Science.gov

Sample records for healthcare providers ability

  1. Why healthcare providers merge.

    PubMed

    Postma, Jeroen; Roos, Anne-Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In many OECD countries, healthcare sectors have become increasingly concentrated as a result of mergers. However, detailed empirical insight into why healthcare providers merge is lacking. Also, we know little about the influence of national healthcare policies on mergers. We fill this gap in the literature by conducting a survey study on mergers among 848 Dutch healthcare executives, of which 35% responded (resulting in a study sample of 239 executives). A total of 65% of the respondents was involved in at least one merger between 2005 and 2012. During this period, Dutch healthcare providers faced a number of policy changes, including increasing competition, more pressure from purchasers, growing financial risks, de-institutionalisation of long-term care and decentralisation of healthcare services to municipalities. Our empirical study shows that healthcare providers predominantly merge to improve the provision of healthcare services and to strengthen their market position. Also efficiency and financial reasons are important drivers of merger activity in healthcare. We find that motives for merger are related to changes in health policies, in particular to the increasing pressure from competitors, insurers and municipalities. PMID:26055501

  2. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  3. [Reembursing health-care service provider networks].

    PubMed

    Binder, A; Braun, G E

    2015-03-01

    Health-care service provider networks are regarded as an important instrument to overcome the widely criticised fragmentation and sectoral partition of the German health-care system. The first part of this paper incorporates health-care service provider networks in the field of health-care research. The system theoretical model and basic functions of health-care research are used for this purpose. Furthermore already established areas of health-care research with strong relations to health-care service provider networks are listed. The second part of this paper introduces some innovative options for reimbursing health-care service provider networks which can be regarded as some results of network-oriented health-care research. The origins are virtual budgets currently used in part to reimburse integrated care according to §§ 140a ff. SGB V. Describing and evaluating this model leads to real budgets (capitation) - a reimbursement scheme repeatedly demanded by SVR-Gesundheit (German governmental health-care advisory board), for example, however barely implemented. As a final step a direct reimbursement of networks by the German sickness fund is discussed. Advantages and challenges are shown. The development of the different reimbursement schemes is partially based on models from the USA. PMID:25625796

  4. Emergency preparedness for home healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Shirley

    2012-06-01

    Unfortunately, disasters occur. We cannot always know the effects ahead of time, but we do know that lives can be lost, property damaged, and public health and home care agencies may not be able to provide the normal standard of care. Studies have shown that disaster preparedness content is limited in U.S. nursing programs (). Given the magnitude of recent natural disasters, such as the Japanese earthquake and tsunami in 2011, these findings are alarming. The increasing demands on healthcare providers in response to emergencies force home healthcare clinicians to identify their roles and responsibilities in emergency preparedness. This article discusses 1 model of disaster response and the role of the home healthcare provider at each stage. It further guides home healthcare nurses in creating a personal and professional plan, enabling them to understand how to minimize the impact of disasters and address the needs of their patients and those close to them. PMID:21987023

  5. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    MedlinePlus

    ... Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider If ... NIHSeniorHealth: Diabetes http://nihseniorhealth.gov/diabetes/toc.html Weekly email updates: MEDLINEPLUS-DIABETES: Subscribe from https://list. ...

  6. Applying the balanced scorecard in healthcare provider organizations.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Noorein; Kaplan, Robert S; Bower, Marvin

    2002-01-01

    Several innovative healthcare executives have recently introduced a new business strategy implementation tool: the Balanced Scorecard. The scorecard's measurement and management system provides the following potential benefits to healthcare organizations: It aligns the organization around a more market-oriented, customer-focused strategy It facilitates, monitors, and assesses the implementation of the strategy It provides a communication and collaboration mechanism It assigns accountability for performance at all levels of the organization It provides continual feedback on the strategy and promotes adjustments to marketplace and regulatory changes. We surveyed executives in nine provider organizations that were implementing the Balanced Scorecard. We asked about the following issues relating to its implementation and effect: 1. The role of the Balanced Scorecard in relation to a well-defined vision, mission, and strategy 2. The motivation for adopting the Balanced Scorecard 3. The difference between the Balanced Scorecard and other measurement systems 4. The process followed to develop and implement the Balanced Scorecard 5. The challenges and barriers during the development and implementation process 6. The benefits gained by the organization from adoption and use. The executives reported that the Balanced Scorecard strategy implementation and performance management tool could be successfully applied in the healthcare sector, enabling organizations to improve their competitive market positioning, financial results, and customer satisfaction. This article concludes with guidelines for other healthcare provider organizations to capture the benefits of the Balanced Scorecard performance management system. PMID:12055900

