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1

Evaluating the Environmental Health Work Force. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report contains all materials pertinent to an intensive evaluation of the environmental health work force conducted in 1986 and 1987. The materials relate to a workshop that was one of the key tools used in conducting the study to estimate environmental health personnel supply, demand, and need. The report begins with an overview and…

Levine Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

2

The health work force, generalism, and the social contract.  

PubMed Central

Since 1990, society has been evolving through a period of significant transformation. In response to an increasingly information-rich and knowledge-based environment, the work force for most of society is becoming more specialized. Medicine is one of the few areas developing a work force which emphasizes generalism. For our current needs, the transitional work force has overproduced physicians. Because the overproduction has been uneven by specialty, it is deceptive to evaluate growth collectively rather than by individual subspecialty. Future shifts in age and types of illness combined with enhanced technology will transform the public's expectations of the American health care system. The type and number of physicians that will be needed in the future will be substantially different than in the past, so current patterns in physician education may not address the population's future demands. Images Figure 1.

Sheldon, G F

1995-01-01

3

For the Health-Care Work Force, a Critical Prognosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States faces a looming shortage of many types of health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, dentists, pharmacists, and allied-health and public-health workers. There may also be a shortage of faculty members in the health sciences. The results will be felt acutely within the next 10 years. Colleges and health-science…

Rahn, Daniel W.; Wartman, Steven A.

2007-01-01

4

For the Health-Care Work Force, a Critical Prognosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The United States faces a looming shortage of many types of health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, dentists, pharmacists, and allied-health and public-health workers. There may also be a shortage of faculty members in the health sciences. The results will be felt acutely within the next 10 years. Colleges and health-science…

Rahn, Daniel W.; Wartman, Steven A.

2007-01-01

5

Mental health issues in the workplace: maintaining a productive work force.  

PubMed

Occupational health nurses must intervene early and validate the conditions and experiences of employees with psychiatric disabilities. Occupational health nurses must ensure employees are receiving appropriate treatment. They must be aware of and prepared to mitigate iatrogenic influences. Occupational health nurses can facilitate resolution of workplace conflicts and issues regarding changing supervisors or departments. They can also facilitate return to work by establishing clear restrictions and coordinating accommodations. compassionate and supportive, yet assertive, approach is key to managing mental health disability. It will, in most cases, facilitate successful return to full-time work. PMID:16921867

Raderstorf, Mark; Kurtz, Jennifer

2006-08-01

6

Women, work and musculoskeletal health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why are employed women at increased risk for upper limb musculoskeletal disorders and what can this tell us about the way work and family life shape health? Despite increases in women's labour force participation, gender differences in work-related health conditions have received little research attention. This appears be the first study to examine why employed women are much more likely

Lyndall Strazdins; Gabriele Bammer

2004-01-01

7

Work Place Health Promotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article deals with the question of whether and how much workplace health promotion measures have infiltrated the working world and which factors determined the results of health promotion programs for the enterprises. To answer this question we conducted a longitudinal study (measuring times: 1997 and 2003) in 150 enterprises in Hessen and Thueringen of the service sector and metal

Jutta Ulmer; Ferdinand Groeben

2005-01-01

8

Health Effects of Shift Work  

PubMed Central

More than 13.5 million American workers, close to 20 percent of the work force, are assigned to evening or night shifts. In some industries such as automobile, petrochemical and textile manufacturing the proportion of shift workers is greater than 50 percent. As the popularity of shift work and other “alternative work schedules” grows, concern is increasing over the disturbance created in the lives of workers and their families by these economically and socially useful innovations. Twenty percent of workers are unable to tolerate shift work. Daily physiologic variations termed circadian rhythms are interactive and require a high degree of phase relationship to produce subjective feelings of wellbeing. Disturbance of these activities, circadian desynchronization, whether from passage over time zones or from shift rotation, results in health effects such as disturbance of the quantity and quality of sleep, disturbance of gastrointestinal and other organ system activities, and aggravation of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, epilepsy and thyrotoxicosis. Worker selection can reduce the number of health problems resulting from shift work. The periodic examination of shift workers is recommended.

LaDou, Joseph

1982-01-01

9

Work Stress and Employee Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review and summarize the literature on work stress with particular emphasis on those studies that examined the effects of work characteristics on employee health. Although there is not convincing evidence that job stressors cause health effects, the indirect evidence is strongly suggestive of a work stress effect. This evidence comes from occupational studies that show differences in health and

Daniel C. Ganster; John Schaubroeck

1991-01-01

10

Creative Work and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Employees with greater control over their own activities have better health. People who are employed give up some control over their own activities for pay, yet employment is associated with better health. Perhaps paid jobs provide resources for productive self-expression that make up for the loss of autonomy. We find that paid employment is…

Mirowsky, John; Ross, Catherine E.

2007-01-01

11

Developing public health work in local health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current government policy aims to create a wider 'community of public health prac- tice' within local systems, working in a coherent and coordinated way in partnership with local people to reduce health inequalities. However, for this to happen policy- makers and practitioners across the public sector have to reconsider boundaries, role definitions, professional identities and responsibilities. On the basis of

Jennie Popay; Sara Mallinson; Sara MacKian

2004-01-01

12

Making Health Communication Programs Work.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This book is a revision of the original 'Making Health Communication Programs Work', first printed in 1989, which the Office of Cancer Communications (OCC, now the Office of Communications) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed to guide communi...

2004-01-01

13

Health Literacy and Social Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Low health literacy is a societal problem, the significance of which has been increasingly recognized in recent years by the United States healthcare community and the federal government. However, its implications have thus far garnered little attention in the field of social work. This paper examines commonly accepted definitions of health

Singleton, Kate

14

Health Literacy and Social Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Low health literacy is a societal problem, the significance of which has been increasingly recognized in recent years by the United States healthcare community and the federal government. However, its implications have thus far garnered little attention in the field of social work. This paper examines commonly accepted definitions of health

Singleton, Kate

15

[Health consequences of shift work].  

PubMed

In humans many biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes occur in a rhythmic manner. Accumulating experimental and epidemiological evidence indicate that disturbances in biological rhythms could lead to unfavorable alterations in body function, thus exerting negative health impact. In industrialized countries, it is estimated that between 15 and 30% of the working population is involved in some kind of permanent night work and rotating shift work. Today, shift work is regarded as a significant occupational stressor which has marked negative effects on both health and well-being. This review surveys data on association between shift work and health problems, including sleep disorders, cardiovascular disease, peptic ulcer, metabolic syndrome, breast cancer and undesirable pregnancy outcome. PMID:22010477

Andrzejczak, Dariusz; Kapa?a-Kempa, Magdalena; Zawilska, Jolanta B

2011-01-01

16

Annual report on contractor work force restructuring, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work force restructuring and community transition activities at all sites. It outlines work force restructuring activity for FY 1997, changing separation patterns, cost savings and separation costs, program assessment, activities to mitigate restructuring impacts, community transition activities, status of displaced workers, lessons learned, and emerging issues in worker and community transition. Work force restructuring and community transition activities for defense nuclear sites are summarized, as are work force restructuring activities at non-defense sites.

NONE

1998-03-01

17

Task Force Report for Revision of State Plan for Mental Health Services.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

State planning for mental health services is addressed in a report prepared by the South Central Connecticut Regional Mental Health Planning Council. A task force was established to work on an ongoing basis to obtain information about mental health resour...

1972-01-01

18

On the optimal safe allocation and scheduling of a work force in a toxic substance environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

An approach using linear programming to model and to solve the problem of safe allocation and scheduling of a manufacturing work force in a toxic substance environment is presented. The firm's objective is to maximize utilization of the work force, without violating any OSHA (US Occupational Safety and Health Administration) standards. The basic assumption is that engineering controls are either

RAMIRO VILLEDA; BURTON V. DEAN

1990-01-01

19

Health Care Workers: Avoiding Infections at Work  

MedlinePLUS

... Web version Health Care Workers: Avoiding Infections at Work Health Care Workers: Avoiding Infections at Work How can I keep myself from getting an infection at work? As a health care worker, you may be ...

20

Joint Work-Force Standards: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps. Armed Forces Radio and Television Broadcast Engineering and Maintenance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Standard defines the workload and prescribes the procedures used to determine work-force requirements for engineering and maintenance operations of the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS). It contains work centers, maintenance management...

M. Russell

1985-01-01

21

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group (TPHCWG) Field Demonstration Report: Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A demonstration of the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group (TPHCWG) approach for assessing human health risk at weathered petroleum release sites was performed at a former underground storage tank (UST) release site at Elmendorf Air Force B...

D. A. Reed T. R. Sterner E. A. Merrill

2001-01-01

22

Industrial Robots Join the Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Robots--powerful, versatile, and easily adapted to new operations--may usher in a new industrial age. Workers throughout the labor force could be affected, as well as the nature of the workplace, skill requirements of jobs, and concomitant shifts in vocational education. (SK)|

Martin, Gail M.

1982-01-01

23

Putting Robots to Work with Force & Friction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the concept of pushing, as well as the relationship between force and mass. Students practice measurement skills using pan scales and rulers to make predictions about mass and distance. A LEGO® MINDSTORMS® NXT robot is used to test their hypotheses. By the end of the activity, students have a better understanding of robotics, mass and friction and the concept of predicting.

Applying Mechatronics to Promote Science (AMPS) GK-12 Program,

24

Interstate Migrant Education Task Force: Migrant Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Because ill-clothed, sick, or hungry migrant children learn poorly, the Task Force has emphasized the migrant health situation in 1979. Migrant workers have a 33% shorter life expectancy, a 25% higher infant mortality rate, and a 25% higher death rate from tuberculosis and other communicable diseases than the national average. Common among…

Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

25

Environmental education work force pipeline strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an educational program designed to provide a pool of highly qualified administrative, technical, and managerial graduates that are familiar with the Hanford Site and business operations. The program is designed to provide work experience and mentoring to a culturally diverse student base which enhances affirmative employment goals. Short-term and long-term objectives of the program are outlined in the report, and current objectives are discussed in more detail. Goals to be completed by the year 2003 are aimed at defining the criteria necessary to establish partnerships between schools, community organizations, and human resources departments. Actions to be implemented includes providing instructors and equipment, enhancing skills of local teachers, and establishing collaboration with human resources organizations. Long-term goals of the program are to ensure a constant supply of qualified, trained workers to support industry missions. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Ortega, S.U.; Jackson, E.R.

1992-11-01

26

Nurses' ratings of their health and professional work environments.  

PubMed

Interactions between nursing work environments and nurses' health are of growing significance, given the aging work force, nursing shortage, and workplace health risks. This study examined relationships among nurses' ratings of health behaviors, health status, and professional work environments. Registered nurses (N = 3,132) from five multi-state settings completed an electronic survey. Participants' general health ratings were good, yet stress levels remained the one consistent predictor of poorer health ratings and work environment ratings in regression models. Additionally, more than half of the participants reported being overweight, only 50% met physical activity standards, more than two thirds reported a history of back or needlestick injuries, and 44% and 62% reported experiencing verbal abuse by colleagues and patients, respectively. Contrary to other studies, professional work environment as measured in this study did not predict nurses' health ratings. Further study of the impact of stress on long-term health outcomes and work force retention, as well as on worksite health strategies, is needed. PMID:20677722

Tucker, Sharon J; Harris, Marcelline R; Pipe, Teri B; Stevens, Susanna R

2010-06-01

27

Hispanics in the Work Force, Part II: Hispanic Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper evaluates the status of Hispanic women in the United States work force. First, demographic information on age patterns, fertility rates, and educational attainment is reviewed. Then, labor market status is assessed in relation to Hispanic women's labor force participation, employment patterns, and poverty. Next, the Federal response to…

Escutia, Marta M.; Prieto, Margarita

28

Hispanics in the Work Force, Part II: Hispanic Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper evaluates the status of Hispanic women in the United States work force. First, demographic information on age patterns, fertility rates, and educational attainment is reviewed. Then, labor market status is assessed in relation to Hispanic women's labor force participation, employment patterns, and poverty. Next, the Federal response to…

Escutia, Marta M.; Prieto, Margarita

29

Volunteer Work and Learning: Hidden Dimensions of Labour Force Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter explores the links between learning and voluntary work, a topic that is usually absent both in the academic literature\\u000a and in policy debates. Two reasons may account for the scant attention paid to this issue. First, unpaid work (such as household\\u000a work and volunteer work) is seldom considered as ‘real’ work, and therefore the literature on labour force

Daniel Schugurensky; Karsten Mündel

30

Our health and theirs: Forced migration, othering, and public health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses ‘othering’ theory to explore how forced migrants are received in developed countries and considers the implications of this for public health. It identifies a variety of mechanisms by which refugees, asylum seekers and irregular migrants are positioned as ‘the other’ and are defined and treated as separate, distant and disconnected from the host communities in receiving countries.

Natalie J. Grove; Anthony B. Zwi

2006-01-01

31

Push Forces Exerted in Sixty-Five Common Working Positions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Experiments were conducted to measure the maximum isometric horizontal push forces exertable in 65 common working positions. The subject (45 male college students), while pushing horizontally, either anchored their feet against a footrest or braced themse...

K. H. E. Kroemer

1969-01-01

32

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces on the vertical columns while restoration of collapsed roof takes place. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Passenger Car Shop, Southwest corner of Pratt & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

33

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section...SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND WATER EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free...

2009-10-01

34

Effects of Shift Work on Air Force Security Police Personnel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

US Air Force security police duties involve the potential necessity for making split second life and death decisions which could well affect national security. Since previous studies have clearly documented that shift work has a significant effect on thos...

M. L. Goslin

1986-01-01

35

Integrating Work and Family: Women's Health Outcomes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An exploratory study examined the relationship between individual, family, and work variables and working mothers' health. The study also investigated the relationship between health management strategies and health. A cross-sectional survey design was used to gather data from 85 women who were married, employed 20 hours a week or more, and had…

Killien, Marcia

36

Children of Working Mothers. Special Labor Force Report. Bulletin 2158.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Part of a Special Labor Force Report series, this bulletin on children of working mothers discusses the increase in the number of children with working mothers as of March 1981, and describes major reasons for this growth. The bulletin consists of an article first published February 1982 in the "Monthly Labor Review," additional tables providing…

Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

37

Dielectric elastomer transducers with enhanced force output and work density  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate that the force output and work density of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dielectric elastomer transducers can be significantly enhanced by the addition of high permittivity titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The nanocomposites are capable of maintaining the actuation strain performance of the pure PDMS at relatively low electric fields while increasing the force output and work density due to mechanical reinforcement. A model relating the Maxwell stress to the measured force from the actuator was used to determine the dielectric permittivity at high electric fields thus providing results that can be directly correlated to device performance. This approach toward higher work density materials should enable smaller, lighter, and less intrusive actuator systems ideal for biomedical and robotic devices in particular.

Stoyanov, Hristiyan; Brochu, Paul; Niu, Xiaofan; Della Gaspera, Enrico; Pei, Qibing

2012-06-01

38

Labour Markets and Organisational Change: Future Working Structures for an Ageing Work Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flexible manufacturing systems, team work with decentralisation of decision-making, integration of tasks and multiple allocation\\u000a across functional barriers demand a skilled work force prepared for continuous learning and adaptation. It is common to see\\u000a a younger, well-educated and trained work force as being required for such a production environment. A closer empirical look\\u000a at most of the internal labour markets

Peter Auer; Stefan Speckesser

1997-01-01

39

[Psychosocial risks at work and occupational health].  

PubMed

The changes on work processes and job design in recent decades are focused in the demographic, economic, political, and technological aspects. These changes have created new psychosocial risks at work that affect the health and quality of workplace, increasing stress levels among workers. The aim of this study is to present such risks, their consequences, and some recommendations to promote health at the workplace as a strategy to improve public health of the population. The study is divided into five points in which: (1) introduces the concept of risk factors and psychosocial work, (2) describes the main emerging psychosocial risks labor, (3) provides some information on the prevalence of psychosocial risks at work in Europe and its consequences, (4) recommendations for health promotion in the workplace, and (5) describes the objective of Occupational Health Psychology and concludes with the recommendations to promote psychosocial health in the workplace as a strategy to improve public health of the population. PMID:22858772

Gil-Monte, Pedro R

2012-06-01

40

Thailand's Work and Health Transition  

PubMed Central

Thailand has experienced a rapid economic transition from agriculture to industry and services, and from informal to formal employment. It has much less state regulation and worker representation relative to developed nations, who underwent these transitions more slowly and sequentially, decades earlier. We examine the strengthening of Thai government policy and legislation affecting worker’s health, responding to international norms, a new democratic constitution, fear of foreign importer embargos and several fatal workplace disasters. We identify key challenges remaining for Thai policy makers, including legislation enforcement and the measurement of impacts on worker’s mental and physical health.

Kelly, Matthew; Strazdins, Lyndall; Dellora, Tarie; Khamman, Suwanee; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian C

2011-01-01

41

The Aging Work Force: A Guide for Higher Education Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume offers 15 papers on the "graying" of the college and university work force in the context of national demographic trends. The papers are arranged in groups which address: growing older, the graying of America, adapting to changing times, retirement and retirement planning, and the corporate example. The following papers are presented:…

Julius, Nancy B., Ed.; Krauss, Herbert H., Ed.

42

Literacy in the Work Force. Report Number 947.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Up to 10 percent of U.S. workers are either functionally illiterate or marginally literate. These workers increase the operational costs of their employers and restrain companies' flexibility. The high school graduates of the 1990s will exacerbate the problem by entering the work force with marginal literacy skills. A survey of 1,600 manufacturing…

Lund, Leonard; McGuire, E. Patrick

43

United States health professionals in international health work.  

PubMed Central

This article reports results of a survey of 1,257 potential employers of US health professionals overseas, interviews with informants in international health, an analysis of career patterns of a small group of international health workers, and a review of numbers of health professionals trained in schools of public health for international health work. There are approximately 9,000 US health professionals in the international health field. Doctors (1,400), nurses (1,500) and administrators (900) are the largest groups. Church-related agencies (2,200 people), private voluntary agencies (1,700 people), and universities (1,000 people) are the largest employers.

Baker, T D; Weisman, C; Piwoz, E

1984-01-01

44

14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151...51 Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the sponsor (or any public agency acting as...

2013-01-01

45

Class position, work experience, and health.  

PubMed

This paper develops a Marxist analysis of the relationships between class position, work experience, the psychological effects of this experience, and subsequent health outcomes. Specifically, it is argued that the structural imperatives of capitalist production make work for those in working-class positions subject to greater routinization and less control than work for those in other class positions. Routinization and control are argued, in turn, to predictably affect two key psychological variables, self-esteem and stress, which are further argued to affect health in predictable ways. Position in the capitalist labor process is thus linked to health via the psychological consequences of the immediate work experience it engenders. Survey data from workers, managers, supervisors, and semi-autonomous employees in five capitalist firms are used to test the descriptive adequacy of this model linking capitalism to ill health for those in working-class positions. PMID:3781716

Schwalbe, M L; Staples, C L

1986-01-01

46

Pilot mental health: expert working group recommendations.  

PubMed

Following a March 27, 2012, incident in which a pilot of a major commercial airline experienced a serious disturbance in his mental health, the Aerospace Medical Association formed an Ad Hoc Working Group on Pilot Mental Health. The working group met several times and analyzed current medical standards for evaluating pilot mental health. The result of the working group was a letter sent to the FAA and other organizations worldwide interested in medical standards. The Committee found that it is neither productive nor cost effective to perform extensive psychiatric evaluations as part of the routine pilot aeromedical assessment. However it did recommend greater attention be given to mental health issues by aeromedical examiners, especially to the more common and detectable mental health conditions and life stressors that can affect pilots and flight performance. They encouraged this through increased education and global recognition of the importance of mental health in aviation safety. PMID:23316549

2012-12-01

47

Force Health Protection: Nutrition and Exercise Resource Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is my great pleasure to present the first edition of 'Force Health Protection: Nutrition and Exercise Resource Manual .' Wellness and health promotion are high priority goals for the Navy. Maintaining personal fitness and sensible nutrition habits is e...

A. Singh P. A. Deuster T. L. Bennett

1999-01-01

48

Is Work Beneficial to Good Health?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unemployment and insecurity at work are a source of stress and may create a threat to individual physical and psychological health. The purpose of this study was to examine the connection between personal, functional, and professional variables and reports of how the health of hospital patients is impacted by financial status in Israel. One hundred and forty three hospitalized patients

Roni Gagin; Shiri Shinan-Altman

2012-01-01

49

Experiences of working with the tobacco issue in the context of health promoting hospitals and health services: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

The worldwide Health Promoting Hospital and Health Services (HPH) network was initiated by the World Health Organizations in the late 1980s. The goal of the network is to change the focus of health services from curing patients to also embrace disease prevention and health promotion. In Sweden the network started in 1996, and involves mainly hospitals and primary care. The network members collaborate in task forces, one of which is working on the tobacco issue. There is limited evidence on the value of working within an HPH organization. The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of members of the Swedish HPH network tobacco task force. Focus group interviews with task force members were analyzed using implementation theory. Three themes, overall experiences of working with tobacco issues, experiences of working with "free from tobacco in connection with surgery", and experiences of work in the HPH tobacco task force, emerged from the interviews. The results show that working with the tobacco issue in the context of health-promoting hospitals and health services met with difficulties involving the following important factors: evidence, context, facilitation and adopter characteristics. Leadership, one contextual factor, at national and local level, seems to be crucial if the work is going to succeed. The tobacco task force of the HPH network is an important facilitator supporting the task. PMID:21556199

Carlfjord, Siw; Kristenson, Margareta; Lindberg, Malou

2011-02-15

50

Experiences of Working with the Tobacco Issue in the Context of Health Promoting Hospitals and Health Services: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

The worldwide Health Promoting Hospital and Health Services (HPH) network was initiated by the World Health Organizations in the late 1980s. The goal of the network is to change the focus of health services from curing patients to also embrace disease prevention and health promotion. In Sweden the network started in 1996, and involves mainly hospitals and primary care. The network members collaborate in task forces, one of which is working on the tobacco issue. There is limited evidence on the value of working within an HPH organization. The aim of this study was to investigate the experiences of members of the Swedish HPH network tobacco task force. Focus group interviews with task force members were analyzed using implementation theory. Three themes, overall experiences of working with tobacco issues, experiences of working with “free from tobacco in connection with surgery”, and experiences of work in the HPH tobacco task force, emerged from the interviews. The results show that working with the tobacco issue in the context of health-promoting hospitals and health services met with difficulties involving the following important factors: evidence, context, facilitation and adopter characteristics. Leadership, one contextual factor, at national and local level, seems to be crucial if the work is going to succeed. The tobacco task force of the HPH network is an important facilitator supporting the task.

Carlfjord, Siw; Kristenson, Margareta; Lindberg, Malou

2011-01-01

51

Precarious employment, working hours, work-life conflict and health in hotel work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Precarious or temporary work is associated with adverse outcomes including low control over working hours, work-life conflict and stress. The rise in precarious employment is most marked in the service sector but little research has been done on its health effects in this sector. This study compares permanent and temporary workers in the hotel industry, where working hours are highly

Maria McNamara; Philip Bohle; Michael Quinlan

2011-01-01

52

Work, Obesity, and Occupational Safety and Health  

PubMed Central

There is increasing evidence that obesity and overweight may be related, in part, to adverse work conditions. In particular, the risk of obesity may increase in high-demand, low-control work environments, and for those who work long hours. In addition, obesity may modify the risk for vibration-induced injury and certain occupational musculoskeletal disorders. We hypothesized that obesity may also be a co–risk factor for the development of occupational asthma and cardiovascular disease that and it may modify the worker’s response to occupational stress, immune response to chemical exposures, and risk of disease from occupational neurotoxins. We developed 5 conceptual models of the interrelationship of work, obesity, and occupational safety and health and highlighted the ethical, legal, and social issues related to fuller consideration of obesity’s role in occupational health and safety.

Schulte, Paul A.; Wagner, Gregory R.; Ostry, Aleck; Blanciforti, Laura A.; Cutlip, Robert G.; Krajnak, Kristine M.; Luster, Michael; Munson, Albert E.; O'Callaghan, James P.; Parks, Christine G.; Simeonova, Petia P.; Miller, Diane B.

2007-01-01

53

VIRGINIA PLAN OF COOPERATIVE COUNTY HEALTH WORK  

PubMed Central

In the development of public health activities the particular needs of the locality to be served should be of prime consideration. If at the start it is evident that only one line of work is possible, it should be that which will yield the greatest returns in lives saved and sickness prevented for the money available.

Draper, W. F.

1921-01-01

54

CHILDREN IN BRAZIL: HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WORK  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Brazil, even though school participation is compulsory for children between 7 to 14 years old, some of them are not enrolled in the education system. One of the main reasons is their participation to the work market that may have an impact on their health. Moreover, child's school attendance in public schools usually insures a meal to child but

Carine Milcent; Jack Huguenin; Danielle Carusi-Machado

2005-01-01

55

Maternal and Child Health Issues and Female Labor Force Participation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviewing health related "costs" of female labor force participation, this paper examines four highly salient maternal and child health issues. Discussion of acute illness in day care settings begins with an overview of studies on day care and illness and focuses on hepatitis A, appropriate sanitation, and indications of research on respiratory…

Howze, Dorothy C.; And Others

56

Does Europe need immigrants? Population and work force projections.  

PubMed

European countries defined as all Northern and Western Europe including the former East Germany had a population of 498.4 million in 1990. In 1990 Western Europe had 374.4 million people. The European Community (EC) makes u 92% of the total population. Projections forecast a peak of the EC population (excluding the former East Germany) in 2005 at 334.2 million compared with 327 million in 1989, then declining to 332.5 million in 2010, 329.0 million min 2015 and 324.5 million in 2020. In Europe outside the East, the 20-24 year old work force entrance age group will drop from 29,860,000 in 1990 to 26,400,000 in 1005 and 23,480,000 in 2000: decreasing by 6,380,000 or 21.3%. Fertility rose by 22% in Sweden between 1985 and 1990, the rise of negligible in France and Belgium, but 2% in the UK and Switzerland, 4% in the Netherlands, 13% in Norway, 16% in Denmark, and even 6% in Germany and Luxembourg. The Ec labor force was 145 million in 1990 (excluding East Germany); it is projected to peak at 146.9 million in 2000, decline slowly until 2010 and decline faster up to 2025 with the steepest decline occurring in Germany and Italy. Unemployment rates would change from the 1990 estimate of 15.7 million to 15.5 million in 1995. Net migration into the 12 EC countries was on average -4,800 from 1965 to 1969; 357,000 from 1970 to 1974; 164,400 from 1980 to 1984; and 533,000/year from 1985 to 1989 as a result of the rise of asylum applicants and migration of ethnic Germans into Germany. Increased immigration is not needed to satisfy work force shortages for the next 10-20 years in Western Europe or in the EC. Other issues addressed are the economic activity forecast, the hidden labor supply, skill shortages, Eastern Europe, and teenage shortage. High-level manpower movements, immigration of asylum seekers, and illegal immigration will continue, but in the long run the conditions of employment and welfare support have to be improved for the women of Europe. PMID:12285858

Coleman, D A

1992-01-01

57

Women in construction: occupational health and working conditions.  

PubMed

Construction is one of the largest industries in the United States, employing 7.6 million workers, or about 5% of the US work force. More women have taken jobs in the construction industry over the last two decades, as they have in other nontraditional industries. In 1997, there were 8.1 million construction workers, of whom 781,000 (9%) were women. Approximately 2% of those were employed as skilled tradeswomen. There is no disputing that construction work is dangerous. Seventeen percent of all fatal on-the-job injuries occur in construction, which is about three times its 6% share of total employment. In this paper, we review the medical literature on the safety and health hazards for women working in the construction industry. Women have a different pattern of fatal injuries and some differences in patterns of nonfatal injuries than men and report unique problems and concerns related to working in this industry. PMID:10808659

Welch, L S; Goldenhar, L M; Hunting, K L

2000-01-01

58

Asbestos health problems force insulation removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Employee health concerns linked to asbestos insulation at industrial facilities will require costly containment or removal. Although the 15,000 pending lawsuits target 250 manufacturers and vendors, building owners and managers foresee possible liability in the future because of prior knowledge that the material may cause inflammation or cancer of the lungs after inhalation over a period of time. At least

1982-01-01

59

[Quality life of working health care professionals].  

PubMed

In this article the author presents the theoretical concepts of quality of life, labor satisfaction, and service professions. Then describes the politic-institution characteristics of the actual national context in which the professionals that work in the Health field, developed their daily work. Presents a proposal of indicators, specially constructed by the author to analyze the labor context, that are being used in different research projects she developed since the beginning on XXI century. Finally presents the necessity of generate project that considers protagonist points of view and allow the construct of diagnosis of the situation, that generate public policies to answer the problem. PMID:20038992

Tonon de Toscano, Graciela

60

Working together for health and human rights.  

PubMed

The right to a standard of living adequate for health and well-being is being denied to vast numbers of people all over the world through increasing disparities in income and in wealth. In the name of economic development, a number of international and national policies have increased the grossly uneven distribution of income, with ever-growing numbers of people living in poverty as well as in increasing depths of poverty. Globalization, crippling levels of external debt, and the 'structural adjustment' policies of international agencies have expanded the numbers and the suffering of people living in poverty and have resulted in the neglect of government-funded social programs, of regulations protecting the environment, and of human development. Access to medical care, an essential element in the protection of health, is difficult for many, including the 44 million people in the United States who lack insurance coverage for the cost of medical care services. Working together for health and human rights also requires promotion of the right to peace. The right to life and health is threatened not only by the existence and active deployment of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, chemical and biological weapons and anti-personnel landmines, but also other weapons. The twentieth century has been the bloodiest in human history, with an estimated 250 wars, more than 110 million people killed, countless people wounded and at the least 50 million refugees. Health workers must work together with people in our communities for the promotion of health and human rights, which, in Sandwell and elsewhere, are inextricably intertwined. PMID:11130630

Sidel, V W

61

Air Force Health Study. An Epidemiologic Investigation of Health Effects in Air Force Personnel Following Exposure to Herbicides. Volume 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of the serum dioxin analysis of the Air Force Health Study 1987 examination cycle. Its purpose is to determine whether long-term health effects are associated with serum dioxin levels for the participants in the study. For...

A. S. Brockman M. B. Lustik R. H. Roegner S. C. Henderson W. D. Grubbs

1991-01-01

62

Flexible work in call centres: Working hours, work-life conflict & health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Call-centre workers encounter major psychosocial pressures, including high work intensity and undesirable working hours. Little is known, however, about whether these pressures vary with employment status and how they affect work-life conflict and health. Questionnaire data were collected from 179 telephone operators in Sydney, Australia, of whom 124 (69.3%) were female and 54 (30.2%) were male. Ninety-three (52%) were permanent

Philip Bohle; Harold Willaby; Michael Quinlan; Maria McNamara

2011-01-01

63

Asbestos health problems force insulation removal  

SciTech Connect

Employee health concerns linked to asbestos insulation at industrial facilities will require costly containment or removal. Although the 15,000 pending lawsuits target 250 manufacturers and vendors, building owners and managers foresee possible liability in the future because of prior knowledge that the material may cause inflammation or cancer of the lungs after inhalation over a period of time. At least five of the nine major manufacturers no longer make asbestos insulation. Cost estimates for abatement range from $2.00 to $20 per square foot for treating and encapsulating the material or disposing of its. No decision has been made on who is financially responsible for the costs. A directory lists 81 suppliers of industrial insulation. (DCK)

Fleming, J.

1982-08-09

64

Flexible work in call centres: Working hours, work-life conflict & health.  

PubMed

Call-centre workers encounter major psychosocial pressures, including high work intensity and undesirable working hours. Little is known, however, about whether these pressures vary with employment status and how they affect work-life conflict and health. Questionnaire data were collected from 179 telephone operators in Sydney, Australia, of whom 124 (69.3%) were female and 54 (30.2%) were male. Ninety-three (52%) were permanent full-time workers, 37 (20.7%) were permanent part-time, and 49 (27.4%) were casual employees. Hypothesised structural relationships between employment status, working hours and work organisation, work-life conflict and health were tested using partial least squares modelling in PLS (Chin, 1998). The final model demonstrated satisfactory fit. It supported important elements of the hypothesised structure, although four of the proposed paths failed to reach significance and the fit was enhanced by adding a path. The final model indicated that casual workers reported more variable working hours which were relatively weakly associated with greater dissatisfaction with hours. The interaction of schedule control and variability of hours also predicted dissatisfaction with hours. Conversely, permanent workers reported greater work intensity, which was associated with both lower work schedule control and greater work-life conflict. Greater work-life conflict was associated with more fatigue and psychological symptoms. Labour market factors and the undesirability of longer hours in a stressful, high-intensity work environment appear to have contributed to the results. PMID:20696420

Bohle, Philip; Willaby, Harold; Quinlan, Michael; McNamara, Maria

2010-08-08

65

Masked Symptoms: Mid-Life Women, Health, and Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (1997) reveal that relatively few mid-life women offer ill health as a reason for leaving their job or downshifting to part-time employment, implying that the role of ill health may be inconsequential in effecting changing patterns in mid-life women's labour force activity. In contrast, interviews with…

Abramson, Zelda

2007-01-01

66

Workplace bullying, working environment and health.  

PubMed

Improved work organisation could be of importance for decreased bullying in workplaces. Participants in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) responded to questions about work and workplace and whether they had been bullied during the past year in 2006. Those in worksites with at least five employees who did not report that they had been bullied in 2006 and without workplace change between 2006 and 2008 constituted the final sample (n=1,021 men and 1,182 women). Work characteristics and workplace factors in 2006 were used in multiple logistic regression as predictors of bullying in 2008. Separate analyses were performed for work characteristics and workplace factors respectively. Adjustments for demographic factors were made in all analyses. The question used for bullying was: "Are you exposed to personal persecution by means of vicious words or actions from your superiors or your workmates?" Such persecution any time during the past year was defined as bullying. For both genders organisational change and conflicting demands were identified as risk factors, and good decision authority as a protective factor. Dictatorial leadership, lack of procedural justice and attitude of expendability were male and lack of humanity a female risk factor for bullying. PMID:22453205

Oxenstierna, Gabriel; Elofsson, Stig; Gjerde, Maria; Magnusson Hanson, Linda; Theorell, Töres

2012-03-28

67

Generation Y, Shifting Funding Structures, and Health Care Reform: Reconceiving the Public Health Paradigm through Social Work.  

