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1

Evaluating the Environmental Health Work Force. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains all materials pertinent to an intensive evaluation of the environmental health work force conducted in 1986 and 1987. The materials relate to a workshop that was one of the key tools used in conducting the study to estimate environmental health personnel supply, demand, and need. The report begins with an overview and…

Levine Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

2

[Investigating work, age, health and work participation in the ageing work force in Germany].  

PubMed

Working life in Germany is changing. The work force is ageing and the number of people available to the labour market will - from now on - shrink considerably. Prospectively, people will have to work longer; but still today, most people leave employment long before reaching official retirement age. What are the reasons for this? In this report, a conceptual framework and the German lidA Cohort Study are presented. The "lidA conceptual framework on work, age, health and work participation" visualises determinants of employment (11 "domains") in higher working age, e.?g., "work", "health", "social status" and "life style". The framework reveals 4 key characteristics of withdrawal from work: leaving working life is the result of an interplay of different domains (complexity); (early) retirement is a process with in part early determinants in the life course (processual character); retirement has a strong individual component (individuality); retirement is embedded in a strong structural frame (structure). On the basis of this framework, the "lidA Cohort Study on work, age, health and work participation" (www.lida-studie.de) investigates long-term effects of work on health and work participation in the ageing work force in Germany. It is the only large study in Germany operationalising the concept of employability in a broad interdisciplinary approach. Employees subject to social security and born in 1959 or in 1965 will be interviewed (CAPI) every 3 years (N[wave 1]=6?585, N[wave 2]=4?244) and their data will be linked (where consented) with social security data covering employment history and with health insurance data. The study design ("Schaie's most efficient design") allows for a tri-factor model that isolates the impact of age, cohort and time. In 2014, the second wave was completed. In the coming years lidA will analyse the association of work, health and work participation, and identify age as well as generation differences. lidA will investigate the complexity of work participation and assess the benefit of broader conceptual and methodological research approaches in the field. PMID:25806501

Ebener, M; Hasselhorn, H M

2015-04-01

3

For the Health-Care Work Force, a Critical Prognosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States faces a looming shortage of many types of health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, dentists, pharmacists, and allied-health and public-health workers. There may also be a shortage of faculty members in the health sciences. The results will be felt acutely within the next 10 years. Colleges and health-science…

Rahn, Daniel W.; Wartman, Steven A.

2007-01-01

4

The youth work force: unique occupational health considerations and challenges.  

PubMed

During the past decade, the characteristics and number of adolescent workers has changed little. Several studies were conducted during this time documenting the patterns, scope, and effect of work among young individuals in the United States. Part-time employment may benefit youth by imparting positive work values, reinforcing the importance of academic skills for future career success, providing a better understanding of the workplace, increasing contact with adults, and building character. Negative aspects of youth employment include threats to completion of developmental tasks and education, injury, toxic exposure, and illness. The enactment of regulations and resulting change in the nature of youth employment has contributed to a substantial decrease in youth-related occupational fatality and injury. However, youth workers continue to suffer fatal and nonfatal occupational injuries with most injuries occurring in the retail industry. Efforts should be made to develop innovative interventions tailored to young workers that focus on surveillance, advocacy, education, and research to decrease workplace injury and illness. PMID:16097103

West, Christine; de Castro, Arnold B; Fitzgerald, Sheila T

2005-07-01

5

Behavioral health in the Department of Defense Patient-Centered Medical Home: history, finance, policy, work force development, and evaluation.  

PubMed

Integrating behavioral health services into the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an important component for meeting the goals of easy access, whole person, coordinated, and integrated care. Unlike most PCMH initiatives, the Department of Defense's (DoD) Military Health System (MHS) launched its PCMH initiative with integrated behavioral health services. This integration facilitates the MHS's goal to meet its strategic imperatives under the "Quadruple Aim" of (1) maximizing readiness, (2) improving the health of the population, (3) enhancing the patient experience of care (including quality, access, and reliability), and (4) responsibly managing per capita cost of care. The MHS experience serves as a guide to other organizations. We discuss the historical underpinnings, funding, policy, and work force development strategies that contributed to integrated behavioral healthcare being a mandated component of the MHS's PCMH. PMID:24073135

Hunter, Christopher L; Goodie, Jeffrey L

2012-09-01

6

Differential exposure and differential vulnerability as counteracting forces linking the psychosocial work environment to socioeconomic health differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIn this article, the link between (1) psychosocial working conditions (job demands, job autonomy, task variation, social support), (2) self-reported health (persistent fatigue, musculoskeletal complaints, emotional well-being) and (3) socioeconomic position (skill levels, occupational status) is explored. The two theoretical pathways linking the psychosocial work environment to socioeconomic differences in health are explored: differential exposure and differential vulnerability. Previously, the

C. Vanroelen; K. Levecque; F. Louckx

2009-01-01

7

[Hygienic aspects of the working conditions assessment and state of health of the workers of the railway departmental security forces].  

PubMed

There were performed a comprehensive hygienic evaluation of the working conditions of employment and analysis of morbidity with temporary disability (MTD) of the workers of the railway departmental security forces. There was proved a significant influence of accumulated period of work on MTD. The professional causality as of the respiratory diseases in shooters and dog handlers, as of diseases of the circulatory system in the administrative and managerial workers has been established. PMID:25051740

Anishchenko, E B; Trankovskaya, L V

2014-01-01

8

Effects of requested, forced and denied shift schedule change on work ability and health of nurses in Europe -Results from the European NEXT-Study  

PubMed Central

Background Previous cross-sectional findings from the European Nurses Early Exit Study (NEXT) show that nurses who were dissatisfied with their work schedule tended to consider leaving the nursing profession. Mediating factors in this decision process may be caused by self-perceived poor work ability and/or health. The aim of this paper is to investigate changes in work ability and general health among nurses in relation to requested, forced and denied change of shift schedule. Methods Longitudinal data from the NEXT Study was used. In total 11,102 nurses from Belgium, Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, France and Italy completed both the ‘basic questionnaire’ (t1) and the ’12 month follow-up questionnaire’ (t2). To examine the time-effect (repeated measures) and the group-effect of five defined groups of nurses on the Work Ability Index (WAI) and general health (SF36), an adjusted 2-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed. Results The nurses who wanted to, but could not change their shifts during the 12 month follow-up had the lowest initial and follow-up scores for WAI (t1: 37.6, t2: 36.6, p <0.001), lowest general health (t1: 63.9, t2: 59.2, p <0.001) and showed the highest decrease in both outcomes. Shift pattern change in line with the nurses’ wishes was associated with improved work ability and to a lesser comparatively low extent with increased decline in health scores. A forced change of shift against the nurses’ will was significantly associated with a deteriorating work ability and health. Conclusions The findings would suggest that nurses’ desire to change their shift patterns may be an indicator for perceived low work ability and/or low health. The results also indicate that fulfilling nurses’ wishes with respect to their shift work pattern may improve their personal resources such as work ability and – to somewhat lesser extent – health. Disregarding nurses’ preferences, however, bears the risk for further resource deterioration. The findings imply that shift schedule organization may constitute a valuable preventive tool to promote nurses’ work ability and – to lesser extent – their perceived health, not least in aging nursing work forces. PMID:24308567

2013-01-01

9

Reduction in Work Force Unclassified Staff Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

Telephone E-mail/URL Policy questions Employee and Labor Relations, Office of Human Resources 614Reduction in Work Force ­ Unclassified Staff 9.15 Office of Human Resources Applies to: Regular by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department for further

Howat, Ian M.

10

Unions and the Contingent Work Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

[Excerpt] Unions seeking to organize the unorganized face increasing numbers of part-time, temporary and leased employees. These contingent workers now make up more than a quarter of the American work force. Of the new work force they are the least organized and perhaps the most difficult to organize. But they are also the group most in need of the protections,

Kate Bronfenbrenner

1988-01-01

11

Shift work, health, the working time regulations and health assessments.  

PubMed

Shift work and night work in particular have been associated with sleep difficulties, general malaise, fatigue, peptic ulceration, ischaemic heart disease, cigarette smoking and adverse pregnancy outcome. The medical conditions previously regarded as making individuals unsuitable for shift work show wide ranging patho-physiological activity and there is no published evidence for any such condition to be regarded an absolute reason to exclude an individual from shift work. The fulfilment of the legal obligations of the Working Time Regulations 1998 is neither prescribed nor constrained in any way. It is advisable therefore to build on existing health procedures where they are in effect. Periodic health questionnaires can offer health professionals an opportunity to detect any disorder likely to be aggravated by shift work or by a combination of shift work, job demands and workplace conditions. A further purpose of the questionnaire is the assessment of ability to undertake shift work duties. However, health questionnaires are neither sensitive nor specific enough to be used to select applicants or employees for shift work, since they do not consistently predict tolerance of shift work or subsequent health problems. Whether employers should offer anything more than a simple questionnaire will depend on the culture of the company and accessibility of health services. Screening programmes affect many people relative to the few who benefit and with existing knowledge, periodic general health examinations performed in asymptomatic subjects have limited predictive or preventive value. PMID:10451593

Nicholson, P J; D'Auria, D A

1999-04-01

12

Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

Gates, Joshua

2014-01-01

13

Gendered work conditions, health, and work outcomes.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study of nonfaculty university employees examined associations among gendered work conditions (e.g., sexism and discrimination), job demands, and employee job satisfaction and health. Organizational responsiveness and social support were examined as effect modifiers. Comparisons were made by gender and by the male-female ratio in each job category. The relationship of gendered conditions of work to outcomes differed on the basis of respondents' sex and the job sex ratio. Although the same predictors were hypothesized for job satisfaction, physical health, and psychological distress, there were some differing results. The strongest correlate of job satisfaction was social support; perceived sexism in the workplace also contributed for both men and women. Organizational factors associated with psychological distress differed between female- and male-dominated jobs. PMID:14700456

Bond, Meg A; Punnett, Laura; Pyle, Jean L; Cazeca, Dianne; Cooperman, Manuela

2004-01-01

14

Employee satisfaction: creating a positive work force.  

PubMed

In the early 1990s, El Camino Hospital (ECH) streamlined its operations in order to remain competitive. In 1992, the hospital's District Board voted to turn the hospital's management over to a nonprofit company and it became an integrated delivery system (IDS). Hospital employees continued to suffer as their work and work schedules changed in ongoing efforts by the new administration to streamline. Finally, in early 1997, the IDS, Camino Healthcare, was dissolved. The director of radiology and radiation oncology services became aware of increasing employee problems, from high turnover rates and increased absenteeism, to morale and productivity issues. Employees also worried about job redesign, re-engineering and a lack of clear direction and expectations from department leadership. The director of the department created a task force to respond to the needs of staff members. With so much anger directed at department leadership, supervisory staff were not included in the task force. The task force worked first to identify rumors and innuendos and followed with a plan to resolve such issues. The second step was to agree to focus on issues that they could change and to let go of those they couldn't. They selected five priority issues or concerns. The group met weekly and made progress by replacing negative talk and attitudes with positive ones. Meanwhile, the director researched employee satisfaction issues so she would be prepared to discuss such issues and concerns with employees. She focused on a common theme, of having a personal mission or goal for one's self. She encouraged staff members to be aware of their own behavior when communicating with others. Although several informal surveys proved there was still much work to be done, there was positive response--a light at the end of the long tunnel. PMID:10180224

Wright, M

1998-01-01

15

Market forces and efficient health care systems.  

PubMed

The "market forces" to which economists ascribe the ability to motivate improvement in quality and efficiency are largely nonexistent in U.S. health care. One thus might ask, "Could market forces be made strong enough to deliver efficient health care systems?" There is some evidence to suggest that the answer is "Yes." This paper offers a short list of some changes that would be needed to create such a health care economy. Continued increases in costs and in the numbers of uninsured people will likely make a universal coverage model based on Medicare a politically popular choice, but such a model would not deliver efficient health care systems because it lacks sufficient incentives for consumers to choose less costly options. PMID:15046128

Enthoven, Alain C

2004-01-01

16

Annual report on contractor work force restructuring, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work force restructuring and community transition activities at all sites. It outlines work force restructuring activity for FY 1997, changing separation patterns, cost savings and separation costs, program assessment, activities to mitigate restructuring impacts, community transition activities, status of displaced workers, lessons learned, and emerging issues in worker and community transition. Work force restructuring and community transition activities for defense nuclear sites are summarized, as are work force restructuring activities at non-defense sites.

NONE

1998-03-01

17

Interstate Migrant Education Task Force: Migrant Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because ill-clothed, sick, or hungry migrant children learn poorly, the Task Force has emphasized the migrant health situation in 1979. Migrant workers have a 33% shorter life expectancy, a 25% higher infant mortality rate, and a 25% higher death rate from tuberculosis and other communicable diseases than the national average. Common among…

Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

18

Mental Health and Hours Worked Among Nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accounting for the endogenous relationship between health and hours worked, the goal of this study was to estimate the effect of mental health on the working hours of nursing professionals. The impact of hours worked on mental health was also investigated. The data was based on the Work Outcomes Research Cost-benefit (WORC) survey conducted in Australia during 2005 and 2006.

Nerina Vecchio; Paul Scuffham

2009-01-01

19

The Multicultural Work Force. Trends and Issues Alerts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

White males represent only 46 percent of the U.S. work force. Within a few years, 75 percent of those entering the labor force will be women and minorities, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The work force is getting smaller as well as changing in nature. To attract and keep the most qualified and productive workers, businesses must make…

Lankard, Bettina A.

20

Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work  

MedlinePLUS

... Holidays Contact CDC-INFO Workplace Safety & Health Topics Industries & Occupations Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work Agriculture Bloodborne Diseases Cancer Construction Ergonomics and Muscle/Bone Disorders Health Care Heart ...

21

Nurses' ratings of their health and professional work environments.  

PubMed

Interactions between nursing work environments and nurses' health are of growing significance, given the aging work force, nursing shortage, and workplace health risks. This study examined relationships among nurses' ratings of health behaviors, health status, and professional work environments. Registered nurses (N = 3,132) from five multi-state settings completed an electronic survey. Participants' general health ratings were good, yet stress levels remained the one consistent predictor of poorer health ratings and work environment ratings in regression models. Additionally, more than half of the participants reported being overweight, only 50% met physical activity standards, more than two thirds reported a history of back or needlestick injuries, and 44% and 62% reported experiencing verbal abuse by colleagues and patients, respectively. Contrary to other studies, professional work environment as measured in this study did not predict nurses' health ratings. Further study of the impact of stress on long-term health outcomes and work force retention, as well as on worksite health strategies, is needed. PMID:20677722

Tucker, Sharon J; Harris, Marcelline R; Pipe, Teri B; Stevens, Susanna R

2010-06-01

22

Putting Robots to Work with Force & Friction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about the concept of pushing, as well as the relationship between force and mass. Students practice measurement skills using pan scales and rulers to make predictions about mass and distance. A LEGO® MINDSTORMS® NXT robot is used to test their hypotheses. By the end of the activity, students have a better understanding of robotics, mass and friction and the concept of predicting.

AMPS GK-12 Program,

23

Industrial Robots Join the Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Robots--powerful, versatile, and easily adapted to new operations--may usher in a new industrial age. Workers throughout the labor force could be affected, as well as the nature of the workplace, skill requirements of jobs, and concomitant shifts in vocational education. (SK)

Martin, Gail M.

1982-01-01

24

Reduction in Work Force Classified Civil Service Staff Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

administrative officers must consult with the Office of Human Resources, Employee and Labor Relations, priorReduction in Work Force ­ Classified Civil Service Staff 9.20 Office of Human Resources Applies to internally by the Health System. Health System employees should contact their human resource department

Howat, Ian M.

25

Honeywell's Working Parents Task Force. Final Report and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication provides a summary of the Honeywell Working Parent Task Force's recommendations on how to solve problems experienced by working parents. The Task Force consisted of three committees: the Employment Practices Committee (EPC); the Parent Education Committee (PEC); and the Child Care Facilities Committee (CCFC). After examining a…

Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

26

The Changing Work Force. Trends and Issues Alerts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Economic pressures, work force diversity, and advances in technology are changing the nature of work and organizational policy and management. A predicted decline in the annual growth in gross national product is expected to trigger a slowdown in the labor force, especially in occupations that employ workers with only a high school education.…

Lankard, Bettina A.

27

The Culture-Work-Health Model and Work Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the role of organizational culture in the etiology of workplace stress through the framework of the Culture-Work- Health model. A review of relevant business and health literature indicates that culture is an important component of work stress and may be a key to creating effective organizational stress interventions. (SM)

Peterson, Michael; Wilson, John F.

2002-01-01

28

Experience proves forced fracture closure works  

SciTech Connect

Forced closure, or perhaps better-named ``reverse gravel packing,`` of fractures immediately following hydraulic fracturing with proppant and gelled fluids is a technique which, with rare exception, can be extremely beneficial to the success of almost every hydraulic fracture treatment. By proper planning of the rig-up to allow immediate flow-back, substantial quantities of polymer and load fluid can be removed while simultaneously negating undesirable proppant settling within fractures in the near wellbore area. Fracture smearing (dilution of proppant into an extending fracture) after shutdown can be negated. And in most cases, proppant production from the formation can be reduced. Discussions in the article explain why Ely and Associates has the confidence to make these claims after extensive hydraulic fracturing experience in many geographical areas.

Ely, J.W. [John Ely and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-01-01

29

United States health professionals in international health work.  

PubMed Central

This article reports results of a survey of 1,257 potential employers of US health professionals overseas, interviews with informants in international health, an analysis of career patterns of a small group of international health workers, and a review of numbers of health professionals trained in schools of public health for international health work. There are approximately 9,000 US health professionals in the international health field. Doctors (1,400), nurses (1,500) and administrators (900) are the largest groups. Church-related agencies (2,200 people), private voluntary agencies (1,700 people), and universities (1,000 people) are the largest employers. PMID:6711716

Baker, T D; Weisman, C; Piwoz, E

1984-01-01

30

[Effects of shift work on health].  

PubMed

20% of employees in industrialized countries are concerned by shift work. Nevertheless, there is very little information in general medical journals about the effects of shift work on health. Shift work can have several major effects on health such as cardiovascular and digestive disorders among others, as demonstrated by several studies in recent decades. Shift work has attracted considerable attention recently when it was declared probable carcinogen by the International Agency for research on cancer. We review the health disorders that may be generated or aggravated by shift work and illustrate the problem by two case studies of occupational medicine and discuss the appropriate attitude to take. PMID:19066146

Ntawuruhunga, Emmanuel; Chouanière, Dominique; Danuser, Brigitta; Praz-Christinaz, Sophie-Maria

2008-11-26

31

Environmental education work force pipeline strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an educational program designed to provide a pool of highly qualified administrative, technical, and managerial graduates that are familiar with the Hanford Site and business operations. The program is designed to provide work experience and mentoring to a culturally diverse student base which enhances affirmative employment goals. Short-term and long-term objectives of the program are outlined in the report, and current objectives are discussed in more detail. Goals to be completed by the year 2003 are aimed at defining the criteria necessary to establish partnerships between schools, community organizations, and human resources departments. Actions to be implemented includes providing instructors and equipment, enhancing skills of local teachers, and establishing collaboration with human resources organizations. Long-term goals of the program are to ensure a constant supply of qualified, trained workers to support industry missions. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Ortega, S.U.; Jackson, E.R.

1992-11-01

32

Occupational Health of Working Women in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is a review of occupational health of working women in China over the past 37 years. Only four papers in connection with the subject of occupational health for working women published before liberation could be found, in which only 543 female workers were surveyed. Since liberation, 317 papers on the subject have been published, Involving 934, 177 female

YL Wang; XH Zhao

1987-01-01

33

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Round ceiling detail, note tension wires working against outward forces on the vertical columns while restoration of collapsed roof takes place. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Mount Clare Passenger Car Shop, Southwest corner of Pratt & Poppleton Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

34

Air Force Web Preventive Health Assessment (AF WEBPHA) mental health screening effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Air Force assesses Active Duty Air Force (ADAF) health annually using the Air Force Web-based Preventative Health Assessment (AF WebPHA). The assessment is based on a self-administered survey used to determine the overall Air Force health and readiness, as well as, the individual health of each airman. Individual survey responses as well as groups of responses generate further

Michael Madrid

2010-01-01

35

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

2011-10-01

36

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

2010-10-01

37

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

2013-10-01

38

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

2014-10-01

39

48 CFR 223.570 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 223.570 Section 223.570 Federal...ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES, OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY, AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Drug-Free Workplace 223.570 Drug-free work...

2012-10-01

40

Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations  

PubMed Central

Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

2014-01-01

41

Diversity in the Work Force. The Highlight Zone: Research @ Work No. 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A literature review was conducted to identify critical work force diversity issues in today's changing workplace and identify ways organizations and career and technical education (CTE) practitioners can increase work force diversity. A broad, all-inclusive definition of diversity was developed that focuses on how diversity affects individuals and…

Wentling, Rose Mary

42

Flextime: A Modified Work Force Scheduling Technique for Selected Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The thesis discusses the advantages and disadvantages of one work force scheduling technique--flextime. The authors were interested in determining if a flextime schedule could be put into effect in a governmental organization such as Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC). The study objectives were to determine the feasibility,…

Kimzey, Reed T.; Prince, Samuel M. O.

43

Social work practice and community mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study of social workers in mental health services reports on practitioners' descriptions of what they do as they perform their occupational roles and compares these descriptions with the social work role appropriate for community mental health practice. Subgroup comparisons are made-between those with the professional degree (MSW) and those without. A reported source of role strain for the group

B. Jeanne Mueller; Bernard J. James

1972-01-01

44

Dielectric elastomer transducers with enhanced force output and work density  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate that the force output and work density of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dielectric elastomer transducers can be significantly enhanced by the addition of high permittivity titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The nanocomposites are capable of maintaining the actuation strain performance of the pure PDMS at relatively low electric fields while increasing the force output and work density due to mechanical reinforcement. A model relating the Maxwell stress to the measured force from the actuator was used to determine the dielectric permittivity at high electric fields thus providing results that can be directly correlated to device performance. This approach toward higher work density materials should enable smaller, lighter, and less intrusive actuator systems ideal for biomedical and robotic devices in particular.

Stoyanov, Hristiyan; Brochu, Paul; Niu, Xiaofan; Della Gaspera, Enrico; Pei, Qibing

2012-06-01

45

Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group is a community of practice that recognizes the interconnections between the health of ecosystems, wildlife, and humans and meets to facilitate the exchange of ideas, data, and research opportunities. Membership includes the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska Sea Life Center, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Shasby, Mark

2009-01-01

46

Force identification of dynamic systems using virtual work principle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the key inverse problems for estimating dynamic forces acting on a structure is to determine the force expansion and the corresponding solving method. This paper presents a moving least square (MLS) method for fitting dynamic forces, which improves the existing traditional methods. The simulation results show that the force expansion order has a tiny effect on the types of forces, which indicates the MLS method's excellent ability for local approximation and noise immunity as well as good fitting function. Then, the differential equation of motion for the system is transformed into an integral equation by using the virtual work principle, which can eliminate the structural acceleration response without introducing the calculation error. Besides, the transformation derives an expression of velocity by integrating by parts, which diminishes the error propagation of the velocity. Hence, the integral equation of motion for the system has a strong constraint to noise with zero mean value. Finally, this paper puts forward an optimization method to solve the equation. The numerical stability can be enhanced as the matrix inversion calculation is avoided. Illustrative examples involving different types of forces demonstrate that the transformation of the differential equation proposed through virtual work principle can eliminate interference efficiently and is robust for dynamic calculation.

Xu, Xun; Ou, Jinping

2015-02-01

47

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT  

E-print Network

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT October 2008 © 2008 The Board of Trustees. Appendix 42 #12;2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Acknowledging the changing landscape of student mental health issues at Stanford and throughout the country, Provost John Etchemendy convened the Student Mental Health and Well

Prinz, Friedrich B.

48

14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

2011-01-01

49

14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

2010-01-01

50

Delivering Alert Messages to Members of a Work Force  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Global Alert Resolution Network (GARNET) is a software system for delivering emergency alerts as well as less-urgent messages to members of the Goddard Space Flight Center work force via an intranet or the Internet, and can be adapted to similar use in other large organizations.

Loftis, Julia; Nickens, Stephanie; Pell, Melissa; Pell, Vince

2008-01-01

51

Spartanburg Technical College 1998 Work Force Development Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1998 Work Force Development Study focuses on Spartanburg Technical College's (STC's) (South Carolina) role in preparing new workers and training/retraining the current workforce. Surveys were mailed to employers in business and industry--the response rate was 10%. In addition, a series of focus groups, including various business, industry,…

Quinley, John W.; Cantrell, Jo Ellen

52

Work Force Diversity as a Special Needs Learner Issue in the American Work Place.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An increasingly diverse work force includes people with special learning needs. When addressing diversity issues, employers should consider accommodations for this population. Special needs educators should broaden their perspectives on training diverse learners for the workplace. (SK)

Brown, James M.

1997-01-01

53

Why do health labour market forces matter?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Human resources for health have been recognized as essential to the development of responsive and effective health systems. Low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve universal health coverage face human resource constraints – whether in the form of health worker shortages, maldistribution of workers or poor worker performance – that seriously undermine their ability to achieve well-functioning health systems. Although much has been written about the human resource crisis in the health sector, labour economic frameworks have seldom been applied to analyse the situation and little is known or understood about the operation of labour markets in low- and middle-income countries. Traditional approaches to addressing human resource constraints have focused on workforce planning: estimating health workforce requirements based on a country’s epidemiological and demographic profile and scaling up education and training capacities to narrow the gap between the “needed” number of health workers and the existing number. However, this approach neglects other important factors that influence human resource capacity, including labour market dynamics and the behavioural responses and preferences of the health workers themselves. This paper describes how labour market analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the factors behind human resource constraints in the health sector and to a more effective design of policies and interventions to address them. The premise is that a better understanding of the impact of health policies on health labour markets, and subsequently on the employment conditions of health workers, would be helpful in identifying an effective strategy towards the progressive attainment of universal health coverage. PMID:24347708

McPake, Barbara; Araújo, Edson Correia; Lemiere, Christophe; El Maghraby, Atef; Cometto, Giorgio

2013-01-01

54

August 16, 2014 mHealth Project Force Asia-Pacific  

E-print Network

August 16, 2014 mHealth Project Force Asia-Pacific Stan Jarzabek Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................................................. 1 Who should join mHealth Project Force?...............................................................................................2 How to join mHealth Project Force

Jarzabek, Stan

55

Human Health Effects, Task Force Assessment, Preliminary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented in this preliminary report is one of seven assessments conducted by a special task force of Project Clean Air, the Human Health Effects Task Force. The reports summarize assessments of the state of knowledge on various air pollution problems, particularly in California, and make tentative recommendations as to what the University of…

Aronow, Wilbert S.; And Others

56

Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives.  

PubMed

For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win-win for productivity and employees' well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today's U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Hammer, Leslie B; Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis

2014-01-01

57

Designing Work, Family & Health Organizational Change Initiatives  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary For decades, leaders and scholars have been advocating change efforts to improve work-life relationships. Yet most initiatives have lacked rigor and not been developed using scientific principles. This has created an evidence gap for employer support of work and personal life as a win–win for productivity and employees’ well-being. This paper examines the approach used by the U.S. Work Family Health Network (WFRN) to develop an innovative workplace intervention to improve employee and family health. The change initiative was designed to reduce organizationally based work-family conflict in two contrasting contexts representative of major segments of today’s U.S. workforce: health care employees and informational technology professionals. The WFRN Intervention (called STAR) had three theoretically based change elements. They were: 1) increase job control over work time and schedule; 2) increase supervisor social support for family and job effectiveness; and 3) improve organizational culture and job design processes to foster results orientation. Seven practical lessons for developing work-life interventions emerged from this groundbreaking endeavor. PMID:24683279

Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.; Moen, Phyllis

2014-01-01

58

Minimum Work Requirements for Admission Academic Department Degree Public Health Related Work Experience  

E-print Network

Public Health Informatics None Public Health Research Methods None Sexuality, Sexual, and ReproductiveMinimum Work Requirements for Admission Academic Department Degree Public Health Related Work _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Environmental Health Sciences M.P.H. None

Grishok, Alla

59

Work, Health, and Family at Older Ages in Japan  

PubMed Central

In this paper, we investigate ways in which the relationship between health and labor force exit at older ages is moderated by family characteristics. Using two waves of data from a national sample of older Japanese men collected 1999 and 2002, we estimate logistic regression models for labor force exit beyond age 63 as a function of health change, family characteristics, and their interactions. We confirm that poor health is strongly associated with labor force exit and find evidence that moderating influences of family context depend upon the level of health. However, results are only partially consistent with hypotheses that the relationship between health and the likelihood of labor force exit should be stronger for (a) those with good health and family incentives to exit the labor force and (b) those with poor health and family incentives to remain in the labor force. PMID:23082037

Raymo, James M.; Liang, Jersey; Kobayashi, Erika; Sugihara, Yoko; Fukaya, Taro

2010-01-01

60

Work activity analysis of Finnish occupational health professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results Employee-oriented tasks accounted for roughly 50% of working hours from all occupational health professionals. The remaining working hours were shared between workplace visits, co-operation with partners, other occupational health care responsibilities and tasks in other health care fields, espe- cially in the health care centres. These working hours varied greatly between the different occupa- tional health professional groups. All

Paula Naumanen; Jyrki Liesivuori

61

Working together for health and human rights.  

PubMed

The right to a standard of living adequate for health and well-being is being denied to vast numbers of people all over the world through increasing disparities in income and in wealth. In the name of economic development, a number of international and national policies have increased the grossly uneven distribution of income, with ever-growing numbers of people living in poverty as well as in increasing depths of poverty. Globalization, crippling levels of external debt, and the 'structural adjustment' policies of international agencies have expanded the numbers and the suffering of people living in poverty and have resulted in the neglect of government-funded social programs, of regulations protecting the environment, and of human development. Access to medical care, an essential element in the protection of health, is difficult for many, including the 44 million people in the United States who lack insurance coverage for the cost of medical care services. Working together for health and human rights also requires promotion of the right to peace. The right to life and health is threatened not only by the existence and active deployment of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, chemical and biological weapons and anti-personnel landmines, but also other weapons. The twentieth century has been the bloodiest in human history, with an estimated 250 wars, more than 110 million people killed, countless people wounded and at the least 50 million refugees. Health workers must work together with people in our communities for the promotion of health and human rights, which, in Sandwell and elsewhere, are inextricably intertwined. PMID:11130630

Sidel, V W

2000-01-01

62

[Health, work and environment at the Brazilian rural].  

PubMed

This manuscript discusses the implications of the productive paradigm changes in health and environment of rural area of Brazil. It analyzes production, economy and demography data, facing social and structural determinants with health and environmental reflexes, revealing a serious panorama that includes: a) environmental impacts associated to large productive chains, such as corn, soy-bean, cotton and sugar cane; b) chemical contamination of diverse environment compartments due to pesticides and fertilizers used in agriculture; c) the use of natural land in the expansion of agriculture and cattle farming activities; and d) the reflexes of these actions on individuals, workers or not, that are more and more forced to deal with extreme vulnerability situations because of the risk of rural work processes. Thus, the present article points that macro-determinants (or driven-forces) tends to configure the health status of Rural Brazil inhabitants which, day after day, face a series of challenges in order to guarantee dignity in their work and quality of life. PMID:20069168

Peres, Frederico

2009-01-01

63

The impact of social inequalities in child health on health visitors' work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Preventive and health promotion work by health visitors ought to reduce social inequalities in child health. However, the increased health and developmental problems among disadvantaged children may constrain health visitors' ability to carry out effective preventive work. This paper measures the impact of socioeconomic inequalities in children's health on the work of health visitors and the amount of preventive

Richard Reading; Christine Allen

64

Work force of India's scheduled caste population: a spatial perspective.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to explore the work force of India's scheduled caste population in a spatial perspective. Findings are based upon data from detailed district-wise maps from data relating to the workers. Peninsular India has a far larger proportion of workers to the total scheduled caste population than northern India. The degree of participation of females trying to earn their living is the most crucial factor in the broad regional differentiation which is then associated with women's social status and autonomy in the society and their freedom from inhibitions to work outside of the home. These factors are deeply rooted in the histories of the two regions and their components. Demographic, economic, and political variables are intermingled with the social and cultural dimensions to impact upon the magnitude and composition of the work force. Further disparities exist within and across macro-regions at meso and micro regional levels which are connected with socioeconomic and demographic specificities of the local/regional situations. PMID:12179048

Gosal, R P

1992-01-01

65

Working conditions and health in hairdressing salons.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to assess the working conditions in hairdressing salons and the influence of work factors on the workers' health. Twenty randomly sampled hairdressing salons in the Helsinki, Finland, metropolitan area were selected for the study. The study was performed during winter 1994-1995; it included a survey of the hairdressing chemicals in use, the measurement of physical and chemical working conditions, and a self-administered questionnaire of the work environment and health of the workers. The air temperature varied between 16-25 degrees C, air velocity 0.02-0.3 m/s, and relative humidity, 18-42 percent. The total dust concentration varied between 66-133 micrograms/m3. The concentration of volatile organic compounds was 84-465 micrograms/m3 and the peaks rose to 25-45 mg/m3. The highest concentration of ammonia detected was 3.5 mg/m3. The long-term concentrations of thioglycolates and persulfates were at their lowest below the detection limit, and at their highest 1.8 micrograms/m3 for thioglycolates and 4.7 micrograms/m3 for persulfates, respectively, and the peaks of persulfates, 30 micrograms/m3. Hairdressing chemicals, awkward work postures, and repetitive movements were the most frequent causes of discomfort and for some had caused a work-related disease. Good general ventilation decreased the health complaints caused by hairdressing chemicals, but caused discomfort as a result of drafts. On average, the physical and chemical working conditions in the hairdressing salons were satisfactory compared with the Finnish criterion for indoor climate. However, the frequent high peak concentrations of chemicals during dyeing, bleaching, permanenting, and aerosol spraying still pose a significant health problem. Although effective general ventilation alleviated the effects of the air pollutants, it could not completely solve the problem. Therefore, local exhaust ventilation is recommended at the mixing places for hairdressing chemicals and wherever they are applied to the hair. According to our results, already increasing the air exchange rate up to 5 to 7 times per hour during the high exposure jobs would improve the situation. PMID:10730135

Leino, T; Kähkönen, E; Saarinen, L; Henriks-Eckerman, M L; Paakkulainen, H

1999-01-01

66

Precarious employment, working hours, work-life conflict and health in hotel work.  

PubMed

Precarious or temporary work is associated with adverse outcomes including low control over working hours, work-life conflict and stress. The rise in precarious employment is most marked in the service sector but little research has been done on its health effects in this sector. This study compares permanent and temporary workers in the hotel industry, where working hours are highly variable. Survey data from 150 workers from eight 3-Star hotels in urban and regional areas around Sydney were analyzed. Forty-five per cent were male and 52 per cent were female. Fifty four per cent were permanent full-time and 46 per cent were temporary workers. The effects of employment status on perceived job security, control over working hours, and work-life conflict are investigated using PLS-Graph 3.0. The effects of control over working hours, on work-life conflict and subsequent health outcomes are also explored. Temporary workers perceived themselves as less in control of their working hours, than permanent workers (? = .27). However, they also reported lower levels of work intensity (? = .25) and working hours (? = .38). The effects of low hours control (? = .20), work intensity (? = .29), and excessive hours (? = .39) on work-life conflict (r² = .50), and subsequent health effects (r² = .30), are illustrated in the final structural equation model. PMID:20643398

McNamara, Maria; Bohle, Philip; Quinlan, Michael

2011-01-01

67

75 FR 47307 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Working Group Preliminary Report and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Working Group Preliminary Report and Recommendations...two internal committees: The 510(k) Working Group and the Task Force on the Utilization...Making. Volume I is entitled ``510(k) Working Group Preliminary Report and...

