: the nurses' sleep health project.  

PubMed

Workers who meet the criteria for shift work disorder (SWD) have elevated levels of risk for various health and behavioral problems. However, the impact of having SWD on shiftworkers engaged in rapid-rotation schedules is unknown. Moreover, the risk factors for the occurrence of SWD remain unclear. To clarify these issues, we conducted a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey on a sample of shiftworking nurses. Responses were obtained from 1202 nurses working at university hospitals in Tokyo, Japan, including 727 two-shift workers and 315 three-shift workers. The questionnaire included items relevant to age, gender, family structure, work environment, health-related quality of life (QOL), diurnal type, depressive symptoms, and SWD. Participants who reported insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness for at least 1 mo that was subjectively relevant to their shiftwork schedules were categorized as having SWD. The prevalence of SWD in the sampled shiftworking nurses was 24.4%; shiftworking nurses with SWD showed lower health-related QOL and more severe depressive symptoms, with greater rates of both actual accidents/errors and near misses, than those without SWD. The results of logistic regression analyses showed that more time spent working at night, frequent missing of nap opportunities during night work, and having an eveningness-oriented chronotype were significantly associated with SWD. The present study indicated that SWD might be associated with reduced health-related QOL and decreased work performance in shiftworking nurses on rapid-rotation schedules. The results also suggested that missing napping opportunities during night work, long nighttime working hours, and the delay of circadian rhythms are associated with the occurrence of SWD among shiftworking nurses on rapid-rotation schedules. PMID:23445510

Asaoka, Shoichi; Aritake, Sayaka; Komada, Yoko; Ozaki, Akiko; Odagiri, Yuko; Inoue, Shigeru; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Inoue, Yuichi

2013-05-01

380

Perceived sources of work stress and satisfaction among hospital and community mental health staff, and their relation to mental health, burnout and job satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This questionnaire study examined perceived sources of stress and satisfaction at work among 121 mental health staff members. Five factors were derived from principal component analysis of sources of work stress items (stress from: role, poor support, clients, future, and overload), and accounted for 70% of the total variance. Four factors were derived from the items related to sources of

David Prosser; Sonia Johnson; Elizabeth Kuipers; George Szmukler; Paul Bebbington; Graham Thornicroft

1997-01-01

381

The Impact of Education on Health Knowledge. NBER Working Paper No. 16422  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The theory on the demand for health suggests that schooling causes health because schooling increases the efficiency of health production. Alternatively, the allocative efficiency hypothesis argues that schooling alters the input mix chosen to produce health. This suggests that the more educated have more knowledge about the health production…

Altindag, Duha Tore; Cannonier, Colin; Mocan, Naci H.

2010-01-01

382

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

383

Development of an Instrument to Measure Behavioral Health Function for Work Disability: Item Pool Construction and Factor Analysis  

PubMed Central

Objectives To develop a broad set of claimant-reported items to assess behavioral health functioning relevant to the Social Security disability determination processes, and to evaluate the underlying structure of behavioral health functioning for use in development of a new functional assessment instrument. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Community. Participants Item pools of behavioral health functioning were developed, refined, and field-tested in a sample of persons applying for Social Security disability benefits (N=1015) who reported difficulties working due to mental or both mental and physical conditions. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure Social Security Administration Behavioral Health (SSA-BH) measurement instrument Results Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) specified that a 4-factor model (self-efficacy, mood and emotions, behavioral control, and social interactions) had the optimal fit with the data and was also consistent with our hypothesized conceptual framework for characterizing behavioral health functioning. When the items within each of the four scales were tested in CFA, the fit statistics indicated adequate support for characterizing behavioral health as a unidimensional construct along these four distinct scales of function. Conclusion This work represents a significant advance both conceptually and psychometrically in assessment methodologies for work related behavioral health. The measurement of behavioral health functioning relevant to the context of work requires the assessment of multiple dimensions of behavioral health functioning. Specifically, we identified a 4-factor model solution that represented key domains of work related behavioral health functioning. These results guided the development and scale formation of a new SSA-BH instrument. PMID:23548542

Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Ni, Pengsheng; Haley, Stephen M.; Jette, Alan M.; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M.; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E.; Rasch, Elizabeth K.

2014-01-01

384

[Rural work and health risks: a review into de "safe use" of pesticides in Brazil].  

PubMed

The paradigm of the "safe use" of pesticides is based on measures to control risks in the handling of these products. However, studies carried out in various regions of Brazil reveal a situation of widespread exposure and health damages among rural workers, revealing the ineffectiveness of this paradigm. This work presents a critical review of the "safe use" approach for pesticides in scientific papers published in Brazil in the past 15 years. Results indicate that these studies do not address, simultaneously, all the work activities that involve exposure and risk of intoxication (acquisition, transportation, storage, preparation and application, final disposal of empty containers and sanitization of contaminated clothes/ PPEs), nor do they comprehensively address the "safe use" measures recommended in safety manuals, which are mandatory for each activity. A total of 25 studies were selected and analyzed, revealing a high number of results and analyses regarding activities of preparation and application and final disposal of empty containers. The range of the approaches was seen to be timely in the six work activities. For future studies, a broader approach of the "safe use" of pesticides is recommended, seeking to reveal the complete infeasibility of this safety paradigm. PMID:25272128

de Abreu, Pedro Henrique Barbosa; Alonzo, Herling Gregorio Aguilar

2014-10-01

385

75 FR 47307 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Working Group Preliminary Report and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...its existing statutory authority. B. Task Force on the Utilization of Science...making across the total product life cycle of medical devices and radiation-emitting...September 2009, CDRH convened an internal Task Force on the Utilization of...

2010-08-05

386

Medical Student Financing and the Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-484) on the supply of physicians for the armed services was assessed. As background to the survey findings, information is presented on conditions of three federal programs and differences in their benefit structures and implications for program participation. These…

Daubert, Victoria; And Others

387

Discrimination by health care workers versus discrimination by others: Countervailing forces on HCV treatment intentions.  

