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1

Evaluating the Environmental Health Work Force. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains all materials pertinent to an intensive evaluation of the environmental health work force conducted in 1986 and 1987. The materials relate to a workshop that was one of the key tools used in conducting the study to estimate environmental health personnel supply, demand, and need. The report begins with an overview and…

Levine Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

2

For the Health-Care Work Force, a Critical Prognosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States faces a looming shortage of many types of health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, dentists, pharmacists, and allied-health and public-health workers. There may also be a shortage of faculty members in the health sciences. The results will be felt acutely within the next 10 years. Colleges and health-science…

Rahn, Daniel W.; Wartman, Steven A.

2007-01-01

3

[Hygienic aspects of the working conditions assessment and state of health of the workers of the railway departmental security forces].  

PubMed

There were performed a comprehensive hygienic evaluation of the working conditions of employment and analysis of morbidity with temporary disability (MTD) of the workers of the railway departmental security forces. There was proved a significant influence of accumulated period of work on MTD. The professional causality as of the respiratory diseases in shooters and dog handlers, as of diseases of the circulatory system in the administrative and managerial workers has been established. PMID:25051740

Anishchenko, E B; Trankovskaya, L V

2014-01-01

4

The Effect of Work on Health and Work Ability  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many countries through the industrial world the population is aging. Despite an increased life expectancy, improved living conditions, and better health status, the average time people spend in paid work is decreasing. There are several mechanisms of withdrawal from the labor force among elderly workers. Workers may leave the work force due to disability, unemployment, and early retirement. Many

S. M. Alavinia

2008-01-01

5

The Work, the Workplace, and the Work Force of Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ann McLaughlin, a former secretary of labor, discusses her views on the future of the workplace. She feels that to solve the impending problem of educational deficits among the work force, employers will begin their own educational programs, improving both employee loyalty and work force mobility. Includes predictions for future growth fields.…

Allen, Claudia

1995-01-01

6

Gender hierarchies in the health labor force.  

PubMed

Rapid growth and increasing diversity characterize trends of the U.S. health labor force in recent decades. While these trends have promoted change on many different fronts of the health system, hierarchical organization of the health work force remains intact. Workers continue to be stratified by class and race. Superimposed on both strata is a structure that segregates jobs by gender, between and within health occupations. While female health workers outnumber males by three to one, they remain clustered in jobs and occupations lower in pay, less prestigious, and less autonomous than those of their male counterparts. What has prevented women from improving their economic and leadership status as health workers? Is work performed by men of higher prestige because men perform it? Would curative and technical fields have less status if dominated by women? Would health promotion be funded more generously if most health educators were men? In this article, two analytical constructs are presented to take a closer look at occupational categories, selected structural characteristics, differential rewards, and their relationship to gender segregation. Taken together, they demonstrate how women always cluster at the bottom and men at the top, no matter which dimension is chosen. PMID:3557769

Butter, I H; Carpenter, E S; Kay, B J; Simmons, R S

1987-01-01

7

Magnetic force and work: an accessible example  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite their physics instructors’ arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented which can illustrate that all may not be what it seems when energy transfer and the magnetic force are involved. Excel and Python simulations of the process are also provided.

Gates, Joshua

2014-05-01

8

Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

Gates, Joshua

2014-01-01

9

Telecommuters: the work force of the future.  

PubMed

Telecommuters are the work force of the future. The dawning of the information age, with its explosion of telecommunication technology, presents new opportunities for healthcare agencies to extend their borders far beyond traditional physical boundaries. The virtual workplace can become a reality and position healthcare agencies to be geographically dispersed throughout their community. The authors describe a pioneering effort to use telecommunications to retain a valuable employee and create a healthcare agency's first virtual workplace. Strategies for success in telecommuting also are provided from both the telecommuter's and the manager's viewpoints. PMID:7636575

Yancer, D A; Moe, J K

1995-01-01

10

Extended working hours and health.  

PubMed

Statistical analyses of the relation between the amount of working hours and impairments to health, based on data from a European survey on working conditions in 2000, clearly reveal that there is a substantial correlation between the number of working hours per week and the frequencies of health complaints. This applies to both musculo-skeletal disorders as well as to psycho-vegetative complaints. The relationship of the duration of the exposure to working conditions to health impairments is moderated by a great number of individual (e.g., age) and situational (e.g., shift-work) variables, showing additive or interactive effects for which selected examples have been presented. In general, however, there is a consistent functional relationship between the number or working hours and their effects on the workers that holds over a great variety of conditions. It is argued that requests for extending working hours should thus be handled with care. PMID:17190715

Raediker, Britta; Janssen, Daniela; Schomann, Carsten; Nachreiner, Friedhelm

2006-01-01

11

Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Workplace Safety & Health Topics NIOSH Share Compartir Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work America's work ... parenting responsibilities. 1 Work-related health challenges facing women Women face different workplace health challenges than men. ...

12

Annual report on contractor work force restructuring, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work force restructuring and community transition activities at all sites. It outlines work force restructuring activity for FY 1997, changing separation patterns, cost savings and separation costs, program assessment, activities to mitigate restructuring impacts, community transition activities, status of displaced workers, lessons learned, and emerging issues in worker and community transition. Work force restructuring and community transition activities for defense nuclear sites are summarized, as are work force restructuring activities at non-defense sites.

NONE

1998-03-01

13

40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section...Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must...officer's prior written approval for use of the force account method for (1) any step...

2010-07-01

14

40 CFR 35.936-14 - Force account work.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Force account work. 35.936-14 Section...Works-Clean Water Act § 35.936-14 Force account work. (a) A grantee must...officer's prior written approval for use of the force account method for (1) any step...

2011-07-01

15

Working Conditions and Health of European Older Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working conditions have greatly evolved in recent decades in developed countries. This evolution has been accompanied with the appearance of new forms of work organisation that may be sources of stress and health risk for older workers. As populations are ageing, these issues are particularly worrying in terms of the health, labour force participation and Social Security expenditure. This paper

Thierry Debrand; Pascale Lengagne

2008-01-01

16

The Multicultural Work Force. Trends and Issues Alerts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

White males represent only 46 percent of the U.S. work force. Within a few years, 75 percent of those entering the labor force will be women and minorities, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The work force is getting smaller as well as changing in nature. To attract and keep the most qualified and productive workers, businesses must make…

Lankard, Bettina A.

17

Flexible Labor: Restructuring the American Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trends in employment, occupations, output, and input provide evidence that firms increased their use of contract and contingent labor. Further research is needed to explore the causal factors behind the shift toward market-mediated work arrangements. (JOW)

Clinton, Angela

1997-01-01

18

Honeywell's Working Parents Task Force. Final Report and Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication provides a summary of the Honeywell Working Parent Task Force's recommendations on how to solve problems experienced by working parents. The Task Force consisted of three committees: the Employment Practices Committee (EPC); the Parent Education Committee (PEC); and the Child Care Facilities Committee (CCFC). After examining a…

Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

19

Environmental education work force pipeline strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an educational program designed to provide a pool of highly qualified administrative, technical, and managerial graduates that are familiar with the Hanford Site and business operations. The program is designed to provide work experience and mentoring to a culturally diverse student base which enhances affirmative employment goals. Short-term and long-term objectives of the program are outlined in the report, and current objectives are discussed in more detail. Goals to be completed by the year 2003 are aimed at defining the criteria necessary to establish partnerships between schools, community organizations, and human resources departments. Actions to be implemented includes providing instructors and equipment, enhancing skills of local teachers, and establishing collaboration with human resources organizations. Long-term goals of the program are to ensure a constant supply of qualified, trained workers to support industry missions. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Ortega, S.U.; Jackson, E.R.

1992-11-01

20

Work ability in health care workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work Ability Index was used as a complementary tool for the periodical health surveillance of health care workers in order to evaluate their functional working capacity and to plan more appropriate preventive and compensatory measures. 867 health care workers of both sexes (337 men, 530 women), aged between 23 and 65 years and with a work experience from 0.5 to

G. Costa; S. Sartori; B. Bertoldo; D. Olivato; G. Antonacci; V. Ciuffa; F. Mauli

2005-01-01

21

Report of the Task Force - Space for Health Sciences. Building Blocks. Volume III.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Task Force on Space for Health Sciences is one of four task forces established by the Committee on Capital Financing of the Council of Ontario Universities to work toward the development of a capital formula that would define space needs and building costs for Ontario universities. Each task force has a particular assignment related to the…

Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

22

The Culture-Work-Health Model and Work Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the role of organizational culture in the etiology of workplace stress through the framework of the Culture-Work- Health model. A review of relevant business and health literature indicates that culture is an important component of work stress and may be a key to creating effective organizational stress interventions. (SM)

Peterson, Michael; Wilson, John F.

2002-01-01

23

Work stress, nonwork stress, and health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the interface between work stress and nonwork stress and how it relates to health. Results indicate that the way people feel at work is largely a function of conditions at work. Similarly, the way people feel outside of work is largely a function of things that occur outside the job. Both work and nonwork stress are independently

Susan Klitzman; James S. House; Barbara A. Israel; Richard P. Mero

1990-01-01

24

Diversity in the Work Force. The Highlight Zone: Research @ Work No. 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A literature review was conducted to identify critical work force diversity issues in today's changing workplace and identify ways organizations and career and technical education (CTE) practitioners can increase work force diversity. A broad, all-inclusive definition of diversity was developed that focuses on how diversity affects individuals and…

Wentling, Rose Mary

25

[Health work in MERCOSUR: a Brazilian approach].  

PubMed

MERCOSUR Member Countries (Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Venezuela) have viewed the regional integration process and management of work and education in health as a concern for government, considering the health sector's specificities. Key issues are professional accreditation and harmonization of current legislation. This article discusses initiatives in the Permanent MERCOSUR Forum related to work in the health field. The Forum serves as a space for dialogue between various actors: Ministry of Health, health workers, and professional boards, with the aim of supporting the work by the Sub-Commission on Professional Development and Practice, under MERCOSUR Working Sub-Group 11, Health, aiding in the formulation of health management and education policies. The current challenge involves the creation of mechanisms for implementing joint actions to solve problems in the regulation of professional practice, especially in municipalities along the borders between MERCOSUR countries. PMID:17625655

Machado, Maria Helena; Paula, Aïda El-Khoury de; Aguiar Filho, Wilson

2007-01-01

26

Improving the Health of Working Families: Research Connections Between Work and Health. NPA Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains two papers on connections between work and health and policy options for improving the health of working families. "Foreword" (James A. Auerbach) places the two papers in the context of recent research on the connections between work, family, and health. Chapter 1's overview addresses the changing nature of work, the new…

Yen, Irene H.; Frank, John W.

27

United States health professionals in international health work.  

PubMed Central

This article reports results of a survey of 1,257 potential employers of US health professionals overseas, interviews with informants in international health, an analysis of career patterns of a small group of international health workers, and a review of numbers of health professionals trained in schools of public health for international health work. There are approximately 9,000 US health professionals in the international health field. Doctors (1,400), nurses (1,500) and administrators (900) are the largest groups. Church-related agencies (2,200 people), private voluntary agencies (1,700 people), and universities (1,000 people) are the largest employers. PMID:6711716

Baker, T D; Weisman, C; Piwoz, E

1984-01-01

28

The Need for Work Force Education. Fastback 350.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational problems underlie the crisis in the high-tech workplace. Insufficient expenditures for workplace education result in low productivity. Technology requires a skilled work force; the chief competitive advantage for a nation will be its skilled workers. Workplace literacy has been a half-hearted effort. Investment of billions by U.S.…

Gordon, Edward E.

29

Literacy in the Work Force. Report Number 947.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Up to 10 percent of U.S. workers are either functionally illiterate or marginally literate. These workers increase the operational costs of their employers and restrain companies' flexibility. The high school graduates of the 1990s will exacerbate the problem by entering the work force with marginal literacy skills. A survey of 1,600 manufacturing…

Lund, Leonard; McGuire, E. Patrick

30

Community Colleges, Work Force Training, and the Clinton Administration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The proposals for work force training put forth by the Clinton Administration offer unprecedented opportunities as well as risks for community colleges, particularly for community colleges in Illinois. These proposals are grounded in a world view that recognizes the need for public investment in employment and training, although this agenda for…

Katsinas, Stephen G.

31

Air Force Web Preventive Health Assessment (AF WEBPHA) mental health screening effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Air Force assesses Active Duty Air Force (ADAF) health annually using the Air Force Web-based Preventative Health Assessment (AF WebPHA). The assessment is based on a self-administered survey used to determine the overall Air Force health and readiness, as well as, the individual health of each airman. Individual survey responses as well as groups of responses generate further

Michael Madrid

2010-01-01

32

14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

2011-01-01

33

14 CFR 151.51 - Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. 151.51 Section 151.51 Aeronautics... Performance of construction work: Sponsor force account. (a) Before undertaking any force account construction work, the...

2010-01-01

34

Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations  

PubMed Central

Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

2014-01-01

35

Parents' work patterns and adolescent mental health.  

PubMed

Previous research demonstrates that non-standard work schedules undermine the stability of marriage and reduce family cohesiveness. Limited research has investigated the effects of parents working non-standard schedules on children's health and wellbeing and no published Australian studies have addressed this important issue. This paper contributes to bridging this knowledge gap by focusing on adolescents aged 15-20 years and by including sole parent families which have been omitted in previous research, using panel data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey. Multilevel linear regression models are estimated to analyse the association between parental work schedules and hours of work and measures of adolescents' mental health derived from the SF-36 Health Survey. Evidence of negative impacts of parents working non-standard hours upon adolescent wellbeing is found to exist primarily within sole parent families. PMID:19084312

Dockery, Alfred; Li, Jianghong; Kendall, Garth

2009-02-01

36

Work against an Electric Force: The Van De Graaff generator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page illustrates the concept of work against an electric force using the examples of the Van de Graaff generator and lightening. There are also shorter examples of the Xerox machine and electric charge on transparency sheets as well as links to sites relating to the Van de Graaff machine or lightening. This is an optional section of "From Stargazers to Starships". French and Italian translations are available.

Stern, David

2005-01-04

37

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT  

E-print Network

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING TASK FORCE REPORT October 2008 © 2008 The Board of Trustees. Appendix 42 #12;2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Acknowledging the changing landscape of student mental health issues at Stanford and throughout the country, Provost John Etchemendy convened the Student Mental Health and Well

Prinz, Friedrich B.

38

Why do health labour market forces matter?  

PubMed Central

Abstract Human resources for health have been recognized as essential to the development of responsive and effective health systems. Low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve universal health coverage face human resource constraints – whether in the form of health worker shortages, maldistribution of workers or poor worker performance – that seriously undermine their ability to achieve well-functioning health systems. Although much has been written about the human resource crisis in the health sector, labour economic frameworks have seldom been applied to analyse the situation and little is known or understood about the operation of labour markets in low- and middle-income countries. Traditional approaches to addressing human resource constraints have focused on workforce planning: estimating health workforce requirements based on a country’s epidemiological and demographic profile and scaling up education and training capacities to narrow the gap between the “needed” number of health workers and the existing number. However, this approach neglects other important factors that influence human resource capacity, including labour market dynamics and the behavioural responses and preferences of the health workers themselves. This paper describes how labour market analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the factors behind human resource constraints in the health sector and to a more effective design of policies and interventions to address them. The premise is that a better understanding of the impact of health policies on health labour markets, and subsequently on the employment conditions of health workers, would be helpful in identifying an effective strategy towards the progressive attainment of universal health coverage. PMID:24347708

McPake, Barbara; Araujo, Edson Correia; Lemiere, Christophe; El Maghraby, Atef; Cometto, Giorgio

2013-01-01

39

Why do health labour market forces matter?  

PubMed

Human resources for health have been recognized as essential to the development of responsive and effective health systems. Low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve universal health coverage face human resource constraints - whether in the form of health worker shortages, maldistribution of workers or poor worker performance - that seriously undermine their ability to achieve well-functioning health systems. Although much has been written about the human resource crisis in the health sector, labour economic frameworks have seldom been applied to analyse the situation and little is known or understood about the operation of labour markets in low- and middle-income countries. Traditional approaches to addressing human resource constraints have focused on workforce planning: estimating health workforce requirements based on a country's epidemiological and demographic profile and scaling up education and training capacities to narrow the gap between the "needed" number of health workers and the existing number. However, this approach neglects other important factors that influence human resource capacity, including labour market dynamics and the behavioural responses and preferences of the health workers themselves. This paper describes how labour market analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the factors behind human resource constraints in the health sector and to a more effective design of policies and interventions to address them. The premise is that a better understanding of the impact of health policies on health labour markets, and subsequently on the employment conditions of health workers, would be helpful in identifying an effective strategy towards the progressive attainment of universal health coverage. PMID:24347708

McPake, Barbara; Maeda, Akiko; Araújo, Edson Correia; Lemiere, Christophe; El Maghraby, Atef; Cometto, Giorgio

2013-11-01

40

Bad Jobs, Bad Health? How Work and Working Conditions Contribute to Health Disparities  

PubMed Central

In this review, we touch on a broad array of ways that work is linked to health and health disparities for individuals and societies. First focusing on the health of individuals, we discuss the health differences between those who do and do not work for pay, and review key positive and negative exposures that can generate health disparities among the employed. These include both psychosocial factors like the benefits of a high status job or the burden of perceived job insecurity, as well as physical exposures to dangerous working conditions like asbestos or rotating shift work. We also provide a discussion of the ways differential exposure to these aspects of work contributes to social disparities in health within and across generations. Analytic complexities in assessing the link between work and health for individuals, such as health selection, are also discussed. We then touch on several contextual level associations between work and the health of populations, discussing the importance of the occupational structure in a given society, the policy environment that prevails there, and the oscillations of the macroeconomy for generating societal disparities in health. We close with a discussion of four areas and associated recommendations that draw on this corpus of knowledge but would push the research on work, health and inequality toward even greater scholarly and policy relevance. PMID:24187340

Burgard, Sarah A.; Lin, Katherine Y.

2013-01-01

41

Power, muscular work, and external forces in cycling.  

PubMed

Cycling performance is affected by the interaction of a number of variables, including environment, mechanical, and human factors. Engineers have focused on the development of more efficient bicycles. Kinesiologists have examined cycling performance from a human perspective. This paper summarizes only certain aspects of human ergonomics of cycling, especially those which are important for the recent current research in our departments. Power is a key to performance of physical work. During locomotion an imaginary flow of energy takes place from the metabolism to the environment, with some efficiency. The 'useful' mechanical muscle power output might be used to perform movements and to do work against the environment. The external power is defined as the sum of joint powers, each calculated as the product of the joint (net) moment and angular velocity. This definition of external power is closely related to the mean external power as applied to exercise physiology: the sum of joint powers reflects all mechanical power which in principle can be used to fulfil a certain task. In this paper, the flow of energy for cycling is traced quantitatively as far as possible. Studies on the total lower limb can give insight into the contribution of individual muscles to external power. The muscle velocity (positive or negative) is obtained from the positions and orientations of body segments and a bar linkage model of the lower limb. The muscle activity can be measured by electromyography. In this way, positive and negative work regions in individual muscles are identified. Synergy between active agonistic/antagonistic muscle groups occurs in order to deliver external power. Maximum power is influenced by body position, geometry of the bicycle and pedalling rate. This has to be interpreted in terms of the length-tension and force-velocity-power relationships of the involved muscles. Flat road and uphill cycling at different saddle-tube angles is simulated on an ergometer. The measured pedal forces (magnitude and direction) are only dependent on the intersegmental orientation of saddle tube, crank position, upper and lower leg, and foot. The changed direction of the gravitational force with respect to the saddle-tube does not interfere with the co-ordinated force production pattern. During locomotory cycling at constant speed the external power is mainly used to overcome the aerodynamic friction force. This force and the rolling resistance are determined by coasting down experiments, yielding the external power.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8112280

de Groot, G; Welbergen, E; Clijsen, L; Clarijs, J; Cabri, J; Antonis, J

1994-01-01

42

Human Health Effects, Task Force Assessment, Preliminary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented in this preliminary report is one of seven assessments conducted by a special task force of Project Clean Air, the Human Health Effects Task Force. The reports summarize assessments of the state of knowledge on various air pollution problems, particularly in California, and make tentative recommendations as to what the University of…

Aronow, Wilbert S.; And Others

43

August 16, 2014 mHealth Project Force Asia-Pacific  

E-print Network

August 16, 2014 mHealth Project Force Asia-Pacific Stan Jarzabek Contents Executive Summary................................................................................................................................. 1 Who should join mHealth Project Force?...............................................................................................2 How to join mHealth Project Force

Jarzabek, Stan

44

Working together for health and human rights.  

PubMed

The right to a standard of living adequate for health and well-being is being denied to vast numbers of people all over the world through increasing disparities in income and in wealth. In the name of economic development, a number of international and national policies have increased the grossly uneven distribution of income, with ever-growing numbers of people living in poverty as well as in increasing depths of poverty. Globalization, crippling levels of external debt, and the 'structural adjustment' policies of international agencies have expanded the numbers and the suffering of people living in poverty and have resulted in the neglect of government-funded social programs, of regulations protecting the environment, and of human development. Access to medical care, an essential element in the protection of health, is difficult for many, including the 44 million people in the United States who lack insurance coverage for the cost of medical care services. Working together for health and human rights also requires promotion of the right to peace. The right to life and health is threatened not only by the existence and active deployment of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, chemical and biological weapons and anti-personnel landmines, but also other weapons. The twentieth century has been the bloodiest in human history, with an estimated 250 wars, more than 110 million people killed, countless people wounded and at the least 50 million refugees. Health workers must work together with people in our communities for the promotion of health and human rights, which, in Sandwell and elsewhere, are inextricably intertwined. PMID:11130630

Sidel, V W

2000-01-01

45

The Air Force health study: an epidemiologic retrospective.  

PubMed

In 1979, the U.S. Air Force announced that an epidemiologic study would be undertaken to determine whether the Air Force personnel involved in Operation Ranch Hand-the program responsible for herbicide spraying in Vietnam-had experienced adverse health effects as a result of that service. In January 1982 the Air Force Health Study (AFHS) protocol was approved and the 20 year matched cohort study consisting of independent mortality, morbidity and reproductive health components was initiated. This controversial study has been criticized regarding the study's potential scientific limitations as well as some of the administrative aspects of its conduct. Now, almost 30 years since the implementation of the AFHS and nearly a decade since the final follow up examinations, an appraisal of the study indicates that the results of the AFHS do not provide evidence of disease in the Ranch Hand veterans caused by their elevated levels of exposure to Agent Orange. PMID:21441038

Buffler, Patricia A; Ginevan, Michael E; Mandel, Jack S; Watkins, Deborah K

2011-09-01

46

Precarious employment, working hours, work-life conflict and health in hotel work.  

PubMed

Precarious or temporary work is associated with adverse outcomes including low control over working hours, work-life conflict and stress. The rise in precarious employment is most marked in the service sector but little research has been done on its health effects in this sector. This study compares permanent and temporary workers in the hotel industry, where working hours are highly variable. Survey data from 150 workers from eight 3-Star hotels in urban and regional areas around Sydney were analyzed. Forty-five per cent were male and 52 per cent were female. Fifty four per cent were permanent full-time and 46 per cent were temporary workers. The effects of employment status on perceived job security, control over working hours, and work-life conflict are investigated using PLS-Graph 3.0. The effects of control over working hours, on work-life conflict and subsequent health outcomes are also explored. Temporary workers perceived themselves as less in control of their working hours, than permanent workers (? = .27). However, they also reported lower levels of work intensity (? = .25) and working hours (? = .38). The effects of low hours control (? = .20), work intensity (? = .29), and excessive hours (? = .39) on work-life conflict (r² = .50), and subsequent health effects (r² = .30), are illustrated in the final structural equation model. PMID:20643398

McNamara, Maria; Bohle, Philip; Quinlan, Michael

2011-01-01

47

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 252.223-7004 Section 252.223-7004...Clauses 252.223-7004 Drug-free work force. As prescribed in 223.570-2, use the following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) (a) Definitions....

2011-10-01

48

48 CFR 252.223-7004 - Drug-free work force.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Drug-free work force. 252.223-7004 Section 252.223-7004...Clauses 252.223-7004 Drug-free work force. As prescribed in 223.570-2, use the following clause: Drug-Free Work Force (SEP 1988) (a) Definitions....

2010-10-01

49

Masked Symptoms: Mid-Life Women, Health, and Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (1997) reveal that relatively few mid-life women offer ill health as a reason for leaving their job or downshifting to part-time employment, implying that the role of ill health may be inconsequential in effecting changing patterns in mid-life women's labour force activity. In contrast, interviews with 30…

Abramson, Zelda

2007-01-01

50

American Indians, Blacks, & Asians in Oregon's Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Labor force issues do not take place in a vacuum. Most individuals base labor force decisions on a multitude of cultural and social factors, such as the environment in which they were reared, family obligations and responsibilities, divorce or the death of a spouse, or because of governmental policies. Sections in this document on demographics,…

Helvoigt, Ted L.

51

Working towards a national health information system in Australia.  

PubMed

One of the major administrative dilemmas facing the Australian national health care system is the need to reform practices associated with massive data-information overload. The current system is burdened with paper-based administrative forms, patient record files, referral notes and other manual methods of data organisation. An integrated computer-based information system may be perceived as an attractive solution to such burdens. However, computerisation must not be seen as a panacea with the possibility of exacerbating information overload and accentuating privacy concerns. Recent surveys in Australia [1] and the US [2] indicate a perceived causal link between computers and privacy invasion. Any moves toward a national health information system must counter this perception through macro-level education schemes of affected parties and micro-level mechanisms such as the establishment of hospital privacy officers. Such concerns may be viewed as a subset of the wider privacy debate, and information policy development should address such considerations to develop policies to prevent unauthorized access to personal information and to avoid the extraction and sale of sensitive health data. Conservative in nature and slow to change the health care sector may be forced to adopt more efficient work practices through the increasing proliferation of information technology (IT) in health care delivery and an escalating emphasis upon accountability and efficiency of the public health care dollar. The economic rationalist stance taken by governments in Australia and other nations generally will also force health care workers to adopt and develop more efficient information management practices, health indicators and best practice care methods than presently employed by this sector The benefits of a national health information system are far reaching, particularly in developing a more effective health care system through better identifying and understanding community health care trends and in applying IT to the efficient collection of data for the development of more appropriate performance measures and statistical indicators. A coherent and integrated approach is called for in the design of a national health information system which incorporates the necessary and requisite security features to meet privacy concerns. Protecting information privacy poses complex political, economic, technological, legal and social problems for systems developers and health care providers alike [2]. According to Brannigan [3] there are three components involved in the formulation and implementation of privacy: public policy (What level of privacy does society want?); legal structure (Does the law adequately provide for society's privacy requirements?); and technical (how much privacy can technical tools provide, at what cost, and with what effects on the system?). Examining technical tools alone, it is apparent that the necessary technologies are available in Australia to provide the security of medical records required by public policy. Such tools may include encryption, user and data authentication methods, authorisation schemes and mechanisms for the prevention of data inference. While none of these available measures are infallible, it is suitable for most applications where the encryption mechanism can provide protection for a given length of time. Australia needs to develop a coherent national health information infrastructure policy to ultimately avoid fragmented, duplicated and incompatible systems that rely on different standards and protocols. Such a policy will only work by addressing the key issue of patient privacy within a technological framework. The application of IT to health care systems is a sensitive social experiment affecting many professions including general practitioners, medical administrators, politicians, lawyers, computer specialists, privacy advocates and patients whose records will ultimately reside in the system. (abstract trun PMID:8591519

Bomba, B; Cooper, J; Miller, M

1995-01-01

52

Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1,299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer.

Wolfe, W.H.; Michalek, J.E.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA)); Rahe, A. (QuesTech Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Silva, J. (Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Thomas, W.F.; Lustik, M.B.; Grubbs, W.D.; Roegner, R.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA)); Karrison, T.G. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Williams, D.E. (Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-10-10

53

Multicultural Group Work: A Force for Developing and Healing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multicultural group work represents a powerful tool for helping and healing in the context of human diversity. This article summarizes multicultural group work, including task, psychoeducational, counseling, and psychotherapy groups, and describes a group work model for multicultural assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Group work

Anderson, Donald

2007-01-01

54

Development of a force sensor working with MR elastomers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the development of a new force sensor with MR elastomer as a sensing element. One key element in this study was to find a suitable material with high sensing capabilities which can be used for developing a sensor. Thus different MR elastomers, with ingredients of carbonyl iron particle, graphite, silicone oil and silicone rubber, were manufactured and

Weihua Li; Kosta Kostidis; Xianzhou Zhang; Yang Zhou

2009-01-01

55

Forced migration and child health and mortality in Angola  

PubMed Central

This study investigates the effects of forced migration on child survival and health in Angola. Using survey data collected in Luanda, Angola, in 2004, just two years after the end of that country's prolonged civil war, we compare three groups: migrants who moved primarily due to war, migrants whose moves were not directly related to war, and non-migrants. First, we examine the differences among the three groups in under-five mortality. Using an event-history approach, we find that hazards of child death in any given year were higher in families that experienced war-related migration in the same year or in the previous year, net of other factors. To assess longer-term effects of forced migration, we examine hazards of death of children who were born in Luanda, i.e., after migrants had reached their destinations. We again observe a disadvantage of forced migrants, but this disadvantage is explained by other characteristics. When looking at the place of delivery, number of antenatal consultations, and age-adequate immunization of children born in Luanda, we again detect a disadvantage of forced migrants relative to non-migrants, but now this disadvantage also extends to migrants who came to Luanda for reasons other than war. Finally, no differences across the three groups in child morbidity and related healthcare seeking behavior in the two weeks preceding the survey are found. We interpret these results within the context of the literature on short- and long-term effects of forced migration on child health. PMID:19879027

Agadjanian, Victor

2009-01-01

56

Manning the Force Through Immigration: Making the American Dream Work for the Armed Forces.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Force struggles with recruitment and retention. Focused recruitment on legal permanent resident immigrants, assisted by new national immigration legislation giving eligible service members the right to accelerate immigrant visa petition interviews for...

A. S. Kong

2001-01-01

57

The Quality of Work and Youth Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the Youth Development Study on adolescents who worked in high school were used to examine mental health, work stress, and work/school interactions. The quality of high school work experiences had significant consequences for mental states during high school, but had little effect on long-term mental health. (Contains 70 references.) (SK)

Mortimer, Jeylan T.; Harley, Carolyn; Staff, Jeremy

2002-01-01

58

Blueprint for Business. Reaching a New Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is designed to help U.S. businesses successfully hire and retain individuals moving from welfare to work. Section 1 discusses the different circumstances created by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 and how those changes affect business. Section 2 reviews bottom-line benefits realized by…

Hogan, Lyn A.; Erden, James Van; Mower, Eleanor; Patel, Apurva; Mitchell, Steve

59

Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

60

Managing Diversity: The New Multicultural Work Force Requires a Simpatico Style.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some companies are finding ways to manage a culturally diverse work force: analyzing work force composition, increasing awareness of attitudinal differences and diversity issues, thinking interculturally about problems, mentoring diverse employees, making standards fluid enough for all achievers, and rewarding successful managers of diverse…

Piturro, Marlene; Mahoney, Sarah S.

1992-01-01

61

Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials  

E-print Network

legislative and regulatory frameworks to mitigate the potential health risks of nanomaterials and to help1 Interim Policy Statement on Health Canada's Working Definition for Nanomaterials 1. Introduction is expected to increase in the future. Health Canada helps protect and promote health by using existing

Carleton University

62

[Work and mental health: risk groups].  

PubMed

Analysis of the Quebec Health survey identified those Quebec industrial sectors and professions in which workers are at risk of higher psychological distress and lower psychological well-being. Risk levels were measured by odds ratio, controlling for: health status, sex, social support and stressful life events. Results show that those at risk are blue collar workers and less qualified workers of traditional sectors. Lower job latitude could explain those results. Results show that risk of mental health problems is significantly higher in the following industrial sectors: leather, chemicals, paint and varnish industries; urban bus transport and taxi; shoe, clothing and textile retail stores; department stores; restaurant services; insurance and public administration (excluding defence). Risk of mental health problems is higher in the following professions road transport (excluding truck drivers); textile, leather, fur manufacturing and repairing; housekeeping and maintenance; painters, tapestry-workers, insulation and waterproofing, food and beverages sector; data processors; editors and university professors. PMID:8753644

Vézina, M; Gingras, S

1996-01-01

63

Working to Death: The Regulation of Working Hours in Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research highlights significant risks associated with health professionals working long hours—risks to their health and safety, to the safety and quality of care provided to patients, and to public safety. This article undertakes a review of the various instruments used to regulate working hours in health systems, using six countries (Australia, Canada, Denmark, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and

FIONA McDONALD

2008-01-01

64

Force Health Protection: the mission and political context of the longitudinal health record.  

PubMed

Drawing upon an extensive search of publically available literature and discussions at the "National Forum on the Future of the Defense Health Information System," this article documents the evolving mission and political context of the longitudinal health record (LHR) as an instrument for Force Health Protection (FHP). Because of the Gulf War syndrome controversy, the Department of Defense (DoD) launched an ambitious, complex series of programs designed to create a comprehensive, integrated defense health surveillance capability to assure FHP and keep faith with the American people. This "system of systems" includes individual component systems to perform specific functions such as disease surveillance, battlefield assessment, and patient care and consolidates these diverse types of information into centrally accessible archives that serve the interests of occupational health, preventive medicine, medical strategic planning, and longitudinal patient health care. After 25 years of effort and major accomplishments, progress toward a LHR remains uneven and controversy persists. PMID:19562957

Collmann, Jeff

2009-05-01

65

Women's Health. Report of the Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues. Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report identifies a broad spectrum of issues affecting women's health and is divided into four sections: (1) social factors affecting women's health; (2) women's physical health and well-being; (3) health concerns of older women; and (4) issues related to alcohol, drug use and abuse, and the mental health of women. The Public Health Service…

Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

66

Making health reform work without employer mandates.  

PubMed

Requiring employers to furnish health insurance may be a politically expedient way to expand coverage to the uninsured, but it will surely undermine economic competitiveness and contribute to greater unemployment at a time when the U.S. is struggling to regain its economic strength. In the present environment, a wiser course of action would require that individual households, not employers, become the entity responsible for obtaining health insurance. Under such a scenario, limits would be established on the percentage of after-tax income devoted to health insurance, subsidies would be granted to low-income individuals to purchase insurance, and a basic benefit package would be developed that limits payments to services meeting efficacy and cost-effectiveness criteria. PMID:10125730

Battistella, R M; Kuder, J M

1993-01-01

67

Thailand’s Work and Health Transition  

PubMed Central

Thailand has experienced a rapid economic transition from agriculture to industry and services, and from informal to formal employment. It has much less state regulation and worker representation relative to developed nations, who underwent these transitions more slowly and sequentially, decades earlier. We examine the strengthening of Thai government policy and legislation affecting worker’s health, responding to international norms, a new democratic constitution, fear of foreign importer embargos and several fatal workplace disasters. We identify key challenges remaining for Thai policy makers, including legislation enforcement and the measurement of impacts on worker’s mental and physical health. PMID:22318916

Kelly, Matthew; Strazdins, Lyndall; Dellora, Tarie; Khamman, Suwanee; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian C

2011-01-01

68

The Aging Work Force. Managing an Aging Work Force. Older Employees Instructional Resources for Instructors of Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These resource materials are designed to help instructors prepare their business students to work with older employees. The materials can be used in undergraduate and graduate courses in management, organizational behavior, human resource management, business policy, and business and society. The materials include lecture guides, discussion…

American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC. Work Force Programs Dept.

69

The goals of health work: Quality of life, health and welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health-related quality of life is the ultimate general goal for medicine, health care and public health, including health\\u000a promotion and health education. The other important general goal is health-related welfare. The aim of the paper is to explain\\u000a what this means and what the consequences of these assumptions are for health work. This involves defining the central terms\\u000a “health”, “quality

Per-Anders Tengland

2006-01-01

70

Farm elders define health as the ability to work.  