2010-08-05

68

A Need-focused Approach to Air Force Engine Health Management Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the work that the author has done to develop a structure to help direct engine health management (EHM) research. It discusses the definitions of the relevant EHM terms, outlines the essential elements of an EHM system, deduces the aims of an EHM system through the contributions it can make to the top-level Air Force goals, and uses

R. A. Wade

2005-01-01

69

Masked Symptoms: Mid-Life Women, Health, and Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (1997) reveal that relatively few mid-life women offer ill health as a reason for leaving their job or downshifting to part-time employment, implying that the role of ill health may be inconsequential in effecting changing patterns in mid-life women's labour force activity. In contrast, interviews with 30…

Abramson, Zelda

2007-01-01

70

Working towards a national health information system in Australia.  

PubMed

One of the major administrative dilemmas facing the Australian national health care system is the need to reform practices associated with massive data-information overload. The current system is burdened with paper-based administrative forms, patient record files, referral notes and other manual methods of data organisation. An integrated computer-based information system may be perceived as an attractive solution to such burdens. However, computerisation must not be seen as a panacea with the possibility of exacerbating information overload and accentuating privacy concerns. Recent surveys in Australia [1] and the US [2] indicate a perceived causal link between computers and privacy invasion. Any moves toward a national health information system must counter this perception through macro-level education schemes of affected parties and micro-level mechanisms such as the establishment of hospital privacy officers. Such concerns may be viewed as a subset of the wider privacy debate, and information policy development should address such considerations to develop policies to prevent unauthorized access to personal information and to avoid the extraction and sale of sensitive health data. Conservative in nature and slow to change the health care sector may be forced to adopt more efficient work practices through the increasing proliferation of information technology (IT) in health care delivery and an escalating emphasis upon accountability and efficiency of the public health care dollar. The economic rationalist stance taken by governments in Australia and other nations generally will also force health care workers to adopt and develop more efficient information management practices, health indicators and best practice care methods than presently employed by this sector The benefits of a national health information system are far reaching, particularly in developing a more effective health care system through better identifying and understanding community health care trends and in applying IT to the efficient collection of data for the development of more appropriate performance measures and statistical indicators. A coherent and integrated approach is called for in the design of a national health information system which incorporates the necessary and requisite security features to meet privacy concerns. Protecting information privacy poses complex political, economic, technological, legal and social problems for systems developers and health care providers alike [2]. According to Brannigan [3] there are three components involved in the formulation and implementation of privacy: public policy (What level of privacy does society want?); legal structure (Does the law adequately provide for society's privacy requirements?); and technical (how much privacy can technical tools provide, at what cost, and with what effects on the system?). Examining technical tools alone, it is apparent that the necessary technologies are available in Australia to provide the security of medical records required by public policy. Such tools may include encryption, user and data authentication methods, authorisation schemes and mechanisms for the prevention of data inference. While none of these available measures are infallible, it is suitable for most applications where the encryption mechanism can provide protection for a given length of time. Australia needs to develop a coherent national health information infrastructure policy to ultimately avoid fragmented, duplicated and incompatible systems that rely on different standards and protocols. Such a policy will only work by addressing the key issue of patient privacy within a technological framework. The application of IT to health care systems is a sensitive social experiment affecting many professions including general practitioners, medical administrators, politicians, lawyers, computer specialists, privacy advocates and patients whose records will ultimately reside in the system. (abstract trun PMID:8591519

Bomba, B; Cooper, J; Miller, M

1995-01-01

71

Perinatal mental health: midwives and health visitors working together.  

PubMed

The Healthy Child Programme (HCP) focuses on the care offered to pregnant women and children in the first five years of life. It is delivered by a range of professionals, with the health visitor as lead. Effective delivery of the HCP depends on services for children and families being fully integrated, and partnership working between different agencies on a local level seems to be the key to success. This article focuses on how effective implementation of the HCP facilitates the recognition and care of women with anxiety, mild to moderate depression and other perinatal mental disorders during both the antenatal period and after the birth. PMID:24669519

Halnan, Bridget

2014-03-01

72

School mental health consultation: A clinical social work interventive technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

The provision of mental health consultation services is one of the five essential service components which a community mental health center must provide to its particular catchment area (Stretch, 1967). An examination of social work practice in community mental health settings by Mueller and James (1972) indicated that mental health consultation is frequently a clinical social work responsibility and therefore

Bryan D. Carter

1975-01-01

73

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 252.223-7004 Section 252.223-7004...Clauses 252.223-7004 Drug-free work force. As prescribed in 223.570-2, use the following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) (a) Definitions....

2010-10-01

74

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 252.223-7004 Drug-free work force. As prescribed...following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) ...achieving the objective of a drug-free work force. While this clause...emphasizing high level direction, education, counseling,...

2013-10-01

75

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 252.223-7004 Drug-free work force. As prescribed...following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) ...achieving the objective of a drug-free work force. While this clause...emphasizing high level direction, education, counseling,...

2014-10-01

76

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 252.223-7004 Drug-free work force. As prescribed...following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) ...achieving the objective of a drug-free work force. While this clause...emphasizing high level direction, education, counseling,...

2011-10-01

77

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 252.223-7004 Drug-free work force. As prescribed...following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) ...achieving the objective of a drug-free work force. While this clause...emphasizing high level direction, education, counseling,...

2012-10-01

78

Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1,299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer.

Wolfe, W.H.; Michalek, J.E.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA)); Rahe, A. (QuesTech Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Silva, J. (Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Thomas, W.F.; Lustik, M.B.; Grubbs, W.D.; Roegner, R.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA)); Karrison, T.G. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Williams, D.E. (Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-10-10

79

Mental Health Work Group Summary Report and Proposal  

E-print Network

Mental Health Work Group Summary Report and Proposal September, 2005 The following is a summary report of the work completed by the Mental Health Work Group (MHWG) between September 2003 and September 2005. This report is followed by future recommendations for addressing the mental health needs

Shyy, Wei

80

[The Italian armed forces health service during the Great War].  

PubMed

The Great War had a huge impact on Italian society. The organisation of the armed forces health service faced extreme difficulties due to the extensive loss of life of an almost exclusively terrestrial war. In this context, the role of the medical staff and nursing staff was essential, as the example of the volunteer Red Cross nurses testifies. However, this conflict revealed the need to improve the training of the nursing staff, as was the case in Anglo-Saxon countries. PMID:25069372

De Caro, Walter; Marucci, Anna Rita; Sansoni, Julita

2014-06-01

81

The health sciences librarian in medical education: a vital pathways project task force  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The Medical Education Task Force of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians reviewed current and future roles of health sciences librarians in medical education at the graduate and undergraduate levels and worked with national organizations to integrate library services, education, and staff into the requirements for training medical students and residents. Methods: Standards for medical education accreditation programs were studied, and a literature search was conducted on the topic of the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education. Results: Expectations for library and information services in current standards were documented, and a draft standard prepared. A comprehensive bibliography on the role of the health sciences librarian in medical education was completed, and an analysis of the services provided by health sciences librarians was created. Conclusion: An essential role and responsibility of the health sciences librarian will be to provide the health care professional with the skills needed to access, manage, and use library and information resources effectively. Validation and recognition of the health sciences librarian's contributions to medical education by accrediting agencies will be critical. The opportunity lies in health sciences librarians embracing the diverse roles that can be served in this vital activity, regardless of accrediting agency mandates. PMID:19851492

Schwartz, Diane G.; Blobaum, Paul M.; Shipman, Jean P.; Markwell, Linda Garr; Marshall, Joanne Gard

2009-01-01

82

Work, marriage, lifestyle, and changes in men's physical health.  

PubMed

Using three waves of data for 320 men living in the rural Midwest, this study tested a model which proposed independent effects of work conditions and marital experiences on change in physical health through health behaviors. The findings support the hypothesized model. Both control over work and positive marital interactions reduced the probability of a risky lifestyle in terms of health related behaviors after controlling for family economic status. Risky lifestyle, in turn, was related to poorer self and spouse reported health after controlling for previous health status and family income. The findings underscore the importance of specific work and marital processes for men's physical health. PMID:7563047

Wickrama, K; Conger, R D; Lorenz, F O

1995-04-01

83

Forced migration and child health and mortality in Angola  

PubMed Central

This study investigates the effects of forced migration on child survival and health in Angola. Using survey data collected in Luanda, Angola, in 2004, just two years after the end of that country's prolonged civil war, we compare three groups: migrants who moved primarily due to war, migrants whose moves were not directly related to war, and non-migrants. First, we examine the differences among the three groups in under-five mortality. Using an event-history approach, we find that hazards of child death in any given year were higher in families that experienced war-related migration in the same year or in the previous year, net of other factors. To assess longer-term effects of forced migration, we examine hazards of death of children who were born in Luanda, i.e., after migrants had reached their destinations. We again observe a disadvantage of forced migrants, but this disadvantage is explained by other characteristics. When looking at the place of delivery, number of antenatal consultations, and age-adequate immunization of children born in Luanda, we again detect a disadvantage of forced migrants relative to non-migrants, but now this disadvantage also extends to migrants who came to Luanda for reasons other than war. Finally, no differences across the three groups in child morbidity and related healthcare seeking behavior in the two weeks preceding the survey are found. We interpret these results within the context of the literature on short- and long-term effects of forced migration on child health. PMID:19879027

Agadjanian, Victor

2009-01-01

84

Social Inclusion as an Agenda for Mental Health Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following New Labour's election to office in the UK in 1997, policy initiatives have proliferated relating to mental health. Much of this policy innovation emphasises the social dimensions of mental health and distress, with an emphasis on employment and social inclusion. Paradoxically, this modernization of the mental health agenda comes at a time when mental health social work is struggling

Nick Gould

2006-01-01

85

Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials  

E-print Network

legislative and regulatory frameworks to mitigate the potential health risks of nanomaterials and to help1 Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials 1. Introduction is expected to increase in the future. Health Canada helps protect and promote health by using existing

Carleton University

86

Working with interpreters during international health responses.  

PubMed

Health care providers face multiple difficulties in providing care to a disaster-stricken community. Training, preparation, and a good attitude are important, as is adequate logistical support. An often-ignored issue is the difficulty encountered with language barriers during a response, and how using interpreters affects the quality and impact of the health care provided. This article reviews the use of interpreters and focuses on how they may affect an international health care response. PMID:21685310

Zoraster, Richard M

2011-06-01

87

Towards Critical Social Work Practice in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progressive social work perspectives that draw on both critical theories and postmodern thought, provide highly relevant and appropriate frameworks to inform social work practice in the mental health field. Despite this, the literature overviewed indicates that the majority of social work practice conducted in mental health settings reflects an uncritical embrace of the medical model of psychiatric illness, and therefore

Christine Morley

2003-01-01

88

Depression in the work of British health visitors: Clinical facets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary health care setting has been established as a key venue for identifying and working with depression. Despite this, and the high risk of depression experienced by women in the post-natal period, maternal depression has been little examined in the work of health visitors. This study focuses on clinical facets of this work, including the rate and content of

Michael Sheppard

1996-01-01

89

3 CFR - White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families Presidential Documents Other...White House Task Force on Middle-Class Working Families Memorandum for the Heads of...years, middle-class Americans have been working harder, yet not enjoying...

2010-01-01

90

Living the reality of forced sex work: perspectives from young migrant women sex workers in northern Vietnam.  

PubMed

Young women are often lured or forced into selling sex as a result of migrating from rural to urban areas to find work. In this setting, they are exposed to high-risk situations, which may leave them vulnerable to exploitation. Using interviews with young migrant women currently working as sex workers in northern Vietnam, we recorded the perspectives of their initiation into sex work and life as a sex worker. The study found that high levels of forced sex and sexual exploitation were experienced by the majority of the young women interviewed. The young women describe their entry into sex work, first sexual experience (intercourse), violence, and condom negotiation and use. Although access to health care was available, the young women perceived the stigma attached to sex work as a barrier to receiving health care, and thus, preferred health education and care from peers. Health education programs focusing on peer education and support are essential for protecting and empowering these young women. In addition, policies and programs must work toward effective strategies to protect young migrant women. PMID:15973256

Rushing, Rosanne; Watts, Charlotte; Rushing, Sharon

2005-01-01

91

Forced migration: health and human rights issues among refugee populations.  

PubMed

Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that is manifest in diverse contexts. In this article, we examine the situations that precipitate the movement of large numbers of people across several African countries, producing a unique type of undocumented migrant--the refugee. These refugee movements impact already fragile African health care systems and often involve human rights violations that are of particular concern, such as gender-based violence and child soldiers. We use examples from several countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current research, and our personal international experiences, we provide an overview of forced migration and discuss implications and opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice, and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

Lori, Jody R; Boyle, Joyceen S

2015-01-01

92

NCCN Task Force Report: Bone Health in Cancer Care  

PubMed Central

Bone health and maintenance of bone integrity are important components of comprehensive cancer care in both early and late stages of disease. Risk factors for osteoporosis are increased in patients with cancer, including women with chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure, those treated with aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer, men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, and patients undergoing glucocorticoid therapy. The skeleton is a common site of metastatic cancer recurrence, and skeletal-related events are the cause of significant morbidity. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) convened a multidisciplinary task force on Bone Health in Cancer Care to discuss the progress made in identifying effective screening and therapeutic options for management of treatment-related bone loss; understanding the factors that result in bone metastases; managing skeletal metastases; and evolving strategies to reduce bone recurrences. This report summarizes presentations made at the meeting. PMID:19555589

Gralow, Julie R.; Biermann, J. Sybil; Farooki, Azeez; Fornier, Monica N.; Gagel, Robert F.; Kumar, Rashmi N.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Shields, Andrew; Smith, Matthew R.; Srinivas, Sandy; Van Poznak, Catherine H.

2011-01-01

93

Will Better Access to Health Care Change How Much Older Men Work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The move toward universal health coverage in the United States is likely to impact the labor force deci­sions of older workers, but the size and direction of the effect is unclear. On the one hand, access to affordable insurance that is not tied to an employer may reduce work by encouraging workers to leave a current job, perhaps shifting to

Melissa A. Boyle; Joanna N. Lahey

2010-01-01

94

Farm elders define health as the ability to work.  

PubMed

Thirty percent of America's 2.2 million farms are operated by individuals older than 65 years. This study examined how older farmers define health and determined whether demographic characteristics, farm work, and physical and mental health status predict health definition. Data were collected via telephone and mailed surveys during the baseline wave of data collection in a longitudinal study of family farmers residing in two southern states (n=1,288). Nearly 42% defined health as the "ability to work" compared to a physical health-related definition. Predictors of defining health as the ability to work included being White, performing more farm tasks in the past week, taking prescription medications daily, and having minimal health-related limitations to farm work. Health behaviors are centered on the individual's perception of health. Understanding the defining attributes of health can support better approaches to health care and health promotion, particularly among rural subcultures such as farmers, whose identity is rooted in their work. PMID:22823476

Reed, Deborah B; Rayens, Mary Kay; Conley, Christina K; Westneat, Susan; Adkins, Sarah M

2012-08-01

95

Women's Health. Report of the Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues. Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report identifies a broad spectrum of issues affecting women's health and is divided into four sections: (1) social factors affecting women's health; (2) women's physical health and well-being; (3) health concerns of older women; and (4) issues related to alcohol, drug use and abuse, and the mental health of women. The Public Health Service…

Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

96

Social Work and The Mental Health Team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The contributions of social work to the interdisciplinary team are described, along with opportunities for, and barriers to, effective teamwork.Conclusions: Social work is concerned with the social context and consequences of mental illness on the individual, family and community. Social work serves to connect the treatment team to the broader issues of family welfare, housing, income security, and community

Robert Bland; Noel Renouf

2001-01-01

97

Knowledge and Attitudes of Health Care Providers Working in Primary Health Care Units Concerning Emergency Contraception  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: The aim of the current study was to explore the extent of knowledge health care providers working in primary health care units in Aydin, Turkey, had about emergency contraception (EC), to determine whether they provide EC counseling, and to understand the barriers and misconceptions in this context. Methods: A total of 120 health care professionals working in primary health

Hilmiye Aksu; Mert Kucuk; Banu Karaoz

2010-01-01

98

Depression and Work Performance: The Work and Health Initiative Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Depression, a chronic, episodic condition affecting at least 4.9% of the working age population (Blazer et al.1994), causes\\u000a substantial functional limitation and social role disability (Wells 1985, 1997; Wells et al. 1991). Since Wells et al. (1989)\\u000a first reported on the disabling impact of depression in the 1980s, evidence of its human and economic burdens has continued\\u000a to accumulate (Druss

Debra Lerner; David Adler; Richard C. Hermann; William H. Rogers; Hong Chang; Pamella Thomas; Annabel Greenhill; Katherine Perch

99

SOCIAL WORK RECORDS IN HEALTH AND MENTAL HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of social service departments in sixty-two health and mental health organizations shows that their records are focused on service and outcome rather than on diagnosis and process. This article addresses the implications of these as well as other findings.

Jill Doner Kagle

1982-01-01

100

On-call work and health: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many professions in the fields of engineering, aviation and medicine employ this form of scheduling. However, on-call work has received significantly less research attention than other work patterns such as shift work and overtime hours. This paper reviews the current body of peer-reviewed, published research conducted on the health effects of on-call work The health effects studies done in the

Anne-Marie Nicol; Jackie S Botterill

2004-01-01

101

Work-family conflict as a mediator of the work stress - mental health relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between work stressors and mental health outcomes has been demonstrated in a whole range of work stress models and studies. But less has been written about factors outside the work setting that might predict or moderate the relationship between work stressors and strain. In this exploratory study, we suggest a model linking work stressors and \\

Steven Poelmans

2001-01-01

102

The Implicit Contract: Implications for Health Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifying common patient dynamics is useful for developing social work practice sensitivity in health social work. This article draws on findings from a study of women who terminated desired pregnancies because of fetal anomalies and identifies dynamics that may be applicable to many health settings. Data suggest that women have expectations…

McCoyd, Judith L. M.

2010-01-01

103

Making competition in health care work.  

PubMed

Health care reform in the United States is on a collision course with economic reality. Most proposals focus on measures that will produce one-time cost savings by eliminating waste and inefficiency. But the right question to ask is how to achieve dramatic and sustained cost reductions over time. What will it take to foster entirely new approaches to disease prevention and treatment, whole new ways to deliver services, and more cost-effective facilities? The answer lies in the powerful lessons business has learned over the past two decades about the imperatives of competition. In industry after industry, the underlying dynamic is the same: competition compels companies to deliver constantly increasing value to customers. The fundamental driver of this continuous quality improvement and cost reduction is innovation. Without incentives to sustain innovation in health care, short-term cost savings will soon be overwhelmed by the desire to widen access, the growing health needs of an aging population, and the unwillingness of Americans to settle for anything less than the best treatments available. The misguided assumption underlying much of the debate about health care is that technology is the enemy. By assuming that technology drives up costs, reformers neglect the central importance of innovation or, worse yet, attempt to slow its pace. In fact, innovation, driven by rigorous competition, is the key to successful reform. PMID:10135458

Teisberg, E O; Porter, M E; Brown, G B

1994-01-01

104

Social work and Koranic mental health healers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The healing activities of six Arab Muslim Koranic healers working in the Negev desert, West Bank and the Gaza Strip are analysed with respect to healer characteristics, the process of becoming a healer, and the stages of treating mental illness, including pre-diagnosis, diagnosis, and treatment. Prospects are considered for mutual integration, observation, and dissemination between social work and Koranic healing.

Alean Al-Krenawi; John R. Graham

1999-01-01

105

Working psychotherapeutically in a student health setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The background context to a particular experience of brief psychotherapy in depth with students is described. Particular stress is given to work and examinations problems in terms of sex and gender difficulties and inhibitions. Issues of envy, enviability and problems of jealousy are found to be a frequent focus for work, not only on study difficulties but relationship problems arising

G. Wooster

1986-01-01

106

Shift work and employee fatigue: implications for occupational health nursing.  

PubMed

Long work hours and irregular shifts are part of the nation's 24-hour society and contribute to employee fatigue. Factors affecting employee fatigue are circadian rhythm, sleep quality and quantity, individual health, the environment, and work tasks. Employee fatigue contributes to accidents and injuries, and affects occupational performance, safety, and health. These findings should be used by occupational health nurses to address fatigue management and develop comprehensive fatigue management programs. PMID:24971821

Yumang-Ross, Doreen J; Burns, Candace

2014-06-01

107

Invest in Children Today for a Work Force Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To confront the growing proportion of disadvantaged children amidst the shrinking pool of future workers, Jule Sugarman (Washington State Secretary of Social and Health Services) has proposed a Children's Trust to fund existing and new programs for children. The program would be funded by a .3 percent payroll tax for both employers and employees.…

Penning, Nick

1989-01-01

108

Blueprint for Business. Reaching a New Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to help U.S. businesses successfully hire and retain individuals moving from welfare to work. Section 1 discusses the different circumstances created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 and how those changes affect business. Section 2 reviews bottom-line benefits realized by…

Hogan, Lyn A.; Erden, James Van; Mower, Eleanor; Patel, Apurva; Mitchell, Steve

109

The Prediction of the Work of Friction Force on the Arbitrary Path  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we have calculated the work of friction force on the arbitrary path. In our method didn't use from energy conservative conceptions any way. The distinction of this procedure is that at least do decrease measurement on the path once. Thus we can forecast the amount of work of friction force without information about speed of…

Matehkolaee, Mehdi Jafari; Majidian, Kourosh

2013-01-01

110

Stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services perceived by Air Force nursing personnel.  

PubMed

We investigated perceptions of stigma and barriers associated with accessing mental health services among active component U.S. Air Force officer and enlisted nursing personnel (N = 211). The Britt and Hoge et al Stigma scale and Hoge et al Barriers to Care scale were administered via an anonymous, online survey. Stigma items pertained to concerns that might affect decisions to seek mental health treatment. Most of the sample agreed with the items "Members of my unit might have less confidence in me" and "My unit leadership might treat me differently." Approximately 20% to 46% agreed with the other four stigma items. Officer nursing personnel were significantly more likely than enlisted to agree that accessing mental health services would be embarrassing, harm their career, or cause leaders to blame them for the problem (p ? 0.03 for each comparison). Getting time off from work for treatment and scheduling appointments were perceived as barriers by 41% and 21% of respondents, respectively. We conclude that proportions of Air Force nursing personnel reporting concerns about potential stigmatizing consequences of seeking mental health care are substantial and similar to ranges previously reported by military service members screening positive for mental health problems after deployment. PMID:25373066

Hernandez, Stephen H A; Bedrick, Edward J; Parshall, Mark B

2014-11-01

111

The aging work force--helping employees navigate midlife.  

PubMed

The baby-boom generation is aging and workplace demographics are changing. Employees in this age group are now middle-aged. Occupational health nurses are in a unique position to guide these individuals through decisions that can affect the years ahead. Individuals in midlife may experience both physical and psychological changes, including changing physical appearance, decreased stamina, loss of family or friends, and altered vision. In the workplace, annual assessments can include evaluations to address normal changes, personal expectations, and needed support, counseling, or referrals. Middle-aged men and women are at a predictable turning point in life that offers an opportunity for growth. Education in the workplace can assist these individuals as they adjust to changes in relationships, make health care decisions, and plan for retirement. PMID:17472132

Leggett, Diane

2007-04-01

112

[Health education: team work at school].  

PubMed

In this field, team work is invaluable, as the relevant frame for both content and method to be permanently readjusted to various levels imposed by the specific objectives. The better the members of this team are integrated into the educational system, as straff members of a service, the deeper the impact of the programme. PMID:595905

Ducommun, S; Hazeghi, P

1977-11-01

113

Demanding work schedules and mental health in nursing assistants working in nursing homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing home assistants have physically and emotionally challenging jobs, and they often work demanding schedules in order to provide 24-h care. While the physical effects of demanding work schedules have been studied, little is known about the impact on mental health. This study explored the relationship between demanding scheduling variables and mental health indicators of depression, anxiety and somatization. A

Jeanne Geiger-brown; Carles Muntaner; Jane Lipscomb; Alison Trinkoff

2004-01-01

114

After the Baby: Work-Family Conflict and Working Mothers' Psychological Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines work and family characteristics and depressive symptomatology among over 700 working mothers of infants. Working mothers in poorer quality jobs, as well as working mothers who were single or whose infant's health was poorer than that of other infants, reported greater depressive symptomatology. The effect of job quality on…

Marshall, Nancy L.; Tracy, Allison J.

2009-01-01

115

Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5-year  

E-print Network

Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5. Marianna Virtanen Finnish Institute of Occupational Health / Work and Mental Health Team Topeliuksenkatu 41 working hours on mental health. Method. We examined the association between long working hours and onset

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

Armed Forces VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Armed Services VIEW (Vital Information for Education and Work) is described as a cooperative program with the Department of Defense which (1) introduces career opportunities and training available through volunteer service enlistment, (2) will be provided to senior high schools at no cost, and (3) presents materials in both printed and microfilm…

Cox, Walter H.; Zerface, W. A., Ed.

117

Enhancing interprofessional education: integrating public health and social work perspectives.  

PubMed

National stakeholders in health system improvement and patient safety including accreditation bodies have requested health professional educational programs to include multiple interprofessional experiences through didactic and experiential opportunities. Clinical and population health faculty at the University of South Carolina redesigned and expanded an introductory interprofessional course to include more than 500 students from public health, social work, medicine, pharmacy, and nursing. Students participated in 3 live class meetings and completed required online coursework to explore concepts related to social determinants of health and health disparities, health system improvement, patient safety, cultural competency, and ethics to address interprofessional education core competencies. Course modifications and expanded student enrollment improved understanding of key health concepts and appreciation of interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25706002

Addy, Cheryl L; Browne, Teri; Blake, Elizabeth W; Bailey, Jennifer

2015-03-01

118

Changing Work, Changing Health: Can Real Work-Time Flexibility Promote Health Behaviors and Well-Being?  

PubMed Central

This article investigates a change in the structuring of work time, using a natural experiment to test whether participation in a corporate initiative (Results Only Work Environment; ROWE) predicts corresponding changes in health-related outcomes. Drawing on job strain and stress process models, we theorize greater schedule control and reduced work-family conflict as key mechanisms linking this initiative with health outcomes. Longitudinal survey data from 659 employees at a corporate headquarters shows that ROWE predicts changes in health-related behaviors, including almost an extra hour of sleep on work nights. Increasing employees’ schedule control and reducing their work-family conflict are key mechanisms linking the ROWE innovation with changes in employees’ health behaviors; they also predict changes in well-being measures, providing indirect links between ROWE and well-being. This study demonstrates that organizational changes in the structuring of time can promote employee wellness, particularly in terms of prevention behaviors. PMID:22144731

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Tranby, Eric; Huang, Qinlei

2012-01-01

119

Metaanalysis of Research on Social Work Practice in Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents findings of metaanalysis of research on effectiveness of social work practice in mental health, including practice in outpatient settings and analysis of studies evaluating interventions for chronically mentally ill. Discusses practice and research implications. (Author/ABL)

Videka-Sherman, Lynn

1988-01-01

120

Conducting organizational-level occupational health interventions: What works?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in how organizational-level occupational health interventions aimed at improving psychosocial working conditions and employee health and well-being may be planned, implemented and evaluated. It has been claimed that such interventions have the best chance of achieving a significant impact if they follow an intervention process that is structured and also includes

Karina Nielsen; Raymond Randall; Ann-Louise Holten; Eusebio Rial González

2010-01-01

121

Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

2004-01-01

122

Where do students in the health professions want to work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. While a number of schemes have been developed to improve recruitment to and retention of the rural health workforce, they will be effective only if appropriately targeted. This study examines the factors that most encourage students attending rural clinical placements to work in rural Australia, and the

Deborah Schofield; Susan Fletcher; Jeffery Fuller; Hudson Birden; Sue Page

2009-01-01

123

Community Mental Health Ideology Scale: Social work norms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study reports mean scores obtained by two groups of professionals deeply involved in the community mental health movement on the Community Mental Health Ideology Scale. Professional social workers and social work graduate students were not included in the scale makers original criterion group. The high mean scores obtained by these groups led the authors to the conclusion that

Nolan E. Penn; Frank Baker; Herbert C. Schulberg

1976-01-01

124

Incorporating Integrative Health Services in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than one third of Americans practice complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Social workers continue to provide most first-line health, mental health, and psychological referral and direct practice services in the United States, despite a lack of systematic education and training opportunities in CAM. Schools of social work are…

Gant, Larry; Benn, Rita; Gioia, Deborah; Seabury, Brett

2009-01-01

125

[Work and health of comprehensive school teachers nowadays].  

PubMed

The authors analyzed occupaitional and non-occupational psycho-social factors for comprehensive school teachers, evaluated their health state according to self-estimation and to thorough medical examinations conducted in prophylactic examinations. Findings are that the major working hazard for the teachers is work intensity: about 80% of the teachers consider the work physically exhausting and nearly 90% assume the work exhausting morally. High prevalence of general non-infectious diseases and health state complaints necessitates regular periodic medical examinations for teachers. PMID:20734855

Stepanov, E G; Fasikov, R M; Didenko, N A; Akimova, V S; IshmukhametovI, I B

2010-01-01

126

Extrinsic Motivation as Correlates of Work Attitude of the Nigerian Police Force: Implications for Counselling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined Extrinsic motivation as correlates of work attitude of the Nigeria Police Force and its implications for counselling. 300 Police personnel were selected by random sampling technique from six departments that make up police force Headquarters, Abuja. The personnel were selected from each department using simple sampling…

Igun, Sylvester Nosakhare

2008-01-01

127

Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

2008-01-01

128

Developing Sustainable Institutions and Organisations: the work of the FIG Task Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

The FIG Task Force on Institutional and Organisational Development has taken forward a programme of work to assess the particular challenges to building organisational capacity. The Task Force developed, tested and refined a self-assessment questionnaire to determine capacity at system, organisation and individual levels; this was made available to and completed by professionals from many countries. In reviewing the responses

Iain GREENWAY; John PARKER; Richard WONNACOTT; Santiago BORRERO; Spike BOYDELL; Stig ENEMARK

129

Mental Health Characteristics of Social Work Students: Implications for Social Work Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

No studies have examined to date the mental health and substance use characteristics of social work students. Therefore, this study was undertaken to describe and identify these characteristics among a sample of social work students located in a Florida school of social work. Results indicated that approximately 34% of the participants reported high levels of depressive symptoms, 12% had a

E. Gail Horton; Naelys Diaz; Diane Green

2009-01-01

130

Gender, work roles and psychosocial work characteristics as determinants of health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to identify gender similarities and differences in psychosocial work characteristics for those in and out of paid employment, to inform research on possible health-related effects. Specifically five questions are addressed: do women report poorer work characteristics than men; are gender differences related to specific characteristics; do work characteristics differ between full- and part-time women workers and between

Sharon Matthews; Clyde Hertzman; Aleck Ostry; Chris Power

1998-01-01

131

A Descriptive Study of Social Work Practice in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although mental health has become the predominant area of social work practice, there is a lack of concrete information regarding what social workers actually provide and to whom. This situation becomes more critical as social work competes for clients and concentrates on improving the profession's image. The data used in this study were obtained from questionnaire responses from a sample

Travis J. Courville; Kathryn F. Kennedy

1986-01-01

132

Working-Class Jobs and New Parents' Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little research has explored linkages between work conditions and mental health in working-class employed parents. The current study aims to address this gap, employing hierarchical linear modeling techniques to examine how levels of and changes in job autonomy, job urgency, supervisor support, and coworker support predicted parents' depressive…

Perry-Jenkins, Maureen; Smith, JuliAnna Z.; Goldberg, Abbie E.; Logan, Jade

2011-01-01

133

Barriers to Partnership Working in Public Health: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background Public health provision in England is undergoing dramatic changes. Currently established partnerships are thus likely to be significantly disrupted by the radical reforms outlined in the Public Health White Paper. We therefore explored the process of partnership working in public health, in order to better understand the potential opportunities and threats associated with the proposed changes. Methodology/Principal Findings 70 participants took part in an in-depth qualitative study involving 40 semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Participants were senior and middle grade public health decision makers working in Primary Care Trusts, Local Authorities, Department of Health, academia, General Practice and Hospital Trusts and the third sector in England. Despite mature arrangements for partnership working in many areas, and much support for joint working in principle, many important barriers exist. These include cultural issues such as a lack of shared values and language, the inherent complexity of intersectoral collaboration for public health, and macro issues including political and resource constraints. There is particular uncertainty and anxiety about the future of joint working relating to the availability and distribution of scarce and diminishing financial resources. There is also the concern that existing effective collaborative networks may be completely disrupted as the proposed changes unfold. The extent to which the proposed reforms might mitigate or potentiate these issues remains unclear. However the threats currently remain more salient than opportunities. Conclusions The current re-organisation of public health offers real opportunity to address some of the barriers to partnership working identified in this study. However, significant threats exist. These include the breakup of established networks, and the risk of cost cutting on effective public health interventions. PMID:22238619

Taylor-Robinson, David Carlton; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Orton, Lois; Moonan, May; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

2012-01-01

134

e-Labs and Work Objects: Towards Digital Health Economies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optimal provision of healthcare and public health services requires the synthesis of evidence from multiple disciplines. It is necessary to understand the genetic, environmental, behavioural and social determinants of disease and health-related states; to balance the effectiveness of interventions with their costs; to ensure the maximum safety and acceptability of interventions; and to provide fair access to care services for given populations. Ever expanding databases of knowledge and local health information, and the ability to employ computationally expensive methods, promises much for decisions to be both supported by best evidence and locally relevant. This promise will, however, not be realised without providing health professionals with the tools to make sense of this information rich environment and to collaborate across disciplines. We propose, as a solution to this problem, the e-Lab and Work Objects model as a sense-making platform for digital health economies - bringing together data, methods and people for timely health intelligence.

Ainsworth, John D.; Buchan, Iain E.

135

Job Tenure Declines as Work Force Changes. Special Labor Force Report 235.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report consists of an article from the December 1979 issues of the Monthly Labor Review, an explanatory note, and supplementary tables. The article considers these factors which determine the length of time a person works continuously for the same employer: age and sex, marital status of women, race, and occupation and industry. It is shown…

Sekscenski, Edward S.

1980-01-01

136

Health consequences of shift work and implications for structural design.  

PubMed

The objective of the study was to perform a literature review on the health consequences of working rotating shifts and implications for structural design. A literature search was performed in June 2012 and a selection of the most relevant peer-review articles was included in the present review. Shift workers are more likely to suffer from a circadian sleep disorder characterized by sleepiness and insomnia. Shift work is associated with decreased productivity, impaired safety, diminished quality of life and adverse effects on health. Circadian disruption resulting from rotating shift work has also been associated with increased risk for metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. This article summarizes the known health effects of shift work and discusses how light can be used as a countermeasure to minimize circadian disruption at night while maintaining alertness. In the context of the lighted environment, implications for the design of newborn intensive care units are also discussed. PMID:23536025

Figueiro, M G; White, R D

2013-04-01

137

Work fluctuations for a Brownian particle driven by a correlated external random force.  

PubMed

We have considered the underdamped motion of a Brownian particle in the presence of a correlated external random force. The force is modeled by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. We investigate the fluctuations of the work done by the external force on the Brownian particle in a given time interval in the steady state. We calculate the large deviation functions as well as the complete asymptotic form of the probability density function of the performed work. We also discuss the symmetry properties of the large deviation functions for this system. Finally we perform numerical simulations and they are in a very good agreement with the analytic results. PMID:25493749

Pal, Arnab; Sabhapandit, Sanjib

2014-11-01

138

Health and Nutritional Status of Working and Non-Working Mothers in Poverty Groups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to examine the health and nutritional status of low-income women in Upstate New York and to identify problems that interfere with their employment. Questionnaires on health and work, complete medical and employment histories, physical examination, laboratory tests, dental examination and diet recalls were obtained for 469…

Roe, Daphne A.; Eickwort, Kathleen R.