PubMed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health burden. Despite recent advances in HCV treatment, uptake remains low, particularly amongst people who inject drugs. HCV-related stigma and discrimination are common, especially within the health care sector. This research examines a more nuanced approach for how HCV-related stigma and discrimination impacts treatment access and uptake. Based on a social identity framework, we explore whether perceived HCV-related discrimination is associated with attempts to remove the stigma of being HCV-positive via HCV treatment intentions. Based on the results of prior research it was also hypothesised that the source of discrimination (health care workers versus others), and whether the discrimination is perceived to be directed to oneself or to the HCV-positive group, will differentially impact treatment intentions. The sample consisted of 416 people living with HCV in New South Wales, Australia, who acquired HCV from injecting drugs. Participants were asked about their experiences of perceived discrimination directed towards themselves versus their HCV-positive group and perceived discrimination within the health care sector. Findings indicate that discrimination towards the self is a more powerful indicator of treatment intentions than discrimination aimed at the HCV-positive group. This finding is consistent with social identity theory suggesting that people from low status groups are motivated to change their stigmatised status when it is possible to do so. The source of the perceived discrimination also matters, however, as participants who report experiencing discrimination from health workers have lowered intentions to engage with HCV treatment in the future. In combination, the results indicate that while perceived discrimination is commonly understood to act as a barrier to treatment uptake, the relationship is actually more complex than previously conceptualised. PMID:24889417

Brener, Loren; Horwitz, Robyn; von Hippel, Courtney; Bryant, Joanne; Treloar, Carla

2015-03-01

388

Labor Force  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

2010-01-01

389

The Directory of Special Opportunities for Women: A National Guide of Educational Opportunities, Career Information, Networks, and Peer Counseling Assistance for Entry or Reentry into the Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This directory is designed to be a source for research and help to women preparing for careers or for entry or reentry into the work force. Section One is an alphabetical listing of national organizations, associations, programs, and government agencies. Section Two is divided by State; resources cited here are listed numerically by zip code so…

Doss, Martha Merrill, Ed.

390

Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.] [eds.

1995-06-01

391

Qualities and Practices of Professional Social Work Leadership in an Interdisciplinary Mental Health Service: An Action Learning Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the mid-1980s, health service restructuring in New Zealand has strengthened managerialism, arguably detracting from professional considerations. Professional leaders without line-management responsibilities have replaced social work departments headed by a professional social worker. An emerging social work contribution to interdisciplinary…

McNabb, David; Webster, Michael

2010-01-01

392

Scand J Work Environ Health . Author manuscript Socioeconomic position and low-back pain--the role of biomechanical  

E-print Network

Scand J Work Environ Health . Author manuscript Page /1 8 Socioeconomic position and low-back pain and psychosocial work factors play in occupational class disparities in low back pain (LBP) in the GAZEL cohort ; Biomechanics ; Cohort Studies ; Female ; France ; epidemiology ; Humans ; Low Back Pain ; epidemiology

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

393

Child Health and Young Adult Outcomes. NBER Working Paper No. 14482  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research has shown a strong connection between birth weight and future child outcomes. But this research has not asked how insults to child health after birth affect long-term outcomes, whether health at birth matters primarily because it predicts future health or through some other mechanism, or whether health insults matter more at some…

Currie, Janet; Stabile, Mark; Manivong, Phongsack; Roos, Leslie L.

2008-01-01

394

www.ehs.psu.edu / 814-865-6391 Working In the Laboratory and Your Health  

E-print Network

and Your Health Many factors including stress and disease can affect a person's health. It is known however Hazards in the laboratory can affect a workers health if they are absorbed into the body. These hazards that some exposures to external factors in the home and workplace can affect health. Laboratory Hazards

Maroncelli, Mark

395

Yoking Three Horses (or Forces) to Change the World: Agenda for the Science and Spirit Work Group of the  

E-print Network

to destroy the world through pollution and nuclear weapons." The following essay presents my personal views to yoke powerful religious, spiritual and secular forces to deal with some of the major environmental

Klein, Stanley

396

Health Professionals' Attitudes and Emotions towards Working with Adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) and Mental Ill Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: Mainstream mental health services are providing more care for individuals with an intellectual disability (ID); this has implications for staff and service users. Attitudes of staff towards people with ID in mental health services may be negative and negative staff attitudes may have a detrimental impact on service provision. Design: A…

Rose, N.; Kent, S.; Rose, J.

2012-01-01

397

The impact of psychosocial and organizational working conditions on the mental health of female cleaning personnel in Norway  

PubMed Central

Background This study examined the association between psychosocial and organizational work conditions and mental health among women employed in the cleaning profession in Norway. Methods Self-report questionnaires were mailed to 661 cleaning staff personnel from seven cleaning organizations in seven different cities across Norway. The response rate was 64%, of which 374 (88%) respondents were women. The questionnaires assessed socio-demographic information and employment history, work organization, and psychosocial working conditions. The Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25) was included to assess mental health. Results On average, respondents were 43 years old and reported 10.8 years of experience working in the cleaning industry. The proportion of women scoring a HSCL-25 equal to or above 1.75 was 17.5%, which was higher than the average prevalence of mental health problems among working Norwegian women (8.4%). A factor analysis of the questions specific to the psychosocial work environment identified the following four underlying dimensions: leadership, co-workers, time pressure/control, and information/knowledge. Two of these, poor satisfaction with leadership (OR = 3.6) and poor satisfaction with co-workers (OR = 2.3), were significantly related to mental health. In addition, having contact with colleagues less than once a day (OR = 2.4) and not being ethnically Norwegian (OR = 3.0) increased the risk for mental health problems. Conclusion Mental health problems are frequent among female cleaning professionals in Norway. Our results indicate that quality of leadership, collaboration with co-workers, and ethnicity were significantly associated with mental health. PMID:17078871

Gamperiene, Migle; Nygård, Jan F; Sandanger, Inger; Wærsted, Morten; Bruusgaard, Dag

2006-01-01

398

A Conceptual Foundation for Measures of Physical Function and Behavioral Health Function for Social Security Work Disability Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Physical and mental impairments represent the two largest health condition categories for which workers receive Social Security disability benefits. Comprehensive assessment of physical and mental impairments should include aspects beyond medical conditions such as a person’s underlying capabilities as well as activity demands relevant to the context of work. The objective of this paper is to describe the initial conceptual stages of developing new measurement instruments of behavioral health and physical functioning relevant for Social Security work disability evaluation purposes. To outline a clear conceptualization of the constructs to be measured, two content models were developed using structured and informal qualitative approaches. We performed a structured literature review focusing on work disability and incorporating aspects of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a unifying taxonomy for framework development. Expert interviews provided advice and consultation to enhance face validity of the resulting content models. The content model for work-related behavioral health function identifies five major domains (1) Behavior Control, (2) Basic Interactions, (3) Temperament and Personality, (4) Adaptability, and (5) Workplace Behaviors. The content model describing physical functioning includes three domains (1) Changing and Maintaining Body Position, (2) Whole Body Mobility, and (3) Carrying, Moving and Handling Objects. These content models informed subsequent measurement properties including item development, measurement scale construction, and provided conceptual coherence guiding future empirical inquiry. The proposed measurement approaches show promise to comprehensively and systematically assess physical and behavioral health functioning relevant to work. PMID:23548543

Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Haley, Stephen M.; Jette, Alan M.; Eisen, Susan V.; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M.; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E.; Rasch, Elizabeth K.

2014-01-01

399

Conceptual foundation for measures of physical function and behavioral health function for Social Security work disability evaluation.  