PubMed

Thirty percent of America's 2.2 million farms are operated by individuals older than 65 years. This study examined how older farmers define health and determined whether demographic characteristics, farm work, and physical and mental health status predict health definition. Data were collected via telephone and mailed surveys during the baseline wave of data collection in a longitudinal study of family farmers residing in two southern states (n=1,288). Nearly 42% defined health as the "ability to work" compared to a physical health-related definition. Predictors of defining health as the ability to work included being White, performing more farm tasks in the past week, taking prescription medications daily, and having minimal health-related limitations to farm work. Health behaviors are centered on the individual's perception of health. Understanding the defining attributes of health can support better approaches to health care and health promotion, particularly among rural subcultures such as farmers, whose identity is rooted in their work. PMID:22823476

Reed, Deborah B; Rayens, Mary Kay; Conley, Christina K; Westneat, Susan; Adkins, Sarah M

2012-08-01

71

Review: Fuchs' Who Shall Live? Health, Economics, and Social Choice Reviewed Work(s)  

E-print Network

Review: Fuchs' Who Shall Live? Health, Economics, and Social Choice Reviewed Work(s): Who Shall Live? Health, Economics, and Social Choice. by Victor R. Fuchs Jeffrey E. Harris The Bell Journal personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the publisher regarding any further use of this work

Seager, Sara

72

Health promotion and work: prevention of shift work disorders in companies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Workplace health promotion is a strategy to improve the health and well-being of people at work. The measures aim at the personal,\\u000a organisational and work environment. Shift work is one of many reasons provoking increased job stress. According to worldwide\\u000a epidemiological data, up to 30% of the working population are employed in shifts. Taking into consideration that shift work\\u000a causes

Kneginja D. Richter; Jens Acker; Friederike Scholz; Günter Niklewski

2010-01-01

73

Work-family conflict as a mediator of the work stress - mental health relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between work stressors and mental health outcomes has been demonstrated in a whole range of work stress models and studies. But less has been written about factors outside the work setting that might predict or moderate the relationship between work stressors and strain. In this exploratory study, we suggest a model linking work stressors and \\

Steven Poelmans

2001-01-01

74

Our Mission The Department of Public Health works to make  

E-print Network

#12;Our Mission The Department of Public Health works to make medicine and medical care more health which are critically important to achieve this goal. We complement and strengthen Weill Cornell of medicine. Our Focus and Expertise Our faculty are experts in a spectrum of disciplines including health

Chen, Tsuhan

75

HEALTH PROMOTION IN THE MARITIME WORK ENVIRONMENT - TRAINING OF LEADERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essence of the project of pro-health attitudes promotion is the assumption that they contribute to a successful occupational career and reduce health and life hazards in the maritime work environment. The method chosen was to train students of the Maritime Academy in Gdynia, the future officers and potential health leaders among maritime employees.

MARIA JEEWSKA; BOGDAN JAREMIN; IRENA LESZCZYSKA

76

The Implicit Contract: Implications for Health Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifying common patient dynamics is useful for developing social work practice sensitivity in health social work. This article draws on findings from a study of women who terminated desired pregnancies because of fetal anomalies and identifies dynamics that may be applicable to many health settings. Data suggest that women have expectations…

McCoyd, Judith L. M.

2010-01-01

77

Working With the TO PROMOTE EYE HEALTH PROGRAMS AND EVENTS  

E-print Network

an enormous influence on our society by shaping public opinion and even changing it. Thus, the media can playTips for Working With the Media TO PROMOTE EYE HEALTH PROGRAMS AND EVENTS #12;Media Guide | 1 Media Guide Tips for Working With the Media To Promote Eye Health Programs and Events The media have

Bandettini, Peter A.

78

[Information systems supporting the management work in health].  

PubMed

The article presents some aspects on the relevance of the information systems as tool of support to the management of the work of the health professionals, a time that is a computational resource capable to potential the knowledge search. Know that the information systems available of fast form, easy and insurance the information, allowing that the professionals of the health search knowledge and if become able, creative and competent to inside act with the complexity of the work in health of the Brazilian system of health aiming at to consolidate the politics of the National Health System. It is reflected on what it is the management of the work in health and as the information systems they come contribute for the fortify of action and processes of health in this area. PMID:19597670

Benito, Gladys Amélia Véles; Licheski, Ana Paula

2009-01-01

79

Extrinsic Motivation as Correlates of Work Attitude of the Nigerian Police Force: Implications for Counselling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined Extrinsic motivation as correlates of work attitude of the Nigeria Police Force and its implications for counselling. 300 Police personnel were selected by random sampling technique from six departments that make up police force Headquarters, Abuja. The personnel were selected from each department using simple sampling…

Igun, Sylvester Nosakhare

2008-01-01

80

Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

2008-01-01

81

Stigma and barriers to accessing mental health services perceived by air force nursing personnel.  

PubMed

We investigated perceptions of stigma and barriers associated with accessing mental health services among active component U.S. Air Force officer and enlisted nursing personnel (N = 211). The Britt and Hoge et al Stigma scale and Hoge et al Barriers to Care scale were administered via an anonymous, online survey. Stigma items pertained to concerns that might affect decisions to seek mental health treatment. Most of the sample agreed with the items "Members of my unit might have less confidence in me" and "My unit leadership might treat me differently." Approximately 20% to 46% agreed with the other four stigma items. Officer nursing personnel were significantly more likely than enlisted to agree that accessing mental health services would be embarrassing, harm their career, or cause leaders to blame them for the problem (p ? 0.03 for each comparison). Getting time off from work for treatment and scheduling appointments were perceived as barriers by 41% and 21% of respondents, respectively. We conclude that proportions of Air Force nursing personnel reporting concerns about potential stigmatizing consequences of seeking mental health care are substantial and similar to ranges previously reported by military service members screening positive for mental health problems after deployment. PMID:25373066

Hernandez, Stephen H A; Bedrick, Edward J; Parshall, Mark B

2014-11-01

82

Occupational epidemiology and work related inequalities in health: a gender perspective for two complementary approaches to work and health research  

PubMed Central

Objectives To provide a framework for epidemiological research on work and health that combines classic occupational epidemiology and the consideration of work in a structural perspective focused on gender inequalities in health. Methods Gaps and limitations in classic occupational epidemiology, when considered from a gender perspective, are described. Limitations in research on work related gender inequalities in health are identified. Finally, some recommendations for future research are proposed. Results Classic occupational epidemiology has paid less attention to women's problems than men's. Research into work related gender inequalities in health has rarely considered either social class or the impact of family demands on men's health. In addition, it has rarely taken into account the potential interactions between gender, social class, employment status and family roles and the differences in social determinants of health according to the health indicator analysed. Conclusions Occupational epidemiology should consider the role of sex and gender in examining exposures and associated health problems. Variables should be used that capture the specific work environments and health conditions of both sexes. The analysis of work and health from a gender perspective should take into account the complex interactions between gender, family roles, employment status and social class. PMID:18000116

Artazcoz, Lucia; Borrell, Carme; Cortes, Imma; Escriba-Aguir, Vicenta; Cascant, Lorena

2007-01-01

83

Health effects of child work: Evidence from rural Vietnam  

Microsoft Academic Search

We test whether work in childhood impacts on health. We focus on agricultural work, the dominant form of child work worldwide. Data are from the Vietnam Living Standards Survey, 1992–93 and 1997–98. We correct for both unobservable heterogeneity and simultaneity biases. Instruments are land holdings and commune labour market and school quality indicators. We examine three indicators of health: weight-for-age

Owen O'Donnell; Furio C. Rosati; Eddy van Doorslaer

2005-01-01

84

The role of work ability and health on sustaining employability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis aimed to contribute to the understanding of the role of\\u000adecreased work ability and ill health on work participation and work\\u000aperformance of older workers.\\u000aThe longitudinal study on the role of four different health measures on\\u000aexit from paid employment among workers aged 50 to 63 years old in 11\\u000aEuropean countries showed, that controlling for individual

Berg van den T. I. J

2010-01-01

85

Community health centers and community development financial institutions: joining forces to address determinants of health.  

PubMed

Community health centers and community development financial institutions share similar origins and missions and are increasingly working together to meet community needs. Addressing the social and economic determinants of health is a common focus. The availability of new federal grants and tax credits has led these financial institutions to invest in the creation and expansion of community health centers. This article reviews the most recent trends in these two sectors and explores opportunities for further collaboration to transform the health and well-being of the nation's low-income communities. PMID:22068401

Kotelchuck, Ronda; Lowenstein, Daniel; Tobin, Jonathan N

2011-11-01

86

Association of Returning to Work With Better Health in Working-Aged Adults: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We systematically reviewed the literature on the impact of returning to work on health among working-aged adults. Methods. We searched 6 electronic databases in 2005. We selected longitudinal studies that documented a transition from unemployment to employment and included a comparison group. Two reviewers independently appraised the retrieved literature for potential relevance and methodological quality. Results. Eighteen studies met our inclusion criteria, including 1 randomized controlled trial. Fifteen studies revealed a beneficial effect of returning to work on health, either demonstrating a significant improvement in health after reemployment or a significant decline in health attributed to continued unemployment. We also found evidence for health selection, suggesting that poor health interferes with people’s ability to go back to work. Some evidence suggested that earlier reemployment may be associated with better health. Conclusions. Beneficial health effects of returning to work have been documented in a variety of populations, times, and settings. Return-to-work programs may improve not only financial situations but also health. PMID:22390520

Chambers, Lori; Wilson, Mike; Mustard, Cameron; Rourke, Sean B.; Bayoumi, Ahmed; Raboud, Janet; Lavis, John

2012-01-01

87

Partnership work between Public Health and Health Psychology: introduction to a novel training programme  

PubMed Central

Background Public health services implement individual, community and population level interventions to change health behaviours, improve healthy life expectancy and reduce health inequalities. Understanding and changing health behaviour is complex. Integrating behaviour change theory and evidence into interventions has the potential to improve services. Methods Health Psychologists apply evidence and theories aimed at understanding and changing health behaviour. A Scottish programme is piloting the training of Health Psychologists within NHS contexts to address prominent public health challenges. Results This article outlines the details of this novel programme. Two projects are examined to illustrate the potential of partnership working between public health and health psychology. Conclusion In order to develop and improve behaviour change interventions and services, public health planners may want to consider developing and using the knowledge and skills of Health Psychologists. Supporting such training within public health contexts is a promising avenue to build critical NHS internal mass to tackle the major public health challenges ahead. PMID:21070643

2010-01-01

88

Effects of arterial perfusion pressure on force production in working human hand muscles.  

PubMed Central

1. The effects of hydrostatic changes in perfusion pressure on performance of working fatigue-resistant muscle fibres in the hand were studied in six normal subjects. 2. Supramaximal stimuli were delivered in trains of 200 ms duration, at 1 train S-1, to the ulnar nerve proximal to the wrist to produce isometric contractions of adductor pollicis. The force of contraction was measured and, after a level contraction force was achieved, the arm was passively raised or lowered. 3. Lifting the hand 45 cm above the heart produced a decline in force output from the muscle within several seconds which, after 4 min, fell by 22% below the steady-state level. Lowering the hand 45 cm below heart level produced an 8% increase in force output. Greater changes in force output occur at higher workloads. 4. It is concluded that in human subjects, muscle performance is sensitive to changes in perfusion pressure that occur across the physiological range. At moderate work levels, force output of the working muscles in the hand can vary by up to 30% over the physiological range of blood pressure. This dependence of muscular force on blood perfusion is of potential importance to motor control during normal activities. Images Figure 1 PMID:8887790

Fitzpatrick, R; Taylor, J L; McCloskey, D I

1996-01-01

89

Work stress and health in primary health care physicians and hospital physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: In order to understand the reasons for the low priority given to work in primary health care among physicians, we studied differences in work stress, health and health related lifestyles between general practitioners (GPs) and hospital physicians. Method: A cohort of 226 GPs and 523 consultants from Finland responded to a questionnaire survey. The responses were linked to data

P Virtanen; T Oksanen; M Kivimaki; M Virtanen; J Pentti; J Vahtera

2008-01-01

90

Labor Force Participation, Gender and Work in South Africa: What Can Time Use Data Reveal?*  

E-print Network

the information they provide. Further, information on the time spent in job- related search and household work cooking, cleaning, shopping and care for children, sick and elderly. They also help us better understand1 Labor Force Participation, Gender and Work in South Africa: What Can Time Use Data Reveal

Lansky, Joshua

91

Intrinsic and Extrinsic Work Motivators: Implications for the Incoming Air Force Officer Workforce. Posters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains three poster presentations from a conference on human resource development. "Intrinsic and Extrinsic Work Motivators: Implications for the Incoming Air Force Officer Workforce" (Stephanie K. Johnson, Jason J. Davis, Christopher Rate) reports on a study that explored the literature relating to work motivators to find Air…

Johnson, Stephanie K.; Davis, Jason J.; Rate, Christopher

92

Changing Work, Changing Health: Can Real Work-Time Flexibility Promote Health Behaviors and Well-Being?  

PubMed Central

This article investigates a change in the structuring of work time, using a natural experiment to test whether participation in a corporate initiative (Results Only Work Environment; ROWE) predicts corresponding changes in health-related outcomes. Drawing on job strain and stress process models, we theorize greater schedule control and reduced work-family conflict as key mechanisms linking this initiative with health outcomes. Longitudinal survey data from 659 employees at a corporate headquarters shows that ROWE predicts changes in health-related behaviors, including almost an extra hour of sleep on work nights. Increasing employees’ schedule control and reducing their work-family conflict are key mechanisms linking the ROWE innovation with changes in employees’ health behaviors; they also predict changes in well-being measures, providing indirect links between ROWE and well-being. This study demonstrates that organizational changes in the structuring of time can promote employee wellness, particularly in terms of prevention behaviors. PMID:22144731

Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin L.; Tranby, Eric; Huang, Qinlei

2012-01-01

93

The stability of health status measurement (SF-36) in a working population.  

PubMed

This study tests the stability of health status measurement (SF-36) in a working population. A total of 4,225 employees from two sectors (one state agency, one private company) enrolled in three health plans at Trigon BlueCross/BlueShield of Virginia. An eight-dimension short-form health survey (SF-36) was first tested on a cross-sectional basis for its validity. Then, a panel study was established to test for the stability of health status instrument over time. Structural equation modeling built on equality constraint conditions was the statistical technique for this study. Data were collected through two-wave mail surveys. Both comprehensive (original eight scales) and parsimonious (revised five scales) models of health status were found fit into the data quite well. Furthermore, the revised parsimonious model was shown highly stable over time. Within a working population aged 18 to 64, people are relatively healthy. Their perception of health issues is reflected mainly on "physical health status," as indicated by physical functionings or role limitations. The high stability of revised health status model warrants the possibility of using a more concise health status instrument for the majority of people in working force. PMID:11272596

Chern, J Y; Wan, T T; Pyles, M

2000-01-01

94

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program  

E-print Network

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs is now accepting to today's public health challenges. The Tufts DrPH degree offers students a foundation in the public

Dennett, Daniel

95

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program  

E-print Network

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs is accepting to today's public health challenges. The Tufts DrPH degree offers students a foundation in the public

Dennett, Daniel

96

The implicit contract: implications for health social work.  

PubMed

Identifying common patient dynamics is useful for developing social work practice sensitivity in health social work. This article draws on findings from a study of women who terminated desired pregnancies because of fetal anomalies and identifies dynamics that may be applicable to many health settings. Data suggest that women have expectations that submission to medical care, particularly high-tech medical care, should ensure a positive outcome--in this case a healthy baby. Analysis of data reveals the presence of an implicit contract that the women hold with the medical system,"Mother Nature," or society. The analysis carries an implication that health social work should help patients develop realistic expectations about health care. The presence of implicit contracts may have further implications for liability and litigation. Social work roles and interventions are addressed. PMID:20506864

McCoyd, Judith L M

2010-05-01

97

Work, health, and welfare: the association between working conditions, welfare states, and self-reported general health in Europe.  

PubMed

This article is the first to examine the association between self-reported general health and a wide range of working conditions at the European level and by type of welfare state regime. Data for 21,705 men and women ages 16 to 60 from 27 European countries were obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey. The influence of individual-level sociodemographic, physical, and psychosocial working conditions and of the organization of work were assessed in multilevel logistic regression analyses, with additional stratification by welfare state regime type (Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Eastern European, Scandinavian, and Southern). At the European level, we found that "not good" general health was more likely to be reported by workers more exposed to hazardous working conditions. Most notably, tiring working positions, job strain, and temporary job contracts were strongly associated with a higher likelihood of reporting "not good" health. Analysis by welfare state regime found that only tiring or painful working conditions were consistently associated with worse self-reported health in all regimes. There was no evidence that the Scandinavian welfare regime protected against the adverse health effects of poor working conditions. The article concludes by examining the implications for comparative occupational health research. PMID:24684087

Bambra, Clare; Lunau, Thorsten; Van der Wel, Kjetil A; Eikemo, Terje A; Dragano, Nico

2014-01-01

98

Health Coverage Instability for Mothers in Working Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors examined the health insurance coverage stability of 1,667 women in working families over a three-year period (1995-1997). Findings revealed that coverage instability is common. Nearly one-half of low-income women experienced health coverage instability over the three-year study…

Anderson, Steven G.; Eamon, Mary Keegan

2004-01-01

99

Incorporating Integrative Health Services in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than one third of Americans practice complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Social workers continue to provide most first-line health, mental health, and psychological referral and direct practice services in the United States, despite a lack of systematic education and training opportunities in CAM. Schools of social work are…

Gant, Larry; Benn, Rita; Gioia, Deborah; Seabury, Brett

2009-01-01

100

Antimicrobial resistance and disease control: making One Health work.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial resistance and infectious disease control were the main themes at a One Health conference held in London last month. Hosted collaboratively by the Royal Society of Medicine and the Bella Moss Foundation, the meeting put particular emphasis on making the One Health concept work when dealing with resistance and disease control. Georgina Mills reports. PMID:25395563

2014-11-15

101

Where do students in the health professions want to work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. While a number of schemes have been developed to improve recruitment to and retention of the rural health workforce, they will be effective only if appropriately targeted. This study examines the factors that most encourage students attending rural clinical placements to work in rural Australia, and the

Deborah Schofield; Susan Fletcher; Jeffery Fuller; Hudson Birden; Sue Page

2009-01-01

102

Work Force Information and Career-Technical Education. In Brief: Fast Facts for Policy and Practice No. 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To prepare young people and adults for labor market success, career-technical education (CTE) practitioners must know how to find and use work force information. Recent federal legislation, including the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, underscores the importance of work force education. The nationwide work force information system makes data on…

Sommers, Dixie

103

Gender, work roles and psychosocial work characteristics as determinants of health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to identify gender similarities and differences in psychosocial work characteristics for those in and out of paid employment, to inform research on possible health-related effects. Specifically five questions are addressed: do women report poorer work characteristics than men; are gender differences related to specific characteristics; do work characteristics differ between full- and part-time women workers and between

Sharon Matthews; Clyde Hertzman; Aleck Ostry; Chris Power

1998-01-01

104

Health status and the labor force participation decisions of married couples  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the labor force participation decisions of married couples, and special attention is paid to a spouse’s health conditions affecting their own and the spouse’s labor force participation decision. I used the Health and Retirement...

Lin, Peng

2009-05-15

105

Agricultural Work Force Households: How Much Do They Depend on Farming? Background for Agricultural Policy. Agriculture Information Bulletin Number 547.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to data from the 1985 Agricultural Work Force Survey, over 13.5 million of the 17.6 million agricultural work force household members (77 percent) lived in households headed by a farm worker. Some farm workers worked on the farm as their primary job, whereas others primarily worked off the farm. Farm work was an occasional form of…

Cox, E. Jane; Oliveira, Victor J.

106

Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

Gamble, Reed

1989-01-01

107

Effects of ergonomic and health training on work interest, work ability and health in elderly public urban transport drivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public urban transport drivers of the Munich Transportation Authority (n=122) with an average age of 50 years participated in 20 health days with full paid worktime over one year. The training consisted of physical exercise, professional skills training and self-experience in groups. The evaluation instruments were the work ability index (WAI) developed by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and

Rudolf Karazman; Irene Kloimüller; Heinrich Geissler; Inge Karazman-Morawetz

2000-01-01

108

Health and Nutritional Status of Working and Non-Working Mothers in Poverty Groups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to examine the health and nutritional status of low-income women in Upstate New York and to identify problems that interfere with their employment. Questionnaires on health and work, complete medical and employment histories, physical examination, laboratory tests, dental examination and diet recalls were obtained for 469…

Roe, Daphne A.; Eickwort, Kathleen R.

109

Work status, work hours and health in women with and without children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives:The authors studied self-reported health in women with and without children in relation to their work status (employed, student, job seeker or homemaker), work hours and having an employed partner.Methods:The study group comprised of 6515 women born in 1960–1979 who were interviewed in one of the Swedish Surveys of Living Conditions in 1994–2003. Self-rated health, fatigue and symptoms of anxiety

B Floderus; M Hagman; G Aronsson; S Marklund; A Wikman

2009-01-01

110

Psychosocial work environment and mental health among construction workers.  

PubMed

We assessed psychosocial work environment, the prevalence of mental health complaints and the association between these two among bricklayers and construction supervisors. For this cross-sectional study a total of 1500 bricklayers and supervisors were selected. Psychosocial work characteristics were measured using the Dutch Questionnaire on the Experience and Evaluation of Work and compared to the general Dutch working population. Mental health effects were measured with scales to assess fatigue during work, need for recovery after work, symptoms of distress, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. The prevalence of self-reported mental health complaints was determined using the cut-off values. Associations between psychosocial work characteristics and self-reported mental health complaints were analysed using logistic regression. Total response rate was 43%. Compared to the general working population, bricklayers experienced statistically significant worse job control, learning opportunities and future perspectives; supervisors experienced statistically significant higher psychological demands and need for recovery. Prevalence of self-reported mental health effects among bricklayers and supervisors, respectively, were as follows: high need for recovery after work (14%; 25%), distress (5%, 7%), depression (18%, 20%) and post-traumatic stress disorder (11%, 7%). Among both occupations, high work speed and quantity were associated with symptoms of depression. Further, among construction supervisors, low participation in decision making and low social support of the direct supervisor was associated with symptoms of depression. The findings in the present study indicate psychosocial risk factors for bricklayers and supervisors. In each occupation a considerable proportion of workers was positively screened for symptoms of common mental disorders. PMID:23380530

Boschman, J S; van der Molen, H F; Sluiter, J K; Frings-Dresen, M H W

2013-09-01

111

The effects of health status and health shocks on hours worked.  

PubMed

We investigate the impact of health on working hours. This is in recognition of the fact that leaving the labour market because of persistently low levels of health status, or because of new health shocks, is only one of the possible responses open to employees. We use the first six waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey to estimate the joint effect of health status and health shocks on working hours. To account for zero working hours, we use a dynamic random effects Tobit model of working hours. We follow Heckman (1981) and approximate the unknown initial conditions with a static equation that utilises information from the first wave of the data. Predicted individual health status is used to ameliorate the possible effects of measurement error and endogeneity. We conclude that overall, lower health status results in fewer working hours and that when they occur, health shocks lead to further reductions in working hours. Estimation results show that the model performs well in separating the time-persistent effect of health status and the potentially more transient health shocks on working hours. PMID:23649673

Cai, Lixin; Mavromaras, Kostas; Oguzoglu, Umut

2014-05-01

112

Measuring coupling forces woodcutters exert on saws in real working conditions.  

PubMed

Prolonged exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) generated by chainsaws can cause HAV syndrome, i.e., disorders in the upper extremities of forestry workers. Progress of HAV syndrome depends on the intensity of mechanical vibration transmitted throughout the body, which is directly proportional to coupling forces applied by the woodcutter to a vibrating tool. This study aimed to establish a method of measuring coupling forces exerted by chainsaw workers in real working conditions. Coupling forces exerted by workers with their right and left hands were measured with a hydro-electronic force meter. Wood hardness, the type of chainsaw and the kind of forest operation, i.e., felling, cross-cutting or limbing, were considered. PMID:22429531

Malinowska-Borowska, Jolanta; Harazin, Barbara; Zieli?ski, Grzegorz

2012-01-01

113

Associations between work ability, health-related quality of life, physical activity and fitness among middle-aged men  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Work ability of ageing work force is a matter of major concern in many countries. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived work ability and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to investigate their associations with age, physical activity and physical fitness in middle-aged men working in blue-collar occupations. The study population consisted of

Lars E. Sörensen; Mika M. Pekkonen; Kaisa H. Männikkö; Veikko A. Louhevaara; Juhani Smolander; Markku J. Alén

2008-01-01

114

Work organization and the health of bank employees.  

PubMed

The Brazilian banking sector has undergone an intense restructuring process and taken a leading position in the incorporation of new technologies and organizational innovations. Computerization in the industry, in association with forms of work organization, has resulted in changes that reflect on the workers' health. Based on the theoretical and methodological frameworks of historical and dialectical materialism, this qualitative study investigates the work conditions of bank employees in order to identify the extent to which changes in work organization interfere with these workers' health. Data were collected through interviews held with 11 bank employees. In addition to physical sickening due to occupational diseases directly related to work intensification, the results also show an increased incidence of mental suffering and a feeling of loss of professional identity. Work-related frustration, instability and concerns related to psychological pressure resulting from the need to achieve goals predominated in the reports. PMID:22699722

Silva, Juliana Lemos; Navarro, Vera Lucia

2012-01-01

115

The Health Care Labor Shortage: Report of the Health Care Labor Shortage Work Group.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A work group consisting of representatives of public agencies, education, the health care industry, and unions and professional associations was formed to examine education and training issues related to the shortage of health care workers in Washington state. The group concluded that the shortage of available workers in many health care…

Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

116

Foreign students and foreign-born scientists and engineers in the US work force  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes some earlier findings regarding the stay rate of foreign students and then addresses two questions about which we have scant information at present. One question is concerning the geographic origin of foreign nationals working in the United States. The second is related to the stay rate of foreign students: What is the emigration rate of foreign-born scientists and engineers once they have become a part of the US work force.

Finn, M.G.

1987-01-01

117

Home-based work, human capital accumulation and women's labor force participation  

E-print Network

This dissertation examines the effect of changes in the stock of human capital on the labor force participation decision of women aged 25-54. Without the option of homebased work, some women choose to leave the labor market and stay at home...

Chutubtim, Piyaluk

2006-10-30

118

Astronomy Resources for Intercurricular Elementary Science (ARIES): Exploring Motion and Forces. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"ARIES: Exploring Motion and Forces" is a physical science curriculum for students in grades 5-8 that employs 18 inquiry-centered, hands-on lessons called "explorations." The curriculum draws upon students' curiosity to explore phenomena, allowing for a discovery-based learning process. Group-centered lab work is designed to help students build an…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

2012-01-01

119

Drug use, educational aspirations, and work force involvement: The transition from adolescence to young adulthood  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of high school drug use and academic potent&l on high school outcome (graduate or dropouO and young adult work force involvement, college involvement, and educational aspirations was examined. Frequency of drug use, grade point average, and educational plans were assessed for 479 adolescents while in high school. Four years later this same group of individuals, now in their

Michael D. Newcomb; P. M. Bentler

1986-01-01

120

Preparing for an Aging Work Force: A Practical Guide for Employers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet, which is intended for human resource managers, provides practical guidance regarding preparing for an aging work force. Chapter 1 concerns the relationship between business practices and age neutrality and offers checklists that human resource managers can use to assess their company's general policy development, training,…

AARP, Washington, DC.

121

Administrative Task Force on the Four Day Work Week. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Administrative Task Force on a 4-day work week at California State University in Los Angeles was charged with the following responsibilities: (1) To make an indepth study of the "literature" of experience of other universities, a survey of staff, faculty, and students if required, and other activities that will result in setting up a list of…

California State Univ., Los Angeles.

122

Profile of a Rural Area Work Force: The Wyoming Uranium Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to provide insights into policies relative to human resource investments and employment information channels, the study's objectives were to: (1) relate types of employment in Wyoming's uranium mines and mills to work force participants; (2) determine employee earnings and relate those earnings to employment categories and…

Dobbs, Thomas L.; Kiner, Phil E.

1974-01-01

123

The Hired Farm Working Force of 1983: A Statistical Profile. Agricultural Economic Report No. 554.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1983, about 2.6 million people 14 years of age and older did hired farmwork. Most of the woekers were White (73%), under 25 years old (50%), and male (78%). Hispanics made up 13% of the work force, and Blacks and other minority groups made up 14%. There were significant regional differences in racial/ethnic composition. Hispanic workers were…

Pollack, Susan L.

124

The Effects of Early Work Experience on Young Women's Labor Force Attachment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of longitudinal data on the employment histories of 1,386 women from age 16 to 28 found that mature women's labor force attachment was influenced by the timing, amount, and volatility of their early work experience, as well as by educational attainment, race, and giving birth. (Contains 58 references.) (SV)

Alon, Sigal; Donahoe, Debra; Tienda, Marta

2001-01-01

125

Community health workers and their value to social work.  

PubMed

Community health workers (CHWs) play a vital and unique role in linking diverse and underserved populations to health and social service systems. Despite their effectiveness, as documented by empirical studies across various disciplines including public health, nursing, and biomedicine, the value and potential role of CHWs in the social work practice and research literature has been largely absent. Thus, this article introduces social workers to CHWs, their role in promoting culturally appropriate practice, and their utility in collaboration with social workers in community settings. This integrative review also discusses current challenges identified by the CHW literature, including potential barriers to the expansion of CHW programs, as well as issues of training, certification, and sustainability. The review also discusses the close alignment of CHWs with social work values and principles of social justice, suggesting opportunities for enhanced social work practice and research. PMID:20408358

Spencer, Michael S; Gunter, Kathryn E; Palmisano, Gloria

2010-04-01

126

Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5-year  

E-print Network

Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5 Kivimäki2 1 Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; 2 University College London. Marianna Virtanen Finnish Institute of Occupational Health / Work and Mental Health Team Topeliuksenkatu 41

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

AIR FORCE HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM MONEY IN YOUR POCKET  

E-print Network

studies. JOB SATISFACTION As an Air Force Nurse, you enter a world class hospital with the best healthcare team in the world. There's no need to worry about HMO's, malpractice insurance and other red tape that

Garfunkel, Eric

128

Shift Work and Health: Current Problems and Preventive Actions  

PubMed Central

The paper gives an overview of the problems to be tackled nowadays by occupational health with regards to shift work as well as the main guidelines at organizational and medical levels on how to protect workers' health and well-being. Working time organization is becoming a key factor on account of new technologies, market globalization, economic competition, and extension of social services to general populations, all of which involve more and more people in continuous assistance and control of work processes over the 24 hours in a day. The large increase of epidemiological and clinical studies on this issue document the severity of this risk factor on human health and well being, at both social and psychophysical levels, starting from a disruption of biological circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycle and ending in several psychosomatic troubles and disorders, likely also including cancer, and extending to impairment of performance efficiency as well as family and social life. Appropriate interventions on the organization of shift schedules according to ergonomic criteria and careful health surveillance and social support for shift workers are important preventive and corrective measures that allow people to keep working without significant health impairment. PMID:22953171

2010-01-01

129

The Role of Market Forces in the Delivery of Health Care: Issues for Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This edition of the Role of Market Forces program note suggests empirical and descriptive analyses required to complement new areas of health policy emphasis and direction. Eight areas and related questions involving health economics are outlined: (1) rural health care; (2) medical malpractice and insurance; (3) supply, productivity, and…

National Center for Health Services Research and Health Care Technology Assessment (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

130

Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries  

PubMed Central

Background Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 408 Nepalese migrants who had at least one period of work experience of at least six months in any of three Gulf countries: Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates (UAE). Face to face questionnaire interviews were conducted applying a convenience technique to select the study participants. Results Nepalese migrants in these Gulf countries were generally young men between 26-35 years of age. Unskilled construction jobs including labourer, scaffolder, plumber and carpenter were the most common jobs. Health problems were widespread and one quarter of study participants reported experiencing injuries or accidents at work within the last 12 months. The rates of health problems and accidents reported were very similar in the three countries. Only one third of the respondents were provided with insurance for health services by their employer. Lack of leave for illness, cost and fear of losing their job were the barriers to accessing health care services. The study found that construction and agricultural workers were more likely to experience accidents at their workplace and health problems than other workers. Conclusion The findings suggest important messages for the migration policy makers in Nepal. There is a lack of adequate information for the migrants making them aware of their health risks and rights in relation to health services in the destination countries and we suggest that the government of Nepal should be responsible for providing this information. Employers should provide orientation on possible health risks and appropriate training for preventive measures and all necessary access to health care services to all their workers. PMID:21443802

2011-01-01

131

Gender, Work, and Health for Trans Health Providers: A Focus on Transmen  

PubMed Central

Well-documented health research points to trans people's vulnerability to health inequities that are linked to deeply embedded structural and social determinants of health. Gender and work, as social determinants of health for trans people, both shape and are shaped by multiple factors such as support networks, social environments, income and social status, shelter, and personal health practices. There is a gap in the nursing literature in regards to research on work and health for diverse trans people and a virtual silence on the particular issues of trans-identified health providers. This qualitative study used comparative life history methodology and purposeful sampling to examine links among work, career, and health for transmen who are health providers. Semistructured interviews were completed with four Canadian transmen involved in health care professional and/or practice contexts with diverse professions, age, work, and transitioning experiences. Critical gender analysis showed that unique and gender-related critical events and influences shape continuities and discontinuities in their careerlives. This strength-based approach foregrounds how resilience and growth emerged through participants' articulation with everyday gender dynamics. These findings have implications for nursing research, education, and practice that include an understanding of how trans providers “do transgender work” and supporting them in that process. PMID:23316387

MacDonnell, Judith A.; Grigorovich, Alisa

2012-01-01

132

Managing professional work: three models of control for health organizations.  

PubMed Central

Three arrangements for structuring the work of professional participants in professional organizations are described, contrasted and evaluated. Arguments are illustrated by application to the organization of physicians within hospitals. The primary rationale, the support structures that have fostered its development, the key structural features and the advantages and disadvantages of each arrangement are described. The effect on these arrangements of structures and forces external to any particular professional organization is emphasized. PMID:6749761

Scott, W R

1982-01-01

133

Forces  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides the background for a basic laboratory exercise on force. Included is an explanation of force and vector components and an interactive java applet to demonstrate vectors and vector algebra.

Sorokin, Vladimir

2004-11-28

134

Nursing attrition and the work environment in South African health facilities.  

PubMed

A number of media reports appeared on the shortages of professional health workers in the public health sector. Unsatisfactory working conditions in health facilities were mentioned as one of the key aspects responsible for the shortages. Literature indicates that stress caused by unsatisfactory work environments may play a major role in employees' decision to resign their jobs, in spite of enjoying the nature of their work. The aim of this article is to explore the current human resource situation in nursing i.e. to determine if a shortage of nursing skills exists, to establish the challenges that nurses have to face in performing their duties and to establish the potential effect of the work environment on attrition. Currently 155 484 nurses are practicing in South Africa at a rate of 343 nurses per 100 000 of the population, which compares favourably with the World Health Organisation minimum of 200:100 000. The lack of reliable data on the supply of and demand for nurses makes it difficult to determine whether real shortages exist. However the supply of nursing services is influenced by the uneven distribution of skills across regions and the outflow of professional skills. It seems that the existing situation will deteriorate because fewer people are interested in taking up or pursuing nursing as a career in South Africa. At the same time a need for more nurses was identified because of the growth in the population as well as a change in health care needs. Workplace conditions for health workers employed at hospitals and clinics in South Africa were explored as part of a recent national study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on the health sector. Health workers' opinions on aspects such as workload, staff morale and working hours were obtained during personal interviews, which were conducted at 222 health facilities. Nine hundred and twenty four professional nurses, enrolled nurses and nursing assistants, who were mostly employed in the public health sector, participated. A stressful work environment was identified in public hospitals and clinics. An increase in the number of patients visiting these facilities, accompanied by a lack of equipment, unsatisfactory work environment and a shortage of nurses were pointed out. Many patients cannot be accommodated elsewhere because of a lack of finance and alternative health care options. Nurses also indicated that they do not get much support from their employers. The effect of all these factors culminates in a stressed workforce who may be forced to consider alternative career options. This will be to the detriment of health care in the country. PMID:15712823

Hall, E J

2004-11-01

135

Force  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Instructions: This is a webquest designed to help students understand force. It is specifically meant to teach the idea that the greater the force applied to an object the greater the change in speed or direction of the object depending on the mass. This is also known as Newton's Second Law of Motion. Lets Learn about Force! For this project your students will understand force. They will use Newton's second law to solve the problem presented. UT Core Curriculum: Science 3rd Grade. Standard 3- Students will understand the relationship between the force applied to an object and resulting motion of the ...