139

Work-Related Violence, Lifestyle, and Health among Special Education Teachers Working in Finnish Basic Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Studies have reported higher levels of absenteeism due to illness among special education teachers compared to other teachers, but it is not known which factors might contribute to this difference. We examined whether health, health behaviors, and exposure to violence at work differed between special education and general education…

Ervasti, Jenni; Kivimaki, Mika; Pentti, Jaana; Salmi, Venla; Suominen, Sakari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna

2012-01-01

140

Ib: MOTION 1-D: WORK, POTENTIALS & FORCES 1st year CLASSICAL MECHANICS MT06 PLR from RCED  

E-print Network

example, a mass m subject to a linear restoring force (shown schemat- ically in Fig. 1a, F(x) = -kx, where by a simple function of position only. Suppose one has a mass m moving under the influence of force of the potential function to work? Work is defined as forceÃ?distance, and since the force may not be constant one

Read, Peter L.

141

Process Evaluation of an Integrated Health Promotion/Occupational Health Model in WellWorks-2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Disparities in chronic disease risk by occupation call for new approaches to health promotion. WellWorks-2 was a randomized, controlled study comparing the effectiveness of a health promotion/occupational health program (HP/OHS) with a standard intervention (HP). Interventions in both studies were based on the same theoretical foundations. Results…

Hunt, Mary Kay; Lederman, Ruth; Stoddard, Anne M.; LaMontagne, Anthony D.; McLellan, Deborah; Combe, Candace; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Glorian

2005-01-01

142

Health visitors' child protection work: exploratory study of risk assessment.  

PubMed

This paper outlines a small-scale research project that utilised a modified grounded theory approach in order to explore the role of risk assessment in health visitors' child protection work. A review of the literature investigated the role of risk assessment in current health and social care policy. Structured focus group and interview work enabled the opinions of health visitors to be collected about the factors that enable them to identify, analyse and manage issues of risk to children.Transcripts were analysed with reference to the literature review. The health visitors considered aspects of their relationship with clients to influence the identification, analysis and management of risk to children. The results suggest that health visitors are not convinced that the Common Assessment Framework or health assessment tools assist in their management of risk to children. The findings of this study are based on data collected from a small sample of health visitors, and conclusions are therefore tentative, but aim to contribute to wider professional debate about risk management in child protection work. PMID:19480117

Selbie, Jean

2009-05-01

143

The Role of Gender and Work Experience on Career and Work Force Diversity Expectations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graduating business students at a large public university participated in a study designed to gain insight into the effects of gender and work experience on salary expectations, career characteristics, job search methods and intensity, internship participation, expected hours required and willingness to work, and sensitivity to gender issues. The study reveals that students with more work experience while in college

Lori J. Sallop; Susan L. Kirby

2007-01-01

144

New Polish occupational health and safety regulations for underwater works.  

PubMed

In Poland, the new regulation of the Ministry of Health on Occupational Health for Underwater Works (dated 2007) pursuant to the Act on Underwater Works (dated 2003) has just been published. It is dedicated for commercial, non-military purposes. It defines health requirements for commercial divers and candidates for divers, medical assessment guide with a list of specific medical tests done on initial and periodical medical examination in order for a diver or a candidate for diver to be recognised fit for work, health surveillance during diving operations, compression and decompression procedures, list of content for medical equipment to be present at any diving place, formal qualifications for physicians conducting medical assessment of divers, requirements for certifications confirming the medical status of divers and candidates for divers. Decompression tables cover divings up to 120 meters of depth using compressed air, oxygen, nitrox and heliox as breathing mixtures. There are also decompression tables for repetitive diving, altitude diving and diving in the high-density waters (mud diving). It this paper, general description of health requirements for divers, as well as decompression tables that are included in the new Regulation on Occupational Health for Underwater Works are presented. PMID:18350984

Kot, Jacek; Si?ko, Zdzis?aw

2007-01-01

145

Gender, Work, and Health for Trans Health Providers: A Focus on Transmen  

PubMed Central

Well-documented health research points to trans people's vulnerability to health inequities that are linked to deeply embedded structural and social determinants of health. Gender and work, as social determinants of health for trans people, both shape and are shaped by multiple factors such as support networks, social environments, income and social status, shelter, and personal health practices. There is a gap in the nursing literature in regards to research on work and health for diverse trans people and a virtual silence on the particular issues of trans-identified health providers. This qualitative study used comparative life history methodology and purposeful sampling to examine links among work, career, and health for transmen who are health providers. Semistructured interviews were completed with four Canadian transmen involved in health care professional and/or practice contexts with diverse professions, age, work, and transitioning experiences. Critical gender analysis showed that unique and gender-related critical events and influences shape continuities and discontinuities in their careerlives. This strength-based approach foregrounds how resilience and growth emerged through participants' articulation with everyday gender dynamics. These findings have implications for nursing research, education, and practice that include an understanding of how trans providers “do transgender work” and supporting them in that process. PMID:23316387

MacDonnell, Judith A.; Grigorovich, Alisa

2012-01-01

146

Gender, work, and health for trans health providers: a focus on transmen.  

PubMed

Well-documented health research points to trans people's vulnerability to health inequities that are linked to deeply embedded structural and social determinants of health. Gender and work, as social determinants of health for trans people, both shape and are shaped by multiple factors such as support networks, social environments, income and social status, shelter, and personal health practices. There is a gap in the nursing literature in regards to research on work and health for diverse trans people and a virtual silence on the particular issues of trans-identified health providers. This qualitative study used comparative life history methodology and purposeful sampling to examine links among work, career, and health for transmen who are health providers. Semistructured interviews were completed with four Canadian transmen involved in health care professional and/or practice contexts with diverse professions, age, work, and transitioning experiences. Critical gender analysis showed that unique and gender-related critical events and influences shape continuities and discontinuities in their careerlives. This strength-based approach foregrounds how resilience and growth emerged through participants' articulation with everyday gender dynamics. These findings have implications for nursing research, education, and practice that include an understanding of how trans providers "do transgender work" and supporting them in that process. PMID:23316387

Macdonnell, Judith A; Grigorovich, Alisa

2012-01-01

147

Work organization and the health of bank employees.  

PubMed

The Brazilian banking sector has undergone an intense restructuring process and taken a leading position in the incorporation of new technologies and organizational innovations. Computerization in the industry, in association with forms of work organization, has resulted in changes that reflect on the workers' health. Based on the theoretical and methodological frameworks of historical and dialectical materialism, this qualitative study investigates the work conditions of bank employees in order to identify the extent to which changes in work organization interfere with these workers' health. Data were collected through interviews held with 11 bank employees. In addition to physical sickening due to occupational diseases directly related to work intensification, the results also show an increased incidence of mental suffering and a feeling of loss of professional identity. Work-related frustration, instability and concerns related to psychological pressure resulting from the need to achieve goals predominated in the reports. PMID:22699722

Silva, Juliana Lemos; Navarro, Vera Lucia

2012-01-01

148

Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries  

PubMed Central

Background Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 408 Nepalese migrants who had at least one period of work experience of at least six months in any of three Gulf countries: Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates (UAE). Face to face questionnaire interviews were conducted applying a convenience technique to select the study participants. Results Nepalese migrants in these Gulf countries were generally young men between 26-35 years of age. Unskilled construction jobs including labourer, scaffolder, plumber and carpenter were the most common jobs. Health problems were widespread and one quarter of study participants reported experiencing injuries or accidents at work within the last 12 months. The rates of health problems and accidents reported were very similar in the three countries. Only one third of the respondents were provided with insurance for health services by their employer. Lack of leave for illness, cost and fear of losing their job were the barriers to accessing health care services. The study found that construction and agricultural workers were more likely to experience accidents at their workplace and health problems than other workers. Conclusion The findings suggest important messages for the migration policy makers in Nepal. There is a lack of adequate information for the migrants making them aware of their health risks and rights in relation to health services in the destination countries and we suggest that the government of Nepal should be responsible for providing this information. Employers should provide orientation on possible health risks and appropriate training for preventive measures and all necessary access to health care services to all their workers. PMID:21443802

2011-01-01

149

Predictors of return to work in cancer survivors in the royal air force.  

PubMed

Purpose Return to work (RTW) is beneficial for cancer survivors, employers and society. However, little is known about predictors of RTW in the military environment. Methods A cohort of 194 Royal Air Force (RAF) personnel aged 18-58 who survived primary cancer treatment between 2001 and 2011 were followed up for 18 months. Information was obtained from occupational health and primary care records. Personal, occupational and clinical predictors of RTW were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression. Results The median sickness absence before RTW was 107 days. Six months after diagnosis 54 % of participants had RTW, and reached 80 % by 12 months. Time taken to RTW was predicted by age at diagnosis, rank, trade group, pre-diagnosis sickness absence, site of cancer, treatment modality, and prognosis. RTW at 18 months were predicted by higher rank (HR = 2.31; 95 % CI 1.46-3.65), and having melanoma (9.75; 4.97-19.13). Those receiving chemotherapy were significantly less likely to have RTW compared to other treatment modalities (0.18; 0.10-0.32). Conclusions Rank, cancer diagnostic group, and treatment modality are the most important predictors of RTW in cancer survivors in the RAF. These predictors can be used to inform rehabilitation programmes and decisions on RTW. PMID:25038986

Murray, Kenneth; Lam, Kin Bong Hubert; McLoughlin, David C; Sadhra, Steven S

2015-03-01

150

Retiree Health Insurance and the Labor Force Behavior of Older Men in the 1990s  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimate the impact of employer-provided retiree health insurance (EPRHI) on the labor force transitions of men aged 51 to 62. Data from the Health and Retirement Survey provide detailed and accurate measures of retiree health insurance. Availability of EPRHI increases the rate of exit from employment by two percentage points per year if the individual shares the cost of

David M. Blau; Donna B. Gilleskie

2001-01-01

151

The Role of Market Forces in the Delivery of Health Care: Issues for Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This edition of the Role of Market Forces program note suggests empirical and descriptive analyses required to complement new areas of health policy emphasis and direction. Eight areas and related questions involving health economics are outlined: (1) rural health care; (2) medical malpractice and insurance; (3) supply, productivity, and…

National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

152

Changing Work and Work-Family Conflict: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Network*  

PubMed

Schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life are work resources that may help employees manage the work-family interface. However, existing data and designs have made it difficult to conclusively identify the effects of these work resources. This analysis utilizes a group-randomized trial in which some units in an information technology workplace were randomly assigned to participate in an initiative, called STAR, that targeted work practices, interactions, and expectations by (a) training supervisors on the value of demonstrating support for employees' personal lives and (b) prompting employees to reconsider when and where they work. We find statistically significant, though modest, improvements in employees' work-family conflict and family time adequacy and larger changes in schedule control and supervisor support for family and personal life. We find no evidence that this intervention increased work hours or perceived job demands, as might have happened with increased permeability of work across time and space. Subgroup analyses suggest the intervention brings greater benefits to employees more vulnerable to work-family conflict. This study advances our understanding of the impact of social structures on individual lives by investigating deliberate organizational changes and their effects on work resources and the work-family interface with a rigorous design. PMID:25349460

Kelly, Erin L; Moen, Phyllis; Oakes, J Michael; Fan, Wen; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Davis, Kelly D; Hammer, Leslie; Kossek, Ellen; King, Rosalind Berkowitz; Hanson, Ginger; Mierzwa, Frank; Casper, Lynne

2014-06-01

153

Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)  

PubMed Central

Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only. PMID:16135246

2005-01-01

154

Intelligent compliant force\\/motion control of nonholonomic mobile manipulator working on the nonrigid surface  

Microsoft Academic Search

The task under consideration is to control a mobile manipulator for the class of nonrigid constrained motion. The working\\u000a surface is deformable. The geometric and physical model of the surface is unknown and all contact force is nonlinear and difficult\\u000a to model. To accomplish a task of this kind, we propose a force\\/motion fuzzy controller based on the philosophy of

Zhijun Li; Jiangong Gu; Aiguo Ming; Chunquan Xu; Makoto Shimojo

2006-01-01

155

Psychosocial working conditions and the utilization of health care services  

PubMed Central

Background While there is considerable theoretical and empirical evidence on how job stress affects physical and mental health, few studies have examined the association between job related stress and health care utilization. Using data from the Canadian National Population Health Survey from 2000 to 2008, this paper examines the association between stressful working conditions, as measured by the job strain model, and the utilization of health care services. Methods A zero inflated negative binomial regression is used to examine the excess health care utilization due to job strain. Separate regressions are estimated for both males and females since studies have shown gender differences in health care utilization. Results Estimates for the whole population show that high or medium job strain has a positive and statistically significant association with the number of visits to both a general practitioner (GP) and a specialist (SP). On average, the number of GP visits is up to 26% more (IRR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.19-1.31) for individuals with high strain jobs compared to those in the low job strain category. Similarly, SP visits are up to 27% more (IRR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.14-142) for the high strain category. Results are quantitatively similar for males and females, save for medium strain. In general, findings are robust to the inclusion of workplace social support, health status, provincial and occupational-fixed effects. Conclusion Job strain may be positively associated with the utilization of health care services. This suggests that improving psychosocial working conditions and educating workers on stress-coping mechanisms could be beneficial for the physical and mental health of workers. PMID:21834974

2011-01-01

156

Physical and psychosocial work environment factors and their association with health outcomes in Danish ambulance personnel – a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Reviews of the literature on the health and work environment of ambulance personnel have indicated an increased risk of work-related health problems in this occupation. The aim of this study was to compare health status and exposure to different work environmental factors among ambulance personnel and the core work force in Denmark. In addition, to examine the association between physical and psychosocial work environment factors and different measures of health among ambulance personnel. Methods Data were taken from a nationwide sample of ambulance personnel and fire fighters (n?=?1,691) and was compared to reference samples of the Danish work force. The questionnaire contained measures of physical and psychosocial work environment as well as measures of musculoskeletal pain, mental health, self-rated health and sleep quality. Results Ambulance personnel have half the prevalence of poor self-rated health compared to the core work force (5% vs. 10%). Levels of mental health were the same across the two samples whereas a substantially higher proportion of the ambulance personnel reported musculoskeletal pain (42% vs. 29%). The ambulance personnel had higher levels of emotional demands and meaningfulness of and commitment to work, and substantially lower levels of quantitative demands and influence at work. Only one out of ten aspects of physical work environment was consistently associated with higher levels of musculoskeletal pain. Emotional demands was the only psychosocial work factor that was associated with both poorer mental health and worse sleep quality. Conclusions Ambulance personnel have similar levels of mental health but substantially higher levels of musculoskeletal pain than the work force in general. They are more exposed to emotional demands and these demands are associated with higher levels of poor mental health and poor sleep quality. To improve work environment, attention should be paid to musculoskeletal problems and the presence of positive organizational support mechanisms that can prevent negative effects from the high levels of emotional demands. PMID:22824415

2012-01-01

157

Work with visual display terminals: psychosocial aspects and health. Report on a World Health Organization meeting.  

PubMed

When health effects related to the use of visual display terminals (VDTs) can be substantiated, complaints are largely associated with poor job and workstation design. Psychosocial aspects of work with VDTs may affect users' health and well-being and include a variety of situations: work demands, work design and organizational problems, workload breakdown control, pacing, social support and isolation, deskilling, management of change and user involvement, task analysis and job design, training, work scheduling, and rest periods. Although various physical aspects may affect the health of VDT users and are, to a large extent, inseparable from psychosocial effects, they have been addressed in a previous report. This report takes the view that, in the prevention of VDT-related health problems, psychosocial factors are at least as important as the physical ergonomics of workstations and the working environment. PMID:2693653

1989-12-01

158

Managing professional work: three models of control for health organizations.  

PubMed Central

Three arrangements for structuring the work of professional participants in professional organizations are described, contrasted and evaluated. Arguments are illustrated by application to the organization of physicians within hospitals. The primary rationale, the support structures that have fostered its development, the key structural features and the advantages and disadvantages of each arrangement are described. The effect on these arrangements of structures and forces external to any particular professional organization is emphasized. PMID:6749761

Scott, W R

1982-01-01

159

Medical surveillance in work-site safety and health programs.  

PubMed

Businesses frequently call on family physicians to provide employee health services at the work site or in the clinician's office. These services include medical screening (detection of dysfunction or disease before an employee would ordinarily seek medical care) and medical surveillance (analysis of health information to identify workplace problems that require targeted prevention). Such services can transform acute care and routine screening activities into opportunities for primary prevention when they are integrated into the broader framework of work-site safety and health programs. Components of these programs include management commitment, employee participation, hazard identification and control, employee training and program evaluation. For optimal program success, family physicians must communicate with frontline safety officers and have first-hand knowledge of the workplace and its hazards. Professional and technical resources are available to guide the family physician in the role of medical surveillance program coordinator. PMID:10821157

Wesdock, J C; Sokas, R K

2000-05-01

160

Sexual health of women working aboard cruise ships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective This paper reports on the sexual health of women working in the cruise sector of the shipping industry.Design Data reported in this paper was collected as part of a larger study exploring company policies and practices relating to women seafarers, and the experiences of women seafarers in both the cruise and cargo . sectors of the shipping industry. Qualitative

Michelle A. Thomas

2003-01-01

161

Dairy Health. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students learn about dairy herd health, as well as how to gather, record, and interpret information. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize…

Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

162

Our Mission The Department of Public Health works to make  

E-print Network

, clinical informatics, medical ethics and the behavioral sciences. We conduct high quality, groundbreaking#12;Our Mission The Department of Public Health works to make medicine and medical care more Medical College's and NewYork-Presbyterian Hos- pital's capacity to provide first-rate, high quality care

Chen, Tsuhan

163

Work engagement: a practical measure for workplace health promotion?  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to investigate whether psychological job demands, personal control and social support affect the negative health measure of depression differently than the positive measure of work engagement and to investigate whether work engagement mediates the effects of job demands and resources on the level of depression. We discuss the implications of using engagement as an outcome measure in workplace health promotion. We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study among a general working population in Norway (n = 605). In the multivariate analysis, high psychological job demands as well as high control and social support correlated significantly with high work engagement. High demands as well as low control and social support correlated significantly with high levels of depression. When we included engagement as an independent variable together with demands, control and social support in the multivariate analysis, the positive correlation between demands and depression remained as well as the significant correlations between the level of depression and control and social support became non-significant. This indicates that engagement mediates the effects of control and social support on the level of depression. Encouraging enterprises to improve engagement in addition to focusing on preventing diseases may be worthwhile in workplace health promotion. Promoting engagement may have more positive organizational effects than a more traditional disease prevention focus, because engagement is contagious and closely related to good work performance and motivation. PMID:22692482

Torp, S; Grimsmo, A; Hagen, S; Duran, A; Gudbergsson, S B

2013-09-01

164

Using empowerment to make quality work in health care.  

PubMed

Is TQM dead in health care? If it is alive and well, what role does quality improvement play in managing the changes that come with health care reform? William Byham and Greg Nelson begin this article by presenting results from a recent international study on TQM, outlining factors common to successful and unsuccessful quality initiatives. The key to success? Organizations must improve how people work as much as what they do in their work, and that means empowering people to improve processes. Easier said than done, say Byham and Nelson. Empowerment requires culture change and training. People first need the right environment to work differently, then the skills, knowledge, and techniques to participate in and influence the quality process. PMID:10135584

Byham, W C; Nelson, G D

1994-01-01

165

Health among hospital employees in Europe: a cross-national study of the impact of work stress and work control.  

PubMed

This article analyses the effect of working conditions on the health of hospital employees across Europe. Hospital employees often have demanding jobs that increase their stress levels and, consequently, their risk of health problems. Work control - typified by employee autonomy and working time flexibility - helps them cope with high levels of work stress. Researchers have traditionally studied the relationship between working conditions, coping strategies and occupational health from an individual perspective. We argue that the individual work-health relationship is closely connected with the social and institutional context. This study explores how work stress and work control influence the health of hospital employees and aims to understand cross-country differences in this respect. Using data on over 1500 hospital employees who participated in the study 'Quality of work and life in a changing Europe' (2007) in eight European countries, we used ordinal regression analyses to test a range of hypotheses. The results show that work stress has a negative effect on the health of hospital employees, while work control is not found to have any effect on their health. Comparative analyses reveal that the effects of working conditions on health vary across European countries. While working overtime is more closely related to poorer health in Eastern European countries, we found evidence of a positive relationship between job autonomy and health in Western Europe only, indicating that circumstances in the working environment have differing effects on employee health in Eastern and Western Europe. PMID:21330025

Pisljar, Tjasa; van der Lippe, Tanja; den Dulk, Laura

2011-03-01

166

Health and safety needs of older farmers: part I. Work habits and health status.  

PubMed

Farming is an occupation that blends the work and home environments and traditionally involves active participation of all family members, including older farmers. The work patterns of older farmers, including typical work hours, range of activities, and health status, are not well documented. This study, surveying a random sample of older Illinois farmers (N=87), focused on these gaps in the literature. Older farmers were found to work long hours in many farm tasks, more than would be expected in other occupational groups. Further, older farmers were found to have several chronic diseases at higher rates than the general population of the same age and gender; mental health implications were also identified. Rural occupational health nurses are in an optimal position to positively impact older farmers' mental and physical health status. PMID:18183800

Lizer, Shannon K; Petrea, Robert E

2007-12-01

167

Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

Gamble, Reed

1989-01-01

168

[The micropolitics of the work of health professionals in health centers: regarding the health needs of families].  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to understand the strengths and limitations of the process of nursing work at a health center in terms of recognizing the health needs of the population. The methodological framework used was social research in the qualitative perspective, with discourse analysis based on hermeneutics-dialectics and founded on the Theory of Praxis Interpretation of Community Health Nursing. The data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, and the working processes of the teams were examined according to the Analyzing Flowchart of the Model of a Health Care Service. In conclusion, there are limitations in the daily working process of the nursing team regarding the recognition of the health needs of the population. Coping with these needs consisted of the identification of complications, relegating the social determinants of the poor life conditions associated with the health-disease process to a secondary concern. PMID:22773486

Graziano, Ana Paula; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

2012-06-01

169

Opportunities for health and safety professionals in environmental restoration work  

SciTech Connect

The safety of workers in waste management and in environmental restoration work is regulated in large part by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Many of the OSHA rules are given in Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards, of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Section 120 of 29 CFR 1910 specifically addresses hazardous waste operations and emergency response operations. The remainder of this discussion focuses on clean-up operations. The purpose of this paper is to review areas of employment opportunity in environmental restoration work for health and safety professionals. Safety and health risk analyses are mentioned as one area of opportunity, and these analyses are required by the standards. Site safety and health supervisors will be needed during field operations. Those who enjoy teaching might consider helping to meet the training needs that are mandated. Finally, engineering help both to separate workers from hazards and to improve personal protective equipment, when it must be worn, would benefit those actively involved in environmental restoration activities.

Norris, A.E.

1991-01-01

170

Depression in Working Adults: Comparing the Costs and Health Outcomes of Working When Ill  

PubMed Central

Objective Working through a depressive illness can improve mental health but also carries risks and costs from reduced concentration, fatigue, and poor on-the-job performance. However, evidence-based recommendations for managing work attendance decisions, which benefit individuals and employers, are lacking. Therefore, this study has compared the costs and health outcomes of short-term absenteeism versus working while ill (“presenteeism”) amongst employed Australians reporting lifetime major depression. Methods Cohort simulation using state-transition Markov models simulated movement of a hypothetical cohort of workers, reporting lifetime major depression, between health states over one- and five-years according to probabilities derived from a quality epidemiological data source and existing clinical literature. Model outcomes were health service and employment-related costs, and quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs), captured for absenteeism relative to presenteeism, and stratified by occupation (blue versus white-collar). Results Per employee with depression, absenteeism produced higher mean costs than presenteeism over one- and five-years ($42,573/5-years for absenteeism, $37,791/5-years for presenteeism). However, overlapping confidence intervals rendered differences non-significant. Employment-related costs (lost productive time, job turnover), and antidepressant medication and service use costs of absenteeism and presenteeism were significantly higher for white-collar workers. Health outcomes differed for absenteeism versus presenteeism amongst white-collar workers only. Conclusions Costs and health outcomes for absenteeism and presenteeism were not significantly different; service use costs excepted. Significant variation by occupation type was identified. These findings provide the first occupation-specific cost evidence which can be used by clinicians, employees, and employers to review their management of depression-related work attendance, and may suggest encouraging employees to continue working is warranted. PMID:25181469

Cocker, Fiona; Nicholson, Jan M.; Graves, Nicholas; Oldenburg, Brian; Palmer, Andrew J.; Martin, Angela; Scott, Jenn; Venn, Alison; Sanderson, Kristy

2014-01-01

171

Working life and mental health - A challenge to psychiatry?  

PubMed Central

According to the World Health Organization, "mental health problems and stress-related disorders are the biggest overall cause of early death in Europe". Some of the root causes of this morbidity and mortality are related to living and working conditions that are accessible to preventive and therapeutic interventions, individual as well as collective ones. A political mandate for such interventions is now developing. Members of the WPA Section on Occupational Psychiatry have contributed to this development and we now invite the readers to join the Section in its endeavours. PMID:16633507

LEVI, LENNART

2005-01-01

172

Work environment characteristics of high-quality home health agencies.  

PubMed

This concurrent mixed-method study examines the nurse work environment of high-quality Medicare-certified home health agencies. High-quality (n=6) and low-quality (n=6) home health agencies were recruited using agency-level publicly reported patient outcomes. Direct care registered nurses (RNs) from each agency participated in a focus group and completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nurse Work Index (PES-NWI). No significant differences were found in the PES-NWI results between nurses working in high- and low-quality agencies, though nurses in high-quality agencies scored higher on all subscales. Nurses working in all the high-quality agencies identified themes of adequate staffing, supportive managers, and team work. These themes were not consistently identified in low-quality agencies. Themes of supportive managers and team work are reflective of effective leadership at the manager level. Agencies struggling to improve quality of care might consider developing their managers' leadership skills. PMID:20935216

Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Riggs, Jennifer S; Farag, Amany A

2011-10-01

173

Initial Report of the Task Force on Cultural Competence Education in the Health Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes the findings and recommendations of the Task Force on Cultural Competence Education and represents the distillation of the Task Force's efforts to fulfill its legislative charge. The report is intended to facilitate a statewide conversation about the health services provided to New Mexico's multicultural citizenry. It…

New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2007

2007-01-01

174

Life in and after the Armed Forces: social networks and mental health in the UK military.  

PubMed

This study focuses on the influence of structural aspects of social integration (social networks and social participation outside work) on mental health (common mental disorders (CMD), that is, depression and anxiety symptoms, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and alcohol misuse). This study examines differences in levels of social integration and associations between social integration and mental health among service leavers and personnel still in service. Data were collected from regular serving personnel (n=6,511) and regular service leavers (n=1,753), from a representative cohort study of the Armed Forces in the UK. We found that service leavers reported less social participation outside work and a general disengagement with military social contacts in comparison to serving personnel. Service leavers were more likely to report CMD and PTSD symptoms. The increased risk of CMD but not PTSD symptoms, was partially accounted for by the reduced levels of social integration among the service leavers. Maintaining social networks in which most members are still in the military is associated with alcohol misuse for both groups, but it is related to CMD and PTSD symptoms for service leavers only. PMID:23356827

Hatch, Stephani L; Harvey, Samuel B; Dandeker, Christopher; Burdett, Howard; Greenberg, Neil; Fear, Nicola T; Wessely, Simon

2013-09-01

175

Preparing the Work Force for the 21st Century: 1998 Community Based Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help determine the community's work force training needs, Spartanburg Technical College (STC) completed an extensive research study. It included a survey of 1,501 high school juniors in Cherokee, Union, and Spartanburg counties in South Carolina; a survey of 293 area businesses and industries; focus groups representing 63 companies, elected…

Quinley, John W.; Cantrell, Jo Ellen

176

My Family's Work: United States Air Force Child Care Program Activity Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This child care program activity guide is designed to help teachers and caregivers in Air Force preschools and child care centers plan activities for increasing young children's understanding and appreciation of their parents' work in military and defense related occupations. Recommended teaching methods, concepts, group activities, and activity…

von Matthiessen, Priscilla; Brant, Linda

177

Profile of a Rural Area Work Force: The Wyoming Uranium Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide insights into policies relative to human resource investments and employment information channels, the study's objectives were to: (1) relate types of employment in Wyoming's uranium mines and mills to work force participants; (2) determine employee earnings and relate those earnings to employment categories and…

Dobbs, Thomas L.; Kiner, Phil E.

1974-01-01

178

Building a World-Class Work Force: A Vision for a New Century.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As society turns increasingly to education to provide remedies for economic and social ills and to prepare citizens for life and work in a rapidly changing world, the community college is emerging as a major force in U.S. education. Recent trends indicate that U.S. productivity is lagging behind that of other countries, most notably Japan. Japan's…

Feldman, Marvin

179

Home-based work, human capital accumulation and women's labor force participation  

E-print Network

This dissertation examines the effect of changes in the stock of human capital on the labor force participation decision of women aged 25-54. Without the option of homebased work, some women choose to leave the labor market and stay at home...

Chutubtim, Piyaluk

2006-10-30

180

Selected Contemporary Work Force Reports: A Synthesis and Critique. Information Series No. 354.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Demographic and social changes, increasing economic interdependence, and educational reform movements are causing major changes in vocational education. Essential work force skills and the standards to account for their achievement are being debated. The 1980s'"Excellence Movement" focused on strengthening academic requirements, developing…

Weber, James M.

181

Review and Implications of Job Satisfaction and Work Motivation Theories for Air Force Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this report is to: (a) review certain major theories of work motivation, particularly as related to job satisfaction, (b) distill from such theories and other research, implications for an Air Force job satisfaction research program, and (c) provide a comprehensive bibliography of satisfaction/retention studies. The theoretical…

Tuttle, Thomas C.; Hazel, Joe T.

182

For Work-Force Training, a Plan to Give College Credit Where It's Due  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After nearly three years of planning, Ohio's higher-education officials are finalizing an ambitious program to grant college credit for some technical courses offered at the state's adult-education centers. The program, called the Career-Technical Credit Transfer, is the latest in a string of state efforts to more closely link work-force training…

Sander, Libby

2008-01-01

183

Health care voluntourism: addressing ethical concerns of undergraduate student participation in global health volunteer work.  

PubMed

The popularity and availability of global health experiences has increased, with organizations helping groups plan service trips and companies specializing in "voluntourism," health care professionals volunteering their services through different organizations, and medical students participating in global health electives. Much has been written about global health experiences in resource poor settings, but the literature focuses primarily on the work of health care professionals and medical students. This paper focuses on undergraduate student involvement in short term medical volunteer work in resource poor countries, a practice that has become popular among pre-health professions students. We argue that the participation of undergraduate students in global health experiences raises many of the ethical concerns associated with voluntourism and global health experiences for medical students. Some of these may be exacerbated by or emerge in unique ways when undergraduates volunteer. Guidelines and curricula for medical student engagement in global health experiences have been developed. Guidelines specific to undergraduate involvement in such trips and pre-departure curricula to prepare students should be developed and such training should be required of volunteers. We propose a framework for such guidelines and curricula, argue that universities should be the primary point of delivery even when universities are not organizing the trips, and recommend that curricula should be developed in light of additional data. PMID:25079381

McCall, Daniel; Iltis, Ana S

2014-12-01

184

AIR FORCE HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM MONEY IN YOUR POCKET  

E-print Network

training, correspondence, military-sponsored short courses and by attending national meetings studies. JOB SATISFACTION As an Air Force Nurse, you enter a world class hospital with the best healthcare team in the world. There's no need to worry about HMO's, malpractice insurance and other red tape that

Garfunkel, Eric

185

Forces Pushing Prescription Psychotropic Drugs in College Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A complex of forceful influences is greatly accelerating the use of what are usually referred to as "psychiatric drugs," although most prescribing is not done by psychiatrists. Many other clinicians, including other kinds of physicians, and recently psychologists, prescribe these medications. The influences contributing to this dramatic surge…

Whitaker, Leighton C.

2007-01-01

186

Discrimination, work and health in immigrant populations in Spain.  

PubMed

One of the most important social phenomena in the global context is the flow of immigration from developing countries, motivated by economic and employment related issues. Discrimination can be approached as a health risk factor within the immigrant population's working environment, especially for those immigrants at greater risk from social exclusion and marginalisation. The aim of this study is to research perceptions of discrimination and the specific relationship between discrimination in the workplace and health among Spain's immigrant population. A qualitative study was performed by means of 84 interviews and 12 focus groups held with immigrant workers in five cities in Spain receiving a large influx of immigrants (Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Alicante and Huelva), covering representative immigrant communities in Spain (Romanians, Moroccans, Ecuadorians, Colombians and Sub-Saharan Africans). Discourse narrative content analysis was performed using pre-established categories and gradually incorporating other emerging categories from the immigrant interviewees themselves. The participants reported instances of discrimination in their community and working life, characterised by experiences of racism, mistreatment and precarious working conditions in comparison to the Spanish-born population. They also talked about limitations in terms of accessible occupations (mainly construction, the hotel and restaurant trade, domestic service and agriculture), and described major difficulties accessing other types of work (for example public administration). They also identified political and legal structural barriers related with social institutions. Experiences of discrimination can affect their mental health and are decisive factors regarding access to healthcare services. Our results suggest the need to adopt integration policies in both the countries of origin and the host country, to acknowledge labour and social rights, and to conduct further research into individual and social factors that affect the health of the immigrant populations. PMID:19328608

Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés; Gil-González, Diana; Ronda-Pérez, Elena; Porthé, Victoria; Paramio-Pérez, Gema; García, Ana M; Garí, Aitana

2009-05-01

187

76 FR 63927 - Interagency Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance (ITFAR): An Update on A Public Health Action...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Resistance (ITFAR): An Update on A Public Health Action Plan to Combat Antimicrobial...accomplishing activities outlined in A Public Health Action Plan to Combat Antimicrobial...increasing importance of AR as a public health threat. The Task Force is...

2011-10-14

188

[Work as a basic human need and health promoting factor].  

PubMed

The Italian Constitution (1948) defines 'work' as the founding value of the Italian Republic. This choice was not motivated by mere economic reasons, but rather stemmed from the recognition that work is the most appropriate tool for the expression of the human personality in society, that it is an asset and a right that will increase the dignity of every person, and which corresponds to a fundamental human desire to fulfil oneself in relationship with other persons and the entire world This view of work, including its technical and manual aspects, was unknown to the ancient mentality and became familiar to us through the monastic orders of the early middle ages, which began to conceive and practise human work as a means of participating in the work of creation and transmitted this value over the centuries. As we experience today, if occupation is lacking, a basic condition for the development of the person and for his/her contribution to the growth of society is lost. Given the meaning of work in human experience, it is not surprising that unemployment represents not only a worrisome economic indicator, but also the cause of ill health. At the end of 2009 unemployment in the European Union reached 10%, similar to the rate in the US; in Italy it was estimated at 8.5% in December 2009 and is expected to reach 10% in 2010. In Lombardy, although employment had been constantly increasing between 1995 and 2008, and the current unemployment rate is as low as 4.9%, 100,000 jobs were lost in 2009. Several scientific papers have demonstrated the association between lack of occupation and lack of physical and mental health. In the present period of crisis, increases of 30% in cases of anxiety syndrome and of 15% in cases of depression have been reported. An increase in suicides among unemployed persons has been documented in several countries even if there are still problems of interpretation of the causal chain of events. Mortality among the unemployed increased, not only that due to violent causes, but also mortality for all causes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. A survey in the Turin area, Northern Italy, showed a twofold increase in mortality among unemployed men. Women were affected both by husbands' unemployment and by their own unemployment because of the previous increasing rate of female occupation. The worse the occupational condition (from "seeking work" to "temporary employment" down to "unemployed and no longer seeking work") the higher the mortality: in the latter category, where the most evident problem is marginalization and social exclusion, the increase in mortality was fourfold. The role of occupational health physicians is to recognize the possible negative effects of working conditions and at the same time promote a positive approach to work, even in difficult conditions. This makes prevention more effective and promotes health. To be aware of the meaning of work makes work itself more liveable and more productive. This is how health promotion contributes to the wellbeing of the individual and, at the same time, to the development of the economy and society at large. PMID:21298870

Bertazzi, P A

2010-01-01

189

The ecology of work and health: research and policy directions for the promotion of employee health.  