PubMed

Physical and mental impairments represent the 2 largest health condition categories for which workers receive Social Security disability benefits. Comprehensive assessment of physical and mental impairments should include aspects beyond medical conditions such as a person's underlying capabilities as well as activity demands relevant to the context of work. The objective of this article is to describe the initial conceptual stages of developing new measurement instruments of behavioral health and physical functioning relevant for Social Security work disability evaluation purposes. To outline a clear conceptualization of the constructs to be measured, 2 content models were developed using structured and informal qualitative approaches. We performed a structured literature review focusing on work disability and incorporating aspects of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a unifying taxonomy for framework development. Expert interviews provided advice and consultation to enhance face validity of the resulting content models. The content model for work-related behavioral health function identifies 5 major domains: (1) behavior control, (2) basic interactions, (3) temperament and personality, (4) adaptability, and (5) workplace behaviors. The content model describing physical functioning includes 3 domains: (1) changing and maintaining body position, (2) whole-body mobility, and (3) carrying, moving, and handling objects. These content models informed subsequent measurement properties including item development and measurement scale construction, and provided conceptual coherence guiding future empirical inquiry. The proposed measurement approaches show promise to comprehensively and systematically assess physical and behavioral health functioning relevant to work. PMID:23548543

Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M; Eisen, Susan V; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E; Rasch, Elizabeth K

2013-09-01

400

Combining resources, combining forces: regionalizing hospital library services in a large statewide health system.  

PubMed

After a reduction in full-time equivalents, 2 libraries in large teaching hospitals and 2 libraries in small community hospitals in a western US statewide health system saw opportunity for expansion through a regional reorganization. Despite a loss of 2/3 of the professional staff and a budgetary decrease of 27% over the previous 3 years, the libraries were able to grow business, usage, awareness, and collections through organizational innovation and improved efficiency. This paper describes the experience-including process, challenges, and lessons learned-of an organizational shift to regionalized services, collections, and staffing. Insights from this process may help similar organizations going through restructuring. PMID:25552945

Martin, Heather J; Delawska-Elliott, Basia

2015-01-01

401

Combining resources, combining forces: regionalizing hospital library services in a large statewide health system*  

PubMed Central

After a reduction in full-time equivalents, 2 libraries in large teaching hospitals and 2 libraries in small community hospitals in a western US statewide health system saw opportunity for expansion through a regional reorganization. Despite a loss of 2/3 of the professional staff and a budgetary decrease of 27% over the previous 3 years, the libraries were able to grow business, usage, awareness, and collections through organizational innovation and improved efficiency. This paper describes the experience—including process, challenges, and lessons learned—of an organizational shift to regionalized services, collections, and staffing. Insights from this process may help similar organizations going through restructuring. PMID:25552945

Martin, Heather J.; Delawska-Elliott, Basia

2015-01-01

402

WORKSHOP TO IDENTIFY CRITICAL WINDOWS OF EXPOSURE FOR CHILDREN'S HEALTH: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WORK GROUP SUMMARY  

EPA Science Inventory

This workgroup report addresses the central question: what are the critical windows during development (pre-conception through puberty) when exposure to xenobiotics may have the greatest adverse impact on subsequent reproductive health. The reproductive system develops in stages...

403

Associations between different types of physical activity and teachers’ perceived mental, physical, and work-related health  

PubMed Central

Background The teaching profession is characterized by high levels of stress and physical complaints, which might be improved through regular participation in physical activity (PA). However, the effect of PA on mental and physical health is not always consistent and depends on the type of PA performed. The aim of this study was to examine the mental, physical, and work-related health of Flemish secondary school teachers and identify the impact on those health variables by demographic and teaching-related factors and various types of PA. Methods This study included an online survey conducted across a representative sample of secondary school teachers (n?=?1066, average age 40 years; 68 percent female). Level of PA and sitting time were estimated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and perceived mental health and physical health were estimated using the Short Form 36. Work-related factors such as job satisfaction, occupational stress, and absenteeism were also collected. T-tests, ANOVAs, and linear regression analyses were performed. Results Flemish secondary school teachers have poorer perceived mental and physical health than a general healthy population. This difference is particularly evident among female teachers, who reported lower perceived health, more occupational stress, and more absent days compared to their male colleagues. Higher participation in leisure-time PA was associated with a more positive perceived health. In contrast, higher levels of occupational PA and sitting time had a negative impact on perceived health. Total amount of PA, total amount of moderate-to-vigorous PA, transportation-related PA, and PA at home were not associated to teachers’ perceived health. Conclusion Because secondary school teachers’ levels of perceived health are low, they are an important target group for interventions aiming to improve health. Only leisure-time PA was associated with more positive perceived health. This finding may indicate that teachers performing more exercise during leisure time, or in a more autonomous way, may be more resistant to physical and mental health problems. Future research should verify whether promoting leisure-time PA among teachers has the potential to improve their mental and physical health, and counteract the negative associations between teachers’ health and their occupational PA. PMID:24885620

2014-01-01

404

The affordable care act and state coverage of clinical preventive health services for working-age adults.  

PubMed

Significant public health challenges facing the United States stem from preventable disease. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act dedicated substantial resources toward prevention. Among other reforms, the Affordable Care Act requires Medicaid and private health insurers to cover clinical preventive services for adults, pursuant to recommendations by the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force. This article examines the infrastructure upon which these recommendations are based, the requirements related to risk factors for leading causes of preventable disease in adults associated with tobacco and alcohol use, unhealthy diet, and inactivity, and coverage requirements for private plans and Medicaid. The article provides and assesses data comparing the health statuses of populations in and preventive services offered by states taking the Affordable Care Act Medicaid expansion versus those in states declining to expand coverage. The article suggests legislative and other methods to increase preventive clinical service requirements and notes outstanding issues for future research. PMID:24787498

Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Yang, Y Tony

2015-01-01

405

Periodic health examination, 1994 update: 4. Secondary prevention of elder abuse and mistreatment. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for family physicians on the detection, assessment and management of abuse or mistreatment in patients over 65 years of age. OPTIONS: Detection of elder abuse by history and examination or by specific protocols; intervention through mandatory reporting, removing the victim from the situation or acting as an advocate for the patient. OUTCOMES: Termination of abusive situation and prevention of further abuse. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted with the use of medical subject headings "elder abuse" and "epidemiology" for articles published from January 1980 to October 1992 and headings "elder abuse" and "clinical trials" for articles published from January 1980 to February 1994. Standard references and review articles and their bibliographies were scrutinized, and experts were consulted. VALUES: The evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. Since senior citizens are among the most disadvantaged people in Canadian society, prevention of abuse and promotion of their autonomy were the highest values selected. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The principal benefits are cessation and prevention of abuse. Potential harms include the loss of a personal residence, the erosion of an established family structure and the loss of autonomy for the victim. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is poor evidence to include case finding for elder abuse in or exclude it from the periodic health examination. However, it is prudent for physicians to be alert for indications of elder abuse and, if such abuse is discovered, to take measures to prevent further abuse. PMID:7954135