  7. Key Aspects of Providing Healthcare Services in Disaster Response Stage

    PubMed Central

    POURHOSSEINI, Samira Sadat; ARDALAN, Ali; MEHROLHASSANI, Mohammad Hossien

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Health care management in disasters is one of the main parts of disaster management. Health in disasters is affected by performance of various sectors, and has an interactive impact on various aspects of disaster management. The aim of this study was to identify the most important themes affecting the healthcare management in disaster. Method In this qualitative study with a content analysis approach, in-depth interviews in two steps with 30 disaster experts and managers were conducted to collect the data. Results Eleven themes affecting healthcare management in disasters were identified. These themes were related to human resources management, resources management, victims’ management transfer, environmental hygiene monitoring, nutrition management, mental health control, inter-agency coordination, training, technology management, information and communication management, and budget management. Conclusion Providing effective health care service in disasters requires a comprehensive look at the various aspects of disaster management. Effective factors on the success of healthcare in disaster are not limited to the scope of healthcare. There should be a close relationship and interaction between different sectors of disaster management. PMID:26060782

  8. Determinants of patient choice of healthcare providers: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In several northwest European countries, a demand-driven healthcare system has been implemented that stresses the importance of patient healthcare provider choice. In this study, we are conducting a scoping review aiming to map out what is known about the determinants of patient choice of a wide range of healthcare providers. As far as we know, not many studies are currently available that attempt to draw a general picture of how patients choose a healthcare provider and of the status of research on this subject. This study is therefore a valuable contribution to the growing amount of literature about patient choice. Methods We carried out a specific type of literature review known as a scoping review. Scoping reviews try to examine the breadth of knowledge that is available about a particular topic and therefore do not make selections or apply quality constraints. Firstly, we defined our research questions and searched the literature in Embase, Medline and PubMed. Secondly, we selected the literature, and finally we analysed and summarized the information. Results Our review shows that patients’ choices are determined by a complex interplay between patient and provider characteristics. A variety of patient characteristics determines whether patients make choices, are willing and able to choose, and how they choose. Patients take account of a variety of structural, process and outcome characteristics of providers, differing in the relative importance they attach to these characteristics. Conclusions There is no such thing as the typical patient: different patients make different choices in different situations. Comparative information seems to have a relatively limited influence on the choices made by many patients and patients base their decisions on a variety of provider characteristics instead of solely on outcome characteristics. The assumptions made in health policy about patient choice may therefore be an oversimplification of reality. Several

  9. Invasive prenatal genetic testing: A Catholic healthcare provider's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bringman, Jay J.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive prenatal testing is performed for a variety of reasons, but the most common indication is for genetic testing of the fetus. Although many times the information obtained from this type of testing results in selective termination of fetuses with genetic diagnoses, the information itself may be morally neutral. Should a Catholic healthcare provider be willing to perform invasive prenatal testing in the setting of uncertainty with respect to the patient's plans following a diagnosis of a genetic abnormality? PMID:25473130

  10. Mental Illness and Prisoners: Concerns for Communities and Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    The United States prison system is the largest in the world. Mental illness is disproportionately represented within this system where half of all incarcerated individuals have a mental illness, compared to 11% of the population. Four of 10 inmates released from prison recidivate and are re-incarcerated within three years. A social hypothesis suggests recidivism is the result of compounding social factors. Mentally ill individuals often find themselves in less than ideal circumstances of compounding social factors such as illicit substances and unemployment. Prison life may provide improved social situations and a rehabilitating environment, yet corrections often fall short of meeting acceptable standards of healthcare. This article provides a brief overview of healthcare in the corrections environment and discusses factors that affect mental healthcare in prisons, such as characteristics of the prison population and social policy. The article also addresses factors impacting mentally ill persons who are incarcerated, including access and barriers to mental health treatment and efforts to reduce recidivism. PMID:26824261

  11. Responding to discriminatory requests for a different healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Kyle; Wright, Linda