PubMed

This article identifies new research and policy directions for the field of worksite health in the context of the changing American workplace. These directions are viewed from an ecological perspective on worksite health and are organized around three major themes: (1) the joint influence of physical and social environmental factors on occupational health, (2) the effects of nonoccupational settings (e.g., households, the health care system) on employee well-being and the implications of recent changes in these settings for worksite health programs, and (3) methodological issues in the design and evaluation of worksite health programs. Developments in these areas suggest that the field of worksite health may be undergoing a fundamental paradigm shift away from individually oriented wellness programs (provided at the worksite and aimed primarily at changing employees' health behavior) and toward broader formulations emphasizing the joint impact of the physical and social environment at work, job-person fit, and work policies on employee well-being. PMID:8744869

Stokols, D; Pelletier, K R; Fielding, J E

1996-05-01

190

Is Working Later in Life Good or Bad for Health? An Investigation of Multiple Health Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To examine the mutual influences between changes in work status and multiple dimensions of health outcomes (immediate memory, physical disability, and depressive symptoms) over later years. Methods. We used a subsample of 8,524 older adults who participated in the Health and Retirement Study from 1998 to 2008 and were 62 years or older in 1998 to examine work status and health outcomes after controlling for age and background characteristics. Results. We present results of cross-lagged auto-regressive models. Work status (level of work) predicted subsequent residual changes in immediate memory over time, whereas immediate memory predicted subsequent residual changes in work status over time, even after controlling for physical disability and depressive symptoms. Similar results were indicated for the associations between work status and physical disability and depressive symptoms over time. Discussion. Consistent with social causation and social selection traditions, the findings support bi-directional associations among changes in work status (the level of work), immediate memory, physical disability, and depressive symptoms in later years. Practical implications are discussed. PMID:23887930

2013-01-01

191

Work-Related Health Disorders among Saudi Computer Users  

PubMed Central

The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and eye and vision complaints among the computer users of King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SAUDIA), and Saudi Telecom Company (STC). Stratified random samples of the work stations and operators at each of the studied institutions were selected and the ergonomics of the work stations were assessed and the operators' health complaints were investigated. The average ergonomic score of the studied work station at STC, KAU, and SAUDIA was 81.5%, 73.3%, and 70.3, respectively. Most of the examined operators use computers daily for ? 7 hours, yet they had some average incidences of general complaints (e.g., headache, body fatigue, and lack of concentration) and relatively high level of incidences of eye and vision complaints and musculoskeletal complaints. The incidences of the complaints have been found to increase with the (a) decrease in work station ergonomic score, (b) progress of age and duration of employment, (c) smoking, (d) use of computers, (e) lack of work satisfaction, and (f) history of operators' previous ailments. It has been recommended to improve the ergonomics of the work stations, set up training programs, and conduct preplacement and periodical examinations for operators. PMID:25383379

Jomoah, Ibrahim M.

2014-01-01

192

‘The dangers attending these conditions are evident’: Public Health and the Working Environment of Lancashire Textile Communities, c.1870–1939  

PubMed Central

This article examines the position of the working environment within public health priorities and as a contributor to the health of a community. Using two Lancashire textile towns (Burnley and Blackburn) as case studies and drawing on a variety of sources, it highlights how, while legislation set the industry parameters for legal enforcement of working conditions, local public health priorities were pivotal in setting codes of practice. The complexities entwined with identifying the working environment as a cause of ill health and with improving it were entangled within the local community health context. In addition, the multiple understandings of Medical Officers of Health surrounding the remit of their responsibilities impacted the local health context. These did not always parallel national regulations. Indeed, it was these local, community specific forces that set the public health agenda, determined its path and the place of the working environment within this. PMID:24771979

Greenlees, Janet

2013-01-01

193

Force  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Instructions: This is a webquest designed to help students understand force. It is specifically meant to teach the idea that the greater the force applied to an object the greater the change in speed or direction of the object depending on the mass. This is also known as Newton's Second Law of Motion. Lets Learn about Force! For this project your students will understand force. They will use Newton's second law to solve the problem presented. UT Core Curriculum: Science 3rd Grade. Standard 3- Students will understand the relationship between the force applied to an object and resulting motion of the ...

Mrs. Brownie

2010-04-07

194

The impact of work-limiting disability on labor force participation.  

PubMed

According to the justification hypothesis, non-employed individuals may over-report their level of work limitation, leading to biased census/survey estimates of the prevalence of severe disabilities and the associated labor force participation rate. For researchers studying policies which impact the disabled or elderly (e.g., Supplemental Security Income, Disability Insurance, and Early Retirement), this could lead to significant bias in key parameters of interest. Using the American Community Survey, we examine the potential for both inflated and deflated reported disability status and generate a general index of disability, which can be used to reduce the bias of these self-reports in other studies. We find that at least 4.8 million individuals have left the labor force because of a work-limiting disability, at least four times greater than the impact implied by our replication of previous models. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24307040

Webber, Douglas A; Bjelland, Melissa J

2015-03-01

195

“Whistle While You Work”: A Historical Account of Some Associations Among Music, Work, and Health  

PubMed Central

Music has long been a uniting force among workers. Music can improve team spirit and provide an enjoyable diversion, but it is most useful in expressing the true feelings of a sometimes desperate community. Over time, a variety of musical media have emerged to match the prevailing conditions at work: the folk songs of 19th-century handloom weavers, the songs of industrial Britain’s trade union members, the workers’ radio programs of the 1940s. Associations have arisen to encourage and coordinate musical activities among workers, and public awareness of the hazards of some occupations has been promoted through music. PMID:15961754

le Roux, Gordon Marc

2005-01-01

196

The relationship between parental labor force participation and adolescents' dietary intake and risks to cardiovascular health  

E-print Network

participation variables and adolescent variables related to cardiovascular health. Daughters' biceps, triceps, subscapular skinfolds, and percent bodyfat were predicted by mothers' work preoccupation and the degree of importance fathers placed on their work...

Godwin, Anne Louise

1997-01-01

197

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work–Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time  

PubMed Central

This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

198

[Multi-disciplinary team work in health services development].  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary teamwork or collaboration is a new approach designed to guide thinking and practise within healthcare systems. As a concept multidisciplinary collaboration or teamwork is not clear. Researchers have developed many definition about multidisciplinary collaboration having characteristics like objectivity, methodicalness, regularity, common goals, population's/patient's perspective and individually shared responsibility. In decision making every expert has a responsibility to give his/her skills and acknowledge for the goals of the working community and patients. A great deal of research and development work is currently ongoing in hospitals and health centers on multidisciplinary topic. This approach has been useful in district responsibility and also in primary nursing. The leadership in primary nursing system has the responsibility to create an environment conductive for collaborative relationships. In multiprofessional relationships nurses can find their professional roles and evaluate their skills and knowledge base and assess their needs for continued education. PMID:8260690

Merjola-Partanen, T

1993-01-01

199

Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting.  

PubMed

Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that 'core' competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health 'programme' or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified. PMID:24427175

Rush, Brian; McPherson-Doe, Catherine; Behrooz, Reneé C; Cudmore, Alan

2013-06-01

200

In Diversity Is Strength: Capitalizing on the New Work Force. 75th Anniversary Symposia Series. Report Number 994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is based on a symposium devoted to capitalizing on the new work force, contains five reports describing how major U.S. corporations are dealing with the demographic changes currently under way in the United States. "Whither the Work Force?" (Delores Wolf) discusses the proper role of corporations in coping with a lack of…

Alster, Judith, Ed.; And Others

201

Workgroup Report: Developing Environmental Health Indicators for European Children: World Health Organization Working Group  

PubMed Central

A working group coordinated by the World Health Organization developed a set of indicators to protect children’s health from environmental risks and to support current and future European policy needs. On the basis of identified policy needs, the group developed a core set of 29 indicators for implementation plus an extended set of eight additional indicators for future development, focusing on exposure, health effects, and action. As far as possible, the indicators were designed to use existing information and are flexible enough to be developed further to meet the needs of policy makers and changing health priorities. These indicators cover most of the priority topic areas specified in the Children’s Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) as adopted in the Fourth Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in 2004, and will be used to monitor the implementation of CEHAPE. This effort can be viewed as an integral part of the Global Initiative on Children’s Environmental Health Indicators, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002. PMID:17805431

Pond, Kathy; Kim, Rokho; Carroquino, Maria-Jose; Pirard, Philippe; Gore, Fiona; Cucu, Alexandra; Nemer, Leda; MacKay, Morag; Smedje, Greta; Georgellis, Antonis; Dalbokova, Dafina; Krzyzanowski, Michal

2007-01-01

202

[Work: disease and health. The role of occupational medicine].  

PubMed

To assess the role of Occupational Medicine in the promotion of workers'health over the last forty years, the author studied the evolution of this discipline from a clinical-diagnostic approach to the current emphasis on prevention. However, it is stressed that in Occupational Medicine even preventive measures are based on clinical methodology, as for example in health surveillance, where the main tasks are the identification of individual hyper-susceptibility and the assessment of early and reversible health effects due to occupational risks. Moreover, the traditional clinical-diagnostic approach is still of utmost importance. In fact, the classical occupational diseases do not present with the specific clinical features of the recent past. Instead, today it is necessary to evaluate whether occupational risk factors play a concomitant role in the origin of diseases that affect the general population. Moreover, new occupational diseases are emerging, due to the continuous changes in manufacturing processes and work organization. To assess the role that Occupational Medicine has played in the binomial expression "disease-health", topics which particularly suit the Author's cultural background are considered and are used as "indicators" of the various scientific, cultural, social, economic, and legislative aspects that contribute to the professional development of Occupational Physicians. Important results have been achieved over the last 40 years, however Occupational Physicians face new problems that impose a continuous updating process, not only on medical topics but also on the development of technological processes. The laws and the recommendations of the most prestigious national and international organizations and the principles of the ICOH Code of Ethics should guide Occupational Physicians in their profession and their actions must imply full professional independence. They must acquire and maintain the necessary competence for their duties and adequate conditions to carry out their tasks according to good practice and professional ethics. PMID:21298869

Alessio, L

2010-01-01

203

WORKING PAPER N 2007 -34 The influence of supplementary health insurance on switching  

E-print Network

WORKING PAPER N° 2007 - 34 The influence of supplementary health insurance on switching behaviour Keywords: competition in health insurance, switching behaviour, premium convergence, influence;1 The influence of supplementary health insurance on switching behaviour: evidence on Swiss data Brigitte Dormont

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

204

Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs  

MedlinePLUS

... Health (NIOSH) Share Compartir Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs October 2008 DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2009-106 Health care workers who handle hazardous drugs are at risk ...

205

Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

MacQueen, D H

2007-02-21

206

Perception of Weight and Health Status among Women Working at Health Centres of Tehran  

PubMed Central

Perception of body-weight status is an important determinant of weight-related behaviours and may affect the burden of weight disturbances as a public-health problem. No study has assessed self-perception of the weight status regarding body-fat distribution among health workers to date. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of the perception of weight and health status among 542 women working at health centres of Tehran. We assessed their perceived body-weight and health status and measured waist- and hip-circumference, weight, and height to calculate waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) as a measure of fat distribution and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2). Women reported their sociodemographic information, and the perceived weight and health status were compared with their actual fatness status, defined based on WHR and BMI, to determine misperception of weight status. Multivariate logistic regression models were performed to assess the predictive effects of various sociodemographic factors and actual fatness on the perception of weight and health status. The results showed that more than 40% of women with normal BMI overestimated their body-weight status while only 15.8% of these women had central obesity. BMI was the most important variable associated with misperceived weight status as normal-weight women had significantly more misperception (OR 8.16, 95% CI 4.82-13.82) than overweight/obese women. WHR did not show any significant relationships with perceived weight status. In addition, perception of health status was not associated with actual fatness indices. It is concluded, BMI was the main predictor of the perception of weight status in female employees. The importance of using body-fat distribution in the perceptions of weight and health status should be emphasized. PMID:24847594

Dorosty, Ahmad Reza; Mehdikhani, Sepideh; Rahimi, Abbas; Koohdani, Fariba; Tehrani, Parastoo

2014-01-01

207

AGU's new task force on scientific ethics and integrity begins work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In support of the new strategic plan, AGU has established a new task force to review, evaluate, and update the Union's policies on scientific misconduct and the process for investigating and responding to allegations of possible misconduct by AGU members. As noted by AGU president Michael McPhaden, “AGU can only realize its vision of ‘collaboratively advancing and communicating science and its power to ensure a sustainable future’ if we have the trust of the public and policy makers. That trust is earned by maintaining the highest standards of scientific integrity in all that we do. The work of the Task Force on Scientific Ethics is essential for defining norms of professional conduct that all our members can aspire to and that demonstrate AGU's unwavering commitment to excellence in Earth and space science.”

Gleick, Peter; Townsend, Randy

2011-11-01

208

The Occupational Safety of Health Professionals Working at Community and Family Health Centers  

PubMed Central

Background: Healthcare professionals encounter many medical risks while providing healthcare services to individuals and the community. Thus, occupational safety studies are very important in health care organizations. They involve studies performed to establish legal, technical, and medical measures that must be taken to prevent employees from sustaining physical or mental damage because of work hazards. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine if the occupational safety of health personnel at community and family health centers (CHC and FHC) has been achieved. Martials and Methods: The population of this cross-sectional study comprised 507 nurses, 199 physicians, and 237 other medical personnel working at a total of 18 family health centers (FHC) and community health centers (CHC) in Trabzon, Turkey. The sample consisted of a total of 418 nurses, 156 physicians, and 123 other medical personnel. Sampling method was not used, and the researchers tried to reach the whole population. Data were gathered with the Occupational Safety Scale (OSS) and a questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics and occupational safety. Results: According to the evaluations of all the medical personnel, the mean ± SD of total score of the OSS was 3.57 ± 0.98; of the OSS’s subscales, the mean ± SD of the health screening and registry systems was 2.76 ± 1.44, of occupational diseases and problems was 3.04 ± 1.3 and critical fields control was 3.12 ± 1.62. In addition, occupational safety was found more insufficient by nurses (F = 14.18; P < 0.001). Conclusions: All healthcare personnel, particularly nurses working in CHCs and FHCs found occupational safety to be insufficient as related to protective and supportive activities. PMID:25558383

Ozturk, Havva; Babacan, Elif

2014-01-01

209

Cohort profile: The lidA Cohort Study—a German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation  

PubMed Central

The lidA Cohort Study (German Cohort Study on Work, Age, Health and Work Participation) was set up to investigate and follow the effects of work and work context on the physical and psychological health of the ageing workforce in Germany and subsequently on work participation. Cohort participants are initially employed people subject to social security contributions and born in either 1959 (n = 2909) or 1965 (n = 3676). They were personally interviewed in their homes in 2011 and will be visited every 3 years. Data collection comprises socio-demographic data, work and private exposures, work ability, work and work participation attitudes, health, health-related behaviour, personality and attitudinal indicators. Employment biographies are assessed using register data. Subjective health reports and physical strength measures are complemented by health insurance claims data, where permission was given. A conceptual framework has been developed for the lidA Cohort Study within which three confirmatory sub-models assess the interdependencies of work and health considering age, gender and socioeconomic status. The first set of the data will be available to the scientific community by 2015. Access will be given by the Research Data Centre of the German Federal Employment Agency at the Institute for Employment Research (http://fdz.iab.de/en.aspx). PMID:24618186

Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Peter, Richard; Rauch, Angela; Schröder, Helmut; Swart, Enno; Bender, Stefan; du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Ebener, Melanie; March, Stefanie; Trappmann, Mark; Steinwede, Jacob; Müller, Bernd Hans

2014-01-01

210

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out"  

E-print Network

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out" Early Bird Pre-Conference Training Opportunity--Youth Mental Health First Aid USA Want to become a Youth Mental Health First Aider? This Early Bird Pre-Conference opportunity

Weber, David J.

211

Disparities in the Geography of Mental Health: Implications for Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews recent theory and research on geographic disparities in mental health and their implications for social work. It focuses on work emerging from the fields of mental health geography, psychiatric epidemiology, and social work, arguing that a wide range of spatial disparities in mental health are important to understand but that…

Hudson, Christopher G.

2012-01-01

212

Development of methods of male contraception: impact of the World Health Organization Task Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo give an historical record of the research of the World Health Organization (WHO) Task Force to develop methods of male contraception; to examine the social, political, medical, pharmaceutical, funding, and other factors that influenced progress; and to suggest reasons why such methods are only now becoming available.

Geoffrey M. H. Waites

2003-01-01

213

Physiological responses to low-force work and psychosocial stress in women with chronic trapezius myalgia  

PubMed Central

Background Repetitive and stressful work tasks have been linked to the development of pain in the trapezius muscle, although the underlying mechanisms still remain unclear. In earlier studies, it has been hypothesized that chronic muscle pain conditions are associated with imbalance in the autonomic nervous system, predominantly expressed as an increased sympathetic activity. This study investigates whether women with chronic trapezius myalgia show higher muscle activity and increased sympathetic tone at baseline and during repetitive low-force work and psychosocial stress, compared with pain-free controls. Methods Eighteen women with chronic trapezius myalgia (MYA) and 30 healthy female controls (CON) were studied during baseline rest, 100 min of repetitive low-force work, 20 min of psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test, TSST), and 80 min recovery. The subjects rated their pain intensity, stress and energy level every 20 min throughout the experiment. Muscle activity was measured by surface electromyography in the trapezius muscle (EMGtrap) and deltoid muscle (EMGdelt). Autonomic reactivity was measured through heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SCL), blood pressure (MAP) and respiration rate (Resp). Results At baseline, EMGtrap, stress ratings, and HR were higher in MYA than in CON. Energy ratings, EMGdelt, SCL, MAP and Resp were, however, similar in the two groups. Significant main group effects were found for pain intensity, stress ratings and EMGtrap. Deltoid muscle activity and autonomic responses were almost identical in MYA and CON during work, stress and recovery. In MYA only, pain intensity and stress ratings increased towards the end of the repetitive work. Conclusion We found increased muscle activity during uninstructed rest in the painful muscle of a group of women with trapezius myalgia. The present study could not confirm the hypothesis that chronic trapezius myalgia is associated with increased sympathetic activity. The suggestion of autonomic imbalance in patients with chronic local or regional musculoskeletal pain needs to be further investigated. PMID:19500420

Sjörs, Anna; Larsson, Britt; Dahlman, Joakim; Falkmer, Torbjörn; Gerdle, Björn

2009-01-01

214

Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: II. Mortality  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the current health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. This report compares the noncombat mortality of 1261 Ranch Hand veterans to that of a comparison population of 19,101 other Air Force veterans primarily involved in cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. The indirectly standardized all-cause death rate among Ranch Hands is 2.5 deaths per 1,000 person-years, the same as that among comparison subjects. After adjustment for age, rank, and occupation, the all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 1.0. In adjusted cause-specific analyses, the authors found no significant group differences regarding accidental, malignant neoplasm, and circulatory deaths. These data are not supportive to a hypothesis of increases mortality among Ranch Hands.

Michalek, J.E.; Wolfe, W.H.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

1990-10-10

215

Self-rated health and its relationship to health/ life problems and coping strategies in members of the professional Slovenian armed forces.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to test the association between self-rated health status (i.e. psychological and interpersonal welfare, physical health, coping mechanisms) and absence from work due to illness in the Slovenian armed forces. 390 military personnel were included in the study. Two groups of soldiers, healthy (G1-H) and sick/less healthy (G2-S), were created according to the median value of their annual sick leave. A third group consisted of soldiers on a mission (G3-M). A background questionnaire (demographic data, lifestyle habits, a list of life problems and a list of health problems in the last three years), a Self-Rated Health Scale and the Folkman-Lazarus Ways of Coping Questionnaire were administered. Self-rated physical health was best in group G1-H and worst in G2-S, with differences between the groups being statistically significant. No gender differences were found either between the groups or in the whole sample. The most common coping strategies amongst all the soldiers were found to be problem solving, positive re-evaluation of the situation and self-control. The groups differed only in their use of the distancing strategy. The self-rated health of all the participants was found to be in strong negative correlation with the escape/avoidance coping strategy. In group G2-S, more soldiers assessed their health as poor; the differences between the groups were statistically significant. Strong positive correlations between self-rated health and satisfaction with interpersonal relationships were found. Self-rated health was found to be significantly associated with the quality of interpersonal relationships and the socio-economic and psycho-physical conditions of the soldiers. PMID:23390808

Seli?, Polona; Petek, Davorina; Serec, Masa; Makovec, Maja Rus

2012-12-01

216

To What Extent Do Financial Strain and Labour Force Status Explain Social Class Inequalities in Self-Rated Health? Analysis of 20 Countries in the European Social Survey  

PubMed Central

Introduction Nordic countries do not have the smallest health inequalities despite egalitarian social policies. A possible explanation for this is that drivers of class differences in health such as financial strain and labour force status remain socially patterned in Nordic countries. Methods Our analyses used data for working age (25–59) men (n?=?48,249) and women (n?=?52,654) for 20 countries from five rounds (2002–2010) of the European Social Survey. The outcome was self-rated health in 5 categories. Stratified by gender we used fixed effects linear regression models and marginal standardisation to instigate how countries varied in the degree to which class inequalities were attenuated by financial strain and labour force status. Results and Discussion Before adjustment, Nordic countries had large inequalities in self-rated health relative to other European countries. For example the regression coefficient for the difference in health between working class and professional men living in Norway was 0.34 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.42), while the comparable figure for Spain was 0.15 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.22). Adjusting for financial strain and labour force status led to attenuation of health inequalities in all countries. However, unlike some countries such as Spain, where after adjustment the regression coefficient for working class men was only 0.02 (95% CI ?0.05 to 0.10), health inequalities persisted after adjustment for Nordic countries. For Norway the adjusted coefficient was 0.17 (95% CI 0.10 to 0.25). Results for women and men were similar. However, in comparison to men, class inequalities tended to be stronger for women and more persistent after adjustment. Conclusions Adjusting for financial security and labour force status attenuates a high proportion of health inequalities in some counties, particularly Southern European countries, but attenuation in Nordic countries was modest and did not improve their relative position. PMID:25313462

Shaw, Richard J.; Benzeval, Michaela; Popham, Frank

2014-01-01

217

Assessing human resources for health: what can be learned from labour force surveys?  

PubMed Central

Background Human resources are an essential element of a health system's inputs, and yet there is a huge disparity among countries in how human resource policies and strategies are developed and implemented. The analysis of the impacts of services on population health and well-being attracts more interest than analysis of the situation of the workforce in this area. This article presents an international comparison of the health workforce in terms of skill mix, sociodemographics and other labour force characteristics, in order to establish an evidence base for monitoring and evaluation of human resources for health. Methods Profiles of the health workforce are drawn for 18 countries with developed market and transitional economies, using data from labour force and income surveys compiled by the Luxembourg Income Study between 1989 and 1997. Further descriptive analyses of the health workforce are conducted for selected countries for which more detailed occupational information was available. Results Considerable cross-national variations were observed in terms of the share of the health workforce in the total labour market, with little discernible pattern by geographical region or type of economy. Increases in the share were found among most countries for which time-trend data were available. Large gender imbalances were often seen in terms of occupational distribution and earnings. In some cases, health professionals, especially physicians, were overrepresented among the foreign-born compared to the total labour force. Conclusions While differences across countries in the profile of the health workforce can be linked to the history and role of the health sector, at the same time some common patterns emerge, notably a growing trend of health occupations in the labour market. The evidence also suggests that gender inequity in the workforce remains an important shortcoming of many health systems. Certain unexpected patterns of occupational distribution and educational attainment were found that may be attributable to differences in health care delivery and education systems; however, definitional inconsistencies in the classification of health occupations across surveys were also apparent. PMID:12904250

Gupta, Neeru; Diallo, Khassoum; Zurn, Pascal; Dal Poz, Mario R

2003-01-01

218

Model Formulation: Health@HomeThe Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveContemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in

Anne Moen; Patricia Flatley Brennan

2005-01-01

219

Combating HIV stigma in health care settings: what works?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this review paper is to provide information and guidance to those in the health care setting about why it is important to combat HIV-related stigma and how to successfully address its causes and consequences within health facilities. Research shows that stigma and discrimination in the health care setting and elsewhere contributes to keeping people, including health workers,

Laura Nyblade; Anne Stangl; Ellen Weiss; Kim Ashburn

2009-01-01

220

Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

2013-01-01

221

A physical fitness programme during paid working hours - impact on health and work ability among women working in the social service sector: a three year follow up study.  

PubMed

In order to study the influence of a physical fitness programme on work ability among women employed in the social sector an intervention was offered to 205 women working in the social care sector in a municipality in Sweden. The reference group comprised 165 women from the same sector working in another municipality. All participants were employed and answered questionnaires at baseline and after 36 months. For women younger than 45 years, work ability and general health improved significantly while for women, 45 years or older, future work expectations improved. For women with less musculoskeletal pain, improvements were observed regarding future work expectations, as well as work ability and general health while for women with more musculoskeletal pain, improvements were observed for general health and future work expectations. Well-structured physical fitness programmes at the worksite can be useful in contributing to individual's experiences of improvements in their own capacity as well as increased health and wellbeing. PMID:20037249

Vingård, Eva; Blomkvist, Vanja; Rosenblad, Andreas; Lindberg, Per; Voss, Margaretha; Alfredsson, Lars; Josephson, Malin

2009-01-01

222

Working on wellness (WOW): A worksite health promotion intervention programme  

PubMed Central

Background Insufficient PA has been shown to cluster with other CVD risk factors including insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, overweight, increased serum cholesterol concentrations and elevated blood pressure. This paper describes the development of Working on Wellness (WOW), a worksite intervention program incorporating motivational interviewing by wellness specialists, targeting employees at risk. In addition, we describe the evaluation the effectiveness of the intervention among employees at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods The intervention mapping (IM) protocol was used in the planning and design of WOW. Focus group discussions and interviews with employees and managers identified the importance of addressing risk factors for CVD at the worksite. Based on the employees’ preference for individual counselling, and previous evidence of the effectiveness of this approach in the worksite setting, we decided to use motivational interviewing as part of the intervention strategy. Thus, as a cluster-randomised, controlled control trial, employees at increased risk for CVD (N?=?928) will be assigned to a control or an intervention group, based on company random allocation. The sessions will include motivational interviewing techniques, comprised of two face-to-face and four telephonic sessions, with the primary aim to increase habitual levels of PA. Measures will take place at baseline, 6 and 12?months. Secondary outcomes include changes in nutritional habits, serum cholesterol and glucose concentrations, blood pressure and BMI. In addition, healthcare expenditure and absenteeism will be measured for the economic evaluation. Analysis of variance will be performed to determine whether there were significant changes in physical activity habits in the intervention and control groups at 6 and 12?months. Discussion The formative work on which this intervention is based suggests that the strategy of targeting employees at increased risk for CVD is preferred. Importantly, this study extends the work of a previous, similar study, Health Under Construction, in a different setting. Finally, this study will allow an economic evaluation of the intervention that will be an important outcome for health care funders, who ultimately will be responsible for implementation of such an intervention. Trial registration United States Clinical Trails Register NCT 01494207 PMID:22625844

2012-01-01

223

Public Health Works: Blood Donation in Urban China  

PubMed Central

Recent shifts in the global health infrastructure warrant consideration of the value and effectiveness of national public health campaigns. These shifts include the globalization of pharmaceutical research, the rise of NGO-funded health interventions, and the rise of biosecurity models of international health. We argue that although these trends have arisen as worthwhile responses to actual health needs, it is important to remember the key role that public health campaigns can play in the promotion of national health, especially in developing nations. Focusing on an example set by China in response to a public health crisis surrounding the national need for a clean and adequate blood supply and the inadvertent spread of HIV by way of blood donation in the early 19902, we argue that there is an important role for strong national public health programs. We also identify the key factors that enabled China’s response to this bourgeoning epidemic to be, in the end, largely successful. PMID:19058887

Adams, Vincanne; Erwin, Kathleen; Le, Phuoc V

2009-01-01

224

Improving Work Functioning and Mental Health of Health Care Employees Using an E-Mental Health Approach to Workers' Health Surveillance: Pretest–Posttest Study  

PubMed Central

Background Mental health complaints are quite common in health care employees and can have adverse effects on work functioning. The aim of this study was to evaluate an e-mental health (EMH) approach to workers' health surveillance (WHS) for nurses and allied health professionals. Using the waiting-list group of a previous randomized controlled trial with high dropout and low compliance to the intervention, we studied the pre- and posteffects of the EMH approach in a larger group of participants. Methods We applied a pretest–posttest study design. The WHS consisted of online screening on impaired work functioning and mental health followed by online automatically generated personalized feedback, online tailored advice, and access to self-help EMH interventions. The effects on work functioning, stress, and work-related fatigue after 3 months were analyzed using paired t tests and effect sizes. Results One hundred and twenty-eight nurses and allied health professionals participated at pretest as well as posttest. Significant improvements were found on work functioning (p = 0.01) and work-related fatigue (p < 0.01). Work functioning had relevantly improved in 30% of participants. A small meaningful effect on stress was found (Cohen d = .23) in the participants who had logged onto an EMH intervention (20%, n = 26). Conclusion The EMH approach to WHS improves the work functioning and mental health of nurses and allied health professionals. However, because we found small effects and participation in the offered EMH interventions was low, there is ample room for improvement. PMID:25516815

Ketelaar, Sarah M.; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Bolier, Linda; Smeets, Odile; Sluiter, Judith K.

2014-01-01

225

Health Literacy: Critical Opportunities for Social Work Leadership in Health Care and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One-third of U. S. adults do not have adequate health literacy to manage their health care needs; and low health literacy is a major concern due to its association with poor health outcomes, high health care costs, and health communication problems. Low health literacy is a potential driver of health disparities, and its alleviation is central to…

Liechty, Janet M.

2011-01-01

226

Periodic health examination, 1996 update: 2. Screening for chlamydial infections. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To update the 1984 recommendations of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination on the routine screening of asymptomatic patients for infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. OPTIONS: Screening, with the use of culture or nonculture tests, of the general population, of certain high-risk groups or of all pregnant women; or no routine screening. OUTCOMES: Rates of asymptomatic and symptomatic chlamydial infection, perinatal complications, longterm complications of infection (i.e., pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility and ectopic pregnancy), coinfection with other sexually transmitted diseases, disease spread, hospital care, complications of therapy and costs of infection and of screening. EVIDENCE: Search of MEDLINE for articles published between Jan. 1, 1983, and Dec. 31, 1995, with the use of the major MeSH heading "chlamydial infections," references from recent review articles and recommendation by other organizations. VALUES: The evidence-based methods of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. Advice from reviewers and experts and recommendations of other organizations were taken into consideration. Prevention of symptomatic disease and decreased overall costs were given high values. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The greatest potential benefits of screening asymptomatic patients for chlamydial infections are the prevention of complications, especially infertility and perinatal complications, and the prevention of disease spread. There is no evidence that screening of the general population for chlamydial infections leads to a reduction in complications, and screening may increase costs. However, there is evidence that annual screening of selected high-risk groups and of pregnant women during the first trimester is beneficial in preventing symptoms and reducing the overall cost resulting from infection. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is fair evidence to support screening and treatment of pregnant women during the first trimester (grade B recommendation) as well as annual screening and treatment of high-risk groups (sexually active women less than 25 years of age, men or women with new or multiple sexual partners during the preceding year, women who use nonbarrier contraceptive methods and women who have symptoms of chlamydial infection: cervical friability, mucopurulent cervical discharge or intermenstrual bleeding; grade B recommendation). There is fair evidence to exclude routine screening of the general population (grade D recommendation). VALIDATION: These recommendations are similar to those of the US Preventive Services Task Force and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination, which is funded by Health Canada and the National Health Canada and the National Health Research and Development Program. The principal author (H.D.D.) was supported in part by the Ontario Ministry of Health and the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society Lilly Fellowship. PMID:8646651

Davies, H D; Wang, E E

1996-01-01

227

Crisis as opportunity: international health work during the economic depression.  

PubMed

The economic depression of the 1930s represented the most important economic and social crisis of its time. Surprisingly, its effect on health did not show in available morbidity and mortality rates. In 1932, the League of Nations Health Organisation embarked on a six-point program addressing statistical methods of measuring the effect and its influence on mental health and nutrition and establishing ways to safeguard public health through more efficient health systems. Some of these studies resulted in considerations of general relevance beyond crisis management. Unexpectedly, the crisis offered an opportunity to reconsider key concepts of individual and public health. PMID:19230333

Borowy, Iris

2008-01-01

228

Forces  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts what forces are and how they can change the motion and shape of objects in an animated slide show. This resource also includes an interactive test and review of the material, and can be downloaded for offline use.

229

Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Burnout can create problems in every aspect of individual’s’ human life. It may have an adverse effect on interpersonal and family relations and can lead to a general negative attitude towards life. Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether burnout is associated with the mental health status of health care providers. Material and Methods: The sample in this study consisted of 240 health care employees. The Greek version of Maslach’s Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used for measuring burnout levels and the Greek version of the Symptoms Rating Scale for Depression and Anxiety (SRSDA) questionnaire was used to evaluate health care providers’ mental health status. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. Normality was checked by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and data was processed with parametric tests. General linear models with MBI dimensions as independent variables and SRSDA subscales as dependent variables were used to determine the relation between burnout and mental health status. Statistics were processed with SPSS v. 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical significance was set at p=0.05. Results: The average age of the sample is 40.00±7.95 years. Regarding gender the percentage of men is 21.40% (N=49) and of women is 78.60% (N=180). Overall the professional burnout of health care workers is moderate. The mean score for emotional exhaustion is 26.41, for personal accomplishment 36.70 and for depersonalization 9.81. The mean for each subscale of SRSDA is 8.23±6.79 for Depression Beck-21, 3.96±4.26 for Depression Beck-13, 4.91±4.44 for Melancholia, 6.32±4.35 for Asthenia and 6.36±4.72 for Anxiety. The results of general linear models with the MBI dimensions as independent variables and the SRSDA subscales as dependent variables are shown that emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment are statistically correlated with all subscales of SRSDA, while depersonalization is not correlated with any SRSDA subscale. Conclusions: Burnout appears to implicate mental health status of healthcare providers in work index. Emotional exhaustion is the burnout dimension that is correlated the most with employees’ mental health. PMID:25870487

Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

2015-01-01

230

Scand J Work Environ Health . Author manuscript Incidence of ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow in repetitive work  

E-print Network

Scand J Work Environ Health . Author manuscript Page /1 9 Incidence of ulnar nerve entrapment working conditions and ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow (UNEE) has not been the object of much study ; Risk Factors ; Workplace ; psychology Author Keywords elbow ; repetitive work ; ulnar nerve entrapment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

231

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

232

Active health monitoring in a rotating cracked shaft using active magnetic bearings as force actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the active health monitoring of rotordynamic systems in the presence of breathing shaft cracks. The shaft is assumed to be supported by conventional bearings and an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is used in a mid-shaft or outboard location as an actuator to apply specified, time-dependent forcing on the system. These forces, if properly chosen, induce a combination resonance that can be used to identify the magnitude of the time-dependent stiffness arising from the breathing mode of the shaft crack.