1994-01-01

406

Influence of Spirituality on Cool Down Reactions, Work Engagement, and Life Satisfaction in Anthroposophic Health Care Professionals  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to analyse whether spirituality is a resource for health care professionals to deal with increasing stress and work burden, specifically to analyse associations between “cool down reactions” (which describe an emotional distancing towards patients and/or reduced engagement as a strategy to protect their own functionality), work burden, and life satisfaction. We specifically focussed on anthroposophic health care professionals because of their unique approach to distinct aspects of spirituality. In a cross-sectional survey using standardized questionnaires, 489 persons were enrolled (66% women, mean age 53?±?10 years, 41% physicians, 12% nurses, and 47% other health care professionals). They scored very high on all measures of spirituality and moderate to low with respect to “cool down reactions.” Significant predictors of “cool down reactions” were low work vigor, perceived work burden, alcohol consumption, low life satisfaction, and religious orientation (R2 = 0.20). In contrast, their life satisfaction was explained best (R2 = 0.35) by vigor, with further positive influences of being a physician, conscious interactions, and living with a partner on one hand and negative influences of “cool down reactions,” work burden, and transcendence convictions on the other hand. Thus, specific aspects of spirituality have only a small influence on anthroposophic health care professionals' “cool down reactions,” but might buffer against a loss of vigor and dedication in their work.

Glöckler, Michaela; Heusser, Peter

2015-01-01

407

[The occupational doctor, a comprehensive point of reference for the health at work. An experience of management of mental patients at work].  

PubMed

Sime essential conditions are necessary to place and keep on duty a mental patient: a correct diagnosis and therapy, a continuos consultation between doctors (family, NHS and occupational doctor), an easy working environment, a sensible leader and manager and a good steering committee. The absence of these elements takes to the end of employment condition. Occupational doctor is a point of reference to manage the health of mental worker, to prepare for a well disposed environment at work and to keep relationship between factory and NHS. PMID:23405624

Donghi, R; Scoglio, G

2012-01-01

408

Working Paper 120 - Community Based Health Insurance Schemes in Africa: the Case of Rwanda  

Microsoft Academic Search

Community-based health insurance schemes (Mutuelles) in Rwanda are one of the largest experiments in community based risk-sharing mechanisms in SubSaharan Africa for health related problems. This study examines the impact of the program on demand for modern health care, mitigation of out-ofpocket catastrophic health expenditure and social inclusiveness based on a nationally representative household survey using traditional regression approach and

Shimeles Abebe

2010-01-01

409

Effect of de-industrialisation on working conditions and self reported health in a sample of manufacturing workers  

PubMed Central

Design and Setting: This investigation is based on a sample of 3000 sawmill workers employed in 1979 (a year before the beginning de-industrialisation) and interviewed in 1998. The sample was obtained by random selection from an already gathered cohort of approximately 28 000 BC sawmill workers. Change in working conditions from 1979 to 1998 are described. Self reported health status, in 1998, was used as a dependent variable in logistic regression after controlling for confounders. Main results: Downsizing in BC sawmills eliminated 60% of workers between 1979 and 1998. Working conditions in 1998 were better for those who left the sawmill industry and obtained re-employment elsewhere. Workers who remained employed in restructuring sawmills were approximately 50% more likely to report poor health than those re-employed elsewhere. Conclusions: Working conditions and health status were better for workers who, under pressure of de-industrialisation, left the sawmill industry and obtained re-employment outside this sector. PMID:12080157

Ostry, A; Barroetavena, M; Hershler, R; Kelly, S; Demers, P; Teschke, K; Hertzman, D

2002-01-01

410

Can information and communication technologies support patient engagement? A review of opportunities and challenges in health social work.  

PubMed

Despite becoming a prerequisite for participation in an information-based society, the use of information communication technologies (ICT) within social work and health care remains in its infancy. Currently, there is a push to adopt newer technologies to enhance practice. This article aims to highlight some of the innovative ways in which ICT have been adopted and adapted to augment social work practice. The need for social workers to become proficient in the use of newer technologies, opportunities for implementing ICT within a health care setting, and potential challenges at the professional, ethical, and systemic level are explored. Using the available literature as a guide, recommendations and strategies to strengthen implementation of ICTs into health social work are provided. PMID:25321933

Craig, Shelley L; Calleja Lorenzo, Maria Victoria

2014-10-01

411

International Aspects of Mental Health Work with Refugees and Future Directions: A European Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes past and present European efforts to address the mental health needs of refugees. It begins with a brief historical survey of mental health services for refugees after the Second World War and delineates the policy recommendations from the 1948 International Congress on Mental Health. The next section describes current…

Hauff, Edvard

412

Mental Health Problems in Early Childhood Can Impair Learning and Behavior for Life. Working Paper #6  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Significant mental health problems can and do occur in young children. In some cases, these problems can have serious consequences for early learning, social competence, and lifelong health. Furthermore, the foundations of many mental health problems that endure through adulthood are established early in life through the interaction of genetic…

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2008

2008-01-01

413

Causes and Consequences of Early Life Health. NBER Working Paper No. 15637  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examine the consequences of childhood health for economic and health outcomes in adulthood, using height as a marker of health in childhood. After reviewing previous evidence, we present a conceptual framework that highlights data limitations and methodological problems associated with the study of this topic. We present estimates of the…

Case, Anne; Paxson, Christina

2010-01-01

414

The Potential of School-Linked Centers To Promote Adolescent Health and Development. Working Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The future of school-linked adolescent health centers cannot be determined without further evaluation. The recent development of school-linked health centers stems from concerns about the special health needs of adolescents. Currently there are 125 school-based and school-linked centers in operation. Characteristics include the following: (1) most…

Millstein, Susan G.

415

Should health care providers be forced to apologise after things go wrong?  

PubMed

The issue of apologising to patients harmed by adverse events has been a subject of interest and debate within medicine, politics, and the law since the early 1980s. Although apology serves several important social roles, including recognising the victims of harm, providing an opportunity for redress, and repairing relationships, compelled apologies ring hollow and ultimately undermine these goals. Apologies that stem from external authorities' edicts rather than an offender's own self-criticism and moral reflection are inauthentic and contribute to a "moral flabbiness" that stunts the moral development of both individual providers and the medical profession. Following a discussion of a recent case from New Zealand in which a midwife was required to apologise not only to the parents but also to the baby, it is argued that rather than requiring health care providers to apologise, authorities should instead train, foster, and support the capacity of providers to apologise voluntarily. PMID:25096170

McLennan, Stuart; Walker, Simon; Rich, Leigh E

2014-12-01

416

Identification of health risks in workers staying and working on the terrains contaminated with depleted uranium.  