    2014-02-01

    Patient requests for a healthcare provider of a particular race or sexual orientation create a conflict of obligations. On the one hand, providers have a duty to deliver clinically indicated care consistent with patient preferences. On the other hand, providers have legal, professional, and organizational assurances that they should not suffer workplace discrimination. Protecting healthcare providers from harm while maintaining obligations to patients requires unambiguous messaging to both parties. Providers need to be clear that their organization will not be complicit in discrimination against them, instead supporting their needs and preferences for management of the situation. In a context of patient-centered care, harm principle-based boundaries of respect for autonomy must be defined. A Caregiver preference guideline developed and used at University Health Network, Toronto provides a standardized way for the organization to decide when it will honor patient requests for providers of a particular background. This process stresses dialogue, assessment of clinical feasibility, and empowerment and support for affected care providers. PMID:23801379

  12. Listeriosis and Toxoplasmosis in Pregnancy: Essentials for Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Nicole Franzen; Tillett, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Listeriosis and toxoplasmosis are foodborne illnesses that can have long-term consequences when contracted during pregnancy. Listeriosis is implicated in stillbirth, preterm labor, newborn sepsis, and meningitis, among other complications. Toxoplasmosis is associated with blindness, cognitive delays, seizures, and hearing loss, among other significant disabilities. Healthcare providers who understand the fundamentals of Listeria and Toxoplasma infection will have the tools to identify symptoms and high-risk behaviors, educate women to make safer decisions, and provide anticipatory guidance if a pregnant woman would become infected with either of these foodborne illnesses. PMID:27104604

  13. Infant Male Circumcision: Healthcare Provider Knowledge and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Starzyk, Erin J.; Kelley, Michele A.; Caskey, Rachel N.; Schwartz, Alan; Kennelly, Joan F.; Bailey, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The emerging science demonstrates various health benefits associated with infant male circumcision and adult male circumcision; yet rates are declining in the United States. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that healthcare providers present evidence-based risk and benefit information for infant male circumcision to parent(s) and guardian(s). The purpose of this study was to assess providers’ level of infant male circumcision knowledge and to identify the associated characteristics. Methods An online survey was administered to healthcare providers in the family medicine, obstetrics, and pediatrics medical specialties at an urban academic health center. To assess infant male circumcision knowledge, a 17 point summary score was constructed to identify level of provider knowledge within the survey. Results Ninety-two providers completed the survey. Providers scored high for the following knowledge items: adverse event rates, protects against phimosis and urinary tract infections, and does not prevent hypospadias. Providers scored lower for items related to more recent research: protection against cervical cancer, genital ulcer disease, bacterial vaginosis, and reduction in HIV acquisition. Two models were constructed looking at (1) overall knowledge about male circumcision, and (2) knowledge about male circumcision reduction in HIV acquisition. Pediatricians demonstrated greater overall infant male circumcision knowledge, while obstetricians exhibited significantly greater knowledge for the HIV acquisition item. Conclusion Providers’ knowledge levels regarding the risks and benefits of infant male circumcision are highly variable, indicating the need for system-based educational interventions. PMID:25635664

  14. Healthcare provider and patient perspectives on diagnostic imaging investigations

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Hoffmann, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Much has been written about the patient-centred approach in doctor–patient consultations. Little is known about interactions and communication processes regarding healthcare providers’ and patients’ perspectives on expectations and experiences of diagnostic imaging investigations within the medical encounter. Patients journey through the health system from the point of referral to the imaging investigation itself and then to the post-imaging consultation. Aim and setting: To explore healthcare provider and patient perspectives on interaction and communication processes during diagnostic imaging investigations as part of their clinical journey through a healthcare complex. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted, with two phases of data collection. Twenty-four patients were conveniently selected at a public district hospital complex and were followed throughout their journey in the hospital system, from admission to discharge. The second phase entailed focus group interviews conducted with providers in the district hospital and adjacent academic hospital (medical officers and family physicians, nurses, radiographers, radiology consultants and registrars). Results: Two main themes guided our analysis: (1) provider perspectives; and (2) patient dispositions and reactions. Golden threads that cut across these themes are interactions and communication processes in the context of expectations, experiences of the imaging investigations and the outcomes thereof. Conclusion: Insights from this study provide a better understanding of the complexity of the processes and interactions between providers and patients during the imaging investigations conducted as part of their clinical pathway. The interactions and communication processes are provider–patient centred when a referral for a diagnostic imaging investigation is included. PMID:26245604