Brownie, Mrs.

2010-04-07

136

Tackling Work Related Stress in a National Health Service Trust  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The challenge of tackling the problem of coping with work related stress in a National Health Service (NHS) Trust was undertaken. Ideas were developed within the context of two different action learning sets and led to actions resulting in a large therapy Taster Session event and the establishment of a centre offering alternative therapies and…

Vick, Donna; Whyatt, Hilary

2004-01-01

137

Handbook for Public Health Nurses Working with Spanish-Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prepared for the use of public health nurses working with rural Spanish Americans in northern New Mexico, this handbook presents information and suggestions, in outline form, to aid these nurses in communicating with their patients with better understanding and cooperation. The handbook is based on the findings of a study conducted between…

Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

138

Employee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare  

E-print Network

and Benefits Learning · Competitive salary · Overtime payments (dependent on Band) · Good pension scheme learning plans · Learning lunches · Library service · Mentor scheme · On-site training facilities and inEmployee Benefits and Facilities Work Life Balance Health and Welfare · Annual leave of up to 30

Crowther, Paul

139

Justice at Work, Job Stress, and Employee Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A small but growing literature has documented an association between justice at work and employee health. However, the pathways and mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. This article proposes a conceptual framework that bridges the organizational justice, occupational stress, and occupational epidemiology literatures.…

Fujishiro, Kaori; Heaney, Catherine A.

2009-01-01

140

A Guide for Health Professionals Working with Aboriginal Peoples: Executive Summary  

PubMed Central

Objective to provide Canadian health professionals with a network of information and recommendations regarding Aboriginal health. Options health professionals working with Aboriginal individuals and communities in the area of women’s health care. Outcomes improved health status of Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Appropriateness and accessibility of women’s health services for Aboriginal peoples. Improved communication and clinical skills of health professionals in the area of Aboriginal health. Improved quality of relationship between health professionals and Aboriginal individuals and communities. Improved quality of relationship between health care professionals and Aboriginal individuals and communities. Evidence recommendations are based on expert opinion and a review of the literature. Published references were identified by a Medline search of all review articles, randomized clinical control trials, meta-analyses, and practice guidelines from 1966 to February 1999, using the MeSH headings “Indians, North American or Eskimos” and “Health.”* Subsequently published articles were brought to the attention of the authors in the process of writing and reviewing the document. Ancillary and unpublished references were recommended by members of the SOGC Aboriginal Health Issues Committee and the panel of expert reviewers. Values information collected was reviewed by the principal author. The social, cultural, political, and historic context of Aboriginal peoples in Canada, systemic barriers regarding the publication of information by Aboriginal authors, the diversity of Aboriginal peoples in Canada, and the need for a culturally appropriate and balanced presentation were carefully considered in addition to more traditional scientific evaluation. The majority of information collected consisted of descriptive health and social information and such evaluation tools as the evidence guidelines of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health exam were not appropriate. Benefits, costs, and harms utilization of the information and recommendations by Canadian health professionals will enhance understanding, communication, and clinical skills in the area of Aboriginal health. The resulting enhancement of collaborative relationships between Aboriginal peoples and their women’s health providers may contribute to health services that are more appropriate, effective, efficient, and accessible for Aboriginal peoples in Canada. The educational process may require an initial investment of time from the health professional. Recommendations Recommendations were grouped according to four themes: sociocultural context, health concerns, cross-cultural understanding, and Aboriginal health resources. Health professionals are encouraged to learn the appropriate names, demographics, and traditional geographic territories and language groups of the various Aboriginal groups in Canada. In addition, sensitivity to the impact of colonization and current socioeconomic challenges to the health status of Aboriginal peoples is warranted. Health services for Aboriginal peoples should take place as close to home as possible. Governmental obligations and policies regarding determination are recognized. With respect to health concerns, holistic definitions of health, based on Aboriginal perspectives, are put forward. Aboriginal peoples continue to experience a disproportionate burden of health problems. Health professionals are encouraged to become familiar with several key areas of morbidity and mortality. Relationships between Aboriginal peoples and their care providers need to be based on a foundation of mutual respect. Gaps and barriers in the current health care system for Aboriginal peoples are identified. Health professionals are encouraged to work with Aboriginal individuals and communities to address these gaps and barriers. Aboriginal peoples require culturally appropriate health care, including treatment in their own languages when possible. This may require interpreters or Aboriginal health advocates.

2013-01-01

141

[Preventing work-related health problems: the work of the ergonomist].  

PubMed

Preventing work-related health problems is an important aspect when considering clinical symptoms. Analysing a person's professional activity is a complex task. The ergonomist intervenes to understand the details of the organisational, environmental and cognitive structures that influence health. The case of a pre-school educator with back pain is presented here as an example of how such a situation is studied and concrete solutions instated. Health preservation strategies, facilitating factors and barriers were identified, which led to a reduction in straining, improved organisation of tasks and achievement of educational goals. PMID:24930153

Benoît, Damien

2014-05-14

142

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' legislative activities and the Joint Medical Library Association/Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries Legislative Task Force  

PubMed Central

The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' (AAHSL's) involvement in national legislative activities and other advocacy initiatives has evolved and matured over the last twenty-five years. Some activities conducted by the Medical Library Association's (MLA's) Legislative Committee from 1976 to 1984 are highlighted to show the evolution of MLA's and AAHSL's interests in collaborating on national legislative issues, which resulted in an agreement to form a joint legislative task force. The history, work, challenges, and accomplishments of the Joint MLA/AAHSL Legislative Task Force, formed in 1985, are discussed. PMID:12883581

Zenan, Joan S.

2003-01-01

143

Work engagement: a practical measure for workplace health promotion?  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to investigate whether psychological job demands, personal control and social support affect the negative health measure of depression differently than the positive measure of work engagement and to investigate whether work engagement mediates the effects of job demands and resources on the level of depression. We discuss the implications of using engagement as an outcome measure in workplace health promotion. We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study among a general working population in Norway (n = 605). In the multivariate analysis, high psychological job demands as well as high control and social support correlated significantly with high work engagement. High demands as well as low control and social support correlated significantly with high levels of depression. When we included engagement as an independent variable together with demands, control and social support in the multivariate analysis, the positive correlation between demands and depression remained as well as the significant correlations between the level of depression and control and social support became non-significant. This indicates that engagement mediates the effects of control and social support on the level of depression. Encouraging enterprises to improve engagement in addition to focusing on preventing diseases may be worthwhile in workplace health promotion. Promoting engagement may have more positive organizational effects than a more traditional disease prevention focus, because engagement is contagious and closely related to good work performance and motivation. PMID:22692482

Torp, S; Grimsmo, A; Hagen, S; Duran, A; Gudbergsson, S B

2013-09-01

144

Forces Pushing Prescription Psychotropic Drugs in College Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A complex of forceful influences is greatly accelerating the use of what are usually referred to as "psychiatric drugs," although most prescribing is not done by psychiatrists. Many other clinicians, including other kinds of physicians, and recently psychologists, prescribe these medications. The influences contributing to this dramatic surge…

Whitaker, Leighton C.

2007-01-01

145

Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)  

PubMed Central

Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only. PMID:16135246

2005-01-01

146

Inflammation: the dynamic force of health and disease.  

PubMed

Replacing "happiness" with "inflammation" in Thomas Merton's quotation holds true for the processes that govern our immune response and health. The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signals regulates inflammatory responses, leading to either restoration of health or the development and progression of disease, depending on whether it creates equilibrium or dysfunction. This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics highlights emerging research and concepts related to inflammation and its underlying role in chronic disease and variable drug response. PMID:25236660

Vassileva, V; Piquette-Miller, M

2014-10-01

147

Labor Market Work and Home Care's Unpaid Caregivers: A Systematic Review of Labor Force Participation Rates, Predictors of Labor Market Withdrawal, and Hours of Work  

PubMed Central

As people continue to age and receive complex health care services at home, concern has arisen about the availability of family caregivers and their ability to combine employment with caregiving. This article evaluates the international research on unpaid caregivers and their labor market choices, highlighting three conclusions: first, caregivers in general are equally as likely to be in the labor force as noncaregivers; second, caregivers are more likely to work fewer hours in the labor market than noncaregivers, particularly if their caring commitments are heavy; and finally, only those heavily involved in caregiving are significantly more likely to withdraw from the labor market than noncaregivers. Policy recommendations are targeting greater access to formal care for “intensive” caregivers and developing workplace policies for employed caregivers. PMID:18070333

Lilly, Meredith B; Laporte, Audrey; Coyte, Peter C

2007-01-01

148

Working life and mental health - A challenge to psychiatry?  

PubMed Central

According to the World Health Organization, "mental health problems and stress-related disorders are the biggest overall cause of early death in Europe". Some of the root causes of this morbidity and mortality are related to living and working conditions that are accessible to preventive and therapeutic interventions, individual as well as collective ones. A political mandate for such interventions is now developing. Members of the WPA Section on Occupational Psychiatry have contributed to this development and we now invite the readers to join the Section in its endeavours. PMID:16633507

LEVI, LENNART

2005-01-01

149

The impact of organizational changes on work stress, sleep, recovery and health.  

PubMed

The study objective was to investigate the impact of different kinds of organizational changes, as well as anticipation of such changes, on work-related stress, sleep, recovery and health. It was hypothesized that impaired sleep and recovery increase the adverse health consequences of organizational changes. The data consisted of cross sectional questionnaire data from a random sample of 1,523 employees in the Swedish police force. It could be shown that extensive organizational changes including downsizing or a change in job tasks were associated with a small increase in work stress, disturbed sleep, incomplete recovery and health complaints. However, less extensive organizational changes like relocation did not affect these outcome variables. Anticipation of extensive organizational changes had almost the same effect as actual changes. Furthermore a moderating effect of sleep and work stress on gastrointestinal complaints and depressive symptoms was found. Thus, like former studies already suggested, extensive organizational changes resulted in increased stress levels, poorer health and impaired sleep and recovery. Furthermore, organizational instability due to anticipation of changes was as negative as actual changes. There was also some evidence that disturbed sleep increased these adverse health effects, in particular with respect to anticipation of organizational changes. PMID:21372437

Greubel, Jana; Kecklund, Göran

2011-01-01

150

Burnout and work environments of public health nurses involved in mental health care  

PubMed Central

Aims: (1) To examine whether prevalence of burnout is higher among community psychiatric nurses working under recently introduced job specific work systems than among public health nurses (PHNs) engaged in other public health services. (2) To identify work environment factors potentially contributing to burnout. Methods: Two groups were examined. The psychiatric group comprised 525 PHNs primarily engaged in public mental health services at public health centres (PHCs) that had adopted the job specific work system. The control group comprised 525 PHNs primarily engaged in other health services. Pines' Burnout Scale was used to measure burnout. Respondents were classified by burnout score into three groups: A (mentally stable, no burnout); B (positive signs, risk of burnout); and C (burnout present, action required). Groups B and C were considered representative of "burnout". A questionnaire was also prepared to investigate systems for supporting PHNs working at PHCs and to define emergency mental health service factors contributing to burnout. Results: Final respondents comprised 785 PHNs. Prevalence of burnout was significantly higher in the psychiatric group (59.2%) than in the control group (51.5%). Responses indicating lack of job control and increased annual frequency of emergency overtime services were significantly correlated with prevalence of burnout in the psychiatric group, but not in the control group. Conclusions: Prevalence of burnout is significantly higher for community psychiatric nurses than for PHNs engaged in other services. Overwork in emergency services and lack of job control appear to represent work environment factors contributing to burnout. PMID:15317917

Imai, H; Nakao, H; Tsuchiya, M; Kuroda, Y; Katoh, T

2004-01-01

151

The airport atmospheric environment: respiratory health at work.  

PubMed

Air traffic is increasing, raising concern about local pollution and its adverse health effects on the people living in the vicinity of large airports. However, the highest risk is probably occupational exposure due to proximity. Jet exhaust is one of the main concerns at an airport and may have a health impact, particularly on the respiratory tract. Current studies are neither numerous enough nor strong enough to prove this kind of association. Yet, more and more people work in airports, and occupational exposure to jet exhaust is a fact. The aim of this review was to evaluate the existing knowledge regarding the impact of airport pollution on respiratory health. We conducted systematic literature searches to examine workplace exposures. PMID:23728866

Touri, Léa; Marchetti, Hélène; Sari-Minodier, Irène; Molinari, Nicolas; Chanez, Pascal

2013-06-01

152

[Global changes and trends in work safety and health].  

PubMed

A description is given of the occupational health and safety problems which are common to workers all over the world, where these must be tackled with a view to achieving coherent and ongoing occupational safety for workers in their jobs. Occupational safety and health will continue to be priorities in international collaboration. Although the nature of the problems and solutions vary as a function of real priorities and needs, it is necessary to place greater emphasis on the application of overall activities concerning safety and health so that measures can be made and policies taken whose development is sustainable. International standards must be turned into actions on a national and company level with the active participation of social workers. The tripartite consensus will continue to be necessary for drawing up plans of action adapted to local situations, with a view to introducing improvements in work centres. PMID:8998697

Pinnagoda, C

1996-01-01

153

Black & Minority Health. Report of the Secretary's Task Force. Volume 1: Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume presents major findings and recommendations of the Department of Health and Human Service's (DHHS) Task Force on Black and Minority Health. The recommendations, which are based on data collected from a number of sources, are intended to guide DHHS in developing programs and policies that address the continuing disparity in the burden…

Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

154

Mental health and labour force status in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Australia it is estimated that mental illness accounts for around 13 per cent of the total years of healthy life lost to disease yet only 5 per cent of the annual health budget is allocated to services for the mentally ill (Butterworth 2003, Andrews, Hall Teeson and Henderson 1999). There is growing concern regarding the effect of employment, including

A. M. Dockery

155

Health Care Reform and Medical Education: Forces toward Generalism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Health care reforms will dramatically change the culture of medical schools in areas of patient care, research, and education programs. Academic medical centers must construct mutually beneficial partnerships that will position them to take advantage of the opportunities rather than leave them without the diversity of resources needed to make…

O'Neil, Edward H.; Seifer, Sarena D.

1995-01-01

156

[Work as a basic human need and health promoting factor].  

PubMed

The Italian Constitution (1948) defines 'work' as the founding value of the Italian Republic. This choice was not motivated by mere economic reasons, but rather stemmed from the recognition that work is the most appropriate tool for the expression of the human personality in society, that it is an asset and a right that will increase the dignity of every person, and which corresponds to a fundamental human desire to fulfil oneself in relationship with other persons and the entire world This view of work, including its technical and manual aspects, was unknown to the ancient mentality and became familiar to us through the monastic orders of the early middle ages, which began to conceive and practise human work as a means of participating in the work of creation and transmitted this value over the centuries. As we experience today, if occupation is lacking, a basic condition for the development of the person and for his/her contribution to the growth of society is lost. Given the meaning of work in human experience, it is not surprising that unemployment represents not only a worrisome economic indicator, but also the cause of ill health. At the end of 2009 unemployment in the European Union reached 10%, similar to the rate in the US; in Italy it was estimated at 8.5% in December 2009 and is expected to reach 10% in 2010. In Lombardy, although employment had been constantly increasing between 1995 and 2008, and the current unemployment rate is as low as 4.9%, 100,000 jobs were lost in 2009. Several scientific papers have demonstrated the association between lack of occupation and lack of physical and mental health. In the present period of crisis, increases of 30% in cases of anxiety syndrome and of 15% in cases of depression have been reported. An increase in suicides among unemployed persons has been documented in several countries even if there are still problems of interpretation of the causal chain of events. Mortality among the unemployed increased, not only that due to violent causes, but also mortality for all causes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. A survey in the Turin area, Northern Italy, showed a twofold increase in mortality among unemployed men. Women were affected both by husbands' unemployment and by their own unemployment because of the previous increasing rate of female occupation. The worse the occupational condition (from "seeking work" to "temporary employment" down to "unemployed and no longer seeking work") the higher the mortality: in the latter category, where the most evident problem is marginalization and social exclusion, the increase in mortality was fourfold. The role of occupational health physicians is to recognize the possible negative effects of working conditions and at the same time promote a positive approach to work, even in difficult conditions. This makes prevention more effective and promotes health. To be aware of the meaning of work makes work itself more liveable and more productive. This is how health promotion contributes to the wellbeing of the individual and, at the same time, to the development of the economy and society at large. PMID:21298870

Bertazzi, P A

2010-01-01

157

AGU's new task force on scientific ethics and integrity begins work  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In support of the new strategic plan, AGU has established a new task force to review, evaluate, and update the Union's policies on scientific misconduct and the process for investigating and responding to allegations of possible misconduct by AGU members. As noted by AGU president Michael McPhaden, “AGU can only realize its vision of ‘collaboratively advancing and communicating science and its power to ensure a sustainable future’ if we have the trust of the public and policy makers. That trust is earned by maintaining the highest standards of scientific integrity in all that we do. The work of the Task Force on Scientific Ethics is essential for defining norms of professional conduct that all our members can aspire to and that demonstrate AGU's unwavering commitment to excellence in Earth and space science.”

Gleick, Peter; Townsend, Randy

2011-11-01

158

"Whistle While You Work": A Historical Account of Some Associations Among Music, Work, and Health  

PubMed Central

Music has long been a uniting force among workers. Music can improve team spirit and provide an enjoyable diversion, but it is most useful in expressing the true feelings of a sometimes desperate community. Over time, a variety of musical media have emerged to match the prevailing conditions at work: the folk songs of 19th-century handloom weavers, the songs of industrial Britain’s trade union members, the workers’ radio programs of the 1940s. Associations have arisen to encourage and coordinate musical activities among workers, and public awareness of the hazards of some occupations has been promoted through music. PMID:15961754

le Roux, Gordon Marc

2005-01-01

159

Work-Related Health Disorders among Saudi Computer Users  

PubMed Central

The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and eye and vision complaints among the computer users of King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SAUDIA), and Saudi Telecom Company (STC). Stratified random samples of the work stations and operators at each of the studied institutions were selected and the ergonomics of the work stations were assessed and the operators' health complaints were investigated. The average ergonomic score of the studied work station at STC, KAU, and SAUDIA was 81.5%, 73.3%, and 70.3, respectively. Most of the examined operators use computers daily for ? 7 hours, yet they had some average incidences of general complaints (e.g., headache, body fatigue, and lack of concentration) and relatively high level of incidences of eye and vision complaints and musculoskeletal complaints. The incidences of the complaints have been found to increase with the (a) decrease in work station ergonomic score, (b) progress of age and duration of employment, (c) smoking, (d) use of computers, (e) lack of work satisfaction, and (f) history of operators' previous ailments. It has been recommended to improve the ergonomics of the work stations, set up training programs, and conduct preplacement and periodical examinations for operators. PMID:25383379

Jomoah, Ibrahim M.

2014-01-01

160

Work-related health factors for female immigrants in Sweden.  

PubMed

Work-related health has been a focus of research since the rate of sickness-related absences began to increase in Sweden. The incidence of sickness-related absences and early retirement is higher among female immigrants than among others in the total population. This study is based on a questionnaire survey which was conducted in a municipality in Sweden. The study population consisted of 2 429 native and immigrant female employees. The aim was to study work-related health factors for female immigrants. The results of this study show that about 20% of female immigrants who participate in the survey have temporary employment while the proportion is 8% for native women. The perception of ethnic discrimination among female immigrants was three times as much as among native females. The results also show that 69% of female immigrants report having received no opportunity to discuss their wages with managers, in comparison to 63% of native females. About 40% of female immigrants and 35% of native women report that they do not get opportunities to upgrade their skills. Female immigrants over the age of 50 experience gender and ethnic discrimination and lack of access to skills training programs more often than younger immigrants. They also participate in health-care activities more often. PMID:17312345

Akhavan, Sharareh; Bildt, Carina; Wamala, Sarah

2007-01-01

161

Gender and beliefs about work force discrimination in the United States and Australia.  

PubMed

Beliefs about gender discrimination in the work force were investigated among a sample of American (n = 201) and Australian (n = 177) business students. Significant differences between genders in beliefs about the existence of gender discrimination were indicated, with women being more likely than men to affirm its existence, particularly in the area of salary discrimination. In addition, there were differences between genders and between countries in assessment of the factors that might lead to lower participation of women in management and in the assessment of avenues of advancement for women. PMID:9121135

Browne, B A

1997-02-01

162

Working at sea and psychosocial health problems Report of an International Maritime Health Association Workshop.  

PubMed

Many of the recognised risk factors for psychosocial health problems impact on seafarers because of the nature and organisation of their work. The consequences are serious because of the safety critical nature of many of the tasks at sea and because of the level of health required to continue working remote from care. There is relatively little relevant research on the scale of psychosocial health problems in seafarers and so the justification for taking preventative action is not secure. The workshop was convened to develop a consensus on how psychosocial risks at sea can best be characterised, their consequences in terms of health, well being and performance and the steps which can be taken to provide better information on risks and on the validity of various forms of intervention. A number of interim measures have been proposed in advance of more definitive research results. PMID:17292007

Carter, Tim

2005-05-01

163

The effect of diabetes on female labor force decisions: new evidence from the National Health Interview Survey.  

PubMed

This paper estimates the effect of diabetes on labor-force participation, hours worked, days-out-of-work due to illness, and earnings using data from the National Health Interview Survey. Findings indicate that diabetes, estimated wholly, is significantly detrimental to most labor market outcomes. However, separation of type I and II diabetes shows that much of the negative effect is due to type II diabetes. On average a female with type II diabetes can experience a wage penalty of almost 50% relative to a healthy individual. Additionally, estimates of specifically type II diabetes may be subject to endogeneity bias. To account for this, I utilize whether an individual's biological mother has been diagnosed with diabetes as an instrumental variable. This instrument provides both theoretical and statistical explanatory power to separate the causal effect of type II diabetes on labor-force decisions. PMID:22025390

Minor, Travis

2011-12-01

164

The relationship between parental labor force participation and adolescents' dietary intake and risks to cardiovascular health  

E-print Network

participation variables and adolescent variables related to cardiovascular health. Daughters' biceps, triceps, subscapular skinfolds, and percent bodyfat were predicted by mothers' work preoccupation and the degree of importance fathers placed on their work...

Godwin, Anne Louise

2012-06-07

165

Forces  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The representation depicts what forces are and how they can change the motion and shape of objects in an animated slide show. This resource also includes an interactive test and review of the material, and can be downloaded for offline use.

166

Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

MacQueen, D H

2007-02-21

167

Partnerships for better mental health worldwide: WPA recommendations on best practices in working with service users and family carers  

PubMed Central

WPA President M. Maj established the Task Force on Best Practice in Working with Service Users and Carers in 2008, chaired by H. Herrman. The Task Force had the remit to create recommendations for the international mental health community on how to develop successful partnership working. The work began with a review of literature on service user and carer involvement and partnership. This set out a range of considerations for good practice, including choice of appropriate terminology, clarifying the partnership process and identifying and reducing barriers to partnership working. Based on the literature review and on the shared knowledge in the Task Force, a set of ten recommendations for good practice was developed. These recommendations were the basis for a worldwide consultation of stakeholders with expertise as service users, families and carers, and the WPA Board and Council. The results showed a strong consensus across the international mental health community on the ten recommendations, with the strongest agreement coming from service users and carers. This general consensus gives a basis for Task Force plans to seek support for activities to promote shared work worldwide to identify best practice examples and create a resource to assist others to begin successful collaboration. PMID:21991284

WALLCRAFT, JAN; AMERING, MICHAELA; FREIDIN, JULIAN; DAVAR, BHARGAVI; FROGGATT, DIANE; JAFRI, HUSSAIN; JAVED, AFZAL; KATONTOKA, SYLVESTER; RAJA, SHOBA; RATAEMANE, SOLOMON; STEFFEN, SIGRID; TYANO, SAM; UNDERHILL, CHRISTPHER; WAHLBERG, HENRIK; WARNER, RICHARD; HERRMAN, HELEN

2011-01-01

168

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time  

PubMed Central

This study examined organizational levers that impact work–family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the associations of 2 job demands (psychological requirements and nonstandard work schedules) with work-to-family conflict. Further, we considered subsequent impact of work-to-family conflict and enrichment on women’s health (physical and mental health) 8 months after women returned to work and the impact of health on voluntary turnover 12 months after women returned to work. Having a nonstandard work schedule was directly and positively related to conflict, whereas schedule control buffered the effect of psychological requirements on conflict. Skill discretion and job security, both job resources, directly and positively related to enrichment. Work-to-family conflict was negatively related to both physical and mental health, but work-to-family enrichment positively predicted only physical health. Physical health and mental health both negatively influenced turnover. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research. PMID:21604833

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

169

[Work related health risks among dentist's assistants in Flanders, Belgium].  

PubMed

The aim of this research project was to learn more about work-related health risks among dental assistants in Flanders, Belgium. Forty-seven dental assistants completed an extensive questionnaire concerning ionized radiation, protection against infection and exposure to chemicals such as mercury, disinfectants and acrylates. Collective and personal means of protection, musculoskeletal disorders and work-related stress were also evaluated. Pain in the lower back, neck pain and shoulder pain were reported by, respectively, 15%, 17% and 22% of the respondents. Eczema resulting from skin irritation or contact-allergy was reported by 13%. Twenty-three percent of the assistants did not consistently make use ofa radiation badge; 80% wore a mouth mask and 33% wore protective glasses; and 82% was vaccinated against hepatitis B. Almost 10% reported verbal or physical aggression by patients. The mean stress score was 3.95 on a scale from 0 to 10. The results may contribute to the formulation of a number of recommendations for the improvement of the health of dental assistants. PMID:21882506

Hambach, R; Acke, S; François, G; Alen, Y; Droste, J; van Sprundel, M

2011-01-01

170

Minimum Work Requirements for Admission Academic Department Degree Public Health Related Work Experience  

E-print Network

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Health Policy and Management M.P.H. Health Care Management None M.P.H. Health Care Policy None M Health Management None Health Policy Analysis None ­ Need to apply during admissions process Health Policy and Practice None Health Promotion Research and Practice None History, Ethics, Law None Infectious

Grishok, Alla

171

Research Regarding the Establishment of Force and Energetic Characteristics of the Bucket Wheel Excavator in given Working Conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the power and energy characteristics whit the view to defining and analyzing the working mode of the rotor excavators in operation at Oltenia lignite open casts, for lignite mining and for mining of the predominantly overburden rock, i.e. the sandy clay. The forces which act on a bucket and wheel, the force needed for the excavation and

MARIN SILVIU NAN; IOSIF KOVACS; IOSIF ANDRAS; DUMITRU JULA

172

Correlates of Injury-forced Work Reduction for Massage Therapists and Bodywork Practitioners†  

PubMed Central

Background Injury-forced work reduction (IFWR) has been acknowledged as an all-too-common occurrence for massage therapists and bodywork practitioners (M & Bs). However, little prior research has specifically investigated demographic, work attitude, and perceptual correlates of IFWR among M & Bs. Purpose To test two hypotheses, H1 and H2. H1 is that the accumulated cost variables set ( e.g., accumulated costs, continuing education costs) will account for a significant amount of IFWR variance beyond control/demographic (e.g., social desirability response bias, gender, years in practice, highest education level) and work attitude/perception variables (e.g., job satisfaction, affective occupation commitment, occupation identification, limited occupation alternatives) sets. H2 is that the two exhaustion variables (i.e., physical exhaustion, work exhaustion) set will account for significant IFWR variance beyond control/demographic, work attitude/perception, and accumulated cost variables sets. Research Design and Participants An online survey sample of 2,079 complete-data M & Bs was collected. Stepwise regression analysis was used to test the study hypotheses. The research design first controlled for control/demographic (Step1) and work attitude/perception variables sets (Step 2), before then testing for the successive incremental impact of two variable sets, accumulated costs (Step 3) and exhaustion variables (Step 4) for explaining IFWR. Results Results supported both study hypotheses: accumulated cost variables set (H1) and exhaustion variables set (H2) each significantly explained IFWR after the control/demographic and work attitude/perception variables sets. The most important correlate for explaining IFWR was higher physical exhaustion, but work exhaustion was also significant. It is not just physical “wear and tear”, but also “mental fatigue”, that can lead to IFWR for M & Bs. Being female, having more years in practice, and having higher continuing education costs were also significant correlates of IFWR. Conclusions Lower overall levels of work exhaustion, physical exhaustion, and IFWR were found in the present sample. However, since both types of exhaustion significantly and positively impact IFWR, taking sufficient time between massages and, if possible, varying one’s massage technique to replenish one’s physical and mental energy seem important. Failure to take required continuing education units, due to high costs, also increases risk for IFWR. Study limitations and future research issues are discussed. PMID:24000304

Blau, Gary; Monos, Christopher; Boyer, Ed; Davis, Kathleen; Flanagan, Richard; Lopez, Andrea; Tatum, Donna S.

2013-01-01

173

Workgroup Report: Developing Environmental Health Indicators for European Children: World Health Organization Working Group  

PubMed Central

A working group coordinated by the World Health Organization developed a set of indicators to protect children’s health from environmental risks and to support current and future European policy needs. On the basis of identified policy needs, the group developed a core set of 29 indicators for implementation plus an extended set of eight additional indicators for future development, focusing on exposure, health effects, and action. As far as possible, the indicators were designed to use existing information and are flexible enough to be developed further to meet the needs of policy makers and changing health priorities. These indicators cover most of the priority topic areas specified in the Children’s Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) as adopted in the Fourth Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in 2004, and will be used to monitor the implementation of CEHAPE. This effort can be viewed as an integral part of the Global Initiative on Children’s Environmental Health Indicators, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002. PMID:17805431

Pond, Kathy; Kim, Rokho; Carroquino, Maria-Jose; Pirard, Philippe; Gore, Fiona; Cucu, Alexandra; Nemer, Leda; MacKay, Morag; Smedje, Greta; Georgellis, Antonis; Dalbokova, Dafina; Krzyzanowski, Michal

2007-01-01

174

Promoting Positive Emotional Health of Children of Transient Armed Forces Families  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this research was to promote emotional health in a small primary school (n = 180), with a highly transient pupil population of armed forces children (Service children). Negative effects of pupil mobility have been found to relate to academic attainment (Dobson, Henthorne, & Lynas, 2000; Mott, 2002), but its effect on social and…

Eodanable, Miranda; Lauchlan, Fraser

2012-01-01

175

From task force to statute: establishing health sciences libraries in state law as a component of the health care system.  

PubMed Central

This paper describes how Montana librarians successfully incorporated health sciences libraries into the statewide health care resource management plan being developed under 1993 state law. First, a broad-based Montana Task Force for Biomedical Information was formed with funds from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine/Pacific Northwest Region and the Montana Area Health Education Center. The resulting report reviewed findings from national studies and trends to current state developments and deficiencies. The report was presented to the governor and state legislators in the context of cost-containment measures being considered in the state's health care reform bill. Now Montana law provides that "it is further the policy of the state of Montana that the health care system should ... facilitate universal access to current health sciences information," and "The management plan must include ... identification of the current supply and distribution of ... health sciences library resources and services." This experience highlights the need for health sciences librarians to develop skills in advocacy, lobbying, and networking with other components of the health care industry. PMID:8547901

Holt, M C

1995-01-01

176

Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: II. Mortality  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the current health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. This report compares the noncombat mortality of 1261 Ranch Hand veterans to that of a comparison population of 19,101 other Air Force veterans primarily involved in cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. The indirectly standardized all-cause death rate among Ranch Hands is 2.5 deaths per 1,000 person-years, the same as that among comparison subjects. After adjustment for age, rank, and occupation, the all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 1.0. In adjusted cause-specific analyses, the authors found no significant group differences regarding accidental, malignant neoplasm, and circulatory deaths. These data are not supportive to a hypothesis of increases mortality among Ranch Hands.

Michalek, J.E.; Wolfe, W.H.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

1990-10-10

177

Characteristics of personal health records: findings of the Medical Library Association/National Library of Medicine Joint Electronic Personal Health Record Task Force  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The Medical Library Association (MLA)/National Library of Medicine (NLM) Joint Electronic Personal Health Record Task Force examined the current state of personal health records (PHRs). Methods: A working definition of PHRs was formulated, and a database was built with fields for specified PHR characteristics. PHRs were identified and listed. Each task force member was assigned a portion of the list for data gathering. Findings were recorded in the database. Results: Of the 117 PHRs identified, 91 were viable. Almost half were standalone products. A number used national standards for nomenclature and/or record structure. Less than half were mobile device enabled. Some were publicly available, and others were offered only to enrollees of particular health plans or employees at particular institutions. A few were targeted to special health conditions. Conclusions: The PHR field is very dynamic. While most PHR products have some common elements, their features can vary. PHRs can link their users with librarians and information resources. MLA and NLM have taken an active role in making this connection and in encouraging librarians to assume this assistance role with PHRs. PMID:20648259

Shipman, Jean P; Plaut, Daphne A; Selden, Catherine R

2010-01-01

178

Spanning the Chasm: Corporate and Academic Cooperation To Improve Work-Force Preparation. Task Force on High-Performance Work and Workers: The Academic Connection.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, conducted by a task force that interviewed corporate and campus officials at 10 corporations and 12 universities and colleges during 1994-96, examined how well undergraduate, graduate, and professional students in the United States are being prepared to meet the demands of the modern high-performance workplace. The study found…

Business-Higher Education Forum, Washington, DC.

179

What works for mental health system change: evolution or revolution?  

PubMed

The mental health system has realized significant metamorphoses in the standards and practices of quality care for people with psychiatric disability during the past decade. Now change agents are wrestling with effective strategies that help real-world systems to adopt programs reflecting these metamorphoses. Two fundamental approaches to systems change are compared and contrasted here: evolution and revolution. First, the authors compare the different ways in which evolution and revolution might approach change in the mental health system. They do this by showing how they might influence the transformation of day treatment into supported employment programs. Then, the authors present the two approaches as naturally occurring change processes that work in tandem to affect real-world adaptations. Finally, they summarize practical strategies that change agents might adopt to realize evolution and revolution. Clearly, all stakeholder groups need to become strategic about system change so that real-world practices keep up with the ideals emerging in practice guidelines and evidence-based practice reviews. PMID:12940682

Corrigan, Patrick W; Boyle, Michael G

2003-05-01

180

The inXuence of psychosocial factors at work and life style on health and work ability among professional workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives The purpose of this article is to explore the associations of psychosocial factors at work, life style, and stressful life events on health and work ability among white-collar workers. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among workers in commercial services (n = 1141). The main out- come variables were work ability, measured by the work ability index (WAI), and

T. I. J. van den Berg; S. M. Alavinia; F. J. Bredt; D. Lindeboom; L. A. M. Elders; A. Burdorf

2008-01-01

181

Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs  

MedlinePLUS

... Health (NIOSH) Share Compartir Personal Protective Equipment for Health Care Workers Who Work with Hazardous Drugs October 2008 DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2009-106 Health care workers who handle hazardous drugs are at risk ...