PubMed

This study investigated health risks in workers residing and working in terrains contaminated by low ionizing radiation doses which originated from ammunition containing depleted uranium (DU). The studied population was composed of two test groups (T-I, T-II) who were occasionally exposed to DU, and two referent (R-I, R-II) groups not exposed at any time to DU. All of them were evaluated for the following: complete clinical examination and blood count, presence of immature forms and blasts, leukocyte alkaline phosphatase activity and cytogenetic tests. The probability of onset of the characteristic complete biomarkers--chromosomal aberrations, was analyzed using logarithmic function of the Poisson regression. The estimated function of the density of probabilities of Poisson distribution of the chromosomal aberrations in the test group T-II was drastically different from the corresponding distribution of the referent group R-I and to a somewhat lesser extent from the group R-II; Wilcoxon test exactly confirms the presence of a significant difference between the reference group R-II and test group T-II, p < 0.05. The damages to chromosomes and cells were highest in the test group T-II of workers additionally occupationally exposed to DU. The group of workers T-I, who had been exposed to DU working on contaminated terrain, have had certain risks of cell and chromosome damages, and that risk was not greater than the risk to the referent group R-II of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. PMID:19531923

Milacic, Snezana; Simic, Jadranko

2009-05-01

417

Dually-Eligible Working-Age Adults with Disabilities: Issues and Challenges as Health Reform is Implemented  

E-print Network

with disabilities, cash supports through SSDI and SSI also play a major role. To the extent that people with disabilities apply for Social Security cash benefits (SSI/SSDI) as a gateway to health insurance, greater availability of affordable health insurance... some people currently on SSI/SSDI to work by severing the tie between eligibility for cash benefits and access to health care while also keeping others from having to apply was a prominent theme. Focusing on a single state, Dr. Jean Hall (Hall...

Hall, Jean P.

2013-01-01

418

Factors associated with forced sex among women accessing health services in rural Haiti: implications for the prevention of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The goals of the current study were to: (1) estimate the prevalence of forced sex among,women,accessing services at a women’s,health clinic in rural Haiti; and,(2) examine,factors associated with forced sex in this population. Based on data from a case-control study of risk factors for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), a cross-sectional analysis to examine,factors associated,with,forced,sex was,performed.,A number,of factors related to

M. c. Smith Fawzi; W. Lambert; J. m. Singler; Y. Tanagho; F. Le Andre; P. Nevil; D. Bertrand; M. s. Claude; J. Bertrand; M. Louissaint; L. Jeannis; J. s. Mukherjee; S. Goldie; J. j. Salazar; P. e. Farmer

419

Somatic symptoms and health-related quality of life among treatment-seeking Canadian Forces personnel with PTSD.  

PubMed

This study examined the association between somatic complaints and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in treatment-seeking Canadian military personnel with military-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Current and former Canadian Forces (CF) members attending the Parkwood Hospital Operational Stress Injury Clinic in London, Ontario (N=291) were administered self-report questionnaires assessing number and severity of somatic complaints, PTSD and depressive symptom severity, and mental and physical health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) prior to commencing treatment. Regression analyses were used to identify the role of somatic complaints on physical and mental HR-QoL, after controlling for PTSD symptom cluster and depressive symptom severity. Somatic symptom severity accounted for only a small amount of the variance in mental HR-QoL after accounting for PTSD symptom cluster and depressive symptom severity, but accounted for a larger proportion of the variance in physical HR-QoL after accounting for PTSD cluster and depressive symptom severity. Understanding the role of somatization in the symptom-presentation of military personnel with PTSD may provide additional avenues for treatment with this population. PMID:24745465

St Cyr, Kate; McIntyre-Smith, Alexandra; Contractor, Ateka A; Elhai, Jon D; Richardson, J Don

2014-08-15

420

Is obesity related to deteriorating mental health of the U.S. working-age population?  

PubMed

This study examined whether the association between obesity and non-specific mental distress has become stronger among the working-age population over time and whether a change in the association was moderated by particular socioeconomic characteristics. More than two million adults aged 20-55, from 1993 to 2010 (except for 2002), were analyzed using self-reported Mentally Unhealthy Days (a measure of non-specific mental distress) and Body Mass Index (BMI) from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System annual survey. This study found that prevalence of obesity more than doubled (p < 0.01) from 14.0 % in 1993 to 28.6 % in 2010 and Mentally Unhealthy Days increased 20 % (p < 0.01) from 3.17 to 3.88 during the same period. Adults with obesity (BMI ? 30) experienced around 0.32 (p < 0.05) more Mentally Unhealthy Days than their counterparts without obesity in 1993, but the difference increased to 1.09 (p < 0.05) in 2010. An increase in the association was much larger for women, Whites, adults aged 36-45, low-income earners, and individuals with some college education. Quantifying the magnitude of the association provides policymakers and researchers with valuable information towards developing and evaluating obesity prevention programs and mental health enhancement policies. PMID:24966112

Jung, Haeil; Chang, Chaeyoung

2015-02-01

421

Sustaining work force inclusion and well-being of mothers on public assistance: Individual deficit and social ecology perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared theoretical perspectives on the psychological and paid labor activity implications of mandating mothers initially on US welfare to participate in labor force activities. Data were collected that reflected these areas: government public policy interventions, family social ecology measures, mother’s psychological and human capital, and community capital. A quasi-experimental design was used, and multiple source data was collected

Ellen Ernst Kossek; Melissa S. Q Huber; Jacqueline V Lerner

2003-01-01

422

Effects of work ability and health promoting interventions for women with musculoskeletal symptoms: A 9-month prospective study  

PubMed Central

Background Women working in the public human service sector in 'overstrained' situations run the risk of musculoskeletal symptoms and long-term sick leave. In order to maintain the level of health and work ability and strengthen the potential resources for health, it is important that employees gain greater control over decisions and actions affecting their health – a process associated with the concept of self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of a self-efficacy intervention and an ergonomic education intervention for women with musculoskeletal symptoms, employed in the public sector. Methods The design of the study was a 9-month prospective study describing the effects of two interventions, a comprehensive self-efficacy intervention (n = 21) and an ergonomic education intervention (n = 21). Data were obtained by a self-report questionnaire on health- and work ability-related factors at baseline, and at ten weeks and nine months follow-up. Within-group differences over time were analysed. Results Over the time period studied there were small magnitudes of improvements within each group. Within the self-efficacy intervention group positive effects in perceived work ability were shown. The ergonomic education group showed increased positive beliefs about future work ability and a more frequent use of pain coping strategies. Conclusion Both interventions showed positive effects on women with musculoskeletal symptoms, but in different ways. Future research in this area should tailor interventions to participants' motivation and readiness to change. PMID:18644154

Larsson, Agneta; Karlqvist, Lena; Gard, Gunvor

2008-01-01

423

[Nobody gives orders here: the meanings of work and health for settlers from the Landless Rural Workers' Movement].  