PubMed

Public health agencies are facing a convergence of forces that require a reexamination of the existing paradigm. The need to replace an aging workforce with a new generation that possesses a different worldview, in the context of budget austerity, will be challenging. In addition, the uncertainty of health care reform poses a challenge for public health leadership. This "perfect storm" provides the opportunity for the social work paradigm to come in and fill the void. PMID:24074132

Gass, Eric; Bezold, Maureen P

2013-11-01

68

Predictability, Work-Family Conflict, and Intent to Stay: An Air Force Case Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A survey was completed by 362 active duty Air Force members in December 2000 regarding their perceptions of schedule predictability, work- family conflict, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to stay with the Air Force. Theory suggests...

P. J. Obruba J. Captain

2001-01-01

69

Multicultural Group Work: A Force for Developing and Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Multicultural group work represents a powerful tool for helping and healing in the context of human diversity. This article summarizes multicultural group work, including task, psychoeducational, counseling, and psychotherapy groups, and describes a group work model for multicultural assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Group work

Anderson, Donald

2007-01-01

70

Research on Organizational Issues in Health Care Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rich body of knowledge spans organizational topics relevant to the practice, conceptual development and planning of social work health care services. At a time when health care organizations are experiencing major changes in their structure and financing, organizational research informs both the system adjustments and leadership which social work can offer the health care field. Organizational research on health

Leonard J. Marcus

1990-01-01

71

Reduction-in-Force: Working Policies and Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The reduction-in-force (RIF) policies presented here are intended to represent the variety of approaches currently being used throughout the nation. They were obtained through inquiries to personnel in more than 100 U.S. school districts. They are presented to give principals and assistant principals information to allow them to play an…

National Association of Secondary School Principals, Reston, VA.

72

Clinical Priorities: Strengthening Social Work Practice in Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the context of health services, decisions regarding priorities for social work intervention and, hence, the allocation of social work expertise and resources have traditionally been based on an interaction between social work knowledge, principles and skills, historical precedence, health policy, multidisciplinary team requirements, and manager opinion. In the current context of health services, traditional practices are questioned and it

Ros Giles; Susan Gould; Christopher Hart; Jennifer Swancott

2007-01-01

73

Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1,299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer.

Wolfe, W.H.; Michalek, J.E.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA)); Rahe, A. (QuesTech Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Silva, J. (Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Thomas, W.F.; Lustik, M.B.; Grubbs, W.D.; Roegner, R.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA)); Karrison, T.G. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Williams, D.E. (Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-10-10

74

Forced migration and child health and mortality in Angola.  

PubMed

This study investigates the effects of forced migration on child survival and health in Angola. Using survey data collected in Luanda, Angola, in 2004, just two years after the end of that country's prolonged civil war, we compare three groups: migrants who moved primarily due to war, migrants whose moves were not directly related to war, and non-migrants. First, we examine the differences among the three groups in under-five mortality. Using an event-history approach, we find that hazards of child death in any given year were higher in families that experienced war-related migration in the same year or in the previous year, net of other factors. To assess longer-term effects of forced migration, we examine hazards of death of children who were born in Luanda, i.e., after migrants had reached their destinations. We again observe a disadvantage of forced migrants, but this disadvantage is explained by other characteristics. When looking at the place of delivery, number of antenatal consultations, and age-adequate immunization of children born in Luanda, we again detect a disadvantage of forced migrants relative to non-migrants, but now this disadvantage also extends to migrants who came to Luanda for reasons other than war. Finally, no differences across the three groups in child morbidity and related health care seeking behavior in the two weeks preceding the survey are found. We interpret these results within the context of the literature on short- and long-term effects of forced migration on child health. PMID:19879027

Avogo, Winfred Aweyire; Agadjanian, Victor

2009-10-29

75

Living the reality of forced sex work: perspectives from young migrant women sex workers in northern Vietnam.  

PubMed

Young women are often lured or forced into selling sex as a result of migrating from rural to urban areas to find work. In this setting, they are exposed to high-risk situations, which may leave them vulnerable to exploitation. Using interviews with young migrant women currently working as sex workers in northern Vietnam, we recorded the perspectives of their initiation into sex work and life as a sex worker. The study found that high levels of forced sex and sexual exploitation were experienced by the majority of the young women interviewed. The young women describe their entry into sex work, first sexual experience (intercourse), violence, and condom negotiation and use. Although access to health care was available, the young women perceived the stigma attached to sex work as a barrier to receiving health care, and thus, preferred health education and care from peers. Health education programs focusing on peer education and support are essential for protecting and empowering these young women. In addition, policies and programs must work toward effective strategies to protect young migrant women. PMID:15973256

Rushing, Rosanne; Watts, Charlotte; Rushing, Sharon

76

Manning the Force Through Immigration: Making the American Dream Work for the Armed Forces.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Force struggles with recruitment and retention. Focused recruitment on legal permanent resident immigrants, assisted by new national immigration legislation giving eligible service members the right to accelerate immigrant visa petition interviews for...

A. S. Kong

2001-01-01

77

Group Process and Group Work in Health Social Work Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent physiological evidence supports social work's historic view that people are social by definition and that they live and function as members of a variety of human groups. This affirmed knowledge reinforces social work's focus on social functioning and requires a reconceptualization of its practice methods in a social group context. The purpose of this article is to summarize some

Thomas Owen Carlton

1986-01-01

78

Masked Symptoms: Mid-life Women, Health, and Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (1997) reveal that relatively few mid-life women offer ill health as a reason for leaving their job or downshifting to part-time employment, implying that the role of ill health may be inconsequential in effecting changing patterns in mid-life women’s labour force activity. In contrast, interviews with 30 mid-life women (aged 40 to 54

Zelda Abramson

2007-01-01

79

Results of the Investigation of the Naval Construction Force (NCF) information Technology Working Group.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the results from the work of the Naval Construction Force (NCF) Information Technology Working Group. The NCF Logistics Quality Management Board (LOG QMB) has characterized current NCF logistics information technology (IT) systems a...

K. P. Lunsford A. L. Lyons

2001-01-01

80

Promoting Health in the Work Setting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Weighing the costs of illness--what does business have to gain; Developing employee wellness programs; The role of the health planning agency; Selected organization resources for worksite health promotion programs.

J. Thomas

1981-01-01

81

Central Indiana Health Planning Work Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A report is presented which systematically details planning methods, the activities to implement these methods, and a strategy for the preparation and execution of a comprehensive health plan by the Central Indiana Comprehensive Health Planning Council, I...

1973-01-01

82

Army Force Health Protection: past, present, and future.  

PubMed

Following the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War, many service members reported health problems and believed these problems were associated with their military service in the Persian Gulf. A paucity of health and deployment data severely limited the ability to investigate the nature and causes of these illnesses. Based on the findings from a 2002 study, the Government Accounting Office recommended that the Secretary of Defense direct the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs to establish an effective quality assurance program that would help ensure that the military services comply with the force health protection and surveillance requirements for all service members. In November 2003, The Surgeon General of the Army tasked the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) with the development of a Deployment Health Quality Assurance Program for the Army. Since 2003, a team from USACHPPM has visited approximately one Army installation per quarter. Over time, there has been remarkable improvement noted in Army deployment health metrics and practices. PMID:20084751

Combs, E Wayne

83

On-call work and health: a review  

PubMed Central

Many professions in the fields of engineering, aviation and medicine employ this form of scheduling. However, on-call work has received significantly less research attention than other work patterns such as shift work and overtime hours. This paper reviews the current body of peer-reviewed, published research conducted on the health effects of on-call work The health effects studies done in the area of on-call work are limited to mental health, job stress, sleep disturbances and personal safety. The reviewed research suggests that on-call work scheduling can pose a risk to health, although there are critical gaps in the literature.

Nicol, Anne-Marie; Botterill, Jackie S

2004-01-01

84

Discrimination against Hispanics in the Public Sector Work Force: Past, Present, and Future.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces the history of discrimination against Hispanics in the public sector work force, drawing examples from large public agencies of Los Angeles (California) and other state and national public work forces. Hispanics must overturn the destructive strategies and policies so effectively used by the power elite. (SLD)

Yaffe, Jerry

1993-01-01

85

Work satisfaction among community-based mental health service providers: The association between work environment and work satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a study of work environment and work satisfaction among 601 community mental health service providers in the central United States. Aspects of the work environment may limit resources and strategies available to minimize staff burnout and maximize effective service delivery. Three human resource issues related to work satisfaction are reviewed: (a) unique constraints in rural mental health service

Lois B. Oberlander

1990-01-01

86

Forced migration and child health and mortality in Angola  

PubMed Central

This study investigates the effects of forced migration on child survival and health in Angola. Using survey data collected in Luanda, Angola, in 2004, just two years after the end of that country's prolonged civil war, we compare three groups: migrants who moved primarily due to war, migrants whose moves were not directly related to war, and non-migrants. First, we examine the differences among the three groups in under-five mortality. Using an event-history approach, we find that hazards of child death in any given year were higher in families that experienced war-related migration in the same year or in the previous year, net of other factors. To assess longer-term effects of forced migration, we examine hazards of death of children who were born in Luanda, i.e., after migrants had reached their destinations. We again observe a disadvantage of forced migrants, but this disadvantage is explained by other characteristics. When looking at the place of delivery, number of antenatal consultations, and age-adequate immunization of children born in Luanda, we again detect a disadvantage of forced migrants relative to non-migrants, but now this disadvantage also extends to migrants who came to Luanda for reasons other than war. Finally, no differences across the three groups in child morbidity and related healthcare seeking behavior in the two weeks preceding the survey are found. We interpret these results within the context of the literature on short- and long-term effects of forced migration on child health.

Agadjanian, Victor

2009-01-01

87

Massachusetts health care reform: is it working?  

PubMed

Before 2006, Massachusetts had more than 500 000 residents who lacked health insurance. Governor Mitt Romney enacted landmark legislation requiring all residents to obtain health insurance. Also, the legislation established a health insurance exchange for the purpose of broadening the choices of insurance plans made available to individuals in the state. The purpose of this research was to assess the Massachusetts health care reform in terms of access, cost, and sustainability. The methodology used was a literature review from 2006 to 2013; a total of 43 references were used. Health reform resulted in additional overall state spending of $2.42 billion on Medicaid for Massachusetts. Since the 2006 reform, 401 000 additional residents have obtained insurance. The number of Massachusetts residents who had access to health care increased substantially after the health care reform was enacted, to 98.1% of residents. The Massachusetts health care reform has not saved money for the state; its funding has been covered by Federal spending. However, reform has been sustained over time because of the high percentage of state residents who have supported the state mandate to obtain health care coverage. PMID:24168866

McAdoo, Joshua; Irving, Julian; Deslich, Stacie; Coustasse, Alberto

88

Employees' perceptions of the impact of work on health behaviours.  

PubMed

Research examining the impact of work on health behaviours has rarely provided a complete picture of the impact across health behaviours. Twenty-four employees were interviewed about their smoking, drinking, exercise and eating. Themes included the impact of the work environment, including policy, convenience and workplace cultural norms; business events effecting one's routine and again convenience and workplace cultural norms; being busy at work effecting time and energy for healthy behaviour; and work stress leading to health behaviours being used as coping responses on bad and good days. The impact of work is similar across health behaviours and is primarily detrimental. PMID:22992583

Payne, Nicola; Jones, Fiona; Harris, Peter R

2012-09-19

89

Factors affecting the work of an occupational health nurse.  

PubMed

Society, economies, work-life and work are undergoing changes that will have global impact on occupational health services (OHS) and the work of occupational health nurses (OHNs) during the next 5-10 years. These changes will bring new challenges to both occupational health services and representatives of specialist groups within those services. The changes will require new ways of working, work methods, performance monitoring, and evaluation of impacts. These developments will also call for changes in the education of occupational health nurses. PMID:10975137

Rossi, K; Heinonen, K; Heikkinen, M R

2000-07-01

90

Social Inclusion as an Agenda for Mental Health Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following New Labour's election to office in the UK in 1997, policy initiatives have proliferated relating to mental health. Much of this policy innovation emphasises the social dimensions of mental health and distress, with an emphasis on employment and social inclusion. Paradoxically, this modernization of the mental health agenda comes at a time when mental health social work is struggling

Nick Gould

2006-01-01

91

Relationship between Work-Life Conflict/Work-Life Balance and Operational Effectiveness in the Canadian Forces.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report reviews studies that have been conducted on work-life conflict/work-life balance and its relationship to operational effectiveness. The majority of studies that are reviewed in this report focus on this issue within the Canadian Forces (CF). W...

D. I. Pickering

2006-01-01

92

Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

93

Work ability among nursing personnel in public hospitals and health centers in Campinas--Brazil.  

PubMed

Nursing personnel is essential in hospital, health centers and enterprises and is the large work force in health system. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a large city in two public hospitals and five health centre with the objective of to evaluate the work ability and health aspects of nursing staff. The sample was composed by 570 workers. The Work Ability Index - WAI and a questionnaire with socio-demographic, health and life style data was applied. The majority of workers was women (83%), married (50.4%), and was working in night shift work (65.6%); 61.4% was auxiliary nursing, 22.3% was registered nurses (RN). The average age was 38.9 years (SD 7.8) and the Body Mass Index mean was 25.8 (SD 5.3). Only 17.2% referred to practice at least 150 minutes of physical exercise five times per week or more. 26.8% had a second job. The work ability mean was 39.3 (SD 5.3) points. Age had a negative correlation with WAI (p=0.0052). Public hospital and health centre workers had poor work ability score when compared with workers from another branches. Public policies related to workplace health promotion need to be implemented in public hospital and health centre to improve the work ability. PMID:22316742

Monteiro, Inês; Chillida, Manuela de Santana Pi; Moreno, Luciana Contrera

2012-01-01

94

Measuring Psychosocial Work Quality and Health: Development of Health Care Measures of Measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demands on workload and work efficiency have increased because of ongoing global changes in health care organizations. Assessing and evaluating effects of changes on organizational and individual well-being require valid and reliable methods. Questionnaires from 3 large health care studies were used to develop instruments for work quality and health. Variable fields of work quality, health and well-being, and modifying

Inga-Lill Petterson; Bengt B. Arnetz

1997-01-01

95

Energetic costs of producing muscle work and force in a cyclical human bouncing task  

PubMed Central

Muscles expend energy to perform active work during locomotion, but they may also expend significant energy to produce force, for example when tendons perform much of the work passively. The relative contributions of work and force to overall energy expenditure are unknown. We therefore measured the mechanics and energetics of a cyclical bouncing task, designed to control for work and force. We hypothesized that near bouncing resonance, little work would be performed actively by muscle, but the cyclical production of force would cost substantial metabolic energy. Human subjects (n = 9) bounced vertically about the ankles at inversely proportional frequencies (1–4 Hz) and amplitudes (15–4 mm), such that the overall rate of work performed on the body remained approximately constant (0.30 ± 0.06 W/kg), but the forces varied considerably. We used parameter identification to estimate series elasticity of the triceps surae tendon, as well as the work performed actively by muscle and passively by tendon. Net metabolic energy expenditure for bouncing at 1 Hz was 1.15 ± 0.31 W/kg, attributable mainly to active muscle work with an efficiency of 24 ± 3%. But at 3 Hz (near resonance), most of the work was performed passively, so that active muscle work could account for only 40% of the net metabolic rate of 0.76 ± 0.28 W/kg. Near resonance, a cost for cyclical force that increased with both amplitude and frequency of force accounted for at least as much of the total energy expenditure as a cost for work. Series elasticity reduces the need for active work, but energy must still be expended for force production.

Kuo, Arthur D.

2011-01-01

96

Working to Death: The Regulation of Working Hours in Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research highlights significant risks associated with health professionals working long hours—risks to their health and safety, to the safety and quality of care provided to patients, and to public safety. This article undertakes a review of the various instruments used to regulate working hours in health systems, using six countries (Australia, Canada, Denmark, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and

FIONA McDONALD

2008-01-01

97

Will Better Access to Health Care Change How Much Older Men Work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The move toward universal health coverage in the United States is likely to impact the labor force deci­sions of older workers, but the size and direction of the effect is unclear. On the one hand, access to affordable insurance that is not tied to an employer may reduce work by encouraging workers to leave a current job, perhaps shifting to

Melissa A. Boyle; Joanna N. Lahey

2010-01-01

98

Do employee health management programs work?  

PubMed

Current peer review literature clearly documents the economic return and Return-on-Investment (ROI) for employee health management (EHM) programs. These EHM programs are defined as: health promotion, self-care, disease management, and case management programs. The evaluation literature for the sub-set of health promotion and disease management programs is examined in this article for specific evidence of the level of economic return in medical benefit cost reduction or avoidance. The article identifies the methodological challenges associated with determination of economic return for EHM programs and summarizes the findings from 23 articles that included 120 peer review study results. The article identifies the average ROI and percent health plan cost impact to be expected for both types of EHM programs, the expected time period for its occurrence, and caveats related to its measurement. PMID:19288852

Serxner, Seth; Gold, Daniel; Meraz, Angela; Gray, Ann

99

NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health in Cancer Care  

PubMed Central

Bone health and maintenance of bone integrity are important components of comprehensive cancer care in both early and late stages of disease. Risk factors for osteoporosis are increased in patients with cancer, including women with chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure, those treated with aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer, men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, and patients undergoing glucocorticoid therapy. The skeleton is a common site of metastatic cancer recurrence, and skeletal-related events are the cause of significant morbidity. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) convened a multidisciplinary task force on Bone Health in Cancer Care to discuss the progress made in identifying effective screening and therapeutic options for management of treatment-related bone loss; understanding the factors that result in bone metastases; managing skeletal metastases; and evolving strategies to reduce bone recurrences. This report summarizes presentations made at the meeting.

Gralow, Julie R.; Biermann, J. Sybil; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica N.; Gagel, Robert F.; Kumar, Rashmi N.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Shields, Andrew; Smith, Matthew R.; Srinivas, Sandy; Van Poznak, Catherine H.

2011-01-01

100

Health promotion and work: prevention of shift work disorders in companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workplace health promotion is a strategy to improve the health and well-being of people at work. The measures aim at the personal,\\u000a organisational and work environment. Shift work is one of many reasons provoking increased job stress. According to worldwide\\u000a epidemiological data, up to 30% of the working population are employed in shifts. Taking into consideration that shift work\\u000a causes

Kneginja D. Richter; Jens Acker; Friederike Scholz; Günter Niklewski

2010-01-01

101

Impact of Work Organization on Women's Postpartum Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This research addressed the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) priority area of Work Environment and Workforce: Organization of Work. This award provided R03 funding for Dr. Marshall, an established investigator of employment and health, for sec...

N. L. Marshall

2008-01-01

102

On-call work and health: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many professions in the fields of engineering, aviation and medicine employ this form of scheduling. However, on-call work has received significantly less research attention than other work patterns such as shift work and overtime hours. This paper reviews the current body of peer-reviewed, published research conducted on the health effects of on-call work The health effects studies done in the

Anne-Marie Nicol; Jackie S Botterill

2004-01-01

103

Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

2008-01-01

104

Extrinsic Motivation as Correlates of Work Attitude of the Nigerian Police Force: Implications for Counselling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The study examined Extrinsic motivation as correlates of work attitude of the Nigeria Police Force and its implications for counselling. 300 Police personnel were selected by random sampling technique from six departments that make up police force Headquarters, Abuja. The personnel were selected from each department using simple sampling…

Igun, Sylvester Nosakhare

2008-01-01

105

Extrinsic Motivation as Correlates of Work Attitude of the Nigerian Police Force: Implications for Counselling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined Extrinsic motivation as correlates of work attitude of the Nigeria Police Force and its implications for counselling. 300 Police personnel were selected by random sampling technique from six departments that make up police force Headquarters, Abuja. The personnel were selected from each department using simple sampling…

Igun, Sylvester Nosakhare

2008-01-01

106

Children of Working Mothers, March 1973. Special Labor Force Report No. 165.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A special labor force report, the pamphlet provides statistics related to the children of working mothers: type of family, number of children under 18, race, number of children in broken families, work experience of family head, and family income. Although the number of children in the population has declined, the number of children with working

Waldman, Elizabeth; Whitmore, Robert

107

Guidelines for making health education work.  

PubMed Central

The results of a number of studies which have indicated the limited effectiveness of health education efforts using the mass media are reviewed. The cause of these failures, according to the authors was the inability to apply a number of principles of effective design to the instructional materials used in the mass media. The basic slide show produced by the neighborhood health center for its own population may be more effective than a nationally televised spot announcement because locally prepared material can be sharply focused on the learner's characteristics and the specifically desired outcome behavior. The authors list 10 guidelines for the construction of effective instructional materials: define outcome measures, analyze relevant characteristics of the learner, gain and maintain the learner's attention, establish the learner's vulnerability, demonstrate the needs for action, establish the learner as an agent, establish the learner's effectiveness, provide for practice, repeat key facts, and generalize to similar situations. The principles of social reinforcement that must accompany health education instruction if behavior is to be modified are outlined. How environmental factors such as time, distance, expense, and the organization of health services hamper desired behavior outcomes is also discussed.

Grover, P L; Miller, J

1976-01-01

108

Health Services Mobility Study, Plan of Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine ways and means of facilitating horizontal and vertical mobility within New York City's Health Services Administration and selected private hospitals, a systems approach was adopted. Methodology for manpower development and training in an organizational setting related to the educational system and other accrediting institutions will…

City Univ. of New York Research Foundation, NY.

109

Working together for health and human rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

The right to a standard of living adequate for health and well?being is being denied to vast numbers of people all over the world through increasing disparities in income and in wealth. In the name of economic development, a number of international and national policies have increased the grossly uneven distribution of income, with ever?growing numbers of people living in

Victor W Sidel

2000-01-01

110

Working with interpreters in mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

To ensure equality of access to health and social care services for all communities resident in Britain, services need to be appropriate and accessible. This requires ensuring that a range of policies is adhered to and that services are designed to make this possible. In a culturally diverse society, there will be people who are not fluent in the language

Rachel Tribe

2009-01-01

111

Joint Work-Force Standards: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps. American Forces Radio and Television Broadcast Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Standard explains to whom the standards apply; how they were initially applied, and the methodology required to reapply and maintain them. It contains the categories and corresponding task definitions of the work requirements of a radio and television...

M. Patterson

1982-01-01

112

Force Health Protection: the mission and political context of the longitudinal health record.  

PubMed

Drawing upon an extensive search of publically available literature and discussions at the "National Forum on the Future of the Defense Health Information System," this article documents the evolving mission and political context of the longitudinal health record (LHR) as an instrument for Force Health Protection (FHP). Because of the Gulf War syndrome controversy, the Department of Defense (DoD) launched an ambitious, complex series of programs designed to create a comprehensive, integrated defense health surveillance capability to assure FHP and keep faith with the American people. This "system of systems" includes individual component systems to perform specific functions such as disease surveillance, battlefield assessment, and patient care and consolidates these diverse types of information into centrally accessible archives that serve the interests of occupational health, preventive medicine, medical strategic planning, and longitudinal patient health care. After 25 years of effort and major accomplishments, progress toward a LHR remains uneven and controversy persists. PMID:19562957

Collmann, Jeff

2009-05-01

113

Community Health Workers and Their Value to Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Community health workers (CHWs) play a vital and unique role in linking diverse and underserved populations to health and social service systems. Despite their effectiveness, as documented by empirical studies across various disciplines including public health, nursing, and biomedicine, the value and potential role of CHWs in the social work

Spencer, Michael S.; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Palmisano, Gloria

2010-01-01

114

HEALTH PROMOTION IN THE MARITIME WORK ENVIRONMENT - TRAINING OF LEADERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essence of the project of pro-health attitudes promotion is the assumption that they contribute to a successful occupational career and reduce health and life hazards in the maritime work environment. The method chosen was to train students of the Maritime Academy in Gdynia, the future officers and potential health leaders among maritime employees.

MARIA JEEWSKA; BOGDAN JAREMIN; IRENA LESZCZYSKA

115

Community Health Workers and Their Value to Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Community health workers (CHWs) play a vital and unique role in linking diverse and underserved populations to health and social service systems. Despite their effectiveness, as documented by empirical studies across various disciplines including public health, nursing, and biomedicine, the value and potential role of CHWs in the social work

Spencer, Michael S.; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Palmisano, Gloria

2010-01-01

116

The effect of work on mental health: does occupation matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper considers the effect of work choices on mental health and looks at whether this differs across occupations. This requires a model that can deal with the endogeneity in the relationship between health, occupation and work choices. We specify such a model and estimate it on a unique UK panel survey. The survey, called the National Child development Survey

Ana Llena-Nozal; Maarten Lindeboom

2004-01-01

117

The relationship between strong motivation to work, “workaholism”, and health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of the present study were to examine (1) psychometric properties of Spence and Robbins’ measures of the components of workaholism and (2) relations between workaholism and health-related outcomes [job stress, burnout, work engagement, and subjective health complaints (SHC)]. Two hundred and thirty-five bank employees completed questionnaires measuring workaholism, job stress, burnout, work engagement, and SHC. Factor analyses suggested

Cecilie Schou Andreassen; Holger Ursin; Hege R. Eriksen

2007-01-01

118

The Implicit Contract: Implications for Health Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Identifying common patient dynamics is useful for developing social work practice sensitivity in health social work. This article draws on findings from a study of women who terminated desired pregnancies because of fetal anomalies and identifies dynamics that may be applicable to many health settings. Data suggest that women have expectations…

McCoyd, Judith L. M.

2010-01-01

119

Participatory-democratic work and adolescents mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five arguments are advanced for the proposition that participatorydemocratic workplaces best promote the mental health of adolescents. These arguments are based on (a) adolescent development theory, (b) research on adolescent work, (c) the goal of preparing adolescents to assume optimally healthful adult jobs, (d) the proposition that participatory-democratic work is optimal for all workers, and (e) the trend toward increased

Stephen F. Hamilton; Michael Basseches; Francis A. Richards

1985-01-01

120

Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Providers Working in Primary Health Care Units Concerning Emergency Contraception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The aim of the current study was to explore the extent of knowledge health care providers working in primary health care units in Aydin, Turkey, had about emergency contraception (EC), to determine whether they provide EC counseling, and to understand the barriers and misconceptions in this context. Methods: A total of 120 health care professionals working in primary health

Hilmiye Aksu; Mert Kucuk; Banu Karaoz

2010-01-01

121

Job Tenure Declines as Work Force Changes. Special Labor Force Report 235.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report consists of an article from the December 1979 issues of the Monthly Labor Review, an explanatory note, and supplementary tables. The article considers these factors which determine the length of time a person works continuously for the same employer: age and sex, marital status of women, race, and occupation and industry. It is shown…

Sekscenski, Edward S.

1980-01-01

122

Occupational epidemiology and work related inequalities in health: a gender perspective for two complementary approaches to work and health research  

PubMed Central

Objectives To provide a framework for epidemiological research on work and health that combines classic occupational epidemiology and the consideration of work in a structural perspective focused on gender inequalities in health. Methods Gaps and limitations in classic occupational epidemiology, when considered from a gender perspective, are described. Limitations in research on work related gender inequalities in health are identified. Finally, some recommendations for future research are proposed. Results Classic occupational epidemiology has paid less attention to women's problems than men's. Research into work related gender inequalities in health has rarely considered either social class or the impact of family demands on men's health. In addition, it has rarely taken into account the potential interactions between gender, social class, employment status and family roles and the differences in social determinants of health according to the health indicator analysed. Conclusions Occupational epidemiology should consider the role of sex and gender in examining exposures and associated health problems. Variables should be used that capture the specific work environments and health conditions of both sexes. The analysis of work and health from a gender perspective should take into account the complex interactions between gender, family roles, employment status and social class.

Artazcoz, Lucia; Borrell, Carme; Cortes, Imma; Escriba-Aguir, Vicenta; Cascant, Lorena

2007-01-01

123

Demanding work schedules and mental health in nursing assistants working in nursing homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing home assistants have physically and emotionally challenging jobs, and they often work demanding schedules in order to provide 24-h care. While the physical effects of demanding work schedules have been studied, little is known about the impact on mental health. This study explored the relationship between demanding scheduling variables and mental health indicators of depression, anxiety and somatization. A

Jeanne Geiger-brown; Carles Muntaner; Jane Lipscomb; Alison Trinkoff

2004-01-01

124

Beyond the Individual: Connecting Work Environment and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work, so fundamental to basic survival and health, as well as to wealth, well-being, and positive social identity, has its darker and more costly side too.1 Work can negatively affect our health, an impact that goes well beyond the usual counts of injuries, accidents, and illnesses from exposure to toxic chemicals. The ways in which work is organized—particularly its pace,

Deborah R. Gordon; Peter L. Schnall

125

Health effects of child work: Evidence from rural Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

We test whether work in childhood impacts on health. We focus on agricultural work, the dominant form of child work worldwide. Data are from the Vietnam Living Standards Survey, 1992–93 and 1997–98. We correct for both unobservable heterogeneity and simultaneity biases. Instruments are land holdings and commune labour market and school quality indicators. We examine three indicators of health: weight-for-age

Owen O'Donnell; Furio C. Rosati; Eddy van Doorslaer

2005-01-01

126

The role of work ability and health on sustaining employability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis aimed to contribute to the understanding of the role of\\u000adecreased work ability and ill health on work participation and work\\u000aperformance of older workers.\\u000aThe longitudinal study on the role of four different health measures on\\u000aexit from paid employment among workers aged 50 to 63 years old in 11\\u000aEuropean countries showed, that controlling for individual

Berg van den T. I. J

2010-01-01

127

Workplace bullying in health care affects the meaning of work.  

PubMed

Our purpose in this grounded theory study was to explore the impact of workplace bullying (WPB) on women working in health care. We analyzed interviews with 21 women, professionals and nonprofessionals. The women experienced a change in their meaning of work (MOW) when they had experienced WPB, and they addressed this change through a process we called the shifting meaning of work. This process has three stages. The first, developing insight, involves recognizing causes of changed MOW as external. In the second stage, resisting, women defend against changed MOW by sustaining acceptable MOW and work performances, and by confronting causes. In the final stage, rebuilding, women try to adapt and modify approaches to work by coming to terms, adjusting work attitudes, and investing in self. We identified implications of this process for managing health and work issues with women, health care providers, and employers. PMID:20463362

MacIntosh, Judith; Wuest, Judith; Gray, Marilyn Merritt; Cronkhite, Marcella

2010-05-12

128

Knowledge Base Needs for Effective Social Work Practice in Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social work education is lacking in preparation of students for work in the health care field. Thirteen content areas necessary for this work are outlined, and both macro- and micro-levels of specialization are encouraged. Whether education should focus on current practice or be developed for future practice designs is discussed. (MSE)|

Berkman, Barbara

1981-01-01

129

Moderators of the Relationship Between Long Work Hours and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined how associations between work hours and self-reported health are moderated by the reasons given for working overtime, by schedule autonomy, and by the degree of social support experienced, in a survey of 372 train drivers. Respondents who lacked both schedule autonomy and social support demonstrated positive associations between the number of hours worked per week and frequency

Philip Tucker; Celia Rutherford

2005-01-01

130

The MATE model: a focused effort to improve marine technical education & meet work force needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center has developed a model for gathering information on the marine work force and providing educators and students with that information, along with educational experiences that help prepare students for ocean-related careers. One example of this model in action focuses on remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). With the help of professionals working in the field,

Jill Zande; Deidre Sullivan; Saundra Butcher; Tom Murphree

2002-01-01

131

Joint Task Force Andrew: the 44th Medical Brigade mental health staff officer's after action review.  

PubMed

The massive Department of Defense deployment in support of Hurricane Andrew relief cast the military medical departments in a new role. Military medical personnel were challenged to apply the traditional principles of combat medicine to a noncombat environment, within the continental United States, within an existing health care infrastructure, in a role subordinate to local civilian health care agencies. As a medical "subject matter expert" assigned to the Joint Task Force Andrew Surgeon's staff, the author worked at the civil-military interface. The lessons learned in his role as a special staff officer should benefit any health care provider involved in disaster relief. They focus on problem areas peculiar to the disaster relief scenario. PMID:8041460

Holsenbeck, L S

1994-03-01

132

Working life across cultures: "Work Life 2000: Quality in Work" and occupational health education in developing countries.  

PubMed

The article reflects on the changing world of work, and the challenges presented to both occupational health and occupational health education. We draw on the 63 preparatory workshops and the international conference in the "Work Life 2000: Quality in Work" program, an initiative of the Swedish Presidency of the European Union. The International Commission on Occupational Health is introduced, with particular concentration on a current practical project initiated by the Department of Health in South Africa, intended to lead to a set of projects, networking for occupational health education in developing countries. The practical initiatives cast light on a new set of issues which arise when occupational health and safety crosses cultural barriers, and previously separate comparative cases are linked. PMID:11743906

Knave, B; Ennals, R

2001-01-01

133

Detrimental Effects of Variable Work Shifts on Quality of Sleep, General Health and Work Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the detrimental effects of working a varying pattern of 8-hour shifts on quality of sleep, general health and work performance. Subjects and Methods: The Arabic version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)and 2 self-administered questionnaires were used to assess quality of sleep, work performance and general health in a sample

Abdullahi Fido; Adel Ghali

2008-01-01

134

The Quality of Working Life: An Important Issue for Managers of the Federal Work Force.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the 1970s, quality of working life has become an increasingly visible issue throughout the industrialized world. This study presents the factors believed to have contributed to its importance in the United States. The study summarizes the literatur...