182

Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health

Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

2013-01-01

183

Combating HIV stigma in health care settings: what works?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this review paper is to provide information and guidance to those in the health care setting about why it is important to combat HIV-related stigma and how to successfully address its causes and consequences within health facilities. Research shows that stigma and discrimination in the health care setting and elsewhere contributes to keeping people, including health workers,

Laura Nyblade; Anne Stangl; Ellen Weiss; Kim Ashburn

2009-01-01

184

Working on wellness (WOW): A worksite health promotion intervention programme  

PubMed Central

Background Insufficient PA has been shown to cluster with other CVD risk factors including insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, overweight, increased serum cholesterol concentrations and elevated blood pressure. This paper describes the development of Working on Wellness (WOW), a worksite intervention program incorporating motivational interviewing by wellness specialists, targeting employees at risk. In addition, we describe the evaluation the effectiveness of the intervention among employees at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods The intervention mapping (IM) protocol was used in the planning and design of WOW. Focus group discussions and interviews with employees and managers identified the importance of addressing risk factors for CVD at the worksite. Based on the employees’ preference for individual counselling, and previous evidence of the effectiveness of this approach in the worksite setting, we decided to use motivational interviewing as part of the intervention strategy. Thus, as a cluster-randomised, controlled control trial, employees at increased risk for CVD (N?=?928) will be assigned to a control or an intervention group, based on company random allocation. The sessions will include motivational interviewing techniques, comprised of two face-to-face and four telephonic sessions, with the primary aim to increase habitual levels of PA. Measures will take place at baseline, 6 and 12?months. Secondary outcomes include changes in nutritional habits, serum cholesterol and glucose concentrations, blood pressure and BMI. In addition, healthcare expenditure and absenteeism will be measured for the economic evaluation. Analysis of variance will be performed to determine whether there were significant changes in physical activity habits in the intervention and control groups at 6 and 12?months. Discussion The formative work on which this intervention is based suggests that the strategy of targeting employees at increased risk for CVD is preferred. Importantly, this study extends the work of a previous, similar study, Health Under Construction, in a different setting. Finally, this study will allow an economic evaluation of the intervention that will be an important outcome for health care funders, who ultimately will be responsible for implementation of such an intervention. Trial registration United States Clinical Trails Register NCT 01494207 PMID:22625844

2012-01-01

185

Phthalate Exposure and Health-Related Outcomes in Specific Types of Work Environment  

PubMed Central

Many toxic substances in the workplace can modify human health and quality of life and there is still insufficient data on respiratory outcomes in adults exposed to phthalates. The aim of this work was to assess in waste management workers from the Nitra region of Slovakia (n = 30) the extent of exposure to phthalates and health-related outcomes. Four urinary phthalate metabolites mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), monobutyl phthalate (MnBP), monoethyl phthalate (MEP) and monoisononyl phthalate (MiNP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Urinary concentration of MEHP was positively associated with ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity % (FEV1/FVC) (r = 0.431; p = 0.018) and MiNP with fat free mass index (FFMI) (r = 0.439; p = 0.015). The strongest predictor of pulmonary function was the pack/year index as smoking history that predicted a decrease of pulmonary parameters, the FEV1/FVC, % of predicted values of peak expiratory flow (PEF % of PV) and FEV1 % of PV. Unexpectedly, urinary MEHP and MINP were positively associated with pulmonary function expressed as PEF % of PV and FEV1/FVC. We hypothesize that occupational exposure to phthalates estimated from urinary metabolites (MEHP, MiNP) can modify pulmonary function on top of lifestyle factors. PMID:24865398

Kolena, Branislav; Petrovicova, Ida; Pilka, Tomas; Pucherova, Zuzana; Munk, Michal; Matula, Bohumil; Vankova, Viera; Petlus, Peter; Jenisova, Zita; Rozova, Zdenka; Wimmerova, Sona; Trnovec, Tomas

2014-01-01

186

Do body weight and gender shape the work force? The case of Iceland.  

PubMed

Most studies of the relationship between body weight - as well as its corollary, beauty - and labor-market outcomes have indicated that it is a function of a gender bias, the negative relationship between excess weight or obesity and labor-market outcomes being greater for women than for men. Iceland offers an exceptional opportunity to examine this hypothesis, given that it scores relatively well on an index of gender equality comprising economic, political, educational, labor-market, and health-based criteria. Equipped with an advanced level of educational attainment, on average, women are well represented in Iceland's labor force. When it comes to women's presence in the political sphere, Iceland is out of the ordinary as well; that Icelanders were the first in the world to elect a woman to be president may suggest a relatively gender-blind assessment in the labor market. In the current study, survey data collected by Gallup Iceland in 2002 are used to examine the relationship between weight and employment within this political and social setting. Point estimates indicate that, despite apparently lesser gender discrimination in Iceland than elsewhere, the bias against excess weight and obesity remains gender-based, showing a slightly negative relationship between weight and the employment rate of women, whereas a slightly positive relationship was found for men. PMID:21196135

Asgeirsdottir, Tinna Laufey

2011-03-01

187

To What Extent Do Financial Strain and Labour Force Status Explain Social Class Inequalities in Self-Rated Health? Analysis of 20 Countries in the European Social Survey  

PubMed Central

Introduction Nordic countries do not have the smallest health inequalities despite egalitarian social policies. A possible explanation for this is that drivers of class differences in health such as financial strain and labour force status remain socially patterned in Nordic countries. Methods Our analyses used data for working age (25–59) men (n?=?48,249) and women (n?=?52,654) for 20 countries from five rounds (2002–2010) of the European Social Survey. The outcome was self-rated health in 5 categories. Stratified by gender we used fixed effects linear regression models and marginal standardisation to instigate how countries varied in the degree to which class inequalities were attenuated by financial strain and labour force status. Results and Discussion Before adjustment, Nordic countries had large inequalities in self-rated health relative to other European countries. For example the regression coefficient for the difference in health between working class and professional men living in Norway was 0.34 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.42), while the comparable figure for Spain was 0.15 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.22). Adjusting for financial strain and labour force status led to attenuation of health inequalities in all countries. However, unlike some countries such as Spain, where after adjustment the regression coefficient for working class men was only 0.02 (95% CI ?0.05 to 0.10), health inequalities persisted after adjustment for Nordic countries. For Norway the adjusted coefficient was 0.17 (95% CI 0.10 to 0.25). Results for women and men were similar. However, in comparison to men, class inequalities tended to be stronger for women and more persistent after adjustment. Conclusions Adjusting for financial security and labour force status attenuates a high proportion of health inequalities in some counties, particularly Southern European countries, but attenuation in Nordic countries was modest and did not improve their relative position. PMID:25313462

Shaw, Richard J.; Benzeval, Michaela; Popham, Frank

2014-01-01

188

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out"  

E-print Network

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out" Early Bird Pre-Conference Training Opportunity--Youth Mental Health First Aid USA Want to become a Youth Mental Health First Aider? This Early Bird Pre-Conference opportunity

Weber, David J.

189

The Influence of Group Work Discussion on Scores of the Force Concept Inventory in Lao PDR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we investigated if freshman student's participation in small group discussions in the tutorial sessions would influence their score of the Lao version of the Force Concept Inventory test (LFCI). We used the LFCI version to test 188 students" understanding of mechanics concepts before and after they studied mechanics at university. In three classes the students used group discussions when they solved the end-of-chapter questions in the textbook during tutorials and they also used group discussions to answer the LFCI. We video recorded three groups when they solved end-of-chapter questions. In two classes the students both solved the problems and answered the LFCI individually. A questionnaire about advantages and disadvantages of cooperative group and individual problem solving were handed out to the students. The questionnaire was supplemented by interviews with four students and three groups. We found that almost all students would like to work with group discussions; only 3% of them were negative. Students that worked with group discussions obtained an average score of 26% correct answers to the LFCI which was slightly higher than the average score of 23% for students that worked individually. The improvement from the pre- to the post-test in average score was 7 percentage points for classes with group discussions and 6 percentage points for classes with individual problem solving. It is not possible to claim that one of these ways of study will result in a larger improvement in the LFCI-score. Apparently, the group discussions did not help the students to improve their theoretical understanding of mechanics concepts as it is tested by the LFCI. However, it was observed in the video analysis that group discussions helped students to better understand mechanics concepts in the context of solving the end-of-chapter questions in the textbook. This observation was also supported by the students' answers to the questionnaire and the interview.

Luangrath, Phimpho; Pettersson, Sune

2010-07-01

190

Public Health Works: Blood Donation in Urban China  

PubMed Central

Recent shifts in the global health infrastructure warrant consideration of the value and effectiveness of national public health campaigns. These shifts include the globalization of pharmaceutical research, the rise of NGO-funded health interventions, and the rise of biosecurity models of international health. We argue that although these trends have arisen as worthwhile responses to actual health needs, it is important to remember the key role that public health campaigns can play in the promotion of national health, especially in developing nations. Focusing on an example set by China in response to a public health crisis surrounding the national need for a clean and adequate blood supply and the inadvertent spread of HIV by way of blood donation in the early 19902, we argue that there is an important role for strong national public health programs. We also identify the key factors that enabled China’s response to this bourgeoning epidemic to be, in the end, largely successful. PMID:19058887

Adams, Vincanne; Erwin, Kathleen; Le, Phuoc V

2009-01-01

191

J Epidemiol Community Health . Author manuscript Work disability following major organisational change: the Whitehall II  

E-print Network

of Occupational Health , Helsinki,FR Department of Epidemiology and Public Health2 University College of London.% ­ These findings were robust to additional adjustment for physical and mental health, and health behavioursJ Epidemiol Community Health . Author manuscript Page /1 6 Work disability following major

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

192

Crisis as opportunity: international health work during the economic depression.  

PubMed

The economic depression of the 1930s represented the most important economic and social crisis of its time. Surprisingly, its effect on health did not show in available morbidity and mortality rates. In 1932, the League of Nations Health Organisation embarked on a six-point program addressing statistical methods of measuring the effect and its influence on mental health and nutrition and establishing ways to safeguard public health through more efficient health systems. Some of these studies resulted in considerations of general relevance beyond crisis management. Unexpectedly, the crisis offered an opportunity to reconsider key concepts of individual and public health. PMID:19230333

Borowy, Iris

2008-01-01

193

Characterization of the 1986 coal-mining work force. Information Circular/1988  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the Bureau of Mines conducted a probability sample survey, Mining Industry Population Survey, to measure such employee characteristics as occupation; principal equipment operated; work location at the mine; present job, present company, and total mining experience; job-related training during the last 2 years; age; sex; race; and education. The population estimates are necessary to properly analyze the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) injury (includes illness and fatality data) statistics; that is, to compare and contrast injury rates for various subpopulations in order to identify those groups that are exhibiting higher than average injury rates. The report uses the survey's results to characterize the U.S. coal mining workforce from March through September 1986.

Butani, S.J.; Bartholomew, A.M.

1988-01-01

194

Statutory authorizations for the work of local health departments.  

PubMed Central

A study of public health statutes of the 50 states identifies 44 specific services or functions that are assigned to local health departments by all or some of the states. Authorizations are most commonly assigned conjointly both to local and state health departments; exceptions are identified. Data suggest striking inconsistencies between what local health departments are authorized to perform and the services they actually render with regard to a selected group of programs that involve personal health services. The full scope of authorizations for local health departments is not revealed by examination of public health statutes. For this reason, among others, development of up-to-date health codes for all states would be beneficial. PMID:911005

Miller, C A; Gilbert, B; Warren, D G; Brooks, E F; DeFriese, G H; Jain, S C; Kavaler, F

1977-01-01

195

The Joint Commission has provided a tool to change your work force: are you paying attention?  

PubMed

Most health care managers wonder how to change employee "attitudes" so that their staff will be more accountable for patient satisfaction, cost reduction, and quality of care. Employees were trained to function in an industry where the power players were the physician and the administrator and now it is exceedingly difficult to get them to switch their attention to the patient and the payer in a market-driven economy. For hospital managers, the answer may be right at their fingertips: The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations' standards demanding that employee competence be objectively measured, proven, tracked & trended, improved, and age specific. A comprehensive competence assessment system can save the health care manager enormous work in measuring fewer things, focusing performance assessment on the 20 percent of things that are true problems, and helping to specifically define certain competencies such as customer focus and cost consciousness so that coaching, training, and giving performance feedback is easier. Developing a comprehensive competence assessment system is a powerful tool to change the culture of organizations. Consequently, it is important that managers be aware of those possibilities before they embark on developing "competencies" or before their organizations get too carried away on redesigning systems to satisfy standards. PMID:10177390

Decker, P J; Strader, M K

1998-03-01

196

WORKING PAPER N 2007 -40 The distortionary effect of health  

E-print Network

contributes to the current debate over health system reform by assessing the impact of insurance on the demand for modeling the impact of insurance on health- care demand extending some of the results of the two-risk model to healthcare and the structure of the health insurance system: compulsory versus voluntary, and private versus

Boyer, Edmond

197

The Trouble with Health Savings Accounts: A Social Work Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, conservatives have promoted health savings accounts (HSAs) as a way of addressing the growing cost of health insurance. HSAs were introduced under the Medical Modernization Act of 2003 as "an alternative to traditional health insurance." They are at the heart of an effort to replace the current system of insurance with…

Gorin, Stephen

2006-01-01

198

Health and Turnover of Working Mothers after Childbirth via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis across Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined organizational levers that impact work-family experiences, participant health, and subsequent turnover. Using a sample of 179 women returning to full-time work 4 months after childbirth, we examined the associations of 3 job resources (job security, skill discretion, and schedule control) with work-to-family enrichment and the…

Carlson, Dawn S.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Ferguson, Merideth; Hunter, Emily M.; Clinch, C. Randall; Arcury, Thomas A.

2011-01-01

199

The American Work Ethic and the Changing Work Force: An Historical Perspective. Contributions in Labor Studies, Number 52.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the colonial period, the ideology of work--the American work ethic--took root. Americans valued work and considered it an obligation to society, to oneself, and to one's family. The key to the agrarian culture was an ethic that recognized the importance of hard, physical labor within a framework of yearly cycles of tasks. The world of the…

Applebaum, Herbert

200

Exploring the Relation between Work Domains and Work-Related Learning: The Case of the Dutch Police Force  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The principal aim of this study is to explore the relations between work domains and the work-related learning of workers. The article is intended to provide insight into the learning experiences of Dutch police officers during the course of their daily work. Interviews regarding actual learning events and subsequent changes in knowledge, skills…

Doornbos, Anja J.; Bolhuis, S.; Denessen, E.

2004-01-01

201

Improvement of force health protection through preventive medicine oversight of contractor support.  

PubMed

Unprecedented numbers of contractors are used throughout the Iraq theater of operations to alleviate military manpower shortages. At virtually every major forward operating base, US-based contractors perform the preponderance of essential life support services. At more remote sites, local national contractors are increasingly relied upon to maintain chemical latrines, remove trash, deliver bulk water, and execute other janitorial functions. Vigorous oversight of contractor performance is essential to ensure services are delivered according to specified standards. Poor oversight can increase the risk of criminal activities, permit substandard performance, elevate disease and nonbattle injury rates, degrade morale, and diminish Soldier readiness. As the principal force health protection proponents in the Department of Defense, preventive medicine units must be tightly integrated into the oversight processes. This article defines the force health protection implications associated with service contracts and provide recommendations for strengthening preventive medicine's oversight role. PMID:20084747

Mower, Scott A

2009-01-01

202

Jeopardy not bonus status for African American women in the work force: why does the myth of advantage persist?  

PubMed

African American women in the United States have a long history of employment outside of their homes. Their experiences are unique from other groups of majority and minority men and women due to the interaction of race, gender, and class. Despite long-standing and continuing struggles against discrimination, harassment, low pay, tokenism, and stereotypes, a myth that African American women enjoy a bonus or advantaged status in the work force has developed and persisted. In this article, Black women's work force experiences are examined from a social constructionist framework, misperceptions of Black women are critiqued, explanations are developed that explain the unique status of African American women and recommendations are proposed to eradicate the discrimination and marginal status that Black women have endured in the work force. PMID:9485574

Sanchez-Hucles, J V

1997-10-01

203

The World Health Organization's work on adolescent sexual and reproductive health.  

PubMed

This paper examines the contribution of the World Health Organization to the field of adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) from the early 1980s to the present. It is based on published documents and on the experiences of WHO staff members who have been part of much of this journey. It recalls the responses of the organization to the (then) new HIV/AIDS pandemic and to the first calls for a global public health response to early pregnancy. It also highlights selected milestones in the organization's work in the ASRH field over the last 25 years. It concludes with an analysis of where the ASRH field stands today and what the organization is doing to strengthen the epidemiologic and evidence base for action, to build consensus and coordination, and most importantly to support country level action, in cooperation with organizations within and outside the United Nations system. In defining its niche in a rapidly evolving and increasingly crowded field, the WHO's mission on ASRH is to contribute to a world in which the importance of ensuring the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents is understood, accepted, and acted upon by adolescents themselves, by their families and communities, by the workforces of different sectors, by civil society bodies, and by leaders and decision makers. PMID:23361211

Chandra-Mouli, V; Bloem, P; Ferguson, J

2013-02-01

204

Work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To assess separate and combined effects of work factors and behavioural coping in relation to withdrawal from the labour force among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).?METHODS—A cross sectional study was conducted in a Dutch nationwide random sample of 720 patients with RA. Information about work factors and behavioural coping was collected by a self-administered postal questionnaire. A broad variety of work factors and coping styles were evaluated separately and in combination using multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for sociodemographic and disease related variables. Attributable and preventable fractions were calculated from the combined analyses to assess the relative importance of the contributing factors.?RESULTS—Additional job training, equal career opportunities, letting the disease influence the choice of the current job position, and informing colleagues about having the disease were negatively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of decreasing the risk was adjusting job demands which accounted for 63% of the patients still in the labour force. Decreasing activities and diverting attention in order to cope with pain, and pacing in order to cope with limitations were the coping styles which were positively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. The most relevant factor in terms of increasing the risk of withdrawal was pacing which accounted for 67% of the withdrawals.?CONCLUSION—Work factors are potentially important modifiable risk factors for withdrawal from the labour force in patients with RA. Behavioural coping is also relevant.?? PMID:11602473

Chorus, A; Miedema, H; Wevers, C; van der Linden, S

2001-01-01

205

How Can Magnetic Forces Do Work? Investigating the Problem with Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students' reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been…

Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

2013-01-01

206

Health consumption as work: the home pregnancy test as a domesticated health tool.  

PubMed

A growing array of biomedical goods and services has become central to the North American experience of navigating illness and pursuing good health. Yet despite the utility of consumption as an analytical framework within the social sciences, the selection, purchase, and use of biomedical goods and services has been understudied. By using the home pregnancy test as a case study, we suggest new approaches to thinking about the consumption of these goods and services. We chose the home pregnancy test because it is the best-known example of a mass-produced diagnostic tool used by consumers. We draw on two sources of data for this qualitative analysis: a set of stories submitted between 2003 and 2005 by women and men to an online exhibit mounted by the National Institutes of Health called "A Thin Blue Line: The History of the Pregnancy Test Kit," which we analysed between 2006 and 2007; and web sampling conducted in 2009 and 2010 of personal web and video logs of women and men who have posted stories and opinions about their experiences with contemporary home pregnancy testing products. We adapt the term "domestication" from Science and Technology Studies scholarship to describe the movement of diagnostic devices into homes for use by consumers. Specifically, we propose that the consumption of domesticated biomedical devices, goods, and services should be theorized as work performed by consumers, in two senses: as a form of tool use that allows non-experts to produce diagnostic knowledge about their own bodies and health; and as the ongoing biopolitical work that is expected of citizens to produce healthy bodies. Our paper draws attention to these understudied phenomena, while suggesting new approaches to theorizing the social and cultural elements of goods and services for health. PMID:23608088

Childerhose, Janet E; Macdonald, Margaret E

2013-06-01

207

The influence of psychosocial factors at work and life style on health and work ability among professional workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The purpose of this article is to explore the associations of psychosocial factors at work, life style, and stressful life\\u000a events on health and work ability among white-collar workers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A cross-sectional survey was conducted among workers in commercial services (n = 1141). The main outcome variables were work ability, measured by the work ability index (WAI), and mental and physical\\u000a health, measured

T. I. J. van den Berg; S. M. Alavinia; F. J. Bredt; D. Lindeboom; L. A. M. Elders; A. Burdorf

2008-01-01

208

Occupational Mental Health: A Study of Work-Related Mental Health among Clinical Nurses  

PubMed Central

Objective: This paper reports a study performed to investigate and assess the mental health as well as the demographic characteristics of nurses to examine their mental health status based on four physical, anxiety, social-function and depression items. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was accomplished on 86 nurses working at three hospitals, affiliated to Iranian health ministry, in Ilam city(western Iran) all the cases were selected by purposeful sampling method. Data was collected by a two-part questionnaire containing individual data and GHQ -28 Standardized Questionnaire. The GHO-28 was developed by Goldberg, in 1978, as a screening tool to detect those likely to have or be at risk of developing psychiatric disorders. The GHQ-28 is a 28-item measure of emotional distress in medical settings. Analysis was done by SPSS 18 software. Results: The majority of participants were females(50.6 vs.49.4) of 35-40 years old(27.2% ), 84 percent were married(vs.16%), 35.8 percent with 10-15 years of record(vs.33.3% less than 5), 22.2% with 5-10, and 8.6% with more than 15-years of work record. The majority of participants have worked in surgical wards of hospitals. The analysis of GHQ results showed that 43.2%(n=35) of participants were suspected to suffer from mental disorders(vs.56.8% n=46 healthy participants); of all the suspected cases, 12.3% were supposed to have physical symptoms, 16% anxiety symptoms, 42% social dysfunction, and 6.2% symptoms of depression. In general, the participants demonstrated a Mean±SD of mental health score equal to 23.65±9.43. Conclusion: Research results showed that the high prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among nurses is alarming. It was concluded that providing efficient adequate and appropriate support services for this group can result in more healthy nurses as well as promotion of public health. PMID:25386506

Taghinejad, Hamid; Kikhavani, Sattar; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Azadi, Arman

2014-01-01

209

[Trends of work force participation of patients with rheumatic diseases : results from German social insurance data and the national database of the German collaborative arthritis centers].  

PubMed

Positive therapeutic effects on the work force participation derived from international clinical trials may not be directly transferable to the community based care in Germany. Therefore recent changes of data regarding sick leave (SL), work disability pension (WDP) and employment from the social insurance and from the national database of the German collaborative arthritis centers were analyzed covering a time period of at least 10 years. Health insurance data showed a steeper decline in the average duration of SL caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with all other diseases. In RA patients from the collaborative arthritis centers the mean duration of SL was much more reduced than the average duration of SL for members of the compulsory health insurance. The proportion of gainfully employed RA patients in collaborative arthritis centers has particularly increased in women. According to data from the pension insurance fund less incident cases of WDP due to RA, AS, and SLE have been observed than WDP caused by all other diseases. Thus different nationwide data show positive changes of the work force participation of individuals suffering from inflammatory rheumatic diseases in Germany. PMID:24402233

Mau, W; Thiele, K; Lamprecht, J

2014-02-01

210

The Association between Childhood Abuse and Labor Force Outcomes in Young Adults: Results from the Ontario Child Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the associations between childhood physical and sexual abuse and labor force outcomes in young adults and the possible mediating effects of educational attainment, current mental health, and physical health. Data from the Ontario Child Health Study (N = 1,893), a province-wide longitudinal study were analyzed. Controlling for childhood and demographic variables, severe childhood physical abuse was significantly associated

Masako Tanaka; Ellen Jamieson; Katholiki Georgiades; Eric K. Duku; Michael H. Boyle; Harriet L. MacMillan

2011-01-01

211

Work ability among health care workers in the United Kingdom: A pilot  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assess the work ability of NHS health care workers in the UK, aged 45 and above, and the factors influencing it, in order to introduce occupational health interventions to improve their ability to work. After obtaining approval from ethical committee, a cross sectional survey was conducted, of a sample of (507) health care workers aged 45 and above, in

N. Nachiappan; J. Harrison

2005-01-01

212

Angus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Angus Council Social Work Department  

E-print Network

staff with training and experience in mental health nursing, occupational therapy and social work. TeamsAngus Community Mental Health Service (Older People and Dementia) Partners Angus Council Social with mental health problems and adults with dementia. Social Work is the lead agency. There is a similar

Mottram, Nigel

213

Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Wellbeing Principles and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a lack of suitable resources to educate and assist health professionals to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experiencing social and emotional wellbeing issues and mental health conditions, across all life stages. Further, those resources currently used by clinicians in mental health have little cross-cultural validity. The purpose of Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Nola Purdie; Pat Dudgeon; Roz Walker

2010-01-01

214

Child Health Inequality: Framing a Social Work Response  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous studies acknowledge that the well-being of our nation hinges on the health of its people. There is specific concern about children because they represent the future. Ignoring children's health needs can compromise their educational preparedness, occupational pursuits, productivity, and longevity. Current science demonstrates that…

Hernandez, Virginia Rondero; Montana, Salvador; Clarke, Kris

2010-01-01

215

Russia's College Students: Work and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the effect of secondary employment on the sense of well-being of students in full-time education shows that the degree of fatigue and emotional stress on the job is affected by gender, the students' assessment of their own health, and their disposition to take care of their health.

Ivanova, L. Iu.

2014-01-01

216

Suicide and the air force mental health provider: frequency and impact.  

PubMed

Although suicide is relatively common among mental health patients, few studies have been published detailing the effects of a patient's suicide on his or her mental health provider. We reviewed data from 97 active duty, Air Force, mental health providers who responded to an anonymous survey. Forty-eight percent of the providers had experienced a patient's suicide. One-third of them reported a sense of responsibility for that patient's death. More than 20% reported significant emotional or behavioral changes following the death. Many providers experienced alterations in their self-esteem and their use of peer consultation following the suicide. Speaking to clergy members, friends, and other providers was generally beneficial following the suicide of a patient. Recommendations are given to minimize the impact of this tragedy on providers. PMID:17036604

Welton, Randon S; Blackman, Lisa R

2006-09-01

217

Mental Health Social Work And The Bureau-Medicalisation Of Mental Health Care: Identity In A Changing World  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychiatry in the UK is seemingly moving inexorably towards bureau-medicalisation, a potent combination of the medical model and organisational imperative. This paper looks at the causes of these developments and one consequent trajectory toward a generic mental health practitioner. This paper provides a rationale for mental health social work (MHSW), arguing against the temptation to modernise mental health care by

Jack Nathan; Martin Webber

2010-01-01

218

Global Health Sciences UCSF scientists, staff and students are working in virtually every  

E-print Network

Global Health Sciences UCSF scientists, staff and students are working in virtually every region of the world in pursuit of UCSF's mission: advancing health worldwide.TM Global Health Sciences (GHS. GHS is at the forefront of educating and training the next generation of global health leaders

Klein, Ophir

219

Work engagement: An emerging concept in occupational health psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This position paper introduces the emerging concept of work engagement: a positive, fulfilling, affective-motivational state of work-related well-being that is characterized by vigour, dedication, and absorption. Although there are different views of work engagement, most scholars agree that engaged employees have high levels of energy and identify strongly with their work. The most often used instrument to measure engagement is

Arnold B. Bakker; Wilmar B. Schaufeli; Michael P. Leiter; Toon W. Taris

2008-01-01

220

SCALING UP HEALTH INVESTMENTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: LESSONS ABOUT WHAT WORKS  

E-print Network

: Vinand NANTULYA, The Global Fund, Geneva Countries: Ghana: George AMOFAH, Director Public Health, Ghana AHMED, Former Chief Executive, Greenstar Social Marketing, Karachi; Consultant, Population ServicesPROGRAMME SCALING UP HEALTH INVESTMENTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: LESSONS ABOUT WHAT WORKS Wednesday

Klein, Ophir

221

Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Careers Life Works: Explore Health and Medical Science Careers Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents ... to technicians and therapists. The NIH Office of Science Education has a Web site that lists and ...

222

Universal access: making health systems work for women  

PubMed Central

Universal coverage by health services is one of the core obligations that any legitimate government should fulfil vis-à-vis its citizens. However, universal coverage may not in itself ensure universal access to health care. Among the many challenges to ensuring universal coverage as well as access to health care are structural inequalities by caste, race, ethnicity and gender. Based on a review of published literature and applying a gender-analysis framework, this paper highlights ways in which the policies aimed at promoting universal coverage may not benefit women to the same extent as men because of gender-based differentials and inequalities in societies. It also explores how ‘gender-blind’ organisation and delivery of health care services may deny universal access to women even when universal coverage has been nominally achieved. The paper then makes recommendations for addressing these. PMID:22992384

2012-01-01

223

Determining the Number of Handicapped Persons in the Work Force: The Experience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1983 the Office of Affirmative Action and Compliance at the University of Wisconsin-Madison surveyed 300 randomly chosen employees to determine the number of disabled persons in its work force. The results are discussed and the survey is appended. (MLW)

Lavin, Marilyn; Rausch, Diane

1984-01-01

224

A Measurement of the Effectiveness of the Airway Science Program To Meet Federal Aviation Administration Work Force Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines why the Airway Science Program, initiated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to develop college-educated and technically prepared personnel for FAA employment (primarily for air traffic control), has failed to meet its work force goals. Research data were gathered from interviews with Airway Science Program…

Bowen, Brent D.

225

The 21st Century at Work: Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States. Summary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What are the forces that will continue to shape the U.S. workforce and workplace over the next 10 to 15 years? With such inevitabilities as the proliferation and acceleration of technology worldwide, will more individuals work at home, will more businesses outsource their noncore functions -- and with what consequences? Answering such questions…

Karoly, Lynn A.; Panis, Constantijn W. A.

2004-01-01

226

The 21st Century at Work: Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What are the forces that will continue to shape the U.S. workforce and workplace over the next 10 to 15 years? With such inevitabilities as the proliferation and acceleration of technology worldwide, will more individuals work at home, will more businesses outsource their noncore functions -- and with what consequences? Answering such questions…

Karoly, Lynn A.; Panis, Constantijn W. A.

2004-01-01

227

Preparing for Global Women’s Health Work  

PubMed Central

Interest in global maternal health has steadily increased over the past decade. Medical schools are offering courses on this subject, residencies are incorporating international elective rotations into their practices, and retiring practitioners are opting to spend a year or two in low-resource settings. Although interest is growing, sometimes wellmeaning health practitioners are not entirely prepared for their new experience. Prior to departure, a multistep process is necessary to prepare physicians for living and practicing overseas. PMID:24358408

Nour, Nawal M

2013-01-01

228

Integration of mental health into primary care and community health working in Kenya: context, rationale, coverage and sustainability  

PubMed Central

Integration of mental health into primary care is essential to meet population needs yet faces many challenges if such projects are to achieve impact and be sustainable in low income countries alongside other competing priorities. This paper describes the rationale and progress of a collaborative project in Kenya to train primary care and community health workers about mental health and integrate mental health into their routine work, Within a health systems strengthening approach. So far 1877 health workers have been trained. The paper describes the multiple challenges faced by the project, and reviews the mechanisms deployed which have strengthened its impact and sustainability to date. PMID:22477921

2010-01-01

229

Serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin levels in Air Force health study participants - preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

In 1978, the US Air Force responded to a congressional mandate to initiate an epidemiologic study of the possible health effects of exposure to herbicides and their 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) contaminants in Air Force veterans who served in the Ranch Hand defoliation operation during the Vietnam conflict. Accordingly, the Air Force conducted a nonconcurrent prospective study, the Air Force Health Study, of all 1267 members of the Ranch Hand unit and a series of matched controls. This phase of the Air Force study focused on measuring serum TCDD levels in 150 Ranch Hand veterans and 50 controls. All participants were enlisted men; the Ranch Hand veterans had been either herbicide loaders or herbicide specialists in Vietnam. The demographic and health characteristics of Ranch Hand personnel and controls were similar; however, their serum TCDD levels differed markedly.

Not Available

1988-06-24

230

Does Living and Working in a Hot Environment Induce Clinically Relevant Changes in Immune Function and Voluntary Force Production Capacity?  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the effect of living (summer vs. winter) and working (morning vs. afternoon) in a hot environment on markers of immune function and forearm strength. Thirty-one healthy male gas field employees were screened before (between 05:30 and 07:00) and after their working day (between 15:30 and 17:00) during both seasons. Body core temperature and physical activity were recorded throughout the working days. The hot condition (i.e. summer) led a higher (p?0.05) average body core temperature (~37.2 vs. ~37.4?°C) but reduced physical activity (?14.8%) during the work-shift. Our data showed an increase (p?0.05) in lymphocyte and monocyte counts in the summer. Additionally, work-shift resulted in significant (p?0.001) changes in leukocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes independently of the environment. Handgrip (p=0.069) and pinch (p=0.077) forces tended to be reduced from pre-to post-work, while only force produced during handgrip manoeuvres was significantly reduced (p?0.05) during the hot compared to the temperate season. No interactions were observed between the environment and work-shift for any marker of immune function or forearm strength. In summary, working and living in hot conditions impact on markers of immune function and work capacity; however by self-regulating energy expenditure, immune markers remained in a healthy reference range. PMID:24583514

KNEZ, Wade; GIRARD, Olivier; RACINAIS, Sebastien; WALSH, Andrew; GAOUA, Nadia; GRANTHAM, Justin

2014-01-01

231

Expanding the Psychosocial Work Environment: Workplace Norms and Work-Family Conflict as Correlates of Stress and Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the contributions of organizational level norms about work requirements and social relations, and work-family conflict, to job stress and subjective health symptoms, controlling for Karasek's job demand-control-support model of the psychosocial work environment, in a sample of 1,346 employees from 56 firms in the Norwegian food and beverage industry. Hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that organizational norms

Tove Helland Hammer; Per Øystein Saksvik; Kjell Nytrø; Hans Torvatn; Mahmut Bayazit

2004-01-01

232

Distraction: an assessment of smartphone usage in health care work settings  

PubMed Central

Smartphone use in health care work settings presents both opportunities and challenges. The benefits could be severely undermined if abuse and overuse are not kept in check. This practice-focused research paper examines the current panorama of health software applications. Findings from existing research are consolidated to elucidate the level and effects of distraction in health care work settings due to smartphone use. A conceptual framework for crafting guidelines to regulate the use of smartphones in health care work settings is then presented. Finally, specific guidelines are delineated to assist in creating policies for the use of smartphones in a health care workplace. PMID:22969308

Gill, Preetinder S; Kamath, Ashwini; Gill, Tejkaran S

2012-01-01

233

[Human resources and health work: challenges for a research agenda].  

PubMed

This article discusses several key concepts for human resources policy in health in the context of Latin America's regional integration efforts. The article focuses on different concepts of integration to emphasize the analytical distinction between regional and conceptual integration. It also presents labor and human resources concepts before discussing, in the final analysis, the challenges that a common research agenda faces in the context of current health sector reforms in Latin America. The conclusion emphasizes the need to develop a technology and research system capable of supporting the agenda for exchange between MERCOSUR member countries. PMID:17625646

Assunção, Ada Avila; Belisário, Soraya Almeida; Campos, Francisco Eduardo; D'Avila, Luciana Souza

2007-01-01

234

Solution focused nursing: a fitting model for mental health nurses working in a public health paradigm.  

PubMed

The Australian Federal Government health agenda is advocating an extension of public health principles across all levels of the health sector. Since mental health nurses have long been proponents of public health and health promoting behaviours, an opportunity exists for this specialty of nursing to extend their influence and contribution within health. Solution focused nursing (SFN), a model that emerged from mental health practice, offers a framework to assist mental health nurses and leaders to more clearly practise public health principles within nursing and articulate that practice - for it is in the articulation of practice that nurses and nursing is made visible and valued. This paper aims to expand on and reiterate the SFN model, showing how it connects to public health principles and develops the mental health nurse's role - particularly in those clinical areas that require more than medical management and illness stabilization. PMID:20509799

McAllister, Margaret

2010-01-01

235

Mental Health Work Group Summary Report and Proposal  

E-print Network

, University Housing, the International Center, and Services for Students with Disabilities. The MHWG report of students at the University of Michigan and includes a proposal for transitioning the MHWG group status of mental health preventive and treatment services for students at The University of Michigan, Ann

Shyy, Wei

236

How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan  

Cancer.gov

There are ways to learn if your health plan covers routine patient care costs in a clinical trial. Here are ideas about who to contact for help, questions to ask, and information to collect and keep if you decide to take part in a trial.

237

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

This working paper synthesizes critical problems identified by interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry and places them in the context of work and family issues. At ...

Harrington, Mona

2004-12-10

238

The Redistribution of the Black Work Force in the South by Industry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The exodus of blacks from the south is connected to their abandonment of farming as a way of life. Since 1860 there has been a gradual move by the black population out of the rural south to the urban north from which stems a remarkable shift of the black labor force into industry. The black population from 1940 to 1970 has progressed from…

Rhee, Jong Mo

239

Labor Force Participation Rates among Working-Age Individuals with Visual Impairments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study analyzes four consecutive years of monthly labor force participation rates reported by the Current Population Survey that included nationally representative samples of the general U.S. population and nationally representative samples of the U.S. population with specifically identified disabilities. Visual impairment is one of the…

Kelly, Stacy M.