PubMed

This paper discusses the partial results of qualitative research on lifestyles and meanings attributed to health and work among settlers from the Landless Rural Workers' Movement (MST) and identifies strategies developed by workers to maintain and/or promote health. The study was conducted in a rural settlement affiliated with the MST in Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. The ergological approach was the main theoretical and methodological reference for understanding work from the perspective of "human activity". The study techniques included document analysis, participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and focus groups, and the data were submitted to thematic content analysis. The landless rural workers attributed the meanings of freedom and satisfaction to their work, associated with self-management and autonomy, which they reported as key elements for health. Although rural work was considered tiring, the work and way of life in the settlement provided this community with possibilities for ensuring their health and resisting the hegemonic agribusiness model. PMID:24005925

Santos, Júlio César Borges dos; Hennington, Elida Azevedo

2013-08-01

424

The interrelationships between working conditions, job satisfaction, burnout and mental health among hospital physicians in Japan: a path analysis.  

PubMed

A growing number of physicians are leaving their hospitals because of painful working conditions in hospitals throughout Japan. We set out to analyze the interrelationships between working conditions, job satisfaction, burnout and mental health among Japanese physicians. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2007 for hospital physicians throughout Japan. A path analysis based on structural equation modeling was utilized for examining the interrelationships between work control, on-call duty volume, job satisfaction (the Japan Hospital Physicians Satisfaction Scale), burnout (the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory) and mental health (the General Health Questionnaire). Of 336 physicians who received a solicitation E-mail, 236 participated in our study (response rate, 70%). Sixty physicians (25.4%) were women with a mean age of 41 yr. In the path analysis, burnout and poor mental health were related directly to job dissatisfaction and short sleeping time, while they were related indirectly to poor work control and heavy on-call duty. In the multi-group path analysis of both genders, sleeping time was related to job satisfaction more likely among female physicians but less among male physicians. Healthcare policy makers need to implement immediate, extensive and decisive measures to improve work condition and to reduce overwork among hospital physicians. PMID:19367046

Tokuda, Yasuharu; Hayano, Keiko; Ozaki, Makiko; Bito, Seiji; Yanai, Haruo; Koizumi, Shunzo

2009-04-01

425

Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Health Impairments. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Health Impaired Preschoolers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to mainstreaming health impaired preschoolers is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of mainstreaming. The role…

Healy, Alfred; And Others

426

Aetna Student Health, working with [School] offers a student-focused health insurance plan that helps protect  

E-print Network

that helps protect students at school, at home, and while traveling or studying abroad. What is the plan all to registered nurses. They can share information on a range of healthy topics*. ·Access to savings on vision, fitness, alternative health care, weight management, books and many more! ·Travel Assistance Services

Tullos, Desiree

427

Making It Work: Health Care Provider Perspectives on Strategies to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening in Federally Qualified Health Centers  

PubMed Central

Objective Colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) rates are low among men and women who seek health care at federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). This study explores health care providers' perspectives about their patient's motivators and impediments to CRCS and receptivity to preparatory education. Methods A mixed methods design consisting of in-depth interviews, focus groups, and a short survey. Setting: FQHCs in the Tampa Bay area. Participants: Seventeen health care providers practicing in FQHCs. Results Test-specific patient impediments and motivations were identified including fear of abnormal findings; importance of offering less invasive fecal occult blood tests; and need for patient-centered test-specific educational materials in clinics. Opportunities to improve provider practices were identified including providers' reliance on patients' report of symptoms as a cue to recommend CRCS and overemphasis of clinic-based guaiac stool tests. Conclusions This study adds to the literature on CRCS test-specific motivators and impediments. Providers offered unique approaches for motivating patients to follow through with recommended CRCS and were receptive to in-clinic patient education and. Findings are readily inform the design of educational materials and interventions to increase CRCS in FQHCs. PMID:23943277

Gwede, Clement K.; Davis, Stacy N.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Koskan, Alexis M.; Ealey, Jamila; Abdulla, Rania; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Elliott, Gloria; Lopez, Diana; Shibata, David; Roetzheim, Richard G.; Meade, Cathy D.

2013-01-01

428

Making it work: health care provider perspectives on strategies to increase colorectal cancer screening in federally qualified health centers.  

PubMed

Colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) rates are low among men and women who seek health care at federally qualified health centers (FQHCs). This study explores health care providers' perspectives about their patient's motivators and impediments to CRCS and receptivity to preparatory education. A mixed methods design consisting of in-depth interviews, focus groups, and a short survey is used in this study. The participants of this study are 17 health care providers practicing in FQHCs in the Tampa Bay area. Test-specific patient impediments and motivations were identified including fear of abnormal findings, importance of offering less invasive fecal occult blood tests, and need for patient-centered test-specific educational materials in clinics. Opportunities to improve provider practices were identified including providers' reliance on patients' report of symptoms as a cue to recommend CRCS and overemphasis of clinic-based guaiac stool tests. This study adds to the literature on CRCS test-specific motivators and impediments. Providers offered unique approaches for motivating patients to follow through with recommended CRCS and were receptive to in-clinic patient education. Findings readily inform the design of educational materials and interventions to increase CRCS in FQHCs. PMID:23943277

Gwede, Clement K; Davis, Stacy N; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Koskan, Alexis M; Ealey, Jamila; Abdulla, Rania; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Elliott, Gloria; Lopez, Diana; Shibata, David; Roetzheim, Richard G; Meade, Cathy D

2013-12-01

429

Ergonomics and work organization: the relationship between tayloristic design and workers' health in banks and credit cards companies.  