  15. Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  16. Burden and Stress among Psychiatry Residents and Psychiatric Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Ishara, Sergio; Bandeira, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared the levels of job burden and stress in psychiatry residents with those of other healthcare professionals at inpatient and outpatient psychiatric hospitals in a medium-sized Brazilian city. Method: In this study, the levels of job burden and stress of 136 healthcare workers and 36 psychiatry residents from six various…

  17. Herpes labialis among dental healthcare providers in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Azodo, C. C.; Umoh, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The epidemiology of herpes labialis has been relatively neglected. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of self-reported herpes labialis among Nigerian dental health providers. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study of final year dental students and dentists undergoing postgraduate training at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria was conducted in June, 2014. The demographic information, lifetime and period (previous year) experience of the herpes labialis, perceived triggers and action taken during the last episode were obtained using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: The annual prevalence of herpes labialis was 7.4% while the lifetime prevalence was 22.1%. The lifetime prevalence was significantly associated with marital status, professional status and family history of herpes labialis. However, in binary regression, it was only marital status and family history of herpes labialis that emerged as the determinants of this lifetime prevalence. The most common trigger factors reported by the participants for the last episode of herpes labialis were fever, malaria, fatigue and stress. The actions taken by participants for the last episode of herpes labialis were using drugs without prescription (14.3%), application of lubricant (23.8%), nothing (57.1%) and could not remember (4.8%). Conclusion: Data from this study revealed that one out of fourteen and one out of five every studied dental healthcare providers had experienced herpes labialis in the last 12 months and their lifetime respectively. The reduction of fever inducing infections, stress and fatigue which were major triggers will help decrease herpes labialis among this studied group. PMID:26392726

  18. Coccidioidomycosis: knowledge, attitudes, and practices among healthcare providers--Arizona, 2007.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sanny; Erhart, Laura M; Anderson, Shoana; Komatsu, Ken; Park, Benjamin; Chiller, Tom; Sunenshine, Rebecca

    2011-08-01

    Coccidioidomycosis presumably causes ≤ 33% of community-acquired pneumonias cases, although < 15% of the patients are tested for coccidioidomycosis. We assessed healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding coccidioidomycosis diagnosis and treatment in Arizona. A survey was mailed to 7,608 eligible healthcare providers licensed by the Arizona medical, osteopathic, and nursing boards in October and December 2007. We used weights to adjust for non-response and multivariate logistic regression models to identify predictors of ≥ 70% correct regarding knowledge and treatment practices. Of 1,823 (24%) respondents, 53% were physicians, 52% were male, and the mean age was 51 years. Approximately 50% reported confidence in their ability to treat coccidioidomycosis, and 21% correctly answered all four treatment questions. Predictors of ≥ 70% correct concerning knowledge and treatment practices included always counseling patients after diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=4.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.8-7.1); specializing in infectious diseases (AOR=2.4; 95% CI: 1.0-5.7); and having received coccidioidomycosis continuing medical education (CME) in the last year (AOR=1.8; 95% CI: 1.2-2.6). These findings demonstrate that coccidioidomycosis CME improves knowledge of disease diagnosis and management, underscoring the need for a comprehensive coccidioidomycosis education campaign for healthcare providers in Arizona. PMID:21247229

  19. Psychosocial issues in diabetes self-management: strategies for healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Brigitte C; Pursley, Shannon

    2013-02-01

    Education and training for diabetes mellitus self-management is widely available and an essential part of many diabetes centres. Nonetheless, the majority of individuals with diabetes do not adhere to optimal self-management recommendations. It is believed that psychosocial issues play an important role in individuals' ability to undertake the extensive behavioural demands involved in managing diabetes. The goal of the present article is to provide an overview of psychosocial issues and suggest strategies for healthcare providers in supporting patients with the challenges of diabetes self-management. First, motivational enhancement strategies have the potential to augment patients' own motivation to engage in health behaviours. Second, behavior modification principles can increase patients' self-efficacy and their experiences of success. Third, managing distressing emotions, including anxiety, depression, distress specifically related to diabetes care, and fear of hypoglycemia, can facilitate motivation and ability to undertake diabetes self-management efforts. Recognizing and addressing psychosocial challenges allows healthcare providers to better support their patients in the demanding tasks of diabetes self-management. PMID:24070746