2013-01-01

240

Special operations forces and counterproliferation: The interagency process at work. Study project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The threat of use of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in the United States or against American vital interests overseas is real. Combating the proliferation of WMD has become a high priority for the U.S. Government. Within Department of Defense Counterproliferation Initiative (DOD CPI) of 1993 Special Operations Forces (SOF) have become pivotal players in the creation of a full

Bakken

1996-01-01

241

Deriving a Third Force Approach to Child Development From the Works of Alfred Adler  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alfred Adler has had an enormous influence on the humanistic movement in psychology, though this influence has not always been properly acknowledged. Adler is considered by some (e.g., Abraham Maslow) to be one of the founding fathers of the third force movement, as his Individual Psychology embodies many of the basic tenets of humanistic psychology. In this article, it is

Eugene M. DeRobertis

2011-01-01

242

Perspectives: Reforming American Higher Education--Implications for a Vibrant Work Force and a Healthy Democracy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The forces of globalization are finally hitting American postsecondary education. For nearly three decades, since the 1983 publication of "A Nation At Risk" launched a sustained focus on the mediocre, if not failing, K-12 system, American postsecondary education has avoided the accountability spotlight. Postsecondary policy debates have focused…

Kolb, Charles

2011-01-01

243

Beyond workers' compensation: men's mental health in and out of work.  

PubMed

The mental health of men is an important issue with significant direct and indirect costs emerging from work-related depression and suicide. Although the merits of men's community-based and workplace mental health promotion initiatives have been endorsed, few programs are mandated or formally evaluated and reported on. Conspicuously absent also are gender analyses detailing connections between masculinities and men's work-related depression and suicide on which to build men-centered mental health promotion programs. This article provides an overview of four interconnected issues, (a) masculinities and men's health, (b) men and work, (c) men's work-related depression and suicide, and (d) men's mental health promotion, in the context of men's diverse relationships to work (including job insecurity and unemployment). Based on the review, recommendations are made for advancing the well-being of men who are in as well as of those out of work. PMID:23727792

Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina S E

2014-01-01

244

Genomic information as a behavioral health intervention: can it work?  

PubMed Central

Individuals can now obtain their personal genomic information via direct-to-consumer genetic testing, but what, if any, impact will this have on their lifestyle and health? A recent longitudinal cohort study of individuals who underwent consumer genome scanning found minimal impacts of testing on risk-reducing lifestyle behaviors, such as diet and exercise. These results raise an important question: is personal genomic information likely to beneficially impact public health through motivation of lifestyle behavioral change? In this article, we review the literature on lifestyle behavioral change in response to genetic testing for common disease susceptibility variants. We find that only a few studies have been carried out, and that those that have been done have yielded little evidence to suggest that the mere provision of genetic information alone results in widespread changes in lifestyle health behaviors. We suggest that further study of this issue is needed, in particular studies that examine response to multiplex testing for multiple genetic markers and conditions. This will be critical as we anticipate the wide availability of whole-genome sequencing and more comprehensive phenotyping of individuals. We also note that while simple communication of genomic information and disease susceptibility may be sufficient to catalyze lifestyle changes in some highly motivated groups of individuals, for others, additional strategies may be required to prompt changes, including more sophisticated means of risk communication (e.g., in the context of social norm feedback) either alone or in combination with other promising interventions (e.g., real-time wireless health monitoring devices). PMID:22199991

Bloss, Cinnamon S; Madlensky, Lisa; Schork, Nicholas J; Topol, Eric J

2011-01-01

245

Health Workforce and International Migration: Can New Zealand Compete? OECD Health Working Papers No. 33  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines health workforce and migration policies in New Zealand, with a special focus on the international recruitment of doctors and nurses. The health workforce in New Zealand, as in all OECD countries, plays a central role in the health system. Nonetheless, maybe more than for any other OECD country, the health workforce in New…

Zurn, Pascal; Dumont, Jean-Christophe

2008-01-01

246

Working Toward Social Justice: Center for Research on Minority Health Summer Workshop on Health Disparities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health disparities research encompasses a complex web of areas of cross-disciplinary expertise from fields such as health policy, public health, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, communications, genetics, biology, environmental science, ethics, and law. Dissemination of health disparities research is paramount to educating and training professionals, academics, community leaders, students and others about the subject area, and providing them with the necessary

Denae W. King; Isabel Torres Vigil; Angelica P. Herrera; Richard A. Hajek; Lovell A. Jones

247

Working towards Men's Health: Findings from the Sefton Men's Health Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas. Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training…

Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve; McCullagh, Jo; Hacking, Sue

2010-01-01

248

What Can Education Teach Child Mental Health Services? Practitioners' Perceptions of Training and Joint Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of joint working between educational and child mental health professionals is well documented but there are numerous challenges and only limited training models. While the evidence base and training programmes for educationalists regarding child mental health is growing, training mental health professionals about education is more…

Vostanis, Panos; O'Reilly, Michelle; Taylor, Helen; Day, Crispin; Street, Cathy; Wolpert, Miranda; Edwards, Ruth

2012-01-01

249

Managing the work–life roller-coaster: Private stress or public health issue?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although research has established the importance for health of a sense of personal control at work, the implications of this for women have not been adequately studied. Using quantitative data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health and qualitative data from an associated study, here we examine women's health and sense of control in relation to family and employment

Lois Bryson; Penny Warner-Smith; Peter Brown; Leanne Fray

2007-01-01

250

WORKING PAPER N 2007 -34 The influence of supplementary health insurance on switching  

E-print Network

in the Swiss health insurance system. Even though the new Federal Law on Social Health Insurance (LAMal. However the impact of supplementary insurance is not significant when the individual assesses hisWORKING PAPER N° 2007 - 34 The influence of supplementary health insurance on switching behaviour

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

251

Broadening the Scope of Medical Careers: American Indians Working in Health Professions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Low numbers of Native Americans working in the health care field can be attributed to lack of Indian role models plus time and financial demands experienced by American Indian students. Indian health care professionals discuss reaching their career goals and the importance of increasing the number of American Indian health care workers. Overviews…

Colby, Patricia

1996-01-01

252

How the health and community development sectors are combining forces to improve health and well-being.  

PubMed

The root causes of poor health experienced by many who live in low-income neighborhoods-such as the lack of access to health care, limited food choices, and exposure to environmental hazards-are well documented, but often go beyond the scope of the health care delivery system. But that is beginning to change. The health sector has begun to collaborate with the community development sector, which for decades has been working in low-income neighborhoods. Encouraging local and national examples of these new partnerships abound. They include an effort in Seattle, Washington, to reduce exposure to allergens and irritants among low-income asthmatic children, and a $500 million federal program to finance the operation of grocery stores in what have previously been urban "food deserts." To nurture such efforts, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Federal Reserve System, and others have sponsored a series of "healthy community" forums in US cities. In this article we explore the growing partnerships between the health and community development sectors as well as the challenges they face, and we offer policy recommendations that might help them succeed. PMID:22068394

Braunstein, Sandra; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

2011-11-01

253

Towards a New Model of Work Based Learning in Health and Social Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wenger's (1998) conception of social participation as a process of learning is the most difficult, yet essential, characteristic of health related work based learning programmes to capture. Informed by a socio-cultural perspective, this integrative model of work based learning applies to any participant at any level in any work context. Background The resurgence of vocational and work based learning in

Pamela M. Irwin

254

Cellular Tug-of-War: Forces at Work and DNA Stretching in Mitosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the microscopic world of the cell dominated by thermal noise, a cell must be able to successfully segregate its DNA with high fidelity in order to pass its genetic information on to its progeny. In this process of mitosis in eukaryotes, driving forces act on the cytoskeleton-based architecture called the mitotic spindle to promote this division. Our preliminary data demonstrates that the dynamics of this process in yeast cells is universal. Moreover, the dynamics suggest an increasing load as the chromosomes are pulled apart. To investigate this, we use three-dimensional imaging to track the dynamics of the poles of this architecture and the points of attachment to chromosomes simultaneously and with high spatial resolution. We analyze the relative motions of chromosomes as they are organized before segregation and as they are pulled apart, using this data to investigate the force-response behavior of this cytoskeleton-chromosome polymer system.

Griffin, Brian; Kilfoil, Maria L.

2013-03-01

255

Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia -MSN Health & Fitness -Mental Health http://health.msn.com/health-topics/mental-health/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100256438[5/7/2010 1:37:50 PM  

E-print Network

Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia - MSN Health & Fitness - Mental Health http://health by: Working-Memory Gene Linked to Schizophrenia Communication breakdown within brain disrupts) -- Schizophrenia may be caused by a genetic mutation that disrupts communication between the hippocampus

256

The determinants of perceived health and labour force participation of people with HIV\\/AIDS in Khayelitsha, South Africa1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the impact of Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) on perceived health and labour force participation of people living with HIV\\/AIDS in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Cox Proportional Hazard Models with stratum effects for three medical clinics, and Accelerated Failure Time Models with individual specific unobserved shared effects (frailty), are estimated for transitions to improved perceptions of health, and

CELESTE COETZEE

257

Strategic Alliances: Working Across Professional Boundaries: Primary Health Care and Social Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective joint working between health and local authorities, and between health, social services and housing professionals, has long been recognized as vital to the provision of ‘seamless’ services for the most vulnerable members of society. Unfortunately, the history of formal joint working over the past 20 years has been largely a poor one. In this article the authors outline the

Bob Hudson; Brian Hardy; Melanie Henwood; Gerald Wistow

1997-01-01

258

HIV and Sexual Health Working Group Guidelines on HIV and AIDS  

E-print Network

1 July 2008 HIV and Sexual Health Working Group Guidelines on HIV and AIDS #12;2 Guidelines on HIV and AIDS These Guidelines have been prepared by the University's HIV and Sexual Health Working Group, which that will help Colleges and University institutions to establish their own specific policy on HIV and AIDS

Talbot, James P.

259

Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force White Paper #2 -- Uses of Uncensored Data  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: (1) reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors; (2) minimize the levels of, and potential for, exposure to beryllium; and (3) establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease. On January 4, 2001, DOE issued DOE G 440.1-7A, Implementation Guide for use with 10 CFR 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing the CBDPP. That guide describes methods and techniques that DOE considers acceptable in complying with the Rule. In 2005 a draft DOE Technical Standard ''Management of Items and Areas Containing Low Levels of Beryllium'' (SAFT 0103; hereafter referred to as the ''TS'') was circulated for comment (http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/tsdrafts/saft-0103.pdf). DOE technical standards are voluntary consensus standards developed when industry standards do not exist (see http://www.hss.energy.gov/NuclearSafety/techstds/index.html for more information). DOE does not require its field elements to implement DOE technical standards, but field elements may choose to adopt these standards to meet specific needs. This beryllium TS is intended to provide best practices and lessons learned for manageing items and areas that contain low levels of beryllium, which has been a costly and technically challenging component of CBDPPs. The TS is also intended to provide guidance for determining if the Rule's housekeeping and release criteria are met. On challenge the TS addressed was the statistical interpretation of data sets with non-detected results, a topic for which no strong consensus exists. Among the many comments on the draft TS was a suggestion that certain of the statistical comparisons described in the TS could be better implemented if analytical results, even when below a reporting limit, were to be reported by analytical laboratories. See Appendix 1 for a review of terminology related to reporting limits. The Beryllium Health and Safety Committee (BHSC) formed a Sampling and Analysis Subcommittee (SAS) in 2003. The SAS established a working group on accreditation and reporting limits. By 2006 it had become evident that the issues extended to data reporting as a whole. The SAS proposed to the BHSC the formation of a Data Reporting Task Force (DRTF) to consider issues related to data reporting. The BHSC Board agreed, and requested that the DRTF generate a white paper, to be offered by the BHSC to potential interested parties such as the DOE policy office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy. It was noted that additional products could include detailed guidance and potentially a journal article in the future. The SAS proposed that DRTF membership represent the affected disciplines (chemists, industrial hygiene professionals and statisticians, and the DOE office that is responsible for beryllium health and safety policy). The BHSC Board decided that DRTF membership should come from DOE sites, since the focus would be on reporting in the context of the TS and the Rule. The DRTF came into existence in late 2006. The DRTF membership includes industrial hygienists, analytical chemists and laboratory managers, members of the regulatory and oversight community, and environmental statisticians. A first White Paper, ''Summary of Issues and Path Forward'', was reviewed by the BHSC in March 2007 and issued by the DRTF in June 2007. It describes the charter of the DRTF, introduces some basic terminology (reproduced here in Appendix 1), lays out the issues the DRTF is expected to address, and describes a path forward for the DRTF's work. This first White Paper is available through the BHSC web site. This White Paper presents recommendations developed by the DRTF following the process laid out in that first White Pap

MacQueen, D H

2007-10-10

260

20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

2012-04-01

261

20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

2011-04-01

262

48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...establish and enforce occupational safety and health standards applicable to...

2013-10-01

263

48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...establish and enforce occupational safety and health standards applicable to...

2012-10-01

264

20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...  

...2014-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

2014-04-01

265

20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the working...Limitations § 667.274 What health and safety standards apply to the working...under title I of WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established...

2013-04-01

266

Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) Work-Rest Cycles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

BHP Program Element Goal: Identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration and return to terrestrial life. BHP Requirements: a) Characterize and assess risks (e.g., likelihood and consequences). b) Develop tools and technologies to prevent, monitor, and treat adverse outcomes. c) Inform standards. d) Develop technologies to: 1) reduce risks and human systems resource requirements (e.g., crew time, mass, volume, power) and 2) ensure effective human-system integration across exploration mission.

Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra

2011-01-01

267

Health problems of Nepalese migrants working in three Gulf countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Nepal is one of the largest suppliers of labour to countries where there is a demand for cheap and low skilled workers. In\\u000a the recent years the Gulf countries have collectively become the main destinations for international migration. This paper\\u000a aims to explore the health problems and accidents experienced by a sample of Nepalese migrant in three Gulf countries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A

Suresh Joshi; Padam Simkhada; Gordon J Prescott

2011-01-01

268

Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Mental Health and Wellbeing Principles and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a lack of suitable resources to educate and assist health professionals to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experiencing social and emotional wellbeing issues and mental health conditions, across all life stages. Further, those resources currently used by clinicians in mental health have little cross-cultural validity.\\u000aThe purpose of Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Nola Purdie; Pat Dudgeon; Roz Walker

2010-01-01

269

Optimal work–rest cycles for an isometric intermittent gripping task as a function of force, posture and grip span  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the maximum acceptable contraction frequencies (i.e. work–rest cycles) for an isometric-intermittent handgrip task as a function of grip span, applied force and shoulder posture using psychophysical and physiological approaches. Twelve healthy males served as subjects. The three grip spans investigated were the optimal, 2 cm narrower than the optimal, and 2 cm wider than

Mahmut Eksioglu

2006-01-01

270

The impact of 9\\/11 on hours of work and labour force participation in the US  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to use observed changes in hours of work and labour force participation to draw inferences regarding behavioural responses to the 9\\/11 terrorist attacks in the US. Using the Current Population Survey and controlling for differences in demographics, labour market conditions and a time-invariant unobserved individual fixed effect, we determine that for most sub-samples there

Julie L. Hotchkiss; Olga Pavlova

2009-01-01

271

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Digestive System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the digestive system.

2012-11-20

272

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Circulatory System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the cardiovascular system.

2012-11-20

273

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Endocrine System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the endocrine system.

2012-11-20

274

Kids Health: How the Body Works - Muscular System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How the Body Works is an interactive website for children to explore the systems of the body and learn basic anatomy and physiology. In particular this link provides students and teachers to animations, videos and activities related to the muscular system.

2012-11-20

275

Seafood processing in South Africa: a study of working practices, occupational health services and allergic health problems in the industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work practices, occupational health services and allergic health problems among workplaces which process seafood in Western Cape province of South Africa were examined. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 68 workplaces that were sent a self-administered postal survey questionnaire. Workplaces reporting a high prevalence of work-related symptoms associated with seafood exposure were also inspected. Forty- one (60%) workplaces responded

M. F. Jeebhay; A. L. Lopata; T. G. Robins

276

41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

2010-07-01

277

41 CFR 302-3.205 - If my transfer is involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of work...TYPE Types of Transfers Reduction in Force Relocation § 302-3.205 If my transfer...involuntary (due to i.e., reduction in force, cessation, or transfer of...

2011-07-01

278

Work Hours and Perceived Time Barriers to Healthful Eating Among Young Adults  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe time-related beliefs and behaviors regarding healthful eating, indicators of dietary intake, and their associations with the number of weekly hours of paid work among young adults. Methods Population-based study in a diverse cohort (N=2287). Results Working > 40 hours per week was associated with time-related barriers to healthful eating most persistently among young adult men. Associations were found among females working both part-time and > 40 hours per week with both time-related barriers and dietary intake. Conclusions Findings indicate that intervention strategies, ideally those addressing time burden, are needed to promote healthful eating among young, working adults. PMID:23026037

Escoto, Kamisha Hamilton; Laska, Melissa Nelson; Larson, Nicole; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Hannan, Peter J.

2012-01-01

279

Assessment of availability and working components of school health services in Delhi.  

PubMed

A total of 204 schools of different types and geographical zones were surveyed. Principals of the selected schools were interviewed to generate data regarding availability and working components of school health during last one year. School health services were non existent in 56 (27.45%) of the total schools and in another 27%, the visits made by school health team were only three or less during last one year. The situation was much better in NDMC and MCD schools but in Govt. of Delhi group, 40 of the 82 schools did not have any school health services. In most of the schools having some form of school health services (govt. or private), all the essential areas of health appraisal viz. anthropometry, general health check-up, vision testing, ENT check-up and dental examination were covered. In 21.62% of such schools no health education activity was done by the school health team. Even in the schools having some form of school health services, referral-follow up system did not seem to be working well. In this situation health check-ups merely satisfy administrative requirements and end up with some data for storage. School health services in Delhi, like other health services, are administered through multiple agencies with somewhat overlapping areas and responsibilities. This has more disadvantages than benefits. An integration of various school health schemes in Delhi with uniform system and standards should be attempted. PMID:10838719

Chaturvedi, S; Aggarwal, O P

2000-03-01

280

THE CRITICAL CARE WORK ENVIRONMENT AND NURSE-REPORTED HEALTH CARE-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS  

PubMed Central

Background Critically ill patients are susceptible to health care–associated infections because of their illnesses and the need for intravenous access and invasive monitoring. The critical care work environment may influence the likelihood of infection in these patients. Objective To determine whether or not the critical care nurse work environment is predictive of nurse-reported health care–associated infections. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional design was used with linked nurse and hospital survey data. Nurses assessed the critical care work environment and provided the frequencies of ventilator-associated pneumonias, urinary tract infections, and infections associated with central catheters. Logistic regression models were used to determine if critical care work environments were predictive of nurse-reported frequent health care–associated infections, with controls for nurse and hospital characteristics. Results The final sample consisted of 3217 critical care nurses in 320 hospitals. Compared with nurses working in poor work environments, nurses working in better work environments were 36% to 41% less likely to report that health care–associated infections occurred frequently. Conclusion Health care–associated infections are less likely in favorable critical care work environments. These findings, based on the largest sample of critical care nurses to date, substantiate efforts to focus on the quality of the work environment as a way to minimize the frequency of health care–associated infections. PMID:24186818

Kelly, Deena; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

2014-01-01

281

Soft Skills and the Minority Work Force: A Guide for Informed Discussion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication analyzes issues that lead to a working definition of soft working skills. Data come from research by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. At a workshop, scholars, practitioners, and representatives from various job sites discussed the impact of soft skills on access to jobs and long-term employment among minority…

Conrad, Cecilia A.

282

CFD analysis and experimental work on water impact forces on transverse sections of planing craft  

Microsoft Academic Search

The water entry problem has been studied using both CFD analysis and model experimental work. The CFD results from this study are compared with the experimental results and with results obtained by others from experimental work and from numerical and semi-analytical methods. This comparison shows good agreement between the present CFD results and those obtained by other methods for estimating

T. Tveitnes; K. S. Varyani; A. C. Fairlie-Clarke

283

Returning Social Security Beneficiaries to the Work Force: A Proactive Disability Management Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used multidisciplinary disability management model to assist Social Security Disability Insurance beneficiaries to return to work. The model, which emphasized multidisciplinary disability management, marketing and public relations, work incentives training, networking, and job-seeking skills training, facilitated 27 job placements out of the 107…

Shrey, Donald E.; And Others

1991-01-01

284

Work strain, health, and absenteeism: a meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Work strain has been argued to be a significant cause of absenteeism in the popular and academic press. However, definitive evidence for associations between absenteeism and strain is currently lacking. A theory focused meta-analysis of 275 effects from 153 studies revealed positive but small associations between absenteeism and work strain, psychological illness, and physical illness. Structural equation modeling results suggested that the strain-absence connection may be mediated by psychological and physical symptoms. Little support was received for the purported volitional distinction between absence frequency and time lost absence measures on the basis of illness. Among the moderators examined, common measurement, midterm and stable sources of variance, and publication year received support. PMID:18837626

Darr, Wendy; Johns, Gary

2008-10-01

285

Reducing work related psychological ill health and sickness absence: a systematic literature review  

PubMed Central

A literature review revealed the following: key work factors associated with psychological ill health and sickness absence in staff were long hours worked, work overload and pressure, and the effects of these on personal lives; lack of control over work; lack of participation in decision making; poor social support; and unclear management and work role. There was some evidence that sickness absence was associated with poor management style. Successful interventions that improved psychological health and levels of sickness absence used training and organisational approaches to increase participation in decision making and problem solving, increase support and feedback, and improve communication. It is concluded that many of the work related variables associated with high levels of psychological ill health are potentially amenable to change. This is shown in intervention studies that have successfully improved psychological health and reduced sickness absence. PMID:12499449

Michie, S; Williams, S

2003-01-01

286

Is living near a coking works harmful to health? A study of industrial air pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To determine whether there was excess ill health in people living near a coking works, and if so whether it was related to exposure to coking works' emissions. DESIGN--Populations varying in proximity to the coking works were compared with control populations. Health data were correlated with available environmental data. METHODS--Analysis of routinely collected mortality, cancer registration, and birth statistics; community

R S Bhopal; P Phillimore; S Moffatt; C Foy

1994-01-01

287

Human health and the water environment: using the DPSEEA framework to identify the driving forces of disease.  

PubMed

There is a growing awareness of global forces that threaten human health via the water environment. A better understanding of the dynamic between human health and the water environment would enable prediction of the significant driving forces and effective strategies for coping with or preventing them. This report details the use of the Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (DPSEEA) framework to explore the linkage between water-related diseases and their significant driving forces. The DPSEEA frameworks indicate that a select group of driving forces, including population growth, agriculture, infrastructure (dams and irrigation), and climate change, is at the root cause of key global disease burdens. Construction of the DPSEEA frameworks also allows for the evaluation of public health interventions. Sanitation was found to be a widely applicable and effective intervention, targeting the driver/pressure linkage of most of the water-related diseases examined. Ultimately, the DPSEEA frameworks offer a platform for constituents in both the health and environmental fields to collaborate and commit to a common goal targeting the same driving forces. PMID:24036221

Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Bartram, Jamie

2014-01-15

288

A Proposed Framework for Understanding the Forces behind Legislation of Universal Health Insurance--Lessons from Ten Countries  

PubMed Central

Objective To understand the forces propelling countries to legislate universal health insurance. Data Source/Study Design Descriptive review and exploratory synthesis of historic data on economic, geographic, socio-demographic, and political factors. Data Extraction Methods We searched under “insurance, health” on MEDLINE and Google Scholar, and we reviewed relevant books and articles via a snowball approach. Principal Findings Ten countries with universal health insurance were studied. For the five countries that passed final universal insurance laws prior to 1958, we found that two forces of “historical context” (i.e., social solidarity and historic patterns), one “ongoing dynamic force” (political pressures), and “one uniqueness of the moment” force (legislative permissiveness) played a major role. For the five countries that passed final legislation between 1967 and 2010, the predominant factors were two “ongoing dynamic forces” (economic pressures and political pressures) and one “uniqueness of the moment” force (leadership). In general, countries in the former group made steady progress, whereas those in the latter group progressed in abrupt leaps. Conclusions The lessons of more recent successes—almost all of which were achieved via abrupt leaps—strongly indicate the importance of leadership in taking advantage of generalized economic and political pressures to achieve universal health insurance. PMID:22092227

Wang, C Jason; Ellender, Stacey M; Textor, Theodora; Bauchner, Joshua H; Wu, Jen-You; Bauchner, Howard; Huang, Andrew T

2011-01-01

289

Mental health/illness and prisons as place: frontline clinicians? perspectives of mental health work in a penal setting.  

PubMed

This article takes mental health and prisons as its two foci. It explores the links between social and structural aspects of the penal setting, the provision of mental healthcare in prisons, and mental health work in this environment. This analysis utilises qualitative interview data from prison-based fieldwork undertaken in Her Majesty?s Prison Service, England. Two themes are discussed: (1) the desire and practicalities of doing mental health work and (2) prison staff as mental health work allies. Concepts covered include equivalence, training, ownership, informal communication, mental health knowledge, service gatekeepers, case identification, and unmet need. Implications for practice are (1) the mental health knowledge and understanding of prison wing staff could be appraised and developed to improve mental healthcare and address unmet need. Their role as observers and gatekeepers could be considered. (2) The realities of frontline mental health work for clinicians in the penal environment should be embraced and used to produce and implement improved policy and practice guidance, which is in better accord with the actuality of the context - both socially and structurally. PMID:25124166

Wright, Nicola; Jordan, Melanie; Kane, Eddie

2014-09-01

290

Perceived unfairness in working conditions: The case of public health services in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background The focus on the determinants of the quality of health services in low-income countries is increasing. Health workers' motivation has emerged as a topic of substantial interest in this context. The main objective of this article is to explore health workers' experience of working conditions, linked to motivation to work. Working conditions have been pointed out as a key factor in ensuring a motivated and well performing staff. The empirical focus is on rural public health services in Tanzania. The study aims to situate the results in a broader historical context in order to enhance our understanding of the health worker discourse on working conditions. Methods The study has a qualitative study design to elicit detailed information on health workers' experience of their working conditions. The data comprise focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) with administrators, clinicians and nursing staff in the public health services in a rural district in Tanzania. The study has an ethnographic backdrop based on earlier long-term fieldwork in the same part of Tanzania. Results The article provides insights into health workers' understanding and assessment of their working conditions. An experience of unsatisfactory working conditions as well as a perceived lack of fundamental fairness dominated the FGDs and IDIs. Informants reported unfairness with reference to factors such as salary, promotion, recognition of work experience, allocation of allowances and access to training as well as to human resource management. The study also revealed that many health workers lack information or knowledge about factors that influence their working conditions. Conclusions The article calls for attention to the importance of locating the discourse of unfairness related to working conditions in a broader historical/political context. Tanzanian history has been characterised by an ambiguous and shifting landscape of state regulation, economic reforms, decentralisation and emerging democratic sentiments. Such a historic contextualisation enhances our understanding of the strong sentiments of unfairness revealed in this study and assists us in considering potential ways forward. PMID:21314985

2011-01-01

291

AUTHORITARIAN AND EGALITARIAN FORCES SHAPE T·HE SCHOOL WORK ETHIC  

E-print Network

This paper summarizes the development ofmodern education as a rational response to the demands of nationalism and industrialization in western societies. The problem of how to best encourage the "school work ethic" is ...

Bradford, John A.

1981-01-01

292

Empowerment in the field of health promotion: recognizing challenges in working toward equity.  

PubMed

Over the last 25 years, the language of empowerment has been woven into the guiding missions and descriptions of institutions, funding and projects globally. Although theoretical understandings of empowerment within the domain of health promotion remain contentious, we have little idea of how a shift toward an empowerment agenda has affected the daily work of those in the field of health promotion. A systematic examination of the implementation of the empowerment agenda is important as it can help us understand how redistributive agendas are received within the multiple institutional contexts in which health promotion work is carried out. The goal of this study, therefore, was to try to understand the empowerment agenda within the context of everyday health promotion. We conducted semi-structured interviews with health promoters from a variety of geographical regions, institutional backgrounds, and job capacities. Essentially we found that empowerment remains conceptually dear to health promoters' understanding of their work, yet at the same time, mainstreaming empowerment is at odds with central trends and initiatives that govern this work. We argue that many of the stumbling blocks that have hindered this specific agenda are actually central stumbling blocks for the wider field of health promotion. We examine some of the barriers to implementing transformational change. Overcoming the primary limitations uncovered in this exploration of empowerment is actually crucial to progressive work in health promotion in general, particularly work that would seek to lessen inequities. PMID:24812101

Berry, Nicole S; Murphy, Jill; Coser, Larissa

2014-12-01

293

Psychosocial Work Characteristics Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Functioning in Rural Women: The Wisconsin Rural Women's Health Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between psychosocial work characteristics and health functioning and cardiovascular disease risk factors among rural women of central Wisconsin and compare psychosocial work characteristics between farm and nonfarm women. Methods: Stratified sampling was used to select a…

Chikani, Vatsal; Reding, Douglas; Gunderson, Paul; McCarty, Catherine A.

2005-01-01

294

Abortion and public policy. A report of the work of the Abortion Task Force of the Western Behavioral Sciences Institute.  

PubMed

In an effort to avoid continued clashes of ideologies the Abortion Task Force of the Western Behavioral Sciences Institute decided to attempt to find what middle ground there is in the abortion debate. The Task Force communicated by computer. There were 7 ground rules for participants: seek mutual understanding of each other's views, agreement to seek understanding for each segment of the discussion before moving on to the next, agreement to explain, but not proselytize, agreement to announce and explain annoyance at each others' remarks instead of counter-attacking or building up tension, agreement to sign on at least twice a week, agreement to enter comments at least once a week, agreement to maintain complete confidentiality of the conversations. The statement issued by the task force attempts to concentrate public policy on reducing or eliminating those conditions that make abortion necessary or desirable. The statement has 7 policy recommendations: provide financial support for women and families whose income is inadequate to provide a decent quality of life for the woman, child and family; require parental leaves for employment, day care and other social measures to improve the usefulness of a parent; assure competent sexual education at an early enough time to be effective; provide free contraceptives and other family planning services to low income people; support reproductive research that effects the health of mothers and babies; make adoption more efficient including counseling; assure counseling at all levels of the issues from pre-teens through parents. PMID:12178919

1991-01-01

295

Comparing working conditions and physical and psychological health complaints in four occupational groups working in female-dominated workplaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Dominant theories of working conditions and their effects on poor employee health have been criticized for failing to consider\\u000a how psychosocial factors interact and how such relationships may differ across occupational groups.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Goal  This paper examines the associations between psychosocial factors and physical and psychological health complaints while at\\u000a the same time taking into account differences between occupational groups in female-dominated

Karina Nielsen; Karen Albertsen; Sten-Olof Brenner; Lars Smith-Hansen; Christian Roepsdorff

2009-01-01

296

Relationship of Work Hours with Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress among a College Student Cohort  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and…

Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

2008-01-01

297

Integration of Health and Social Services Provision Review of Current Practice Drivers & Barriers to Integrated Working  

E-print Network

Services Provision ­ Review of Current Practice Drivers & Barriers to Integrated Working Nuffield Centre' no incentives to change `it won't work here' `it won't work now' sense of momentum - `the time is now' baggageIntegration of Health and Social Services Provision ­ Review of Current Practice Drivers & Barriers

Mottram, Nigel

298

Piezoresistive cantilever working in a shear force mode for in situ characterization of exposed micro- and nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a method of characterization micro- and nanostructures defined in a photolithography process. To implement this method a measurement system composed of an atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a system for maskless lithography was developed. This integration enables exposed patterns to be examined in situ, without any necessity for a developing process. The microscope works in a shear force mode, uses a cantilever with a piezoresistive method of detecting deflection and can be used for measuring surfaces with high aspect ratio by applying an appropriate technology of sharpening in a focused ion beam process. The cantilever fabrication process, its calibration and examination procedures are presented. Finally, the AFM images of structures scanned directly after exposure are shown.

Sierakowski, Andrzej; Kopiec, Daniel; Janus, Pawe?; Ekwi?ska, Magdalena; P?uska, Mariusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Gotszalk, Teodor

2014-04-01

299

Ümraniye ?lçesinde Birinci Basamakta Görevli Sa?lik Çali?anlarinin Genel Sa?lik Sigortasi Hakkindaki Bilgi Düzeyi (Knowledge about General Health Insurance of Health Workers Working in the Primary Health Care in Ümraniye)  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY AIM: The aim of our study was to determine the knowledge of general health insurance of health workers working in the primary health care in Umraniye. METHODS: This descriptive research performed on health workers working in 18 primary health care centers and Province Health Dirocterate in Umraniye, between September-November 2006. Study sample didn't select and we included 250 health

2009-01-01

300

Self rated health and working conditions of small-scale enterprisers in Sweden.  

PubMed

This study was an investigation of prevalence and associations between self-rated health and working conditions for small-scale enterprisers in a county in Sweden. A postal questionnaire was answered by 340 male and 153 female small-scale enterprisers in different sectors, with a response rate of 66%. For comparative purposes, data from a population study of 1,699 employees in private companies was included in the analyses. Differences were tested by Chi(2)-test and associations were presented as odds ratios (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The frequency of health problems in male enterprisers was higher than in employees in the private sector, while the frequency of health problems in female enterprisers was equal to that of the control employees. The main findings highlighted that male enterprisers reported higher rate of health problems and female enterprisers equal rate compared with employees in the private sector. Enterprisers stated musculoskeletal pain (women 59%, men 56%) and mental health problems (women 47%, men 45%) as the most frequent health problems. Poor job satisfaction, reported by 17% of the females and 20% of the male enterprisers, revealed an OR of 10.42 (95% CI 5.78-18.77) for poor general health. For the enterprisers, the most frequent complaints, musculoskeletal pain and mental health problems, were associated with poor job satisfaction and poor physical work environment. An association between poor general health and working as an enterpriser remained after adjusting for working conditions, sex and age. PMID:18212472

Gunnarsson, Kristina; Vingård, Eva; Josephson, Malin

2007-12-01

301

Project: Strategies for Sex Fairness. Re-Entering the Work Force--New Options.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of a series of instructional packets to aid schools in reducing sex stereotypes, this outreach packet is designed to inform and stimulate community support and encourage women in their attempt to assess and reenter the work world. Materials are suggested for use in forty-five to sixty minutes. Contents include a leader's script (material to be…

Mook, Corena; Legg, Marilyn

302

Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: occupational work force mortality study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents work performed in support of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. We compared total and cause-specific mortality for Pantex Plant workers employed between 1951 and December 31, 1978, with expected mortalities based on US death rates. We observed significantly fewer deaths than expected from all causes of death:

J. F. Acquavella; L. D. Wiggs; R. J. Waxweiler; D. G. Macdonell; G. S. Wilkinson

1982-01-01

303

Consumer Health: Does Advertising Work on You? and Evaluating a Product's Health Claims.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes lessons for teaching middle and high school students how to determine if they are influenced by the power of advertising and how to evaluate a product's health claims. To determine the influence of advertising, teachers have high school students discuss what their latest health product/service purchase was, why they bought it,…

Cox, Carolyn C.

304

[Problems of work world and its impact on health. Current financial crisis].  

PubMed

Health and work are complex processes. Besides, they are multiple considering the forms they take. These two processes are linked to each other and they are influenced by each other. According to this, it is possible to establish that work world is extremely complex and heterogeneous. In this world, "old" or traditional risks coexist with "modern risks", derived from the new models of work organization and the incorporation of new technologies. Unemployment, work relationships precariousness and work risks outsourcing are results of neoliberal strategies. Some negative results of health-sickness process derived from transformation in work world and current global economic crisis have been noticed in current work conditions. Finally, the need for reconstructing policies focusing on this situation derived from work world is suggested. PMID:23258747

Tomasina, Fernando

2012-06-01

305

A Prospective Study of Return to Work Across Health Conditions: Perceived Work Attitude, Self-efficacy and Perceived Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background The aim of the present study was to conduct subgroup-analyses in a prospective cohort of workers on long-term sickness absence\\u000a to investigate whether associations between perceived work attitude, self-efficacy and perceived social support and time to\\u000a RTW differ across different health conditions. Methods The study was based on a sample of 926 workers on sickness absence (6–12 weeks). The participants

Sandra BrouwerMichiel; Michiel F. Reneman; Ute Bültmann; Johan W. Groothoff

2010-01-01

306

Preparing Social Work Students for Interprofessional Practice in Geriatric Health Care: Insights from Two Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several interprofessional education projects have addressed training allied health students for effective teamwork in geriatrics, few curriculum evaluation studies have examined differences in learning outcomes between interprofessional and traditional uniprofessional approaches, especially for social work students. This paper compares…

Bonifas, Robin P.; Gray, Amanda K.