PubMed

The discussion developed in this paper is based on the results of an ergonomic work analysis carried out with attendants at call centers. Some critical issues and difficulties, like working pace, inadequate tools and workstations, and software inadequacies were detected in working situations. Operator-customer interactions are presented, attempting to put in evidence working constraints, working conditions, and their connection with health problems. The main conclusion is that serving clients, especially when the job is to provide information, is not a simple task, as information is not always available in the computerized system and is completely fragmented. The scope of workers' actions is very restricted and complicated and recurrent requests are redirected to others. Workers (individually or as groups) have limited possibilities to make adjustments to be able to give more adequate and personalized treatment to clients and, at the same time, to work in a less stressful environment. In periods of increased workload and work intensification, the situation is very much favorable to the incidence of health disorders, such as work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) and others. Some suggestions to improve the work situation are discussed. PMID:10602650

Sznelwar, L I; Mascia, F L; Zilbovicius, M; Arbix, G

1999-01-01

430

Work stress and health in Western European and post-communist countries: an East–West comparison study  

PubMed Central

Background There is evidence that psychosocial factors at work influence the risk of poor health in Western societies, but little is known about the effect of work stress in the former communist countries. The aim of this paper is to compare the association of work stress with self-rated health in Western European and post-communist countries. Methods Data from four epidemiological studies were used: the HAPIEE study (Poland, Russia and the Czech Republic), the Hungarian Epidemiological Panel (Hungary), the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study (Germany) and the Whitehall II study (UK). The overall sample consisted of 18 494 male and female workers aged 35–65 years. Results High effort-reward imbalance at work was associated with poor self-rated health. The adjusted odds ratios for the highest versus lowest quartile of the effort-reward ratio were 3.8 (95% CI 1.9 to 7.7) in Hungary, 3.6 (95% CI 2.3 to 5.7) in the Czech Republic, 2.5 (95% CI 1.5 to 4.1) in the UK, 2.3 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.5) in Germany, 1.5 (95% CI 1.0 to 2.1) in Poland and 1.4 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.8) in Russia. The differences in odds ratios between countries were statistically significant (p<0.05). A similar pattern was observed for the effect of overcommitment on poor health. Conclusion The association of effort-reward imbalance at work and of a high degree of work-related overcommitment with poor self-rated health was seen in all countries, but the size of the effects differed considerably. It does not appear that the effects in Eastern Europe are systematically stronger than in the West. PMID:19692735

Salavecz, G; Chandola, T; Pikhart, H; Dragano, N; Siegrist, J; Jöckel, K-H; Erbel, R; Pajak, A; Malyutina, S; Kubinova, R; Marmot, M; Bobak, M; Kopp, M

2014-01-01

431

Risk assessment of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

This thesis assesses the risk of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste (MSW). The goal is to determine the probability that the composted MSW could be a health hazard if it were used as a soil amendment. The research limited the assessment of the exposure risk to heavy metals found in raw MSW and its resulting compost. The thesis uses reviews of present literature to examine the food and soil ingestion exposure pathways. These pathways are assessed using the heavy metal concentrations found in MSW compost and the soil-plant partition coefficients of vegetables grown in soil mixed with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge leachate. The recommendation resulting from this research is that the Air Force should not use MSW composting as part of its future solid waste management plan. This alternative to landfilling contains a chronic health risk that is greater than the Environmental Protection Agency's guideline. If the Air Force would use MSW composting in the future, it may endanger Air Force personnel and others who use the compost created from Air Force MSW. Risk assessment, Heavy metals, Recycling municipal solid waste, Pollution, Composting.

Merrymon, T.L.

1993-09-01

432

Environmental health sciences center task force review on halogenated organics in drinking water  

PubMed Central

The disinfection of drinking water by chlorination has in recent years come under closer scrutiny because of the potential hazards associated with the production of stable chlorinated organic chemicals. Organic chemical contaminants are common to all water supplies and it is now well-established that chlorinated by-products are obtained under conditions of disinfection, or during tertiary treatment of sewage whose products can ultimately find their way into drinking water supplies. Naturally occurring humic substances which are invariably present in drinking waters are probably the source of chloroform and other halogenated methanes, and chloroform has shown up in every water supply investigated thus far. The Environmental Protection Agency is charged with the responsibility of assessing the public health effects resulting from the consumption of contaminated drinking water. It has specifically undertaken the task of determining whether organic contaminants or their chlorinated derivatives have a special impact, and if so, what alternatives there are to protect the consumer against bacterial and viral diseases that are transmitted through infected drinking waters. The impetus to look at these chemicals is not entirely without some prima facie evidence of potential trouble. Epidemiological studies suggested a higher incidence of cancer along the lower Mississippi River where the contamination from organic chemicals is particularly high. The conclusions from these studies have, to be sure, not gone unchallenged. The task of assessing the effects of chemicals in the drinking water is a difficult one. It includes many variables, including differences in water supplies and the temporal relationship between contamination and consumption of the finished product. It must also take into account the relative importance of the effects from these chemicals in comparison to those from occupational exposure, ingestion of contaminated foods, inhalation of polluted air, and many others. The susceptibility of different age, genetic, and ethnic groups within the population must also be carefully considered. The present review discusses: the reasons for disinfection; the general occurrence of chlorinated organics in drinking water; the chemistry in the synthesis of chlorinated organics under aqueous conditions; and alternatives to chlorine for disinfection. PMID:17539149

Deinzer, M.; Schaumburg, F.; Klein, E.

1978-01-01

433

Principles of Good Practice for Decision Analytic Modeling in HealthCare Evaluation: Report of the ISPOR Task Force on Good Research Practices—Modeling Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesMathematical modeling is used widely in economic evaluations of pharmaceuticals and other health-care technologies. Users of models in government and the private sector need to be able to evaluate the quality of models according to scientific criteria of good practice. This report describes the consensus of a task force convened to provide modelers with guidelines for conducting and reporting modeling

Milton C. Weinstein; Bernie O'Brien; John Hornberger; Joseph Jackson; Magnus Johannesson; Chris McCabe; Bryan R. Luce

2003-01-01

434

[Social Control, work world and the National Conferences of Health at the turn of the 20th century].  

PubMed

The practice of social control in the field of the worker's health has been facing barriers imposed by the globalization and the restructuring in the work world, either because of the weakness of the workers' unions, or by the absence of representatives of the various workers categories without formal work bond, belonging to the expressive informal/precarious market. In the beginning of the 20th century, big National Conferences of Health were marked by political contexts with significant differences, favoring the lack of articulation among the representative bases that were engaged mainly in fragmented demands and particulars interests. To contemplate on as the legitimate representation of the workers' classes is configured, either belonging to the formal market, or informal/precarious, is necessary against the evidences that the current arrangement is impeding the deepening of the specific worker's health issues. PMID:20069180

Lacaz, Francisco Antonio de Castro; Flório, Solange Maria Ribeiro

2009-01-01

435

The Role of Work in Psychological Health and Well-Being: A Conceptual, Historical, and Public Policy Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary theme of this article, which serves as the introductory contribution of a special section of the "American Psychologist," is that work plays a central role in the development, expression, and maintenance of psychological health. The argument underlying this assumption is articulated at the outset of the article in conjunction with a…

Blustein, David L.