Mani, G.; Quinn, D. D.; Kasarda, M.

2006-06-01

233

Are market forces strong enough to deliver efficient health care systems? Confidence is waning.  

PubMed

Our paper draws lessons for policymakers from twelve communities as we identify the power and limits of general market-based strategies for improving the efficiency of health systems. The vision of market forces driving our system toward efficiency attracted politicians, policy analysts, and practitioners in the 1990s. Today some policy advocates profess even more faith in unfettered market forces. Market participants in the twelve communities in the Community Tracking Study, however, have become doubtful, and our analysis confirms the logic of their pessimism. Major barriers to efficient market outcomes exist amid growing willingness to consider renewed government interventions. PMID:15046126

Nichols, Len M; Ginsburg, Paul B; Berenson, Robert A; Christianson, Jon; Hurley, Robert E

2004-01-01

234

Making Health Communication Programs Work. A Planner's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual, designed to assist professionals in health and health-related agencies, offers guidance for planning a health communication program about cancer based on social marketing and other principles as well as the experiences of National Cancer Institute staff and other practitioners. The six chapters are arranged by sequentially ordered…

Arkin, Elaine Bratic

235

The Trouble with Health Savings Accounts: A Social Work Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, conservatives have promoted health savings accounts (HSAs) as a way of addressing the growing cost of health insurance. HSAs were introduced under the Medical Modernization Act of 2003 as "an alternative to traditional health insurance." They are at the heart of an effort to replace the current system of insurance with…

Gorin, Stephen

2006-01-01

236

Family Support & Health Care: Working Together for Healthy Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report of the Family Resource Coalition of America examines partnerships between family support programs and health care providers, forged to ensure that the comprehensive needs of families are met. The report begins with two articles, "Family Support and the Emerging Health System" and "Social and Economic Issues Affecting Health--A…

Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.; Ahsan, Nilofer, Ed.

1998-01-01

237

Demand-specific work ability, poor health and working conditions in middle-aged full-time employees.  

PubMed

We investigated the prevalence of reduced demand-specific work ability, its association with age, gender, education, poor health, and working conditions, and the interaction between poor health and working conditions regarding reduced demand-specific work ability. We used cross-sectional questionnaire data from 3381 full-time employees responding to questions about vocational education, job demands and social support (working conditions), musculoskeletal pain (MSP) and major depression (MD) (poor health) and seven questions about difficulty managing different job demands (reduced demand-specific work ability). Reduced demand-specific work ability varied from 9% to 19% among the 46-year old and from 11% to 21% among the 56-year old. Age was associated with two, gender with four, and education with all measures of reduced demand-specific work ability. MSP was associated with four and MD was associated with six measures of reduced demand-specific work ability. We found no interaction between working conditions and poor health regarding reduced demand-specific work ability. PMID:24629345

Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Thielen, Karsten; Nygaard, Else; Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Diderichsen, Finn

2014-07-01

238

48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...Contracts 970.5223-1 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work...

2013-10-01

239

48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...Contracts 970.5223-1 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work...

2014-10-01

240

48 CFR 970.5223-1 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...Contracts 970.5223-1 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning...following clause: Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health Into Work...

2012-10-01

241

Work ability among health care workers in the United Kingdom: A pilot  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the work ability of NHS health care workers in the UK, aged 45 and above, and the factors influencing it, in order to introduce occupational health interventions to improve their ability to work. After obtaining approval from ethical committee, a cross sectional survey was conducted, of a sample of (507) health care workers aged 45 and above, in

N. Nachiappan; J. Harrison

2005-01-01

242

Ethnic Minority Social Work Mental Health Training Programs: An Assessment of the Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of 64 educators in graduate social work programs examined mental health issues of American Indians and Alaskan Natives, Asian Americans, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans and gathered recommendations relating to ethnic minority faculty and mental health professionals, curriculum development, mental health social work issues and…

Edwards, E. Daniel; And Others

1992-01-01

243

Integrating Education on Addressing Health Disparities into the Graduate Social Work Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to propose an elective social work course as a means of better preparing social workers entering practice in healthcare to meet the challenges of promoting health and reducing health disparities in minority and underserved communities. Course offerings specifically targeting health or medical social work training…

Mitchell, Jamie Ann

2012-01-01

244

Mental Health Social Work And The Bureau-Medicalisation Of Mental Health Care: Identity In A Changing World  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychiatry in the UK is seemingly moving inexorably towards bureau-medicalisation, a potent combination of the medical model and organisational imperative. This paper looks at the causes of these developments and one consequent trajectory toward a generic mental health practitioner. This paper provides a rationale for mental health social work (MHSW), arguing against the temptation to modernise mental health care by

Jack Nathan; Martin Webber

2010-01-01

245

Go For IT!: A Resource for Building America's Information Technology Work Force  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Commerce, partly as a result of the response to its recently published America's New Deficit: The Shortage of Information Technology Workers (discussed in the October 17, 1997 Scout Report), has created this site to aid in building and maintaining an information technology workforce. The key to the site is an IT work force program database, which lists education, employment, and training programs. The database is searchable by type of program, geography, sponsorship agency, and keyword. For an overview of the over 170 programs in the database at present, simply click on the Search button without using any of the options. Each entry contains address and contact information for the IT program, a hyperlink when available, and a detailed description of the program. The site will act as a resource clearinghouse for educators, companies, organizations, and individuals. Go for IT! actively solicits new programs for the database.

1998-01-01

246

Uranium mining and milling work force characteristics in the western US  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a survey of the socioeconomic characteristics associated with 11 uranium mine and mill operations in 5 Western States. Comparisons are made with the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews for coal mines and utility plants in eight Western States. Worker productivity also is compared with that in similar types of coal and uranium mining operations. We found that there existed no significant differences between the socioeconomic characteristics of construction and operating crews and the secondary employment impacts associated with uranium mines and mills when compared with those associated with coal mines and utility plants requiring similar skills at comparable locations. In addition, our survey includes a comparison of several characteristics associated with the households of basic and nonbasic work forces and concludes that significant changes have occurred in the last 5 yr. Accordingly, we recommend additional monitoring and updating of data used in several economic forecasting models to avoid unwarranted delays in achieving national energy goals.

Rapp, D.A.

1980-12-01

247

The Center for Health Policy (CHP) works with institutional partners at the local, state,  

E-print Network

Health Literacy, Health Knowledge and Adherence to #12;Recently Sponsored Activities 22nd AnnualMission The Center for Health Policy (CHP) works with institutional partners at the local, state, and national levels to develop and evaluate health policy initiatives as well as translate research findings

Grishok, Alla

248

Aetna Student Health, working with Oregon State University offers a student-focused  

E-print Network

/14) Oregon State University Visiting Scholars 20142015 Student Health Insurance Plan How much does it cost Charge This material is for information only. Health insurance plans contain exclusions, limitationsAetna Student Health, working with Oregon State University offers a student-focused health

Tullos, Desiree

249

The interrelation between disability and work and t he role of health shocks and childhood circumstances  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we focus on the interrelation between disability and work, the role of health shocks and how this relationship varies with socio-economic background and health during (early) childhood and early adulthood. We use accid ents that lead to an unscheduled hospital visit as a measure for a health shock and exploit the una nticipated nature of this health

Maarten Lindeboom

250

Global Health Sciences UCSF scientists, staff and students are working in virtually every  

E-print Network

Global Health Sciences UCSF scientists, staff and students are working in virtually every region of the world in pursuit of UCSF's mission: advancing health worldwide.TM Global Health Sciences (GHS. GHS is at the forefront of educating and training the next generation of global health leaders

Klein, Ophir

251

The mental health of the UK Armed Forces: where facts meet fiction  

PubMed Central

A substantial amount of research has been conducted into the mental health of the UK military in recent years. This article summarises the results of the various studies and offers possible explanations for differences in findings between the UK and other allied nations. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) rates are perhaps surprisingly low amongst British forces, with prevalence rates of around 4% in personnel who have deployed, rising to 6% in combat troops, despite the high tempo of operations in recent years. The rates in personnel currently on operations are consistently lower than these. Explanations for the lower PTSD prevalence in British troops include variations in combat exposures, demographic differences, higher leader to enlisted soldier ratios, shorter operational tour lengths and differences in access to long-term health care between countries. Delayed-onset PTSD was recently found to be more common than previously supposed, accounting for nearly half of all PTSD cases; however, many of these had sub-syndromal PTSD predating the onset of the full disorder. Rates of common mental health disorders in UK troops are similar or higher to those of the general population, and overall operational deployments are not associated with an increase in mental health problems in UK regular forces. However, there does appear to be a correlation between both deployment and increased alcohol misuse and post-deployment violence in combat troops. Unlike for regular forces, there is an overall association between deployment and mental health problems in Reservists. There have been growing concerns regarding mild traumatic brain injury, though this appears to be low in British troops with an overall prevalence of 4.4% in comparison with 15% in the US military. The current strategies for detection and treatment of mental health problems in British forces are also described. The stance of the UK military is that psychological welfare of troops is primarily a chain of command responsibility, aided by medical advice when necessary, and to this end uses third location decompression, stress briefings, and Trauma Risk Management approaches. Outpatient treatment is provided by Field Mental Health Teams and military Departments of Community Mental Health, whilst inpatient care is given in specific NHS hospitals. PMID:25206948

Hunt, Elizabeth J. F.; Wessely, Simon; Jones, Norman; Rona, Roberto J.; Greenberg, Neil

2014-01-01

252

The mental health of the UK Armed Forces: where facts meet fiction.  

PubMed

A substantial amount of research has been conducted into the mental health of the UK military in recent years. This article summarises the results of the various studies and offers possible explanations for differences in findings between the UK and other allied nations. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) rates are perhaps surprisingly low amongst British forces, with prevalence rates of around 4% in personnel who have deployed, rising to 6% in combat troops, despite the high tempo of operations in recent years. The rates in personnel currently on operations are consistently lower than these. Explanations for the lower PTSD prevalence in British troops include variations in combat exposures, demographic differences, higher leader to enlisted soldier ratios, shorter operational tour lengths and differences in access to long-term health care between countries. Delayed-onset PTSD was recently found to be more common than previously supposed, accounting for nearly half of all PTSD cases; however, many of these had sub-syndromal PTSD predating the onset of the full disorder. Rates of common mental health disorders in UK troops are similar or higher to those of the general population, and overall operational deployments are not associated with an increase in mental health problems in UK regular forces. However, there does appear to be a correlation between both deployment and increased alcohol misuse and post-deployment violence in combat troops. Unlike for regular forces, there is an overall association between deployment and mental health problems in Reservists. There have been growing concerns regarding mild traumatic brain injury, though this appears to be low in British troops with an overall prevalence of 4.4% in comparison with 15% in the US military. The current strategies for detection and treatment of mental health problems in British forces are also described. The stance of the UK military is that psychological welfare of troops is primarily a chain of command responsibility, aided by medical advice when necessary, and to this end uses third location decompression, stress briefings, and Trauma Risk Management approaches. Outpatient treatment is provided by Field Mental Health Teams and military Departments of Community Mental Health, whilst inpatient care is given in specific NHS hospitals. PMID:25206948

Hunt, Elizabeth J F; Wessely, Simon; Jones, Norman; Rona, Roberto J; Greenberg, Neil

2014-01-01

253

Self-rated health, work characteristics and health related behaviours among nurses in Greece: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies on self-rated health among nurses have indicated an association of low job satisfaction and stress in relation to poor self-rated health. The relationship between self rated health and the specific work characteristics and health related behaviours of nurses to our knowledge have not been adequately studied. Objective To investigate the health profile of nurses working in hospitals in North West Greece and to examine the associations between self rated health (SRH) and health related behaviours and work characteristics in this group of hospital employees. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of 443 nurses working in all the hospitals in North West Greece. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship of health related behaviours and work characteristics with self rated health among the nurses. Results A total of 353 responded to the questionnaire (response rate 80%) of which 311 (88%) were female and 42 (12%) male. The mean age (standard deviation) of the respondents was 36 years (5.6) and their mean years of working as nurses were 13.5 years (5.9). Almost half of the nurses' smoked, and about one third were overweight or obese. About 58% (206) of the nurses reported having poor health while 42% (147) reported having good health. Self-rated health was independently associated with gender, effort to avoid fatty foods and physical activity, according to multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion The population studied presented a relatively poor health profile, and a high proportion of poor SRH. Though female gender and effort to avoid fatty foods were associated with poor SRH, and exercise and white meat consumption with good SRH, specific work characteristics were not associated with SRH. PMID:16364183

Pappas, Noula A; Alamanos, Yannis; Dimoliatis, Ioannis DK

2005-01-01

254

Spanning the Chasm: Corporate and Academic Cooperation To Improve Work-Force Preparation. Task Force on High-Performance Work and Workers: The Academic Connection.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, conducted by a task force that interviewed corporate and campus officials at 10 corporations and 12 universities and colleges during 1994-96, examined how well undergraduate, graduate, and professional students in the United States are being prepared to meet the demands of the modern high-performance workplace. The study found…

Business-Higher Education Forum, Washington, DC.

255

Integration of mental health into primary care and community health working in Kenya: context, rationale, coverage and sustainability  

PubMed Central

Integration of mental health into primary care is essential to meet population needs yet faces many challenges if such projects are to achieve impact and be sustainable in low income countries alongside other competing priorities. This paper describes the rationale and progress of a collaborative project in Kenya to train primary care and community health workers about mental health and integrate mental health into their routine work, Within a health systems strengthening approach. So far 1877 health workers have been trained. The paper describes the multiple challenges faced by the project, and reviews the mechanisms deployed which have strengthened its impact and sustainability to date. PMID:22477921

2010-01-01

256

Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform  

E-print Network

Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% ...

Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

2011-01-01

257

Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Careers Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents ... to technicians and therapists. The NIH Office of Science Education has a Web site that lists and ...

258

The Role of Biobehavioral, Environmental, and Social Forces on Oral Health Disparities in Frail and Functionally Dependent Nursing Home Elders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to review the literature on and discuss how interactions between bio-behavioral aging, nursing home environments, and social forces shaping current health care policies have contributed to oral health disparities in frail and functionally dependent elders who reside in nursing homes. Emerging empirical evidence suggests links between poor oral health with dental plaque deposition and

Rita A. Jablonski; Cindy L. Munro; Mary Jo Grap; Ronald K. Elswick

2005-01-01

259

Developing Future Health Professionals' Capacities for Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article details reflections of an interdisciplinary team of educators working with groups of health sciences students in preparing them for working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The first-year common core unit discussed here is one attempt to equip future health practitioners with skills and knowledges to work adequately…

Hendrick, Antonia; Britton, Katherine Frances; Hoffman, Julie; Kickett, Marion

2014-01-01

260

An Exploration of the Working Alliance in Mental Health Case Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The working alliance between clients and helpers has been identified as a common factor of treatment effectiveness, yet very little research has explored variables associated with working alliance between mental health case managers and their consumers. This study explored the potential covariates of working alliance within community mental health

Kondrat, David C.; Early, Theresa J.

2010-01-01

261

Equal health, equal work? The role of disability benefits in employment after controlling for health status.  

PubMed

In Spain, an individual can be considered legally disabled in one of the following two ways: by either receiving a disability support benefit and/or holding a certificate of disability. Having at least one of these official sanctions entitles the disabled person to a number of financial and tax advantages. However, only support benefits entail a monthly allowance and, at the same time, the individual is required to undertake a different job to that of his/her previous one. To jointly estimate (after controlling for the health characteristics of the disabling condition and for unobserved factors) the probability of receiving disability benefits and the probability of working, we make use of a newly released database of individuals with a certificate of disability. Additionally, we exploit the rich set of health measures that this database also provides. Our results show that the probability of working is 5 % lower (average treatment effect, ATE) for those disabled individuals receiving benefits. However, when we perform the estimation for individuals with differing degrees of disability, the disincentive effects of the benefits are only significant for individuals with the mildest level of disability (33-44 %) i.e. those who are on the threshold of being disabled. PMID:24647566

Frutos, Eva Maria Lopez; Castello, Judit Vall

2015-04-01

262

Russia's College Students: Work and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the effect of secondary employment on the sense of well-being of students in full-time education shows that the degree of fatigue and emotional stress on the job is affected by gender, the students' assessment of their own health, and their disposition to take care of their health.

Ivanova, L. Iu.

2014-01-01

263

Child Health Inequality: Framing a Social Work Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous studies acknowledge that the well-being of our nation hinges on the health of its people. There is specific concern about children because they represent the future. Ignoring children's health needs can compromise their educational preparedness, occupational pursuits, productivity, and longevity. Current science demonstrates that…

Hernandez, Virginia Rondero; Montana, Salvador; Clarke, Kris

2010-01-01

264

Working with young people - towards an agenda for sexual health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we outline key elements of a human rights-based framework for sexual health promotion that takes account of young people's needs and interests. This framework is located against the backdrop of a critique of the way in which negative definitions of 'sexual health' and of 'adolescence', as well as restrictions on open and appropriate sex education in schools,

Peter Aggleton; Cathy Campbell

2000-01-01

265

THE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH WORK IN ENGLAND  

PubMed Central

“There is much illness that might have been avoided if there had been an organized system of state medicine,” says Sir Arthur Newsholme, speaking of England. He would give a freer hand to the health officer who measures up to the standard. England's chief defect lies in the existence of small and inefficient local health bodies. PMID:18010211

Newsholme, Arthur

1919-01-01

266

Health informatics education – working across the professional boundaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines requirements of information professionals in the health sector, and ways career development can be enhanced. Includes analysis of job descriptions, categorising skills and roles, mapping profiles to other criteria, including health sector, and two statements for standards in higher education. Interviews with nine professionals confirmed findings of the job description analysis. There is a spectrum of skills, with clumps

Andrew Pearson; Christine Urquhart

2002-01-01

267

Re-entry into the registered nursing work force: we did it!  

PubMed

Because the enrollment in nursing programs dropped in the late 1990s and healthcare agencies and education programs were seeking ways to increase the numbers of nurses, Bethel College in Mishawaka, Indiana, and Memorial Hospital in South Bend, Indiana, designed a plan to encourage nurses who had been out of nursing to re-enter the work force. This article details the steps used in this partnership and demonstrates a process for helping registered nurses to return to nursing. In the 6-credit, 8-week course, nurses were prepared to function on a medical-surgical unit by reviewing important concepts related to nursing practice, physical assessment, nursing process, nursing skills, pharmacology, and clinical nursing update. It was anticipated that receiving college credit for the course would be a motivator for returning to study at the registered nurse to bachelor of science in nursing level. With 2 full clinical days each week, the students could experience a normal work shift and the routine of a busy clinical unit. PMID:16892670

Davidhizar, Ruth E; Bartlett, Doris

2006-01-01

268

Labor Force Participation in Formal Work-Related Education in 2000-01. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2005-048  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of the many purposes education serves in society, one of the most important is to prepare people for work. In today's economy, education is important not just to help adults enter the labor market, but also to ensure that adults remain marketable throughout their working lives. This report examines how adults in the labor force use formal…

Hudson, Lisa; Bhandari, Rajika; Peter, Katharin; Bills, David B.

2005-01-01

269

Distraction: an assessment of smartphone usage in health care work settings  

PubMed Central

Smartphone use in health care work settings presents both opportunities and challenges. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and overuse are not kept in check. This practice-focused research paper examines the current panorama of health software applications. Findings from existing research are consolidated to elucidate the level and effects of distraction in health care work settings due to smartphone use. A conceptual framework for crafting guidelines to regulate the use of smartphones in health care work settings is then presented. Finally, specific guidelines are delineated to assist in creating policies for the use of smartphones in a health care workplace. PMID:22969308

Gill, Preetinder S; Kamath, Ashwini; Gill, Tejkaran S

2012-01-01

270

The Australian Defence Force Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study: design and methods  

PubMed Central

Background The Australian Defence Force (ADF) Mental Health Prevalence and Wellbeing Study (MHPWS) is the first study of mental disorder prevalence in an entire military population. Objective The MHPWS aims to establish mental disorder prevalence, refine current ADF mental health screening methods, and identify specific occupational factors that influence mental health. This paper describes the design, sampling strategies, and methodology used in this study. Method At Phase 1, approximately half of all regular Navy, Army, and Air Force personnel (n=24,481) completed self-report questionnaires. At Phase 2, a stratified sub-sample (n=1,798) completed a structured diagnostic interview to detect mental disorder. Based on data from non-responders, data were weighted to represent the entire ADF population (n=50,049). Results One in five ADF members met criteria for a 12-month mental disorder (22%). The most common disorder category was anxiety disorders (14.8%), followed by affective (9.5%) and alcohol disorders (5.2%). At risk ADF sub-groups were Army personnel, and those in the lower ranks. Deployment status did not have an impact on mental disorder rates. Conclusion This study has important implications for mental health service delivery for Australian and international military personnel as well as contemporary veterans. PMID:25206944

Hooff, Miranda Van; McFarlane, Alexander C.; Davies, Christopher E.; Searle, Amelia K.; Fairweather-Schmidt, A. Kate; Verhagen, Alan; Benassi, Helen; Hodson, Stephanie E.

2014-01-01

271

Reducing work related psychological ill health and sickness absence: a systematic literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A literature review revealed the following: key work factors associated with psychological ill health and sickness absence in staff were long hours worked, work overload and pressure, and the effects of these on personal lives; lack of control over work; lack of participation in decision making; poor social support; and unclear management and work role. There was some evidence that

S Michie; S Williams

2003-01-01

272

Four principles for expanding PEPFAR's role as a vital force in US health diplomacy abroad.  

PubMed

The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is the leading platform for US health diplomacy and a symbol of American capacity to achieve constructive and beneficial change. The program now faces an evolving context for its work that includes, on the one hand, domestic fiscal pressures in the United States, but on the other, the potential for substantial gains against the AIDS epidemic around the world. Continued success in advancing America's humanitarian and diplomatic interests through global health requires the United States to maintain robust investments in PEPFAR; implement a strategic plan to achieve an AIDS-free generation; use the program as a foundation to strengthen health systems generally and enable them to address broader health issues, such as chronic and noncommunicable diseases; carefully manage the transition to country "ownership" of the fight against HIV; and achieve greater coherence in US government health-related policy. PMID:22778348

Collins, Chris; Isbell, Michael; Sohn, Annette; Klindera, Kent

2012-07-01

273

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ FOOD SYSTEMS FOR HEALTH: FINDING INTERVENTIONS THAT WORK  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This is a short report of a “safari” held in conjunction with the International Congress of Nutrition in September, 2005, in Futululu, St. Lucia, South Africa. Participants were several members of the International Union of Nutritional Sciences Task Force on Indigenous Peoples’ Food Systems and Nutr...

274

Managing stress in health social work roles today.  

PubMed

Stress on social workers in health settings is of increasing professional interest and concern. This article suggests individual and system sources of such stress and outlines pathways for nurture of the authentic and creative self in health careers. Replenishing measures include empowerment through teamwork, stress management techniques, consciousness raising to alter self defeating cognitions, and activities within and outside the setting to enrich definition and use of self. PMID:2237717

Dillon, C

1990-01-01

275

A systematic review of resilience and mental health outcomes of conflict-driven adult forced migrants  

PubMed Central

Background The rising global burden of forced migration due to armed conflict is increasingly recognised as an important issue in global health. Forced migrants are at a greater risk of developing mental disorders. However, resilience, defined as the ability of a person to successfully adapt to or recover from stressful and traumatic experiences, has been highlighted as a key potential protective factor. This study aimed to review systematically the global literature on the impact of resilience on the mental health of adult conflict-driven forced migrants. Methodology Both quantitative and qualitative studies that reported resilience and mental health outcomes among forcibly displaced persons (aged 18+) by way of exploring associations, links, pathways and causative mechanisms were included. Fourteen bibliographic databases and seven humanitarian study databases/websites were searched and a four stage screening process was followed. Results Twenty three studies were included in the final review. Ten qualitative studies identified highlighted family and community cohesion, family and community support, individual personal qualities, collective identity, supportive primary relationships and religion. Thirteen quantitative studies were identified, but only two attempted to link resilience with mental disorders, and three used a specific resilience measure. Over-reliance on cross-sectional designs was noted. Resilience was generally shown to be associated with better mental health in displaced populations, but the evidence on this and underlying mechanisms was limited. Discussion The review highlights the need for more epidemiological and qualitative evidence on resilience in forcibly displaced persons as a potential avenue for intervention development, particularly in resource-poor settings. PMID:25177360

2014-01-01

276

Impaired work functioning due to common mental disorders in nurses and allied health professionals: the Nurses Work Functioning Questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Common mental disorders (CMD) negatively affect work functioning. In the health service sector not only the prevalence of\\u000a CMDs is high, but work functioning problems are associated with a risk of serious consequences for patients and healthcare\\u000a providers. If work functioning problems due to CMDs are detected early, timely help can be provided. Therefore, the aim of\\u000a this study is

F. R. Gärtner; K. Nieuwenhuijsen; F. J. H. van Dijk; J. K. Sluiter

277

Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia -MSN Health & Fitness -Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM  

E-print Network

Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia - MSN Health & Fitness - Mental Health http://health by: Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia Communication breakdown within brain disrupts) -- Schizophrenia may be caused by a genetic mutation that disrupts communication between the hippocampus

278

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

This working paper synthesizes critical problems identified by interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry and places them in the context of work and family issues. At ...

Harrington, Mona

2004-12-10

279

Serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin levels in Air Force health study participants - preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, the US Air Force responded to a congressional mandate to initiate an epidemiologic study of the possible health effects of exposure to herbicides and their 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) contaminants in Air Force veterans who served in the Ranch Hand defoliation operation during the Vietnam conflict. Accordingly, the Air Force conducted a nonconcurrent prospective study, the Air Force Health Study, of all 1267 members of the Ranch Hand unit and a series of matched controls. This phase of the Air Force study focused on measuring serum TCDD levels in 150 Ranch Hand veterans and 50 controls. All participants were enlisted men; the Ranch Hand veterans had been either herbicide loaders or herbicide specialists in Vietnam. The demographic and health characteristics of Ranch Hand personnel and controls were similar; however, their serum TCDD levels differed markedly.

Not Available

1988-06-24

280

The mental health of the UK Armed Forces in the 21st century: resilience in the face of adversity.  

PubMed

The recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have attracted considerable political and media interest in the mental health of UK military personnel. As a result of the close operational collaboration between US and UK forces, there have inevitably been many comparisons drawn between the mental health status of the two forces. Considerable research activity suggests that the mental health of UK forces appear to have remained relatively resilient in spite of their considerable exposure to traumatic events; one stark exception to this is the high rates of alcohol misuse which seem to be related to deployment. This paper explores the recently published literature relating to UK military forces and attempts to draw conclusions about the reasons for the apparent resilience shown by the majority of the regular forces. PMID:24574105

MacManus, Deirdre; Jones, N; Wessely, S; Fear, N T; Jones, E; Greenberg, N

2014-06-01

281

The inconsistent mediating effects of psychosocial work characteristics on the education-health relationship.  

PubMed

This study examined the relationship between psychosocial work characteristics and educational disparities in health. Informed by the evidence on the relationship between work pressure and higher education, we suggested reframing the distribution of psychosocial work characteristics in the context of education. We differentiated psychosocial work resources from demands and hypothesized that the inconsistent mediation effects of psychosocial resources and demands are associated with educational status. Using data from the 2008 National Study of Changing Workforce (NSCW), we found that psychosocial work resources and demands had inconsistent mediating effects on the education-health relationship. Higher educated employees were more likely to report autonomy, challenge and schedule control, but they were also more likely to experience overtime hours, job overload and work-family conflict. Work resources appeared to protect higher-educated workers from stress and health problems while work demands put them at risk of less favorable health outcomes. In addition we found that the 'costs' of psychosocial work demands were stronger among women, particularly those who were highly educated, suggesting that highly educated women did not reap the full health benefit of high educational attainment. Our findings illustrate that the observed positive associations between education and health mask important heterogeneity in the effects of psychosocial work characteristics. We discuss the implications of this study for health and family-based work policies. PMID:22800919

Qiu, Hanyao; Bures, Regina; Shehan, Constance L

2012-10-01

282

The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

Applebaum, Herbert

283

Beyond workers' compensation: men's mental health in and out of work.  

PubMed

The mental health of men is an important issue with significant direct and indirect costs emerging from work-related depression and suicide. Although the merits of men's community-based and workplace mental health promotion initiatives have been endorsed, few programs are mandated or formally evaluated and reported on. Conspicuously absent also are gender analyses detailing connections between masculinities and men's work-related depression and suicide on which to build men-centered mental health promotion programs. This article provides an overview of four interconnected issues, (a) masculinities and men's health, (b) men and work, (c) men's work-related depression and suicide, and (d) men's mental health promotion, in the context of men's diverse relationships to work (including job insecurity and unemployment). Based on the review, recommendations are made for advancing the well-being of men who are in as well as of those out of work. PMID:23727792

Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina S E

2014-01-01

284

Health behavior, quality of work life, and organizational effectiveness in the lumber industry.  

PubMed

A major incentive for work-site health promotion activities has been the promise of increased company profitability. Some critics have challenged the economic argument based on distal outcomes such as increased employee longevity and less morbidity later in life. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between employee health behavior, quality of work life, and proximal organizationally valued outcomes. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of employees working at Pacific Lumber Company (N = 146), the largest single-site lumber mill in California. Although employee sleep patterns predicted health care utilization and psychological well-being, for the most part employee health behaviors were not strong predictors of proximal organizational effectiveness factors. However, quality-of-work-life factors significantly predicted organizational commitment, absenteeism, and tardiness frequency. The findings suggest the value of improving the system of work in which employees are embedded as part of comprehensive work-site health promotion efforts. PMID:10435239

Donaldson, S I; Sussman, S; Dent, C W; Severson, H H; Stoddard, J L

1999-08-01

285

Jeopardy not bonus status for African American women in the work force: why does the myth of advantage persist?  

PubMed

African American women in the United States have a long history of employment outside of their homes. Their experiences are unique from other groups of majority and minority men and women due to the interaction of race, gender, and class. Despite long-standing and continuing struggles against discrimination, harassment, low pay, tokenism, and stereotypes, a myth that African American women enjoy a bonus or advantaged status in the work force has developed and persisted. In this article, Black women's work force experiences are examined from a social constructionist framework, misperceptions of Black women are critiqued, explanations are developed that explain the unique status of African American women and recommendations are proposed to eradicate the discrimination and marginal status that Black women have endured in the work force. PMID:9485574

Sanchez-Hucles, J V

1997-10-01

286

Work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To assess separate and combined effects of work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).?METHODS—A cross sectional study was conducted in a Dutch nationwide random sample of 720 patients with RA. Information about work factors and behavioural coping was collected by a self-administered postal questionnaire. A broad variety of work factors and coping styles were evaluated separately and in combination using multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for sociodemographic and disease related variables. Attributable and preventable fractions were calculated from the combined analyses to assess the relative importance of the contributing factors.?RESULTS—Additional job training, equal career opportunities, letting the disease influence the choice of the current job position, and informing colleagues about having the disease were negatively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of decreasing the risk was adjusting job demands which accounted for 63% of the patients still in the labour force. Decreasing activities and diverting attention in order to cope with pain, and pacing in order to cope with limitations were the coping styles which were positively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of increasing the risk of withdrawal was pacing which accounted for 67% of the withdrawals.?CONCLUSION—Work factors are potentially important modifiable risk factors for withdrawal from the labour force in patients with RA. Behavioural coping is also relevant.?? PMID:11602473

Chorus, A; Miedema, H; Wevers, C; van der Linden, S

2001-01-01

287

The stigma of mental health problems and other barriers to care in the UK Armed Forces  

PubMed Central

Background As with the general population, a proportion of military personnel with mental health problems do not seek help. As the military is a profession at high risk of occupational psychiatric injury, understanding barriers to help-seeking is a priority. Method Participants were drawn from a large UK military health study. Participants undertook a telephone interview including the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ); a short measure of PTSD (Primary Care PTSD, PC-PTSD); a series of questions about service utilisation; and barriers to care. The response rate was 76% (821 participants). Results The most common barriers to care reported are those relating to the anticipated public stigma associated with consulting for a mental health problem. In addition, participants reported barriers in the practicalities of consulting such as scheduling an appointment and having time off for treatment. Barriers to care did not appear to be diminished after people leave the Armed Forces. Veterans report additional barriers to care of not knowing where to find help and a concern that their employer would blame them for their problems. Those with mental health problems, such as PTSD, report significantly more barriers to care than those who do not have a diagnosis of a mental disorder. Conclusions Despite recent efforts to de-stigmatise mental disorders in the military, anticipated stigma and practical barriers to consulting stand in the way of access to care for some Service personnel. Further interventions to reduce stigma and ensuring that Service personnel have access to high quality confidential assessment and treatment remain priorities for the UK Armed Forces. PMID:21310027

2011-01-01

288

Managed Mental Health Care: Implications for Social Work Practice and Social Work Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Managed care has rapidly developed as the most common model of delivery of health care in this country. This article examines the implications of new demands brought to bear on social workers. This research compares six managed health care plans operating regionally and nationally and demonstrates the cumbersome application process. Fee schedules for each of the plans are listed. Ethical

Howard M. Turney; Patricia G. Conway

2001-01-01

289

SIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern.  

E-print Network

. Fact Sheet 1. Students want health coverage that is fully compliant with the Affordable Care Act (ACASIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern even if they could afford it. 8. As students are having more difficulty finding affordable health care

Nickrent, Daniel L.

290

SIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern.  

E-print Network

and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010. The SIU Student Health Initiative is a public education and policySIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern for a student health plan that is both affordable and easily accessible to a wide range of students. Students

Nickrent, Daniel L.

291

Knowledge for Social Work Roles In Community Mental Health: Findings of Empirical Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a study that examined the knowledge needed for practice in community mental health and the primary source for this knowledge. Differences were found in knowledge areas needed for practice in community mental health settings when contrasted with practice in more traditional mental health agencies. The most frequently indicated source of knowledge for social work roles in

Lawrence K. Berg; Stephen Z. Cohen; William J. Reid

1978-01-01

292

What Can Education Teach Child Mental Health Services? Practitioners' Perceptions of Training and Joint Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of joint working between educational and child mental health professionals is well documented but there are numerous challenges and only limited training models. While the evidence base and training programmes for educationalists regarding child mental health is growing, training mental health professionals about education is more…

Vostanis, Panos; O'Reilly, Michelle; Taylor, Helen; Day, Crispin; Street, Cathy; Wolpert, Miranda; Edwards, Ruth

2012-01-01

293

Employee Health and Well-Being: The Role of Flexibility and Work–Family Balance  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is substantial interest in the potential health effects of workplace flexibility; however, the literature linking flexibility to health is limited. The purpose of this study was to enhance understanding of the potential benefits of flexibility for employee health and well-being. Additionally, this study determines if this association is mediated by work–family balance. Results from longitudinal data obtained from a

Patrick R. Casey; Joseph G. Grzywacz

2008-01-01

294

Toward a Collaborative Working Relationship among Vision Rehabilitation and Allied Health Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores issues of allied health professionals who provide vision rehabilitation services to individuals with visual impairments. It questions whether allied health professionals receive sufficient training to work with this population, identifies challenges facing the rehabilitation field, and suggests ways allied health

Orr, Alberta L.; Huebner, Kathleen M.

2001-01-01

295

Managing the work–life roller-coaster: Private stress or public health issue?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although research has established the importance for health of a sense of personal control at work, the implications of this for women have not been adequately studied. Using quantitative data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health and qualitative data from an associated study, here we examine women's health and sense of control in relation to family and employment

Lois Bryson; Penny Warner-Smith; Peter Brown; Leanne Fray

2007-01-01

296

Angus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Angus Council Social Work Department  

E-print Network

Angus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Partners Angus Council Social Work Department Tayside Primary Care NHS Trust Overview A review of mental health services and Tayside Primary Care Trust have operated a joint community mental health service for older people

Mottram, Nigel

297

Effects of war exposure on air force personnel's mental health, job burnout and other organizational related outcomes.  