1978-01-01

135

An integrative perspective on work-site health promotion.  

PubMed

The present paper argues that health promotion efforts, particularly those directed to resistant and high-risk workers, should be integrated into a corporate health strategy in which equal concern is expressed for individual lifestyle modification and the provision of safe and healthful working conditions. The current popularity of work-site health promotion is discussed, and the health promotion and occupational safety and health movements are compared and contrasted. Following this, ecologic models of health promotion are examined as a vehicle for addressing environmental and organizational influences, and this line of thinking is expanded into an integrative model of worker health. The proposed model features three interactive systems: (1) job demands and worker characteristics, (2) work environment, and (3) extraorganizational influences, and assigns an expanded role to environmental factors in promoting and protecting worker health. The principal goal of integrative programming is to devise complementary behavioral and environmental interventions that will have mutually reinforcing effects on workplace health problems. The remainder of the paper outlines the three phases of implementing such a program. PMID:8113926

DeJoy, D M; Southern, D J

1993-12-01

136

[Psychosocial stress at work and musculoskeletal pain among police officers in special forces].  

PubMed

This study investigates associations of an adverse psychosocial work environment with musculoskeletal pain among German police officers in special forces. Analyses are based on a survey of 480 officers in special police forces (mainly special assignments and mobile units). An adverse psychosocial work environment is measured by the effort-reward imbalance model that identifies "high effort/low reward" working conditions. Musculoskeletal pain is assessed by means of a validated questionnaire (12 months and 7 days prevalence). Analyses confirm that police work is a stressful occupation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicates a twofold risk for neck, back and hip pain among police officers defined by an imbalance of high effort and low reward at work after adjustment for age, gender, socio-economic status, and physical work load. PMID:16217722

von dem Knesebeck, O; David, K; Siegrist, J

137

The work function of doped polyaniline nanoparticles observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The work function of polyaniline nanoparticles in the emeraldine base state was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy to be ˜270 meV higher than that of similar nanoparticles in the emeraldine salt state. Normal tapping mode atomic force microscopy could not be used to distinguish between the particles due to their similar morphologies and sizes. Moreover, other potential measurement systems, such as using zeta potentials, were not suitable for the measurement of surface charges of doped nanoparticles due to their encapsulation by interfering chemical groups. Kelvin probe force microscopy can be used to overcome these limitations and unambiguously distinguish between the bare and doped polyaniline nanoparticles.

Park, Jinsung; Bang, Doyeon; Jang, Kuewhan; Haam, Seungjoo; Yang, Jaemoon; Na, Sungsoo

2012-09-01

138

What changes in health behaviour might nurses logically expect from their health education work?  

PubMed

This paper examines nurses' health education work from a philosophical perspective. Two key concepts, choice and autonomy, are explored by analysing examples of the health education work of the practice nurse and the health visitor. As a result, the question, 'what changes in health behaviour might nurses logically expect from their health education work?' is considered. The individualistic assumption within nurses' health education work, that individual patients and clients face certain choices and are able to exert some control over their health status, is reviewed. Choices related to healthy eating, for example, are recognized to be constrained by issues such as finance, time and social circumstances. The choice not to smoke is similarly constrained, for example, by social deprivation, cultural patterns and advertising. The paper both rejects an overly determined conception of patients and clients where they are viewed as unable to make any choices, but also cautions against the danger of victim-blaming. Constraints on patients' and clients' autonomy in health education by nurses are also considered. These limitations on health education work include, for example, a lack of scientific knowledge related to an individual's propensity to develop disease. In contrast, health education work within nursing may also be seen as enabling people to be more autonomous in relation to their health by imparting knowledge about health risks. Health education work by nurses thus emerges from the analysis as a constrained but valuable activity. PMID:7930137

Dines, A

1994-08-01

139

Working conditions, work organization and consequences for health of Brazilian petrochemical workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cross-sectional study carried out in a Brazilian petrochemical plant aimed to examine the working conditions, work organization, and effects caused by combinations of multiple stressors. The workers completed a comprehensive questionnaire and self-assessed their working conditions (general and specific risks), sick leaves, drinking and smoking habits, sleep disturbances, diagnosed diseases, symptoms and complaints, personal availability for use of health

Frida Marina Fischer; Antonio de Castro Bruni; Claudia Roberta de C. Moreno; Adelaide Berwerth; Claudia Riviello; Marta Maria L. Vianna

1998-01-01

140

Mental Health Characteristics of Social Work Students: Implications for Social Work Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

No studies have examined to date the mental health and substance use characteristics of social work students. Therefore, this study was undertaken to describe and identify these characteristics among a sample of social work students located in a Florida school of social work. Results indicated that approximately 34% of the participants reported high levels of depressive symptoms, 12% had a

E. Gail Horton; Naelys Diaz; Diane Green

2009-01-01

141

Changing Work, Changing Health: Can Real Work-Time Flexibility Promote Health Behaviors and Well-Being?  

PubMed Central

This article investigates a change in the structuring of work time, using a natural experiment to test whether participation in a corporate initiative (Results Only Work Environment; ROWE) predicts corresponding changes in health-related outcomes. Drawing on job strain and stress process models, we theorize greater schedule control and reduced work-family conflict as key mechanisms linking this initiative with health outcomes. Longitudinal survey data from 659 employees at a corporate headquarters shows that ROWE predicts changes in health-related behaviors, including almost an extra hour of sleep on work nights. Increasing employees’ schedule control and reducing their work-family conflict are key mechanisms linking the ROWE innovation with changes in employees’ health behaviors; they also predict changes in well-being measures, providing indirect links between ROWE and well-being. This study demonstrates that organizational changes in the structuring of time can promote employee wellness, particularly in terms of prevention behaviors.

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Tranby, Eric; Huang, Qinlei

2012-01-01

142

Changing work, changing health: can real work-time flexibility promote health behaviors and well-being?  

PubMed

This article investigates a change in the structuring of work time, using a natural experiment to test whether participation in a corporate initiative (Results Only Work Environment; ROWE) predicts corresponding changes in health-related outcomes. Drawing on job strain and stress process models, we theorize greater schedule control and reduced work-family conflict as key mechanisms linking this initiative with health outcomes. Longitudinal survey data from 659 employees at a corporate headquarters shows that ROWE predicts changes in health-related behaviors, including almost an extra hour of sleep on work nights. Increasing employees' schedule control and reducing their work-family conflict are key mechanisms linking the ROWE innovation with changes in employees' health behaviors; they also predict changes in well-being measures, providing indirect links between ROWE and well-being. This study demonstrates that organizational changes in the structuring of time can promote employee wellness, particularly in terms of prevention behaviors. PMID:22144731

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L; Tranby, Eric; Huang, Qinlei

2011-12-01

143

A Case for Generic Social Work in Health Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the need for generic social work in health settings and the importance of role definition. Describes a practical application of such a role definition in regard to discharge planning. (Author/JAC)

Bailis, Susan S.

1985-01-01

144

Private and Public Initiatives: Working Together for Health and Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Private and Public Initiatives: Working Together for Health and Education (Changing Roles in a Changing World, Important Developments of Recent Decades, Historical Roots of Present Trends, The Current Situation, Comparing Different Options, The ...

J. van der Gaag

1995-01-01

145

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPublic health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes.Methodology\\/Principal Findings70 participants took part

David Carlton Taylor-Robinson; Ffion Lloyd-Williams; Lois Orton; May Moonan; Martin OFlaherty; Simon Capewell

2012-01-01

146

Work-related psychological health among clergywomen in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing on the classic model of balanced affect, the Francis Burnout Inventory conceptualises good work-related psychological health among clergy in terms of negative affect being balanced by positive affect. This paper sets out to explore the relationship between work-related psychological health and psychological type (as assessed by the Francis Psychological-Type Scales) among a sample of 212 Australian clergywomen who completed

Mandy Robbins; Leslie Francis; Ruth Powell

2012-01-01

147

Where do students in the health professions want to work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. While a number of schemes have been developed to improve recruitment to and retention of the rural health workforce, they will be effective only if appropriately targeted. This study examines the factors that most encourage students attending rural clinical placements to work in rural Australia, and the

Deborah Schofield; Susan Fletcher; Jeffery Fuller; Hudson Birden; Sue Page

2009-01-01

148

Nurses and health information technology: working with and around computers.  

PubMed

Information technology is nearly ubiquitous in health care settings. Nurses need basic computer skills and information literacy to effectively practice nursing. In addition, nurses must be prepared not only to work around complex health information technology, but also to communicate with individuals who can address the underlying problems. PMID:22128698

Peace, Jane

149

Learning opportunities at work as predictor for recovery and health  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the principles of good job design is to make jobs that are conducive to personal development and to health. One of the ways in which jobs can facilitate personal development is to provide learning opportunities. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that learning opportunities at work are positively related to health. The jobs of 185 men and women

Renate Rau

2006-01-01

150

Incorporating Integrative Health Services in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|More than one third of Americans practice complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Social workers continue to provide most first-line health, mental health, and psychological referral and direct practice services in the United States, despite a lack of systematic education and training opportunities in CAM. Schools of social work are…

Gant, Larry; Benn, Rita; Gioia, Deborah; Seabury, Brett

2009-01-01

151

Why do Health Professionals Work in a Community Mental Health Service?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reasons why mental health professionals work in a community mental health service.Methods: A survey of psychiatrists and trainees (n = 13) and other mental health professionals (n = 67) was conducted in an Australian community mental health service with a socioeconomically deprived catchment population. Respondents were asked to list

Jonathan Spear

2006-01-01

152

Job Characteristics in the United States Air Force and Mental Health Service Utilization.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data from the 2000 Air Force Community Needs Assessment were used to assess the significance and strength of the effects of job characteristics and social supports on mental health service utilization. In this study, mental health services included anger ...

V. A. Baumgarten

2004-01-01

153

When work calls-associations between being contacted outside of regular working hours for work-related matters and health.  

PubMed

Boundaries between work and private life are diminishing, but little is known on how this influences worker health. Therefore, we examined the association between work-related contacts outside of regular working hours by e-mail or phone and self-reported health in a representative sample of European employees (n?=?23 760). The risk of reporting ?1 health problem(s) was increased in workers contacted sometimes (odds ratio [OR]: 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.27) or often (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.12-1.34) as compared with never, controlling for several demographic and workplace characteristics. Further research is needed to quantify work and nonwork patterns and their health effects. PMID:23898880

Arlinghaus, Anna; Nachreiner, Friedhelm

2013-07-30

154

Health of children working in small urban industrial shops  

PubMed Central

Aims: To explore associations between work status and multidimensional health indices in a sample of urban Lebanese children. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was used to compare 78 male children (aged 10–17 years) working full time in small industrial shops, and a comparison group of 60 non-working male schoolchildren. All children lived and worked or studied in the poor neighbourhoods of three main Lebanese cities. Results: Working children reported frequent abuses. They smoked and dated more than the comparison group. They also reported a higher number of injuries (last 12 months) and recent skin, eye, and ear complaints (last two weeks). Physical examination revealed more changes in their skin and nails, but no differences in height or weight compared to non-working group. A higher blood lead concentration was detected among working children, but no differences in haemoglobin and ferritin. No differences were noted between the two groups of children regarding anxiety, hopelessness, and self-esteem. The drawings of the working children, however, revealed a higher tendency to place themselves outside home and a wider deficit in developmental age when compared to non-working children. Conclusion: Significant differences were found between working and non-working children with respect to physical and social health parameters, but differences were less with regard to mental health. Future research should focus on (1) more sensitive and early predictors of health effects, and (2) long term health effects. The generality of findings to other work settings in the developing world should also be tested.

Nuwayhid, I; Usta, J; Makarem, M; Khudr, A; El-Zein, A

2005-01-01

155

The Education Deficit. A Staff Report Summarizing the Hearing on "Competitiveness and the Quality of the American Work Force," Prepared for the Use of the Subcommittee on Education and Health of the Joint Economic Committee. Congress of the United States, 101st Congress, First Session, December 14, 1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This staff report summarizes testimony on competitiveness and the quality of the American work force. The testimony was received during 9 days of hearings held between September 23 and December 3, 1987, that featured 52 witnesses including federal and state officials, educators, business and labor leaders, and scholars. Contents comprise prepared…

Joint Economic Committee, Washington, DC.

156

Strengthening health workforce capacity through work-based training  

PubMed Central

Background Although much attention has been given to increasing the number of health workers, less focus has been directed at developing models of training that address real-life workplace needs. Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) with funding support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed an eight-month modular, in-service work-based training program aimed at strengthening the capacity for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) in health service delivery. Methods This capacity building program, initiated in 2008, is offered to in-service health professionals working in Uganda. The purpose of the training is to strengthen the capacity to provide quality health services through hands-on training that allows for skills building with minimum work disruptions while encouraging greater involvement of other institutional staff to enhance continuity and sustainability. The hands-on training uses practical gaps and challenges at the workplace through a highly participatory process. Trainees work with other staff to design and implement ‘projects’ meant to address work-related priority problems, working closely with mentors. Trainees’ knowledge and skills are enhanced through short courses offered at specific intervals throughout the course. Results Overall, 143 trainees were admitted between 2008 and 2011. Of these, 120 (84%) from 66 institutions completed the training successfully. Of the trainees, 37% were Social Scientists, 34% were Medical/Nursing/Clinical Officers, 5.8% were Statisticians, while 23% belonged to other professions. Majority of the trainees (80%) were employed by Non-Government Organizations while 20% worked with the public health sector. Trainees implemented 66 projects which addressed issues such as improving access to health care services; reducing waiting time for patients; strengthening M&E systems; and improving data collection and reporting. The projects implemented aimed to improve trainees’ skills and competencies in M&E and CQI and the design of the projects was such that they could share these skills with other staff, with minimal interruptions of their work. Conclusions The modular, work-based training model strengthens the capacity of the health workforce through hands-on, real-life experiences in the work-setting and improves institutional capacity, thereby providing a practical example of health systems strengthening through health workforce capacity building.

2013-01-01

157

Health and Nutritional Status of Working and Non-Working Mothers in Poverty Groups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The aim of this study was to examine the health and nutritional status of low-income women in Upstate New York and to identify problems that interfere with their employment. Questionnaires on health and work, complete medical and employment histories, physical examination, laboratory tests, dental examination and diet recalls were obtained for…

Roe, Daphne A.; Eickwort, Kathleen R.

158

Critically Reflective Work Behavior of Health Care Professionals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Introduction: Better understanding of critically reflective work behavior (CRWB), an approach for work-related informal learning, is important in order to gain more profound insight in the continuing development of health care professionals. Methods: A survey, developed to measure CRWB and its predictors, was distributed to veterinary…

de Groot, Esther; Jaarsma, Debbie; Endedijk, Maaike; Mainhard, Tim; Lam, Ineke; Simons, Robert-Jan; van Beukelen, Peter

2012-01-01

159

The relationship between work stress and oral health status  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated whether oral health status is associated with work stress. 164 male workers aged from 35 to 44 years, equally distributed over four socio-economic groups took part in the study. Three work characteristics related to stress were studied: mental demand, control and variety. Age, socio-economic status, sugar consumption, frequency of dental attendance, toothbrushing frequency, type of toothpaste used,

Wagner Segura Marcenes; Aubrey Sheiham

1992-01-01

160

Understanding social work in the home health care setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social work is one of the least understood services in home health care. Frequently, social work ers are limited to the provision of concrete services, such as linkage with community resources or long-term planning. Social workers are capable of providing a wide range of services beyond community resources, including short-term therapy and crisis intervention. Clear understand ing and interpretation of

Elaine Williams

1995-01-01

161

Representations at work: a national standard for electronic health records  

Microsoft Academic Search

Representations are at work in IT technology. As plans of and for work, they enable cooperation, coordination, accountability and control, which have to be balanced off against each other. The article describes a standard developed for electronic health records (EHR) and the results of a test of a prototype built on that standard at a department of internal medicine in

Claus Bossen

2006-01-01

162

Measuring coupling forces woodcutters exert on saws in real working conditions.  

PubMed

Prolonged exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) generated by chainsaws can cause HAV syndrome, i.e., disorders in the upper extremities of forestry workers. Progress of HAV syndrome depends on the intensity of mechanical vibration transmitted throughout the body, which is directly proportional to coupling forces applied by the woodcutter to a vibrating tool. This study aimed to establish a method of measuring coupling forces exerted by chainsaw workers in real working conditions. Coupling forces exerted by workers with their right and left hands were measured with a hydro-electronic force meter. Wood hardness, the type of chainsaw and the kind of forest operation, i.e., felling, cross-cutting or limbing, were considered. PMID:22429531

Malinowska-Borowska, Jolanta; Harazin, Barbara; Zieli?ski, Grzegorz

2012-01-01

163

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. Methodology/Principal Findings 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. Conclusions The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions.

Taylor-Robinson, David Carlton; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Orton, Lois; Moonan, May; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

2012-01-01

164

Women, Work and Health Hazards: A Fact Sheet and Cosmetologists: Health Risks at Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The first part of this document is a fact sheet that provides information on health hazards faced by employed women. It covers the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), job-related diseases suffered by workers in female-dominated occupations, employer responsibilities under OSHA, and the lack of statistical reporting on job-related disease.…

National Commission on Working Women, Washington, DC.

165

e-Labs and Work Objects: Towards Digital Health Economies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optimal provision of healthcare and public health services requires the synthesis of evidence from multiple disciplines. It is necessary to understand the genetic, environmental, behavioural and social determinants of disease and health-related states; to balance the effectiveness of interventions with their costs; to ensure the maximum safety and acceptability of interventions; and to provide fair access to care services for given populations. Ever expanding databases of knowledge and local health information, and the ability to employ computationally expensive methods, promises much for decisions to be both supported by best evidence and locally relevant. This promise will, however, not be realised without providing health professionals with the tools to make sense of this information rich environment and to collaborate across disciplines. We propose, as a solution to this problem, the e-Lab and Work Objects model as a sense-making platform for digital health economies - bringing together data, methods and people for timely health intelligence.

Ainsworth, John D.; Buchan, Iain E.

166

Withdrawal from labour force due to work disability in patients with ankylosing spondylitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVETo investigate withdrawal from the labour force because of inability to work owing to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to determine the characteristics of patients with no job because of work disability attributable to AS.METHODSA postal questionnaire was sent to 709 patients with AS aged 16–60 years followed up by a rheumatologist. Kaplan-Meier survival statistics were used to assess the time

A Boonen; A Chorus; H Miedema; D van der Heijde; R Landewé; H Schouten; H van der Tempel; S van der Linden

2001-01-01

167

Air Force Health Study. An Epidemiologic Investigation of Health Effects in Air Force Personnel Following Exposure to Herbicides. Introduction, Background and Conclusions (Chapters 1-5, 18, 19).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of the serum dioxin analysis of the Air Force Health Study 1987 examination cycle. Its purpose is to determine whether long-term health affects are associated with serum dioxin levels for the participants in the study. For...

R. H. Roegner W. D. Grubbs M. B. Lustik A. S. Brockman S. C. Henderson

1991-01-01

168

Measuring psychosocial work quality and health: development of health care measures of measurement.  

PubMed

Demands on workload and work efficiency have increased because of ongoing global changes in health care organizations. Assessing and evaluating effects of changes on organizational and individual well-being require valid and reliable methods. Questionnaires from 3 large health care studies were used to develop instruments for work quality and health. Variable fields of work quality, health and well-being, and modifying factors were factor analyzed with replicated structures in new samples, including 6 factors of work quality, 5 health factors, and 2 modifying factors. All except 2 factors had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .69-.84) and low factor intercorrelations within areas. Social climate (but not individual resources) had, according to our model, a modifying effect on the work-health interaction. PMID:9552293

Petterson, I L; Arnetz, B B

1997-07-01

169

Factors Affecting Work Force Development in the People's Republic of China.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Work force development in the Peoples' Republic of China (PRC) is affected by sundry but interrelated factors. Included among these are the following: (1) the PRC's population of one billion people; (2) a recent history of political turmoil and violence, resulting in profound changes in national leadership and vacillation in national policy; (3)…

Sredl, Henry J.

170

Study of the Job Satisfaction of Professional Air Force Social Work Officers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The job satisfaction levels of 149 Air Force Social Work Officers were studied by using the Professional Satisfaction Inventory originally developed by Jayaratne and Chess (1982) to study the job satisfaction and job stress of a sample of members of the N...

D. W. Jablonski

1984-01-01

171

Profile of a Rural Area Work Force: The Wyoming Uranium Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Designed to provide insights into policies relative to human resource investments and employment information channels, the study's objectives were to: (1) relate types of employment in Wyoming's uranium mines and mills to work force participants; (2) determine employee earnings and relate those earnings to employment categories and…

Dobbs, Thomas L.; Kiner, Phil E.

1974-01-01

172

Working with interpreters: tools for clinicians conducting psychotherapy with forced immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the important and unique challenges that arise when using interpreters while conducting psychotherapy with forced migrants who have experienced a range of human rights abuse. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper employs a practice-based evidence methodology that offers guidance to both clinicians and researchers. Findings – Working with interpreters in

Maile OHara; Adeyinka M. Akinsulure-Smith

2011-01-01

173

Developing the Nation's Work Force: Yearbook 5 of the American Vocational Association.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Focusing on major issues related to the preparation of the nation's work force, the yearbook considers all sectors of manpower preparation--public and private schools, industry, military, and other agencies. Thirty contributing authors represent the broad fields of manpower and research. Section 1, The Opportunity for Leadership, contains…

Strong, Merle E., Ed.

174

The Growing Presence of Hispanics in the U.S. Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author documents the increasing number of Hispanic workers in the work force between 1980 and 1987. This population accounts for approximately one-fifth of employment growth in the United States. The author states that Hispanic women have shown the biggest gains; their employment levels have grown at 250 percent the rate of other women's.…

Cattan, Peter

1988-01-01

175

Review and Implications of Job Satisfaction and Work Motivation Theories for Air Force Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this report is to: (a) review certain major theories of work motivation, particularly as related to job satisfaction, (b) distill from such theories and other research, implications for an Air Force job satisfaction research program, and (c) provide a comprehensive bibliography of satisfaction/retention studies. The theoretical…

Tuttle, Thomas C.; Hazel, Joe T.

176

Adolescents who work: Health and behavioral consequences of job stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compared 212 10th and 11th graders holding their 1st part-time jobs with 319 youngsters who had never worked, with respect to self-reported frequency of psychological and physical health symptoms, school absence, and use of cigarettes, alcohol, marihuana, and other drugs. These aspects of health and well-being, along with job absence, were examined in the workers as a function of exposure

Ellen Greenberger; Laurence D. Steinberg

1981-01-01

177

Process Evaluation of an Integrated Health Promotion/Occupational Health Model in WellWorks-2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Disparities in chronic disease risk by occupation call for new approaches to health promotion. WellWorks-2 was a randomized, controlled study comparing the effectiveness of a health promotion/occupational health program (HP/OHS) with a standard intervention (HP). Interventions in both studies were based on the same theoretical foundations.…

Hunt, Mary Kay; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; McLellan, Deborah; Combe, Candace; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Glorian

2005-01-01

178

Public health and working children in twentieth-century America: an historical overview.  

PubMed

Throughout this century, concern for the health of America's youth has been a driving force in the long fight to regulate child labor. The prevalence of children in dangerous trades like mining and mill work at the start of the century was a major factor behind the creation of a national child labor reform movement. Not until the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, however, were reformers able to secure universal age, hour and health standards for working youngsters. In the decades following World War 2, child labor dramatically declined in the United States. But new waves of immigration in the 1980s, along with increased participation of high school students in the service sector, have contributed to a resurgence in juvenile employment and focused renewed attention on the health risks faced by minors in the workplace. PMID:8254008

Postol, T

1993-01-01

179

[Effect of night shift work on health status].  

PubMed

Presented in the paper are opinions on night work. The authors submit not only their own views but also those of other researchers. The material points to considerable hazards of the night work, including specific negative health effects. However, it could hardly be defined who is more harmed by the night shift--women or men, except for its probable contribution to reproduction disturbances in women. Genetic effects are not clear--they call for further studies. Apart from the negative effects of the night shift upon health, family and social life, the paper deals with the issues of minimising those adverse effects, including some examples of preventive measures. PMID:2687619

Indulski, J A; Makowiec-Dabrowska, T; Starzy?ski, Z

1989-01-01

180

Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries  

PubMed Central

Background Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 408 Nepalese migrants who had at least one period of work experience of at least six months in any of three Gulf countries: Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates (UAE). Face to face questionnaire interviews were conducted applying a convenience technique to select the study participants. Results Nepalese migrants in these Gulf countries were generally young men between 26-35 years of age. Unskilled construction jobs including labourer, scaffolder, plumber and carpenter were the most common jobs. Health problems were widespread and one quarter of study participants reported experiencing injuries or accidents at work within the last 12 months. The rates of health problems and accidents reported were very similar in the three countries. Only one third of the respondents were provided with insurance for health services by their employer. Lack of leave for illness, cost and fear of losing their job were the barriers to accessing health care services. The study found that construction and agricultural workers were more likely to experience accidents at their workplace and health problems than other workers. Conclusion The findings suggest important messages for the migration policy makers in Nepal. There is a lack of adequate information for the migrants making them aware of their health risks and rights in relation to health services in the destination countries and we suggest that the government of Nepal should be responsible for providing this information. Employers should provide orientation on possible health risks and appropriate training for preventive measures and all necessary access to health care services to all their workers.

2011-01-01

181

Gender, Work, and Health for Trans Health Providers: A Focus on Transmen  

PubMed Central

Well-documented health research points to trans people's vulnerability to health inequities that are linked to deeply embedded structural and social determinants of health. Gender and work, as social determinants of health for trans people, both shape and are shaped by multiple factors such as support networks, social environments, income and social status, shelter, and personal health practices. There is a gap in the nursing literature in regards to research on work and health for diverse trans people and a virtual silence on the particular issues of trans-identified health providers. This qualitative study used comparative life history methodology and purposeful sampling to examine links among work, career, and health for transmen who are health providers. Semistructured interviews were completed with four Canadian transmen involved in health care professional and/or practice contexts with diverse professions, age, work, and transitioning experiences. Critical gender analysis showed that unique and gender-related critical events and influences shape continuities and discontinuities in their careerlives. This strength-based approach foregrounds how resilience and growth emerged through participants' articulation with everyday gender dynamics. These findings have implications for nursing research, education, and practice that include an understanding of how trans providers “do transgender work” and supporting them in that process.

MacDonnell, Judith A.; Grigorovich, Alisa

2012-01-01

182

Nursing attrition and the work environment in South African health facilities.  

PubMed

A number of media reports appeared on the shortages of professional health workers in the public health sector. Unsatisfactory working conditions in health facilities were mentioned as one of the key aspects responsible for the shortages. Literature indicates that stress caused by unsatisfactory work environments may play a major role in employees' decision to resign their jobs, in spite of enjoying the nature of their work. The aim of this article is to explore the current human resource situation in nursing i.e. to determine if a shortage of nursing skills exists, to establish the challenges that nurses have to face in performing their duties and to establish the potential effect of the work environment on attrition. Currently 155 484 nurses are practicing in South Africa at a rate of 343 nurses per 100 000 of the population, which compares favourably with the World Health Organisation minimum of 200:100 000. The lack of reliable data on the supply of and demand for nurses makes it difficult to determine whether real shortages exist. However the supply of nursing services is influenced by the uneven distribution of skills across regions and the outflow of professional skills. It seems that the existing situation will deteriorate because fewer people are interested in taking up or pursuing nursing as a career in South Africa. At the same time a need for more nurses was identified because of the growth in the population as well as a change in health care needs. Workplace conditions for health workers employed at hospitals and clinics in South Africa were explored as part of a recent national study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on the health sector. Health workers' opinions on aspects such as workload, staff morale and working hours were obtained during personal interviews, which were conducted at 222 health facilities. Nine hundred and twenty four professional nurses, enrolled nurses and nursing assistants, who were mostly employed in the public health sector, participated. A stressful work environment was identified in public hospitals and clinics. An increase in the number of patients visiting these facilities, accompanied by a lack of equipment, unsatisfactory work environment and a shortage of nurses were pointed out. Many patients cannot be accommodated elsewhere because of a lack of finance and alternative health care options. Nurses also indicated that they do not get much support from their employers. The effect of all these factors culminates in a stressed workforce who may be forced to consider alternative career options. This will be to the detriment of health care in the country. PMID:15712823

Hall, E J

2004-11-01

183

Working conditions and health behaviours among employed women and men: the Helsinki Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Working conditions influence health, but previous studies on the associations between work-related factors and health behaviours are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyse whether unfavourable working conditions are associated with diet, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and smoking.Methods. The data derive from postal questionnaires collected in 2000–2001 from 40- to 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki

Tea Lallukka; Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva; Eva Roos; Mikko Laaksonen; Ossi Rahkonen; Eero Lahelma

2004-01-01

184

The Role of Market Forces in the Delivery of Health Care: Issues for Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This edition of the Role of Market Forces program note suggests empirical and descriptive analyses required to complement new areas of health policy emphasis and direction. Eight areas and related questions involving health economics are outlined: (1) rural health care; (2) medical malpractice and insurance; (3) supply, productivity, and…

National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

185

Retiree Health Insurance and the Labor Force Behavior of Older Men in the 1990s  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimate the impact of employer-provided retiree health insurance (EPRHI) on the labor force transitions of men aged 51 to 62. Data from the Health and Retirement Survey provide detailed and accurate measures of retiree health insurance. Availability of EPRHI increases the rate of exit from employment by two percentage points per year if the individual shares the cost of

David M. Blau; Donna B. Gilleskie

2001-01-01

186

Shift work and cognition in the nurses' health study.  

PubMed

Rotating night-shift work, which can disrupt circadian rhythm, may adversely affect long-term health. Experimental studies indicate that circadian rhythm disruption might specifically accelerate brain aging; thus, we prospectively examined shift-work history at midlife as associated with cognitive function among older women in the Nurses' Health Study. Women reported their history of rotating night-shift work in 1988 and participated in telephone-based cognitive interviews between 1995 and 2001; interviews included 6 cognitive tests that were subsequently repeated 3 times, at 2-year intervals. We focused on shift work through midlife (here, ages 58-68 years) because cognitive decline is thought to begin during this period. Using multivariable-adjusted linear regression, we evaluated mean differences in both "average cognitive status" at older age (averaging cognitive scores from all 4 interviews) and rates of cognitive decline over time across categories of shift-work duration at midlife (none, 1-9, 10-19, or ?20 years). There was little association between shift work and average cognition in later life or between shift work and cognitive decline. Overall, this study does not clearly support the hypothesis that shift-work history in midlife has long-term effects on cognition in older adults. PMID:24076971

Devore, Elizabeth E; Grodstein, Francine; Schernhammer, Eva S

2013-09-27

187

[Work conditions and health status of specialist meteorologists working with weather charts].  

PubMed

The contributors present a generalized description of the labour conditions' hygienic assessment and state of health of the communication service technicians and weather forecasters engaged in the State meteorology service centres in the northern and southern regions of the country. The unfavourable labour conditions' impact on the health state is revealed depending on the specificity of the weather-chart makers' working conditions, which lead to morbidity with temporary disability and occupational skin and upper respiratory tract diseases. A complex of tested measures is proposed for the improvement of the working conditions in question. PMID:2262149

Alekseev, S V; Dmitriev, A V; Mozzhukhina, N A

1990-01-01

188

Walking and Working Surfaces. Module SH-06. Safety and Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student module on walking and working surfaces is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module describes safety requirements for floors, stairways, ladders, and scaffolds, as well as OSHA standards for the construction, use, and maintenance of each of these. Following the introduction, nine objectives (each keyed to a…

Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

189

Tackling Work Related Stress in a National Health Service Trust  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The challenge of tackling the problem of coping with work related stress in a National Health Service (NHS) Trust was undertaken. Ideas were developed within the context of two different action learning sets and led to actions resulting in a large therapy Taster Session event and the establishment of a centre offering alternative therapies and…

Vick, Donna; Whyatt, Hilary

2004-01-01

190

Justice at Work, Job Stress, and Employee Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A small but growing literature has documented an association between justice at work and employee health. However, the pathways and mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. This article proposes a conceptual framework that bridges the organizational justice, occupational stress, and occupational epidemiology literatures.…

Fujishiro, Kaori; Heaney, Catherine A.

2009-01-01

191

Private and Public Initiatives: Working Together for Health and Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The World Bank helps countries to arrive at whatever combination of public and private control is best for their particular economic circumstances. This booklet describes that work and summarizes examples of private-sector involvement in health and education provision in the developing world today. The examples also illustrate what the World Bank…

Gaag, Jacques van der

192

Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work  

PubMed Central

As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers.

Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

2007-01-01

193

The Implications of Work Force Diversification in the U.S. Forest Service  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural resource management agencies, like the U.S. Forest Service, face a formidable challenge today—to develop and implement resource management plans that satisfy diverse and changing social political and economic values. Effective organizations develop strategies, either explicit or implicit, for adapting to changing environments. The Forest Service is currently implementing one such adaptive strategy—a work force diversification program based on affirmative

Greg Brown; Charles C. Harris

1993-01-01

194

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' legislative activities and the Joint Medical Library Association/Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Legislative Task Force  

PubMed Central

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' (AAHSL's) involvement in national legislative activities and other advocacy initiatives has evolved and matured over the last twenty-five years. Some activities conducted by the Medical Library Association's (MLA's) Legislative Committee from 1976 to 1984 are highlighted to show the evolution of MLA's and AAHSL's interests in collaborating on national legislative issues, which resulted in an agreement to form a joint legislative task force. The history, work, challenges, and accomplishments of the Joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force, formed in 1985, are discussed.

Zenan, Joan S.