2013-01-01

307

Workforce Issues in the Greater Boston Health Care Industry: Implications for Work and Family  

E-print Network

Interviews with more than 40 leaders in the Boston area health care industry have identified a range of broadly-felt critical problems. This document synthesizes these problems and places them in the context of work and ...

Harrington, Mona

308

Assessment of availability and working components of school health services in Delhi  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 204 schools of different types and geographical zones were surveyed. Principals of the selected schools were interviewed\\u000a to generate data regarding availability and working components of school health during last one year. School health services\\u000a were non existent in 56 (27.45%) of the total schools and in another 27%, the visits made by school health team were

Sanjay Chaturvedi; O. P. Aggarwal

2000-01-01

309

The challenges of health care reform for hospital social work in the United States.  

PubMed

This article examines the potential impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 on the practice of hospital social work in the United States and its implications for social work education and training. It briefly traces the history of hospital social work, outlines some contemporary issues in the health care field, particularly those that create persistent health disparities, summarizes the major provisions of the Act that have implications for social work practice, and discusses how social workers in hospital settings might respond effectively to the changes produced by the legislation. PMID:23151284

Reisch, Michael

2012-01-01

310

Mental Health Status among Married Working Women Residing in Bhubaneswar City, India: A Psychosocial Survey  

PubMed Central

Mental health is a major public health concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the mental health status and its correlates among married working women residing in Bhubaneswar city of Odisha, India. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 240 households involving 240 married working women following a multistage cluster random sampling design. Using the predesigned, pretested interview schedule and self-reporting questionnaire, all relevant information was collected. Our study revealed that 32.9% of study respondents had poor mental health and only about 10% of these women had sought any kind of mental health services. Logistic regression analysis showed that 3 predictors such as favourable attitude of colleagues, sharing their own problems with husband, and spending time for yoga/meditation/exercise had significant positive impact on the mental health status of married working women. A preventive program regarding various aspects of mental health for married working women at workplace as well as community level could be a useful strategy in reducing this public health problem. PMID:24800258

Panigrahi, Ansuman; Padhy, Aditya Prasad; Panigrahi, Madhulita

2014-01-01

311

Occupational health surveillance: a means to identify work-related risks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lack of successful disease surveillance methods has resulted in few reliable estimates of workplace-related disease. Hazard surveillance - the ongoing assessment of chemical use and worked exposure to the chemicals - is presented as a way to supplement occupational disease surveillance. Existing OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Health) data systems are adapted

J. R. Froines; C. A. Dellenbaugh; D. H. Wegman

1986-01-01

312

Working in permanent hypoxia for fire protection--impact on health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. A new technique to prevent fires is continuous exchange of oxygen with nitrogen which leads to an oxygen concentration of between 15% and 13% in the ambient air. This paper reviews the effect of short-term, intermittent hypoxia on health and performance of people working in such atmospheres. Methods. We reviewed the effect of ambient air hypoxia on human health

Peter Angerer; Dennis Nowak

2003-01-01

313

Beyond Specialization: Social Work Education and Practice for Health Care and Family Life.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a role for social workers in all settings to play in providing assistance related to the health care needs of individuals and families. Schools of social work should prepare all students to understand and deal with the effects of evolving health policies and practices on family life. (Author/MH)

Olson, Miriam Meltzer

1986-01-01

314

Bachelor of Social Work Students and Mental Health Stigma: Understanding Student Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bachelor-level social work students (n = 198) at a midsized Midwestern public university were surveyed to evaluate their attitudes toward those with mental health concerns. Additionally, students were surveyed regarding their willingness to seek treatment for their own mental health needs. Results of the analyses suggest that the majority of…

Zellmann, Karen T.; Madden, Elissa E.; Aguiniga, Donna M.

2014-01-01

315

Mental Health Workforce Change through Social Work Education: A California Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 2004 California Mental Health Services Act requires large-scale system change in the public mental health system through a shift to recovery-oriented services for diverse populations. This article describes an innovative strategy for workforce recruitment and retention to create and sustain these systemic changes. The California Social Work

Foster, Gwen; Morris, Meghan Brenna; Sirojudin, Sirojudin

2013-01-01

316

Clocking in: The Organization of Work Time and Health in the United States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article assesses the health implications of emerging patterns in the organization of work time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we examine general mental and physical health (SF-12 scores), psychological distress (CESD score), clinical levels of obesity, and the presence of medical conditions, at age 40.…

Kleiner, Sibyl; Pavalko, Eliza K.

2010-01-01

317

Work Improvement and Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems: Common Features and Research Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing trend in re-orientating occupational health research towards risk management. Such a trend is accelerated by the increasing attention to occupational safety and health management systems. The trend, also seen in many Asian countries, is offering new opportunities for strengthening primary prevention. Useful examples are provided from recent work improvement projects dealing with technology transfer, small workplaces

Kazutaka KOGI

2002-01-01

318

The Community Health Worker. Working Guide. Guidelines for Training. Guidelines for Adaptation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a revised and enlarged edition of "The Primary Health Worker," a standard teaching text and reference manual developed for community health workers and their trainers and supervisors. The new edition has been updated with practical knowledge gained during the extensive field use of the previous work. The book also incorporates new…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

319

Health and safety consequences of shift work in the food processing industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both a questionnaire survey and an evaluation of health and safety records were used to characterize the health and safety consequences of day versus afternoon, night and rotating shifts for approximately 1000 food processing workers. Relative to the day workers, the results indicated that those on shift work, particularly rotating and night shifts, showed greater adverse effects. These included poorer

MICHAEL J. SMITH; MICHAEL J. COLLIGAN; DONALD L. TASTO

1982-01-01

320

Work-Related Health Limitations, Education, and the Risk of Marital Disruption  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite progress in identifying the covariates of divorce, there remain substantial gaps in the knowledge. One of these gaps is the relationship between health and risk of marital dissolution. I extend prior research by examining the linkages between work-related health limitations and divorce using 25 years of data (N = 7919) taken from the 1979…

Teachman, Jay

2010-01-01

321

The Health of Women at Work. A Bibliography. Occasional Papers No. 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both English and foreign language articles and books, most of them published since 1950, are cited in this bibliography on the health of women in the workplace. Citations were selected to represent the efforts that have been made by health professionals, statisticians, historians, and social scientists in this area. The designation "at work"…

Hunt, Vilma R.

322

Work Losses Related to Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Canada: Results From a National Population Health Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:Few studies have assessed the influence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on work loss or estimated the costs related to work loss. Our analysis reports the employment effects related to IBD as based on the 1998 sample of the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS).METHODS:Our predictive analysis adapts the theory of labor supply to a health context. Respondents between the

Teresa Longobardi; Philip Jacobs; Lieling Wu; Charles N. Bernstein

2003-01-01

323

Health effects of supplemental work from home in the European Union.  

PubMed

Internationalization and technological developments have changed the work organization in developed and developing industrial economies. Information and communication technologies, such as computers and smartphones, are increasingly used, allowing more temporal and spatial flexibility of work. This may lead to an increase in supplemental work, i.e. constant availability or working in addition to contractually agreed work hours. This in turn extends work hours and leads to work hours in evenings and weekends, causing interferences of work hours with biological and social rhythms for sleep, recovery and social interaction. However, empirical findings on the effects of supplemental work and work hours on occupational health are rather scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between (1) work-related contacts outside of regular work hours and (2) working in the free time with self-reported work-related health impairments in the fourth and fifth European Working Conditions Surveys (EWCS 2005, EWCS 2010). Out of these cross-sectional, large-scale surveys, data on n?=?22?836 and n?=?34?399 employed workers were used for weighted logistic regression analyses. About half of the sample reported at least occasional supplemental work. The results showed an increased risk of reporting at least one health problem for employees who had been contacted by their employer (EWCS 2005), or worked in their free time to meet work demands (EWCS 2010) in the last 12 months, compared to those reporting no supplemental work or work-related contacts during free time. These results were controlled for demographic variables, physical and mental work load, worker autonomy, and several work hours characteristics (e.g. hours per week, unusual and variable hours). The risk of reporting health problems was increased by being contacted both sometimes (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.14-1.39) and often (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.02-1.25), whereas the frequency of working in the free time showed a clear dose-response effect (sometimes: OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.24; often: OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.47-1.75), both compared to the category "never". The findings, thus, indicate that even a small amount of supplemental work beyond contractually agreed work hours may increase the risk of work-related health impairments. Working in the free time was associated with a substantial risk increase and might be a better indicator for actual work load than being contacted by the employer outside of contractually agreed work hours. Thus, in order to minimize negative health effects, availability requirements for employees outside their regular work hours should be minimized. While these effects definitely need further study, especially regarding a quantification of actual supplemental work and its temporal location, addressing the company culture and using incentives and policies might be options to reduce the amount of supplemental work and maintain the risks of health impairments in the working population at a lower level. PMID:25229274

Arlinghaus, Anna; Nachreiner, Friedhelm

2014-12-01

324

Working Together for Mental Health: Evaluation of a one-day mental health course for human service providers  

PubMed Central

Background The Working Together For Mental Health course is an 8-hour course designed to demystify mental illness and mental health services. The main target group for the course is people working in human service organisations who provide services for people with mental illness. Methods A questionnaire was administered to all participants attending the course during 2003 (n = 165). Participants completed the questionnaire before and immediately after the course, and at three month follow-up. Results A response rate of 69% was achieved with 114 people completing the questionnaire on all three occasions. The responses showed a significant improvement in the self-assessed knowledge and confidence of participants to provide human services to people with a mental health problem or disorder, three months after the course. There was no significant improvement in participants' attitudes or beliefs about people with a mental health problem or disorder at three month follow-up; however, participants' attitudes were largely positive before entering the course. Conclusion The Working Together For Mental Health course was successful in improving participants' confidence and knowledge around providing human services to people with a mental health illness. PMID:17074097

Grootemaat, Pam; Gillan, Cathie; Holt, Gillian; Forward, Wayne; Heywood, Narelle; Willis, Sue

2006-01-01

325

Hope and despair: community health assistants’ experiences of working in a rural district in Zambia  

PubMed Central

Background In order to address the challenges facing the community-based health workforce in Zambia, the Ministry of Health implemented the national community health assistant strategy in 2010. The strategy aims to address the challenges by creating a new group of workers called community health assistants (CHAs) and integrating them into the health system. The first group started working in August 2012. The objective of this paper is to document their motivation to become a CHA, their experiences of working in a rural district, and how these experiences affected their motivation to work. Methods A phenomenological approach was used to examine CHAs’ experiences. Data collected through in-depth interviews with 12 CHAs in Kapiri Mposhi district and observations were analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Personal characteristics such as previous experience and knowledge, passion to serve the community and a desire to improve skills motivated people to become CHAs. Health systems characteristics such as an inclusive work culture in some health posts motivated CHAs to work. Conversely, a non-inclusive work culture created a social structure which constrained CHAs’ ability to learn, to be innovative and to effectively conduct their duties. Further, limited supervision, misconceptions about CHA roles, poor prioritisation of CHA tasks by some supervisors, as well as non- and irregular payment of incentives also adversely affected CHAs’ ability to work effectively. In addition, negative feedback from some colleagues at the health posts affected CHA’s self-confidence and professional outlook. In the community, respect and support provided to CHAs by community members instilled a sense of recognition, appreciation and belonging in CHAs which inspired them to work. On the other hand, limited drug supplies and support from other community-based health workers due to their exclusion from the government payroll inhibited CHAs’ ability to deliver services. Conclusions Programmes aimed at integrating community-based health workers into health systems should adequately consider multiple incentives, effective management, supervision and support from the district. These should be tailored towards enhancing the individual, health system and community characteristics that positively impact work motivation at the local level if such programmes are to effectively contribute towards improved primary healthcare. PMID:24886146

2014-01-01

326

New respirator fit test panels representing the current U.S. civilian work force.  

PubMed

The fit test panels currently used for respirator research, design, and certification are 25-subject panels developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and are based on data from the 1967 and 1968 anthropometric surveys of U.S. Air Force personnel. Military data do not represent the great diversity in face size and shape seen in civilian populations. In addition, the demographics of the U.S. population have changed over the last 30 years. Thus, it is necessary to assess and refine the LANL fit test panels. This paper presents the development of new respirator fit test panels representative of current U.S. civilian workers based on an anthropometric survey of 3,997 respirator users conducted in 2003. One panel was developed using face length and face width (bivariate approach) and weighting subjects to match the age and race distribution of the U.S. population as determined from the 2000 census. Another panel was developed using the first two principal components obtained from a set of 10 facial dimensions (age and race adjusted). These 10 dimensions are associated with respirator fit and leakage and can predict the remaining face dimensions well. Respirators designed to fit these panels are expected to accommodate more than 95% of the current U.S. civilian workers. Both panels are more representative of the U.S. population than the existing LANL panel and may be appropriate for testing both half-masks and full-face piece respirators. Respirator manufacturers, standards development organizations, and government respirator certification bodies need to select the appropriate fit test panel for their particular needs. The bivariate panel is simpler to use than the principal component analysis (PCA) panel and is most similar to the LANL panel currently used. The inclusion of the eight additional facial measurements allows the PCA panel to provide better criteria for excluding extreme face sizes from being used. Because the boundaries of the two new panels are significantly different from the LANL panel, it may be necessary to develop new respirator sizing systems. A new five-category sizing system is proposed. PMID:17613722

Zhuang, Ziqing; Bradtmiller, Bruce; Shaffer, Ronald E

2007-09-01

327

Working with refugees: Health education and communication issues in a child health clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To explore the views of a group of Turkish and Kurdish women refugees about child feeding issues and communication with health professionals in a child health clinic.Design This was a qualitative study using focus groups.Setting A four partner general practice surgery in North London with a large Turkish and Kurdish refugee practice population.Method Three focus groups were set up

Rhiannon England; Kathy Doughty; Sevtap Genc; Zeynep Putkeli

2003-01-01

328

Voice Problems at Work: A Challenge for Occupational Safety and Health Arrangement  

Microsoft Academic Search

In modern societies about one third of the labor force are working in professions in which voice is the primary tool. Voice problems are common in general, but they are even more common in professions in which there is heavy vocal loading, i.e. professions that do not only require prolonged voice use, but also involve extra loading factors such as

Erkki Vilkman

2000-01-01

329

Effects of extended work shifts on employee fatigue, health, satisfaction, work/family balance, and patient safety.  

PubMed

12-hour shifts are quickly spreading in Europe. From our multivariate analysis concerning 25,924 European nurses, including twenty explanatory variables simultaneously, we found that work schedule itself is not a major determinant factor. Nurses aim to choose or accept night shifts or 12-hour shift in order to reduce their work/home conflicts, however, at the expense of the patient's safety, as well as their own health and safety. Therefore, it is important to develop measures, such as extended child care, association of nurses to the elaboration of their rota, 9- or 10-hour shifts in the afternoon, allowing naps during night shifts, and reduction of changing shifts with short notice. Work schedules must be organized in order to allow time for shift handover, social support and team building. PMID:22317378

Estryn-Béhar, Madeleine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

2012-01-01

330

77 FR 43721 - Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR...Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety Standards AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration,...

2012-07-26

331

76 FR 11187 - Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR...Examinations of Work Areas in Underground Coal Mines for Violations of Mandatory Health or Safety Standards AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration,...

2011-03-01

332

Work organization and health among immigrant women: latina manual workers in north Carolina.  

PubMed

Objectives. We sought to describe work organization attributes for employed immigrant Latinas and determine associations of work organization with physical health, mental health, and health-related quality of life. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional survey with 319 employed Latinas in western North Carolina (2009-2011). Measures included job demands (heavy load, awkward posture, psychological demand), decision latitude (skill variety, job control), support (supervisor control, safety climate), musculoskeletal symptoms, mental health (depressive symptoms), and mental (MCS) and physical component score (PCS) health-related quality of life. Results. Three fifths reported musculoskeletal symptoms. Mean scores for depression, MCS, and PCS were 6.2 (SE?=?0.2), 38.3 (SE?=?0.5), and 42.8 (SE?=?0.3), respectively. Greater job demands (heavy load, awkward posture, greater psychological demand) were associated with more musculoskeletal and depressive symptoms and worse MCS. Less decision latitude (lower skill variety, job control) was associated with more musculoskeletal and depressive symptoms. Greater support (supervisor's power and safety climate) was associated with fewer depressive symptoms and better MCS. Conclusions. Work organization should be considered to improve occupational health of vulnerable women workers. Additional research should delineate the links between work organization and health among vulnerable workers. PMID:24432938

Arcury, Thomas A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Chen, Haiying; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

2014-12-01

333

Application of a Web-based tailored health risk assessment in a work-site population.  

PubMed

This article presents an examination of the feasibility of implementing a Web-based tailored health risk assessment (HRA) as part of a University-based work-site health promotion program. Although the effectiveness of tailoring has been well established in the research literature, tailoring health messages for the purposes of health promotion and behavior change is only now starting to be used and evaluated in real-world settings. Key issues to be examined include the feasibility of delivery of a web-based tailored HRA, utility of data gathered for program planning, participation rates compared to traditional programming, usability, and participant satisfaction with the HRA. PMID:16980572

Cowdery, Joan E; Suggs, L Suzanne; Parker, Shandowyn

2007-01-01

334

[Sleep disorders and work: guidelines for health surveillance, risk management and prevention].  

PubMed

Sleep disorders and related diseases are becoming increasingly relevant for the health and wellbeing of the general and working populations. Sleep disorders affect all aspects of health, showing a bi-directionality with health conditions and comorbidity with several diseases. Consequently, sleep disorders may have severe negative consequences both for the individual and the enterprise, as well as for society on the whole, in terms of health, productivity and social costs. When considering the disturbances of the sleep/wake cycle, it is important to distinguish between those connected with endogenous biological factors from those related to socio-environmental conditions, including work, and those associated with mental and physical diseases, that are often associated and interact with each other. Many sleep disorders are still underestimated and under-valued in clinical practice and, to a much greater extent, in workers' health surveillance. The present paper is aimed at drawing the attention of the occupational health physician to some key issues, particularly regarding excessive daytime sleepiness, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and shift and night work, as well as their implications in terms of health and occupational consequences. Information on the main aspects of clinical diagnosis and health surveillance, as well as risk management and prevention at the workplace, are provided. PMID:24228304

Costa, G; Accattoli, Maria Patrizia; Garbarino, S; Magnavita, N; Roscelli, F

2013-01-01

335

HEALTH OUTCOMES OF CHILDHOOD ATTENTION-DEFICIT\\/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD): HEALTH CARE USE AND WORK STATUS OF CAREGIVERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: Attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorder among children in the US. However, the social and economic costs of ADHD are not well understood. We sought to examine the impact of childhood ADHD on caregivers' work status and work productivity, and patients' health care use. METHODS: We conducted a telephone survey of 154 caregivers of ADHD-diagnosed

Les L. Noe; Cheryl S. Hankin

2001-01-01

336

Supervisory behaviour as a predictor of return to work in employees absent from work due to mental health problems  

PubMed Central

Aims: To study supervisory behaviour as a predictive factor for return to work of employees absent due to mental health problems; and to explore the association between conditional factors and supervisory behaviour. Methods: Eighty five supervisors of employees were interviewed by telephone. Questionnaires providing information on person related factors, depressive symptoms, and sickness absence were sent to the employees at baseline, three months, six months, and after one year. Three aspects of supervisory behaviour during the period of absence were measured: communication with the employee, promoting gradual return to work, and consulting of other professionals. Results: Better communication between supervisor and employee was associated with time to full return to work in non-depressed employees. For employees with a high level of depressive symptoms, this association could not be established. Consulting other professionals more often was associated with a longer duration of the sickness absence for both full and partial return to work. If sickness absence had financial consequences for the department, the supervisor was more likely to communicate frequently with the employee. Supervisors who were responsible for return to work in their organisation were more likely to communicate better and to consult more often with other professionals. Conclusion: Supervisors should communicate more frequently with employees during sickness absence as well as hold follow up meetings more often as this is associated with a faster return to work in those employees. PMID:15377767

Nieuwenhuijsen, K; Verbeek, J; de Boer, A G E M; Blonk, R; van Dijk, F J H

2004-01-01

337

Contractual conditions, working conditions and their impact on health and well-being.  

PubMed

Given changes in the labour market in past decades, it is of interest to evaluate whether and how contractual and working conditions affect health and psychological well-being in society today. We consider the effects of contractual and working conditions on self-assessed health and psychological well-being using twelve waves (1991/1992-2002/2003) of the British Household Panel Survey. For self-assessed health, the dependent variable is categorical, and we estimate non-linear dynamic panel ordered probit models, while for psychological well-being, we estimate a dynamic linear specification. The results show that both contractual and working conditions have an influence on health and psychological well-being and that the impact is different for men and women. PMID:20499127

Robone, Silvana; Jones, Andrew M; Rice, Nigel

2011-10-01

338

48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and...

2011-10-01

339

48 CFR 952.223-71 - Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and execution...Provisions and Clauses 952.223-71 Integration of environment, safety, and health into work planning and...

2010-10-01

340

Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the final report of National Black Health Providers Task Force (NBHPTF) on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The first chapter of the report recounts the history of the NBHPTF and its objectives. In the second chapter epidemiological evidence is presented to demonstrate the need for a suggested 20 year plan aimed at controlling…

Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

341

The Outsourcing of Health, Sport and Physical Educational Work: A State of Play  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The outsourcing of health, sport and physical educational (HSPE) work has been a feature of physical education (PE) "futures talk" for over 20 years. However, HSPE work outsourcing has been the focus of little empirical research and only occasional commentary. That small amount of empirical research that has been conducted has been…

Williams, Benjamin James; Hay, Peter James; Macdonald, Doune

2011-01-01

342

The health effects of work and family role characteristics: Gender and race comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have documented the benefits of work and family roles for both physical and mental health. A number of these studies have suggested that work and family roles are beneficial to the degree that they entail rewarding relationships and activities. Using data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 10633; 17 percent African-American), this paper examines

Beth Rushing; Annette Schwabe

1995-01-01

343

The Orthodontist, Our Friend: World of Work Project: Fifth Grade: Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document is one of the teaching units developed by the Utah World of Work Project, designed to integrate career awareness into the regular curriculum at the elementary level. The fifth grade guide is tied to the health education area and focuses on the work of the orthodontist in terms of understanding what an orthodontist does, learning what…

Anderson, Nancy

344

Perceptions of Health Promotion and Cancer Prevention among Adults in Working-Class Occupations and Neighborhoods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A social-contextual approach to cancer prevention among participants associated with the working class may result in behavior-change messages that are more relevant to them and contribute to a reduction in health disparities among classes. This article reports findings from a qualitative study of adults in working-class occupations and/or living…

Goldman, Roberta E.; Barbeau, Elizabeth; Hunt, Mary Kay; Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores; Emmons, Karen M.; Gagne, Joshua; Sorensen, Glorian

2008-01-01

345

The outsourcing of health, sport and physical educational work: a state of play  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The outsourcing of health, sport and physical educational (HSPE) work has been a feature of physical education (PE) ‘futures talk’ for over 20 years. However, HSPE work outsourcing has been the focus of little empirical research and only occasional commentary. That small amount of empirical research that has been conducted has been narrow in scope, focusing exclusively on primary

Benjamin James Williams; Peter James Hay; Doune Macdonald

2011-01-01

346

The Relationship of Work Environment and Client Contact to Burnout in Mental Health Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored the relationship of the work environment and client contact to scores of mental health professionals (N=94) on the Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment, and Depersonalization subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Work environments associated with low levels of general burnout were those in which workers were strongly…

Savicki, Victor; Cooley, Eric

1987-01-01

347

Work Stressors, Health and Sense of Coherence in UK Academic Employees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This cross-sectional study examined relationships between job-specific stressors and psychological and physical health symptoms in academic employees working in UK universities. The study also tests the main and moderating role played by sense of coherence (SOC: Antonovsky, 1987 in work stress process). SOC is described as a generalised resistance…

Kinman, Gail

2008-01-01

348

Partner Violence and Survivors' Chronic Health Problems: Informing Social Work Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most social work professionals may expect that women who experience partner violence will sustain acute physical injuries, social workers may be less knowledgeable about the chronic health problems with which violence survivors often struggle. To inform social work practice, we reviewed and synthesized the recently published research on…

Macy, Rebecca J.; Ferron, Joelle; Crosby, Carmen

2009-01-01

349

Work and Health Outcomes Among Police Officers: The Mediating Role of Police Cynicism and Engagement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between personality variables (Type A), job demands and job resources, and police cynicism and engagement, and also examined the mediating role of cynicism and work engagement in predicting both work and health related outcomes among police officers. The participants were 150 Norwegian police officers, and data were collected using questionnaires. Results showed that Type A

Astrid M. Richardsen; Ronald J. Burke; Monica Martinussen

2006-01-01

350

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

Not Available

1991-10-01

351

Working conditions, visual fatigue, and mental health among systems analysts in S?o Paulo, Brazil  

PubMed Central

Aims: To evaluate the association between working conditions and visual fatigue and mental health among systems analysts living in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out by a multidisciplinary team. It included: ergonomic analysis of work, individual and group interviews, and 553 self applied questionnaires in two enterprises. The comparison population numbered 136 workers in different occupations. Results: The study population mainly comprised young males. Among systems analysts, visual fatigue was associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment and workstation, low level of worker participation, being a woman, and subject's attitude of fascination by the computer. Nervousness and intellectual performance were associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment, work environment, and tools. Continuing education and leisure were protective factors. Work interfering in family life was associated with mental workload, difficulties with clients, strict deadlines, subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, and finding solutions of work problems outside work. Family support, satisfaction in life and work, and adequate work environment and tools were protective factors. Work interfering in personal life was associated with subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, strict deadlines, inadequate equipment, and high level of work participation. Satisfaction in life and work and continuing education were protective factors. The comparison population did not share common working factors with the systems analysts in the regression analysis. Conclusions: The main health effects of systems analysts' work were expressed by machine anthropomorphism, being very demanding, mental acceleration, mental absorption, and difficulty in dealing with emotions. PMID:14691269

Rocha, L; Debert-Ribeiro, M

2004-01-01

352

Health services market testing--the experience of the community services review team in British Forces Germany.  

PubMed

During 1993-1995 the health services in British Forces Germany were subjected to a market testing process by which the primary, community and acute health services for the British Servicemen and women, their families and attached civilian staff, a population of 70,000, were put out to competitive tender with the then current provider, the Defence Medical Services, as one tenderer for the contract. This paper outlines the methodology developed by the Health Alliance Community Services Review team in formulating a successful bid. It is considered that the process outlined could be of value to those involved in future market tests, commissioning projects or performance improvement programmes. PMID:8819035

Leach, A J; Whitmore, M K; Schofield, J; Morris, G

1996-06-01

353

Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany  

PubMed Central

Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention. Method: In a written survey conducted in Germany in 2001, 820 nursing staff of 113 palliative stations and stationary hospices were included. A qualified diagnostic procedure for the assessment of health promoting work was implemented. In order of obtaining a secure comparison, a sample of 320 nurses working in 12 homes for old people in Saxony was also considered. Results: The nurses referred generally to favourable working conditions, still they informed about deficiencies in the perceived participation, organizational benefits and experienced gratification. Hospice nurses experienced overall more favourable work conditions than palliative nurses or than the staff of homes for old people (regarding identification with the institution, organizational benefits, accurate gratification and little time pressure during work). Hospice personnel were psychologically and physically healthier than the staff of palliative stations. Important predictors for health stability that could be assessed by multiple regression analysis were: positively evaluated work contents, the identification with the institution, little time pressure and a positive working atmosphere. Conclusions: The assessed organisational framework is generally more favourable in the institutions of professional terminal care than in common hospitals and homes for old people. Therefore, the conditions in hospices could have a modelling function for the inner-institutional work organisation and for the anchorage of the intrinsic motivation of nurses in the health care system. PMID:19742056

Schroder, Christina; Bansch, Alexander; Schroder, Harry

2004-01-01

354

Childhood exposure to violence and lifelong health: Clinical intervention science and stress biology research join forces  

PubMed Central

Many young people who are mistreated by an adult, victimized by bullies, criminally assaulted, or who witness domestic violence react to this violence exposure by developing behavioral, emotional, or learning problems. What is less well known is that adverse experiences like violence exposure can lead to hidden physical alterations inside a child’s body, alterations which may have adverse effects on life-long health. We discuss why this is important for the field of developmental psychopathology and for society, and we recommend that stress-biology research and intervention science join forces to tackle the problem. We examine the evidence base in relation to stress-sensitive measures for the body (inflammatory reactions, telomere erosion, epigenetic methylation, and gene expression) and brain (mental disorders, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological testing). We also review promising interventions for families, couples, and children that have been designed to reduce the effects of childhood violence exposure. We invite intervention scientists and stress-biology researchers to collaborate in adding stress-biology measures to randomized clinical trials of interventions intended to reduce effects of violence exposure and other traumas on young people. PMID:24342859

Moffitt, Terrie E.

2013-01-01

355

Networking between community health programs: a team-work approach to improving health service provision  

PubMed Central

Background Networking between non-government organisations in the health sector is recognised as an effective method of improving service delivery. The Uttarakhand Cluster was established in 2008 as a collaboration of community health programs in rural north India with the aim of building capacity, increasing visibility and improving linkages with the government. This qualitative research, conducted between 2011-2012, examined the factors contributing to formation and sustainability of this clustering approach. Methods Annual focus group discussions, indicator surveys and participant observation were used to document and observe the factors involved in the formation and sustainability of an NGO network in North India. Results The analysis demonstrated that relationships were central to the formation and sustainability of the cluster. The elements of small group relationships: forming, storming, norming and performing emerged as a helpful way to describe the phases which have contributed to the functioning of this network with common values, strong leadership, resource sharing and visible progress encouraging the ongoing commitment of programs to the network goals. Conclusions In conclusion, this case study demonstrates an example of a successful and effective network of community health programs. The development of relationships was seen to be to be an important part of promoting effective resource sharing, training opportunities, government networking and resource mobilisation and will be important for other health networks to consider. PMID:25015212

2014-01-01

356

Preventing Work-Related Musculoskeletal Illnesses Through Ergonomics: The Air Force PREMIER Program. Volume 2: Job Requirements and Physical Demands Survey Methodology Guide (Field Version).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Air Force consists of over 500,000 Military and civilian workers performing diverse jobs and tasks at multiple installations around the world. A typical installation has hundreds of administrative and industrial work areas of various siz...

A. Marcotte, R. Barker, M. Joyce, N. Miller, E. J. Cogburn

1997-01-01

357

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in nursing: current knowledge and ongoing challenges for occupational health.  

PubMed

Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) represent a major occupational health concern when considering the relationships between work and disease but associations between MSD and hospital work, especially in the nursing profession, aren't yet full understanded.QMSDuestions that still need to be answered include: Are nurses' work-related musculoskeletal symptoms and injuries dependent on the wards, the hospital organization and even the national occupational health policies that they originated from? Is their MSD related with workplaces demands, equipment, and nurse-patient ratios? Do these factors highlight different nursing occupational exposure to MSD hazards? What are the individual and psychosocial contributes to nurses WRMSDs in different nursing contexts? As such, a new approach which integrates more realistic working conditions, real hospital equipment, workplace features, and individual information would likely be a better way forwards in the addressing the current MSD epidemic among hospital nurses, worldwide...... PMID:25134634

Serranheira, Florentino; Smith, Derek

2014-01-01

358

[Analyses of work-relatedness of health problems among truck drivers by questionnaire survey].  

PubMed

In order to estimate occupational risk factors for health problems among truck drivers, a questionnaire survey of working conditions, job content in truck transportation, subjective symptoms and present illnesses was carried out among 541 truck transportation workers in 1997. The valid response rate was 85.7%, and 134 local truck drivers, 199 long-distance truck drivers and 71 clerical workers were analyzed. First, to examine occupational risk factors and health problems among the three groups, the authors analyzed working conditions, job content in truck transportation, subjective symptoms and present illnesses. Second, to estimate the work-relatedness of health problems among local truck drivers and long-distance truck drivers, logistic regression analyses were conducted, and odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed. The prevalence rates of working factors affecting health problems of truck drivers were significantly higher than those of clerical workers in the items on irregular shift work, working environment, working posture, handling heavy materials, job stress due to overloading and long working time and limited time off. The prevalence rates for subjective symptoms (ringing in the ears, neck pain and low back pain) and present illnesses (hypertension, ulcers in the digestive tract, back injuries, whiplash injuries and hemorrhoids) among truck drivers were significantly higher than those of clerical workers. In logistic regression analyses, many work-related items except age, BMI and smoking habit showed significantly higher odds ratios for subjective symptoms and present illnesses of truck drivers. Odds ratios for hypertension, heart diseases and related subjective symptoms among local truck drivers were significantly increased by job career, twisting posture, vibration and driving stress. Odds ratios for gastro-duodenal diseases and related subjective symptoms were significantly increased by narrow working space, sleeping in the truck, driving distance, squatting posture and driving stress. Odds ratios for ringing in the ears among local truck drivers were significantly increased by job career, long working time, narrow working space, sleeping in the truck and driving stress. Odds ratios for musculo-skeletal diseases and related subjective symptoms were significantly increased by overwork, vibration, narrow working space, sitting posture and shortage of recess. Odds ratios for fatigue symptoms were significantly increased by the shortage of recess, vibration and driving stress. In order to cope with the health problems of truck drivers, it is recommended that working conditions and work loads for among truck drivers as described above be improved. PMID:10707379

Koda, S; Yasuda, N; Sugihara, Y; Ohara, H; Udo, H; Otani, T; Hisashige, A; Ogawa, T; Aoyama, H

2000-01-01

359

Team-level flexibility, work-home spillover, and health behavior  

PubMed Central

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

360

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in senior farmers: safety and health considerations.  

PubMed

Aging farmers are at high risk musculoskeletal disorders due to occupational exposures. The development of musculoskeletal conditions can increase older farmers' risk for additional injuries because many older farmers continue to work past typical retirement age. Occupational health nurses with agricultural expertise can assist farmers by evaluating their health and safety needs. Possible interventions include ergonomic improvements in farm equipment, safety improvements in farm environment, and referrals to programs that assist older farmers in modifying their farms to improve safety. PMID:25191676

Tonelli, Shalome; Culp, Kennith; Donham, Kelley

2014-08-01

361

Combining care and work: Health and stress effects in male and female academics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study contributed to an explanation of mixed results (beneficial vs. detrimental health effects) in studies on multiple\\u000a roles. We hypothesized that self-reported health in working parents might be good, whereas their heavy total workload might\\u000a be reflected in relatively high scores on more unobtrusive stress measures. Participants were 54 university workers including\\u000a a group with children (16 women and

Marrie H. J. Bekker; Peter F. de Jong; Fred R. H. Zijlstra; Bart A. J. van Landeghem

2000-01-01

362

Conceptions of authority within contemporary social work practice in managed mental health care organizations.  

PubMed

This article examines how social workers may use their authority to create managed mental health care organizations that support the principles and values of professional social work practice. By exploring research and theoretical contributions from a multidisciplinary perspective, the author suggests ways that social workers may incorporate empowerment strategies into their organizational practices to create more socially responsible and humane mental health organizations. PMID:16060736

Bransford, Cassandra L

2005-07-01

363

Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. Methods This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Results Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR?=?1.91; 1.07–3.42), and in the physical (OR?=?1.62; 1.02–2.66), and environmental (OR?=?2.39; 1.37–4.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR?=?1.82; 1.00–3.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR?=?1.55, 1.06–2.26) and environmental (OR?=?1.69; 1.08–2.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. Conclusions There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. PMID:24884707

2014-01-01

364

Health-Related Factors Associated with Mode of Travel to Work  

PubMed Central

Active commuting (AC) to the workplace is a potential strategy for incorporating physical activity into daily life and is associated with health benefits. This study examined the association between health-related factors and mode of travel to the workplace. Methods. A volunteer convenience sample of employed adults completed an online survey regarding demographics, health-related factors, and the number of times/week walking, biking, driving, and using public transit to work (dichotomized as no walk/bike/drive/PT and walk/bike/drive/PT 1 + x/week). Logistic regression was used to predict the likelihood of each mode of transport and meeting PA recommendations from AC according to demographics and health-related factors. Results. The sample (n = 1175) was aged 43.5 ± 11.4 years and was primarily White (92.7%) and female (67.9%). Respondents reported walking (7.3%), biking (14.4%), taking public transit (20.3%), and driving (78.3%) to work at least one time/week. Among those reporting AC, 9.6% met PA recommendations from AC alone. Mode of travel to work was associated with several demographic and health-related factors, including age, number of chronic diseases, weight status, and AC beliefs. Discussion. Mode of transportation to the workplace and health-related factors such as disease or weight status should be considered in future interventions targeting AC. PMID:23533450

Bopp, Melissa; Kaczynski, Andrew T.; Campbell, Matthew E.