PubMed

Longitudinal data from a stratified representative sample of U.S. Air Force personnel (N = 1009) deployed to the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations were analyzed in this study. Using structural equation models, we examined the effects of war exposure on traumatic experiences, Post Traumatic Stress (PTS) symptoms, resource loss, and on subsequent functioning, perceived health, and on job and organizationally relevant outcomes. The job and organizational outcomes included job burnout, job involvement, job strain, job satisfaction, work-family conflict, organizational commitment, deployment readiness, and intention to reenlist. We found that deployment to the theater of the war increased risk of exposure to trauma, which in turn, predicted elevated PTS symptoms and resource loss. PTS symptoms predicted later loss of resources and deterioration in perceived health and functioning. In turn, resource loss predicted negative job and organizational outcomes. Exposure to trauma fully mediated the effects of deployment to the theater of war on PTS symptoms and resource loss and had additional significant indirect effects on several job and organizational relevant outcomes. For returning veterans, deployment to the theater of war, exposure to trauma, PTS symptoms, and resource loss represents a "cascading" chain of events that over time results in a decline of health and functioning as well as in adverse job and organizationally relevant outcomes that may affect organizational effectiveness. PMID:21280941

Vinokur, Amiram D; Pierce, Penny F; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Galea, Sandro

2011-01-01

298

Effects of war exposure on Air Force personnel’s mental health, job burnout and other organizational related outcomes  

PubMed Central

Longitudinal data from a stratified representative sample of U.S. Air Force personnel (N = 1009) deployed to the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations were analyzed in this study. Using structural equation models, we examined the effects of war exposure on traumatic experiences, Post Traumatic Stress (PTS) symptoms, resource loss, and on subsequent functioning, perceived health, and on job and organizationally relevant outcomes. The job and organizational outcomes included job burnout, job involvement, job strain, job satisfaction, work-family conflict, organizational commitment, deployment readiness, and intention to reenlist. We found that deployment to the theater of the war increased risk of exposure to trauma, which in turn, predicted elevated PTS symptoms and resource loss. PTS symptoms predicted later loss of resources and deterioration in perceived health and functioning. In turn, resource loss predicted negative job and organizational outcomes. Exposure to trauma fully mediated the effects of deployment to the theater of war on PTS symptoms and resource loss and had additional significant indirect effects on several job and organizational relevant outcomes. For returning veterans, deployment to the theater of war, exposure to trauma, PTS symptoms, and resource loss represents a ‘cascading’ chain of events that over time results in a decline of health and functioning as well as in adverse job and organizationally relevant outcomes that may affect organizational effectiveness. PMID:21280941

Vinokur, Amiram D.; Pierce, Penny F.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Hobfoll, Stevan E.; Galea, Sandro

2011-01-01

299

The contribution of social work in promoting rural health: a case from the grassroots.  

PubMed

Promotion of rural health has become a high priority of policy makers in many third world countries. Numerous NGOs are working to improve health quality in rural India. By describing a rural health promotion project in which a social worker played a key role, this article illustrates how social work practitioners can bring their many skills to bear in efforts to promote health. This commentary seeks to share the experience of an NGO in specific health promotion project in Rural Karnataka State (India). PMID:19773302

Nanjunda, D C

2009-09-01

300

Day laborers' life satisfaction: the role of familismo, spirituality, work, health, and discrimination.  

PubMed

Limited research exists on day laborers' mental health. This study identifies relevant factors that influence the life satisfaction of 143 predominantly undocumented Latino male day laborers. Findings demonstrated the importance of familismo, spirituality, work satisfaction, perceived health, and perceived discrimination on life satisfaction. Given the deleterious impact discrimination can have on mental health, we examined whether perceived discrimination's role on life satisfaction would be buffered by familismo, spirituality, work satisfaction, and perceived health. Among these variable, spirituality and perceived health were identified as protective factors against the role of perceived discrimination on life satisfaction. Implications for research and practice with Latino male day laborers are discussed. PMID:23875852

Ojeda, Lizette; Piña-Watson, Brandy

2013-07-01

301

Associations of psychosocial working conditions with self-rated general health and mental health among municipal employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine associations of job demands and job control, procedural and relational organizational fairness, and physical work load with self-rated general health and mental health. In addition, the effect of occupational class on these associations is examined. Methods: The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study baseline surveys in 2001–2002. Respondents to cross-sectional postal surveys were middle-aged employees

Mikko Laaksonen; Ossi Rahkonen; Pekka Martikainen; Eero Lahelma

2006-01-01

302

Theoretical and Practical Imperatives for Reflective Social Work Organizations in Health and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the common challenges to health and mental health organizations that require these agencies to become more “reflective” in their culture and structures. This necessitates integrating practice and research at all organizational levels. Schon's concept of reflective practice to health and mental health organizations is extended to develop the construct of a reflective organization, in which direct practitioners

Ken Peake; Irwin Epstein

2005-01-01

303

Working Toward Social Justice: Center for Research on Minority Health Summer Workshop on Health Disparities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health disparities research encompasses a complex web of areas of cross-disciplinary expertise from fields such as health policy, public health, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, communications, genetics, biology, environmental science, ethics, and law. Dissemination of health disparities research is paramount to educating and training professionals, academics, community leaders, students and others about the subject area, and providing them with the necessary

Denae W. King; Isabel Torres Vigil; Angelica P. Herrera; Richard A. Hajek; Lovell A. Jones

304

Working towards Men's Health: Findings from the Sefton Men's Health Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas. Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training…

Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve; McCullagh, Jo; Hacking, Sue

2010-01-01

305

The Application of Social Constructionist Principles to Teaching Social Work Practice in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of social constructionism to social work education has added an important dimension to traditional methods of social work pedagogy. This paper discusses several social constructionist principles relevant to the field of mental health and applies them to the contexualization of major issues in mental health practice. A model for teaching is proposed that integrates the voices of clients,

Marty Dewees

1999-01-01

306

Strategic Alliances: Working Across Professional Boundaries: Primary Health Care and Social Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective joint working between health and local authorities, and between health, social services and housing professionals, has long been recognized as vital to the provision of ‘seamless’ services for the most vulnerable members of society. Unfortunately, the history of formal joint working over the past 20 years has been largely a poor one. In this article the authors outline the

Bob Hudson; Brian Hardy; Melanie Henwood; Gerald Wistow

1997-01-01

307

Ethics in Humanitarian Aid Work: Learning From the Narratives of Humanitarian Health Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little analysis has been made of ethical challenges encountered by health care professionals (HCPs) participating in humanitarian aid work. This is a qualitative study drawing on Grounded Theory analysis of 20 interviews with health care professionals who have provided humanitarian assistance. We collected the stories of ethical challenges reported by expatriate HCPs who participated in humanitarian and development work. Analysis

Lisa Schwartz; Christina Sinding; Matthew Hunt; Laurie Elit; Lynda Redwood-Campbell; Naomi Adelson; Lori Luther; Jennifer Ranford; Sonya DeLaat

2010-01-01

308

HIV and Sexual Health Working Group Guidelines on HIV and AIDS  

E-print Network

1 July 2008 HIV and Sexual Health Working Group Guidelines on HIV and AIDS #12;2 Guidelines on HIV and AIDS These Guidelines have been prepared by the University's HIV and Sexual Health Working Group, which that will help Colleges and University institutions to establish their own specific policy on HIV and AIDS

Talbot, James P.

309

How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan  

Cancer.gov

There are ways to learn if your health plan covers routine patient care costs in a clinical trial. Here are ideas about who to contact for help, questions to ask, and information to collect and keep if you decide to take part in a trial.

310

The use of a website as an interaction and training device in health, gender and work in schools.  

PubMed

The objective of this paper is to introduce the Website "Encontros sobre a vida, a saúde e o trabalho nas escolas públicas" (Encounters of life, health and work in public schools). It was designed viewing to contribute to the generation of changes regarding the meanings attributed to work done by all professionals acting in Brazilian public schools, in their relationship to health. We have tried to create a space conducive to reflection and invention of different ways of action towards the struggle for health of the protagonists of the school units. We present the Website's different ambients, such as the one for availability of Training materials, Discussion Forums and the Observatory of facts and events related to the topic. We point out the analysis of a dialogue between the Formaction Program in Health, Gender and Work at Schools. Through the displaying of dialogs that mobilized the training participants we observed a process of collective analysis of the situations that occur at meetings, allowing other interpretation possibilities by the different parties. In the case focused, a nursery assistant (male), in the dialogue, is forced to review his description of the activity, initially, portrayed as simple. PMID:22317438

Brito, Jussara; Neves, Mary Yale; Hyppolito, Amanda Ornela; Alvarez, Denise; da Silva, Edil Ferreira; Muniz, Hélder; de Souza, Kátia Reis; França, Maristela; Athayde, Milton

2012-01-01

311

Determinants of child and forced marriage in Morocco: stakeholder perspectives on health, policies and human rights  

PubMed Central

Background In Morocco, the social and legal framework surrounding sexual and reproductive health has transformed greatly in the past decade, especially with the introduction of the new Family Law or Moudawana. Yet, despite raising the minimum age of marriage for girls and stipulating equal rights in the family, child and forced marriage is widespread. The objective of this research study was to explore perspectives of a broad range of professionals on factors that contribute to the occurrence of child and forced marriage in Morocco. Methods A qualitative approach was used to generate both primary and secondary data for the analysis. Primary data consist of individual semi-structured interviews that were conducted with 22 professionals from various sectors: health, legal, education, NGO’s and government. Sources of secondary data include academic papers, government and NGO reports, various legal documents and media reports. Data were analyzed using thematic qualitative analysis. Results Four major themes arose from the data, indicating that the following elements contribute to child and forced marriage: (1) the legal and social divergence in conceptualizing forced and child marriage; (2) the impact of legislation; (3) the role of education; and (4) the economic factor. Emphasis was especially placed on the new Family Code or Moudawana as having the greatest influence on advancement of women's rights in the sphere of marriage. However, participants pointed out that embedded patriarchal attitudes and behaviours limit its effectiveness. Conclusion The study provided a comprehensive understanding of the factors that compound the problem of child and forced marriage in Morocco. From the viewpoint of professionals, who are closely involved in tackling the issue, policy measures and the law have the greatest potential to bring child and forced marriage to a halt. However, the implementation of new legal tools is facing barriers and resistance. Additionally, the legal and policy framework should go hand in hand with both education and increased economic opportunities. Education and awareness-raising of all ages is considered essential, seeing that parents and the extended family play a huge role in marrying off girls and young women. PMID:24131501

2013-01-01

312

How Can Magnetic Forces Do Work? Investigating the Problem with Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students' reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been…

Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

2013-01-01

313

Analysis of long- and short-range contribution to adhesion work in cardiac fibroblasts: An atomic force microscopy study.  

PubMed

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) and Poisson statistic were used to analyze the detachment work recorded during the removal of gold-covered microspheres from cardiac fibroblasts. The effect of Cytochalasin D, a disruptor of the actin cytoskeleton, on cell adhesion was also tested. The adhesion work was assessed using a Poisson analysis also derived from single-cell force spectroscopy retracting curves. The use of Poisson analysis to get adhesion work from AFM curves is quite a novel method, and in this case, proved to be effective to study the short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work. This method avoids the difficult identification of minor peaks in the AFM retracting curves by creating what can be considered an average adhesion work. Even though the effect of actin depolymerisation is well documented, its use revealed that control cardiac fibroblasts (CT) exhibit a work of adhesion at least 5 times higher than that of the Cytochalasin treated cells. However, our results indicate that in both cells short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work are nearly equal and the same heterogeneity index describes both cells. Therefore, we infer that the different adhesion behaviors might be explained by the presence of fewer membrane adhesion molecules available at the AFM tip-cell interface under circumstances where the actin cytoskeleton has been disrupted. PMID:25686942

Sbaizero, O; DelFavero, G; Martinelli, V; Long, C S; Mestroni, L

2015-04-01

314

How the health and community development sectors are combining forces to improve health and well-being.  

PubMed

The root causes of poor health experienced by many who live in low-income neighborhoods-such as the lack of access to health care, limited food choices, and exposure to environmental hazards-are well documented, but often go beyond the scope of the health care delivery system. But that is beginning to change. The health sector has begun to collaborate with the community development sector, which for decades has been working in low-income neighborhoods. Encouraging local and national examples of these new partnerships abound. They include an effort in Seattle, Washington, to reduce exposure to allergens and irritants among low-income asthmatic children, and a $500 million federal program to finance the operation of grocery stores in what have previously been urban "food deserts." To nurture such efforts, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Federal Reserve System, and others have sponsored a series of "healthy community" forums in US cities. In this article we explore the growing partnerships between the health and community development sectors as well as the challenges they face, and we offer policy recommendations that might help them succeed. PMID:22068394

Braunstein, Sandra; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

2011-11-01

315

Associations of Work-Related Factors and Work Engagement with Mental and Physical Health: A 1-Year Follow-up Study Among Older Workers.  

PubMed

Purpose The goals of this study were to determine whether, among older employees, unfavourable physical and psychosocial work-related factors were associated with poorer mental and physical health and whether high work engagement buffered the associations between unfavourable work-related factors and poorer health. Methods A 1-year longitudinal study with employed persons aged 45-64 was conducted within the Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (n = 8,837). Using an online questionnaire, work-related factors (physical: physical load; psychosocial: psychological job demands, autonomy, and support) and work engagement were measured at baseline and health at baseline and 1-year follow-up. General linear models were used to assess associations of work-related factors and work engagement with health. Tests of interaction terms assessed whether work engagement buffered the work-related factor-health associations. Results Unfavourable psychosocial work-related factors at baseline were associated with poorer mental health at follow-up. Higher physical load, higher psychological job demands, and lower autonomy at baseline were associated with poorer physical health at follow-up. Higher work engagement at baseline was related to better physical and especially better mental health during the 1-year follow-up. Work engagement had a small effect on the associations between work-related factors and health. Conclusions Among older employees, especially the promotion of a high work engagement and, to a lesser extent, favourable work-related factors can be beneficial for mental health in particular. PMID:24928413

Leijten, Fenna R M; van den Heuvel, Swenne G; van der Beek, Allard J; Ybema, Jan Fekke; Robroek, Suzan J W; Burdorf, Alex

2015-03-01

316

[Life style, health aspects and work among truck drivers].  

PubMed

Epidemiological study with the purpose of identify the demographic characteristics, health aspects and life style, amongst truck drivers were applied to 105 drivers from supply center of Campinas (fruit, vegetable, product wholesale market). The outcomes showed that all drivers interviewed were men, the majority were married, had kids, low study level and more than 30 years old. 54,2% reported abuse psychoactive drugs. The majority was aware of the importance of using condoms with casual partners; 47,5% reported relationship with casual partners and 86 always used condoms. Although the small sample analyzed, the results suggests that must be implemented health promotion actions and illness prevention public politics, including the development of customized educational interventions with in this professional group. PMID:20835656

Masson, Valéria Aparecida; Monteiro, Maria Inês

2010-01-01

317

Influenza and the work of the World Health Organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Before World War I, influenza was not considered a particularly serious problem. The great pandemic of 1918–1919 changed all that, and the possibility that such a catastrophe could occur again has conditioned all subsequent developments.In epidemiological terms, the hallmark of an influenza is the excess mortality that it causes combined with an enormous burden of ill-health that saps the energy

M. E Kitler; P Gavinio; D Lavanchy

2002-01-01

318

[Fitness for work and public health in hospital workers].  

PubMed

Transmission of infection to patients from health-care workers has recently become a topic in medical literature. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) in the US, and the UK Health Departments in the UK issued guidelines for professionals performing invasive procedures who may be infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or hepatitis B virus. The Italian Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) in 1999 held a Consensus Conference advocating routine mandatory testing of health-care workers and a general restriction on performing exposure-prone invasive procedures. Nevertheless, the ISS failed to identify the institution that should be responsible for these controls. Harmful behavior of health-care workers comprises not only the risk of the impact of blood-borne infections but also the impact of, for example, depression, substance missuse, side effects of medication, family problems, fatigue or lack of insight. Time and effort is required for drafting, revising and refining policy in this area. The complexity of the matter hampers the standardisation of guidelines internationally: American and British policies are hardly enforceable in the Italian context. The Italian Study Committee for the Hospital Management of Workers affected by illnesses hazardous for the public (GIS GILMaPP) here discusses the legal end ethical issues surrounding the risk of "provider-to patient" transmission of disease. The policy dilemma involving patients' rights and sick workers should be addressed on a case-by-case basis. Strenuous efforts should be made to respect ethical and legal issues, such as informed consent, confidentiality, and to avoid discrimination. There is an urgent need for the medical community to find a broad consensus that would be acceptable for both the healthcare worker and the patient. PMID:11775615

2001-01-01

319

20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...and State law otherwise applicable to working conditions of employees are equally...

2011-04-01

320

20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...and State law otherwise applicable to working conditions of employees are equally...

2010-04-01

321

Quantification of the Impact of Endometriosis Symptoms on Health Related Quality of Life and Work Productivity  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To quantify the impact of endometriosis-related symptoms on physical and mental health status, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and work-related aspects (absenteeism, presenteeism, work productivity, activity impairment). DESIGN Cross-sectional quantitative study. SETTING Academic and research institution. PATIENT(S) Women (n=193) with self-reported surgically diagnosed endometriosis from the Endometriosis Patient Registry at Ponce School of Medicine and Health Sciences (PSMHS). INTERVENTION(S) Patients completed an anonymous questionnaire divided into three sections consisting of questions from the Patient Health Survey (SF-12®), the Endometriosis Health Profile (EHP-5), and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Survey (WPAI). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S) Impact of endometriosis symptoms on physical and mental health status, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), absenteeism, presenteeism, work productivity and activity impairment was quantified. RESULTS Patients had SF-12 scores denoting significant disability in the phyisical and mental health components. They also reported an average of 7.41 hrs (approximately one working day) of work time loss during the week the symptoms are worse. In addition, WPAI scores show high impact on work-related domains: 13% of average loss in work time (absenteeism), 65% of their work was impaired (presenteeism), 64% loss in efficiency levels (work productivity loss), and 60% of daily activities perturbed (activity impairment). CONCLUSION Endometriosis symptoms such as chronic, incapacitating pelvic pain and infertility negatively and substantially impact the physical and mental health status, HRQoL, and productivity at work of patients with endometriosis. PMID:21621771

Fourquet, Jessica; Báez, Lorna; Figueroa, Michelle; Iriarte, R. Iván; Flores, Idhaliz

2011-01-01

322

Rethinking work-health models for the new global economy: a qualitative analysis of emerging dimensions of work.  

PubMed

Technology change, rising international trade and investment, and increased competition are changing the organization, distribution and nature of work in industrialized countries. To enhance productivity, employers are striving to increase innovation while minimizing costs. This is leading to an intensification of work demands on core employees and the outsourcing or casualization of more marginal tasks, often to contingent workers. The two prevailing models of work and health - demand-control and effort-reward imbalance - may not capture the full range of experiences of workers in today's increasingly flexible and competitive economies. To explore this proposition, we conducted a secondary qualitative analysis of interviews with 120 American workers [6]. Our analysis identifies aspects of work affecting the quality of workers' experiences that are largely overlooked by popular work-health models: the nature of social interactions with customers and clients; workers' belief in, and perception of, the importance of the product of their work. We suggest that the quality of work experiences is partly determined by the objective characteristics of the work environment, but also by the fit of the work environment with the worker's needs, interests, desires and personality, something not adequately captured in current models. PMID:15328458

Polanyi, Michael; Tompa, Emile

2004-01-01

323

The Relationships between Mothers’ Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health*  

PubMed Central

We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers’ diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the NLSY79 (N=2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first birth is associated with significantly better health at age forty than part-time work, paid work interrupted by unemployment, and unpaid work in the home. Part-time workers with little unemployment report significantly better health at age forty than mothers experiencing persistent unemployment. These relationships remain after accounting for the unequal selection of more advantaged mothers into full-time, continuous employment, suggesting full-time workers benefit from cumulating advantages across the life course and reiterating the need to disentangle health benefits associated with work from those associated with pre-pregnancy characteristics. PMID:23197483

Frech, Adrianne; Damaske, Sarah

2014-01-01

324

[Disclosing the work processes of the community health agents on the Family Health Strategy in Vitória (ES, Brazil)].  

PubMed

The community health agent (CHA) has a singular role as a "link" between the community and the health service. The main purpose of this descriptive/qualitative study is to evaluate the production of the CHA work processes in the Family Health Strategy in the county of Vitória (ES, Brazil). The research was developed in the health region of Maruípe, a district in the county of Vitória. The researchers invited 14 CHAs to use a half structured interview based on a guide script containing 24 questions. The process of work in health was considered as "a prevention and promotion of health", and the domiciliary visits were considered as being an everyday basic activity. The CHAs withhold several interpretations concerning to the work process and associated to the concept of unit the team has. It is also possible to notice a kind of idealism of the competences concerning to the CHA work, thus, causing a feeling of impotence and limitation when facing the challenges imposed by it. It is possible to conclude that the CHA needs tools and abilities that overcome their technical knowledge in order to act in a social scope and also to deal with the health needs of each user. PMID:21180831

Galavote, Heletícia Scabelo; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia; de Cássia Duarte Lima, Rita

2011-01-01

325

Force, Velocity, and Work: The Effects of Different Contexts on Students' Understanding of Vector Concepts Using Isomorphic Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test…

Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

2014-01-01

326

Effects of Viscous Dissipation and Flow Work on Forced Convection in a Channel Filled by a Saturated Porous Medium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fully developed forced convection in a parallel plate channel filled by a saturated porous medium, with walls held either at uniform temperature or at uniform heat flux, with the effects of viscous dissipation and flow work included, is treated analytically. The Brinkman model is employed. The analysis leads to expressions for the Nusselt number, as a function of the Darcy

D. A. Nield; A. V. Kuznetsov; Ming Xiong

2004-01-01

327

Constrained choices? Linking employees' and spouses' work time to health behaviors.  

PubMed

There are extensive literatures on work conditions and health and on family contexts and health, but less research asking how a spouse or partners' work conditions may affect health behaviors. Drawing on the constrained choices framework, we theorized health behaviors as a product of one's own time and spouses' work time as well as gender expectations. We examined fast food consumption and exercise behaviors using survey data from 429 employees in an Information Technology (IT) division of a U.S. Fortune 500 firm and from their spouses. We found fast food consumption is affected by men's work hours-both male employees' own work hours and the hours worked by husbands of women respondents-in a nonlinear way. The groups most likely to eat fast food are men working 50 h/week and women whose husbands work 45-50 h/week. Second, exercise is better explained if work time is conceptualized at the couple, rather than individual, level. In particular, neo-traditional arrangements (where husbands work longer than their wives) constrain women's ability to engage in exercise but increase odds of men exercising. Women in couples where both partners are working long hours have the highest odds of exercise. In addition, women working long hours with high schedule control are more apt to exercise and men working long hours whose wives have high schedule flexibility are as well. Our findings suggest different health behaviors may have distinct antecedents but gendered work-family expectations shape time allocations in ways that promote men's and constrain women's health behaviors. They also suggest the need to expand the constrained choices framework to recognize that long hours may encourage exercise if both partners are looking to sustain long work hours and that work resources, specifically schedule control, of one partner may expand the choices of the other. PMID:25531550

Fan, Wen; Lam, Jack; Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; King, Rosalind; McHale, Susan

2015-02-01

328

Social work in health care when conventional meets complementary: nonspecific back pain and massage therapy.  

PubMed

Through years of engagement within health, the profession of social work has worked diligently to influence and incorporate the professional values of holism and biopsychosocial-spiritual approaches into mainstream health care to support health care consumers. Continuing education supports social workers' specialized knowledge of health conditions as well as issues affecting health care systems and delivery. Two pressing and current issues in health of concern to social work are (1) nonspecific back pain and (2) the fastest growing consumer trend in North America--integration of complementary and alternative medicine. This article offers information relevant to social workers in practice about the complex and multifactoral condition of chronic nonspecific back pain and the integration of complementary and alternative medicine, in particular, massage therapy, as an effective evidence-based integrated approach. PMID:25665287

McEwen, Shelly

2015-02-01

329

Perceived unfairness in working conditions: The case of public health services in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background The focus on the determinants of the quality of health services in low-income countries is increasing. Health workers' motivation has emerged as a topic of substantial interest in this context. The main objective of this article is to explore health workers' experience of working conditions, linked to motivation to work. Working conditions have been pointed out as a key factor in ensuring a motivated and well performing staff. The empirical focus is on rural public health services in Tanzania. The study aims to situate the results in a broader historical context in order to enhance our understanding of the health worker discourse on working conditions. Methods The study has a qualitative study design to elicit detailed information on health workers' experience of their working conditions. The data comprise focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) with administrators, clinicians and nursing staff in the public health services in a rural district in Tanzania. The study has an ethnographic backdrop based on earlier long-term fieldwork in the same part of Tanzania. Results The article provides insights into health workers' understanding and assessment of their working conditions. An experience of unsatisfactory working conditions as well as a perceived lack of fundamental fairness dominated the FGDs and IDIs. Informants reported unfairness with reference to factors such as salary, promotion, recognition of work experience, allocation of allowances and access to training as well as to human resource management. The study also revealed that many health workers lack information or knowledge about factors that influence their working conditions. Conclusions The article calls for attention to the importance of locating the discourse of unfairness related to working conditions in a broader historical/political context. Tanzanian history has been characterised by an ambiguous and shifting landscape of state regulation, economic reforms, decentralisation and emerging democratic sentiments. Such a historic contextualisation enhances our understanding of the strong sentiments of unfairness revealed in this study and assists us in considering potential ways forward. PMID:21314985

2011-01-01

330

Psychosocial Work Characteristics Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Functioning in Rural Women: The Wisconsin Rural Women's Health Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between psychosocial work characteristics and health functioning and cardiovascular disease risk factors among rural women of central Wisconsin and compare psychosocial work characteristics between farm and nonfarm women. Methods: Stratified sampling was used to select a…

Chikani, Vatsal; Reding, Douglas; Gunderson, Paul; McCarty, Catherine A.

2005-01-01

331

Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Work-Rest Cycles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BHP Program Element Goal: Identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration and return to terrestrial life. BHP Requirements: a) Characterize and assess risks (e.g., likelihood and consequences). b) Develop tools and technologies to prevent, monitor, and treat adverse outcomes. c) Inform standards. d) Develop technologies to: 1) reduce risks and human systems resource requirements (e.g., crew time, mass, volume, power) and 2) ensure effective human-system integration across exploration mission.

Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra

2011-01-01

332

Empowerment in the field of health promotion: recognizing challenges in working toward equity.  

PubMed

Over the last 25 years, the language of empowerment has been woven into the guiding missions and descriptions of institutions, funding and projects globally. Although theoretical understandings of empowerment within the domain of health promotion remain contentious, we have little idea of how a shift toward an empowerment agenda has affected the daily work of those in the field of health promotion. A systematic examination of the implementation of the empowerment agenda is important as it can help us understand how redistributive agendas are received within the multiple institutional contexts in which health promotion work is carried out. The goal of this study, therefore, was to try to understand the empowerment agenda within the context of everyday health promotion. We conducted semi-structured interviews with health promoters from a variety of geographical regions, institutional backgrounds, and job capacities. Essentially we found that empowerment remains conceptually dear to health promoters' understanding of their work, yet at the same time, mainstreaming empowerment is at odds with central trends and initiatives that govern this work. We argue that many of the stumbling blocks that have hindered this specific agenda are actually central stumbling blocks for the wider field of health promotion. We examine some of the barriers to implementing transformational change. Overcoming the primary limitations uncovered in this exploration of empowerment is actually crucial to progressive work in health promotion in general, particularly work that would seek to lessen inequities. PMID:24812101

Berry, Nicole S; Murphy, Jill; Coser, Larissa

2014-12-01

333

Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force White Paper #2 -- Uses of Uncensored Data  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: (1) reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors; (2) minimize the levels of, and potential for, exposure to beryllium; and (3) establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease. On January 4, 2001, DOE issued DOE G 440.1-7A, Implementation Guide for use with 10 CFR 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing the CBDPP. That guide describes methods and techniques that DOE considers acceptable in complying with the Rule. In 2005 a draft DOE Technical Standard ''Management of Items and Areas Containing Low Levels of Beryllium'' (SAFT 0103; hereafter referred to as the ''TS'') was circulated for comment (http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/tsdrafts/saft-0103.pdf). DOE technical standards are voluntary consensus standards developed when industry standards do not exist (see http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/index.html for more information). DOE does not require its field elements to implement DOE technical standards, but field elements may choose to adopt these standards to meet specific needs. This beryllium TS is intended to provide best practices and lessons learned for manageing items and areas that contain low levels of beryllium, which has been a costly and technically challenging component of CBDPPs. The TS is also intended to provide guidance for determining if the Rule's housekeeping and release criteria are met. On challenge the TS addressed was the statistical interpretation of data sets with non-detected results, a topic for which no strong consensus exists. Among the many comments on the draft TS was a suggestion that certain of the statistical comparisons described in the TS could be better implemented if analytical results, even when below a reporting limit, were to be reported by analytical laboratories. See Appendix 1 for a review of terminology related to reporting limits. The Beryllium Health and Safety Committee (BHSC) formed a Sampling and Analysis Subcommittee (SAS) in 2003. The SAS established a working group on accreditation and reporting limits. By 2006 it had become evident that the issues extended to data reporting as a whole. The SAS proposed to the BHSC the formation of a Data Reporting Task Force (DRTF) to consider issues related to data reporting. The BHSC Board agreed, and requested that the DRTF generate a white paper, to be offered by the BHSC to potential interested parties such as the DOE policy office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy. It was noted that additional products could include detailed guidance and potentially a journal article in the future. The SAS proposed that DRTF membership represent the affected disciplines (chemists, industrial hygiene professionals and statisticians, and the DOE office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy). The BHSC Board decided that DRTF membership should come from DOE sites, since the focus would be on reporting in the context of the TS and the Rule. The DRTF came into existence in late 2006. The DRTF membership includes industrial hygienists, analytical chemists and laboratory managers, members of the regulatory and oversight community, and environmental statisticians. A first White Paper, ''Summary of Issues and Path Forward'', was reviewed by the BHSC in March 2007 and issued by the DRTF in June 2007. It describes the charter of the DRTF, introduces some basic terminology (reproduced here in Appendix 1), lays out the issues the DRTF is expected to address, and describes a path forward for the DRTF's work. This first White Paper is available through the BHSC web site. This White Paper presents recommendations developed by the DRTF following the process laid out in that first White Pap

MacQueen, D H

2007-10-10

334

Making Program Assessment Work: A Profile of the U.S. Air Force Academy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the three levels of course and program assessment present at the U.S. Air Force Academy, including assessment at the course, departmental, and institutional levels. Points out common elements useful to all assessment efforts. (EV)

Millis, Barbara J.; Lowe, James K.; Aretz, Anthony J.

2003-01-01

335

Microsatellite based, on-orbit servicing work at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-orbit servicing can dramatically reduce the life cycle cost, and increase the utility, of expensive space assets. However, previous servicing attempts have generally been too large, complex, and expensive to be effective. Newer, streamlined approaches, such as the Air Force's Modular On-orbit Servicing (MOS) concept, might make on-orbit servicing feasible. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing many of

Richard W. Madison; Kirtland AFB

2000-01-01

336

Do Skyrme forces that ?t nuclear matter work well in ?nite nuclei?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A short list of Skyrme force parameterizations, recently found to have passed a series of constraints relating to nuclear matter properties is analyzed for their ability to reproduce data in ?nite nuclei. We analyse binding energies, isotope shifts, neutron skin thicknesses and ?ssion barriers. We ?nd that the subset of forces have no common ability to reproduce(or otherwise)properties of ?nite nuclei, despite passing the extensive range of nuclear matter constraints.

Stevenson, P. D.; Goddard, P. M.; Stone, J. R.; Dutra, M.

2013-05-01

337

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Endocrine System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the endocrine system.

2012-11-20

338

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Muscular System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the muscular system.

2012-11-20

339

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Circulatory System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the cardiovascular system.

2012-11-20

340

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Respiratory System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the respiratory system.

2012-11-20

341

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Immune Cells  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the immune system.

2012-11-20

342

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Digestive System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the digestive system.

2012-11-20

343

TEMPERATURE MONITORS WORKS OF ART HEALTH AS HUMAN BEINGS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review of different cases studies concerning heritage buildings, frescos, archaeological ceramic and wood paintings, shows as Thermal non Destructive Testing and Evaluation is particularly effective examining works of art. Nevertheless, in spite of fascinating images, a quantitative and reliable diagnosis is difficult. Hence, in many cases particular equipments and procedures must be arranged. Established techniques allows to monitor different

E. Grinzato

344

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Nervous System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the nervous system.

2012-11-20

345

Female work participation and child health: an investigation in rural Tamil Nadu, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper seeks to examine the linkage between mothers' work and child health. The data are from a survey of 75 working and 75 non-working women in a village in Tamil Nadu, India. The results show that the working women spend on an average 1.7 hours less than the non-working women on child care. The duration of breastfeeding also is

M. Sivakami

346

Does Occupational Mobility Influence Health among Working Women? Comparing Objective and Subjective Measures of Work Trajectories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Occupational mobility is highly valued in American society, but is it consequential to women's health? Previous studies have yielded inconsistent results, but most measured occupational mobility by identifying transitions across occupational categories. Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, this study (1) compares objective and subjective…

Wilkinson, Lindsay R.; Shippee, Tetyana P.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

2012-01-01

347

Periodic health examination, 1995 update: 2. Prevention of dental caries. The Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations, based on current evidence, for practising physicians and dentists on interventions for the prevention of dental caries in their patients. OPTIONS: Systemic fluoride administration, professionally administered fluoride, use of fluoride mouth rinses, fissure sealants, oral-hygiene practices, dietary practices, identification of groups at a high risk of dental caries, and early diagnosis and treatment. OUTCOMES: Reduced prevalence of dental caries and fluorosis, longer retention of teeth and lower treatment costs. EVIDENCE: Several MEDLINE searches were conducted for articles published from January 1980 to December 1992, including relevant review articles. VALUES: Relevant clinical findings were evaluated and categorized with the use of the evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. Recommendations were developed for each method of caries prevention, with reduced incidence of dental caries and improved prevalence of caries-free teeth given high values. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The potential benefits of these measures in the long-term are a lower incidence of tooth decay, longer retention of teeth and prevention of fluorosis. The cost saving can be considerable for patients and insurers; however, implementation of some recommendations will be difficult, since the traditional preventive practices of dentists and dental hygienists are not easily changed. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is good evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: use of dentifrices containing fluoride, fluoridation of drinking water, fluoride supplements for patients in areas where there is a low level (0.3 ppm or less) of fluoride in the drinking water, professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with very active decay or at a high risk of dental caries and selective use of professionally applied fissure sealants on permanent molar teeth. There is poor evidence that the following manoeuvres are effective in preventing dental caries: professionally applied topical fluoride and the use of fluoride mouth rinses for patients with a low risk of caries, toothbrushing (without a dentifrice containing fluoride) and flossing, cleaning of teeth by a dentist or dental hygienist before topical application of fluoride or at a dental visit and dietary counselling for the general population. There is good evidence to recommend against the use of over-the-counter fluoride mouth rinses by the general population. VALIDATION: These guidelines are compatible with those of the US Preventive Services Task Force. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the task force, which is funded by Health Canada. Major funding was provided by the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Toronto, Toronto and the Faculty of Dentistry of Dalhousie University, Halifax. PMID:7697577

Lewis, D W; Ismail, A I

1995-01-01

348

Gendered emotion work around physical health problems in mid- and later-life marriages?  