2003-01-01

195

Shift work and work injury in the New Zealand Blood Donors' Health Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate associations between work patterns and the occurrence of work injury. Methods A cross sectional analysis of the New Zealand Blood Donors Health Study conducted among the 15?687 (70%) participants who reported being in paid employment. After measurement of height and weight, a self?administered questionnaire collected information concerning occupation and work pattern, lifestyle behaviour, sleep, and the occurrence of an injury at work requiring treatment from a doctor during the past 12?months. Results Among paid employees providing information on work pattern, 3119 (21.2%) reported doing shift work (rotating with nights, rotating without nights, or permanent nights) and 1282 (8.7%) sustained a work injury. In unadjusted analysis, work injury was most strongly associated with employment in heavy manual occupations (3.6, 2.8 to 4.6) (relative risk, 95% CI), being male (1.9, 1.7 to 2.2), being obese (1.7, 1.5 to 2.0), working rotating shifts with nights (2.1, 1.7 to 2.5), and working more than three nights a week (1.9, 1.6 to 2.3). Snoring, apnoea or choking during sleep, sleep complaints, and excessive daytime sleepiness were also significantly associated with work injury. When mutually adjusting for all significant risk factors, rotating shift work, with or without nights, remained significantly associated with work injury (1.9, 1.5 to 2.4) and (1.8, 1.2 to 2.6), respectively. Working permanent night shifts was no longer significantly associated with work injury in the adjusted model. Conclusion Work injury is highly associated with rotating shift work, even when accounting for increased exposure to high risk occupations, lifestyle factors, and excessive daytime sleepiness.

Fransen, M; Wilsmore, B; Winstanley, J; Woodward, M; Grunstein, R; Ameratunga, S; Norton, R

2006-01-01

196

Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)  

PubMed Central

Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only.

2005-01-01

197

Depot Maintenance: Air Force is Assessing Engine Maintenance Options for Work Currently Performed at Kelly Aviation Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report responds to questions that you raised about Air Force engine maintenance and repair work currently performed at Kelly Aviation Center (KAC) and the potential transfer of that work to another location. In 1999, Oklahoma City Air Logistics Cente...

C. Bennett C. Perdue J. Madison L. Cooper M. Willems

2011-01-01

198

The impact of organizational changes on work stress, sleep, recovery and health.  

PubMed

The study objective was to investigate the impact of different kinds of organizational changes, as well as anticipation of such changes, on work-related stress, sleep, recovery and health. It was hypothesized that impaired sleep and recovery increase the adverse health consequences of organizational changes. The data consisted of cross sectional questionnaire data from a random sample of 1,523 employees in the Swedish police force. It could be shown that extensive organizational changes including downsizing or a change in job tasks were associated with a small increase in work stress, disturbed sleep, incomplete recovery and health complaints. However, less extensive organizational changes like relocation did not affect these outcome variables. Anticipation of extensive organizational changes had almost the same effect as actual changes. Furthermore a moderating effect of sleep and work stress on gastrointestinal complaints and depressive symptoms was found. Thus, like former studies already suggested, extensive organizational changes resulted in increased stress levels, poorer health and impaired sleep and recovery. Furthermore, organizational instability due to anticipation of changes was as negative as actual changes. There was also some evidence that disturbed sleep increased these adverse health effects, in particular with respect to anticipation of organizational changes. PMID:21372437

Greubel, Jana; Kecklund, Göran

2011-03-01

199

Opportunities for health and safety professionals in environmental restoration work  

SciTech Connect

The safety of workers in waste management and in environmental restoration work is regulated in large part by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Many of the OSHA rules are given in Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Section 120 of 29 CFR 1910 specifically addresses hazardous waste operations and emergency response operations. The remainder of this discussion focuses on clean-up operations. The purpose of this paper is to review areas of employment opportunity in environmental restoration work for health and safety professionals. Safety and health risk analyses are mentioned as one area of opportunity, and these analyses are required by the standards. Site safety and health supervisors will be needed during field operations. Those who enjoy teaching might consider helping to meet the training needs that are mandated. Finally, engineering help both to separate workers from hazards and to improve personal protective equipment, when it must be worn, would benefit those actively involved in environmental restoration activities.

Norris, A.E.

1991-01-01

200

Epidemiologic Investigation of Health Effects in Air Force Personnel Following Exposure to Herbicides. Volume 3.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Partial Contents: Summary of Previous Analyses of the Air Force Health Study, 1982 Baseline Study Summary Results, 1985 Followup Study Summary Results, 1987 Followup Study Summary Results, Serum Dioxin Analysis of 1987 Followup Study Summary Results Param...

W. D. Grubbe W. H. Wolfe J. E. Michalek D. E. Williams M. B. Lustik

1995-01-01

201

Health-Risk Appraisal of Naval Special Operations Forces Personnel Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The relationship between exposure to extreme physical and mental activities and adverse environments to the susceptibility to injuries, disease, and death has not been examined for Special Operations Forces (SOF) personnel. The purpose of the Health Risk ...

K. R. Johnson M. Q. Wang

2000-01-01

202

Working life and mental health - A challenge to psychiatry?  

PubMed Central

According to the World Health Organization, "mental health problems and stress-related disorders are the biggest overall cause of early death in Europe". Some of the root causes of this morbidity and mortality are related to living and working conditions that are accessible to preventive and therapeutic interventions, individual as well as collective ones. A political mandate for such interventions is now developing. Members of the WPA Section on Occupational Psychiatry have contributed to this development and we now invite the readers to join the Section in its endeavours.

LEVI, LENNART

2005-01-01

203

Initial Report of the Task Force on Cultural Competence Education in the Health Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of the Task Force on Cultural Competence Education and represents the distillation of the Task Force's efforts to fulfill its legislative charge. The report is intended to facilitate a statewide conversation about the health services provided to New Mexico's multicultural citizenry. It…

New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2007

2007-01-01

204

Force kinetics and oxygen consumption during bicycle ergometer work in racing cyclists and reference-group.  

PubMed

The forces acting on the right crank of a bicycle ergometer were measured in 18 male subjects (6 racing cyclists, 8 students of physical education, 4 long distance runners) during an incremental exercise test. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was simultaneously determined by means of a breath-by-breath method. Differences in peak values of the typical force record might indicate a different force distribution during each cranking cycle. When compared to the reference group, the racing cyclists showed peak values that were significantly lower at all levels of work load. Oxygen consumption during the initial 20 min of the test was found to be significantly lower in the cyclist group (cyclists: 37.2 +/- 3.2 1, reference group: 41.1 +/- 3.9 1). These results suggest that a different force distribution during a crank revolution might lead to an improved gross efficiency in the cyclist group. The findings might be due to different fractions of ST-fibres in the exercising muscle. PMID:4018055

Künstlinger, U; Ludwig, H G; Stegemann, J

1985-01-01

205

Presenteeism according to healthy behaviors, physical health, and work environment.  

PubMed

The objective of this study is to identify the contribution that selected demographic characteristics, health behaviors, physical health outcomes, and workplace environmental factors have on presenteeism (on-the-job productivity loss attributed to poor health and other personal issues). Analyses are based on a cross-sectional survey administered to 3 geographically diverse US companies in 2010. Work-related factors had the greatest influence on presenteeism (eg, too much to do but not enough time to do it, insufficient technological support/resources). Personal problems and financial stress/concerns also contributed substantially to presenteeism. Factors with less contribution to presenteeism included physical limitations, depression or anxiety, inadequate job training, and problems with supervisors and coworkers. Presenteeism was greatest for those ages 30-49, women, separated/divorced/widowed employees, and those with a high school degree or some college. Clerical/office workers and service workers had higher presenteeism. Managers and professionals had the highest level of presenteeism related to having too much to do but too little time to do it, and transportation workers had the greatest presenteeism because of physical health limitations. Lowering presenteeism will require that employers have realistic expectations of workers, help workers prioritize, and provide sufficient technological support. Financial stress and concerns may warrant financial planning services. Health promotion interventions aimed at improving nutrition and physical and mental health also may contribute to reducing presenteeism. PMID:22856386

Merrill, Ray M; Aldana, Steven G; Pope, James E; Anderson, David R; Coberley, Carter R; Whitmer, R William

2012-08-02

206

Health and safety needs of older farmers: part I. Work habits and health status.  

PubMed

Farming is an occupation that blends the work and home environments and traditionally involves active participation of all family members, including older farmers. The work patterns of older farmers, including typical work hours, range of activities, and health status, are not well documented. This study, surveying a random sample of older Illinois farmers (N=87), focused on these gaps in the literature. Older farmers were found to work long hours in many farm tasks, more than would be expected in other occupational groups. Further, older farmers were found to have several chronic diseases at higher rates than the general population of the same age and gender; mental health implications were also identified. Rural occupational health nurses are in an optimal position to positively impact older farmers' mental and physical health status. PMID:18183800

Lizer, Shannon K; Petrea, Robert E

2007-12-01

207

Health among hospital employees in Europe: A cross-national study of the impact of work stress and work control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyses the effect of working conditions on the health of hospital employees across Europe. Hospital employees often have demanding jobs that increase their stress levels and, consequently, their risk of health problems. Work control – typified by employee autonomy and working time flexibility – helps them cope with high levels of work stress. Researchers have traditionally studied the

Tjasa Pisljar; Tanja van der Lippe; Laura den Dulk

2011-01-01

208

Forces Pushing Prescription Psychotropic Drugs in College Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A complex of forceful influences is greatly accelerating the use of what are usually referred to as "psychiatric drugs," although most prescribing is not done by psychiatrists. Many other clinicians, including other kinds of physicians, and recently psychologists, prescribe these medications. The influences contributing to this dramatic surge…

Whitaker, Leighton C.

2007-01-01

209

The airport atmospheric environment: respiratory health at work.  

PubMed

Air traffic is increasing, raising concern about local pollution and its adverse health effects on the people living in the vicinity of large airports. However, the highest risk is probably occupational exposure due to proximity. Jet exhaust is one of the main concerns at an airport and may have a health impact, particularly on the respiratory tract. Current studies are neither numerous enough nor strong enough to prove this kind of association. Yet, more and more people work in airports, and occupational exposure to jet exhaust is a fact. The aim of this review was to evaluate the existing knowledge regarding the impact of airport pollution on respiratory health. We conducted systematic literature searches to examine workplace exposures. PMID:23728866

Touri, Léa; Marchetti, Hélène; Sari-Minodier, Irène; Molinari, Nicolas; Chanez, Pascal

2013-06-01

210

Protocol Optimisation For Work-Function Measurements Of Metal Gates Using Kelvin Force Microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, the work-functions of metal gates are determined using capacitance-versus-gate-voltage measurements of a dedicated MOS capacitor structure. Alternatively, Kelvin Force Microscopy (KFM) is a promising technique which allows the work-function to be measured with high spatial resolution (<100 nm) coupled with a high sensitivity (10 meV). Nevertheless, before becoming a standard technique, there are still challenges facing a reliable operating protocol such as careful specimen preparation and environmental control to avoid surface artifacts. In the paper we show that the presence of an oxide, confirmed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), on a WSix metallic layer surface have a detrimental effect on the work-function measurement using KFM.

Mariolle, D.; Kaja, K.; Bertin, F.; Martinez, E.; Martin, F.; Gassilloud, R.

2007-09-01

211

Discrimination, work and health in immigrant populations in Spain.  

PubMed

One of the most important social phenomena in the global context is the flow of immigration from developing countries, motivated by economic and employment related issues. Discrimination can be approached as a health risk factor within the immigrant population's working environment, especially for those immigrants at greater risk from social exclusion and marginalisation. The aim of this study is to research perceptions of discrimination and the specific relationship between discrimination in the workplace and health among Spain's immigrant population. A qualitative study was performed by means of 84 interviews and 12 focus groups held with immigrant workers in five cities in Spain receiving a large influx of immigrants (Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Alicante and Huelva), covering representative immigrant communities in Spain (Romanians, Moroccans, Ecuadorians, Colombians and Sub-Saharan Africans). Discourse narrative content analysis was performed using pre-established categories and gradually incorporating other emerging categories from the immigrant interviewees themselves. The participants reported instances of discrimination in their community and working life, characterised by experiences of racism, mistreatment and precarious working conditions in comparison to the Spanish-born population. They also talked about limitations in terms of accessible occupations (mainly construction, the hotel and restaurant trade, domestic service and agriculture), and described major difficulties accessing other types of work (for example public administration). They also identified political and legal structural barriers related with social institutions. Experiences of discrimination can affect their mental health and are decisive factors regarding access to healthcare services. Our results suggest the need to adopt integration policies in both the countries of origin and the host country, to acknowledge labour and social rights, and to conduct further research into individual and social factors that affect the health of the immigrant populations. PMID:19328608

Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés; Gil-González, Diana; Ronda-Pérez, Elena; Porthé, Victoria; Paramio-Pérez, Gema; García, Ana M; Garí, Aitana

2009-03-28

212

Work conditions for workers with good long-term health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to investigate which work- and private life factors are associated with long-term health, operationalized as low sickness absence and low sickness presence. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A representative sample of 2,297 individuals responded to a questionnaire on two occasions at an interval of one year. In total, 28 percent were classified as having good

Gunnar Aronsson; Victoria Blom

2010-01-01

213

[The work of community health agents in health promotion: an integrative literature review].  

PubMed

This article is an integrative review that aimed to evaluate the available evidence in the literature on the development of strategies operationalized by community health agents for health promotion. Three databases were used - BDTD, LILACS and SciELO - and 2,179 publications were found, of which 58 were selected for analysis. The results were summarized in three empirical categories: Health promotion: challenges in reorienting the health care model, Educational practice in the daily work of community health agents and Vocational training in the perspective of Primary Health Care. The conclusion is that the construction of a model of care based on health promotion requires the incorporation of new educational, care-related and institutional practices. PMID:23887792

Pereira, Iara Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Amélia de Campos

214

Self-reported work ability of Norwegian women in relation to physical and mental health, and to the work environment  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the self-reported level of work ability among female employees and the relationship between work ability and demographic characteristics, physical health, mental health, and various psychosocial and organizational work environment factors. Methods Participants were 597 female employees with an average age of 43 years from urban and rural areas in Norway. Trained personnel performed a structured interview to measure demographic variables, physical health, and characteristics of the working environment. Mental health was assessed using the 25-item version of the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25). Work ability was assessed using a question from the Graded Reduced Work Ability Scale. Results Of the 597 female employees, 8.9% reported an extremely or very reduced ability to work. Twenty-four percent reported poor physical health and 21.9% reported mental distress (? 1.55 HSCL-25 cut-off). Women, who reported moderately and severely reduced work ability, did not differ a lot. Moderately reduced work ability increased with age and was associated with physical and mental health. Severely reduced work ability was strongly associated only with physical health and with unskilled occupation. Of eight work environment variables, only three yielded significant associations with work ability, and these associations disappeared after adjustment in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Results indicate that ageing, in addition to poor self-reported physical health and unskilled work, were the strongest factors associated with reduced work ability among female employees. Impact of work environment in general was visible only in univariate analysis.

Gamperiene, Migle; Nygard, Jan F; Sandanger, Inger; Lau, Bj?rn; Bruusgaard, Dag

2008-01-01

215

Occupational health professionals' knowledge, understanding and use of work ability.  

PubMed

Background The concept of work ability (WA) has a 30-year history in Finland, where it has been used extensively in occupational health (OH) research and practice. The extent to which WA has been integrated into UK OH practice is unclear. Aims (i) To compare knowledge, understanding and use of WA among OH nurses and physicians in the UK and Finland and (ii) to identify factors that influence the use of WA in Finnish OH practice. Methods An online questionnaire administered to OH practitioners in the UK and Finland. Results A total of 436 UK and 97 Finnish OH practitioners completed the questionnaire. Though familiarity with the term 'work ability' was similar among Finnish and UK respondents, substantial differences were found in understanding of the term. Ninety-five per cent (Finland) and 7% (UK) of respondents reported using the Work Ability Index (WAI), a validated measure of WA, in their practice. Finnish respondents indicated that they used the WAI results primarily for individual case management, understanding population health trends, health promotion and determining WA across age groups. UK respondents primarily attributed failure to use the WAI to lack of training. Primary factors influencing use of WA in Finland included it being considered common practice and an effect ive system by which to conduct individual assessments. Conclusions There are large differences between Finland and the UK in the assessment of WA in OH practice. Differences may reflect contrasting OH legislative frameworks. PMID:23771875

Coomer, K; Houdmont, J

2013-06-14

216

[Work as a basic human need and health promoting factor].  

PubMed

The Italian Constitution (1948) defines 'work' as the founding value of the Italian Republic. This choice was not motivated by mere economic reasons, but rather stemmed from the recognition that work is the most appropriate tool for the expression of the human personality in society, that it is an asset and a right that will increase the dignity of every person, and which corresponds to a fundamental human desire to fulfil oneself in relationship with other persons and the entire world This view of work, including its technical and manual aspects, was unknown to the ancient mentality and became familiar to us through the monastic orders of the early middle ages, which began to conceive and practise human work as a means of participating in the work of creation and transmitted this value over the centuries. As we experience today, if occupation is lacking, a basic condition for the development of the person and for his/her contribution to the growth of society is lost. Given the meaning of work in human experience, it is not surprising that unemployment represents not only a worrisome economic indicator, but also the cause of ill health. At the end of 2009 unemployment in the European Union reached 10%, similar to the rate in the US; in Italy it was estimated at 8.5% in December 2009 and is expected to reach 10% in 2010. In Lombardy, although employment had been constantly increasing between 1995 and 2008, and the current unemployment rate is as low as 4.9%, 100,000 jobs were lost in 2009. Several scientific papers have demonstrated the association between lack of occupation and lack of physical and mental health. In the present period of crisis, increases of 30% in cases of anxiety syndrome and of 15% in cases of depression have been reported. An increase in suicides among unemployed persons has been documented in several countries even if there are still problems of interpretation of the causal chain of events. Mortality among the unemployed increased, not only that due to violent causes, but also mortality for all causes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. A survey in the Turin area, Northern Italy, showed a twofold increase in mortality among unemployed men. Women were affected both by husbands' unemployment and by their own unemployment because of the previous increasing rate of female occupation. The worse the occupational condition (from "seeking work" to "temporary employment" down to "unemployed and no longer seeking work") the higher the mortality: in the latter category, where the most evident problem is marginalization and social exclusion, the increase in mortality was fourfold. The role of occupational health physicians is to recognize the possible negative effects of working conditions and at the same time promote a positive approach to work, even in difficult conditions. This makes prevention more effective and promotes health. To be aware of the meaning of work makes work itself more liveable and more productive. This is how health promotion contributes to the wellbeing of the individual and, at the same time, to the development of the economy and society at large. PMID:21298870

Bertazzi, P A

2010-01-01

217

Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs  

MedlinePLUS

... Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs Health care workers who handle ... Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs [PDF - 227 KB] Email page ...

218

Variable Name Dictionary for the Air Force Health Study 1987 Physical Examination Data Tape. Volume 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year cohort study of the health, mortality, and reproductive outcomes of veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam during the period 1961 to 1971. The study is de...

W. H. Wolfe J. E. Michalek J. C. Miner

1994-01-01

219

Variable Name Dictionary for the Air Force Health Study 1987 Physical Examination (Operation Ranch Hand).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year cohort study of the health, mortality, and reproductive outcomes of veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam during the period 1961 to 1971. The study is de...

1987-01-01

220

Variable Name Dictionary for the Air Force Health Study 1987 Physical Examination Data Tape. Volume 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year cohort study of the health, mortality, and reproductive outcomes of veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam during the period 1961 to 1971. The study is de...

W. H. Wolfe J. E. Michalek J. C. Miner

1994-01-01

221

Black & Minority Health. Report of the Secretary's Task Force. Volume 1: Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume presents major findings and recommendations of the Department of Health and Human Service's (DHHS) Task Force on Black and Minority Health. The recommendations, which are based on data collected from a number of sources, are intended to guide DHHS in developing programs and policies that address the continuing disparity in the burden…

Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

222

Report of the Task Force on the Planning and Coordination of Mental Health Services.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The establishment of a task force was authorized by the United Way to investigate the extent of coordinated mental health service planning and delivery in Summit County, Ohio. Historical developments in the field of mental health at the Federal, State, an...

E. W. Haley

1977-01-01

223

[What is the origin of inequalities in work and health?].  

PubMed

There has been an enormous increasing trend of widening gap of social inequalities since economic crisis at the end of 1997 in Korea. Since then, Korean society has deteriorated in economic and social conditions; the unemployment rate, temporary or casual workers and absolute poverty have increased. This paper presents the origin of inequalities in work and health in Korea. The origin of inequalities in work begins with the relationship between the capitalist and labourers in the capitalist mode of production. The conception and execution are dissolved in the work process in the capitalist mode of production. Thus, captitalists become control over ther labour process from workers. An alienation of the work process from the workers. The distribution of work is the majour source if inequalities in many countries as well as Korea. This paper presents the increasing tendency of unhealthy states such as mortality, early death, morbidity, physical work load, workplace injury amongst the under-privileged: ordinary workers, unemployed people, casual workers and socially deprived people in Korea. PMID:16323623

Son, Mi-A

2005-08-01

224

Working across the veterinary and human health sectors.  

PubMed

Antibiotics are widely used in human and veterinary medicine for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. This practice has led to the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in both humans and animals. The potential role that animals, particularly livestock, might play as potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes has been recognized, and it is currently a cause of public health concern. The impact of animal and human antibiotic usage on the emergence and persistence of resistant bacteria and the precise transfer pathways for resistance genes between humans and animals are not currently fully understood. As part of the remit of the UK Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare-Associated Infection (ARHAI), two main areas were addressed, namely methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, where both the human and veterinary health sectors share interests. We review the current knowledge of MRSA and resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and provide guidance on occupational risks for veterinary healthcare workers relating to animals infected or colonized with MRSA. Findings and recommendations for further work across disciplines and future research in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are also presented. Working collaboratively across disciplines is essential in order to better understand and challenge an important human and animal health problem: antimicrobial resistance. PMID:22855878

Garcia-Alvarez, Laura; Dawson, Susan; Cookson, Barry; Hawkey, Peter

2012-07-01

225

Aviation safety. Serious problems concerning the Air Traffic Control work force  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an extensive study of the air traffic control work force and includes conclusions and recommendations. The report shows that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not met its goals for fully qualified (FPL) controllers at many major facilities, and that the growth in air traffic activity as caused controller work load to reach a point where controllers are stretched too thin. Controllers and their supervisors have expressed serious concerns about their ability to continue to maintain the proper margin of safety. We recommend that FAA impose restrictions on air traffic until both the number of FPL controllers and overtime requirements meet FAA's goals. Problems relating to both the number of FPLs and overtime are most acute at the air route traffic control centers and FAA must recognize this in deciding what restrictions to impose.

Not Available

1986-03-01

226

Health Care Reform and Medical Education: Forces toward Generalism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health care reforms will dramatically change the culture of medical schools in areas of patient care, research, and education programs. Academic medical centers must construct mutually beneficial partnerships that will position them to take advantage of the opportunities rather than leave them without the diversity of resources needed to make…

O'Neil, Edward H.; Seifer, Sarena D.

1995-01-01

227

The relationship between work stress and oral health status.  

PubMed

This study investigated whether oral health status is associated with work stress. 164 male workers aged from 35 to 44 years, equally distributed over four socio-economic groups took part in the study. Three work characteristics related to stress were studied: mental demand, control and variety. Age, socio-economic status, sugar consumption, frequency of dental attendance, toothbrushing frequency, type of toothpaste used, years of residence in Belo Horizonte and marital quality were considered in the data analysis. The results of simple regression analysis (dental caries data) and simple logistic regression analysis (periodontal data) showed a significant relationship between periodontal health status and work-related mental demand (P < 0.001), marital quality (P < 0.01) and socio-economic status (P < 0.05). Dental caries status was significantly associated with age (P < 0.001), socio-economic status (P < 0.05), sugar consumption (P < 0.01) and marital quality (P < 0.0001). Socio-economic status did not remain significantly associated with dental caries after adjusting for all the variables studied. PMID:1485198

Marcenes, W S; Sheiham, A

1992-12-01

228

Partnerships for better mental health worldwide: WPA recommendations on best practices in working with service users and family carers.  

PubMed

WPA President M. Maj established the Task Force on Best Practice in Working with Service Users and Carers in 2008, chaired by H. Herrman. The Task Force had the remit to create recommendations for the international mental health community on how to develop successful partnership working. The work began with a review of literature on service user and carer involvement and partnership. This set out a range of considerations for good practice, including choice of appropriate terminology, clarifying the partnership process and identifying and reducing barriers to partnership working. Based on the literature review and on the shared knowledge in the Task Force, a set of ten recommendations for good practice was developed. These recommendations were the basis for a worldwide consultation of stakeholders with expertise as service users, families and carers, and the WPA Board and Council. The results showed a strong consensus across the international mental health community on the ten recommendations, with the strongest agreement coming from service users and carers. This general consensus gives a basis for Task Force plans to seek support for activities to promote shared work worldwide to identify best practice examples and create a resource to assist others to begin successful collaboration. PMID:21991284

Wallcraft, Jan; Amering, Michaela; Freidin, Julian; Davar, Bhargavi; Froggatt, Diane; Jafri, Hussain; Javed, Afzal; Katontoka, Sylvester; Raja, Shoba; Rataemane, Solomon; Steffen, Sigrid; Tyano, Sam; Underhill, Christopher; Wahlberg, Henrik; Warner, Richard; Herrman, Helen

2011-10-01

229

Working at sea and psychosocial health problems Report of an International Maritime Health Association Workshop.  

PubMed

Many of the recognised risk factors for psychosocial health problems impact on seafarers because of the nature and organisation of their work. The consequences are serious because of the safety critical nature of many of the tasks at sea and because of the level of health required to continue working remote from care. There is relatively little relevant research on the scale of psychosocial health problems in seafarers and so the justification for taking preventative action is not secure. The workshop was convened to develop a consensus on how psychosocial risks at sea can best be characterised, their consequences in terms of health, well being and performance and the steps which can be taken to provide better information on risks and on the validity of various forms of intervention. A number of interim measures have been proposed in advance of more definitive research results. PMID:17292007

Carter, Tim

2005-05-01

230

Health and turnover of working mothers after childbirth via the work-family interface: an analysis across time.  

PubMed

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women's health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M; Clinch, C Randall; Arcury, Thomas A

2011-09-01

231

'The dangers attending these conditions are evident': Public Health and the Working Environment of Lancashire Textile Communities, c.1870-1939  

PubMed Central

This article examines the position of the working environment within public health priorities and as a contributor to the health of a community. Using two Lancashire textile towns (Burnley and Blackburn) as case studies and drawing on a variety of sources, it highlights how, while legislation set the industry parameters for legal enforcement of working conditions, local public health priorities were pivotal in setting codes of practice. The complexities entwined with identifying the working environment as a cause of ill health and with improving it were entangled within the local community health context. In addition, the multiple understandings of Medical Officers of Health surrounding the remit of their responsibilities impacted the local health context. These did not always parallel national regulations. Indeed, it was these local, community specific forces that set the public health agenda, determined its path and the place of the working environment within this.

Greenlees, Janet

2013-01-01

232

Boundary Management, Interplexity, and Nostalgia: Managing Marginal Identities in Public Health Working  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores identity dynamics in public health working at the level of the institutional identity ascribed to public health professionals, and the identity work that public health workers perform. Drawing on focus group research with school nurses and community midwives in England, the article identifies two important but neglected areas for interrogating public health worker's identity work: boundary management

Robert McMurray; Alison Pullen

2008-01-01

233

Integrated approach for managing health risks at work--the role of occupational health nurses.  

PubMed

Currently, many organizations are using a department-centered approach to manage health risks at work. In such a model, segregated departments are providing employee benefits such as health insurance, workers' compensation, and short- and long-term disability or benefits addressing work-life issues. In recent years, a new model has emerged: health and productivity management (HPM). This is an employee-centered, integrated approach, designed to increase efficiency, reduce competition for scarce resources, and increase employee participation in prevention activities. Evidence suggests that corporations using integrated HPM programs achieve better health outcomes for their employees, with consequent increased productivity and decreased absenteeism. Occupational health nurses are well positioned to assume leadership roles in their organizations by coordinating efforts and programs across departments that offer health, wellness, and safety benefits. To assume their role as change agents to improve employees' health, nurses should start using the language of business more often by improving their communication skills, computer skills, and ability to quantify and articulate results of programs and services to senior management. PMID:17323873

Marinescu, Luiza G

2007-02-01

234

Forces  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts what forces are and how they can change the motion and shape of objects in an animated slide show. This resource also includes an interactive test and review of the material, and can be downloaded for offline use.

235

The attitudes of occupational health personnel to smoking at work.  

PubMed

Attitudes of occupational health care professionals toward smoking and their activity to address smoking issues were investigated by a questionnaire survey. Data were also collected on employees' exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and on smoking policies that existed in workplaces. Questionnaires were mailed to all occupational health care centers (n = 1,004) in Finland. The prevalence of daily smokers was 9.6% among physicians and 3.6% among nurses; 15% and 11%, respectively smoked occasionally. Smoking restrictions were enforced in more than 70% of all workplaces, but only 3.6% of them had a total smoking ban. Nonsmoking professionals were in favor of smoke-fee workplaces and smoking restrictions significantly more often than their smoking colleagues. Nonsmokers also regarded smoking as a serious problem to the organizational climate of workplaces. Almost half of nonsmoking respondents, but only 11% of daily smokers, would totally ban smoking in workplaces. Although the personal smoking status of the respondent had a strong effect on attitudes to smoking regulations, it did not have a clear influence on interest in discussing smoking issues when seeing patients. Nurses were more active in addressing smoking issues than physicians. Occupational health professionals of large companies reported stricter smoking policies at work than those who represented small enterprises PMID:9617390

Heloma, A; Reijula, K; Tikkanen, J; Nykyri, E

1998-07-01

236

[Work: disease and health. The role of occupational medicine].  

PubMed

To assess the role of Occupational Medicine in the promotion of workers'health over the last forty years, the author studied the evolution of this discipline from a clinical-diagnostic approach to the current emphasis on prevention. However, it is stressed that in Occupational Medicine even preventive measures are based on clinical methodology, as for example in health surveillance, where the main tasks are the identification of individual hyper-susceptibility and the assessment of early and reversible health effects due to occupational risks. Moreover, the traditional clinical-diagnostic approach is still of utmost importance. In fact, the classical occupational diseases do not present with the specific clinical features of the recent past. Instead, today it is necessary to evaluate whether occupational risk factors play a concomitant role in the origin of diseases that affect the general population. Moreover, new occupational diseases are emerging, due to the continuous changes in manufacturing processes and work organization. To assess the role that Occupational Medicine has played in the binomial expression "disease-health", topics which particularly suit the Author's cultural background are considered and are used as "indicators" of the various scientific, cultural, social, economic, and legislative aspects that contribute to the professional development of Occupational Physicians. Important results have been achieved over the last 40 years, however Occupational Physicians face new problems that impose a continuous updating process, not only on medical topics but also on the development of technological processes. The laws and the recommendations of the most prestigious national and international organizations and the principles of the ICOH Code of Ethics should guide Occupational Physicians in their profession and their actions must imply full professional independence. They must acquire and maintain the necessary competence for their duties and adequate conditions to carry out their tasks according to good practice and professional ethics. PMID:21298869

Alessio, L

2010-01-01

237

Health@Home: The Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations  

PubMed Central

Objective: Contemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in a given physical environment. Design: We conducted a descriptive-exploratory study of the work of HIMH, involving 49 community-dwelling volunteers from a rural Midwestern community. Measurements: During in-person interviews, we collected data using semistructured questionnaires and photographs of artifacts used for HIMH. Results: The work of HIMH is largely the responsibility of a single individual, primarily engaged in the tasks of acquiring, managing, and organizing a diverse set of health information. Paper-based tools are most common, and residents develop strategies for storing information in the household environment aligned with anticipated use. Affiliative relationships, e.g., parent-child or spousal, within the household serve as the organization that gives rise to health information management practices. Synthesis of these findings led to identification of several storage strategies employed in HIMH. These strategies are labeled “just-in-time,” “just-because,” “just-in-case,” and “just-at-hand,” reflecting location of the artifacts of health information and anticipated urgency in the need to retrieve it. Conclusion: Laypeople develop and employ robust, complex strategies for managing health information in the home. Capitalizing on these strategies will complement and extend current consumer health innovations to provide functional support to people who face increasing demands to manage personal health information.

Moen, Anne; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

2005-01-01

238

Go For IT!: A Resource for Building America's Information Technology Work Force  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Commerce, partly as a result of the response to its recently published America's New Deficit: The Shortage of Information Technology Workers (discussed in the October 17, 1997 Scout Report), has created this site to aid in building and maintaining an information technology workforce. The key to the site is an IT work force program database, which lists education, employment, and training programs. The database is searchable by type of program, geography, sponsorship agency, and keyword. For an overview of the over 170 programs in the database at present, simply click on the Search button without using any of the options. Each entry contains address and contact information for the IT program, a hyperlink when available, and a detailed description of the program. The site will act as a resource clearinghouse for educators, companies, organizations, and individuals. Go for IT! actively solicits new programs for the database.

1998-01-01

239

Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

MacQueen, D H

2007-02-21

240

Paid work, unpaid work and social support: A study of the health of male and female nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paid work, unpaid work in the home and social support are important elements of the social production of health and illness, though their combined effects on both women and men have only recently become a focus of research. This paper examines their association with the health problems of nurses, presenting data from a survey of a proportional random sample of

Vivienne Walters; Rhonda Lenton; Susan French; John Eyles; Janet Mayr; Bruce Newbold

1996-01-01

241

Satisfied Workers, Retained Workers: Effects of Work and Work Environment on Homecare Workers' Job Satisfaction, Stress, Physical Health, and Retention  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this project was to assist health system managers and policy makers develop policies and strategies to recruit and retain human resources in the homecare sector and have a satisfied, healthy workforce. The overall research question was: How do the work characteristics of homecare workers and the work environment in homecare contribute to job satisfaction, stress, physical health,

Isik U. Zeytinoglu; Margaret Denton

2006-01-01

242

Workgroup Report: Developing Environmental Health Indicators for European Children: World Health Organization Working Group  

PubMed Central

A working group coordinated by the World Health Organization developed a set of indicators to protect children’s health from environmental risks and to support current and future European policy needs. On the basis of identified policy needs, the group developed a core set of 29 indicators for implementation plus an extended set of eight additional indicators for future development, focusing on exposure, health effects, and action. As far as possible, the indicators were designed to use existing information and are flexible enough to be developed further to meet the needs of policy makers and changing health priorities. These indicators cover most of the priority topic areas specified in the Children’s Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) as adopted in the Fourth Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in 2004, and will be used to monitor the implementation of CEHAPE. This effort can be viewed as an integral part of the Global Initiative on Children’s Environmental Health Indicators, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002.