  20. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women. PMID:27350095

  1. Effects of librarian-provided services in healthcare settings: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Laure; Farrell, Ann; Ayala, A Patricia; Lightfoot, David; Kenny, Tim; Aaronson, Ellen; Allee, Nancy; Brigham, Tara; Connor, Elizabeth; Constantinescu, Teodora; Muellenbach, Joanne; Epstein, Helen-Ann Brown; Weiss, Ardis

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of librarian-provided services in healthcare settings on patient, healthcare provider, and researcher outcomes. Materials and methods Medline, CINAHL, ERIC, LISA (Library and Information Science Abstracts), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception to June 2013. Studies involving librarian-provided services for patients encountering the healthcare system, healthcare providers, or researchers were eligible for inclusion. All librarian-provided services in healthcare settings were considered as an intervention, including hospitals, primary care settings, or public health clinics. Results Twenty-five articles fulfilled our eligibility criteria, including 22 primary publications and three companion reports. The majority of studies (15/22 primary publications) examined librarians providing instruction in literature searching to healthcare trainees, and measured literature searching proficiency. Other studies analyzed librarian-provided literature searching services and instruction in question formulation as well as the impact of librarian-provided services on patient length of stay in hospital. No studies were found that investigated librarians providing direct services to researchers or patients in healthcare settings. Conclusions Librarian-provided services directed to participants in training programs (eg, students, residents) improve skills in searching the literature to facilitate the integration of research evidence into clinical decision-making. Services provided to clinicians were shown to be effective in saving time for health professionals and providing relevant information for decision-making. Two studies indicated patient length of stay was reduced when clinicians requested literature searches related to a patient's case. PMID:24872341

  2. Educating Healthcare Providers Regarding LGBT Patients and Health Issues: The Special Case of Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, David A.; Whitehead, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Much is written about the availability of healthcare services among elements of the U.S. population, with a large proportion of the literature focusing on access. Although physical access is an overarching issue for many, educators must remember that a key factor in providing complete and competent healthcare is to understand the patient and any…

  3. Why and How Is Compassion Necessary to Provide Good Healthcare? Comments From an Academic Physician

    PubMed Central

    Lionis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    This is a short commentary to the editorial issued by Marianna Fotaki, entitled: "Why and how is compassion necessary to provide good quality healthcare." It introduces the necessity of a more cognitive approach to explore further the determinants of behavior towards compassionate care. It raises questions about the importance of training towards a more patient-care and values driven healthcare system. PMID:26673339

  4. Sexual Assault Simulation Course for Healthcare Providers: Enhancing Sexual Assault Education Using Simulation.

    PubMed

    Scannell, Meredith; Lewis-O'Connor, Annie; Barash, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have been sexually assaulted disproportionately experience gaps in healthcare delivery. Ensuring that healthcare providers who care for this population are adequately prepared is one way of addressing this gap. At the Brigham and Women's Hospital, a 4-hour long interprofessional Sexual Assault Simulation Course for Healthcare Providers (SASH) was developed and conducted at the hospital's Simulation, Training, Research, & Technology Utilization System Center. The SASH is offered using a variety of teaching methodologies including didactics, skill stations comprising how to collect forensic evidence, simulation experience with standardized patient, and debriefing. Using simulation as an educational method allows healthcare professionals to gain hands-on skills in a safe environment. Ultimately, the goal of the SASH is to enhance collaborative practice between healthcare professionals and to improve knowledge, with the purpose of improving care for patients who have been sexually assaulted. PMID:26457900

  5. Measuring patients’ perceptions of communication with healthcare providers: Do differences in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics matter?

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Wallace, Lorraine S.; Fryer, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Background National governments across the globe have set goals to improve healthcare delivery. Understanding patient–provider communication is essential for the development of policies that measure how well a healthcare system delivers care. Objectives This study was designed to determine which, if any, demographic factors were independently associated with how US patients perceive various aspects of communication with their healthcare providers. Design and methods The study was a secondary, cross-sectional analysis of nationally representative data from the 2002 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Among US adults with a healthcare visit in the past year (n = approximately 16 700), we assessed the association between several covariate demographic and socioeconomic factors and four dependent measures of patient perceptions of communication with their healthcare providers. Results Across all four measures of communication, older patients were more likely to report positively. Having health insurance and a usual source of care were consistent predictors of positive perceptions of communication. Hispanic patients also reported better perceptions of communication across all four measures. The most economically disadvantaged patients were less likely to report that providers always explained things so that they understood. Male patients were more likely to report that providers always spent enough time with them. Conclusions This study suggests that patient perceptions of communication in healthcare settings vary widely by demographics and other individual patient characteristics. In this paper, we discuss the relevance of these communication disparities to design policies to improve healthcare systems, both at the individual practice level and the national level. PMID:19250153

  6. 32 CFR 105.11 - Healthcare provider procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of a victim. (6) Require that care provided to sexual assault victims shall be gender-responsive... eligible, which shall include, but are not limited to: (1) Testing, prophylactic treatment options,...