PubMed Central

The provision and receipt of emotion work—defined as intentional activities done to promote another’s emotional well-being—are central dimensions of marriage. However, emotion work in response to physical health problems is a largely unexplored, yet likely important, aspect of the marital experience. We analyze dyadic in-depth interviews with husbands and wives in 21 mid-to later-life couples to examine the ways that health-impaired people and their spouses provide, interpret, and explain emotion work. Because physical health problems, emotion work, and marital dynamics are gendered, we consider how these processes differ for women and men. We find that wives provide emotion work regardless of their own health status. Husbands provide emotion work less consistently, typically only when the husbands see themselves as their wife’s primary source of stability or when the husbands view their marriage as balanced. Notions of traditional masculinity preclude some husbands from providing emotion work even when their wife is health-impaired. This study articulates emotion work around physical health problems as one factor that sustains and exacerbates gender inequalities in marriage with implications for emotional and physical well-being. PMID:25661852

Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Reczek, Corinne; Umberson, Debra

2015-01-01

349

Assessment of the welfare of working horses, mules and donkeys, using health and behaviour parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working animals provide an essential transport resource in developing countries worldwide. Many of these animals are owned by poor people and work in harsh environments, so their welfare is a cause for concern. A protocol was developed to assess the welfare of working horses, mules and donkeys in urban and peri-urban areas, using direct observation of health and behaviour parameters.

J. C. Pritchard; A. C. Lindberg; D. C. J. Main; H. R. Whay

2005-01-01

350

Relationship of Work Hours With Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress Among a College Student Cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and Methods: The authors randomly selected a sample of 1,700 undergraduates

Kim Miller; Fred Danner; Ruth Staten

2008-01-01

351

Relationship of Work Hours with Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress among a College Student Cohort  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and…

Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

2008-01-01

352

Predicting mental health outcomes in female working carers: a longitudinal analysis.  

PubMed

This study investigated the factors contributing to psychological distress and positive affect over time in female working carers of older people. Questionnaires (including measures of work-related, care-related, interpersonal and psychological aspects of working and caring) were distributed to 275 female working carers in the UK, the majority of whom were working as nurses in the National Health Service. In cross-sectional analyses, higher work stress and work demands predicted higher psychological distress among respondents. Better carer health, lower external pressures to care and higher work satisfaction predicted greater positive affect. The combined effects of greater work stress and work demands also predicted higher levels of psychological distress at follow-up (after one year), whereas younger age and lower work stress predicted greater positive affect over time. We conclude that more stressful and demanding work roles appear detrimental to carers' mental health, while lower stress occupational roles may be beneficial, providing satisfaction and fulfilment outside of the caring role. Older female carers may be especially at risk of psychological distress, possibly due in part to increasing health problems of their own. PMID:16798629

Lyonette, C; Yardley, L

2006-07-01

353

First aid at work The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as  

E-print Network

First aid at work The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (as amended) Guidance approval of the amended Regulations. First aid at work (Advance copy) 1 #12;© Crown copyright 2013 First to this guidance. First aid at work (Advance copy) 2 #12;Contents Preface Introduction Regulation 1 Citation

Romano, Daniela

354

A Proposed Framework for Understanding the Forces behind Legislation of Universal Health Insurance—Lessons from Ten Countries  

PubMed Central

Objective To understand the forces propelling countries to legislate universal health insurance. Data Source/Study Design Descriptive review and exploratory synthesis of historic data on economic, geographic, socio-demographic, and political factors. Data Extraction Methods We searched under “insurance, health” on MEDLINE and Google Scholar, and we reviewed relevant books and articles via a snowball approach. Principal Findings Ten countries with universal health insurance were studied. For the five countries that passed final universal insurance laws prior to 1958, we found that two forces of “historical context” (i.e., social solidarity and historic patterns), one “ongoing dynamic force” (political pressures), and “one uniqueness of the moment” force (legislative permissiveness) played a major role. For the five countries that passed final legislation between 1967 and 2010, the predominant factors were two “ongoing dynamic forces” (economic pressures and political pressures) and one “uniqueness of the moment” force (leadership). In general, countries in the former group made steady progress, whereas those in the latter group progressed in abrupt leaps. Conclusions The lessons of more recent successes—almost all of which were achieved via abrupt leaps—strongly indicate the importance of leadership in taking advantage of generalized economic and political pressures to achieve universal health insurance. PMID:22092227

Wang, C Jason; Ellender, Stacey M; Textor, Theodora; Bauchner, Joshua H; Wu, Jen-You; Bauchner, Howard; Huang, Andrew T

2011-01-01

355

International experts’ perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care: implication for Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Enhancing primary health care to incorporate mental health services is a key strategy for closing the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. The integration of psychological care into primary health care is a critical step in addressing poor access to mental health specialists. As the psychology profession is increasingly called upon to prepare psychologists for primary health care settings, an international experts' consensus is valuable in guiding the development of a high-quality curriculum for psychologists working in the primary health care context. A Delphi method was used to gain a consensus on the most appropriate roles and training for psychologists. Initial constructs and themes were derived from a detailed literature review and sent to 114 international experts in primary mental health care from five continents. Overall, 52 experts who participated agreed that psychologists should have wide-ranging roles and skills including clinical, health promotion and advocacy skills. This study has identified the specific roles and training needed by psychologists to enable them to work more effectively in primary health care settings. The consensus will inform the development of a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia, and is part of a broader suite of studies.

Setiyawati, Diana; Colucci, Erminia; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Minas, Harry

2014-01-01

356

Indonesian experts' perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Mental health is a critical issue in Indonesia, since its population ranks among the top five in the world and the prevalence of common mental disorders is 11.6% of the adult population. However, the need to build an effective mental health-care system that is accessible to the whole population has only been recently addressed. The Aceh tsunami in 2004 brought to the forefront an unexpected window of opportunity to build a mental health-care system. Integration of mental health care into primary health care is a key strategy to close the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. Existing integration of psychologists into primary health care is a big step to meet the shortage of mental health-care specialists. As primary mental health care is an emerging field, the perspectives of Indonesian experts on Indonesian mental health care are needed to develop a curriculum for training psychologists to work in primary health care. In this study, data have been collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 Indonesian mental health experts, and three focus group discussions with 26 psychologists. Overall, experts agreed that to be able to work in primary health-care psychologists should have roles and training ranging from clinical to advocacy skills. Participants also agreed that psychologists should work in the community and contribute to primary health care as service providers and that strong collaborations between psychologists and other primary health-care providers are the key; these can be developed partly through referral and by respecting each other's unique strengths. PMID:25750806

Setiyawati, Diana; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry

2014-01-01

357

Health promotion and surveillance: the establishment of an IUHPE global working group.  

PubMed

Following a series of international meetings on behavioral monitoring and surveillance, in 2007 the Italian Ministry of Health (Ministerio della Salute) and the Institute for Health (Istituto Superiore della Sanità) hosted the 5(th) International Conference on Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance (BRFS) in Rome. A key focus of the conference was on how current surveillance systems could be applied to the field of health promotion, particularly in building the evidence base for health promotion practice. As a result of these discussions, the World Alliance for Risk Factor Surveillance (WARFS), an IUHPE Global Working Group, was formed to work toward providing knowledge and expertise in surveillance as a tool for advancing health promotion. For those IUHPE members interested in participation, this article provides an overview on the strategic direction of WARFS and the newly formed sub-working groups. PMID:20028670

Campostrini, Stefano; McQueen, David V; Evans, Linnea

2009-12-01

358

Ethics beyond borders: how health professionals experience ethics in humanitarian assistance and development work.  

PubMed

Health professionals are involved in humanitarian assistance and development work in many regions of the world. They participate in primary health care, immunization campaigns, clinic- and hospital-based care, rehabilitation and feeding programs. In the course of this work, clinicians are frequently exposed to complex ethical issues. This paper examines how health workers experience ethics in the course of humanitarian assistance and development work. A qualitative study was conducted to consider this question. Five core themes emerged from the data, including: tension between respecting local customs and imposing values; obstacles to providing adequate care; differing understandings of health and illness; questions of identity for health workers; and issues of trust and distrust. Recommendations are made for organizational strategies that could help aid agencies support and equip their staff as they respond to ethical issues. PMID:19143083

Hunt, Matthew R

2008-08-01

359

Labor force participation and health-related quality of life in HIV-positive men who have sex with men: The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Too many people with HIV have left the job market permanently and those with reduced work capacity have been unable to keep their jobs. There is a need to examine the health effects of labor force participation in people with HIV. This study presents longitudinal data from 1,415 HIV-positive men who have sex with men taking part in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Generalized Estimating Equations show that employment is associated with better physical and mental health quality of life and suggests that there may be an adaptation process to the experience of unemployment. Post-hoc analyses also suggest that people who are more physically vulnerable may undergo steeper health declines due to job loss than those who are generally healthier. However, this may also be the result of a selection effect whereby poor physical health contributes to unemployment. Policies that promote labor force participation may not only increase employment rates but also improve the health of people living with HIV. PMID:22814570

Rueda, Sergio; Raboud, Janet; Plankey, Michael; Ostrow, David; Mustard, Cameron; Rourke, Sean B.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Bekele, Tsegaye; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Lavis, John; Detels, Roger; Silvestre, Anthony J.

2013-01-01

360

A comparison of hospital- and community-based mental health nurses: perceptions of their work environment and psychological health.  

PubMed

This study compares hospital- (n = 67) and community-based (n = 55) mental health nurses in relation to their perceptions of the work environment and also their psychological health. Measures include: the General Health Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Work Environment Scale. The data, obtained from self-returned questionnaires, show that community nurses rated their work environments higher for the dimensions of Involvement, Supervisor Support, Autonomy, Innovation and Work Pressure. Hospital nurses saw their environments as being higher in (managerial) Control. There were no differences between the groups for the dimensions of Peer Cohesion, Task Orientation, Clarity or (physical) Comfort. Furthermore, there were no overall differences between the two groups in relation to psychological health, although the pattern of factors associated with emotional well-being differed. Finally, analyses of the community data revealed that those nurses with 'flexitime' arrangements evaluated their work environments less positively and showed higher levels of psychological strain than did those working 'fixed-time' schedules. The findings suggest that the hospital and community environments make different demands on nursing staff, and that this should be considered when organizing nursing services if stress is to be avoided. PMID:7930101

Fielding, J; Weaver, S M

1994-06-01

361

Social Networks, the ‘Work’ and Work Force of Chronic Illness Self-Management: A Survey Analysis of Personal Communities  

PubMed Central

Self-management support forms a central aspect of chronic Illness management nationally and globally. Evidence for the success of self-management support has mainly focussed on individually-centred outcomes of behavioural change. While it is recognised that social network members play an important role there is currently a gap in knowledge regarding who provides what type of support and under what circumstances. This is relevant for understanding the division of labour and the meeting of needs for those living with a long-term condition. We therefore took a network approach to explore self-management support conceptualising it as types of illness ‘work’ undertaken within peoples’ social networks. 300 people from deprived areas and with chronic illnesses took part in a survey conducted in 2010 in the North West of England. A concentric circles diagram was used as a research tool with which participants identified 2,544 network members who contributed to illness management. The results provide an articulation of how social network members are substantially involved in illness management. Whilst partners and close family make the highest contributions there is evidence of inputs from a wide range of relationships. Network member characteristics (type of relationship, proximity, frequency of contact) impact on the amount of illness work undertaken in peoples’ networks. In networks with ‘no partner’ other people tend to contribute more in the way of illness related work than in networks with a partner. This indicates a degree of substitutability between differently constituted networks, and that the level and type of input by different members of a network might change according to circumstances. A network perspective offers an opportunity to redress the balance of an exclusively individual focus on self-management because it addresses the broader set of contributions and resources available to people in need of chronic illness management and support. PMID:23565162

Vassilev, Ivaylo; Rogers, Anne; Blickem, Christian; Brooks, Helen; Kapadia, Dharmi; Kennedy, Anne; Sanders, Caroline; Kirk, Sue; Reeves, David

2013-01-01

362

[The effect of the working conditions on the health status of female assemblers and their children].  

PubMed

The study covered work conditions and health state of female assemblers and their children. The authors represent the results and evaluate gonadotoxic and embryotoxic effects of lead-tin solder in experiments on animals. PMID:8689067

Salangina, L I; Dube?kovskaia, L S; Sladkova, Iu N

1995-01-01

363

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

Interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry have identified a range of broadly-felt critical problems. This document synthesizes these problems and places them in the context of work and ...

Harrington, Mona

364

[Problems of work world and its impact on health. Current financial crisis].  

PubMed

Health and work are complex processes. Besides, they are multiple considering the forms they take. These two processes are linked to each other and they are influenced by each other. According to this, it is possible to establish that work world is extremely complex and heterogeneous. In this world, "old" or traditional risks coexist with "modern risks", derived from the new models of work organization and the incorporation of new technologies. Unemployment, work relationships precariousness and work risks outsourcing are results of neoliberal strategies. Some negative results of health-sickness process derived from transformation in work world and current global economic crisis have been noticed in current work conditions. Finally, the need for reconstructing policies focusing on this situation derived from work world is suggested. PMID:23258747

Tomasina, Fernando

2012-06-01

365

Consumer Health: Does Advertising Work on You? and Evaluating a Product's Health Claims.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes lessons for teaching middle and high school students how to determine if they are influenced by the power of advertising and how to evaluate a product's health claims. To determine the influence of advertising, teachers have high school students discuss what their latest health product/service purchase was, why they bought it,…

Cox, Carolyn C.

366

The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.  

PubMed

Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

2013-11-01

367

SIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern.  

E-print Network

SIU Student Health Initiative Working for quality and affordable student heath care at Southern. Benefit Comparison Current SIUC self-funded student insurance plan* Affordable Care Act (ACA) compliant,000 lifetime benefits cap) No limits on mental health care appointments Limited number of therapy appointments

Nickrent, Daniel L.

368

The Health of Women at Work. A Bibliography. Occasional Papers No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both English and foreign language articles and books, most of them published since 1950, are cited in this bibliography on the health of women in the workplace. Citations were selected to represent the efforts that have been made by health professionals, statisticians, historians, and social scientists in this area. The designation "at work"…

Hunt, Vilma R.

369

Developing the Health Care Workforce: A Comparison of Two Work-Based Learning Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share practice on how two approaches to work-based learning (WBL) are used to develop the knowledge and skills of health care staff with different levels of experience and educational attainment within the Department of Nursing and the Department of Allied Health Professions at a post-1992 university…

Brown, Barbara Alice; Harte, Jacqui; Warnes, Anne-Marie

2007-01-01

370

Working with Our Communities: Moving from Service to Scholarship in the Health Professions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: As faculty at health professionals schools have become increasingly engaged with their communities in partnerships to improve health, new questions have arisen about faculty rewards for such activites. To sustain the community work of their faculty, institutions need to reconceptualize faculty rewards, promotion, and tenure that are relevant to community activities. Historical perspective: Scholarship has evolved since the 17th

CHERYL A. MAURANA; MARIE WOLFF; BARBRA J. BECK; DEBORAH E. SIMPSON

2001-01-01

371

The Development Integrated Health and Social Work Services for Older People with South West Glasgow  

E-print Network

Greater Glasgow Primary Care NHS Trust Overview The South West LHCC area in Glasgow is developing communication between primary health and social care services. CARENAP-D ­ a joint assessment tool for peopleThe Development Integrated Health and Social Work Services for Older People with South West Glasgow

Mottram, Nigel

372

WorkExcel.com E115 Mental health experts know that distance  

E-print Network

© WorkExcel.com E115 Mental health experts know that distance compounds stress, worry, and fear when someone you love is in harm's way. That's why so much social and mental health support exists for military families who have loved ones serving overseas. When you're starved for infor- mation, it's natural

Oliver, Douglas L.

373

Mental Health Status among Married Working Women Residing in Bhubaneswar City, India: A Psychosocial Survey  

PubMed Central

Mental health is a major public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the mental health status and its correlates among married working women residing in Bhubaneswar city of Odisha, India. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 240 households involving 240 married working women following a multistage cluster random sampling design. Using the predesigned, pretested interview schedule and self-reporting questionnaire, all relevant information was collected. Our study revealed that 32.9% of study respondents had poor mental health and only about 10% of these women had sought any kind of mental health services. Logistic regression analysis showed that 3 predictors such as favourable attitude of colleagues, sharing their own problems with husband, and spending time for yoga/meditation/exercise had significant positive impact on the mental health status of married working women. A preventive program regarding various aspects of mental health for married working women at workplace as well as community level could be a useful strategy in reducing this public health problem. PMID:24800258

Panigrahi, Ansuman; Padhy, Aditya Prasad; Panigrahi, Madhulita

2014-01-01

374

Developing social work students’ reflectivity in cultural indigenization of mental health practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cultural indigenization is important in mental health practice within various cultural contexts. In this paper, the writer describes the teaching experience in developing the reflectivity of social work students in mental health practice. By means of various teaching and learning strategies, students achieve various levels of reflectivity in cultural indigenization. They were: basic reflectivity by knowing the difference between western

2006-01-01

375

A Leadership Role for Social Work in the Mental Health Transition to Local Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current philosophy, policy, and practice involving care of persons with serious mental illnesses are reviewed, with a focus on the movement that is usually called deinstitutionalization. Past efforts and future trends are discussed within the context of public mental health systems at the state level. The paper argues for a greater leadership role for social work in providing mental health

John A. Morris Jr

1996-01-01

376

The Evolution of Mental Health Care Policy and the Implications for Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this article is on the evolution of mental health care policy in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. To the extent that social work practice enacts policy, this article focuses particularly on the ways 20th century social workers have reflected, interpreted, and forged mental health care initiatives and reforms. The article includes a

Cassandra Bransford; Tim Bakken

2003-01-01

377

Social work in mental health services: A survey of the field  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of social workers employed in mental health services was conducted in Victoria in mid-1997. Approximately 300 social workers were identified as working in the sector. About half were employed in adult clinical services, 23% in psychiatric disability services, 12.4% in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, and the rest in a range of other services. More than 90%

Stephen Ziguras; Kristen Henley; Wayne Conron; Neil Catford

1999-01-01

378

Clocking in: The Organization of Work Time and Health in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article assesses the health implications of emerging patterns in the organization of work time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we examine general mental and physical health (SF-12 scores), psychological distress (CESD score), clinical levels of obesity, and the presence of medical conditions, at age 40.…

Kleiner, Sibyl; Pavalko, Eliza K.

2010-01-01

379

Social Work Training for Mental Health Services to the Elderly Within a Multigenerational Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Multigenerational Family Project at the University of Washington School of Social Work aims to respond to practice gaps in both mental health and aging services. Given the growth in the number of multigenerational families and the increased employment of middle aged women who have been the traditional family caregivers, it is critical that geriatric social workers in mental health

Nancy R. Hooyman

1986-01-01

380

Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper  

E-print Network

Pollution Externalities and Health: A Study of Indian Rivers Working Paper Quy-Toan Do (The World's rivers, focusing on infant mortality as a measure of health outcomes. In particular, we quantify two impacts: The mortality burden of river pollution in the district of its measurement; and the persistence

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

381

Liaison Problems among Infant Psychiatry, Psychology, Pediatrics, Nursing, and Social Work in Infant Mental Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed are attempts made by staff at the Community Mental Health Center of the New Jersey School of Medicine to develop an ongoing working relationship with pediatric neonatologists, house staff, and nursing staff in order to promote their attunement to mental health needs and obtain access to their expertise. After a description of the center…

Bry, Thea

382

Job stress and coping strategies in health care professionals working with cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing stress in health care professionals working with cancer patients and the strategies used to cope with stress. The data was collected by self-report questionnaires, the Job Stress Inventory and Ways of Coping Inventory. Overall 109 health care professionals (physicians n=52, nurses n=57) employed in five Oncology Hospitals in Ankara,

Vedat Isikhan; Turhan Comez; M. Zafer Danis

2004-01-01

383

Bachelor of Social Work Students and Mental Health Stigma: Understanding Student Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bachelor-level social work students (n = 198) at a midsized Midwestern public university were surveyed to evaluate their attitudes toward those with mental health concerns. Additionally, students were surveyed regarding their willingness to seek treatment for their own mental health needs. Results of the analyses suggest that the majority of…

Zellmann, Karen T.; Madden, Elissa E.; Aguiniga, Donna M.

2014-01-01

384

Mental Health Workforce Change through Social Work Education: A California Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2004 California Mental Health Services Act requires large-scale system change in the public mental health system through a shift to recovery-oriented services for diverse populations. This article describes an innovative strategy for workforce recruitment and retention to create and sustain these systemic changes. The California Social Work

Foster, Gwen; Morris, Meghan Brenna; Sirojudin, Sirojudin

2013-01-01

385

Work-Related Health Limitations, Education, and the Risk of Marital Disruption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite progress in identifying the covariates of divorce, there remain substantial gaps in the knowledge. One of these gaps is the relationship between health and risk of marital dissolution. I extend prior research by examining the linkages between work-related health limitations and divorce using 25 years of data (N = 7919) taken from the 1979…

Teachman, Jay

2010-01-01

386

Inequalities in health care and social work intervention: The case of Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the role of social workers in tackling inequalities in health care. The aim of such social work interventions is to empower service users, increase their well-being and reduce stress symptoms, mainly by advocacy and facilitating their access to health-care facilities and promoting social change.

Taghi Doostgharin

2010-01-01

387

School of Health Sciences As a midwife you will be working with families and parents at  

E-print Network

School of Health Sciences As a midwife you will be working with families and parents at one Sciences Fundamental Aspects of Care Professional Midwifery Knowledge Psychosocial Sciences and Public Health. Students will be able to combine theoretical study and develop clinical skills within our

Weyde, Tillman

388

Labor Force Participation Rates among Working-Age Individuals with Visual Impairments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study analyzes four consecutive years of monthly labor force participation rates reported by the Current Population Survey that included nationally representative samples of the general U.S. population and nationally representative samples of the U.S. population with specifically identified disabilities. Visual impairment is one of the…

Kelly, Stacy M.

2013-01-01

389

Special operations forces and counterproliferation: The interagency process at work. Study project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The threat of use of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in the United States or against American vital interests overseas is real. Combating the proliferation of WMD has become a high priority for the U.S. Government. Within Department of Defense Counterproliferation Initiative (DOD CPI) of 1993 Special Operations Forces (SOF) have become pivotal players in the creation of a full

Bakken

1996-01-01

390

Perspectives: Reforming American Higher Education--Implications for a Vibrant Work Force and a Healthy Democracy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The forces of globalization are finally hitting American postsecondary education. For nearly three decades, since the 1983 publication of "A Nation At Risk" launched a sustained focus on the mediocre, if not failing, K-12 system, American postsecondary education has avoided the accountability spotlight. Postsecondary policy debates have focused…

Kolb, Charles

2011-01-01

391

Culture, discrimination and women's work force participation: a study on Indian labor  

E-print Network

in labor market in the forms of gender wage gap and low labor force participation for women is a well discrimination characterizes the discrimination in many ways. It can be measured by gender wage gap and its variants such as sticky floor, glass ceiling, and also by occupational gender sorting. Gender wage gap

Bandyopadhyay, Antar

392

Health Inequalities among Workers with a Foreign Background in Sweden: Do Working Conditions Matter?  

PubMed Central

Employment and working conditions are key social determinants of health, yet current information is lacking regarding relationships between foreign background status, working conditions and health among workers in Sweden. This study utilized cross-sectional data from the 2010 Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Level of Living Survey for Foreign Born Persons and their Children (LNU-UFB) to assess whether or not health inequalities exist between native Swedish and foreign background workers and if exposure to adverse psychosocial and physical working conditions contributes to the risk for poor health among foreign background workers. A sub-sample of 4,021 employed individuals aged 18–65 was analyzed using logistic regression. Eastern European, Latin American and Other Non-Western workers had an increased risk of both poor self-rated health and mental distress compared to native Swedish workers. Exposure to adverse working conditions only minimally influenced the risk of poor health. Further research should examine workers who are less integrated or who have less secure labor market attachments and also investigate how additional working conditions may influence associations between health and foreign background status. PMID:23846669

Dunlavy, Andrea C.; Rostila, Mikael

2013-01-01

393

Psychometric Evaluation of Health-Related Work Outcome Measures For Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: This systematic review evaluated the quality of psychometric properties of self-report health-related work outcome measures\\u000a for patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Methods: Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) between 1980\\u000a and December 2006 were conducted for peer-reviewed studies that evaluated self-report work outcome measures for patients with\\u000a musculoskeletal disorders. The eligibility

Renee M. Williams; Gloria Schmuck; Shannon Allwood; Matthew Sanchez; Ryan Shea; Glenn Wark

2007-01-01

394

The new corporate health ethic: lifestyle and the social control of work.  

PubMed

A corporate health ethic, forged in U.S. industry in the 20th century, clearly demarcated boundaries between private and workplace health concerns. This article advances evidence that the boundary is blurring, and argues that trends in workplace initiatives, including employee assistance, wellness programs, and drug screening, are giving shape to a new corporate health ethic. The new ethic emphasizes workers' lifestyles on and off the job, engendering a shift in corporate jurisdiction over employee health and behavior. Economic arguments such as "health care cost containment" are commonly offered as explanations for these new health initiatives. But the authors see the new ethic as a deeper response to a changing corporate environment and, more fundamentally, as emblematic of changes in the social control of work and productivity. They argue that the new health ethic may be a harbinger of new forms of social control in the workplace. PMID:1735630

Conrad, P; Walsh, D C

1992-01-01

395

76 FR 11187 - Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR...Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety Standards AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration,...

2011-03-01

396

77 FR 43721 - Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR...Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety Standards AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration,...

2012-07-26

397

Hope and despair: community health assistants’ experiences of working in a rural district in Zambia  

PubMed Central

Background In order to address the challenges facing the community-based health workforce in Zambia, the Ministry of Health implemented the national community health assistant strategy in 2010. The strategy aims to address the challenges by creating a new group of workers called community health assistants (CHAs) and integrating them into the health system. The first group started working in August 2012. The objective of this paper is to document their motivation to become a CHA, their experiences of working in a rural district, and how these experiences affected their motivation to work. Methods A phenomenological approach was used to examine CHAs’ experiences. Data collected through in-depth interviews with 12 CHAs in Kapiri Mposhi district and observations were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Personal characteristics such as previous experience and knowledge, passion to serve the community and a desire to improve skills motivated people to become CHAs. Health systems characteristics such as an inclusive work culture in some health posts motivated CHAs to work. Conversely, a non-inclusive work culture created a social structure which constrained CHAs’ ability to learn, to be innovative and to effectively conduct their duties. Further, limited supervision, misconceptions about CHA roles, poor prioritisation of CHA tasks by some supervisors, as well as non- and irregular payment of incentives also adversely affected CHAs’ ability to work effectively. In addition, negative feedback from some colleagues at the health posts affected CHA’s self-confidence and professional outlook. In the community, respect and support provided to CHAs by community members instilled a sense of recognition, appreciation and belonging in CHAs which inspired them to work. On the other hand, limited drug supplies and support from other community-based health workers due to their exclusion from the government payroll inhibited CHAs’ ability to deliver services. Conclusions Programmes aimed at integrating community-based health workers into health systems should adequately consider multiple incentives, effective management, supervision and support from the district. These should be tailored towards enhancing the individual, health system and community characteristics that positively impact work motivation at the local level if such programmes are to effectively contribute towards improved primary healthcare. PMID:24886146

2014-01-01

398

Health effects of supplemental work from home in the European Union.  

PubMed

Internationalization and technological developments have changed the work organization in developed and developing industrial economies. Information and communication technologies, such as computers and smartphones, are increasingly used, allowing more temporal and spatial flexibility of work. This may lead to an increase in supplemental work, i.e. constant availability or working in addition to contractually agreed work hours. This in turn extends work hours and leads to work hours in evenings and weekends, causing interferences of work hours with biological and social rhythms for sleep, recovery and social interaction. However, empirical findings on the effects of supplemental work and work hours on occupational health are rather scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between (1) work-related contacts outside of regular work hours and (2) working in the free time with self-reported work-related health impairments in the fourth and fifth European Working Conditions Surveys (EWCS 2005, EWCS 2010). Out of these cross-sectional, large-scale surveys, data on n?=?22?836 and n?=?34?399 employed workers were used for weighted logistic regression analyses. About half of the sample reported at least occasional supplemental work. The results showed an increased risk of reporting at least one health problem for employees who had been contacted by their employer (EWCS 2005), or worked in their free time to meet work demands (EWCS 2010) in the last 12 months, compared to those reporting no supplemental work or work-related contacts during free time. These results were controlled for demographic variables, physical and mental work load, worker autonomy, and several work hours characteristics (e.g. hours per week, unusual and variable hours). The risk of reporting health problems was increased by being contacted both sometimes (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.14-1.39) and often (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.25), whereas the frequency of working in the free time showed a clear dose-response effect (sometimes: OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.24; often: OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.47-1.75), both compared to the category "never". The findings, thus, indicate that even a small amount of supplemental work beyond contractually agreed work hours may increase the risk of work-related health impairments. Working in the free time was associated with a substantial risk increase and might be a better indicator for actual work load than being contacted by the employer outside of contractually agreed work hours. Thus, in order to minimize negative health effects, availability requirements for employees outside their regular work hours should be minimized. While these effects definitely need further study, especially regarding a quantification of actual supplemental work and its temporal location, addressing the company culture and using incentives and policies might be options to reduce the amount of supplemental work and maintain the risks of health impairments in the working population at a lower level. PMID:25229274

Arlinghaus, Anna; Nachreiner, Friedhelm

2014-12-01

399

41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

2011-07-01

400

41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

2010-07-01

401

Towards a Unified Taxonomy of Health Indicators: Academic Health Centers and Communities Working Together to Improve Population Health  

PubMed Central

The Clinical Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program represents a significant public investment. To realize its major goal of improving the public’s health and reducing health disparities, the CTSA Consortium’s Community Engagement Key Function Committee has undertaken the challenge of developing a taxonomy of community health indicators. The objective is to initiate a unified approach for monitoring progress in improving population health outcomes. Such outcomes include, importantly, the interests and priorities of community stakeholders, plus the multiple, overlapping interests of universities and of the public health and health care professions involved in the development and use of local health care indicators. The emerging taxonomy of community health indicators that the authors propose supports alignment of CTSA activities and facilitates comparative effectiveness research across CTSAs, thereby improving the health of communities and reducing health disparities. The proposed taxonomy starts at the broadest level, determinants of health; subsequently moves to more finite categories of community health indicators; and, finally, addresses specific quantifiable measures. To illustrate the taxonomy’s application, the authors have synthesized 21 health indicator projects from the literature and categorized them into international, national, or local/special jurisdictions. They furthered categorized the projects within the taxonomy by ranking indicators with the greatest representation among projects and by ranking the frequency of specific measures. They intend for the taxonomy to provide common metrics for measuring changes to population health and, thus, extend the utility of the CTSA Community Engagement Logic Model. The input of community partners will ultimately improve population health. PMID:24556775

Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Ahmed, Syed; Franco, Zeno; Kissack, Anne; Gabriel, Davera; Hurd, Thelma; Ziegahn, Linda; Bates, Nancy J.; Calhoun, Karen; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Eder, Milton “Mickey”; Ferrans, Carol; Hacker, Karen; Rumala, Bernice B.; Strelnick, A. Hal; Wallerstein, Nina

2014-01-01

402

Task Force Report 5. Report of the Task Force on Family Medicine’s Role in Shaping the Future Health Care Delivery System  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recognizing that the implementation of needed changes within family medicine will be enhanced through a concurrent effort to transform the broader health care system, this Future of Family Medicine task force was charged with determining family medicine’s leadership role in shaping the future health care delivery system. METHODS After reviewing the changes taking place within family medicine and the broader health care system, this task force identified 6 priorities for fostering necessary modifications in the health care system. In addressing the leadership challenge facing the discipline, the task force presents a 3-dimensional matrix that provides a useful framework for describing the audiences that should be targeted, the strategic priorities that should be pursued, and the specific recommendations that should be addressed. Noting that leadership is part of the heritage of family medicine, the task force reviewed past successes by the discipline as important lessons that can be instructive as family physicians begin advocating for needed changes. MAJOR FINDINGS Effective leadership is an essential ingredient that will determine, to a large extent, the success of family medicine in advocating for needed change in the health care system overall and in the specialty. It is vitally important to groom leaders within family medicine and to create venues where policy makers and influence leaders can look beyond their usual constituencies and horizons to a comprehensive view of health care. A central concept being proposed is that of a relationship-centered personal medical home. This medical home serves as the focal point through which all individuals—regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status—receive a basket of acute, chronic, and preventive medical care services that are accessible, accountable, comprehensive, integrated, patient-centered, safe, scientifically valid, and satisfying to both patients and their physicians. CONCLUSION Family medicine has and will continue to have an important leadership role in health system change. It has been most successful when it has been able to identify a high-priority goal through consensus within the discipline, to focus and coordinate local and national resources, and to use a multipronged approach in addressing the priority. Although the Future of Family Medicine project has provided an important impetus for the identification of key priorities across the discipline, for the FFM project ultimately to be a success, implementation steps will need to be identified and prioritized. The leadership matrix presented in this report can provide a useful structuring tool to identify, understand, and coordinate change efforts more effectively. Strategic alliances with primary care groups and others also will be critical to the success of change initiatives.

Roberts, Richard G.; Snape, Pam S.; Burke, Kevin

2004-01-01

403

Working with people who have killed: The experience and attitudes of forensic mental health clinicians working with forensic patients.  

PubMed

Forensic mental health (FMH) clinicians sometimes feel unsupported and unprepared for their work. This article explores their experiences of working in a FMH setting in Australia. The research examined the clinical context of clinicians working with forensic patients (FP), particularly those individuals who have killed while experiencing a mental illness. A qualitative, exploratory design was selected. Data were collected through focus groups and individual interviews with hospital and community-based forensic clinicians from all professional groups: psychiatric medicine, social work, psychology, mental health nursing, occupational therapy, and psychiatric service officers. The main themes identified were orientation and adjustment to FMH, training in FMH, vicarious traumatization, clinical debriefing and clinical supervision, and therapeutic relationships. Participants described being frustrated and unsupported in making the transition to working with FP and felt conflicted by the emotional response that was generated when developing therapeutic relationships. Recommendations include the development of programmes that might assist clinicians and address gaps in service delivery, such as clinical governance, targeted orientation programmes, and clinical supervision. PMID:25522179

Harris, Derith M; Happell, Brenda; Manias, Elizabeth

2015-04-01

404

The Effect of Educational Disequilibrium in Field Work on Graduate Social Work Students' Self-Concept and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author used a mixed methods design to assess field work-related educational disequilibrium and its effect on the self-concept and mental health of MSW students. Twenty-eight advanced, fourth-semester MSW students were compared with 37 entering, first-semester MSW students in practice-related sense of accomplishment. Compared with first-year students, second-year students reported a lower sense of accomplishment, which, in turn, explained their

Yu-Wen Ying

2011-01-01

405

Deriving the Work Done by an Inverse Square Force in Non-Calculus-Based Introductory Physics Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

I describe a method of evaluating the integral of 1/r[superscript 2] with respect to r that uses only algebra and the concept of area underneath a curve, and which does not formally employ any calculus. This is useful for algebra-based introductory physics classes (where the use of calculus is forbidden) to derive the work done by the force of one…

Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

2012-01-01

406

Turnover Among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Blue-Collar Workers in the U.S. Navy's Civilian Work Force  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turnover rates and factors related to job turnover among Hispanic and non-Hispanic blue-collar employees in the U.S. Navy's civilian work force were investigated. When the subjects started their jobs they were administered a questionnaire assessing possible predictors of turnover, such as acculturation level, method of recruitment, importance of job-related factors, and geographic location considerations. The Hispanic subjects were classified into

Stephanie Booth-Kewley; Paul Rosenfeld; Jack E. Edwards

1993-01-01

407

48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and...