Pond, Kathy; Kim, Rokho; Carroquino, Maria-Jose; Pirard, Philippe; Gore, Fiona; Cucu, Alexandra; Nemer, Leda; MacKay, Morag; Smedje, Greta; Georgellis, Antonis; Dalbokova, Dafina; Krzyzanowski, Michal

2007-01-01

243

Workgroup report: developing environmental health indicators for European children: World Health Organization Working Group.  

PubMed

A working group coordinated by the World Health Organization developed a set of indicators to protect children's health from environmental risks and to support current and future European policy needs. On the basis of identified policy needs, the group developed a core set of 29 indicators for implementation plus an extended set of eight additional indicators for future development, focusing on exposure, health effects, and action. As far as possible, the indicators were designed to use existing information and are flexible enough to be developed further to meet the needs of policy makers and changing health priorities. These indicators cover most of the priority topic areas specified in the Children's Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) as adopted in the Fourth Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in 2004, and will be used to monitor the implementation of CEHAPE. This effort can be viewed as an integral part of the Global Initiative on Children's Environmental Health Indicators, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002. PMID:17805431

Pond, Kathy; Kim, Rokho; Carroquino, Maria-Jose; Pirard, Philippe; Gore, Fiona; Cucu, Alexandra; Nemer, Leda; MacKay, Morag; Smedje, Greta; Georgellis, Antonis; Dalbokova, Dafina; Krzyzanowski, Michal

2007-09-01

244

Mental Health Services in Rural Jails. Working Paper No. 42.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to explore the role of rural jails in the mental health systems in rural communities, investigate how rural jails manage mental health and substance abuse problems among inmates, ascertain barriers to providing mental health ...

A. Yousefian D. Hartley D. Lambert M. M. Race

2010-01-01

245

NIOSH Conference Grant: 5th International Congress on Women, Work, and Health, Mexico, October 2008.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Researchers and women's health advocates over the years have highlighted the importance of the relationship between work and women's health. This complex area of investigation includes the impact of women's work in the unpaid private and paid public spher...

C. Becerril L. Delp

2010-01-01

246

Do stigma and other perceived barriers to mental health care differ across Armed Forces?  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives Military organizations are keen to address barriers to mental health care yet stigma and barriers to care remain little understood, especially potential cultural differences between Armed Forces. The aim of this study was to compare data collected by the US, UK, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian militaries using Hoge et al.'s perceived stigma and barriers to care measure (Combat duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, mental health problems and barriers to care. New Engl J Med 2004;351:13–22). Design Each member country identified data sources that had enquired about Hoge et al.'s perceived stigma and perceived barriers to care items in the re-deployment or immediate post-deployment period. Five relevant statements were included in the study. Setting US, UK Australian, New Zealand and Canadian Armed Forces. Results Concerns about stigma and barriers to care tended to be more prominent among personnel who met criteria for a mental health problem. The pattern of reported stigma and barriers to care was similar across the Armed Forces of all five nations. Conclusions Barriers to care continue to be a major issue for service personnel within Western military forces. Although there are policy, procedural and cultural differences between Armed Forces, the nations studied appear to share some similarities in terms of perceived stigma and barriers to psychological care. Further research to understand patterns of reporting and subgroup differences is required.

Gould, Matthew; Adler, Amy; Zamorski, Mark; Castro, Carl; Hanily, Natalie; Steele, Nicole; Kearney, Steve; Greenberg, Neil

2010-01-01

247

Comparison of United States (NIOSH Lifting Guidelines) and European (ECSC Force Limits) Recommendations for Manual Work Limits  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the early 1980's two different guidelines for manual lifting were established: the NIOSH Work Practices Guide for Manual Lifting and the European Coal and Steel Community's Force Limits in Manual Work. A comparison of the two guidelines indicates some discrepancies in their predictive capabilities and a significant nonlinear relationship between the two limits. These discrepancies may be explained by

ANDRIS FREIVALDS

1987-01-01

248

Promoting Positive Emotional Health of Children of Transient Armed Forces Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The focus of this research was to promote emotional health in a small primary school (n = 180), with a highly transient pupil population of armed forces children (Service children). Negative effects of pupil mobility have been found to relate to academic attainment (Dobson, Henthorne, & Lynas, 2000; Mott, 2002), but its effect on social and…

Eodanable, Miranda; Lauchlan, Fraser

2012-01-01

249

The Relationship of Socioeconomic Status, Labor Force Participation, and Health among Men and Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using survey data from an extensive sample of Californians in the United States, we examined the relationship among indicators of socio-economic status (SES) and health for men and women in and out of the paid labor force. In contrast to data reported from the mid-1980s in which correlations among SES variables were stronger among men than among women, correlations among

Joan M. Ostrove; Nancy E. Adler

1998-01-01

250

Infusing Public Health Content into Foundation and Advanced Social Work Courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to prepare social workers better to intervene in the complex social problems affecting the health and social functioning of all populations, we propose the integration of appropriate public health content into the social work curriculum. In this paper we discuss the relationship between social work and public health, how public health content (i.e., epidemiology, prevention, community and population

Deborah Schild Wilkinson; Kathleen A. Rounds; Valire Carr Copeland

2002-01-01

251

Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: II. Mortality  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the current health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. This report compares the noncombat mortality of 1261 Ranch Hand veterans to that of a comparison population of 19,101 other Air Force veterans primarily involved in cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. The indirectly standardized all-cause death rate among Ranch Hands is 2.5 deaths per 1,000 person-years, the same as that among comparison subjects. After adjustment for age, rank, and occupation, the all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 1.0. In adjusted cause-specific analyses, the authors found no significant group differences regarding accidental, malignant neoplasm, and circulatory deaths. These data are not supportive to a hypothesis of increases mortality among Ranch Hands.

Michalek, J.E.; Wolfe, W.H.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

1990-10-10

252

Health problems due to long working hours in Japan: working hours, workers' compensation (Karoshi), and preventive measures.  

PubMed

Late in the 1970s, serious social concern over health problems due to long working hours has arisen in Japan. This report briefly summarizes the Japanese circumstances about long working hours and what the Government has achieved so far. The national statistics show that more than 6 million people worked for 60 h or more per week during years 2000 and 2004. Approximately three hundred cases of brain and heart diseases were recognized as labour accidents resulting from overwork (Karoshi) by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) between 2002 and 2005. Consequently, the MHLW has been working to establish a more appropriate compensation system for Karoshi, as well as preventive measures for overwork related health problems. In 2001, the MHLW set the standards for clearly recognizing Karoshi in association with the amount of overtime working hours. These standards were based on the results of a literature review and medical examinations indicating a relationship between overwork and brain and heart diseases. In 2002, the MHLW launched the program for the prevention of health impairment due to overwork, and in 2005 the health guidance through an interview by a doctor for overworked workers has been enacted as law. Long working hours are controversial issues because of conflicts between health, safety, work-life balance, and productivity. It is obvious that we need to continue research regarding the impact on worker health and the management of long working hours. PMID:17085914

Iwasaki, Kenji; Takahashi, Masaya; Nakata, Akinori

2006-10-01

253

Expanding the psychosocial work environment: workplace norms and work-family conflict as correlates of stress and health.  

PubMed

This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms governing work performance and social relations, and work-to-family and family-to-work conflict, explained significant amounts of variance for job stress. The cross-level interaction between work performance norms and work-to-family conflict was also significantly related to job stress. Work-to-family conflict was significantly related to health symptoms, but family-to-work conflict and organizational norms were not. PMID:14700459

Hammer, Tove Helland; Saksvik, Per Øystein; Nytrø, Kjell; Torvatn, Hans; Bayazit, Mahmut

2004-01-01

254

Self-healing forces and concepts of health and disease. A historical discourse.  

PubMed

The phenomenon of self-healing forces has again and again challenged doctors in the different historical periods of medical science. They relied on effects of self-healing forces in diagnosis and therapy. They also tried to explain these effects based on the current model of organism. The understanding of this phenomenon has always influenced the understanding of therapy and played a role in defining the concept of health and disease. In the 17th and 18th century the idea of self-healing force was interpreted as a phenomenon related to the organic forces, whereas in the 19th century the explanation was reduced to a materialistic mechanism. Nowadays the knowledge of heath-shock-proteins open the way of a new understanding of the organic defense mechanisms. PMID:11939425

Lohff, B

2001-01-01

255

Employment in multiple sclerosis. Exiting and re-entering the work force.  

PubMed

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with significant economic burden and high rates of unemployment. This investigation evaluated patient and disease characteristics associated with work loss and work initiation using the NARCOMS patient registry. Patient and disease characteristics associated with transitions to unemployment or employment were evaluated cross-sectionally and prospectively over the course of two assessment periods (mean interval of 1.56 +/- 0.93 years). Eligible participants included 8,867 patients for the cross-sectional component, and 8,122 for longitudinal analyses. At Time 1 and Time 2 56-58 % of MS patients were not employed. At Time 1, unemployed participants more likely to have a progressive disease course, had a longer symptom duration, greater levels of disability as measured by the PDDS, and greater functional limitations across all domains of the performance scales (p < 0.0001 for all). At Time 2, increasing MS symptoms in the past 6 months increased the odds of becoming unemployed. In addition, specific problems in mobility, hand function, fatigue, and cognitive performance domains were associated with increased odds of becoming unemployed. Less severe problems in similar areas, including mobility, hand function, and cognitive functioning were also predictive of work initiation among patients not employed. MS is associated with high rates of unemployment. Specific physical and mental health limitations confer risk of employment cessation over time, as well as the likelihood of employment initiation. This study has implications for rehabilitation interventions to target specific MS related limitations that place patients at greatest risk for work status changes. PMID:18677639

Julian, Laura J; Vella, Lea; Vollmer, Tim; Hadjimichael, Olympia; Mohr, David C

2008-07-17

256

The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

Applebaum, Herbert

257

The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

Applebaum, Herbert

258

Health consequences of work in childhood in opinions of respondents from agricultural families.  

PubMed

Introduction: The engagement of children in work on a family farm is a common phenomenon in many countries worldwide. An excessive loading of children with work creates many risks for their health or even life. Studies concerning the effect of work on health concern mainly the negative consequences for the health of working children. Objective: The objective of the study was the recognition of opinions of adults from agricultural families concerning the effect of work in childhood on their state of health. Materials and method: The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey using a questionnaire technique, and covered a group of 482 adults from agricultural families. The selection of the study group was targeted according to the following criteria: 1) agricultural family origin, 2) respondents' age 20 - 65, 3) completed education. Results: The majority of respondents expressed the opinion that work in childhood had no impact on their health. At the same time, 2/5 of respondents considered that work on their parents' farm exerted an effect on their health in childhood (current effects), whereas nearly 1/3 admitted that an engagement in work in childhood also affected their present state of health as adults (distant effects). Respondents who experienced the impact of work on health perceived both positive and negative consequences of performing agricultural work activities in their childhood. Opinions concerning the effect of work on health depended on loading with agricultural work in childhood. The higher the level of loading with work activities, the more frequently the respondents perceived the impact of work on their health. Conclusion: The engagement of children in agricultural work in a small amount of working time, and adjustment of the endowed jobs to their capabilities brings about many benefits for health with low health risk. In turn, the engagement of children in work from their youngest years and overloading them with work exerts a negative effect on health, especially in later life. PMID:24069875

Lachowski, Stanis?aw

2013-09-20

259

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

260

Health Problems due to Long Working Hours in Japan: Working Hours, Workers' Compensation (Karoshi), and Preventive Measuresa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Late in the 1970s, serious social concern over health problems due to long working hours has arisen in Japan. This report briefly summarizes the Japanese circumstances about long working hours and what the Government has achieved so far. The national statistics show that more than 6 million people worked for 60 h or more per week during years 2000 and

Kenji IWASAKI; Masaya TAKAHASHI; Akinori NAKATA

261

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

262

Breastfeeding mothers returning to work: possibilities for information, anticipatory guidance and support from US health care professionals.  

PubMed

Today, more mothers in the United States are in the labor force, and returning to the workforce presents numerous challenges for the breastfeeding mother. Although it as been demonstrated that maternal employment is associated with a decrease in the length of time a mother continues to breastfeed, health care providers are in a unique position to enhance a mother's breastfeeding success as she transitions back into the workplace. This article describes various commonly perceived obstacles to combining breastfeeding and working and provides examples of information, anticipatory guidance, and support that health care providers can use to assist a breastfeeding mother with a successful return to the workforce. PMID:19136394

Angeletti, Michelle A

2009-01-08

263

Public Health Works: Blood Donation in Urban China  

PubMed Central

Recent shifts in the global health infrastructure warrant consideration of the value and effectiveness of national public health campaigns. These shifts include the globalization of pharmaceutical research, the rise of NGO-funded health interventions, and the rise of biosecurity models of international health. We argue that although these trends have arisen as worthwhile responses to actual health needs, it is important to remember the key role that public health campaigns can play in the promotion of national health, especially in developing nations. Focusing on an example set by China in response to a public health crisis surrounding the national need for a clean and adequate blood supply and the inadvertent spread of HIV by way of blood donation in the early 19902, we argue that there is an important role for strong national public health programs. We also identify the key factors that enabled China’s response to this bourgeoning epidemic to be, in the end, largely successful.

Adams, Vincanne; Erwin, Kathleen; Le, Phuoc V

2009-01-01

264

The health and cost implications of high body mass index in Australian defence force personnel  

PubMed Central

Background Frequent illness and injury among workers with high body mass index (BMI) can raise the costs of employee healthcare and reduce workforce maintenance and productivity. These issues are particularly important in vocational settings such as the military, which require good physical health, regular attendance and teamwork to operate efficiently. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of injury and illness, absenteeism, productivity, healthcare usage and administrative outcomes among Australian Defence Force personnel with varying BMI. Methods Personnel were grouped into cohorts according to the following ranges for (BMI): normal (18.5???24.9?kg/m2; n?=?197), overweight (25–29.9?kg/m2; n?=?154) and obese (?30?kg/m2) with restricted body fat (?28% for females, ?24% for males) (n?=?148) and with no restriction on body fat (n?=?180). Medical records for each individual were audited retrospectively to record the incidence of injury and illness, absenteeism, productivity, healthcare usage (i.e., consultation with medical specialists, hospital stays, medical investigations, prescriptions) and administrative outcomes (e.g., discharge from service) over one year. These data were then grouped and compared between the cohorts. Results The prevalence of injury and illness, cost of medical specialist consultations and cost of medical scans were all higher (p?work days were also higher (p?work days, the rate of re-classification of Medical Employment Classification and the rate of discharge from service were similar between all four cohorts. Conclusions High BMI in the military increases healthcare usage, but does not disrupt workforce maintenance. The greater prevalence of injury and illness, greater healthcare usage and lower productivity in obese Australian Defence Force personnel is not related to higher levels of body fat.

2012-01-01

265

Work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To assess separate and combined effects of work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).?METHODS—A cross sectional study was conducted in a Dutch nationwide random sample of 720 patients with RA. Information about work factors and behavioural coping was collected by a self-administered postal questionnaire. A broad variety of work factors and coping styles were evaluated separately and in combination using multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for sociodemographic and disease related variables. Attributable and preventable fractions were calculated from the combined analyses to assess the relative importance of the contributing factors.?RESULTS—Additional job training, equal career opportunities, letting the disease influence the choice of the current job position, and informing colleagues about having the disease were negatively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of decreasing the risk was adjusting job demands which accounted for 63% of the patients still in the labour force. Decreasing activities and diverting attention in order to cope with pain, and pacing in order to cope with limitations were the coping styles which were positively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of increasing the risk of withdrawal was pacing which accounted for 67% of the withdrawals.?CONCLUSION—Work factors are potentially important modifiable risk factors for withdrawal from the labour force in patients with RA. Behavioural coping is also relevant.??

Chorus, A; Miedema, H; Wevers, C; van der Linden, S

2001-01-01

266

Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA.

Ratzlaff, Charles R.; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A.

2012-01-01

267

Single-Parent | Working-Parent Heart Health  

MedlinePLUS

... he may have rejected initially. It definitely helps to start young.” Download or print our quick reference ... Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Consumer Health Care • Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, ...

268

Toward Standardized, Comparable Public Health Systems Data: A Taxonomic Description of Essential Public Health Work  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify taxonomy of task, knowledge, and resources for documenting the work performed in local health departments (LHDs). Data Sources Secondary data were collected from documents describing public health (PH) practice produced by organizations representing the PH community. Study Design A multistep consensus-based method was used that included literature review, data extraction, expert opinion, focus group review, and pilot testing. Data Extraction Methods Terms and concepts were manually extracted from documents, consolidated, and evaluated for scope and sufficiency by researchers. An expert panel determined suitability of terms and a hierarchy for classifying them. This work was validated by practitioners and results pilot tested in two LHDs. Principal Findings The finalized taxonomy was applied to compare a national sample of 11 LHDs. Data were obtained from 1,064 of 1,267 (84 percent) of employees. Frequencies of tasks, knowledge, and resources constitute a profile of PH work. About 70 percent of the correlations between LHD pairs on tasks and knowledge were high (>0.7), suggesting between-department commonalities. On resources only 16 percent of correlations between LHD pairs were high, suggesting a source of performance variability. Conclusions A taxonomy of PH work serves as a tool for comparative research and a framework for further development.

Merrill, Jacqueline; Keeling, Jonathan; Gebbie, Kristine

2009-01-01

269

Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

1998-01-01

270

Health Consultation in Child Care: A Partnership That Works.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the role of child care health consultants and suggests whom to contact for health consultant services. Notes that professional child care health consultants should be knowledgeable of pediatric care, child development, injury prevention screening, and state licensing guidelines. Suggests that consultants can provide on-site visits, assist…

Dooling, Mary V.; Ulione, Margaret S.

2000-01-01

271

The Trouble with Health Savings Accounts: A Social Work Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In recent years, conservatives have promoted health savings accounts (HSAs) as a way of addressing the growing cost of health insurance. HSAs were introduced under the Medical Modernization Act of 2003 as "an alternative to traditional health insurance." They are at the heart of an effort to replace the current system of insurance with…

Gorin, Stephen

2006-01-01

272

Black Women in the Labor Force. Facts on Working Women No. 90-4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the 1980s, the population of black women aged 16 years and older in the United States increased by 17.2%, and labor force participation for black women increased by 29%. In 1987, black women accounted for 50% of total black employment. The unemployment rate for black teenagers in 1990 was 30% (versus 10.8% for all black women). Labor force

Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

273

Health Literacy: Critical Opportunities for Social Work Leadership in Health Care and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|One-third of U. S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to…

Liechty, Janet M.

2011-01-01

274

Health Services Management in the Health Administration Curriculum. Report by the Curriculum Task Force on Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Critical decisions that need to be made by faculties of health administration education programs when developing and assessing the health services management portion of the curriculum are identified. Decisions should draw from the information available concerning professional target roles of graduates, graduate behavior expected, resources for…

Association of Univ. Programs in Health Administration, Washington, DC.

275

[Transformations in the world of work and of health care. Preliminary reflexions].  

PubMed

In this work, I make some preliminary reflections about the transformations in the world of work and health. For this purpose, I start this study discussing essential dimensions of the work like the central category to analyse the society based on the Marxist conception. Following, I investigate transformations in the world of work and the specificity of health to the related reflection about care and the organization of health workers. PMID:9370751

Kantorski, L P

1997-04-01

276

Scientific and popular health knowledge in the education work of community health agents in Rio de Janeiro shantytowns.  

PubMed

Health education for socially marginalized populations challenges the efficacy of existing strategies and methods, and the pertinence of the educational and philosophical principles that underpin them. The Brazilian Community Health Agents Initiative (CHAI) hires residents of deprived marginalized communities to undertake health promotion and education in their communities. The ultimate goal of the CHAI is to connect populations with the public healthcare system by promoting social re-affiliation, protecting civil rights and enhancing equity of access to health services. In this article, we present the education work of community health agents through interplay between popular and scientific health knowledge in nine Rio de Janeiro shantytowns. A critical ethnographic research design, using thematic analysis, allowed us to explore agents' education work to enhance family health literacy in shantytowns. Local culture and social practices inspire Agents to create original strategies to reconcile forms of health knowledge in their work. PMID:22717941

Zanchetta, M S; Kolawole Salami, B; Perreault, M; Leite, L C

2012-06-19

277

Pride and confidence at work: potential predictors of occupational health in a hospital setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This study focuses on determinants of a healthy work environment in two departments in a Swedish university hospital. The study is based on previously conducted longitudinal studies at the hospital (1994–2001), concerning working conditions and health outcomes among health care personnel in conjunction with downsizing processes. Overall, there was a general negative trend in relation to mental health, as

Kerstin Nilsson; Anna Hertting; Inga-Lill Petterson; Töres Theorell

2005-01-01

278

Integrating Education on Addressing Health Disparities into the Graduate Social Work Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this article is to propose an elective social work course as a means of better preparing social workers entering practice in healthcare to meet the challenges of promoting health and reducing health disparities in minority and underserved communities. Course offerings specifically targeting health or medical social work training…

Mitchell, Jamie Ann

2012-01-01

279

Work ability among health care workers in the United Kingdom: A pilot  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the work ability of NHS health care workers in the UK, aged 45 and above, and the factors influencing it, in order to introduce occupational health interventions to improve their ability to work. After obtaining approval from ethical committee, a cross sectional survey was conducted, of a sample of (507) health care workers aged 45 and above, in

N. Nachiappan; J. Harrison

2005-01-01

280

Creative forces for retention of home health aides in hospice and palliative care.  

PubMed

Qualities of character and physical capability are essential for the success of a home health aide. The aide needs to be prepared by the organization to provide expert care in various home settings, with patients and families whose personalities, lifestyles, ages, cultural background, and socioeconomic status may be vastly different from those the aide has experienced. This article explores the history of home health aide services as a backdrop to understanding the creative forces in recruitment and education methods, as well as support and team efforts that contribute to having successful careers as aides in the home care setting. PMID:22743530

Brown, Lauren

281

Forced migration and mental health: prolonged internal displacement, return migration and resilience.  

PubMed

Forced internal displacement has been rising steadily, mainly due to conflict. Many internally displaced people (IDP) experience prolonged displacement. Global research evidence suggests that many of these IDP are at high risk for developing mental disorders, adding weight to the global burden of disease. However, individual and community resilience may act as protective factors. Return migration may be an option for some IDP populations, especially when conflicts end, although return migration may itself be associated with worse mental health. Limited evidence is available on effects of resettlement or return migration following prolonged forced internal displacement on mental health. Also, the role of resilience factors remains to be clarified following situations of prolonged displacement. The public health impact of internal displacement is not clearly understood. Epidemiological and interventional research in IDP mental health needs to look beyond medicalised models and encompass broader social and cultural aspects. The resilience factor should be integrated and explored more in mental health research among IDP and a clearly focused multidisciplinary approach is advocated. PMID:24029841

Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Stewart, Robert

2012-12-21

282

Receiving Treatment, Labor Force Activity, and Work Performance Among People with Psychiatric Disorders: Results from a Population Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction Standard treatments for psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and anxiety disorders are generally expected\\u000a to benefit individuals, employers, and the wider community through improvements in work-functioning and productivity. Methods We repeated a previous secondary investigation of receiving treatment, labor force activity and self-reported work performance\\u000a among people with ICD-10 psychiatric disorders, in comparison to people with other types

Geoffrey Waghorn; David Chant

283

The 21st Century at Work: Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States. Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|What are the forces that will continue to shape the U.S. workforce and workplace over the next 10 to 15 years? With such inevitabilities as the proliferation and acceleration of technology worldwide, will more individuals work at home, will more businesses outsource their noncore functions -- and with what consequences? Answering such questions…

Karoly, Lynn A.; Panis, Constantijn W. A.

2004-01-01

284

The 21st Century at Work: Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|What are the forces that will continue to shape the U.S. workforce and workplace over the next 10 to 15 years? With such inevitabilities as the proliferation and acceleration of technology worldwide, will more individuals work at home, will more businesses outsource their noncore functions -- and with what consequences? Answering such questions…

Karoly, Lynn A.; Panis, Constantijn W. A.

2004-01-01

285

Bioventing Test Work Plan and Interim Test Results Report for Bulk Fuel Storage Area, Pease Air Force Base, New Hampshire.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This test work plan presents the scope of an in-situ bioventing pilot test for treatment of fuel contaminated soils within the Bulk Fuel Storage Area (BFSA) at Pease Air Force Base (AFB), New Hampshire. The pilot test has four primary objectives: 1) to as...

1994-01-01

286

Between the Cracks: Access to Physical Health Care in Children of the Working Poor.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the demographic and psychological characteristics of the parents of a group of children with no access to health care, due to their status as "working poor" and thus denied either public or private health insurance whose children were referred for treatment for an acute health problem by a volunteer health care program for…

Tinsley, Barbara J.; Wang, Shirley J.; Kwasman, Alan; Green, Delores

287

Work Satisfaction Issues among Prior United States Air Force Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The recruitment and retention of professional nurses is now recognized as a major problem in the United States. Over the last three years, the United States Air Force (USAF) has experienced increasing difficulty in retaining sufficient numbers of its' Cer...

D. K. Martino

1990-01-01

288

Microsatellite based, on-orbit servicing work at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-orbit servicing can dramatically reduce the life cycle cost, and increase the utility, of expensive space assets. However, previous servicing attempts have generally been too large, complex, and expensive to be effective. Newer, streamlined approaches, such as the Air Force's Modular On-orbit Servicing (MOS) concept, might make on-orbit servicing feasible. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing many of

Richard W. Madison; Kirtland AFB

2000-01-01

289

Child Health Inequality: Framing a Social Work Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Numerous studies acknowledge that the well-being of our nation hinges on the health of its people. There is specific concern about children because they represent the future. Ignoring children's health needs can compromise their educational preparedness, occupational pursuits, productivity, and longevity. Current science demonstrates that…

Hernandez, Virginia Rondero; Montana, Salvador; Clarke, Kris

2010-01-01

290

How older workers with coronary heart disease perceive the health effects of work.  

PubMed

More than 3.4 million workers have coronary heart disease (CHD) with significant work limitations and disability. Although the cohort of aging workers with CHD is growing, little is known about how older workers with CHD perceive the relationship between the work environment, including job stress, and their health. The purpose of this qualitative, descriptive study was to explore the perceptions of the health effects of work among older workers with CHD and describe how they cope with work stress. The sample was 47% female and 33% African American. Their mean age was 59.21 (± 5.4) years, and most (55%) worked in professional or managerial jobs. Themes emerged about perceptions of the health effects of work and coping strategies. Because older employees are a vulnerable work group, understanding the perceived health effects of work may guide future workplace program development and policy. [Workplace Health Saf 2013;61(11):486-494.]. PMID:24169955

Dickson, Victoria Vaughan

2013-11-01

291

Mental Health Social Work And The Bureau-Medicalisation Of Mental Health Care: Identity In A Changing World  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychiatry in the UK is seemingly moving inexorably towards bureau-medicalisation, a potent combination of the medical model and organisational imperative. This paper looks at the causes of these developments and one consequent trajectory toward a generic mental health practitioner. This paper provides a rationale for mental health social work (MHSW), arguing against the temptation to modernise mental health care by

Jack Nathan; Martin Webber

2010-01-01

292

Making activity-based funding work for mental health.  

PubMed

The implementation of activity-based funding (ABF) in mental health from 1 July 2013 has significant risks and benefits. It is critical that the process of implementation is consistent with Australia's cherished goal of establishing a genuine and effective model of community-based mental health care. The infrastructure to support the application of ABF to mental health is currently weak and requires considerable development. States and territories are struggling to meet existing demand for largely hospital-based acute mental health care. There is a risk that valuable ABF-driven Commonwealth growth funds may be used to prop up these systems rather than drive the emergence of new models of community-based care. Some of these new models exist now and this article provides a short description. The aim is to help the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority better understand the landscape of mental health into which it now seeks to deploy ABF. PMID:23731959

Rosenberg, Sebastian P; Hickie, Ian B

2013-06-01

293

An Exploration of the Working Alliance in Mental Health Case Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The working alliance between clients and helpers has been identified as a common factor of treatment effectiveness, yet very little research has explored variables associated with working alliance between mental health case managers and their consumers. This study explored the potential covariates of working alliance within community mental health

Kondrat, David C.; Early, Theresa J.

2010-01-01

294

Working Together for Mental Health: Evaluation of a one-day mental health course for human service providers  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Working Together For Mental Health course is an 8-hour course designed to demystify mental illness and mental health services. The main target group for the course is people working in human service organisations who provide services for people with mental illness. METHODS: A questionnaire was administered to all participants attending the course during 2003 (n = 165). Participants

Pam Grootemaat; Cathie Gillan; Gillian Holt; Wayne Forward; Narelle Heywood; Sue Willis

2006-01-01

295

The Role of Biobehavioral, Environmental, and Social Forces on Oral Health Disparities in Frail and Functionally Dependent Nursing Home Elders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to review the literature on and discuss how interactions between bio-behavioral aging, nursing home environments, and social forces shaping current health care policies have contributed to oral health disparities in frail and functionally dependent elders who reside in nursing homes. Emerging empirical evidence suggests links between poor oral health with dental plaque deposition and

Rita A. Jablonski; Cindy L. Munro; Mary Jo Grap; Ronald K. Elswick

2005-01-01

296

The Association between Childhood Abuse and Labor Force Outcomes in Young Adults: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the associations between childhood physical and sexual abuse and labor force outcomes in young adults and the possible mediating effects of educational attainment, current mental health, and physical health. Data from the Ontario Child Health Study (N = 1,893), a province-wide longitudinal study were analyzed. Controlling for childhood and demographic variables, severe childhood physical abuse was significantly associated

Masako Tanaka; Ellen Jamieson; Katholiki Georgiades; Eric K. Duku; Michael H. Boyle; Harriet L. MacMillan

2011-01-01

297

[Managment system in safety and health at work organization. An Italian example in public sector: Inps].  

PubMed

The Istituto Nazionale della Previdenza Sociale (Inps) is one of the biggest Public Sector organizations in Italy; about 30.000 people work in his structures. Fifteen years ago, Inps launched a long term project with the objective to create a complex and efficient safety and health at work organization. Italian law contemplates a specific kind of physician working on safety and health at work, called "Medico competente", and 85 Inps's physicians work also as "Medico competente". This work describes how IT improved coordination and efficiency in this occupational health's management system. PMID:21086694

Di Loreto, G; Felicioli, G

298

Health Systems Plan for the Seven-County Metropolitan Area of Minnesota, 1979. Minnesota Health Service Ara 5. Report of the Developmental Disabilities Residential Guidelines Task Force.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In October of 1979, the Metropolitan Health Board, (the health systems agency for the seven-county Metropolitan Area) began to discuss the need to appoint a Task Force to review and revise existing Developmental Disabilities (DD) guidelines in the Health ...

B. Farnham

1980-01-01

299

Home Health Social Work: Obstacles to Evidence-Based Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article briefly describes the mandate for evidence-based practice in social work, the basic principles of evidence-based social work practice, systemic obstacles to evidence-based social work practice in home care, and suggestions for removing these obstacles.

Timothy B. Dyeson

2005-01-01

300

Patterns for collaborative work in health care teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe problem of designing and managing teams of workers that can collaborate working together towards common goals is a challenging one. Incomplete or ambiguous specification of responsibilities and accountabilities, lack of continuity in teams working in shifts, inefficient organization of teams due to lack of information about workers’ competences and lack of clarity to determine if the work is delegated

Maria Adela Grando; Mor Peleg; Marc Cuggia; David Glasspool

2011-01-01

301

Biomechanically and electromyographically assessed load on the spine in self-paced and force-paced lifting work.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to measure dose of spinal load when different pacing methods were applied to lifting work and to develop methodology for such measurements. The compressive load on the spine computed by a dynamic biomechanical model and the electromyographic activity of back muscles were used for describing the spinal load. Five men and five women worked in a laboratory on two days lifting a box up and down for 30 min on both days, on one day force-paced (4 lifts/min), and on the other self-paced in random order. The weight of the box was rated by the subjects to be acceptable for the work done. The lift rate of our female subjects was higher and that of the male subjects lower in self-paced than in force-paced work. There were no significant differences in peak lumbosacral compressions nor in the amplitude distributions of electromyography between the two pacing methods. The biomechanically-calculated compressive forces on the spine were lower (about 2.7 kN for the men and 2.3 kN for women) than the biomechanical recommendations for safe lifting, but the EMG activity showed quite high peaks so that for 1% of work time the activity was on women above 60% and on men above 40% of the activity during maximum isometric voluntary test contraction. PMID:1633794

Leskinen, T P; Stålhammar, H R; Rautanen, M T; Troup, J D

302

Distraction: an assessment of smartphone usage in health care work settings  

PubMed Central

Smartphone use in health care work settings presents both opportunities and challenges. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and overuse are not kept in check. This practice-focused research paper examines the current panorama of health software applications. Findings from existing research are consolidated to elucidate the level and effects of distraction in health care work settings due to smartphone use. A conceptual framework for crafting guidelines to regulate the use of smartphones in health care work settings is then presented. Finally, specific guidelines are delineated to assist in creating policies for the use of smartphones in a health care workplace.