2013-01-01

365

Health and safety problems associated with long working hours: a review of the current position.  

PubMed Central

The European Community Directive on Working Time, which should have been implemented in member states of the European Community by November 1996, contains several requirements related to working hours, including the right of employees to refuse to work more than 48 hours a week. The United Kingdom government attempted to oppose the Directive, arguing that there is no convincing evidence that hours of work should be limited on health and safety grounds. Much of the research in this area has focused on the problems of shiftworking and previous reviews have therefore tended to emphasise this aspect of working hours. However, there is much less information about the effects of overtime work, which is a central element of the terms of the Directive. This paper reviews the current evidence relating to the potential effects on health and performance of extensions to the normal working day. Several gaps in the literature are identified. Research to date has been restricted to a limited range of health outcomes--namely, mental health and cardiovascular disorders. Other potential effects which are normally associated with stress--for example, gastrointestinal disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and problems associated with depression of the immune system, have received little attention. Also, there have been few systematic investigations of performance effects, and little consideration of the implications for occupational exposure limits of extensions to the working day. Existing data relate largely to situations where working hours exceed 50 a week and there is a lack of information on hours below this level, which is of direct relevance to the European Community proposal. Finally, it is clear from investigations relating to shiftwork that a range of modifying factors are likely to influence the level and nature of health and performance outcomes. These include the attitudes and motivation of the people concerned, the job requirements, and other aspects of the organisational and cultural climate. It is concluded that there is currently sufficient evidence to raise concerns about the risks to health and safety of long working hours. However, much more work is required to define the level and nature of those risks. PMID:9245942

Spurgeon, A; Harrington, J M; Cooper, C L

1997-01-01

366

Symbolic capital and health: the case of women's sex work in Antananarivo, Madagascar.  

PubMed

Public health research on sex work has been criticized both for representing sex work as a monolithic entity and for focusing only on individual behavioral determinants of health. When broader determinants are acknowledged, they are often described in solely economic terms (ie, comparing health risks of higher class versus lower class sex workers). Drawing from Pierre Bourdieu, I describe women's sex work in Antananarivo, Madagascar as a social 'field' and demonstrate that this field is both highly complex and highly structured. Fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork (December 2002-December 2003; May-June 2004) in Antananarivo with women sex workers (n approximately 60) and community members (n approximately 85) informed a description of the community's understanding of the sex work field and its contrast to the lived experience of key informant sex workers. Women who sell sex were categorized by their communities into three social positions--ambony (high), antonony (middle) and ambany (low)--which were differentiated by economic capital (earnings per sexual exchange) and symbolic capital (prestige associated with race, ethnicity and moral demeanor). Women who occupied the antonony social position held the greatest volumes of symbolic capital both because they were identified as belonging to the local dominant ethnic group, and because they demonstrated discretion and shame in their sex work practice. Alternatively, women who occupied the ambony and ambany positions openly practiced their sex work and were associated with ethnic or racial minority identities, contributing to their lower volumes of symbolic capital. Symbolic capital influenced unique health vulnerabilities, such as to sexually transmitted disease, by social position through mechanisms operating from the institutional to the interpersonal level. This analysis illustrates the value of examining sex work as a social field, specifically the importance of capturing more than economic capital in order to understand sex workers' unique health vulnerabilities and concerns. PMID:19362403

Stoebenau, Kirsten

2009-06-01

367

The public health nursing work environment: review of the research literature.  

PubMed

Public health nurses (PHNs) work to address critical health issues at the individual, family, and population levels. In recent years, a global nursing shortage has posed a significant challenge to the recruitment and retention of PHNs. Hospital-based research has shown that a healthy and productive work environment is vital to successful nursing recruitment and retention. Specific organizational characteristics have been linked to job satisfaction, organizational commitment, job vacancies, and turnover rates. Although it is presumed that similarities exist between the public health and acute care nursing work environments, further evaluation is required. This literature review was conducted to identify studies that characterize the PHN work environment. An online database search was conducted to identify prospective PHN studies published between 2000 and 2010. Definitions were established for screening purposes. Twenty-nine PHN studies in the United States and abroad met criteria for inclusion in this review. Satisfaction with teamwork and job autonomy generally was reported. However, inadequate PHN staffing was described as a concern, with problems magnified during prolonged response to public health emergencies. Insufficient control over PHN practice was reported as well. Perceptions regarding other work environment characteristics were mixed or were not measured in detail. More in-depth research is recommended with the ultimate goal of improving PHN recruitment and retention. PMID:23392207

Dingley, Jacquelyn; Yoder, Linda

2013-01-01

368

The Contribution of Social Work and Social Interventions Across the Life Course to the Reduction of Health Inequalities: A New Agenda for Social Work Education?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inequalities in health and well-being are wide and widening and reflect the disadvantaged circumstances in which many people live. Users of personal social services in many cases already experience disadvantaged health and well-being. Social work has established experience of working with marginalised groups, and may play a role in promoting individual and community health and well-being. The value base for

Esther Coren; Wendy Iredale; Deborah Rutter; Paul Bywaters

2011-01-01

369

Studying the striving and opposing forces in newspaper journalism: the actantial model of health promotion.  

PubMed

The cultural aspects of health promotion are important in policy development as well as in assessing effectiveness of health promotion activities. The discourses on promoting health and well-being in journalism reflect the health promotion culture in society. This article illustrates how health promotion is portrayed by 147 newspaper items from the two Finnish quality dailies during the period 2002-2004 and introduces a semiotic Actantial Model of Health Promotion (AMHP) for studying health promotion cultures. The most popular news themes on health promotion were physical and social environment, welfare services, nutrition and obesity, and mental well-being. The actants (actors, actions and abstract factor) of health promotion were identified and the AMHP with seven key actants (generator, health-object, public, tool, executor, threat and obstacle) was constructed. The model sheds light on two sides of health promotion discourses in journalism. The dominant culture of health promotion was represented by policy actions, information, education and scientific research, which were defined by health experts, decision-makers and researchers. Representations of the opposite culture--'the otherness' of health promotion included external harmful factors and unhealthy behaviours, mentalities opposed to being health-oriented, rationally uncontrolled living, disorder, disharmony and insecurity. The opposing factors were presented by people and institutions lacking the will, ability or motivation for a health-oriented life. To understand better the values of health promotion, it is necessary to assess the characteristics of the opposite side of health promotion culture, because the current dominant values can be described more clearly by the boundaries--by 'otherness'. The study argues that the AMHP can be used as a semiotic method to identify the value dimensions and the boundaries between the dominant and the opposite discourses of health promotion in various communications such as advertising and health education. Also, it provides a tool for the analysis of the media's role in 'victimization' or 'heroization' of various population groups. PMID:16567361

Aarva, Pauliina; Tampere, Marja Pakarinen

2006-06-01

370

HHS announces Text4Health task force recommendations and global partnership:  

Cancer.gov

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced new recommendations to support health text messaging and mobile health (mHealth) programs. The department has been actively exploring means to capitalize on the rapid proliferation of mobile phone technology and platforms, such as text messaging, to develop programs and/or partnerships with the overall aim of improving public health outcomes.

371

Views and experiences of mental health nurses working with undergraduate assistants in nursing in an acute mental health setting.  

PubMed

Undergraduate nurses are employed as assistants in nursing (AIN) in inpatient mental health settings; however, there is a paucity of published research exploring registered nurses' (RN) views about the AIN role in these settings. This qualitative study documents the views and experiences of RN working with undergraduate AIN. Fifty structured face-to-face interviews were analysed, and the results are discussed in three sections. The first section outlines RN perceptions of qualities and skills required of AIN in mental health, and the responses primarily focus on communication skills, initiative, and willingness to learn. The second section targets factors in the workplace that might enhance the interest of AIN in a mental health nursing career; the responses emphasize their need to work with experienced staff. The last section outlines RN expectations of AIN, most of which are met and involve physical observations and technical tasks; less fulfilled activities primarily cluster around interactions with patients. Findings highlight the advantages and disadvantages of drawing on undergraduate nursing students as AIN in mental health settings. Communication skills, personal initiative, safety training to prevent violence, and education to increase knowledge and awareness about mental illness, diagnosis, and mental status-related skills were all important concerns articulated by RN. PMID:22176587

Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Mannix, Judy; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

2012-04-01

372

Hazarding Health: Experiences of Body, Work, and Risk Among Factory Women in Malaysia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 1970s, Malaysia launched an export-oriented development strategy as a means of financing the nation's modernization. The success of the strategy hinged significantly on intensive recruitment of women for factory employment. I draw on descriptive qualitative research, including interviews (51), surveys (106), and ethnography in Malaysia to investigate factory women's experiences of work and work-related health risks. Discourse analysis

Robin Root

2009-01-01

373

Participatory Research Revealing the Work and Occupational Health Hazards of Cooperative Recyclers in Brazil  

PubMed Central

Although informal waste collectors are sometimes organized in cooperatives, their working conditions remain extremely precarious and unsafe. The paper discusses the findings of action oriented, participatory qualitative research with several recycling groups in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. During workshops with the recyclers mapping, acting, and drawing methods helped reveal health hazards from collection, separation and transportation of recyclable materials. Major health problems relate to chemical and biological hazards, musculoskeletal damage, mechanical trauma and poor emotional wellbeing. The recent federal legislation on solid waste management opens new avenues for the inclusion of recycling cooperatives in selective waste collection. Nevertheless, we express the need to consider the distinctive characteristics and vulnerabilities of recycling groups, when developing safer work environments in these social businesses. We also suggest that the workspace be ergonomically organized and that public awareness campaigns about selective waste collection are conducted regularly to increase the quality of source separation. The introduction of electric hand pushed carts can further reduce health strains. This research has produced a better understanding of the work of the recyclers and related health risks. The interactive qualitative research methodology has allowed for the co-creation and mobilization of specific knowledge on health and safety in recycling cooperatives. PMID:24084672

Gutberlet, Jutta; Baeder, Angela M.; Pontuschka, Nidia N.; Felipone, Sonia M. N.; dos Santos, Tereza L. F.

2013-01-01

374

Participatory research revealing the work and occupational health hazards of cooperative recyclers in Brazil.  

PubMed

Although informal waste collectors are sometimes organized in cooperatives, their working conditions remain extremely precarious and unsafe. The paper discusses the findings of action oriented, participatory qualitative research with several recycling groups in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil. During workshops with the recyclers mapping, acting, and drawing methods helped reveal health hazards from collection, separation and transportation of recyclable materials. Major health problems relate to chemical and biological hazards, musculoskeletal damage, mechanical trauma and poor emotional wellbeing. The recent federal legislation on solid waste management opens new avenues for the inclusion of recycling cooperatives in selective waste collection. Nevertheless, we express the need to consider the distinctive characteristics and vulnerabilities of recycling groups, when developing safer work environments in these social businesses. We also suggest that the workspace be ergonomically organized and that public awareness campaigns about selective waste collection are conducted regularly to increase the quality of source separation. The introduction of electric hand pushed carts can further reduce health strains. This research has produced a better understanding of the work of the recyclers and related health risks. The interactive qualitative research methodology has allowed for the co-creation and mobilization of specific knowledge on health and safety in recycling cooperatives. PMID:24084672

Gutberlet, Jutta; Baeder, Angela M; Pontuschka, Nídia N; Felipone, Sonia M N; Dos Santos, Tereza L F

2013-10-01

375

The doctor in claims for work injuries and ill health--legal pitfalls.  

PubMed

Occupational health work is currently undertaken by the specialist and the non-specialist physician alike. The work scope can vary from medical assessments of individual workers to health risk assessment at the workplace. The scope of the latter will include evaluation of exposures, hazards, risks and its management to control these risks. Much of the case law governing legal disputes over industrial safety and health have involved the employers. Over the years, the actions brought forth by workers have resulted in a formidable volume of case law based on statutes and on the common law of negligence in tort. Disputes over the assessment of workers' health or workplace health risks to the extent that it is a failure to discharge a reasonable standard of care, may result in the doctor being a defendant. Measures to prevent these legal pitfalls include communication with employers about the causative link of the illness suffered to workplace factors and the clarity of contractual obligations undertaken with regard to workplace health risk assessment. PMID:19736580

Lee, See-Muah; Sng, Judy; Koh, David

2009-08-01

376

Effects of work ability and health promoting interventions for women with musculoskeletal symptoms: A 9-month prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Women working in the public human service sector in 'overstrained' situations run the risk of musculoskeletal symptoms and long-term sick leave. In order to maintain the level of health and work ability and strengthen the potential resources for health, it is important that employees gain greater control over decisions and actions affecting their health – a process associated with

Agneta Larsson; Lena Karlqvist; Gunvor Gard

2008-01-01

377

Opposite behaviours in the forced swimming test are linked to differences in spatial working memory performances in the rat.  

PubMed

Despite consistent evidence of an association between depression and impaired memory performance, only a few studies have investigated memory processes in animal models of depression. The aim of the present study was to determine if rats selected for marked differences in their immobility response in the forced swimming test (FST, i.e. high-immobility, [HI] and low-immobility [LI] rats) exhibit differences in spatial and non-spatial memory performances. In a classic radial maze elimination task, we observed that HI rats made significantly more errors than LI rats, and their first error appeared significantly earlier. In a delayed spatial win-shift procedure where rats have to hold spatially relevant information in working memory across a 30 min delay, HI rats tended initially to perform more poorly than LI rats. HI rats made more across-phase errors, the occurrence of the first error was earlier and by the end of the experiment the differences between the two groups disappeared. Thus, HI rats present more difficulties to learn the rules in a spatial task and show weaker performances in spatial working memory in comparison to LI rats. On the other hand, performances in the two groups of animals were similar in a non-spatial task, the object recognition task. Complementary behavioral data indicate that the differences observed between the two groups are not attributable to opposite locomotor activities or to different levels of anxiety. Overall we can conclude that opposite swimming behavior in the FST could parallel some differences in cognitive performances, more specifically linked to spatial working memory. PMID:15664685

Naudon, L; Jay, T M

2005-01-01

378

Beyond motivation: job and work design for development, health, ambidexterity, and more.  

PubMed

Much research shows it is possible to design motivating work, which has positive consequences for individuals and their organizations. This article reviews research that adopts this motivational perspective on work design, and it emphasizes that it is important to continue to refine motivational theories. In light of continued large numbers of poor-quality jobs, attention must also be given to influencing practice and policy to promote the effective implementation of enriched work designs. Nevertheless, current and future work-based challenges mean that designing work for motivation is necessary but insufficient. This review argues that work design can be a powerful vehicle for learning and development, for maintaining and enhancing employees' physical and mental health, and for achieving control and flexibility simultaneously (for example, in the form of ambidexterity); all these outcomes are important given the challenges in today's workplaces. The review concludes by suggesting methodological directions. PMID:24016276

Parker, Sharon K

2014-01-01

379

Respiratory Health Effects Associated with Restoration Work in Post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans  

PubMed Central

Background. This study examines prevalence of respiratory conditions in New Orleans-area restoration workers after Hurricane Katrina. Methods. Between 2007 and 2010, spirometry and respiratory health and occupational questionnaire were administered to 791 New Orleans-area adults who mostly worked in the building construction and maintenance trades or custodial services. The associations between restoration work hours and lung function and prevalence of respiratory symptoms were examined by multiple linear regression, ?2, or multiple logistic regression. Results. 74% of participants performed post-Katrina restoration work (median time: 620 hours). Symptoms reported include episodes of transient fever/cough (29%), sinus symptoms (48%), pneumonia (3.7%), and new onset asthma (4.5%). Prevalence rate ratios for post-Katrina sinus symptoms (PRR?=?1.3; CI: 1.1, 1.7) and fever and cough (PRR?=?1.7; CI: 1.3, 2.4) were significantly elevated overall for those who did restoration work and prevalence increased with restoration work hours. Prevalence rate ratios with restoration work were also elevated for new onset asthma (PRR?=?2.2; CI: 0.8, 6.2) and pneumonia (PRR?=?1.3; CI: 0.5, 3.2) but were not statistically significant. Overall, lung function was slightly depressed but was not significantly different between those with and without restoration work exposure. Conclusions. Post-Katrina restoration work is associated with moderate adverse effects on respiratory health, including sinusitis and toxic pneumonitis. PMID:23365586

Rando, Roy J.; Lefante, John J.; Freyder, Laurie M.; Jones, Robert N.

2012-01-01

380

Investing in the Mental Health of the Labor Force: Epidemiological and Economic Impact of Mental Health Disabilities in the Workplace  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a By the year 2020, depression will emerge as one of the leading causes of disability globally, second only to ischemic heart\\u000a disease (World Health Organization 2001). Thus, governments are taking notice of the mental health of workers. For example,\\u000a the European Ministers of Health have endorsed a detailed action plan calling for employers to “create healthy workplaces\\u000a by introducing ­measures

Carolyn S. Dewa; David McDaid

381

Contribution of Self-Compassion to Competence and Mental Health in Social Work Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the potential contribution of self-compassion to perceived competence and mental health in master's of social work students (N=65). It was hypothesized that the components of self-compassion (i.e., mindfulness, common humanity, self-kindness, overidentification, isolation, and self-judgment) would impact perceived competence…

Ying, Yu-Wen

2009-01-01

382

Learning and Recognition in Health and Care Work: An Inter-Subjective Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of recognition in learning processes among female nurses, social and health care assistants and occupational therapists working with people with dementia and other age-related illnesses. Design/methodology/approach: The paper highlights the need to experience recognizing learning spaces…

Liveng, Anne

2010-01-01

383

The Social Patterning of Work-Related Insecurity and Its Health Consequences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the association between work-related insecurity and health, with a focus on how this relationship is moderated by social location (gender, age and race). Drawing on longitudinal data from a Canadian labour market survey (1999-2004) the findings show that certain groups have a higher prevalence of exposure to certain types of…

Scott-Marshall, Heather

2010-01-01

384

Health Care Costs and the Socioeconomic Consequences of Work Injuries in Brazil: A Longitudinal Study  

PubMed Central

Work injuries are a worldwide public health problem but little is known about their socioeconomic impact. This prospective longitudinal study estimates the direct health care costs and socioeconomic consequences of work injuries for 406 workers identified in the emergency departments of the two largest public hospitals in Salvador, Brazil, from June through September 2005. After hospital discharge workers were followed up monthly until their return to work. Most insured workers were unaware of their rights or of how to obtain insurance benefits (81.6%). Approximately half the cases suffered loss of earnings, and women were more frequently dismissed than men. The most frequently reported family consequences were: need for a family member to act as a caregiver and difficulties with daily expenses. Total costs were US$40,077.00 but individual costs varied widely, according to injury severity. Out-of-pocket costs accounted for the highest proportion of total costs (50.5%) and increased with severity (57.6%). Most out-of-pocket costs were related to transport and purchasing medicines and other wound care products. The second largest contribution (40.6%) came from the public National Health System ? SUS. Employer participation was negligible. Health care funding must be discussed to alleviate the economic burden of work injuries on workers. PMID:23803496

SANTANA, Vilma Sousa; FERNANDES DE SOUZA, Luis Eugênio Portela; PINTO, Isabela Cardoso de Matos

2013-01-01

385

Interventions to Reduce Job Stress and Improve Work Organization and Worker Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interventions or programs to improve the organization of work and reduce the impact of stressful jobs on our health can be conducted in a wide variety of ways. Changes can be madeat the level of the job, at the level of the organization, at a more individual level, or from outside the organization through laws and regulations. The U.S. National

Paul A. Landsbergis

386

Work Attitudes, Employment Barriers, and Mental Health Symptoms in a Sample of Rural Welfare Recipients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the extant research on welfare reform has neglected to consider the experiences of families in rural settings. Fifty women receiving welfare for their dependent children in a rural community were interviewed about their work experiences and aspirations, barriers to employment and service use, as well as mental health and social support. The findings indicate that the majority of

Lorraine C. Taylor

2001-01-01

387

Childhood family relationships, marital and work conflict, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the associations among childhood family relationships, adult conflict in marriage and work relationships, and mental health distress in Mexican immigrants. The sample consisted of 135 married Mexican immigrants recruited from an ESL program in Southern California. Structural equation modeling was used to test theoretical hypotheses. The model revealed that dysfunctional childhood family relationships predicted dissatisfaction and

Silvia J. Santos; Lisa M. Bohon

1998-01-01

388

PARTNERING, LEAN CONSTRUCTION AND HEALTH AND SAFETY WORK ON THE CONSTRUCTION SITE: CO-PLAYERS OR  

E-print Network

concepts and H&S at the construction industry level (Focus group interviews with different actors in the construction industry) 45 #12;3. Gathering of examples of practice with new cooperation concepPARTNERING, LEAN CONSTRUCTION AND HEALTH AND SAFETY WORK ON THE CONSTRUCTION SITE: CO

Hansen, René Rydhof

389

Stigmatizing Clients With Mental Health Conditions: An Assessment of Social Work Student Attitudes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research suggests that stigma plays a major role in discouraging clients from participating in mental health treatment. Because social workers provide a significant amount of such services, this study investigates social work student stigma as a function of their willingness to treat clients with alcohol dependence, nicotine dependence, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Students held higher levels of stigma toward nicotine

Sheryl Pimlott Kubiak; Brian K. Ahmedani; Carlos F. Rios-Bedoya; James C. Anthony

2011-01-01

390

Organizational Culture, Work Organization Conditions, and Mental Health: A Proposed Integration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advancing a framework that links organizational culture, work organization conditions, and mental health, this article extends current stress models so as to capture the influence of an important dimension of the broader context in which individuals experience stress and strain. By so doing, this framework integrates distal organizational and proximal task-level characteristics and thereby provides a wider lens for studies

Julie Dextras-Gauthier; Alain Marchand; Victor Haines

2012-01-01

391

Barriers to Maternal Workforce Participation and Relationship between Paid Work and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Families of children with disabilities experience extra financial strains, and mothers are frequently unable to participate in paid work because of caregiving obligations. Methods: A mailed survey and follow-up phone calls were used to gather data about mother's health, workforce participation and barriers to inclusion in the workplace…

Bourke-Taylor, H.; Howie, L.; Law, M.

2011-01-01

392

A Social Network Approach to Working With Elderly Clients: Training Manual for Mental Health Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual, geared for mental health professionals, demonstrates that social network intervention provides an excellent framework and set of tools for working with the multiple problems of older adults. Social networks are "family" groupings of client, family members, friends and other community supports. The intervention focusses on bonding and…

Paley, Evelyn S., Ed.; Dea, Timothy Patrick, Ed.

393

Is Graduate Social Work Education Promoting a Critical Approach to Mental Health Practice?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of 71 psychopathology course syllabi from 58 different graduate schools of social work was analyzed to determine whether different viewpoints and the concomitant empirical evidence were presented regarding 4 significant mental health topics: concepts of mental disorder, reliability and validity of psychiatric diagnoses, biological…

Lacasse, Jeffrey R.; Gomory, Tomi

2003-01-01

394

Screening and Assessment for Physical and Mental Health Issues That Impact TANF Recipients' Ability To Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document examines screening and assessment for physical and mental health conditions that impact Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients' ability to work. The document begins by defining screening and assessment and discussing their relevance for agencies serving TANF recipients. The next section answers policy questions…

Kramer, Fredrica D.

2001-01-01

395

Non-Production Benefits of Education: Crime, Health, and Good Citizenship. NBER Working Paper No. 16722  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A growing body of work suggests that education offers a wide-range of benefits that extend beyond increases in labor market productivity. Improvements in education can lower crime, improve health, and increase voting and democratic participation. This chapter reviews recent developments on these "non-production" benefits of education with an…

Lochner, Lance

2011-01-01

396

Youth with Disabilities in Transition: Health Insurance Options and Obstacles. Healthy & Ready To Work (HRTW) Policy Brief.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper highlights the public and private health insurance options for young people with disabilities or chronic health conditions including several recent Federal initiatives to increase access to health care for working adults with disabilities. Discussion of public health insurance eligibility and coverage focuses on aspects of Medicaid and…

Schulzinger, Rhoda

397

A Report of the Task Force on Career Competencies in Oral Communication Skills for Community College Students Seeking Immediate Entry into the Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the results of a Speech Communication Association Task Force investigating communication skills needed by community college graduates. Summarizes relevant literature and survey results from state instructional offices and community college committee members in various occupational areas. Findings indicate a strong need for group…

Muchmore, John; Galvin, Kathleen

1983-01-01

398

Occupational health aspects of unusual work schedules: a review of Exxon's experiences  

SciTech Connect

Today more than 300,000 persons in the US work unusually long shifts (longer than eight hours per day) during which they are exposed to airborne toxicants. This paper reviews Exxon's experience in managing the various potential occupational health problems associated with such work schedules. A review of mathematical approaches to modifying exposure limits for such shifts is included; special emphasis is placed on the potential role of circadian rhythm effects as they serve to affect the physiological adjustment of workers to these schedules. A listing of the kinds of physical ailments which have been associated with unusual work schedules is included also. A fairly thorough list of references accompanies the text.

Brief, R.S.; Scala, R.A.

1986-04-01

399

Children working on the streets in Brazil: predictors of mental health problems.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine which factors predict higher risk for mental health problems in children working on the streets. We studied a sample of families that had at least one child working on the streets, from October 2008 to March 2009. The instruments applied were the parent version strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), the childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) for children and caregivers, the WorldSAFE core questionnaire, the global assessment of relational functioning scale (GARF), the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia for school-age children (K-SADS), and a socio-demographic questionnaire. 191 children between 7 and 14 years of age were analyzed; 126 (66%) were working on the streets, and 65 were siblings who did not work on the streets. Multivariate analysis showed that mental health problems in the caregivers, violent behaviors of the caregivers toward the children, absence of a partner living in the house, and lower levels of family functioning increased the risk of mental health problems in the children. Caregivers reported severe forms of physical punishment against their children in 62% of cases. Caregivers who had suffered sexual abuse and emotional negligence in childhood were more violent with their children. Factors that increased risk for mental health symptoms in these children were caregivers' psychopathology, physical punishment at home, single-parent structure, and poor family functioning. Work on the streets did not influence the children's mental health, when multiple risk factors were considered; family characteristics were the most significant in this sample. PMID:23073672

Maciel, Mariana R; Mello, Andrea F; Fossaluza, Victor; Nobrega, Luciana P; Cividanes, Giuliana C; Mari, Jair J; Mello, Marcelo F

2013-03-01

400

Mental health nurses working in primary care: Perceptions of general practitioners.  

PubMed

The Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program (MHNIP) was established across Australia during 2007. Under the guidelines for the program, mental health nurses work in partnership with general practitioners (GPs) to assist in the assessment and treatment of those with more severe mental health problems. This paper provides insights, from the perspective of GPs, on the qualities required of mental health nurses seeking employment in the primary care setting. A descriptive, exploratory approach was employed to isolate relevant themes. Discussion groups were conducted with 25 GPs involved with the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program. These discussion groups were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Five overarching thematic clusters emerged from the data: (i) 'fitting in'; (ii) knowledge; (iii) skills; (iv) supporting GPs; and (v) educating GPs. While GPs recognize the valuable contribution that mental health nurses can make in the treatment of those with mental health problems, this appears to be dependent on the knowledge and skills of the nurses involved and their ability to engage with GPs. Ongoing education and other practical interventions are required to ensure that GPs are better informed about the initiative. PMID:23020105

Meehan, Tom; Robertson, Samantha

2013-10-01

401

Casual Dock Work: Profile of Diseases and Injuries and Perception of Influence on Health  

PubMed Central

The present study aimed to identify the profile of diseases and injuries that affect casual dock workers and identify casual dock workers’ perceptions of positive and negative work influences on their health. This study consisted of two phases. The first phase was a quantitative study composed of a retrospective analysis, conducted with 953 medical records. The second phase of the research is a non-random sample with 51 casual dock workers. Data analysis was performed with SPSS 19.0. The average age of the casual dock workers was 48.7. Concerning working time, the majority had more than 19.6 years of dock work experience. In the first phase, 527 pathologic diagnoses were identified. The diagnoses that affected the musculoskeletal system (15.8%, N = 152; p < 0.01) were highlighted. Consequences to physical health produced by accidents stood out, with fracture registration predominating (12.8%, N = 122; p < 0.05). Significant differences were found for positive work influence on the cardiovascular system and family health. It was concluded that the diagnoses obtained are related to the influence of dock work perception and have motivated an introduction of preventive measures. PMID:24557521

Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; de Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Borges, Anelise Miritz; Piexak, Diessica Roggia

2014-01-01

402

Casual dock work: profile of diseases and injuries and perception of influence on health.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to identify the profile of diseases and injuries that affect casual dock workers and identify casual dock workers' perceptions of positive and negative work influences on their health. This study consisted of two phases. The first phase was a quantitative study composed of a retrospective analysis, conducted with 953 medical records. The second phase of the research is a non-random sample with 51 casual dock workers. Data analysis was performed with SPSS 19.0. The average age of the casual dock workers was 48.7. Concerning working time, the majority had more than 19.6 years of dock work experience. In the first phase, 527 pathologic diagnoses were identified. The diagnoses that affected the musculoskeletal system (15.8%, N = 152; p < 0.01) were highlighted. Consequences to physical health produced by accidents stood out, with fracture registration predominating (12.8%, N = 122; p < 0.05). Significant differences were found for positive work influence on the cardiovascular system and family health. It was concluded that the diagnoses obtained are related to the influence of dock work perception and have motivated an introduction of preventive measures. PMID:24557521

Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; de Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Borges, Anelise Miritz; Piexak, Diéssica Roggia

2014-02-01

403

Working the night shift: a necessary time for training or a risk to health and safety?  

PubMed

The European Working Time Directive (EWTD) limits excessive night shifts and restricts the working week to no more than 48 hours. The underlying rationale is to minimise the health risks to all workers. Here we debate the impact of night rotas for doctors-in-training on patient safety and medical education; when the EWTD was agreed these topics may not have been considered, either systematically or objectively. The impacts of diurnal rhythms on human functions affect all night workers, but the nature of rostered medical and surgical work has little precedent in other industries or even in the contracts of other healthcare staff. For example, rostered night duties need to be distinguished from permanent night shift work. On-call medical night work from training doctors is generally required for short periods and usually involves fewer patients. It is an important time in training, where clinical responsibility and decision-making can be matured in a supervised setting. To comply with the EWTD most hospitals have adopted rota patterns that aim to cover the clinical needs, while ensuring no doctor works for more than 48 hours in an average working week. To monitor this process longterm studies are necessary to evaluate effects on a doctor's health and on patient care generally. The EWTD has also led to a loss of continuity of patient care; does this really matter? PMID:24087803

Morrison, I; Flower, D; Hurley, J; McFadyen, R J

2013-01-01

404

Health conditions and factors related to the work ability of teachers.  

PubMed

This is a cross-sectional study conducted with 258 teachers from nine state schools in two municipalities of São Paulo state with the purpose of assessing their work ability. A questionnaire with socio-demographic and health/work conditions data and the Work Ability Index (WAI) was performed. Most teachers were females, 41.9?yr old on average (SD 9.4), and with an undergraduate degree (95.7%). The work ability was considered good for 42.6% and moderate/low for 35.3%. In linear regressions models, which used the two domain model, the significant variables for a decrease in WAI were: individual perception of a worsening in the health situation (p<0001), having children (p=0.0003 / p=0.0001), difficulty in sleeping well at night (p=0.0009 / p=0.0014), history of physical pain in the previous six months (p<0.0001 / p<0.0001), being a teacher with a contract (p=0.0007) and working as a teacher for a longer time. (p=0.0183). Public investments on the work conditions of teachers are important to recover and to maintain their work ability. PMID:24429517

Vedovato, Tatiana Giovanelli; Monteiro, Inês

2014-01-01

405

Health Conditions and Factors Related to the Work Ability of Teachers  

PubMed Central

This is a cross-sectional study conducted with 258 teachers from nine state schools in two municipalities of São Paulo state with the purpose of assessing their work ability. A questionnaire with socio-demographic and health/work conditions data and the Work Ability Index (WAI) was performed. Most teachers were females, 41.9?yr old on average (SD 9.4), and with an undergraduate degree (95.7%). The work ability was considered good for 42.6% and moderate/low for 35.3%. In linear regressions models, which used the two domain model, the significant variables for a decrease in WAI were: individual perception of a worsening in the health situation (p<0001), having children (p=0.0003 / p=0.0001), difficulty in sleeping well at night (p=0.0009 / p=0.0014), history of physical pain in the previous six months (p<0.0001 / p<0.0001), being a teacher with a contract (p=0.0007) and working as a teacher for a longer time. (p=0.0183). Public investments on the work conditions of teachers are important to recover and to maintain their work ability. PMID:24429517

VEDOVATO, Tatiana Giovanelli; MONTEIRO, Ines

2014-01-01

406

The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints\\u000a on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain\\u000a healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective\\u000a strategy

Fania R Gärtner; Sarah M Ketelaar; Odile Smeets; Linda Bolier; Eva Fischer; Frank JH van Dijk; Karen Nieuwenhuijsen; Judith K Sluiter

2011-01-01

407

Qualities and practices of professional social work leadership in an interdisciplinary mental health service: an action learning approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the mid-1980s, health service restructuring in New Zealand has strengthened managerialism, arguably detracting from professional considerations. Professional leaders without line-management responsibilities have replaced social work departments headed by a professional social worker. An emerging social work contribution to interdisciplinary leadership in mental health settings aims to advance quality of service and fill social work leadership gaps resulting from structural

David McNabb; Michael Webster

2010-01-01

408

MSW Social Work Experience 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca. Evaluation of AB3632,  

E-print Network

1 MSW Social Work Experience Consultant 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca consisting mainly of skid row alcoholics who were overflow from the main county hospital. MSW Social Work care center for their children. Prior to MSW Social Work 11973-1976. Casemanagement. L.A. County Health

Ahmad, Sajjad

409

Impact of shift work on the health and safety of nurses and patients.  

PubMed

Shift work generally is defined as work hours that are scheduled outside of daylight. Shift work disrupts the synchronous relationship between the body's internal clock and the environment. The disruption often results in problems such as sleep disturbances, increased accidents and injuries, and social isolation. Physiologic effects include changes in rhythms of core temperature, various hormonal levels, immune functioning, and activity-rest cycles. Adaptation to shift work is promoted by reentrainment of the internally regulated functions and adjustment of activity-rest and social patterns. Nurses working various shifts can improve shift-work tolerance when they understand and adopt counter measures to reduce the feelings of jet lag. By learning how to adjust internal rhythms to the same phase as working time, nurses can improve daytime sleep and family functioning and reduce sleepiness and work-related errors. Modifying external factors such as the direction of the rotation pattern, the number of consecutive night shifts worked, and food and beverage intake patterns can help to reduce the negative health effects of shift work. Nurses can adopt counter measures such as power napping, eliminating overtime on 12-hour shifts, and completing challenging tasks before 4 am to reduce patient care errors. PMID:16927899

Berger, Ann M; Hobbs, Barbara B

2006-08-01

410

Force, velocity, and work: The effects of different contexts on students' understanding of vector concepts using isomorphic problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test with no physical context, and a test with mechanics contexts. For this study, we administered the items twice to students who were finishing an introductory mechanics course at a large private university in Mexico. The first time, we administered the two 12-item tests to 608 students. In the second, we only tested the items for which we had found differences in students' performances that were difficult to explain, and in this case, we asked them to show their reasoning in written form. In the first administration, we detected no significant difference between the medians obtained in the tests; however, we did identify significant differences in some of the items. For each item we analyze the type of difference found between the tests in the selection of the correct answer, the most common error on each of the tests, and the differences in the selection of incorrect answers. We also investigate the causes of the different context effects. Based on these analyses, we establish specific recommendations for the instruction of vector concepts in an introductory mechanics course. In the Supplemental Material we include both tests for other researchers studying vector learning, and for physics teachers who teach this material.

Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

2014-12-01

411

Unemployment, informal work, precarious employment, child labor, slavery, and health inequalities: pathways and mechanisms.  

PubMed

The study explores the pathways and mechanisms of the relation between employment conditions and health inequalities. A significant amount of published research has proved that workers in several risky types of labor--precarious employment, unemployment, informal labor, child and bonded labor--are exposed to behavioral, psychosocial, and physio-pathological pathways leading to physical and mental health problems. Other pathways, linking employment to health inequalities, are closely connected to hazardous working conditions (material and social deprivation, lack of social protection, and job insecurity), excessive demands, and unattainable work effort, with little power and few rewards (in salaries, fringe benefits, or job stability). Differences across countries in the social contexts and types of jobs result in varying pathways, but the general conceptual model suggests that formal and informal power relations between employees and employers can determine health conditions. In addition, welfare state regimes (unionization and employment protection) can increase or decrease the risk of mortality, morbidity, and occupational injury. In a multilevel context, however, these micro- and macro-level pathways have yet to be fully studied, especially in middle- and low-income countries. The authors recommend some future areas of study on the pathways leading to employment-related health inequalities, using worldwide standard definitions of the different forms of labor, authentic data, and a theoretical framework. PMID:20440971

Muntaner, Carles; Solar, Orielle; Vanroelen, Christophe; Martínez, José Miguel; Vergara, Montserrat; Santana, Vilma; Castedo, Antía; Kim, Il-Ho; Benach, Joan

2010-01-01

412

[Trade unionism, working conditions and health: the perspective of educational professionals in Rio de Janeiro].  

PubMed

The scope of this paper is to analyze and interpret the problems and prospects of trade union activity, in order to achieve changes in the workplace and promote health in schools by means of the experience of the Training Program in Health, Gender and Work in Public Schools. In order to conduct this research we staged interviews with union leaders and education professionals. In our analysis we concentrated on the report of a specific case, namely the State Union of Education Professionals in Rio de Janeiro (SEPE-RJ). We perceived that, after the training program, the campaign began to focus not only on the defense of certain rights that are traditionally present on the union agenda. The concept of health broadens the union concept of working conditions; it also allows workers in schools to be the protagonists of movements for change. We note, moreover, the sense of renewal that the theme "work"--in its relation to health--has given to trade union militancy. PMID:22267033

de Souza, Kátia Reis; de Brito, Jussara Cruz

2012-02-01

413

Preventing Work-Related Musculoskeletal Illnesses Through Ergonomics: The Air Force PREMIER Program. Volume 3A: Level I Ergonomics Methodology Guide For Administrative Work Areas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes a methodology which allow technicians with minimal ergonomics training to identify risk factors, select realistic controls, facilitate modifications, and measure the impact of ergonomic modifications to United States Air Force admini...

A. Marcotte, M. Joyce, P. Crawford, R. Barker, V. Calvez

1997-01-01

414

Preventing Work-Related Musculoskeletal Illnesses Through Ergonomics: The Air Force PREMIER Program Volume 4A: Level I Ergonomics Methodology Guide For Maintenance/Inspection Work Areas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes a methodology which allow technicians with minimal ergonomics training to identify risk factors, select realistic controls, facilitate modifications, and measure the impact of ergonomic modifications to United States Air Force I main...

A. Marcotte, M. Joyce, R. Barker, V. Calvez

1997-01-01

415

Risk of adverse health outcomes associated with frequency and duration of deployment with the Australian Defence Force.  

PubMed

The operational tempo of the Australian Defence Force has increased over the last two decades. We examine the relationship between health of personnel and the frequency and duration of their deployment. Self-reported health measures (number of symptoms, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist) were compared for people who had never deployed to those who had deployed only once and for those who had deployed at least twice with at least one deployment to East Timor and one deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq. Comparisons were also made between people who had deployed for at least one month and those who had deployed for longer periods. Frequency of deployment but not duration of deployment was associated with poorer health. PMID:21366074

Bleier, Jonathan; McFarlane, Alexander; McGuire, Annabel; Treloar, Susan; Waller, Michael; Dobson, Annette

2011-02-01

416

Work and its role in shaping the social gradient in health  

PubMed Central

Adults with better jobs enjoy better health: job title was, in fact, the social gradient metric first used to study the relationship between social class and chronic disease etiology, a core finding now replicated in most developed countries. What has been less well proved is whether this correlation is causal, and if so, through what mechanisms. During the past decade, much research has been directed at these issues.Best evidence in2009 suggests that occupation does affect health. Most recent research on the relationship has been directed at disentangling the pathways through which lower-status work leads to adverse health outcomes. This review focuses on six areas of recent progress: (1) the role of status in a hierarchical occupational system; (2) the roles of psychosocial job stressors; (3) effects of workplace physical and chemical hazard exposures; (4) evidence that work organization matters as a contextual factor; (5) implications for the gradient of new forms of nonstandard or “precarious” employment such as contract and shift work; and (6) emerging evidence that women may be impacted differently by adverse working conditions, and possibly more strongly, than men. PMID:20201870

Clougherty, Jane E.; Souza, Kerry; Cullen, Mark R.

2013-01-01

417

Association between work-related health problems and job insecurity in permanent and temporary employees  

PubMed Central

Objectives This research was conducted with an aim of determining the correlation between job insecurity and an employee’s work-related health problems among permanent and temporary workers. Methods Using the data from the First Korean Working Conditions Survey conducted in 2006, a total of 7,071 workers, excluding employers and the self-employed, were analyzed. Work-related health problems were categorized as backache, headache, abdominal pain, muscular pain, stress, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety or depression. Each problem was then analyzed for its relationship to job insecurity through logistic regression analysis. Results Among the 7,071 workers, 5,294 (74.9%) were permanent workers and 1,777 (25.1%) were temporary workers. For the permanent workers, presence of high or moderate job insecurity appeared more closely linked to backache, headache, abdominal pain, muscular pain, stress, fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, and depression compared to absence of job insecurity. However, for the temporary workers, only depression appeared to be associated with the presence of high job insecurity. Conclusion The study showed that the presence of job insecurity is correlated with work-related health problems. The deleterious effects of job insecurity appeared to be stronger in permanent than temporary workers. Additional research should investigate ways to effectively reduce job insecurity. PMID:24472497

2013-01-01

418

The impact of work configuration, target angle and hand force direction on upper extremity muscle activity during sub-maximal overhead work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overhead work has established links to upper extremity discomfort and disorders. As many jobs incorporate working overhead, this study aimed to identify working conditions requiring relatively lower muscular shoulder load. Eleven upper extremity muscles were monitored with electromyography during laboratory simulations of overhead work tasks. Tasks were defined with three criteria: work configuration (fixed, stature-specific); target angle (?15°, 0°, 15°,

Jaclyn N. Chopp; Steven L. Fischer; Clark R. Dickerson

2010-01-01

419

A panel priority rating exercise for the British Forces Germany Health Services Market test.  

PubMed

We report on the application to the BFG Health Services Market Testing (MT) study of the response to a users' questionnaire and panel discussions to determine in which priority and how services should be provided. The questionnaire served to inform lay and health care panel members on users' views on the relative importance of future health services and the way they will be provided. Based on the questionnaire results and data contained in the BAOR Report of Public Health for 1992/93 the panel assigned the highest priorities to emergency services, followed by routine General Practitioner services and essential hospital services. The lowest ranking were non-essential hospital services, health care for children with special needs and provision of designated transport. There was a high consistency in views between the lay and health care members of the panel. PMID:7602554

Jefferson, T O; Demicheli, V

1995-02-01

420

Factors influencing the work passion of Chinese community health service workers: an investigation in five provinces  

PubMed Central

Background After the implementation of new healthcare reform, Chinese government paid increasing attention to developing community health service (CHS). The current focus is mainly on cultivating community general practitioners but paying less attention to the working status and occupational demands of in-service CHS workers. Work passion is playing an important role for medical workers. With work passion, CHS workers’ team will become more stable and more effective, ensuring the sustainable development of CHS system. At present, the work passion of CHS workers is relatively low. Studying on influencing factors of work passion of CHS workers, promoting their work passion, and making them keep enthusiasm for work are significant. Methods A total of 100 CHS organizations were sampled randomly in 10 cities from 5 Chinese provinces for this study. A total of 3450 CHS workers from these CHS institutions took part in the surveys. Questionnaires were used to collect data, including socio-demographic information, work passion and opinion on influencing causes, and work-related satisfaction. Pearson chi-square statistical method was used to identify the factors related to CHS workers’ work passion. Binary logistic regression was performed to determine the significant factors that influence CHS workers’ work passion. Results A total of 38.77% of those who accomplished the questionnaire expressed that they didn’t have passion for current work. The related factors that influence CHS workers’ work passion are (1) socio-demographic factors such as age, and years of employment, and (2) other work-related factors such as learning and training opportunities, compensation packages, work stress, and personal development opportunities. CHS workers were most dissatisfied with the balance between remuneration and workload, job promotion opportunities. Conclusions Based on the results, the government should concern for CHS workers’ working status and work-related demands, pay more attention and meet their demands for reasonable compensation packages and self-development, balance the income and workload, provide more learning and training opportunities and personal development opportunities for CHS workers, in order to promote CHS workers’ work satisfaction, improve their work passion and enthusiasm. PMID:24885642

2014-01-01

421

Disability, Work and Cash Benefits.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 13 papers from a workshop convened to explore the causes of work disability and the types of interventions that might enable individuals to remain at work, return to work, or enter the work force for the first time, despite having chronic health conditions or impairments. Following an overview of the papers by editors Jerry L.…

Mashaw, Jerry L., Ed.; And Others

422

Literacy Works: Moving from the Margins to the Mainstream. Report of the Task Force To Study Adult Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A task force studied adult education services in Maryland. The task force heard presentations from a wide range of stakeholders, including adult learners, professional associations, administrators, practitioners, and educational researchers. The presentations confirmed that the need for adult education services in Maryland is extensive and the…

Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

423

Periodic health examination, 1993 update: 3. Periodontal diseases: classification, diagnosis, risk factors and prevention. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To review the 1979 Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination recommendations on the diagnosis and prevention of periodontal disease. OPTIONS: Self-care at home, professional care, treatment with antimicrobial agents and management of patients at high risk. OUTCOMES: Maintaining the gingiva, alveolar bone and periodontal ligament in a healthy state (absence of gingival bleeding and no loss of epithelial attachment). EVIDENCE: A literature search for articles published from 1980 to 1993 was conducted. Selected studies published before 1980 were also reviewed if there were no recent updates. Evidence was evaluated and classified as good, fair or poor according to the criteria of the task force. VALUES: The task force's evidence-based rules for recommendations were used. In addition, whenever feasible, and on the basis of advice from the reviewers and experts, recommendations were modified in the interest of maintaining oral health (e.g., dental flossing in children). BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The recommendations are not expected to increase the costs of preventing periodontal diseases for the general population. They could benefit dental patients and reduce costs because they are based on the periodontal needs of patients rather than on the current universal application approach. PMID:8221425

Ismail, A I; Lewis, D W

1993-01-01

424

Astronautical Hygiene - A New Discipline to Protect the Health of Astronauts Working in Space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper outlines the rationale for a new scientific discipline namely astronautical hygiene. Astronautical hygiene is an applied science that utilises a knowledge of space toxicology, space medicine, astronautics, occupational hygiene etc. to identify the hazards, assess the exposure risks to health, and thereby determine the measures to mitigate exposure to protect the health of astronauts during living and working in space. This paper describes the nature of the hazards (i.e. physical, chemical, microbial and psychological) encountered during space flight. It discusses exposure risk assessment and the use of sampling techniques to assess astronaut health risks. This paper then discusses the measures used to mitigate exposure to the exposure hazards during space exploration. A case study of the application of the principles of astronautical hygiene to control lunar dust exposure is then described.

Cain, J. R.

425

The impact of lean production and related new systems of work organization on worker health.  

PubMed

New systems of work organization, such as lean production and total quality management, have been introduced by employers throughout the industrialized world to improve productivity, quality, and profitability. However, few studies have examined the impact of such systems on occupational injuries or illnesses or on job characteristics related to job strain, which has been linked to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The studies reviewed provide little evidence to support the hypothesis that lean production "empowers" auto workers. In fact, auto industry studies suggest that lean production creates intensified work pace and demands. Increases in decision authority and skill levels are modest or temporary, whereas decision latitude typically remains low. Thus, such work can be considered to have job strain. In jobs with ergonomic stressors, intensification of labor appears to lead to increases in musculoskeletal disorders. The evidence for adverse health effects remains inconclusive for related new work systems in other industries, such as modular manufacturing or patient-focused care. PMID:10212864

Landsbergis, P A; Cahill, J; Schnall, P

1999-04-01

426

The Gutenberg Health Study: measuring psychosocial factors at work and predicting health and work-related outcomes with the ERI and the COPSOQ questionnaire  

PubMed Central

Background Several instruments have been developed to assess psychosocial workload. We compared two of these instruments, the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) with regard to congruent validity and internal validity. Methods This analysis is based on a population-based sample of the baseline examination of 2,783 employees from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS). About half of the participants completed the ERI questionnaire (n?=?1,342), the other half completed the COPSOQ (n?=?1,441). First, the two samples were compared and descriptive analyses were carried out calculating mean values for both instruments in general, then separately for age, gender and main occupational groups. Second, we analyzed the relationship between ERI and COPSOQ scales on the workplace situation and on the workplace outcomes: job satisfaction, general health, burnout, satisfaction with life, by applying stepwise logistic regression analysis. Results and discussion For the majority of occupations, high effort as reflected by the ERI corresponded with high demands as reflected by the COPSOQ. Comparably, high reward (according to ERI) yielded a good agreement with high “influence and development” (according to COPSOQ). However, we could also find differences between ERI and COPSOQ concerning the intensity of psychosocial workload in some occupations (e.g., physicians/pharmacists or warehouse managers/warehousemen/transport workers). These differences point to differing theoretical concepts of ERI and COPSOQ. When the ability of ERI and COPSOQ was examined to determine the associations with health and work outcomes, burnout could be better predicted by the COPSOQ; this might be due to the fact that COPSOQ comprises the constructs “work-privacy conflict” and “emotional demand”, which are closely related to burnout. However, methodological differences between these instruments limit their direct comparability. Conclusions The ERI and COPSOQ instrument yielded similar results for most occupational groups. The slightly stronger association between psychosocial workload as assessed by COPSOQ and burnout might be explained by its broader approach. The ability of the ERI and COPSOQ instrument to reflect relevant risk factors for clinically manifest disorders (e.g., coronary heart disease) will be derived from subsequent prospective analyses of the GHS with the follow-up data. PMID:23734632

2013-01-01

427

[A questionnaire study on health of taxi drivers--relations to work conditions and daily life].  

PubMed

A questionnaire survey was conducted on 5,523 taxi drivers in Osaka Prefecture to investigate their working conditions and daily life as well as characteristics of their health condition and various effects on health, especially on their cardiovascular system. The major results of this survey were as follows: 1) The rate of subjective symptoms, morbidity rate and rate of poor physical condition over the past year in the taxi drivers were higher than those of the control group. Among the subjective symptoms, the rate of gastrointestinal disorders, fatigue, musculoskeletal system disorders, sensory system disorders, hemorrhoids, etc. was especially high. 2) Work shift, density of work, years of experience in taxi-driving, frequency of fright while driving, pattern of taking meals, way of recuperation on rest days or holidays, obesity, smoking, and intake of coffee and alcohol were found to be factors affecting the health of taxi drivers. 3) Nearly half of the respondents said that they would like to quit or change their job with as much as 62% giving "condition of health" as reason. On the other hand, the rate of heart-related symptoms such as palpitation, and breathlessness did not differ from that of the control group. The possible reason for this deduced from the foregoing results, is that there were some who had changed or quit the job at an early stage for health reasons such as heart trouble and severe physical and mental burden resulting from taxi driving. 4) Many taxi driver are obese and the rate of those with heart-related symptoms was considerably high among those classified as obese. In addition, the results showed that those with longer driving experience tended to be obese. PMID:2795989

Ueda, T; Hashimoto, M; Yasui, I; Sunaga, M; Higashida, T; Hara, I

1989-05-01

428

Forces and Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Explore the forces at work when you try to push a filing cabinet. Create an applied force and see the resulting friction force and total force acting on the cabinet. Charts show the forces, position, velocity, and acceleration vs. time. View a Free Body Diagram of all the forces (including gravitational and normal forces).

Simulations, Phet I.; Reid, Sam; Podelefsky, Noah; Loeblein, Trish; Perkins, Kathy

2010-10-01

429

SENIOR DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND RESEARCH SAFETY The Senior Director, Environmental Health and Research Safety works collaboratively with the Chief Safety  

E-print Network

of occupational and trades safety, environmental health and research safety. The Senior Director is responsibleSENIOR DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND RESEARCH SAFETY The Senior Director, Environmental Health and Research Safety works collaboratively with the Chief Safety Officer and the VP, Research to plan SFU

430

Stigmatizing Clients with Mental Health Conditions: An Assessment of Social Work Student Attitudes  

PubMed Central

Research suggests that stigma plays a major role in discouraging clients from participating in mental health treatment. Because social workers provide a significant amount of such services, this study investigates social work student stigma as a function of their willingness to treat clients with alcohol dependence, nicotine dependence, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease. Students’ held higher levels of stigma toward nicotine dependent clients and less toward those with depression. Personal histories of depression and student age – but not smoking or alcohol use – were predictive of higher stigma levels towards nicotine dependent clients. Implications for social work are discussed. PMID:21779152

Ahmedani, Brian K.; Rios-Bedoya, Carlos F.; Anthony, James C.

2011-01-01

431

Status of work-related diseases in Wisconsin: five occupational health indicators.  

PubMed

Direct and indirect costs of work-related injuries and illnesses in the United States are estimated to cost over dollar 170 billion annually. Wisconsin's costs alone may be as high as dollar 1 billion annually. Considering the magnitude of these costs, it is disconcerting that there is no national surveillance program to track the occupational injuries, illnesses, and hazards responsible. Surveillance is an essential public health function and the foundation for recognizing and then designing and evaluating interventions to reduce the consequences of identified hazards. Wisconsin has a rudimentary occupational injury and illness surveillance program. It has recently been strengthened by receipt of a 3-year fundamental surveillance grant from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). As part of that grant, Wisconsin will begin tracking 19 NIOSH occupational health indicators. In this paper we measured 5 occupational health indicators for Wisconsin: Pneumoconiosis hospitalizations, Pneumoconiosis mortality, Acute work-related pesticide poisonings, Incidence of malignant mesothelioma, and Elevated blood lead levels among adults. Year 2000 baseline results of these 5 occupational disease indicators show that Wisconsin has lower disease rates than the nation for some of the indicators and higher rates for others. Such surveillance data informs the understanding of environmental and other important risk factors for occupational diseases and injuries. PMID:16628971

Islam, K M Monirul; Anderson, Henry A

2006-03-01

432

“He forced me to love him”: putting violence on adolescent sexual health agendas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Violence against women within sexual relationships is a neglected area in public health despite the fact that, in partially defining women's capacity to protect themselves against STDs, pregnancy and unwanted sexual intercourse, it directly affects female reproductive health. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study conducted among Xhosa-speaking adolescent women in South Africa which revealed male violent and

Katharine Wood; Fidelia Maforah; Rachel Jewkes

1998-01-01

433

Assessing human resources for health: what can be learned from labour force surveys?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Human resources are an essential element of a health system's inputs, and yet there is a huge disparity among countries in how human resource policies and strategies are developed and implemented. The analysis of the impacts of services on population health and well-being attracts more interest than analysis of the situation of the workforce in this area. This article

Neeru Gupta; Khassoum Diallo; Pascal Zurn; Mario R Dal Poz

2003-01-01

434

EFFECT OF WALKING ON HEALTH-RELATED PHYSICAL FITNESS IN OVERWEIGHT WORKING GROUP Sasipa Jinajin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose : The purpose of this investigation was to study the effect of walking on health- related physical fitness in overweight working group. Method : The subjects were 37 volunteered males and females (ages 30-59) with overweight condition (BMI = 25-29.9 kg\\/m2). All subjects were instructed to wear the pedometer (Omron, HJ 109) on the right waist from wake up

Thanomwong Kritpet

435

Errorless Learning for Training Individuals With Schizophrenia at a Community Mental Health Setting Providing Work Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theeffectsoferrorlesslearning (EL)onworkperformance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with con- ventional job training in a community mental health fellow- ship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job

Robert S. Kern; Robert P. Liberman; Deborah R. Becker; Robert E. Drake; Catherine A. Sugar; Michael F. Green

2008-01-01

436

Leaving Family for Work: Ambivalence and Mental Health Among Mexican Migrant Farmworker Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men migrating to the United States from Mexico and Central America confront opposing family norms. They need to leave their\\u000a families to gain family economic security; yet, leaving renders their families vulnerable. We examined the mental health implications\\u000a of the opposing family norms inherent in migration using an ambivalence framework. We interviewed 60 Latino migrant farmworkers\\u000a working in North Carolina.

Joseph G. Grzywacz; Sara A. Quandt; Julie Early; Janeth Tapia; Christopher N. Graham; Thomas A. Arcury

2006-01-01

437

Joint working in community mental health teams: implementation of an integrated care pathway.  

PubMed

Abstract Integration of community mental health services is a key policy objective that aims to increase quality and efficiency of care. Integrated care pathways (ICPs) are a mechanism designed to formalise multi-agency working at an operational level and are currently being applied to mental health services. Evidence regarding the impact of this tool to support joint working is mixed, and there is limited evidence regarding the suitability of ICPs for complex, community-based services. The present study was set in one primary care trust (PCT) in Scotland that is currently implementing an ICP for community mental health teams (CMHTs) across the region. The aim of the study was to investigate professionals' experiences and views on the implementation of an ICP within adult CMHTs in order to generate learning points for other organisations which are considering developing and implementing such systems. The study used qualitative methods which comprised of individual interviews with three CMHT leaders and two service development managers, as well as group interviews with members of four adult CMHTs. Data was analysed using the constant comparison method. Participants reported positive views regarding joint working and the role of an ICP in theory. However, in practice, teams were not implementing the ICP. Lack of integration at higher organisational levels was found to create conflicts within the teams which became explicit in response to the ICP. Implementation was also hindered by lack of resources for ongoing support, team development and change management. In conclusion, the study suggests that operational systems such as ICPs do not address and cannot overcome wider organisational barriers to integration of mental health services. Integrated care pathways need to be developed with strategic input as well as practitioner involvement and ownership. Team development, education about integration and change management are essential if ICPs are to foster and support joint working in integrated teams. PMID:15717899

Rees, Gwyneth; Huby, Guro; McDade, Lian; McKechnie, L

2004-11-01

438

Training Manpower for Health Administrations. Report on the Working Group on Specific Problems of Schools of Public Health. Brussels, 9-11 September 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A working group composed of representatives from ten European countries and Nigeria was convened by the World Health Organization because of a recognition of the accelerating rate of change in the character and range of public health problems throughout the world. The program for the working group was designed to explore the major aspects of…

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

439

Physical and Mental Health Status of Staff Working for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: Measurement with the 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) Health Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Little explicit attention has been given to the generic health profile of staff working for people with intellectual disability in institutions. This study aimed to provide a profile of physical and mental health of staff working in disability welfare institutions, and to examine the possible demographic and organizational factors that explain an…

Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Sheng-Ru

2009-01-01

440

Booster Breaks in the workplace: participants' perspectives on health-promoting work breaks  

PubMed Central

Increasing sedentary work has been associated with greater cardiovascular and metabolic risk, as well as premature mortality. Interrupting the sedentary workday with health-promoting work breaks can counter these negative health effects. To examine the potential sustainability of work-break programs, we assessed the acceptance of these breaks among participants in a Booster Break program. We analyzed qualitative responses from 35 participants across five worksites where one 15-min physical activity break was taken each workday. Two worksites completed a 1-year intervention and three worksites completed a 6-month intervention. Responses to two open-ended questions about the acceptance and feasibility of Booster Breaks were obtained from a survey administered after the intervention. Three themes for benefits and two themes for barriers were identified. The benefit themes were (i) reduced stress and promoted enjoyment, (ii) increased health awareness and facilitated behavior change, and (iii) enhanced workplace social interaction. The barrier themes were the need for (iv) greater variety in Booster Break routines and (v) greater management support. This study provides empirical support for the acceptance and feasibility of Booster Breaks during the workday. Emphasizing the benefits and minimizing the barriers are strategies that can be used to implement Booster Breaks in other workplaces. PMID:23466367

Taylor, Wendell C.; King, Kathryn E.; Shegog, Ross; Paxton, Raheem J.; Evans-Hudnall, Gina L.; Rempel, David M.; Chen, Vincent; Yancey, Antronette K.

2013-01-01

441

Behavioral Health Care for Adolescents with Poorly Controlled Diabetes via Skype: Does Working Alliance Remain Intact?  

PubMed Central

Background: Increasingly various technologies are being tested to deliver behavioral health care. Delivering services via videoconferencing shows promise. Given that the patient–provider relationship is a strong predictor of patient adherence to medical regimens, addressing relationship quality when services are not delivered face-to-face is critical. To that end, we compared the therapeutic alliance when behavioral health care was delivered to youth with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and their caregivers in-clinic with the same services delivered via Internet-based videoconferencing (i.e., Skype™). Methods: Seventy-one adolescents with poorly controlled T1DM (hemoglobin A1c ?9%) and one of their caregivers received up to 10 sessions of a family-based behavioral health intervention previously shown to improve adherence to diabetes regimens and family functioning; 32 were randomized to the Skype condition. Youth and caregivers completed the working alliance inventory (WAI), a 36-item measure of therapeutic alliance, at the end of treatment. Additionally, the number of behavioral health sessions completed was tracked. Results: No significant differences in WAI scores were found for those receiving behavioral health care via Skype versus in-clinic. Youth WAI goal and total scores were significantly associated with the number of sessions completed for those in the clinic group. Conclusion: Behavioral health can be delivered to youth with T1DM via Internet-based videoconferencing without significantly impacting the therapeutic relationship. Thus, for those adolescents with T1DM who require specialized behavioral health care that targets T1DM management, Internet-based teleconferencing represents a viable alternative to clinic-based care. PMID:23759406

Freeman, Kurt A.; Duke, Danny C.; Harris, Michael A.

2013-01-01

442

Emotional exhaustion and mental health problems among employees doing “people work”: the impact of job demands, job resources and family-to-work conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  This study investigates the relationship between four job characteristics and family-to-work conflict on emotional exhaustion\\u000a and mental health problems.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Multiple regression analyses were performed using data from 1,008 mental health care employees. Separate regression analyses\\u000a were computed for high and low patient interaction jobs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Different job characteristics as well as family-to-work conflict were associated with emotional exhaustion and mental health

Geertje van Daalen; Tineke M. Willemsen; Karin Sanders

2009-01-01

443

The stigma of mental health problems and other barriers to care in the UK Armed Forces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  As with the general population, a proportion of military personnel with mental health problems do not seek help. As the military\\u000a is a profession at high risk of occupational psychiatric injury, understanding barriers to help-seeking is a priority.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Participants were drawn from a large UK military health study. Participants undertook a telephone interview including the\\u000a Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ); a

Amy C Iversen; Lauren van Staden; Jamie Hacker Hughes; Neil Greenberg; Matthew Hotopf; Roberto J Rona; Graham Thornicroft; Simon Wessely; Nicola T Fear

2011-01-01

444

Successive Ontario governments forced to grapple with problem of health care fraud.  

PubMed Central

Albert Shu of Willowdale, Ont., is the 1995 winner of the Amy Chouinard Memorial Essay Contest. Named in memory of long time CMAJ and Canadian Journal of Surgery contributor Amy Chouinard, the competition is intended to stimulate interest in medical and health-related writing among journalism students. The winning essay, written prior to Ontario's 1995 provincial election, examined health care fraud in the province and the impact of the photo health card that was introduced by the New Democrats party government. PMID:8616746

Shu, A

1996-01-01

445

Validating a work group climate assessment tool for improving the performance of public health organizations  

PubMed Central

Background This article describes the validation of an instrument to measure work group climate in public health organizations in developing countries. The instrument, the Work Group Climate Assessment Tool (WCA), was applied in Brazil, Mozambique, and Guinea to assess the intermediate outcomes of a program to develop leadership for performance improvement. Data were collected from 305 individuals in 42 work groups, who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Methods The WCA was initially validated using Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient and exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a second validation study to refine the initial analyses to account for nested data, to provide item-level psychometrics, and to establish construct validity. Analyses included eigenvalue decomposition analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and validity and reliability analyses. Results This study confirmed the validity and reliability of the WCA across work groups with different demographic characteristics (gender, education, management level, and geographical location). The study showed that there is agreement between the theoretical construct of work climate and the items in the WCA tool across different populations. The WCA captures a single perception of climate rather than individual sub-scales of clarity, support, and challenge. Conclusion The WCA is useful for comparing the climates of different work groups, tracking the changes in climate in a single work group over time, or examining differences among individuals' perceptions of their work group climate. Application of the WCA before and after a leadership development process can help work groups hold a discussion about current climate and select a target for improvement. The WCA provides work groups with a tool to take ownership of their own group climate through a process that is simple and objective and that protects individual confidentiality. PMID:16223447

Perry, Cary; LeMay, Nancy; Rodway, Greg; Tracy, Allison; Galer, Joan

2005-01-01

446

RISK ASSESSMENT New and Expectant Mothers The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999) include specific  

E-print Network

RISK ASSESSMENT ­ New and Expectant Mothers The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations to the health and safety of the employee? Yes No If there is a risk, please contact Health & Safety for further their employer they are pregnant they are required to conduct a risk assessment and take any appropriate measures

Barker, Jon

447

The Effect of Child Health Insurance Access on Schooling: Evidence from Public Insurance Expansions. NBER Working Paper No. 20178  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Public health insurance programs comprise a large share of federal and state government expenditure, and these programs are due to be expanded as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act. Despite a large literature on the effects of these programs on health care utilization and health outcomes, little prior work has examined the long-term effects of…

Cohodes, Sarah; Kleiner, Samuel; Lovenheim, Michael F.; Grossman, Daniel

2014-01-01

448

Sex work and the 2010 FIFA World Cup: time for public health imperatives to prevail  

PubMed Central

Background Sex work is receiving increased attention in southern Africa. In the context of South Africa's intense preparation for hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup, anxiety over HIV transmission in the context of sex work has sparked debate on the most appropriate legal response to this industry. Discussion Drawing on existing literature, the authors highlight the increased vulnerability of sex workers in the context of the HIV pandemic in southern Africa. They argue that laws that criminalise sex work not only compound sex workers' individual risk for HIV, but also compromise broader public health goals. International sporting events are thought to increase demand for paid sex and, particularly in countries with hyper-endemic HIV such as South Africa, likely to foster increased HIV transmission through unprotected sex. Summary The 2010 FIFA World Cup presents a strategic opportunity for South Africa to respond to the challenges that the sex industry poses in a strategic and rights-based manner. Public health goals and growing evidence on HIV prevention suggest that sex work is best approached in a context where it is decriminalised and where sex workers are empowered. In short, the authors argue for a moratorium on the enforcement of laws that persecute and victimise sex workers during the World Cup period. PMID:20181213

2010-01-01

449

Adolescent ADHD and Adult Physical and Mental Health, Work Performance, and Financial Stress  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: There is a scarcity of longitudinal studies of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) followed until adulthood. We studied the relationship between ADHD in adolescence and impaired general physical health, impaired general mental health, antisocial personality disorder, impaired work performance, and high financial stress in adulthood. METHODS: A prospective design incorporated 6 assessments of participants spanning mean ages from 14 to 37 years. Two baseline assessments were taken between ages 14 and 16 years, and 5 outcome assessments were taken at mean age 37 years. Participants were assessed with structured interviews and questionnaires. The participants were from a community sample of individuals initially drawn in 1975 and followed to a mean age of 37 years in 2009. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ADHD in adolescence as related to internal stress in adulthood were 1.82 (95% CI = 1.01–3.25; P < .05) for impaired general physical health, 2.36 (95% CI = 1.23–4.51; P < .01) for impaired general mental health, and 3.28 (95% CI = 1.51–7.13; P < .01) for antisocial personality disorder. The adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs for ADHD in adolescence as related to external stress were 2.46 (95% CI = 1.37–4.43; P < .01) for impaired work performance and 3.33 (95% CI = 1.70–6.55; P < .001) for high financial stress. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should focus on early diagnosis and treatment of adolescent ADHD because it is a major predictor of an array of physical, mental, work, and financial problems in adulthood. PMID:23230074

Brook, David W.; Zhang, Chenshu; Seltzer, Nathan; Finch, Stephen J.

2013-01-01

450

Effects of organisational-level interventions at work on employees' health: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Organisational-level workplace interventions are thought to produce more sustainable effects on the health of employees than interventions targeting individual behaviours. However, scientific evidence from intervention studies does not fully support this notion. It is therefore important to explore conditions of positive health effects by systematically reviewing available studies. We set out to evaluate the effectiveness of 39 health-related intervention studies targeting a variety of working conditions. Methods Systematic review. Organisational-level workplace interventions aiming at improving employees’ health were identified in electronic databases and manual searches. The appraisal of studies was adapted from the Cochrane Back Review Group guidelines. To improve comparability of the widely varying studies we classified the interventions according to the main approaches towards modifying working conditions. Based on this classification we applied a logistic regression model to estimate significant intervention effects. Results 39 intervention studies published between 1993 and 2012 were included. In terms of methodology the majority of interventions were of medium quality, and four studies only had a high level of evidence. About half of the studies (19) reported significant effects. There was a marginally significant probability of reporting effects among interventions targeting several organisational-level modifications simultaneously (Odds ratio (OR) 2.71; 95% CI 0.94-11.12), compared to those targeting one dimension only. Conclusions Despite the heterogeneity of the 39 organisational-level workplace interventions underlying this review, we were able to compare their effects by applying broad classification categories. Success rates were higher among more comprehensive interventions tackling material, organisational and work-time related conditions simultaneously. To increase the number of successful organisational-level interventions in the future, commonly reported obstacles against the implementation process should be addressed in developing these studies. PMID:24507447

2014-01-01

451

Draft Horizon 2020 Work Programme 2014-2015 in the area of health, demographic change and wellbeing  

E-print Network

19 11 2013 Draft Horizon 2020 Work Programme 2014-2015 in the area of health, demographic change Decision establishing the Specific Programme implementing Horizon 2020, and c) The availability of the content of this document. #12;HORIZON 2020 ­ WORK PROGRAMME 2014-2015 Health, demographic change

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

452

[Fitzpatrick, G., (2004) "Integrated care and the working record", in Health Informatics Journal, Vol 10, No 4, 291-302  

E-print Network

[Fitzpatrick, G., (2004) "Integrated care and the working record", in Health Informatics Journal, Vol 10, No 4, 291-302] Integrated Care and the Working Record Geraldine Fitzpatrick B.Inf.Tech (Hons: By default, many discussions and specifications of electronic health records or integrated care records often

Fitzpatrick, Geraldine

453

Biographical work and returning to employment Isabelle Ville 324 Sociology of Health & Illness -Vol.27 N3 -2005  

E-print Network

Biographical work and returning to employment ­ Isabelle Ville 324 Sociology of Health & Illness opportunities and space for relationships to form, encourages the development of biographical work. - Nowadays ­ Isabelle Ville 325 Sociology of Health & Illness - Vol.27 N°3 - 2005 national governments have made

Boyer, Edmond

454

Training and Educating the Work Force in the Nineties: The Rationale for Public/Private Collaboration. Public/Private Ventures. Information Series No. 331.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need for partnerships among deliverers of training in the public and private sectors has reached a critical point if U.S. businesses are to remain competitive. The work force and workplace are being transformed by demographic trends, economic and employment trends, a growing skills mismatch, and concerns over educational effectiveness. Two…

Smith, Thomas J.; Trist, Carolyn

455

The Directory of Special Opportunities for Women: A National Guide of Educational Opportunities, Career Information, Networks, and Peer Counseling Assistance for Entry or Reentry into the Work Force.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This directory is designed to be a source for research and help to women preparing for careers or for entry or reentry into the work force. Section One is an alphabetical listing of national organizations, associations, programs, and government agencies. Section Two is divided by State; resources cited here are listed numerically by zip code so…

Doss, Martha Merrill, Ed.