2013-10-01

408

48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and...

2012-10-01

409

48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and...

2014-10-01

410

"Deaf Health Talks" DHCC is a community partner of the NCDHR, working with RRCD's R.E.A.P  

E-print Network

"Deaf Health Talks" DHCC is a community partner of the NCDHR, working with RRCD's R.E.A.P Health. NCDHRNational Center for Deaf Health Research Working for a Healthy Deaf Community #12; Topic: Women's Health: Stay Healthy at Any Age" Presenter: Kim Kelstone, CI/CT Date: Thursday, Feb. 28

Goldman, Steven A.

411

Cellular Tug-of-War: Forces at Work and DNA Stretching in Mitosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the microscopic world of the cell dominated by thermal noise, a cell must be able to successfully segregate its DNA with high fidelity in order to pass its genetic information on to its progeny. In this process of mitosis in eukaryotes, driving forces act on the cytoskeleton-based architecture called the mitotic spindle to promote this division. Our preliminary data demonstrates that the dynamics of this process in yeast cells is universal. Moreover, the dynamics suggest an increasing load as the chromosomes are pulled apart. To investigate this, we use three-dimensional imaging to track the dynamics of the poles of this architecture and the points of attachment to chromosomes simultaneously and with high spatial resolution. We analyze the relative motions of chromosomes as they are organized before segregation and as they are pulled apart, using this data to investigate the force-response behavior of this cytoskeleton-chromosome polymer system.

Griffin, Brian; Kilfoil, Maria L.

2013-03-01

412

Type of Work Matters: Women's Labor Force Participation and the Child Sex Ratio in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Province-level census data for 1985 and 1990 from Turkey are used to examine the effect of the economic value of women on the 0–9 cohort population sex ratio. The sex ratio is interpreted as an indicator of the relative life chances of girls, reflecting their relative neglect in the household. We test two hypotheses: women’s labor force participation lowers the

GÜnseli Berik; Cihan Bilginsoy

2000-01-01

413

Working with UK-based non-governmental organisations for better reproductive health in Nepal.  

PubMed

Over the years, strong health links have developed between Nepal and the UK with the overall aim of helping to achieve Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. The nature of such health links is varied and ranges from education and training projects to service work, with a focus on direct medical care. The role of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in Nepal cannot be underestimated: there are over 5000 NGOs, working in all aspects of Nepali life. Most are not specifically dedicated to maternal, neonatal and reproductive health care, but have developed this area of interest in response to the identified needs in the local communities. The benefits from such health links are immense but, in times of limited funding of projects, it is increasingly important that different agencies work together to maximise the impact of projects. PMID:21951507

Nunns, D

2011-09-01

414

Work Productivity and Health of Informal Caregivers of Persons With Advanced Cancer  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to describe health promotion behaviors and work productivity loss in informal caregivers of individuals with advanced stage cancer. Using a cross-sectional, correlational design, 70 caregivers completed measures of health behaviors, mood, social support, and burden. Absenteeism and presenteeism were evaluated in employed caregivers (n = 40). Caregivers reported low levels of physical activity. The mean percentage of work productivity loss due to caregiving was 22.9%. Greater work productivity loss was associated with greater number of caregiving hours, higher cancer stage, married status, and greater anxiety, depression, and burden related to financial problems, disrupted schedule, and health. Nurses should assess caregivers and provide health promotion interventions, which may ultimately reduce the economic impact of caregiving. PMID:21953274

Daly, Barbara J.; Douglas, Sara L.; Lipson, Amy R.

2015-01-01

415

[Mental health and work: a discussion on the connection between work and diagnosis, based on daily practice].  

PubMed

Seven cases of workers selected among 150 who had undergone psychiatric treatment at the Workers' Health Reference Centers in Santo Amaro and André Gabois from 1994 to 1997 were presented for a detailed analysis characterizing work situations and discussing definition of the diagnosis and causal connections with work. The qualitative case study provides a thematic analysis of the patient history and files. Work situations are characterized by: unhealthy working conditions, problems related to work organization, inadequate human resources management, and urban violence. Symptoms included: fear, anxiety, depression, nervousness, tension, fatigue, malaise, loss of appetite, sleep disorders, and psychosomatic disorders (gastritis, hypertension); in addition, workers were unable to forget about work while off the job. Diagnosis varied. Three cases involved post-traumatic syndrome. Two cases involved organic psychosis linked to accidents or exposure to neurotoxic chemical products. Cases also included neurotic syndromes of fatigue, depression, and paranoia, as well as adaptation and reaction to acute stress. In all of the cases it was possible to relate the clinical picture to the work situation. PMID:11395797

Glina, D M; Rocha, L E; Batista, M L; Mendonça, M G

2001-01-01

416

Health at work in small and medium sized enterprises : Issues of engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to explore a health at work initiative (“Fair Chance at Work”) for small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and identify opportunities for improving engagement of businesses in such activities. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A case study approach is used Findings – Two problems are identified - engagement and participation. A model of engagement incorporating aspects of Prochaska

Barbara L. Griffin; Nicky Hall; Nigel Watson

2005-01-01

417

The Relationships between Mothers' Work Pathways and Physical and Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We contribute to research on the relationships between gender, work, and health by using longitudinal, theoretically driven models of mothers' diverse work pathways and adjusting for unequal selection into these pathways. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth-1979 (N = 2,540), we find full-time, continuous employment following a first…

Frech, Adrianne; Damaske, Sarah

2012-01-01

418

The Orthodontist, Our Friend: World of Work Project: Fifth Grade: Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document is one of the teaching units developed by the Utah World of Work Project, designed to integrate career awareness into the regular curriculum at the elementary level. The fifth grade guide is tied to the health education area and focuses on the work of the orthodontist in terms of understanding what an orthodontist does, learning what…

Anderson, Nancy

419

The Influence of the Work Environment on Cardiovascular Health: A Historical, Conceptual, and Methodological Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The framework of psychosocial epidemiology is used to examine research developments that characterize the accumulation of knowledge regarding the role of the work environment in cardiovascular health and disease. The discussion of current programs of research focuses on the work of T. Theorell and R. Karasek (1996) and J. Siegrist (1996) as exemplars of European and American studies that have

Stanislav V. Kasl

1996-01-01

420

Perceptions of Health Promotion and Cancer Prevention among Adults in Working-Class Occupations and Neighborhoods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A social-contextual approach to cancer prevention among participants associated with the working class may result in behavior-change messages that are more relevant to them and contribute to a reduction in health disparities among classes. This article reports findings from a qualitative study of adults in working-class occupations and/or living…

Goldman, Roberta E.; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Hunt, Mary Kay; Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores; Emmons, Karen M.; Gagne, Joshua; Sorensen, Glorian

2008-01-01

421

Partner Violence and Survivors' Chronic Health Problems: Informing Social Work Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most social work professionals may expect that women who experience partner violence will sustain acute physical injuries, social workers may be less knowledgeable about the chronic health problems with which violence survivors often struggle. To inform social work practice, we reviewed and synthesized the recently published research on…

Macy, Rebecca J.; Ferron, Joelle; Crosby, Carmen

2009-01-01

422

Work plan, health and safety plan, and site characterization for the Rust Spoil Area (D-106)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Department of Energy`s Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this work plan has been developed for the Rust Spoil Area (a solid waste disposal area). The work plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research

D. E. Bohrman; M. S. Uziel; D. C. Landguth; S. W. Hawthorne

1990-01-01

423

Work plan, health and safety plan, and site characterization for the Rust Spoil Area (D-106)  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Department of Energy's Y-12 Plant located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this work plan has been developed for the Rust Spoil Area (a solid waste disposal area). The work plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research

D. E. Bohrman; M. S. Uziel; D. C. Landguth; S. W. Hawthorne

1990-01-01

424

Primary Prevention in Mental Health and Social Work: A Sourcebook of Curriculum and Teaching Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sourcebook of curriculum and teaching materials pertaining to primary prevention in mental health and social work is presented. Contents include: two articles addressing the theoretical dimensions of primary prevention and the relationship to social work education and practice; five articles describing preventive content that can be integrated…

Nobel, Milton, Ed.

425

The Outsourcing of Health, Sport and Physical Educational Work: A State of Play  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The outsourcing of health, sport and physical educational (HSPE) work has been a feature of physical education (PE) "futures talk" for over 20 years. However, HSPE work outsourcing has been the focus of little empirical research and only occasional commentary. That small amount of empirical research that has been conducted has been…

Williams, Benjamin James; Hay, Peter James; Macdonald, Doune

2011-01-01

426

The association between lower back pain and health status, work productivity, and health care resource use in Japan  

PubMed Central

Introduction This study investigated the effect of pain severity on health status, work productivity, health care resource use, and costs among respondents with lower back pain (LBP), in Japan. Materials and methods Data from the 2013 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey, a survey of Japanese adults, were analyzed (N=30,000). All respondents provided informed consent, and the protocol was institutional review board-approved. Respondents who reported experiencing LBP were propensity score–matched to those without LBP, based on demographics and health history. Using regression modeling, patients with mild, moderate, and severe pain were compared against matched controls, with respect to health status (Mental and Physical Component Summary scores, and health utilities from the Short Form®-36 Health Survey version 2), work productivity (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment – General Health version), health care resource use, and annual per-patient costs (estimated using published annual wages and resource use event costs). Results A total 1,897 patients reported experiencing LBP in the past month (6.32%); 52.45% reported their pain as mild, 32.79% as moderate, and 14.76% as severe. Increasing pain severity was associated with significantly lower levels of mental component scores (46.99 [mild], 42.93 [moderate], and 40.58 [severe] vs 48.10 [matched controls]), physical component scores (50.29 [mild], 46.74 [moderate], and 43.94 [severe] vs 52.93 [matched controls]), and health utilities (0.72 [mild], 0.66 [moderate], and 0.62 [severe] vs 0.76 [matched controls]) (all P<0.05). Indirect costs were significantly higher (P<0.05) among those with moderate (¥1.69 million [MM] [equivalent to $17,000, based on United States dollar exchange rates on September 1, 2014]) and severe (¥1.88 MM [$19,000]) pain, relative to matched controls (¥0.95 MM [$9,500]). Direct costs were only marginally different (P=0.05) between those with severe pain and matched controls (¥1.33 MM [$13,000] vs ¥0.54 MM [$5,000]). Conclusion Increasing pain severity among respondents with LBP was associated with significantly worse health status, to a clinically-relevant degree, along with greater indirect and direct costs, in Japan.

Sadosky, Alesia B; DiBonaventura, Marco; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Ebata, Nozomi; Fujii, Koichi

2015-01-01

427

Soft Skills and the Minority Work Force: A Guide for Informed Discussion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication analyzes issues that lead to a working definition of soft working skills. Data come from research by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. At a workshop, scholars, practitioners, and representatives from various job sites discussed the impact of soft skills on access to jobs and long-term employment among minority…

Conrad, Cecilia A.

428

Untying the Knots. An Approach to Problem Solving. The WorkForce Series for Small Businesses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide presents an approach to problem solving for managers who work with young or entry-level workers in small businesses. The guide is designed to help managers (1) distinguish between a behavior problem and a performance problem; (2) balance positive and negative factors to make the changes they want; (3) devise solutions that will work for…

National Child Labor Committee, New York, NY.

429

Psychosocial work environment factors and weight change: a prospective study among Danish health care workers  

PubMed Central

Background Lifestyle variables may serve as important intermediate factors between psychosocial work environment and health outcomes. Previous studies, focussing on work stress models have shown mixed and weak results in relation to weight change. This study aims to investigate psychosocial factors outside the classical work stress models as potential predictors of change in body mass index (BMI) in a population of health care workers. Methods A cohort study, with three years follow-up, was conducted among Danish health care workers (3982 women and 152 men). Logistic regression analyses examined change in BMI (more than +/? 2?kg/m2) as predicted by baseline psychosocial work factors (work pace, workload, quality of leadership, influence at work, meaning of work, predictability, commitment, role clarity, and role conflicts) and five covariates (age, cohabitation, physical work demands, type of work position and seniority). Results Among women, high role conflicts predicted weight gain, while high role clarity predicted both weight gain and weight loss. Living alone also predicted weight gain among women, while older age decreased the odds of weight gain. High leadership quality predicted weight loss among men. Associations were generally weak, with the exception of quality of leadership, age, and cohabitation. Conclusion This study of a single occupational group suggested a few new risk factors for weight change outside the traditional work stress models. PMID:23327287

2013-01-01

430

Working conditions, visual fatigue, and mental health among systems analysts in São Paulo, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Aims: To evaluate the association between working conditions and visual fatigue and mental health among systems analysts living in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out by a multidisciplinary team. It included: ergonomic analysis of work, individual and group interviews, and 553 self applied questionnaires in two enterprises. The comparison population numbered 136 workers in different occupations. Results: The study population mainly comprised young males. Among systems analysts, visual fatigue was associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment and workstation, low level of worker participation, being a woman, and subject's attitude of fascination by the computer. Nervousness and intellectual performance were associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment, work environment, and tools. Continuing education and leisure were protective factors. Work interfering in family life was associated with mental workload, difficulties with clients, strict deadlines, subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, and finding solutions of work problems outside work. Family support, satisfaction in life and work, and adequate work environment and tools were protective factors. Work interfering in personal life was associated with subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, strict deadlines, inadequate equipment, and high level of work participation. Satisfaction in life and work and continuing education were protective factors. The comparison population did not share common working factors with the systems analysts in the regression analysis. Conclusions: The main health effects of systems analysts' work were expressed by machine anthropomorphism, being very demanding, mental acceleration, mental absorption, and difficulty in dealing with emotions. PMID:14691269

Rocha, L; Debert-Ribeiro, M

2004-01-01

431

[The value of using administrative data in public health research: the Continuous Working Life Sample].  

PubMed

The use of administrative data is common practice in public health research. The present field note describes the Continuous Working Life Sample (CWLS) and its use in health research. The CWLS is built on records generated by all contacts with the social security system (work contracts, disability, etc.), plus tax data (monetary gains, income, etc.) and census data (level of education, country of birth, etc.), but does not allow individuals to be identified. The CWLS was started in 2004 with 4% (1.1 million persons) of the total population who were either contributors to or beneficiaries of the social security system. The information on the individuals in the CWLS is updated annually and lost individuals are replaced. This continuous design allows the construction of a cohort with information on working life and financial status and evaluation of their relationship with work disability. Future connection with clinical records would enable analysis of other health-related outcomes. PMID:24698033

López, María Andrée; Benavides, Fernando G; Alonso, Jordi; Espallargues, Mireia; Durán, Xavier; Martínez, José Miguel

2014-01-01

432

Work and Health of Parents of Adult Children with Serious Mental Illness  

PubMed Central

This study examined the effects of work schedule flexibility and the spillover of work stress to family life on the health of parents of adult children with serious mental illness (SMI). We compared 100 parents of adult children with SMI to 500 parents with nondisabled adult children using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The detrimental impact on health of a lack of work flexibility and of higher levels of negative work-to-family spillover were more pronounced among parents of adult children with SMI than parents with non-disabled adult children. The results have significant implications for developing interventions to help midlife families of persons with SMI cope with work-related stress and for policies that provide for greater work schedule flexibility. PMID:24489424

Song, Jieun; Mailick, Marsha R.; Greenberg, Jan S.

2013-01-01

433

Australian experts' perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care: implication for Indonesia  

PubMed Central

In Indonesia there is a pressing need to scale up mental health services due to a substantial unmet need for mental health care. Integrating psychologists into primary health care can potentially deliver affordable mental health services to communities and help to close the treatment gap. Australia is one of the pioneers in integrating mental health into primary health care, and the mental health reforms in Australia may have some implications for Indonesia. The aim of this paper is to examine the Australian experience and to reflect in particular on lessons that may be learnt to inform the development of curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 12 Australian experts in primary mental health care. The focus of the interview was on the roles and skills of psychologists working in primary health care with a particular focus on the appropriate curriculum for psychologists. Overall, the Australian experts agreed that psychologists' roles and training should include both clinical skills and public mental health skills. The experts also agreed that psychologists should be able to educate the community about mental health issues and be capable of undertaking research and evaluation of programs. A central theme was the need for strong collaborations with general practitioners and existing agencies in the community so that psychologists are able to make appropriate referrals and also accept referrals. The lessons learnt from the Australian experience, which are most applicable to the Indonesian setting are: (1) the importance of adequate government funding of psychologists; (2) the value of evidence-based treatments such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; (3) the need to specifically train psychologists for primary care; (4) the need for flexibility in the psychologist workforce (e.g. location); and (5) the value of continuing supervision for psychologists to support them in their role. PMID:25750829

Setiyawati, Diana; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry

2014-01-01

434

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01

435

State mental health policy: Maryland's shared leadership approach to mental health transformation: partnerships that work.  

PubMed

In 2005, Maryland received a mental health transformation grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Maryland's transformation efforts have differed from those in other grantee states and have evolved into a shared leadership approach that harnesses the power of leaders from all sectors of the community. This column describes Maryland's reform efforts, focusing in particular on the development of the position of a peer employment specialist to improve placement of consumers in employment. This shared leadership approach has the potential to enhance long-term sustainability of reform initiatives and uses fewer state resources. PMID:22752032

Semansky, Rafael M

2012-07-01

436

The Association between Long Working Hours and Self-Rated Health  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study was conducted to determine the number of hours worked per week by full-time wage workers by using the data of the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS), which represents the domestic urban area household, and to determine the association between weekly working hours and the level of self-rated health. Methods We used data from the 11th KLIPS conducted in 2008. The subjects of this study were 3,699 full-time wage workers between the ages of 25 and 64 years. The association between weekly working hours and self-rated health was analyzed considering socio-demographic characteristics, work environment, and health-related behaviors. Results Among the workers, 29.7% worked less than 40 hours per week; 39.7%, more than 40 to 52 hours; 19.7%, more than 52 to 60 hours; and 10.9%, more than 60 hours per week. After controlling for socio-demographic variables, work environment-related variables, and health-related behavior variables, the odds ratio (OR) for poor self-rated health for the group working more than 40 hours and up to 52 hours was calculated to be 1.06 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.89-1.27) when the group working less than 40 hours per week was considered the reference. The OR for the group working more than 60 hours was 1.42 (95% CI, 1.10-1.83) and that for the group working more than 52 hours and up to 60 hours was 1.07 (95% CI, 0.86-1.33). After stratification by gender and tenure, the OR of the female workers group and that of the group with a tenure of more than 1 year were found to be significantly higher than those of the other groups. Conclusions This study showed that workers working more than 60 hours per week have a significantly higher risk of poor self-rated health than workers working less than 40 hours per week. This effect was more obvious for the female workers group and the group with a tenure of more than 1 year. In the future, longitudinal studies may be needed to determine the association between long working hours and various health effects in Korean workers. PMID:24472333

2014-01-01

437

Supervisory behaviour as a predictor of return to work in employees absent from work due to mental health problems  

PubMed Central

Aims: To study supervisory behaviour as a predictive factor for return to work of employees absent due to mental health problems; and to explore the association between conditional factors and supervisory behaviour. Methods: Eighty five supervisors of employees were interviewed by telephone. Questionnaires providing information on person related factors, depressive symptoms, and sickness absence were sent to the employees at baseline, three months, six months, and after one year. Three aspects of supervisory behaviour during the period of absence were measured: communication with the employee, promoting gradual return to work, and consulting of other professionals. Results: Better communication between supervisor and employee was associated with time to full return to work in non-depressed employees. For employees with a high level of depressive symptoms, this association could not be established. Consulting other professionals more often was associated with a longer duration of the sickness absence for both full and partial return to work. If sickness absence had financial consequences for the department, the supervisor was more likely to communicate frequently with the employee. Supervisors who were responsible for return to work in their organisation were more likely to communicate better and to consult more often with other professionals. Conclusion: Supervisors should communicate more frequently with employees during sickness absence as well as hold follow up meetings more often as this is associated with a faster return to work in those employees. PMID:15377767

Nieuwenhuijsen, K; Verbeek, J; de Boer, A G E M; Blonk, R; van Dijk, F J H

2004-01-01

438

AUTHORITARIAN AND EGALITARIAN FORCES SHAPE T·HE SCHOOL WORK ETHIC  

E-print Network

This paper summarizes the development ofmodern education as a rational response to the demands of nationalism and industrialization in western societies. The problem of how to best encourage the "school work ethic" is ...

Bradford, John A.

1981-01-01

439

Work History, Labor Force Attachment, and Earnings Differences between the Races and Sexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article uses a new data set to investigate the extent to which differences in work history, on-the-job training, absenteeism, and self-imposed restrictions on work hours and location account for wage differences between the sexes and races. As expected, white men generally had more education and training and less absenteeism and fewer restrictions than black men and women of both

Mary Corcoran; Greg J. Duncan

1979-01-01

440

Labor force participation of working mothers and family formation: Some further evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper offers additional insight and evidence on the well-documented inverse relationship between female employment and\\u000a fertility. Interviews with 388 working mothers from a probability sample in Robeson County, North Carolina, provide the data\\u000a for testing the hypothesized relationships. Generally, the results indicate that lower fertility, lower desires and expectations,\\u000a and earlier use of birth control are associated with work

William B. Clifford; Patricia L. Tobin

1977-01-01

441

Labor force participation and family formation: A study of working mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing upon a sample of 638 mothers aged 18 to 40, with at least some marital work experience, significant associations were\\u000a found between the extent, kind, and timing of employment and a series of family formation variables. Generally lower fertility,\\u000a longer first birth intervals, and earlier use of birth control were associated with the longest work durations, the highest\\u000a status

H. Theodore Groat; Randy L. Workman; Arthur G. Neal

1976-01-01

442

Unconscious Aspects of Statutory Mental Health Social Work: Emotional Labour and the Approved Mental Health Professional  

Microsoft Academic Search

In November 2008 the statutory role of the Approved Social Worker (ASW) in the UK came to an end, and a new role Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) was created. This paper is based on qualitative data gathered from Approved Social Workers (ASWs) in relation to the roles, tasks and skills they felt were required in order to perform statutory

Claire Gregor

2010-01-01

443

Health risk behaviors and work injury among hispanic adolescents and farmworkers.  

PubMed

Adolescents may engage in health risk behaviors that increase their likelihood of injury. Employment places adolescents at risk of work-related injuries. This study responds to the paucity of data on the relationship between adolescent health risk behaviors and work-related injury. This cross-sectional study included the administration of anonymous surveys to ninth graders (n=4914) who attended high schools in south Texas. An aggregate risk score (ARS) was developed based on health risk behaviors. The ARS was analyzed as an outcome using linear regression. Associations between health risk behaviors and work-related injury were assessed with logistic regression. Of the respondents, 19% reported they had a job, and 14% reported that they had been employed in farmwork. Farmwork-related injury was reported by 9% of adolescents, and 12% reported other work-related injury. Mean ARS scores were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for both male and female adolescents who reported a work-related injury compared to nonworking adolescents, and for males who had done migrant farmwork compared to all other adolescent males. The ARS increased as hours worked per week increased. After controlling for confounding factors, a statistically significant association was found between ARS and non-farmwork, work-related injury, but not between ARS and farmwork-related injury. Farmworkers with high ARS were more likely to report non-farmwork, work-related injuries. The predictors of work-related injury in the adolescent groups, particularly for farmworkers and migrants who are under additional stress, remain an important occupational health area to be addressed. PMID:17555202

Vela Acosta, M S; Sanderson, M; Cooper, S P; Pérez, A; Roberts, R E

2007-04-01

444

Special operations forces and counterproliferation: The interagency process at work. Study project  

SciTech Connect

The threat of use of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in the United States or against American vital interests overseas is real. Combating the proliferation of WMD has become a high priority for the U.S. Government. Within Department of Defense Counterproliferation Initiative (DOD CPI) of 1993 Special Operations Forces (SOF) have become pivotal players in the creation of a full range of military options to counter this threat. SOF provides the National Command Authority (NCA) with flexible and responsive options. In order to successfully execute any type of CP related special operation, the interagency process must be fully engaged and synchronized. This study assesses the nature of the threat, reviews the evolution of the DOD CPI, and focuses on the use of SOF as an instrument of U.S. policy. Specifically this study explores the connectivity of the interagency process to support a U.S. SOF Counterproliferation mission.

Bakken, H.L.

1996-04-01

445

Investigating the Associations among Overtime Work, Health Behaviors, and Health: A Longitudinal Study among Full-time Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  It has often been suggested that high levels of overtime lead to adverse health outcomes. One mechanism that may account for\\u000a this association is that working overtime leads to elevated levels of stress, which could affect worker’s behavioral decisions\\u000a or habits (such as smoking and lack of physical activity). In turn, this could lead to adverse health.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Purpose  The present study

Toon W. Taris; Jan Fekke Ybema; Debby G. J. Beckers; Marieke W. Verheijden; Sabine A. E. Geurts; Michiel A. J. Kompier

446

Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses  

PubMed Central

Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

2015-01-01

447

Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses.  

PubMed

Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate). Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes. PMID:25588157

Khamisa, Natasha; Oldenburg, Brian; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan

2015-01-01

448

Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior  

PubMed Central

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

449

[Health effects and psychological stress in pregnant women engaged in work outside the home].  

PubMed

Modern society demands working conditions in which pregnant women can successfully deliver children and maintain a professional position. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of work on the health and psychological stress in working women and their newborns. We reviewed twenty-eight publications and found that health problems in working women occur at high rates. However, there is no report investigating the mechanism by which health problems occur, or describing the precise working conditions and symptoms in pregnant women who are engaged in work outside the home. In addition, the literature uses subjective evaluations, including psychological tests, to quantify stress and anxiety, but no biochemical analyses of stress-related substances were conducted. We suggest that a standard index to represent working conditions and job category, as well as an investigation of the workload of house-keeping, is needed to understand the total work effort by pregnant women in modern times. Finally, measurement of stress-related biological markers may be effective in the investigation from various perspectives of occupational stress in pregnant women. PMID:21229729

Anan, Ayumi; Shiiba, Michiyo; Sibata, Eiji; Kawamoto, Rieko

2010-12-01

450

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in senior farmers: safety and health considerations.  

PubMed

Aging farmers are at high risk musculoskeletal disorders due to occupational exposures. The development of musculoskeletal conditions can increase older farmers' risk for additional injuries because many older farmers continue to work past typical retirement age. Occupational health nurses with agricultural expertise can assist farmers by evaluating their health and safety needs. Possible interventions include ergonomic improvements in farm equipment, safety improvements in farm environment, and referrals to programs that assist older farmers in modifying their farms to improve safety. PMID:25191676

Tonelli, Shalome; Culp, Kennith; Donham, Kelley

2014-08-01

451

[Hygienic evaluation of work conditions and health state of women engaged into soldering].  

PubMed

Based on longstanding research, the authors present hygienic evaluation of work conditions and health state of female solderers and low temperature soldering assemblers. The findings are that the main occupational hazard is air pollution with aerosol produced in release of solder particles. The authors demonstrate data of toxicologic experiments and justify hygienic standards for lead-tin and lead-cadmium solders in air of workplace. The article covers results on health state of female solderers' newborns. PMID:11715725

Salangina, L I; Dube?kovskaia, L S; Sladkova, Iu N; Markova, O L

2001-01-01

452

The effects of Managed Care on Social Work Mental Health Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

An individual seeking psycho-therapy services for a mental health disorder has 60-70 percent chance of receiving services from a master’s level clinical social worker. Despite their lower status, clinical social workers make up 60 to 70 percent of the mental health workforce (Ivey et al, 1998; Clinical Social Work Society of Delaware; Testimony of the National Association of Social Workers

Tendai Masiriri

2008-01-01

453

Will increased wages increase nurses' working hours in the health care sector?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many registered nurses (RNs) in Norway work part-time, or in non-health jobs. The nurses’ trade organizations claim that a wage increase will increase the short-term labor supply in health care. This paper is an attempt to identify the effects of job-type specific wage increases through policy simulations on micro data. The individual’s labor supply decision can be considered as a

Erik Magnus Sæther

2009-01-01

454

Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. Methods This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Results Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR?=?1.91; 1.07–3.42), and in the physical (OR?=?1.62; 1.02–2.66), and environmental (OR?=?2.39; 1.37–4.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR?=?1.82; 1.00–3.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR?=?1.55, 1.06–2.26) and environmental (OR?=?1.69; 1.08–2.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. Conclusions There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. PMID:24884707

2014-01-01

455

Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: occupational work force mortality study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents work performed in support of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. We compared total and cause-specific mortality for Pantex Plant workers employed between 1951 and December 31, 1978, with expected mortalities based on US death rates. We observed significantly fewer deaths than expected from all causes of death:

J. F. Acquavella; L. D. Wiggs; R. J. Waxweiler; D. G. Macdonell; G. S. Wilkinson

1982-01-01

456

Moving Along. Developing Competent Workers. The WorkForce Series for Small Businesses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide presents ideas for staff development for managers who work with young or entry-level workers in small businesses. The guide is designed to help managers (1) get new workers to do their jobs well consistently; (2) devise a plan of action that will broaden the worker's job skills; and (3) evaluate the worker's progress to spot problems…

National Child Labor Committee, New York, NY.

457

Economic and Work Force Development. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 75.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among the factors reshaping the American workforce are diversity, demands of work and family, global competition, the growing importance of strategic human resource planning, the need to reeducate employees for new technologies and more demanding jobs, and renewed interest in ethics and social responsibility. This collection of articles examines…

Waddell, Geneva, Ed.

1991-01-01

458

Occupational class inequalities in health across employment sectors: the contribution of working conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  While health inequalities among employees are well documented, their variation and determinants among employee subpopulations\\u000a are poorly understood. We examined variations in occupational class inequalities in health within four employment sectors\\u000a and the contribution of working conditions to these inequalities.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Cross-sectional data from the Helsinki Health Study in 2000–2002 were used. Each year, employees of the City of Helsinki,\\u000a aged

Eero Lahelma; Mikko Laaksonen; Akseli Aittomäki

2009-01-01

459

Tuberculosis as a force health protection threat to the United States military.  

PubMed

Tuberculosis (TB) is a communicable disease that poses a threat to force health protection to the U.S. military. The rate of TB disease in the military is low; however, there are unique challenges for its control in this setting. As a low-risk population, TB testing in the U.S. military can be scaled back from the universal testing approach used previously. Reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) present at accession into service is the most important factor leading to TB disease; therefore, its diagnosis and treatment among recruits should be given a high priority. Deployment and overseas military service is an uncommon but important source of TB infection, and rigorous surveillance should be ensured. Case management of TB disease and LTBI can be improved by the use of cohort reviews at the service and installation levels and case finding and delays in the diagnosis of TB disease can be improved by education of providers, as well as increased use of molecular diagnostic tests. Program outcomes can be improved by making LTBI treatment compulsory, offering shorter treatment regimens, and increasing accountability through oversight and evaluation. The diagnosis of LTBI can be improved by implementing targeted testing in all settings and reducing confirmatory interferon-gamma release assay testing. PMID:25735017

Sanchez, Jose L; Sanchez, Joyce L; Cooper, Michael J; Hiser, Michelle J; Mancuso, James D

2015-03-01

460

Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: Clinical intervention science and stress biology research join forces  

PubMed Central

Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child’s body, alterations which may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathology and for society, and we recommend that stress-biology research and intervention science join forces to tackle the problem. We examine the evidence base in relation to stress-sensitive measures for the body (inflammatory reactions, telomere erosion, epigenetic methylation, and gene expression) and brain (mental disorders, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological testing). We also review promising interventions for families, couples, and children that have been designed to reduce the effects of childhood violence exposure. We invite intervention scientists and stress-biology researchers to collaborate in adding stress-biology measures to randomized clinical trials of interventions intended to reduce effects of violence exposure and other traumas on young people. PMID:24342859

Moffitt, Terrie E.

2013-01-01

461

Involvement in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Work: Conceptions of Service Users  

PubMed Central

Service user involvement (SUI) is a principal and a guideline in social and health care and also in mental health and substance abuse work. In practice, however, there are indicators of SUI remaining rhetoric rather than reality. The purpose of this study was to analyse and describe service users' conceptions of SUI in mental health and substance abuse work. The following study question was addressed: what are service users' conceptions of service user involvement in mental health and substance abuse work? In total, 27 users of services participated in the study, and the data was gathered by means of interviews. A phenomenographic approach was applied in order to explore the qualitative variations in participants' conceptions of SUI. As a result of the data analysis, four main categories of description representing service users' conceptions of service user involvement were formed: service users have the best expertise, opinions are not heard, systems make the rules, and courage and readiness to participate. In mental health and substance abuse work, SUI is still insufficiently achieved and there are obstacles to be taken into consideration. Nurses are in a key position to promote and encourage service user involvement. PMID:21994839

Laitila, Minna; Nikkonen, Merja; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

2011-01-01

462

Health Impact Assessment of increased cycling to place of work or education in Copenhagen  

PubMed Central

Objective To quantify the effects of increased cycling on both mortality and morbidity. Design Health Impact Assessment. Setting Cycling to place of work or education in Copenhagen, Denmark. Population Effects were calculated based on the working-age population of Copenhagen. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was change in burden of disease (measured as disability-adjusted life years (DALY)) due to changed exposure to the health determinants physical inactivity, air pollution (particulate matter <2.5??m) and traffic accidents. Results Obtainment of the proposed increase in cycling could reduce the burden of disease in the study population by 19.5 DALY annually. This overall effect comprised a reduction in the burden of disease from health outcomes associated with physical inactivity (76.0 DALY) and an increase in the burden of disease from outcomes associated with air pollution and traffic accidents (5.4 and 51.2 DALY, respectively). Conclusion This study illustrates how quantitative Health Impact Assessment can help clarify potential effects of policies: increased cycling involves opposing effects from different outcomes but with the overall health effect being positive. This result illustrates the importance of designing policies that promote the health benefits and minimise the health risks related to cycling. PMID:22833650

Glümer, Charlotte; Diderichsen, Finn

2012-01-01

463

Leadership, organizational climate, and working alliance in a children's mental health service system.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to examine the relationships of transformational leadership and organizational climate with working alliance, in a children's mental health service system. Using multilevel structural equation modeling, the effect of leadership on working alliance was mediated by organizational climate. These results suggest that supervisors may be able to impact quality of care through improving workplace climate. Organizational factors should be considered in efforts to improve public sector services. Understanding these issues is important for program leaders, mental health service providers, and consumers because they can affect both the way services are delivered and ultimately, clinical outcomes. PMID:24323137

Green, Amy E; Albanese, Brian J; Cafri, Guy; Aarons, Gregory A

2014-10-01

464

An institutional ethnography inquiry of health care work in special education: a research protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Special education for children with chronic health conditions or disabilities requires the integration of health care work with education. This phenomenon occurs in an understudied and challenging context for integrated care despite policies and protocols that outline work processes in this context. We are interested in an approach to inquiry that will allow us to address gaps in current literature and practices in integrated care, and move towards informing policy. Study design and data collection methods Institutional ethnography is an approach to inquiry that maps the actualities of what individuals do at an everyday local level, while examining this work activity in relation to the sociopolitical context. It has been used to change policy and local practice by highlighting disjunctures between policy and actuality. We are adopting institutional ethnography and its three common methods of data collection: document collection, interviews, and observation/shadowing. Informants to this inquiry are chosen from school-based teams, family-centred units and constellations of clinical professionals. Methods of analysis We are following work processes, verbally and visually mapping what is done and by whom. It is important to note that work includes ‘unofficial’ work, including the work of families and others who may not be assigned an official work role in a policy or protocol. The mediating role of texts in work processes is also being mapped in order to link the local work to the high-level social coordinators. To begin, analysis focuses on local, or micro-level, work processes; next, analysis identifies and explains the macro-level coordination of the local work (i.e. social and political structures). Conclusion A p