Gill, Preetinder S; Kamath, Ashwini; Gill, Tejkaran S

2012-01-01

303

Partnership work between Public Health and Health Psychology: introduction to a novel training programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Public health services implement individual, community and population level interventions to change health behaviours, improve healthy life expectancy and reduce health inequalities. Understanding and changing health behaviour is complex. Integrating behaviour change theory and evidence into interventions has the potential to improve services. METHODS: Health Psychologists apply evidence and theories aimed at understanding and changing health behaviour. A Scottish

Alyssa S Gilinsky; Stephan U Dombrowski; Hannah Dale; Douglas Marks; Clare Robinson; Claire Eades; Despina Ouzounidou

2010-01-01

304

Course Content for Social Work Practice in Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Guidelines are presented for developing curricula that integrate health-specific content with traditional foundation content. Specific course content for practice in human behavior, social environment, organization, and policy sequences are proposed. (Author/MH)|

Berkman, Barbara; And Others

1985-01-01

305

Special Working Group: Mental Health Problems of Vietnam Era Veterans.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This commission met to identify problems faced by Vietnam veterans and to recommend programs and policies that could help meet their needs. Five major mental health problems are identified: psychiatric disorders, drug abuse and alcoholism, the stigma asso...

J. Helmer

1978-01-01

306

Working Paper of Health and Medical Care Resources.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A preliminary inventory is presented of facilities, personnel, and programs available in the Connecticut Valley Health Compact (CVHC) service areas. Ninety-two towns in southeastern Vermont and southwestern New Hampshire are included in the Connecticut Va...

1969-01-01

307

Universal access: making health systems work for women  

PubMed Central

Universal coverage by health services is one of the core obligations that any legitimate government should fulfil vis-à-vis its citizens. However, universal coverage may not in itself ensure universal access to health care. Among the many challenges to ensuring universal coverage as well as access to health care are structural inequalities by caste, race, ethnicity and gender. Based on a review of published literature and applying a gender-analysis framework, this paper highlights ways in which the policies aimed at promoting universal coverage may not benefit women to the same extent as men because of gender-based differentials and inequalities in societies. It also explores how ‘gender-blind’ organisation and delivery of health care services may deny universal access to women even when universal coverage has been nominally achieved. The paper then makes recommendations for addressing these.

2012-01-01

308

Identifying Health Technologies That Work: Searching for Evidence.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report provides an evaluation of the field of health technology assessment, identifying strengths and weaknesses of current efforts, and outlines options which may help focus future efforts and resources. Types of activities covered in the evaluation ...

1994-01-01

309

Which aspects of health differ between working and nonworking women with fibromyalgia? A cross-sectional study of work status and health  

PubMed Central

Background Women with fibromyalgia (FM) describe great difficulties in managing work. Reported work ability in women with FM varies from 34 to 77 percent in studies from different countries. Many factors are suggested to affect the ability to work in women with FM, including pain, fatigue, impaired physical capacity and activity limitations. However, it is difficult to define to which extent symptom severity can be compatible with work. The aim of this study was to investigate which aspects of health differ between working women with FM and nonworking women with FM. Methods A cross-sectional study of 129 women of working age with FM which included clinical assessment, structured interviews, questionnaires and performance-based tests. The women were categorized as working or nonworking. Aspects of health are presented according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results Working women with FM presented better health than nonworking women with FM in ratings of body function (FIQ pain p?health status were also significantly better in working women with FM than in nonworking women with FM (FIQ total, eight-item p?=?0.001 and SF-36 PCS p?working- and nonworking women in tests of physical capacity. FIQ pain was an independent explanatory factor for work in stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis (OR 0.95, CI 0.93- 0.98), p?Working women with FM reported better health than nonworking women with FM in terms of pain, fatigue, stiffness, depression, disease specific health status and physical aspects of quality of life, which represent body functions and overall health status. However, they were equally impaired in tests of physical capacity. Moderate pain levels were compatible with work, while severe pain appeared to compromise work. Fatigue was better tolerated, as women scoring severe levels of fatigue worked.

2012-01-01

310

Empowering nurses for work engagement and health in hospital settings.  

PubMed

Employee empowerment has become an increasingly important factor in determining employee health and wellbeing in restructured healthcare settings. The authors tested a theoretical model which specified the relationships among structural empowerment, 6 areas of worklife that promote employee engagement, and staff nurses' physical and mental health. A predictive, non-experimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of staff nurses. The authors discuss their findings and the implication for nurse administrators. PMID:16220057

Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Finegan, Joan

2005-10-01

311

Reducing cancer mortality: Does health promotion work? A discussion paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To examine cancer mortality in the period 1988 to 1992 in relation to health education (HE) and health promotion (HP) in 1976 and 1986.Design Self-completion questionnaires on HE\\/HP returned by mail. Incidence and mortality data from reliable published sources for comparison.Setting The EC-funded Standing Committee of the Hospitals of the European Union (HOPE) Project.Subjects Representatives of 15 EU Member

Anne Charlton; Ann-Marie Coyne; Stephen Horsley

2002-01-01

312

Office of Science Education: LifeWorks: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institutes of Health Office of Science Education presents LifeWorks, an online guide to exploring careers in the health and medical sciences. LifeWorks offers a number of features such as Career Finder -- a searchable database of over 100 career descriptions. Details include required education and average salary. The site also features interviews with people working in the health and medical fields. While no formal lesson plans are provided, LifeWorks should be a useful resource for students who may be interested in pursuing health-related careers.

313

Managed Mental Health Care: Implications for Social Work Practice and Social Work Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Managed care has rapidly developed as the most common model of delivery of health care in this country. This article examines the implications of new demands brought to bear on social workers. This research compares six managed health care plans operating regionally and nationally and demonstrates the cumbersome application process. Fee schedules for each of the plans are listed. Ethical

Howard M. Turney; Patricia G. Conway

2001-01-01

314

The effects of a health promotion-health protection intervention on behavior change: the WellWorks Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effects of a 2-year integrated health promotion-health protection work-site intervention on changes in dietary habits and cigarette smoking.\\u000aMETHODS: A randomized, controlled intervention study used the work site as the unit of intervention and analysis; it included 24 predominantly manufacturing work sites in Massachusetts (250-2500 workers per site). Behaviors were assessed in self-administered surveys (n

Glorian Sorensen; Anne M. Stoddard; Mary K. Hunt; James R. Hebert; Judith K. Ockene; Jill Spitz Avrunin; Jay S. Himmelstein; S. Katharine Hammond

1998-01-01

315

Social networks, the 'work' and work force of chronic illness self-management: a survey analysis of personal communities.  

PubMed

Self-management support forms a central aspect of chronic Illness management nationally and globally. Evidence for the success of self-management support has mainly focussed on individually-centred outcomes of behavioural change. While it is recognised that social network members play an important role there is currently a gap in knowledge regarding who provides what type of support and under what circumstances. This is relevant for understanding the division of labour and the meeting of needs for those living with a long-term condition. We therefore took a network approach to explore self-management support conceptualising it as types of illness 'work' undertaken within peoples' social networks. 300 people from deprived areas and with chronic illnesses took part in a survey conducted in 2010 in the North West of England. A concentric circles diagram was used as a research tool with which participants identified 2,544 network members who contributed to illness management. The results provide an articulation of how social network members are substantially involved in illness management. Whilst partners and close family make the highest contributions there is evidence of inputs from a wide range of relationships. Network member characteristics (type of relationship, proximity, frequency of contact) impact on the amount of illness work undertaken in peoples' networks. In networks with 'no partner' other people tend to contribute more in the way of illness related work than in networks with a partner. This indicates a degree of substitutability between differently constituted networks, and that the level and type of input by different members of a network might change according to circumstances. A network perspective offers an opportunity to redress the balance of an exclusively individual focus on self-management because it addresses the broader set of contributions and resources available to people in need of chronic illness management and support. PMID:23565162

Vassilev, Ivaylo; Rogers, Anne; Blickem, Christian; Brooks, Helen; Kapadia, Dharmi; Kennedy, Anne; Sanders, Caroline; Kirk, Sue; Reeves, David

2013-04-02

316

Impact of Rural Training on Physician Work Force: The Role of Postresidency Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 53 obstetrical and rural fellowship programs found that graduates of rural health fellowships were more likely to locate in rural areas. Almost all graduates from obstetrical and rural health programs attained general hospital privileges in family practice and low-risk obstetrics, and a significant number attained privileges in…

Acosta, David A.

2000-01-01

317

Impact of Rural Training on Physician Work Force: The Role of Postresidency Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A survey of 53 obstetrical and rural fellowship programs found that graduates of rural health fellowships were more likely to locate in rural areas. Almost all graduates from obstetrical and rural health programs attained general hospital privileges in family practice and low-risk obstetrics, and a significant number attained privileges in…

Acosta, David A.

2000-01-01

318

The American Organization of Nurse Executives System CNE task force: a work in progress.  

PubMed

Health care is a complex industry, consequently requiring a diverse group of health care executives leading initiatives for efficiency and effectiveness in patient care delivery. Value-based purchasing and pay for performance are at the top of the list for indicators of success, and many hospitals are merging into health care systems. The role of the system chief nurse executive is an evolving role to lead health care systems in clinical, operational, patient safety, and patient satisfaction processes and outcomes. The American Organization of Nurse Executives, being the voice for nursing leadership, convened a group of system chief nurse executives to address the role, function, and competencies needed for this significant and emerging role in health care. This article describes the role statement and system chief nurse executive competencies needed for success in the role. In addition, the next steps for addressing the needs of this group will be outlined in this article. PMID:22955216

Rudisill, Pamela T; Thompson, Pamela A

319

Wives' Relative Wages, Husbands' Paid Work Hours, and Wives' Labor-Force Exit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Economic theories predict that women are more likely to exit the labor force if their partners' earnings are higher and if their own wage rate is lower. In this article, I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,254) and discrete-time event-history analysis to show that wives' relative wages are more predictive of their exit than are…

Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons

2011-01-01

320

Time for Results: The Governors' 1991 Report on Education. Supporting Works. Task Force on Readiness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The members of this task force adopted a broad approach to readiness so that issues relating to at-risk children and youth between the preschool years and graduation might be addressed. Two papers are presented: (1) "Readiness for the New Educational Standards" (Jean G. McDonald); and (2) "State Policy for At-Risk Children: Preschool to High…

National Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

321

New Respirator Fit Test Panels Representing the Current U.S. Civilian Work Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fit test panels currently used for respirator research, design, and certification are 25-subject panels developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and are based on data from the 1967 and 1968 anthropometric surveys of U.S. Air Force personnel. Military data do not represent the great diversity in face size and shape seen in civilian populations. In addition, the demographics

Ziqing Zhuang; Bruce Bradtmiller; Ronald E. Shaffer

2007-01-01

322

Time for Results: The Governors' 1991 Report on Education. Supporting Works. Task Force on School Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Task Force on School Facilities was asked to analyze research data, review literature, and collect testimony on current state policies related to the use of school facilities. Two papers are presented: (1) "Issues in School Facilities Use" (Jean G. McDonald); and (2) "School Facilities: State Role" (Jean G. McDonald). This report includes…

National Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

323

Special operations forces and counterproliferation: The interagency process at work. Study project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The threat of use of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in the United States or against American vital interests overseas is real. Combating the proliferation of WMD has become a high priority for the U.S. Government. Within Department of Defense Counterproliferation Initiative (DOD CPI) of 1993 Special Operations Forces (SOF) have become pivotal players in the creation of a full

Bakken

1996-01-01

324

Research on rescue robots with force sensors on the fingertips for rubble withdrawal works  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research is concerned with a rubble withdrawal method using force sensors attached on fingertips in order to not break down rubbles during operating for advanced autonomous rescue robots. In rescue fields, mass, shapes, materials and so on of rubbles are unknown. Thus, it is necessary to recognize or estimate a good grasping position without breaking rubbles case by case

Masatoshi Hatano

2007-01-01

325

Video: Animals; Electric Current; Force; Science Activities. Learning in Science Project. Working Papers 51-54.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four papers to be used in conjunction with video-tapes developed by the Learning in Science Project are presented. Topic areas of the papers focus on: (1) animals; (2) electric current; (3) force; and (4) science activities. The first paper presents transcripts of class discussions focusing on the scientific meaning of the word animal. The second…

Bell, Beverley; And Others

326

Perspectives: Reforming American Higher Education--Implications for a Vibrant Work Force and a Healthy Democracy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The forces of globalization are finally hitting American postsecondary education. For nearly three decades, since the 1983 publication of "A Nation At Risk" launched a sustained focus on the mediocre, if not failing, K-12 system, American postsecondary education has avoided the accountability spotlight. Postsecondary policy debates have focused…

Kolb, Charles

2011-01-01

327

Four principles for expanding PEPFAR's role as a vital force in US health diplomacy abroad.  

PubMed

The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is the leading platform for US health diplomacy and a symbol of American capacity to achieve constructive and beneficial change. The program now faces an evolving context for its work that includes, on the one hand, domestic fiscal pressures in the United States, but on the other, the potential for substantial gains against the AIDS epidemic around the world. Continued success in advancing America's humanitarian and diplomatic interests through global health requires the United States to maintain robust investments in PEPFAR; implement a strategic plan to achieve an AIDS-free generation; use the program as a foundation to strengthen health systems generally and enable them to address broader health issues, such as chronic and noncommunicable diseases; carefully manage the transition to country "ownership" of the fight against HIV; and achieve greater coherence in US government health-related policy. PMID:22778348

Collins, Chris; Isbell, Michael; Sohn, Annette; Klindera, Kent

2012-07-01

328

The inconsistent mediating effects of psychosocial work characteristics on the education-health relationship.  

PubMed

This study examined the relationship between psychosocial work characteristics and educational disparities in health. Informed by the evidence on the relationship between work pressure and higher education, we suggested reframing the distribution of psychosocial work characteristics in the context of education. We differentiated psychosocial work resources from demands and hypothesized that the inconsistent mediation effects of psychosocial resources and demands are associated with educational status. Using data from the 2008 National Study of Changing Workforce (NSCW), we found that psychosocial work resources and demands had inconsistent mediating effects on the education-health relationship. Higher educated employees were more likely to report autonomy, challenge and schedule control, but they were also more likely to experience overtime hours, job overload and work-family conflict. Work resources appeared to protect higher-educated workers from stress and health problems while work demands put them at risk of less favorable health outcomes. In addition we found that the 'costs' of psychosocial work demands were stronger among women, particularly those who were highly educated, suggesting that highly educated women did not reap the full health benefit of high educational attainment. Our findings illustrate that the observed positive associations between education and health mask important heterogeneity in the effects of psychosocial work characteristics. We discuss the implications of this study for health and family-based work policies. PMID:22800919

Qiu, Hanyao; Bures, Regina; Shehan, Constance L

2012-07-03

329

76 FR 63927 - Interagency Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (ITFAR): An Update on A Public Health Action...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...created in 1999 to coordinate the activities of federal agencies in addressing antimicrobial resistance (AR) in recognition of the increasing importance of AR as a public health threat. The Task Force is co-chaired by...

2011-10-14

330

Beyond Workers' Compensation: Men's Mental Health In and Out of Work.  

PubMed

The mental health of men is an important issue with significant direct and indirect costs emerging from work-related depression and suicide. Although the merits of men's community-based and workplace mental health promotion initiatives have been endorsed, few programs are mandated or formally evaluated and reported on. Conspicuously absent also are gender analyses detailing connections between masculinities and men's work-related depression and suicide on which to build men-centered mental health promotion programs. This article provides an overview of four interconnected issues, (a) masculinities and men's health, (b) men and work, (c) men's work-related depression and suicide, and (d) men's mental health promotion, in the context of men's diverse relationships to work (including job insecurity and unemployment). Based on the review, recommendations are made for advancing the well-being of men who are in as well as of those out of work. PMID:23727792

Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina S E

2013-05-30

331

A review of work-force development literature for the Maori addiction treatment field in Aotearoa\\/New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maori, like Indigenous Australians and other indigenous people world-wide, are simultaneously over-represented among those presenting with addiction-related problems and under-represented within various health professions. Providing the opportunity for individuals and whanau (family\\/extended family) to work with ethnically matched health workers is likely to increase service accessibility and to improve treatment outcomes. In New Zealand, a number of initiatives have been

PAUL J. ROBERTSON; TRACY N. HAITANA; SUZANNE G. PITAMA; TERRY T. HURIWAI

2006-01-01

332

The effects of finger rest positions on hand muscle load and pinch force in simulated dental hygiene work.  

PubMed

One of the techniques taught in dental and dental hygiene programs is to use finger rests to stabilize the instrument while performing dental scaling or other types of dental work. It is believed that finger rests may also reduce muscle stress and prevent injury due to muscle fatigue. In this study the effects of three different finger rest positions on hand muscle activity and thumb pinch force were compared. Twelve predental students performed simulated dental scaling tasks on a manikin using three different finger rest positions: 1) no finger rest, 2) one finger rest, and 3) two finger rests. Muscle activity and thumb pinch force were measured by surface electromyography and a pressure sensor, respectively. Using two finger rests was always associated with reduced thumb pinch force and muscle activity, as compared to not using any finger rests (p<0.05), while using one finger rest reduced thumb pinch force and muscle activity in most cases. Hence, using finger rests plays an important role in reducing the muscle load of the hand in students performing simulated dental hygiene work. It is concluded that dental and dental hygiene students may benefit from instructions for using finger rests at an early stage of their clinical training. Including biomechanical and ergonomic principles in dental and dental hygiene curricula will raise awareness of ergonomics among dental practitioners and help them incorporate these principles into daily practice. PMID:15800259

Dong, Hui; Barr, Alan; Loomer, Peter; Rempel, David

2005-04-01

333

Air Force Health Care Providers Incidence of Performing Testicular Exams and Instruction of Testicular Self-Exam.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to describe the incidence of Air Force Health Care Provider's performance of testicular exams and their incidence of teaching testicular self-exam (TSE) within an Air Force healthcare setting. The study is also designed to de...

N. S. Adams

1999-01-01

334

NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2000-0066-2892, United States Air Force, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Tucson, Arizona.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the week of April 10-14, 2000, NIOSH representatives conducted a health hazard evaluation at Davis-Monthan (D-M) Air Force Base (AFB), Tucson, Arizona. We looked into management concerns about personnel exposures to high temperatures while conducti...

2002-01-01

335

The stigma of mental health problems and other barriers to care in the UK Armed Forces  

PubMed Central

Background As with the general population, a proportion of military personnel with mental health problems do not seek help. As the military is a profession at high risk of occupational psychiatric injury, understanding barriers to help-seeking is a priority. Method Participants were drawn from a large UK military health study. Participants undertook a telephone interview including the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ); a short measure of PTSD (Primary Care PTSD, PC-PTSD); a series of questions about service utilisation; and barriers to care. The response rate was 76% (821 participants). Results The most common barriers to care reported are those relating to the anticipated public stigma associated with consulting for a mental health problem. In addition, participants reported barriers in the practicalities of consulting such as scheduling an appointment and having time off for treatment. Barriers to care did not appear to be diminished after people leave the Armed Forces. Veterans report additional barriers to care of not knowing where to find help and a concern that their employer would blame them for their problems. Those with mental health problems, such as PTSD, report significantly more barriers to care than those who do not have a diagnosis of a mental disorder. Conclusions Despite recent efforts to de-stigmatise mental disorders in the military, anticipated stigma and practical barriers to consulting stand in the way of access to care for some Service personnel. Further interventions to reduce stigma and ensuring that Service personnel have access to high quality confidential assessment and treatment remain priorities for the UK Armed Forces.

2011-01-01

336

Health hazards of working with ceramics. Recommendations for reducing risks.  

PubMed

Ceramics artists are at risk for pulmonary disease, heavy metal poisoning, and other toxic reactions caused by exposure to clays, glazes, and kiln emissions. Stringent personal hygiene, awareness of hazardous materials, and appropriate safety measures may reduce the health risks of repeated exposures. PMID:2911535

Fuortes, L J

1989-01-01

337

Working Together for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite years of significant advances in improving child survival and health, the final chapter on ending unnecessary child deaths has not yet been written and advances have stagnated in several countries with the highest child mortality rates. Creative, respectful and effective partnerships between most-affected countries and donor country governments, multilateral agencies and private donors are needed to make acceptance of

Francisco Songane

2007-01-01

338

Training home health aides to work with persons with AIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors of this article present a grass-roots approach to the instruction of home health care aides in caring for PWAs. Much of the information presented could be applied to other care providers as well. The goal of the educational process, which advocates facilitating the learning process rather than lecturing, is to better prepare the aides to care for their

Pamela Bohmann; Marcy A. Fraser

1991-01-01

339

What Works for Mental Health System Change: Evolution or Revolution?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mental health system has realized significant metamorphoses in the standards and practices of quality care for people with psychiatric disability during the past decade. Now change agents are wrestling with effective strategies that help real-world systems to adopt programs reflecting these metamorphoses. Two fundamental approaches to systems change are compared and contrasted here: evolution and revolution. First, the authors

Patrick W. Corrigan; Michael G. Boyle

2003-01-01

340

Preparing the Health Care Workforce by Learning Through Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The practice of mental health care delivery for severely mentally ill people has been under scrutiny for many years. We argue that history tends to dictate the type of care offered. Bourdieu (1977) argues that history leads to the production of 'Habitus'; this produces and perpetuates collective practices and, subsequently, history. In other words: Habitus becomes self-perpetuating, maintaining the status

David Skidmore; Mark Montgomery

341

MECHANICAL POWER AND WORK OF CAT SOLEUS, GASTROCNEMIUS AND PLANTARIS MUSCLES DURING LOCOMOTION: POSSIBLE FUNCTIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF MUSCLE DESIGN AND FORCE PATTERNS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electrical activity, forces, power and work of the soleus (SO), the gastrocnemius (GA) and the plantaris (PL) muscles were measured during locomotion in the cat in order to study the functional role of these ankle extensor muscles. Forces and electrical activity (EMG) of the three muscles were measured using home-made force transducers and bipolar, indwelling wire electrodes, respectively, for walking

B. I. PRILUTSKY; W. HERZOG; T. L. ALLINGER

342

Emotional labour at work and at home among Greek health-care professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The emotionally taxing nature of health-care work has been increasingly recognized. In parallel, the field of work and family has been searching for more specific antecedents of both work interference with family (WFI) and family interference with work (FWI). The current study aims to examine the relationship between surface acting and hiding negative emotions with WFI and FWI

Anthony J. Montgomery; Efharis Panagopolou; Alexos Benos

2005-01-01

343

Effects of war exposure on air force personnel's mental health, job burnout and other organizational related outcomes.  

PubMed

Longitudinal data from a stratified representative sample of U.S. Air Force personnel (N = 1009) deployed to the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations were analyzed in this study. Using structural equation models, we examined the effects of war exposure on traumatic experiences, Post Traumatic Stress (PTS) symptoms, resource loss, and on subsequent functioning, perceived health, and on job and organizationally relevant outcomes. The job and organizational outcomes included job burnout, job involvement, job strain, job satisfaction, work-family conflict, organizational commitment, deployment readiness, and intention to reenlist. We found that deployment to the theater of the war increased risk of exposure to trauma, which in turn, predicted elevated PTS symptoms and resource loss. PTS symptoms predicted later loss of resources and deterioration in perceived health and functioning. In turn, resource loss predicted negative job and organizational outcomes. Exposure to trauma fully mediated the effects of deployment to the theater of war on PTS symptoms and resource loss and had additional significant indirect effects on several job and organizational relevant outcomes. For returning veterans, deployment to the theater of war, exposure to trauma, PTS symptoms, and resource loss represents a "cascading" chain of events that over time results in a decline of health and functioning as well as in adverse job and organizationally relevant outcomes that may affect organizational effectiveness. PMID:21280941

Vinokur, Amiram D; Pierce, Penny F; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Galea, Sandro

2011-01-01

344

What Can Education Teach Child Mental Health Services? Practitioners' Perceptions of Training and Joint Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The importance of joint working between educational and child mental health professionals is well documented but there are numerous challenges and only limited training models. While the evidence base and training programmes for educationalists regarding child mental health is growing, training mental health professionals about education is more…

Vostanis, Panos; O'Reilly, Michelle; Taylor, Helen; Day, Crispin; Street, Cathy; Wolpert, Miranda; Edwards, Ruth

2012-01-01

345

Resource Manual From the Inner City Work-Study Institute for Health Professions Faculty.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An institute for health professionals working in inner city areas was conducted at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio in 1975 to focus on the role of consumers in health care delivery and a community-university education model for health professions fac...

1975-01-01

346

Managing the work–life roller-coaster: Private stress or public health issue?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although research has established the importance for health of a sense of personal control at work, the implications of this for women have not been adequately studied. Using quantitative data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health and qualitative data from an associated study, here we examine women's health and sense of control in relation to family and employment

Lois Bryson; Penny Warner-Smith; Peter Brown; Leanne Fray

2007-01-01

347

Information and Health. Report on a Working Group (Luxembourg, Belgium, November 4-7, 1980).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A Working Group, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO), proposed a clearer definition of the essential role of health information and suggested the most appropriate means of communication between governments and the mass media, between the media and health services, and between patients and doctors. The Group urged all WHO Member States…

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

348

The e¡ect of work on mental health: does occupation matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper considers the effect of work choices on mental health and looks at whether this differs across occupations. This requires a model that can deal with the endogeneity in the relationship between health, occupation and work choices. We specify such a model and estimate it on a unique UK panel survey. The survey, called the National Child development

Ana Llena-nozal; Maarten Lindeboom

349

Strategic Alliances: Working Across Professional Boundaries: Primary Health Care and Social Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective joint working between health and local authorities, and between health, social services and housing professionals, has long been recognized as vital to the provision of ‘seamless’ services for the most vulnerable members of society. Unfortunately, the history of formal joint working over the past 20 years has been largely a poor one. In this article the authors outline the

Bob Hudson; Brian Hardy; Melanie Henwood; Gerald Wistow

1997-01-01

350

Patterns of working and living conditions: A holistic, multivariate approach to occupational health studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the study was to develop a multivariate approach to occupational health studies that is: capable of identifying groups with similar working conditions; relevant for studies of associations between working and living conditions and health; and an appropriate basis for preventive actions. Data at the individual level were obtained through measurements, observations, interviews and questionnaires, and at the

Annika Härenstam; Lena Karlqvist; Lennart Bodin; Gun Nise; Patrik Schéele

2003-01-01

351

Linking Leader Social Skills and Organisational Health to Positive Work Relationships in Local Governments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the links between leaders' social skills, organisational health (decline) and positive work relationships. In particular it tests whether leaders' social skills are more strongly associated to work relationships when the organisation's fiscal health is more precarious. Using data from both surveys and annual financial statements of 103 public sector organisations, the results indicate that a leader's social

Abraham Carmeli; Hedva Vinarski-Peretz

2010-01-01

352

Effects of lifestyle and stress on the employee and organization: Implications for promoting health at work  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research was designed to determine the extent to which employee health and performance are predicted by lifestyle and stress. Data were collected from 345 employees working in a variety of organizations in southern California. Additionally, supervisors evaluated the work performance of the participating employees whom they directly supervised, and company records of employee health care costs were obtained. Hierarchical

Stewart I. Donaldson

1993-01-01

353

[Fragments of a health work genealogy: genealogy as a research technique].  

PubMed

The article aims to explore the influence of health work in subjectification processes. The notion of history commonly used in health-related scientific output is based on an evolutionist and developmental logic. As a counterpoint, the genealogical approach used in this article and based on Michel Foucault highlights the notions of discontinuity, event, and the production of truth as tools to rethink the ethical and political implications involved in the production of knowledge, practices, and subjects. To illustrate these aspects we sketch a health work genealogy, specifically in the field of mental health and HIV/AIDS work. PMID:16021242

Nardi, Henrique Caetano; Tittoni, Jaqueline; Giannechini, Letícia; Ramminger, Tatiana

2005-07-11

354

Distribution of mental health professionals working on site in English and Welsh general practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To describe the nature and distribution of mental health professionals working on site in general practices. DESIGN--Postal questionnaire and telephone interview survey. SETTING--English and Welsh general practices. SUBJECTS--1880 general practitioners, of whom 1542 (82%) responded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence, types, and distribution of mental health professionals working on site among general practices. Factors predicting the presence of mental health professionals on

T Kendrick; B Sibbald; J Addington-Hall; D Brenneman; P Freeling

1993-01-01

355

Working towards Men's Health: Findings from the Sefton Men's Health Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas. Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training…

Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve; McCullagh, Jo; Hacking, Sue

2010-01-01

356

Working towards men’s health: Findings from the Sefton men’s health project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas.Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training programme delivered to community and public sector staff.Setting: The programme was

Mark Robinson; Steve Robertson; Jo McCullagh; Sue Hacking

2010-01-01

357

Work Experience of the Population in 1974. Special Labor Force Report 181.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The number of unemployed persons at some time during calendar year 1974 totaled 18.3 million which is nearly four million above the 1973 level. The number of persons who worked reached 101.7 million. The proportion of the population who work varies widely by age, and the pattern for men differs from that for women. Over this period, the rate for…

Young, Anne McDougall

358

Labor Force Participation and Work Status of People 65 Years and Older. American Community Survey Briefs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Some people of traditional working age (16 to 64 years old) dream of the day when they can retire and pursue other interests, while others may plan to continue working past traditional retirement age. Most assume they will be making this choice around the...

B. Kromer D. Howard

2013-01-01

359

Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women's health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective…

Wilkinson, Lindsay R.; Shippee, Tetyana P.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

2012-01-01

360

The critical care work environment and nurse-reported health care-associated infections.  

PubMed

Background Critically ill patients are susceptible to health care-associated infections because of their illnesses and the need for intravenous access and invasive monitoring. The critical care work environment may influence the likelihood of infection in these patients. Objective To determine whether or not the critical care nurse work environment is predictive of nurse-reported health care-associated infections. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional design was used with linked nurse and hospital survey data. Nurses assessed the critical care work environment and provided the frequencies of ventilator-associated pneumonias, urinary tract infections, and infections associated with central catheters. Logistic regression models were used to determine if critical care work environments were predictive of nurse-reported frequent health care-associated infections, with controls for nurse and hospital characteristics. Results The final sample consisted of 3217 critical care nurses in 320 hospitals. Compared with nurses working in poor work environments, nurses working in better work environments were 36% to 41% less likely to report that health care-associated infections occurred frequently. Conclusion Health care-associated infections are less likely in favorable critical care work environments. These findings, based on the largest sample of critical care nurses to date, substantiate efforts to focus on the quality of the work environment as a way to minimize the frequency of health care-associated infections. PMID:24186818

Kelly, Deena; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Lake, Eileen T; Aiken, Linda H

2013-11-01

361

Reducing work related psychological ill health and sickness absence: a systematic literature review  

PubMed Central

A literature review revealed the following: key work factors associated with psychological ill health and sickness absence in staff were long hours worked, work overload and pressure, and the effects of these on personal lives; lack of control over work; lack of participation in decision making; poor social support; and unclear management and work role. There was some evidence that sickness absence was associated with poor management style. Successful interventions that improved psychological health and levels of sickness absence used training and organisational approaches to increase participation in decision making and problem solving, increase support and feedback, and improve communication. It is concluded that many of the work related variables associated with high levels of psychological ill health are potentially amenable to change. This is shown in intervention studies that have successfully improved psychological health and reduced sickness absence.

Michie, S; Williams, S

2003-01-01

362

The effects of shift work on physical and mental health.  

PubMed

Occupational engagement is a pre-requisite for continuous income opportunities. Among the changing social circumstances work-related conditions play an increasingly eminent role in psychological and mental well-being. The public discusses the question of a possible association between the demands of modern work life and the increases of psychological, psychosomatic and cardiovascular disorders. Given the socioeconomic implications of psychiatric and psychosomatic suffering in the general population, there is a need to further elucidate the causes of their increasing incidence. From a medical point of view, any organization of work disrupting the phased circadian rhythms for bio-psycho-social processes and functioning of the individual are interesting against the background of clock genes and certain biological functions that are organized in a circadian fashion. The authors review the influence of shift work as a form of systematic desynchronization of inner clock systems on the endocrine, the physical, and the mental level. The significance of the findings in the field is discussed along with future directions of conclusive research. PMID:22488445

Vogel, Matthias; Braungardt, Tanja; Meyer, Wolfgang; Schneider, Wolfgang

2012-04-10

363

Work in progress — A health information technology centralized web application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Healthcare is not about seeing patients anymore; the focus has shifted. Patients are concerned with the cost associated with the care and the amount of time they will spend at the doctor's office and away from work. Doctors are concerned with administration, management, business development, cost, review boards, lawyers, insurance companies, government, specialists, continuing education, and patient education. The focus

Ronald J. Glotzbach; Laura A. Kocur; James L. Mohler; Carlos R. Morales

2011-01-01

364

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Nervous System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the nervous system.

2012-11-20

365

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Respiratory System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the respiratory system.

2012-11-20

366

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Immune Cells  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the immune system.

2012-11-20

367

Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In\\u000a the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper\\u000a aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A

Suresh Joshi; Padam Simkhada; Gordon J Prescott

2011-01-01

368

77 FR 52748 - 60-Day Proposed Information Collection: Indian Health Service (IHS) Sharing What Works-Best...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Indian Health Service (IHS) Sharing What Works--Best Practice, Promising Practice...Indian Health Service (IHS) Sharing What Works--Best Practice, Promising Practice...collection, 0917-0034, ``IHS Sharing What Works--BPPPLE Form,'' which was...

2012-08-30

369

Work-based social networks and health status among Japanese employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Despite the worldwide trend towards more time being spent at work by employed people, few studies have examined the independent influences of work-based versus home-based social networks on employees’ health. We examined the association between work-based social networks and health status by controlling for home-based social networks in a cross-sectional study.Methods:By employing a two-stage stratified random sampling procedure, 1105 employees

E Suzuki; S Takao; S V Subramanian; H Doi; I Kawachi

2009-01-01

370

The obesity epidemic in Australia: can public health interventions work?  