  7. Informal rural healthcare providers in North and South India.

    PubMed

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Shyamprasad, K M; Singh, Rajesh; Zachariah, Anshi; Singh, Rajkumari; Bloom, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Rural households in India rely extensively on informal biomedical providers, who lack valid medical qualifications. Their numbers far exceed those of formal providers. Our study reports on the education, knowledge, practices and relationships of informal providers (IPs) in two very different districts: Tehri Garhwal in Uttarakhand (north) and Guntur in Andhra Pradesh (south). We mapped and interviewed IPs in all nine blocks of Tehri and in nine out of 57 blocks in Guntur, and then interviewed a smaller sample in depth (90 IPs in Tehri, 100 in Guntur) about market practices, relationships with the formal sector, and their knowledge of protocol-based management of fever, diarrhoea and respiratory conditions. We evaluated IPs' performance by observing their interactions with three patients per condition; nine patients per provider. IPs in the two districts had very different educational backgrounds-more years of schooling followed by various informal diplomas in Tehri and more apprenticeships in Guntur, yet their knowledge of management of the three conditions was similar and reasonably high (71% Tehri and 73% Guntur). IPs in Tehri were mostly clinic-based and dispensed a blend of allopathic and indigenous drugs. IPs in Guntur mostly provided door-to-door services and prescribed and dispensed mainly allopathic drugs. In Guntur, formal private doctors were important referral providers (with commissions) and source of new knowledge for IPs. At both sites, IPs prescribed inappropriate drugs, but the use of injections and antibiotics was higher in Guntur. Guntur IPs were well organized in state and block level associations that had successfully lobbied for a state government registration and training for themselves. We find that IPs are firmly established in rural India but their role has grown and evolved differently in different market settings. Interventions need to be tailored differently keeping in view these unique features. PMID:25012795

  8. Informal rural healthcare providers in North and South India

    PubMed Central

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Shyamprasad, K M; Singh, Rajesh; Zachariah, Anshi; Singh, Rajkumari; Bloom, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Rural households in India rely extensively on informal biomedical providers, who lack valid medical qualifications. Their numbers far exceed those of formal providers. Our study reports on the education, knowledge, practices and relationships of informal providers (IPs) in two very different districts: Tehri Garhwal in Uttarakhand (north) and Guntur in Andhra Pradesh (south). We mapped and interviewed IPs in all nine blocks of Tehri and in nine out of 57 blocks in Guntur, and then interviewed a smaller sample in depth (90 IPs in Tehri, 100 in Guntur) about market practices, relationships with the formal sector, and their knowledge of protocol-based management of fever, diarrhoea and respiratory conditions. We evaluated IPs’ performance by observing their interactions with three patients per condition; nine patients per provider. IPs in the two districts had very different educational backgrounds—more years of schooling followed by various informal diplomas in Tehri and more apprenticeships in Guntur, yet their knowledge of management of the three conditions was similar and reasonably high (71% Tehri and 73% Guntur). IPs in Tehri were mostly clinic-based and dispensed a blend of allopathic and indigenous drugs. IPs in Guntur mostly provided door-to-door services and prescribed and dispensed mainly allopathic drugs. In Guntur, formal private doctors were important referral providers (with commissions) and source of new knowledge for IPs. At both sites, IPs prescribed inappropriate drugs, but the use of injections and antibiotics was higher in Guntur. Guntur IPs were well organized in state and block level associations that had successfully lobbied for a state government registration and training for themselves. We find that IPs are firmly established in rural India but their role has grown and evolved differently in different market settings. Interventions need to be tailored differently keeping in view these unique features. PMID:25012795

  9. Protect Your Baby from Bleeds: Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Bleeds – Talk to Your Healthcare Provider about Vitamin K Without enough vitamin K, your baby has a chance of bleeding ... even death. Infants who do not receive the vitamin K shot at birth can develop VKDB up ...