2008-01-01

436

Expanding the risk assessment methodology for work-related health: A technique for incorporating multivariate curvilinear effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is conceptual and empirical evidence that supports the existence of possible curvilinear relationships between job characteristics and health outcomes, risk assessments usually rely on linear estimation approaches. However, this approach may not be conducive to good risk management practice. Where curvilinear effects exist, it is possible for there to be too much of a beneficial work characteristic, or

M. Karanika-Murray; A. S. Antoniou; G. Michaelides; T. Cox

2009-01-01

437

Programs-That-Work: CDC's Guide to Effective Programs that Reduce Health-Risk Behavior of Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated "Programs-That-Work" (PTW) in 1992 to identify health education programs with credible evidence of effectiveness and disseminate them to schools and youth agencies. Two tobacco use reduction programs and eight sexual risk behavior reduction programs were identified. This paper describes…

Collins, Janet; Robin, Leah; Wooley, Susan; Fenley, Dean; Hunt, Peter; Taylor, Julie; Haber, Deborah; Kolbe, Lloyd

2002-01-01

438

The Role of Work in Psychological Health and Well-Being: A Conceptual, Historical, and Public Policy Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary theme of this article, which serves as the introductory contribution of a special section of the American Psychologist, is that work plays a central role in the development, expression, and maintenance of psychological health. The argument underlying this assumption is articulated at the outset of the article in conjunction with a historical review of vocational psychology and industrial\\/organizational

David L. Blustein

2008-01-01

439

Mental Health, Substance Use, and Adaptive Coping among Social Work Students in the Aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study examined mental health symptomology, substance use, and adaptive coping among 416 social work students following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Among participants, 47% scored at or above the clinical level for depression, with 6% of students showing clinical PTSD-like symptoms, and 16.9% reporting substance use. Two thirds (66.9%)…

Lemieux, Catherine M.; Plummer, Carol A.; Richardson, Roslyn; Simon, Cassandra E.; Ai, Amy L.

2010-01-01

440

The impact of the introduction of a pilot electronic health record system on general practitioners' work practices in the Illawarra  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis assessed the impact of the use of information technology (IT), specifically, electronic health records (EHRs), on general practitioners' (GPs') clinical work practices in NSW, Australia. The research framework and context was taken from EHR initiatives proposed by the Australian Commonwealth and State Governments for improving the Australian Healthcare system. A new system that provided increased access to electronic

Karolyn Annette Spinks

2006-01-01

441

Health Professionals' Attitudes towards AOD-Related Work: Moving the Traditional Focus from Education and Training to Organizational Culture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aim: This article presents a critical review of research on health professionals' attitudes towards alcohol and other drug (AOD)-related work relevant to both researchers and practitioners. It moves beyond education and training programs to examine the relevance of organizational culture in influencing attitudes. Method: A review of research…

Skinner, Natalie; Roche, Ann M.; Freeman, Toby; Mckinnon, Anna

2009-01-01

442

Impact of Chronic Constipation on Health-Related Quality of Life, Work Productivity, and Healthcare Resource Use: An Analysis of the National Health and Wellness Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  There has been limited research addressing the effects of constipation on work productivity and healthcare resource use.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Aims  To assess the effect of chronic constipation on health outcomes and healthcare resource use.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Using data from the 2007 National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS), chronic constipation patients (n = 1,430) were propensity score-matched to controls (n = 1,430) on demographic and clinical characteristics. Differences between groups

Shawn X. Sun; Marco DiBonaventura; Fanta W. Purayidathil; Jan-Samuel Wagner; Omar Dabbous; Reema Mody

443

Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed -Print -MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM  

E-print Network

Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed - Print - MSN Health & Fitness http://health.msn.com/print.aspx?cp-documentid=100262630&page=0[8/24/2010 3:20:16 PM] Inner Workings of Gene Tied to Breast, Ovarian Cancer Revealed In 3 of Gene Tied to Breast Ovarian Cancer Revealed - Print - MSN Health & Fitness http

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

444

The School-to-Work Revolution. How Employers and Educators Are Joining Forces To Prepare Tomorrow's Skilled Workforce.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents a realistic appraisal of the state of efforts to link work and schooling and what can be expected of them. Chapter 1 focuses on the need for a new alliance between educators and employers. It discusses school-to-work (STW) and its variations and origins. Chapter 2 describes some new building blocks on which U.S. high school…

Olson, Lynn

445

Ebola virus disease cases among health care workers not working in Ebola treatment units--Liberia, June-August, 2014.  

PubMed

West Africa is experiencing the largest Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in recorded history. Health care workers (HCWs) are at increased risk for Ebola. In Liberia, as of August 14, 2014, a total of 810 cases of Ebola had been reported, including 10 clusters of Ebola cases among HCWs working in facilities that were not Ebola treatment units (non-ETUs). The Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and CDC investigated these clusters by reviewing surveillance data, interviewing county health officials, HCWs, and contact tracers, and visiting health care facilities. Ninety-seven cases of Ebola (12% of the estimated total) were identified among HCWs; 62 HCW cases (64%) were part of 10 distinct clusters in non-ETU health care facilities, primarily hospitals. Early recognition and diagnosis of Ebola in patients who were the likely source of introduction to the HCWs (i.e., source patients) was missed in four clusters. Inconsistent recognition and triage of cases of Ebola, overcrowding, limitations in layout of physical spaces, lack of training in the use of and adequate supply of personal protective equipment (PPE), and limited supervision to ensure consistent adherence to infection control practices all were observed. Improving infection control infrastructure in non-ETUs is essential for protecting HCWs. Since August, the Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare with a consortium of partners have undertaken collaborative efforts to strengthen infection control infrastructure in non-ETU health facilities. PMID:25412067

Matanock, Almea; Arwady, M Allison; Ayscue, Patrick; Forrester, Joseph D; Gaddis, Bethany; Hunter, Jennifer C; Monroe, Benjamin; Pillai, Satish K; Reed, Christie; Schafer, Ilana J; Massaquoi, Moses; Dahn, Bernice; De Cock, Kevin M

2014-11-21

446

Mental Health Practitioners' Reflections on Psychological Work in Uganda: Exploring Perspectives from Different Professions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Butabika-East London Link collaborated with Ugandan mental health services to train mental health professionals (psychiatric clinical officers, "PCOs", and clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, "Core Group") in psychological therapies. The aims of this research were to investigate how professionals were applying and…

Hall, Jennifer; d'Ardenne, Patricia; Nsereko, James; Kasujja, Rosco; Baillie, Dave; Mpango, Richard; Birabwa, Harriet; Hunter, Elaine

2014-01-01

447

Relationship of Teachers' Perceptions of Organizational Health and Work-Place Bullying  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study investigated the relationship between teachers' ratings of the organizational health of the school and the level of workplace bullying experienced. The relationship between organizational health, bullying, and the staff level factors of gender and age were analyzed. The study examined the survey ratings of 52 teachers from a…

Cabrera, Cesar M.

2012-01-01