PubMed

Background - The rapid rise in the obesity epidemic in Australia has been well documented in adults from several national surveys since 1980. The awareness of the size of this epidemic in children is low because the monitoring of obesity is non-existent, yet overweight/ obesity is undoubtedly one of the biggest health threats facing Australian children. Major public health interventions are urgently needed, and Australia has a vast experience of the successful control of other epidemics to draw upon for this latest challenge. Successful public health interventions - Several epidemics in Australia have been turned around by a concerted public health and clinical effort including cardiovascular diseases, smoking, road deaths and other injuries, HIV/AIDS, cot death and some cancers. All have had to overcome substantial barriers such as vested commercial interests, addiction, unknown causes, and strong social norms, desires, or taboos. Some have had a major clinical component (eg hypertension, cervical cancer), some have had a strong social marketing and education approach (eg cot death, HIV/AIDS), and others have had strong policy and environmental components (eg tobacco, road deaths). All have had significant, ongoing funding and political commitment and have taken as comprehensive approach as possible. The lessons for obesity are clear - if there is a similar commitment, the epidemic can be reduced. The current individual-based approaches to obesity have only a modest long-term success rate, and many potential population-based strategies have not been attempted or evaluated. This means that more comprehensive and innovative interventions are needed with a strong emphasis on evaluation so that the evidence base for effective interventions can be developed. A comprehensive program for obesity - The appropriate target groups for a comprehensive obesity program are children and high-risk adults. For the latter group, the modest weight loss (about 10%) that is achievable through lifestyle and pharmacological means has significant clinical benefits for preventing and managing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. For children, management programs in primary care are also needed but more importantly, children's food and activity environments need to be made less ' obesogenic'. A process of developing the ' Best Investments for Childhood Obesity' has been undertaken for the Department of Health and Ageing. About 50 experts around Australia contributed to the development of a framework for a comprehensive program and gave their opinion on the likely effectiveness of each of the components. This was accompanied by a review of the current evidence of effectiveness of interventions and a modelling process to fill the gaps where empirical evidence was not available. An economic analysis assessed the 'warranted investment' for reducing obesity prevalence given the cost of overweight/obesity complications in adulthood. Four action areas were considered essential: monitoring and research; whole-of-community demonstration projects; communication and education programs; coordination and training. Key settings for potential action were schools, preschools, neighbourhoods, fast food outlets, breastfeeding, and primary care. Key sectors for action were influencing the food supply towards healthier foods and reducing the huge number of television food advertisements in Australia that target young children. The home setting and parents need to be incorporated into all areas of action. Funding and policy leadership is urgently needed from Federal and State governments to implement a comprehensive program to combat this escalating epidemic. PMID:15023592

Swinburn, B A

2003-01-01

371

A Study of the Motivating and Dissatisfying Forces in an Isolated Work Situation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study presented in this dissertation investigated the factors which contribute to worker motivation and dissatisfaction in an isolated work situation. Specifically, the study focused on the maritime industry, with the objective of determining underlyi...

R. A. Ullrich

1968-01-01

372

Psychometric Examination of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile Among Ar Force Enlisted Personnel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present study presents an examination of the psychometric properties of the Multidimensional Work Ethic Profile (MWEP) developed by Michael Miller and David Woehr (Miller & Woehr, 1997; Woehr & Miller, 1997). The MWEP is a multidimensional measure of ...

M. J. Miller D. J. Woehr

1998-01-01

373

Perceived unfairness in working conditions: The case of public health services in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background The focus on the determinants of the quality of health services in low-income countries is increasing. Health workers' motivation has emerged as a topic of substantial interest in this context. The main objective of this article is to explore health workers' experience of working conditions, linked to motivation to work. Working conditions have been pointed out as a key factor in ensuring a motivated and well performing staff. The empirical focus is on rural public health services in Tanzania. The study aims to situate the results in a broader historical context in order to enhance our understanding of the health worker discourse on working conditions. Methods The study has a qualitative study design to elicit detailed information on health workers' experience of their working conditions. The data comprise focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) with administrators, clinicians and nursing staff in the public health services in a rural district in Tanzania. The study has an ethnographic backdrop based on earlier long-term fieldwork in the same part of Tanzania. Results The article provides insights into health workers' understanding and assessment of their working conditions. An experience of unsatisfactory working conditions as well as a perceived lack of fundamental fairness dominated the FGDs and IDIs. Informants reported unfairness with reference to factors such as salary, promotion, recognition of work experience, allocation of allowances and access to training as well as to human resource management. The study also revealed that many health workers lack information or knowledge about factors that influence their working conditions. Conclusions The article calls for attention to the importance of locating the discourse of unfairness related to working conditions in a broader historical/political context. Tanzanian history has been characterised by an ambiguous and shifting landscape of state regulation, economic reforms, decentralisation and emerging democratic sentiments. Such a historic contextualisation enhances our understanding of the strong sentiments of unfairness revealed in this study and assists us in considering potential ways forward.

2011-01-01

374

How the health and community development sectors are combining forces to improve health and well-being.  

PubMed

The root causes of poor health experienced by many who live in low-income neighborhoods-such as the lack of access to health care, limited food choices, and exposure to environmental hazards-are well documented, but often go beyond the scope of the health care delivery system. But that is beginning to change. The health sector has begun to collaborate with the community development sector, which for decades has been working in low-income neighborhoods. Encouraging local and national examples of these new partnerships abound. They include an effort in Seattle, Washington, to reduce exposure to allergens and irritants among low-income asthmatic children, and a $500 million federal program to finance the operation of grocery stores in what have previously been urban "food deserts." To nurture such efforts, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Federal Reserve System, and others have sponsored a series of "healthy community" forums in US cities. In this article we explore the growing partnerships between the health and community development sectors as well as the challenges they face, and we offer policy recommendations that might help them succeed. PMID:22068394

Braunstein, Sandra; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

2011-11-01

375

Proposal to construct the operational base of the educative work process in collective health.  

PubMed

This study aimed to construct the operational base of the educative work in health from a Marxist perspective. Reports of nursing experiences in the basic health services, published between 1988-2003, served as empirical base. The object was captured from: the participants; the action agents; the objective; health and education conceptions; and the generating necessity. The means/instruments were identified through: physical space; didactic resources; frequency of meetings; and the conception of health education. The type of evaluation; to whom it was directed; the goal to be reached and articulation between the theoretical and operational knowledge were identified in order to capture the purpose. The educative work in collective health can strengthen social groups when it becomes praxis that assumes the participant as a dialogical co-producer of the work in health. PMID:18235946

Pereira, Erica Gomes; Soares, Cássia Baldini; Campos, Célia Maria Sivalli

376

Stress at work and mental health status among female hospital workers.  

PubMed Central

Relations between working conditions and mental health status of female hospital workers were studied in a sample of 1505 women: 43% were nurses, 32% auxiliaries, and 7% ancillary staff; 13% were other qualified health care staff, mainly head nurses; 5% had occupations other than direct health care; 63% worked on the morning, 20% on the afternoon, and 17% on the night shift. Data were collected at the annual routine medical visit by the occupational health practitioner, using self administered questionnaires and clinical assessments. Five health indicators were considered: a high score to the general health questionnaire (GHQ); fatigue; sleep impairment; use of antidepressants, sleeping pills, or sedatives; and diagnosis of psychiatric morbidity at clinical assessment. Four indices of stress at work were defined: job stress, mental load, insufficiency in internal training and discussion, and strain caused by schedule. The analysis was conducted by multiple logistic regression, controlling for type of occupation, shift, number of years of work in hospital, daily travel time to work, age, marital status, number of children, and wish to move house. Sleep impairment was mostly linked to shift and strain due to schedule. For all other indicators of mental health impairment and especially high GHQ scores, the adjusted odds ratios increased significantly with the levels of job stress, mental load, and strain due to schedule. This evidence of association between work involving an excessive cumulation of stress factors and mental wellbeing should be considered in interventions aimed at improving the working conditions of hospital workers.

Estryn-Behar, M; Kaminski, M; Peigne, E; Bonnet, N; Vaichere, E; Gozlan, C; Azoulay, S; Giorgi, M

1990-01-01

377

Stress at work and mental health status among female hospital workers.  

PubMed

Relations between working conditions and mental health status of female hospital workers were studied in a sample of 1505 women: 43% were nurses, 32% auxiliaries, and 7% ancillary staff; 13% were other qualified health care staff, mainly head nurses; 5% had occupations other than direct health care; 63% worked on the morning, 20% on the afternoon, and 17% on the night shift. Data were collected at the annual routine medical visit by the occupational health practitioner, using self administered questionnaires and clinical assessments. Five health indicators were considered: a high score to the general health questionnaire (GHQ); fatigue; sleep impairment; use of antidepressants, sleeping pills, or sedatives; and diagnosis of psychiatric morbidity at clinical assessment. Four indices of stress at work were defined: job stress, mental load, insufficiency in internal training and discussion, and strain caused by schedule. The analysis was conducted by multiple logistic regression, controlling for type of occupation, shift, number of years of work in hospital, daily travel time to work, age, marital status, number of children, and wish to move house. Sleep impairment was mostly linked to shift and strain due to schedule. For all other indicators of mental health impairment and especially high GHQ scores, the adjusted odds ratios increased significantly with the levels of job stress, mental load, and strain due to schedule. This evidence of association between work involving an excessive cumulation of stress factors and mental wellbeing should be considered in interventions aimed at improving the working conditions of hospital workers. PMID:2310704

Estryn-Behar, M; Kaminski, M; Peigne, E; Bonnet, N; Vaichere, E; Gozlan, C; Azoulay, S; Giorgi, M

1990-01-01

378

Special operations forces and counterproliferation: The interagency process at work. Study project  

SciTech Connect

The threat of use of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in the United States or against American vital interests overseas is real. Combating the proliferation of WMD has become a high priority for the U.S. Government. Within Department of Defense Counterproliferation Initiative (DOD CPI) of 1993 Special Operations Forces (SOF) have become pivotal players in the creation of a full range of military options to counter this threat. SOF provides the National Command Authority (NCA) with flexible and responsive options. In order to successfully execute any type of CP related special operation, the interagency process must be fully engaged and synchronized. This study assesses the nature of the threat, reviews the evolution of the DOD CPI, and focuses on the use of SOF as an instrument of U.S. policy. Specifically this study explores the connectivity of the interagency process to support a U.S. SOF Counterproliferation mission.

Bakken, H.L.

1996-04-01

379

Organizational influences on the work life conflict and health of shiftworkers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined organizational factors affecting the impact of shiftwork on work life conflict and subjective health. A model was proposed in which support from supervisors, support from colleagues, and team identity influence time-based work life conflict through two mediating variables: team climate and control over the working environment. Reduced conflict, in turn, produces enhanced psychological well-being and diminished physical

Anne Pisarski; Sandra A. Lawrence; Philip Bohle; Christine Brook

2008-01-01

380

Relationship of Work Hours with Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress among a College Student Cohort  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and…

Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

2008-01-01

381

Relationship of Work Hours With Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress Among a College Student Cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly selected a sample of 1,700 undergraduates

Kim Miller; Fred Danner; Ruth Staten

2008-01-01

382

Psychosocial Work Characteristics Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Functioning in Rural Women: The Wisconsin Rural Women's Health Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between psychosocial work characteristics and health functioning and cardiovascular disease risk factors among rural women of central Wisconsin and compare psychosocial work characteristics between farm and nonfarm women. Methods: Stratified sampling was used to select a…

Chikani, Vatsal; Reding, Douglas; Gunderson, Paul; McCarty, Catherine A.

2005-01-01

383

Persistent work-life conflict and health satisfaction - A representative longitudinal study in Switzerland  

PubMed Central

Background The objectives of the present study were (1) to track work-life conflict in Switzerland during the years 2002 to 2008 and (2) to analyse the relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction, examining whether long-term work-life conflict leads to poor health satisfaction. Methods The study is based on a representative longitudinal database (Swiss Household Panel), covering a six-year period containing seven waves of data collection. The sample includes 1261 persons, with 636 men and 625 women. Data was analysed by multi-level mixed models and analysis of variance with repeated measures. Results In the overall sample, there was no linear increase or decrease of work-life conflict detected, in either its time-based or strain-based form. People with higher education were more often found to have a strong work-life conflict (time- and strain-based), and more men demonstrated a strong time-based work-life conflict than women (12.2% vs. 5%). A negative relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction over time was found. People reporting strong work-life conflict at every wave reported lower health satisfaction than people with consistently weak work-life conflict. However, the health satisfaction of those with a continuously strong work-life conflict did not decrease during the study period. Conclusions Both time-based and strain-based work-life conflict are strongly correlated to health satisfaction. However, no evidence was found for a persistent work-life conflict leading to poor health satisfaction.

2011-01-01

384

Comparing working conditions and physical and psychological health complaints in four occupational groups working in female-dominated workplaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Dominant theories of working conditions and their effects on poor employee health have been criticized for failing to consider\\u000a how psychosocial factors interact and how such relationships may differ across occupational groups.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Goal  This paper examines the associations between psychosocial factors and physical and psychological health complaints while at\\u000a the same time taking into account differences between occupational groups in female-dominated

Karina Nielsen; Karen Albertsen; Sten-Olof Brenner; Lars Smith-Hansen; Christian Roepsdorff

2009-01-01

385

The Ecology of Work and Health: Research and Policy Directions for the Promotion of Employee Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article identifies new research and policy directions for the field of worksite health in the context of the changing American workplace. These directions are viewed from an ecological perspective on worksite health and are organized around three major themes: (1) the joint influence of physical and social environmental factors on occupational health, (2) the effects of nonoccupational settings (e.g.,

Daniel Stokols; Kenneth R. Pelletier; Jonathan E. Fielding

1996-01-01

386

Working Toward Financial Sustainability of Integrated Behavioral Health Services in a Public Health Care System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need, benefit, and desirability of behavioral health integration in primary care is generally accepted and has acquired widespread positive regard. However, in many health care settings the economics, business aspects, and financial sustainability of practice in integrated care settings remains an unsolved puzzle. Organizational administrators may be reluctant to expand behavioral health services without evidence that such programs offer

Samantha Pelican Monson; J. Christopher Sheldon; Laurie C. Ivey; Carissa R. Kinman; Abbie O. Beacham

2012-01-01

387

Periodic health examination, 1995 update: 2. Prevention of dental caries. The Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations, based on current evidence, for practising physicians and dentists on interventions for the prevention of dental caries in their patients. OPTIONS: Systemic fluoride administration, professionally administered fluoride, use of fluoride mouth rinses, fissure sealants, oral-hygiene practices, dietary practices, identification of groups at a high risk of dental caries, and early diagnosis and treatment. OUTCOMES: Reduced prevalence of dental caries and fluorosis, longer retention of teeth and lower treatment costs. EVIDENCE: Several MEDLINE searches were conducted for articles published from January 1980 to December 1992, including relevant review articles. VALUES: Relevant clinical findings were evaluated and categorized with the use of the evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. Recommendations were developed for each method of caries prevention, with reduced incidence of dental caries and improved prevalence of caries-free teeth given high values. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The potential benefits of these measures in the long-term are a lower incidence of tooth decay, longer retention of teeth and prevention of fluorosis. The cost saving can be considerable for patients and insurers; however, implementation of some recommendations will be difficult, since the traditional preventive practices of dentists and dental hygienists are not easily changed. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is good evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: use of dentifrices containing fluoride, fluoridation of drinking water, fluoride supplements for patients in areas where there is a low level (0.3 ppm or less) of fluoride in the drinking water, professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with very active decay or at a high risk of dental caries and selective use of professionally applied fissure sealants on permanent molar teeth. There is poor evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with a low risk of caries, toothbrushing (without a dentifrice containing fluoride) and flossing, cleaning of teeth by a dentist or dental hygienist before topical application of fluoride or at a dental visit and dietary counselling for the general population. There is good evidence to recommend against the use of over-the-counter fluoride mouth rinses by the general population. VALIDATION: These guidelines are compatible with those of the US Preventive Services Task Force. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the task force, which is funded by Health Canada. Major funding was provided by the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Toronto, Toronto and the Faculty of Dentistry of Dalhousie University, Halifax.

Lewis, D W; Ismail, A I

1995-01-01

388

Responding to Change in the Work Force and the Economy: The Challenge for Personnel Executives  

Microsoft Academic Search

These quotations seem somehow to summarise the condition in which personnel management finds itself today. On the one hand, there is the alienation of work and the alienation of workers. On the other hand, we have the employee who has read Maslow, but has so far failed to achieve her self-actualisation. With his focus on eight hours, one assumes that

R. S. Rudman

1984-01-01

389

Industrial Structure, the Flexibility of Working Hours, and Women's Labor Force Participation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper argues that the importance of a woman's time in child caring and other family responsibilities places a premium on her ability to schedule market work around these activities. It tests the hypothesis that the variability in the distribution of ...

A. G. King

1976-01-01

390

Length of Working Life for Men and Women, 1970. Special Labor Force Report 187. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Noting that data from 1970 working life tables indicate that since 1960 worklife expectancy has continued to edge downward for men and to lengthen for women, this report briefly discusses continuing trends in the worklife of men and women from 1900 through 1970. Women's worklife is presented in terms of single women; mothers; widowed, divorced,…

Fullerton, Howard N., Jr.; Byrne, James J.

391

Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: occupational work force mortality study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents work performed in support of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. We compared total and cause-specific mortality for Pantex Plant workers employed between 1951 and December 31, 1978, with expected mortalities based on US death rates. We observed significantly fewer deaths than expected from all causes of death:

J. F. Acquavella; L. D. Wiggs; R. J. Waxweiler; D. G. Macdonell; G. S. Wilkinson

1982-01-01

392

Artists in the Work Force: Employment and Earnings, 1970-1990. Research Division Report #37.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the U.S. Census and more limited surveys aimed at specific artist occupations were used to profile the employment and earnings of four groups of artists in 1970-1990: authors, artists who work with their hands, performing artists, and architects and designers. The following items were examined: evidence of multiple job holding;…

Alper, Neil O.; And Others

393

Ümraniye ?lçesinde Birinci Basamakta Görevli Sa?lik Çali?anlarinin Genel Sa?lik Sigortasi Hakkindaki Bilgi Düzeyi (Knowledge about General Health Insurance of Health Workers Working in the Primary Health Care in Ümraniye)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY AIM: The aim of our study was to determine the knowledge of general health insurance of health workers working in the primary health care in Umraniye. METHODS: This descriptive research performed on health workers working in 18 primary health care centers and Province Health Dirocterate in Umraniye, between September-November 2006. Study sample didn't select and we included 250 health

2009-01-01

394

Longevity and optimal health: working toward an integrative methodology.  

PubMed

Efforts to foster a research dialogue between traditions as seemingly divergent as Western biomedicine and Indo-Tibetan medical and self-regulatory practice require a carefully conceived set of methodological guidelines. To approach a useful methodology, some specific structural differences between traditions must be negotiated, for example the Indo-Tibetan emphasis on holism in medicine and ethics, which appears to run contrary to Western trends toward specialization in both clinical and research contexts. Certain pitfalls must be avoided as well, including the tendency to appropriate elements of either tradition in a reductionistic manner. However, research methods offering creative solutions to these problems are now emerging, successfully engendering quantitative insight without subsuming one tradition within the terms of the other. Only through continued, creative work exploring both the potentials and limitations of this dialogue can collaborative research insight be attained, and an appropriate and useful set of methodological principles be approached. PMID:19735253

Oz, Mehmet; Tallent, Jeremy

2009-08-01

395

A review of zoonotic disease surveillance supported by the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center.  

PubMed

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC), Division of Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System conducts disease surveillance through a global network of US Department of Defense research laboratories and partnerships with foreign ministries of agriculture, health and livestock development in over 90 countries worldwide. In 2010, AFHSC supported zoonosis survey efforts were organized into four main categories: (i) development of field assays for animal disease surveillance during deployments and in resource limited environments, (ii) determining zoonotic disease prevalence in high-contact species which may serve as important reservoirs of diseases and sources of transmission, (iii) surveillance in high-risk human populations which are more likely to become exposed and subsequently infected with zoonotic pathogens and (iv) surveillance at the human-animal interface examining zoonotic disease prevalence and transmission within and between human and animal populations. These efforts have aided in the detection, identification and quantification of the burden of zoonotic diseases such as anthrax, brucellosis, Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever, dengue fever, Hantaan virus, influenza, Lassa fever, leptospirosis, melioidosis, Q fever, Rift Valley fever, sandfly fever Sicilian virus, sandfly fever Naples virus, tuberculosis and West Nile virus, which are of military and public health importance. Future zoonotic surveillance efforts will seek to develop local capacity for zoonotic surveillance focusing on high risk populations at the human-animal interface. PMID:22128834

Burke, R L; Kronmann, K C; Daniels, C C; Meyers, M; Byarugaba, D K; Dueger, E; Klein, T A; Evans, B P; Vest, K G

2011-11-30

396

The influence of perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain on work performance and work ability in Swedish health care workers.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of perceived stress and musculoskeletal ache/pain, separately and in combination, at baseline, on self-rated work ability and work performance at two-year follow-up. METHODS: Survey data were collected with a 2-year interval. Health care workers participating at both waves were included. Inclusion criteria were good self-reported work ability and unchanged self-rated work performance at baseline, resulting in 770 participants; 617 women and 153 men. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed using the question "How often do you experience pain in joints and muscles, including the neck and low back?", perceived stress with a modified version of a single item from the QPS-Nordic questionnaire, work performance by the question "Have your work performance changed during the preceding 12 months?" and work ability by a single item from the work ability index. Associations between baseline data and the two outcomes at follow-up were analysed by means of the log binomial model and expressed as risk ratios (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: A combination of frequent musculoskeletal pain and perceived stress constituted the highest risk for reporting decreased work performance (RR 1.7; CI 1.28-2.32) and reduced work ability (RR 1.7; CI 1.27-2.30) at follow-up. Separately, frequent pain, but not stress, was clearly associated with both outcomes. CONCLUSION: The results imply that proactive workplace interventions in order to maintain high work performance and good work ability should include measures to promote musculoskeletal well-being for the employees and measures, both individual and organizational, to minimize the risk of persistent stress reactions. PMID:23609321

Lindegård, A; Larsman, P; Hadzibajramovic, E; Ahlborg, G

2013-04-23

397

Public health law, human rights and HIV: a work in progress.  

PubMed

Australia has been a global leader in balancing public health law, human rights and HIV. The first National HIV/AIDS Strategy launched in 1989 set the agenda for law reform. The Intergovernmental Committee on AIDS subsequently established a legal working party with one of its key tasks to formulate public health legislation that would protect public health and human rights. The NSW Public Health Act 1991 has provided the framework for managing HIV in NSW over the subsequent decades. Recent changes to criminal law in NSW and opportunities to redefine public health law may affect how HIV transmission risks are managed in the future. PMID:20513311

Clayton, Stevie

398

Work life and psychological health: the experiences of Thai women in deprived communities.  

PubMed

I discuss women's work life and the psychological health of women in low-income communities in Northeast Thailand. Previous research has shown that low-income women are part of a disadvantaged group who struggle against several problems in their everyday life, and who work hard to survive. These women worked as either manual laborers in agriculture or factories or as self-employed vendors, and were busy Ha Yoo Ha Kin (working and earning a living). The women's way of life was complex and involved being responsible for their children, husband, extended family, work, and themselves. Understanding women's beliefs and practice relating to work life and health is essential in designing effective intervention programmes to promote the health and well-being of low-income women in Thailand. PMID:15354620

Jongudomkarn, Darunee; West, Bernice J M

399

Healthy Workplaces: The Effects of Nature Contact at Work on Employee Stress and Health  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Cultivating healthy workplaces is a critical aspect of comprehensive worksite health promotion. The influence of healthy workplace exposures on employee health outcomes warrants research attention. To date, it is unknown if nature contact in the workplace is related to employee stress and health. This study was designed to examine the effects of nature contact experienced at work on employee stress and health. Methods. Office staff at a southeastern university (n=503, 30% response rate) participated in the cross-sectional study. We used a 16-item workplace environment questionnaire, the Nature Contact Questionnaire, to comprehensively measure, for the first time, nature contact at work. The Perceived Stress Questionnaire and 13 established health and behavioral items assessed the dependent variables, general perceived stress, stress-related health behaviors, and stress-related health outcomes. Results. There was a significant, negative association between nature contact and stress and nature contact and general health complaints. The results indicate that as workday nature contact increased, perceived stress and generalized health complaints decreased. Conclusions. The findings suggest that nature contact is a healthy workplace exposure. Increasing nature contact at work may offer a simple population-based approach to enhance workplace health promotion efforts. Future researchers should test the efficacy of nature-contact workplace stress interventions.

Largo-Wight, Erin; Chen, W. William; Dodd, Virginia; Weiler, Robert

2011-01-01

400

Maximal strength training improves work economy, rate of force development and maximal strength more than conventional strength training.  

PubMed

This study compared maximal strength training (MST) with equal training volume (kg × sets × repetitions) of conventional strength training (CON) primarily with regard to work economy, and second one repetition maximum (1RM) and rate of force development (RFD) of single leg knee extension. In an intra-individual design, one leg was randomized to knee-extension MST (4 or 5RM) and the other leg to CON (3 × 10RM) three times per week for 8 weeks. MST was performed with maximal concentric mobilization of force while CON was performed with moderate velocity. Eight untrained or moderately trained men (26 ± 1 years) completed the study. The improvement in gross work economy was -0.10 ± 0.08 L min(-1) larger after MST (P = 0.011, between groups). From pre- to post-test the MST and CON improved net work economy with 31 % (P < 0.001) and 18 % (P = 0.01), respectively. Compared with CON, the improvement in 1RM and dynamic RFD was 13.7 ± 8.4 kg (P = 0.002) and 587 ± 679 N s(-1) (P = 0.044) larger after MST, whereas isometric RFD was of borderline significance 3,028 ± 3,674 N s(-1) (P = 0.053). From pre- to post-test, MST improved 1RM and isometric RFD with 50 % (P < 0.001) and 155 % (P < 0.001), respectively whereas CON improved 1RM and isometric RFD with 35 % (P < 0.001) and 83 % (P = 0.028), respectively. Anthropometric measures of quadriceps femoris muscle mass and peak oxygen uptake did not change. In conclusion, 8 weeks of MST was more effective than CON for improving work economy, 1RM and RFD in untrained and moderately trained men. The advantageous effect of MST to improve work economy could be due to larger improvements in 1RM and RFD. PMID:23307029

Heggelund, Jørn; Fimland, Marius S; Helgerud, Jan; Hoff, Jan

2013-01-11

401

Marriott Corporation Human Resources Department (A): Managing A Low-Wage Work Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Marriott Corporation, family owned and run, has always had a nonunion stance. Its "welfare-to-work" programs have angered unions but have also created a more reliable low-wage workforce. These cases (see also the B case, UVA-E-0130) deal with the company’s efforts to reduce turnover in its low-wage positions (thus saving money), help those on welfare find employment, and maintain its

Patricia Werhane; Orson Watson; Jenny Mead

402

A conceptual model of work and health disparities in the United States.  

PubMed

Recent research in medicine and public health highlights differences in health related to race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender. These inequalities, often labeled "disparities," are pervasive and pertain to the major causes of morbidity, mortality, and lost life years. Often ignored in discussions of health disparities is the complex role of work, including not only occupational exposures and working conditions, but also benefits associated with work, effects of work on families and communities, and policies that determine where and how people work. The authors argue that work should be considered explicitly as a determinant of health disparities. Their conceptual model and empirical evidence, built on previous contributions, describe how work contributes to disparities in health on multiple levels. The examples focus on the United States, but many of the key conceptual features can also be applied to other countries. The model emphasizes behaviors and characteristics of institutions rather than individual workers. This approach avoids a focus on individual responsibility alone, which may lead to victim blaming and failure to emphasize policies and institutional factors that affect large populations and systematically create and maintain racial, gender, and socioeconomic disparities in health. PMID:16524164

Lipscomb, Hester J; Loomis, Dana; McDonald, Mary Anne; Argue, Robin A; Wing, Steve

2006-01-01

403

The Effect of Educational Disequilibrium in Field Work on Graduate Social Work Students' Self-Concept and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author used a mixed methods design to assess field work-related educational disequilibrium and its effect on the self-concept and mental health of MSW students. Twenty-eight advanced, fourth-semester MSW students were compared with 37 entering, first-semester MSW students in practice-related sense of accomplishment. Compared with first-year students, second-year students reported a lower sense of accomplishment, which, in turn, explained their

Yu-Wen Ying

2011-01-01

404

Revitalizing communities together: the shared values, goals, and work of education, urban planning, and public health.  

PubMed

Inequities in education, the urban environment, and health co-exist and mutually reinforce each other. Educators, planners, and public health practitioners share commitments to place-based, participatory, youth-focused, and equitable work. They also have shared goals of building community resilience, social capital, and civic engagement. Interdisciplinary programs that embody these shared values and work towards these shared goals are emerging, including school-based health centers, full-service community schools, community health centers, Promise Neighborhoods, and Choice Neighborhoods. The intersection of these three fields represents an opportunity to intervene on social determinants of health. More collaborative research and practice across public health, education, and planning should build from the shared values identified to continue to address these common goals. PMID:22711169

Cohen, Alison Klebanoff; Schuchter, Joseph W

2013-04-01

405

Labor force participation and health-related quality of life in HIV-positive men who have sex with men: The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Too many people with HIV have left the job market permanently and those with reduced work capacity have been unable to keep their jobs. There is a need to examine the health effects of labor force participation in people with HIV. This study presents longitudinal data from 1,415 HIV-positive men who have sex with men taking part in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Generalized Estimating Equations show that employment is associated with better physical and mental health quality of life and suggests that there may be an adaptation process to the experience of unemployment. Post-hoc analyses also suggest that people who are more physically vulnerable may undergo steeper health declines due to job loss than those who are generally healthier. However, this may also be the result of a selection effect whereby poor physical health contributes to unemployment. Policies that promote labor force participation may not only increase employment rates but also improve the health of people living with HIV.

Rueda, Sergio; Raboud, Janet; Plankey, Michael; Ostrow, David; Mustard, Cameron; Rourke, Sean B.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Bekele, Tsegaye; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Lavis, John; Detels, Roger; Silvestre, Anthony J.

2013-01-01

406

Chinese concepts of mental healthCultural implications for social work practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

In terms of the traditional Chinese medical, Confucian and Taoist schools of thought, Chinese concepts of mental health have a strong impact. All these have significant implications for culturally sensitive or culturally competent social work practice in Chinese communities.

Kam-shing Yip

2005-01-01

407

Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General, Work Plan, Fiscal Year 2006.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project areas described in this Office of Inspector General (OIG) Work Plan reflect what we believe at the beginning of each fiscal year best identifies vulnerabilities of Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) programs and activities, and promot...

2006-01-01

408

Associations between working memory, health literacy, and recall of the signs of stroke among older adults.  

PubMed

Stroke remains a major cause of mortality and disability among older adults. Although early treatment after stroke is known to reduce both mortality and disability, the first step in seeking early treatment is dependent on the rapid recognition of the signs of stroke. Recall of the signs of stroke may be dependent on factors that exist before the stroke itself. Although it is known that both working memory and health literacy decline with advancing age, these factors have not been thoroughly examined with respect to recall of the signs of stroke. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to investigate associations between working memory, health literacy, and recall of the signs of stroke among older adults. Community dwelling older adults (?65 years of age) were recruited from two senior centers. Fifty-six participants meeting inclusion criteria provided demographic and health information and were asked to read a public service brochure listing the five warning signs of stroke. Working memory was then assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale 3rd Edition Working Memory Index. Health literacy was assessed by the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Participants' recall of the five warning signs of stroke was evaluated. The mean age was 80.4 years. The mean number of the signs of stroke recalled was 2.9 ± 1.33. Working memory and health literacy were positively correlated with recall of the signs of stroke (r = .38, p < 0.01; r = .44, p < 0.01). In a simultaneous regression, only health literacy remained a significant predictor of recall. There was no statistically significant interaction between working memory and health literacy. Findings from this study indicate that working memory and health literacy were associated with successful recall of the warning signs of stroke in older adults. Further studies are needed to determine if programs that include cognitive and literacy assessments could identify older adults who need additional support to learn and recall the signs of stroke. PMID:22955236

Ganzer, Christine A; Insel, Kathleen C; Ritter, Leslie S

2012-10-01

409

Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine's Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

2004-01-01

410

Health and Job-Specific Body Composition Standards for the US Air Force. Volume 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Air Force Medical Service strives to deliver a fit and healthy force, which ultimately translates to sustained and enhanced mission performance. In support of these goals, the Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine's Performance Enhancement Division i...

B. Palmer J. W. Carroll M. E. Rench S. H. Constable

2000-01-01

411

Psychosocial work characteristics and self rated health in four post-communist countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY OBJECTIVESTo examine whether psychosocial factors at work are related to self rated health in post-communist countries.DESIGN AND SETTINGSRandom samples of men and women in five communities in four countries were sent a postal questionnaire (Poland, Czech Republic and Lithuania) or were invited to an interview (Hungary). Working subjects (n=3941) reported their self rated health in the past 12 months

H Pikhart; M Bobak; J Siegrist; A Pajak; S Rywik; J Kyshegyi; A Gostautas; Z Skodova; M Marmot

2001-01-01

412

Psychometric Evaluation of Health-Related Work Outcome Measures For Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: This systematic review evaluated the quality of psychometric properties of self-report health-related work outcome measures\\u000a for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Methods: Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) between 1980\\u000a and December 2006 were conducted for peer-reviewed studies that evaluated self-report work outcome measures for patients with\\u000a musculoskeletal disorders. The eligibility

Renee M. Williams; Gloria Schmuck; Shannon Allwood; Matthew Sanchez; Ryan Shea; Glenn Wark

2007-01-01

413

Need for Acute Psychiatric Beds in the Southern Tier: Report of the Southern Tier Psychiatric Task Force as Approved by the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency Executive Committee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Fingers Lake Health Systems Agency (FLHSA) Executive Committee authorized the establishment of the Southern Tier Psychiatric Task Force in 1979. The Task Force developed a quantitative estimate of the need for acute psychiatric inpatients beds and ide...

1981-01-01

414

Organization and Administration of School Health Work. Bulletin, 1939, No. 12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bulletin brings to its readers a discussion presented with a view to focusing attention upon this very important educational field of school health work. In Part I, Commissioner Studebaker discusses General Administrative Policies, including the relation of health education to public administration. Sections appearing in Part I include: (1)…

Moore, Fred; Studebaker, John W.

1940-01-01

415

Liaison Problems among Infant Psychiatry, Psychology, Pediatrics, Nursing, and Social Work in Infant Mental Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discussed are attempts made by staff at the Community Mental Health Center of the New Jersey School of Medicine to develop an ongoing working relationship with pediatric neonatologists, house staff, and nursing staff in order to promote their attunement to mental health needs and obtain access to their expertise. After a description of the center…

Bry, Thea

416

The Role of Acceptance and Job Control in Mental Health, Job Satisfaction, and Work Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acceptance, the willingness to experience thoughts, feelings, and physiological sensations without having to control them or let them determine one's actions, is a major individual determinant of mental health and behavioral effectiveness in a more recent theory of psychopathology. This 2-wave panel study examined the ability of acceptance also to explain mental health, job satisfaction, and performance in the work

Frank W. Bond; David Bunce

2003-01-01

417

Paternal psychosocial work conditions and mental health outcomes: A case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The role of social and family environments in the development of mental health problems among children and youth has been widely investigated. However, the degree to which parental working conditions may impact on developmental psychopathology has not been thoroughly studied. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study of several mental health outcomes of 19,833 children of sawmill workers and their

Stefania Maggi; Aleck Ostry; James Tansey; James Dunn; Ruth Hershler; Lisa Chen; Clyde Hertzman

2008-01-01

418

Clocking in: The Organization of Work Time and Health in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article assesses the health implications of emerging patterns in the organization of work time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we examine general mental and physical health (SF-12 scores), psychological distress (CESD score), clinical levels of obesity, and the presence of medical conditions, at age 40.…

Kleiner, Sibyl; Pavalko, Eliza K.

2010-01-01

419

The Health of Women at Work. A Bibliography. Occasional Papers No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Both English and foreign language articles and books, most of them published since 1950, are cited in this bibliography on the health of women in the workplace. Citations were selected to represent the efforts that have been made by health professionals, statisticians, historians, and social scientists in this area. The designation "at work"…

Hunt, Vilma R.

420

Work-Related Health Limitations, Education, and the Risk of Marital Disruption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite progress in identifying the covariates of divorce, there remain substantial gaps in the knowledge. One of these gaps is the relationship between health and risk of marital dissolution. I extend prior research by examining the linkages between work-related health limitations and divorce using 25 years of data (N = 7919) taken from the 1979…

Teachman, Jay

2010-01-01

421

Perceptions of employment, domestic work, and leisure as predictors of health among women and men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The aims of this longitudinal study were to analyse whether perceptions of employment, domestic work and leisure were predictors of health among women and men, and whether the predictors revealed were the same for both genders. Method: A random sample comprising of 2,683 employees in public health care and social insurance offices (2286 women and 397 men) in western

Carita Håkansson; Gunnar Ahlborg Jr

2010-01-01

422

Work Improvement and Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems: Common Features and Research Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing trend in re-orientating occupational health research towards risk management. Such a trend is accelerated by the increasing attention to occupational safety and health management systems. The trend, also seen in many Asian countries, is offering new opportunities for strengthening primary prevention. Useful examples are provided from recent work improvement projects dealing with technology transfer, small workplaces

Kazutaka KOGI

2002-01-01

423

Occupational health surveillance: a means to identify work-related risks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lack of successful disease surveillance methods has resulted in few reliable estimates of workplace-related disease. Hazard surveillance - the ongoing assessment of chemical use and worked exposure to the chemicals - is presented as a way to supplement occupational disease surveillance. Existing OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Health) data systems are adapted

J. R. Froines; C. A. Dellenbaugh; D. H. Wegman

1986-01-01

424

Social Work Training for Mental Health Services to the Elderly Within a Multigenerational Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Multigenerational Family Project at the University of Washington School of Social Work aims to respond to practice gaps in both mental health and aging services. Given the growth in the number of multigenerational families and the increased employment of middle aged women who have been the traditional family caregivers, it is critical that geriatric social workers in mental health

Nancy R. Hooyman

1986-01-01

425

Clocking in: The Organization of Work Time and Health in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article assesses the health implications of emerging patterns in the organization of work time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we examine general mental and physical health (SF-12 scores), psychological distress (CESD score), clinical levels of obesity, and the presence of medical conditions, at age 40.…

Kleiner, Sibyl; Pavalko, Eliza K.

2010-01-01

426

Leadership, organization and health at work: a case study of a Swedish industrial company  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The application of knowledge on organization and lea- dership is important for the promotion of health at work- place. The purpose of this article is to analyse the leadership and organization, including the organizational culture, of a Swedish industrial company in relation to the health of the employees. The leadership in this company has been oriented towards developing and

ANDREA ERIKSSON; BJARNE JANSSON; BO J. A. HAGLUND; RUNO AXELSSON

2008-01-01

427

Working with Partners to Improve Global Health: A Strategy for CDC and ATSDR.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), are pleased to present their new global health strategy. The Global Health Strategy sets the stage for our international work in the new...

2000-01-01

428

[Mental health and work: a discussion on the connection between work and diagnosis, based on daily practice].  

PubMed

Seven cases of workers selected among 150 who had undergone psychiatric treatment at the Workers' Health Reference Centers in Santo Amaro and André Gabois from 1994 to 1997 were presented for a detailed analysis characterizing work situations and discussing definition of the diagnosis and causal connections with work. The qualitative case study provides a thematic analysis of the patient history and files. Work situations are characterized by: unhealthy working conditions, problems related to work organization, inadequate human resources management, and urban violence. Symptoms included: fear, anxiety, depression, nervousness, tension, fatigue, malaise, loss of appetite, sleep disorders, and psychosomatic disorders (gastritis, hypertension); in addition, workers were unable to forget about work while off the job. Diagnosis varied. Three cases involved post-traumatic syndrome. Two cases involved organic psychosis linked to accidents or exposure to neurotoxic chemical products. Cases also included neurotic syndromes of fatigue, depression, and paranoia, as well as adaptation and reaction to acute stress. In all of the cases it was possible to relate the clinical picture to the work situation. PMID:11395797

Glina, D M; Rocha, L E; Batista, M L; Mendonça, M G

429

Health inequalities among workers with a foreign background in Sweden: do working conditions matter?  

PubMed

Employment and working conditions are key social determinants of health, yet current information is lacking regarding relationships between foreign background status, working conditions and health among workers in Sweden. This study utilized cross-sectional data from the 2010 Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Level of Living Survey for Foreign Born Persons and their Children (LNU-UFB) to assess whether or not health inequalities exist between native Swedish and foreign background workers and if exposure to adverse psychosocial and physical working conditions contributes to the risk for poor health among foreign background workers. A sub-sample of 4,021 employed individuals aged 18-65 was analyzed using logistic regression. Eastern European, Latin American and Other Non-Western workers had an increased risk of both poor self-rated health and mental distress compared to native Swedish workers. Exposure to adverse working conditions only minimally influenced the risk of poor health. Further research should examine workers who are less integrated or who have less secure labor market attachments and also investigate how additional working conditions may influence associations between health and foreign background status. PMID:23846669

Dunlavy, Andrea C; Rostila, Mikael

2013-07-10

430

Health Inequalities among Workers with a Foreign Background in Sweden: Do Working Conditions Matter?  

PubMed Central

Employment and working conditions are key social determinants of health, yet current information is lacking regarding relationships between foreign background status, working conditions and health among workers in Sweden. This study utilized cross-sectional data from the 2010 Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Level of Living Survey for Foreign Born Persons and their Children (LNU-UFB) to assess whether or not health inequalities exist between native Swedish and foreign background workers and if exposure to adverse psychosocial and physical working conditions contributes to the risk for poor health among foreign background workers. A sub-sample of 4,021 employed individuals aged 18–65 was analyzed using logistic regression. Eastern European, Latin American and Other Non-Western workers had an increased risk of both poor self-rated health and mental distress compared to native Swedish workers. Exposure to adverse working conditions only minimally influenced the risk of poor health. Further research should examine workers who are less integrated or who have less secure labor market attachments and also investigate how additional working conditions may influence associations between health and foreign background status.

Dunlavy, Andrea C.; Rostila, Mikael

2013-01-01

431

Burnout: Interpreting the Perception of Iranian Primary Rural Health Care Providers from Working and Organizational Conditions  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Health care providers in the rural centers offer the primary health services in the form of proficiencies and professions to the most required target population in the health system. These services are provided in certain condition and population with a verity of limitations. This study aimed to describe and interpret the experiences of the employees from their own working condition in the rural health centers. Methods: The present study conducted in a qualitative research approach and content analysis method through individual and group interviews with 26 employed primary health care providers (including 7 family physicians, 7 midwives, and 12 health workers) in the rural health centers in Isfahan in 2009. Sampling was done using purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as constant comparative basis. Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; “instability and frequent changes”, “involved in laws and regulations”, “pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower”, “helplessness in performing the tasks and duties”, “sense of identity threat and low self-concept”, and “deprivation of professional development”. The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called “burnout”. Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community.

Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Farajzadegan, Ziba

2012-01-01

432

Consumer Health: Does Advertising Work on You? and Evaluating a Product's Health Claims.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes lessons for teaching middle and high school students how to determine if they are influenced by the power of advertising and how to evaluate a product's health claims. To determine the influence of advertising, teachers have high school students discuss what their latest health product/service purchase was, why they bought…

Cox, Carolyn C.

433

[Community health agents and their experiences of pleasure and distress at work: a qualitative study].  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to identify the situations that cause pleasure or distress at work among the Community Health Agents (CHA) in a city in Rio Grande do Sul state/Brazil. A qualitative study was performed with 24 agents as the participants. Data collection took place in 2009 through the use of focal groups, using the thematic analysis technique. The situations causing pleasure at work were: being recognized, solving problems, working with peers and being creative. Situations causing distress were: deficiencies in the health service; lack of knowledge regarding their roles; lack of recognition; the stress of teamwork; the obligation of living and working in the same area; daily living and becoming involved with the social problems of the community; and being exposed to violence, which resulted in fear. It was verified that there is a need for adopting interventions with a view to promoting better working conditions, professional satisfaction and the health of community agents. PMID:22773484

Lopes, Denise Maria Quatrin; Beck, Carmem Lúcia Colomé; Prestes, Francine Cassol; Weiller, Teresinha Heck; Colomé, Juliana Silveira; da Silva, Gilson Mafacioli

2012-06-01

434

Voice Problems at Work: A Challenge for Occupational Safety and Health Arrangement  

Microsoft Academic Search

In modern societies about one third of the labor force are working in professions in which voice is the primary tool. Voice problems are common in general, but they are even more common in professions in which there is heavy vocal loading, i.e. professions that do not only require prolonged voice use, but also involve extra loading factors such as

Erkki Vilkman

2000-01-01

435

The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.  

PubMed

Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

2013-11-01

436

Working Together for Mental Health: Evaluation of a one-day mental health course for human service providers  

PubMed Central

Background The Working Together For Mental Health course is an 8-hour course designed to demystify mental illness and mental health services. The main target group for the course is people working in human service organisations who provide services for people with mental illness. Methods A questionnaire was administered to all participants attending the course during 2003 (n = 165). Participants completed the questionnaire before and immediately after the course, and at three month follow-up. Results A response rate of 69% was achieved with 114 people completing the questionnaire on all three occasions. The responses showed a significant improvement in the self-assessed knowledge and confidence of participants to provide human services to people with a mental health problem or disorder, three months after the course. There was no significant improvement in participants' attitudes or beliefs about people with a mental health problem or disorder at three month follow-up; however, participants' attitudes were largely positive before entering the course. Conclusion The Working Together For Mental Health course was successful in improving participants' confidence and knowledge around providing human services to people with a mental health illness.

Grootemaat, Pam; Gillan, Cathie; Holt, Gillian; Forward, Wayne; Heywood, Narelle; Willis, Sue

2006-01-01

437

Women of Hispanic Origin in the Labor Force. Facts on Working Women No. 89-1 = La mujer de origen hispano en la fuerza laboral. Facts on Working Women Num. 89-1S.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Data on Hispanic women in the labor force between 1978 and 1988 show the following: (1) 6.5 percent of the women in the work force in 1988 were of Hispanic origin (3.6 million); (2) the median age of Hispanic women was 26.1 years, 2-5 years younger than Black or White women; (3) 66 percent of Hispanic women participate in the labor force, a…

Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

438

Educational Approaches for Preparing Social Work Students for Interdisciplinary Teamwork on Geriatric Health Care Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interest in teamwork has fluctuated over the last several decades, with recent renewed interest. As social workers become more involved in working with older people in the coming years, their success will hinge on collaboration with other health providers. Schools of social work and clinical sites must address this through the development of educational curricula and clinical programs which prepare

Judith L. Howe; Kathryn Hyer; Joanna Mellor; David Lindeman; Marilyn Luptak

2001-01-01

439

Cancer survivors’ received and needed social support from their work place and the occupational health services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals of work  Even though a lot of studies have been conducted concerning cancer patients’ social support, the importance of social support from the work life is unclear. We examined the amount of emotional and practical support that cancer survivors needed and had actually received from their coworkers, supervisors, and the occupational health personnel. We also examined whether disease-related or sociodemographic

Taina Taskila; Marja-Liisa Lindbohm; Rami Martikainen; Ulla-Sisko Lehto; Jari Hakanen; Päivi Hietanen

2006-01-01

440

The Relationships between Mothers' Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work, and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers' diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1979 (N = 2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first…

Frech, Adrianne; Damaske, Sarah

2012-01-01

441

The Relationships between Mothers' Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work, and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers' diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1979 (N = 2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first…

Frech, Adrianne; Damaske, Sarah

2012-01-01

442

The health effects of work and family role characteristics: Gender and race comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have documented the benefits of work and family roles for both physical and mental health. A number of these studies have suggested that work and family roles are beneficial to the degree that they entail rewarding relationships and activities. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 10633; 17 percent African-American), this paper examines

Beth Rushing; Annette Schwabe

1995-01-01

443

Work and Health Outcomes Among Police Officers: The Mediating Role of Police Cynicism and Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between personality variables (Type A), job demands and job resources, and police cynicism and engagement, and also examined the mediating role of cynicism and work engagement in predicting both work and health related outcomes among police officers. The participants were 150 Norwegian police officers, and data were collected using questionnaires. Results showed that Type A

Astrid M. Richardsen; Ronald J. Burke; Monica Martinussen

2006-01-01

444

Work plan, health and safety plan, and site characterization for the Rust Spoil Area (D-106)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Department of Energy`s Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this work plan has been developed for the Rust Spoil Area (a solid waste disposal area). The work plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research

D. E. Bohrman; M. S. Uziel; D. C. Landguth; S. W. Hawthorne

1990-01-01

445

Work plan, health and safety plan, and site characterization for the Rust Spoil Area (D-106)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Department of Energy's Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this work plan has been developed for the Rust Spoil Area (a solid waste disposal area). The work plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research

D. E. Bohrman; M. S. Uziel; D. C. Landguth; S. W. Hawthorne

1990-01-01

446

Working conditions, visual fatigue, and mental health among systems analysts in S?o Paulo, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Aims: To evaluate the association between working conditions and visual fatigue and mental health among systems analysts living in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out by a multidisciplinary team. It included: ergonomic analysis of work, individual and group interviews, and 553 self applied questionnaires in two enterprises. The comparison population numbered 136 workers in different occupations. Results: The study population mainly comprised young males. Among systems analysts, visual fatigue was associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment and workstation, low level of worker participation, being a woman, and subject's attitude of fascination by the computer. Nervousness and intellectual performance were associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment, work environment, and tools. Continuing education and leisure were protective factors. Work interfering in family life was associated with mental workload, difficulties with clients, strict deadlines, subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, and finding solutions of work problems outside work. Family support, satisfaction in life and work, and adequate work environment and tools were protective factors. Work interfering in personal life was associated with subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, strict deadlines, inadequate equipment, and high level of work participation. Satisfaction in life and work and continuing education were protective factors. The comparison population did not share common working factors with the systems analysts in the regression analysis. Conclusions: The main health effects of systems analysts' work were expressed by machine anthropomorphism, being very demanding, mental acceleration, mental absorption, and difficulty in dealing with emotions.

Rocha, L; Debert-Ribeiro, M

2004-01-01

447

Development of a Unified Code of Ethics for the Health Education Profession: A Report of the National Task Force on Ethics in Health Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the development, over many years, of a unified code of ethics designed to represent the professional needs of various health education professionals working in the field. The code of ethics for the health education profession is included. It focuses on responsibility to: the public; the profession; employers; health education delivery:…

Capwell, Ellen M.; Smith, Becky J.; Shirreffs, Janet; Olsen, Larry K.

2000-01-01

448

Healthy and Ready to Work - Kentucky: Incorporating Transition Into a State Program for Children with Special Health Care Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transition into the adult world for youth with special health care needs includes moving from pediatric to adult health care, from school to work, and from home to independent living. The federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)\\/Maternal and Child Health Bureau, through the Healthy and Ready to Work Initiative, has funded state demonstration projects. With this funding, the Kentucky

Kathleen B. Blomquist

449

Preventing Work-Related Musculoskeletal Illnesses Through Ergonomics: The Air Force PREMIER Program. Volume 2: Job Requirements and Physical Demands Survey Methodology Guide (Field Version).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Air Force consists of over 500,000 Military and civilian workers performing diverse jobs and tasks at multiple installations around the world. A typical installation has hundreds of administrative and industrial work areas of various siz...

A. Marcotte R. Barker M. Joyce N. Miller E. J. Cogburn

1997-01-01

450

Persistent work-life conflict and health satisfaction - A representative longitudinal study in Switzerland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The objectives of the present study were (1) to track work-life conflict in Switzerland during the years 2002 to 2008 and\\u000a (2) to analyse the relationship between work-life conflict and health satisfaction, examining whether long-term work-life\\u000a conflict leads to poor health satisfaction.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The study is based on a representative longitudinal database (Swiss Household Panel), covering a six-year period containing\\u000a seven

Michaela K Knecht; Georg F Bauer; Felix Gutzwiller; Oliver Hämmig

2011-01-01

451

Secondary traumatic stress among mental health providers working with the military: prevalence and its work- and exposure-related correlates.  

PubMed

Our research assessed the prevalence of secondary traumatic stress (STS) among mental health providers working with military patients. We also investigated personal, work-related, and exposure-related correlates of STS. Finally, using meta-analysis, the mean level of STS symptoms in this population was compared with the mean level of these symptoms in other groups. Participants (N = 224) completed measures of indirect exposure to trauma (i.e., diversity, volume, frequency, ratio), appraisal of secondary exposure impact, direct exposure to trauma, STS, and work characteristics. The prevalence of STS was 19.2%. Personal history of trauma, complaints about having too many patients, and more negative appraisals of the impact caused by an indirect exposure to trauma were associated with higher frequency of STS symptoms. A meta-analysis showed that the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and arousal symptoms of STS was similar across various groups of professionals indirectly exposed to trauma (e.g., mental health providers, rescue workers, social workers). PMID:24177477

Cieslak, Roman; Anderson, Valerie; Bock, Judith; Moore, Bret A; Peterson, Alan L; Benight, Charles C

2013-11-01

452

[Conditions and work process in the daily of the Family Health Program: coherency with health humanization principles].  

PubMed

This study analyzes humanization at work in the context of the Family Health Program (FHP), inquiring: what is the role that infrastructure assumes in the construction of humanized work in the FHP? Does the course of staff work reveal coherency with health humanization principles? In order to find out answers to these questions, it was explored the perception of FHP' professionals about their work routine, considering concrete conditions whereby it occurs besides involved relationships, practices and products. It is a multiple case study, both qualitative and quantitative (with primacy of the first approach), developed through questionnaires and focal-groups with FHP' teams of selected areas. The results indicate that infrastructure fragilities and low investment in training of staffs are factors that contribute for the persistence of work conditions and practices that are far away from health humanization principles. Despite of the difficulties, it was evidenced, by the staffs, in general way, great engagement to their work and great sensibility to population needs and problems. PMID:21519685

Trad, Leny Alves Bomfim; Rocha, Ana Angélica Ribeiro de Meneses E

2011-03-01

453

Training of Senior Public Health Administrators: Report of a WHO Working Group (Moscow, Russia, June 21-23, 1978).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A report of the World Health Organization (WHO) Working Group on the Training of Senior Public Health Administrators is presented. The working group met to review programs for specialized, advanced, and continuing training of senior public health administrators. WHO activities leading up to the working group and WHO's present policy and activities…

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

454

Training of Senior Public Health Administrators: Report of a WHO Working Group (Moscow, Russia, June 21-23, 1978).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A report of the World Health Organization (WHO) Working Group on the Training of Senior Public Health Administrators is presented. The working group met to review programs for specialized, advanced, and continuing training of senior public health administrators. WHO activities leading up to the working group and WHO's present policy and…

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

455

Effects of a Dutch work-site wellness-health program: the Brabantia Project.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study examined a project designed to improve the health and wellness of employees of Brabantia, a Dutch manufacturer of household goods, by means of lifestyle changes and changes in working conditions. METHODS: The workers at one Brabantia site constituted the experimental group, and the workers from two other sites formed the control group. Biomedical variables, lifestyles, general stress reactions, and quality of work were measured identically in both groups at baseline and 1, 2, and 3 years later. During this period, there was continuous registration of absenteeism. RESULTS: The interventions brought about favorable short-term changes in terms of health risks, and there were stable effects on working conditions (especially decision latitude) and absenteeism. CONCLUSIONS: A combination of interventions directed at both lifestyles and the work environment can produce extensive and stable effects on health-related variables, wellness, and absenteeism.

Maes, S; Verhoeven, C; Kittel, F; Scholten, H

1998-01-01

456

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01

457

Women of Hispanic Origin in the United States Labor Force. Facts on Working Women. Fact Sheet No. 85-11.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A four-page synposis of data on women of Hispanic origin in the labor force is presented. Data included are numbers of Hispanic women in the labor force; percentage of Hispanics among women in labor force; percentage of Hispanic women in the labor force; median ages; unemployment rate; education level; income levels; types of jobs occupied…

Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

458

"Have you seen your aura lately?" examining boundary-work in holistic health pamphlets.  

PubMed

An increasing number of people in the United States are using holistic therapies. Both encouraging and informing this trend in growth, printed leaflets are a popular and important medium for holistic health practitioners. Using a discourse analytic approach, the author analyzed pamphlets and printed texts distributed at a holistic health fair. These texts reflect and construct specific understandings of holistic health and proper health care. Understood through the notion of boundary-work, pamphlets demarcated holism as the proper way of conceptualizing health and health care. However, holistic medicine's boundaries are quite porous, as these practices are also legitimized through the use of scientific conventions and the practice of integration, both commonly associated with biomedicine. PMID:17170241

Ho, Evelyn Y

2007-01-01

459

Effects of a Tailored Health Promotion Program for Female Blue-Collar Workers: Health Works for Women1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. This study assessed the effects of the Health Works for Women (HWW) intervention on im- proving multiple behaviors including nutrition and physical activity among rural female blue-collar em- ployees in North Carolina. Methods. Nine small to mid-size workplaces were ran- domly assigned to either intervention or delayed inter- vention conditions. After a baseline survey, an interven- tion consisting of

Marci Kramish Campbell; Irene Tessaro; Brenda DeVellis; Salli Benedict; Kristine Kelsey; Leigh Belton; Antonio Sanhueza; Robert C. Byrd

460

Education of Managers in Health Services. Report on a Working Group. Dusseldorf: 29 November-2 December 1977.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is the report by the Working Group on the education of managers in health services in the World Health Organization, European Region. The report is organized into the following sections: health care management and managers; key issues in health service management (public policy-making and health care management, the managerial role of…

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

461

Education of Managers in Health Services. Report on a Working Group. Dusseldorf: 29 November-2 December 1977.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presented is the report by the Working Group on the education of managers in health services in the World Health Organization, European Region. The report is organized into the following sections: health care management and managers; key issues in health service management (public policy-making and health care management, the managerial role of…

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

462

Fitness for work in health care workers from the prospective of ethics, science and good practices.  

PubMed

Fitness for work (FFW) is the final task of both risk assessment and health surveillance, aimed at protecting workers' health and working capacity. There are numerous specific concerns regarding health care workers. In particular: i) the frequent difficulty in determining at pre-employment/pre-placement examinations the specific task that the individual worker will perform; ii) the prevalence of female workers and the contemporary presence of numerous occupational risk factors that are a potential cause of harmful effects on women's reproductive health; iii) the progressive aging of the staff especially nurses; iv) the risk to third parties, with particular reference to the issues of biological risk and substance abuse, also in relation to shift work, fatigue and occupational stress; v) the increasing number of immigrant workers among support staff In such cases the occupational physician, respecting both ethical principles and regulations and with an appropriate balance between scientific evidence and the precautionary principle, should express a FFW judgment that allows both the adaptation of work to the worker and vice versa, as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH). Proper FFW judgment also permits the expected benefits to be achieved, not only for the workers but also for employers, companies and society. PMID:22838294

Alessio, L; Arici, Cecilia; Franco, G

463

Virtue and health--finding meaning and joy in working life.  

PubMed

The perspective of this investigation is the humanistic caring tradition of caring science where caritas motive, i.e. charity and love, constitutes the basic motive and suffering the basic category of caring, i.e. Eriksson's theory of caritative caring. The concept of virtue is used in accordance with Aristotle's theory of virtue and fragments of theory are added to the study from Arendt. The aim of the study was to investigate the meaning of virtues for worker's health and to develop a theoretical model of the inner health domains. The investigation comprises an empirical study using focus-group interviews for the collection of data. The participants were 16 employees, in four focus groups, in the wood-processing industry. The study was conducted from September 1999 to January 2000. Hermeneutical interpretation has been used in the search for a deeper understanding of the connection between virtue and health in working life. Abduction is the conclusion method, which is used in this study. The result is presented at four levels of interpretation and the final findings constitutes four theses which comprise the virtues of pride, generosity, love and honesty as important in working life and a theoretical model comprising three dimensions: the innermost dimension, the middle dimension and the outer dimension. These dimensions reflect health as becoming. By means of virtues it is possible to find the way to the inner domains of health. Pride as a virtue and how it is heeded at work, is decisive in determining whether health becomes discernable in working life and the value, i.e. found in pride is decisive when it comes to the employee's conception of the meaning of work. The study shows that the connection between health and virtue is important to recognize. This approach points out underlying values that effects worker's health. PMID:17559437

Wärnå, Carola; Lindholm, Lisbet; Eriksson, Katie

2007-06-01

464

Long-Term Health and Work Outcomes of Renal Transplantation and Patterns of Work Status During the End-Stage Renal Disease Trajectory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the health- and work outcomes of renal transplant recipients long-term after transplantation\\u000a as well as the pattern of work status, work ability and disability benefits during the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) trajectory\\u000a that precedes transplantation. Methods 34 transplant recipients completed interviews 3, 13 months and >6 years posttransplantation. Health status (SF-36), work\\u000a ability

Sijrike F. van der Mei; Daphne Kuiper; Johan W. Groothoff; Willem J. van Son; Sandra Brouwer

465

Evaluation of Work Place Stress in Health University Workers: A Study from Rural India  

PubMed Central

Background: Healthcare providers being over-worked and under staffed are prone to poor mental health. Unhealthy work place compounds it further. Aims: This study was aimed at to assess the mental health status of a medical university employee with special reference to work place stressors. Settings and design: A cross-sectional study was designed and carried out at a Rural Health University. Materials and Methods: Both the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12 and Holmes–Rahe Scale were used to evaluate 406 participants. Statistical analysis: Multivariate analysis, correlation, and ANOVA by SPSS 11.0. Results: The minimum age of the participant was 19 years and the maximum 64 years, with an average age at 35.09 years. On the GHQ scale 239(58.9%) recorded psychiatric morbidity out of which 201(49.5%) had moderate and 38(9.3%) severe morbidity. Doctors were the highest stressed group (P ? 0.04). Prominent work environmental stressors were poor departmental reorganization, lack of cohesiveness in department, difficult superiors and juniors (P ? 0.001, Pearson correlation). Stressors associated with work organization and work nature were: noninvolvement in departmental decision making and lack of proper feedback; along with; work load, lack of clarity in job, and a erratic work schedule (P ? 0.001 on Pearson correlation). Harassment, favoritism, discrimination, and lack of self-expression (P ? 0.003) were other factors responsible for work dissatisfaction. Conclusions: A high stress level was detected in the study population. The principal stressors were work environment related. Poor work culture was found to lead to job dissatisfaction among majority.

Mishra, Badrinarayan; Mehta, SC; Sinha, Nidhi Dinesh; Shukla, Sushil Kumar; Ahmed, Nadeem; Kawatra, Abhishek

2011-01-01

466

Combining work and family: rewards or risks for children's mental health?  

PubMed

Prevailing child psychopathology paradigms focus on caregiving in isolation from market work. Yet most children's caregivers - mothers and fathers - are also employed. Although policy and academic debate has voiced concerns that employment could hamper mothers' capacity to care, less emphasis is given to the benefits generated by mothers' jobs. By contrast, theories of child mental health often view fathers' employment as beneficial, indeed necessary, for children's wellbeing, and few problematise fathers' capacity to combine work and care. This paper aims to integrate these seemingly contradictory concerns. We consider whether mothers' and fathers' rewards from combining employment with childcare may be protective for children's mental health, and whether their conflicts and dilemmas generate risks. Analyses use cross-sectional data from a representative survey of families with 4-5 year old children (Growing Up in Australia Study). We restricted our sample to employed parents (N = 2809 mothers; 3982 fathers), using data gathered in 2004. While a majority of parents reported benefits and rewards from working (work-family facilitation), more than one third also reported difficulties and conflicts (work-family conflict). When mothers or fathers experienced conflict we found elevations in young children's emotional and behavioural symptoms, with the risks compounding if both parents experienced conflict between work and family. Associations persisted after adjusting for family socioeconomic circumstances and composition, and they were not offset by work-family facilitation. We did not find evidence for heightened vulnerability to work-family conflict in families with few socioeconomic resources. However, among these disadvantaged families we observed stronger protective associations with children's mental health when parents had rewarding and supportive jobs. Our study extends current paradigms of child mental health by considering the interplay between care environments and market work. Jobs which help mothers and fathers to combine employment with caregiving could yield health benefits across generations. PMID:23631784

Strazdins, Lyndall; Obrien, Léan V; Lucas, Nina; Rodgers, Bryan

2013-04-03

467

Women Who Work, Part 2: Married Women in the Labour Force: The Influence of Age, Education, Child-Bearing Status and Residence. Special Labour Force Studies Series B, No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To followup an earlier study of the relative importance of age, education, and marital status as variables influencing female participation in the labor force, this research attempts to measure the relative importance of similar factors in determining whether or not a woman works or wishes to work. Particular emphasis was given to such…

Allingham, John D.; Spencer, Byron G.

468

Promoting occupational safety and health for working children through microfinance programming.  

PubMed

Microfinance programs are recognized as a way of improving incomes and creating employment for large numbers of low-income families, but there are concerns that working conditions within these informal microenterprises are far from ideal. For example, when families receive loans to expand a microenterprise, children may make up the labor shortfall until the family can afford to hire adult workers. Through the Promoting and Protecting the Interests of Children who Work (PPIC-Work) project being carried out in Egypt, a set of interventions that can not only improve working conditions, but can also be integrated into standard microfinance programs has been developed. By working with and through self-financing microfinance programs, the PPIC-Work approach provides a way of improving occupational safety and health not only for children working in microenterprises but also for large numbers of children and adults working in the informal sector more generally. PMID:20465063

Carothers, Richard; Breslin, Curtis; Denomy, Jennifer; Foad, Mamdouh

469

Determinants of Health Promotion Behavior In Active Duty Air Force Personnel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Increased attention has been given to health promotion and disease prevention activities within today's ever-changing health care system. Health continues to be a valued personal commodity. Several researchers have identified health promotion, disease pre...

B. J. Grabowski

1997-01-01

470

Unconscious Aspects of Statutory Mental Health Social Work: Emotional Labour and the Approved Mental Health Professional  

Microsoft Academic Search

In November 2008 the statutory role of the Approved Social Worker (ASW) in the UK came to an end, and a new role Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) was created. This paper is based on qualitative data gathered from Approved Social Workers (ASWs) in relation to the roles, tasks and skills they felt were required in order to perform statutory

Claire Gregor

2010-01-01

471

Corporate response to reproductive hazards in the workplace: Results of the Family, Work, and Health Survey  

SciTech Connect

As a part of a Family, Work, and Health Survey, we analyzed corporate practices regarding reproductive hazards in the chemical and electronics manufacturing industries in Massachusetts. Over half of the 198 firms surveyed had at least one of four designated reproductive hazards in use. Among these firms, 57% provided information on reproductive risks to employees. Nearly 20% of companies excluded certain classes of workers from substances, work areas, or occupations on the basis of reproductive health concerns. Another 13% offered voluntary transfers to workers concerned about reproductive risks. With one exception, all restrictions and transfers applied to women only--even when scientific evidence supports potential reproductive risk to both sexes. Analysis of corporate practices by industry type, and size, gender stratification, and unionization of the workforce was carried out. Results of the survey raise important public health concerns about corporate practices that may restrict women's job opportunities on the basis of reproductive status while underprotecting the health of male workers.

Paul, M.; Daniels, C.; Rosofsky, R. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))