  10. Maryland's Top 25 Demand Healthcare Occupations: Projected Demand and Reported Supply Provided by Maryland Higher Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This report compares the demand for qualified healthcare workers in Maryland and the supply provided by Maryland higher education institutions. It identifies: (1) Maryland?s top 25 demand healthcare occupations, and (2) any gaps between the supply and demand for these 25 healthcare occupations. Additional information on each healthcare occupation…

  11. Challenges to Arboviral Surveillance in Tennessee: Health-Care Providers' Attitudes and Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Shaffner, Julie; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

    2016-06-01

    Surveillance of arboviruses depends on health-care providers' ability to diagnose and report human cases of disease. The purposes of this study were to assess Tennessee providers' 1) self-efficacy toward diagnosis and management, 2) clinical practices, and 3) variation in these measures by provider characteristics. A survey was e-mailed to 13,851 providers, of which 916 (7%) responded. Respondents diagnosed more arboviruses in the previous year than were recorded in surveillance records, an indication of underreporting. Respondents had low to moderate self-efficacy toward diagnosis and management of arboviruses. Although more than 70% (N = 589) used paired serology, only 46% (N = 396) asked patients to return for a convalescent specimen draw within the correct time frame. One of the most commonly reported barriers to testing was uncertainty about which tests to order. Providers working in family medicine and urgent care, nurse practitioners, and those at outpatient facilities had lower rates of high self-efficacy than their counterparts working in other settings and from other specialties. Clinical practices were influenced by specialty, designation, setting, and geography but not by years of experience. Education to improve arboviral surveillance in Tennessee is warranted. Topics could include proper diagnosis and management, appropriate testing and overcoming barriers to testing, and public health reporting. PMID:27022148

  12. Assessing the quality of healthcare provided to children.

    PubMed Central

    Mangione-Smith, R; McGlynn, E A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a conceptual framework for evaluating quality of care for children and adolescents, summarize the key issues related to developing measures to assess pediatric quality of care, examine some existing measures, and present evidence about their current level of performance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Assessing the quality of care for children poses many challenges not encountered when making these measurements in the adult population. Children and adolescents (from this point forward referred to collectively as children unless differentiation is necessary) differ from adults in two clinically important ways (Jameson and Wehr 1993): (1) their normal developmental trajectory is characterized by change, and (2) they have differential morbidity. These factors contribute to the limitations encountered when developing measures to assess the quality of care for children. The movement of a child through the various stages of development makes it difficult to establish what constitutes a "normal" outcome and by extension what constitutes a poor outcome. Additionally, salient developmental outcomes that result from poor quality of care may not be observed for several years. This implies that poor outcomes may be observed when the child is receiving care from a delivery system other than the one that provided the low-quality care. Attributing the suboptimal outcome to the new delivery system would be inappropriate. Differential morbidity refers to the fact that the type, prevalence, and severity of illness experienced by children is measurably different from that observed in adults. Most children experience numerous self-limited illness of mild severity. A minority of children suffer from markedly more severe diseases. Thus, condition-specific measures in children are problematic to implement for routine assessments because of the extremely low incidence and prevalence of most severe pediatric diseases (Halfon 1996). However, children with these conditions are

  13. HPV vaccine hesitancy: Findings from a statewide survey of healthcare providers

    PubMed Central

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Dempsey, Amanda F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Healthcare provider recommendations are critical for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake. We sought to describe providers' HPV vaccine recommendation practices and explore their perceptions of parental hesitancy. Method A statewide sample (n=575) of Minnesota healthcare providers (20% pediatricians, 47% family medicine physicians, 33% nurse practitioners) completed our online survey in April 2013. Results Only 76% of healthcare providers reported routinely recommending HPV vaccine for girls ages 11-12, and far fewer (46%) did so for boys (p<.001). A majority of providers reported asking questions about parents' concerns (74%), but many lacked time to probe reasons (47%) or felt that they could not change parents' minds (55%). Higher levels of self-efficacy and outcome expectations were associated with routine recommendations (p<.05). Discussion Findings suggest that providers' perceptions of hesitancy may discourage them from routinely recommending HPV vaccine. Improving providers' self-efficacy to address hesitancy may be important for improving vaccination rates. PMID:25017939

  14. Citizens' quality councils: an innovative mechanism for monitoring and providing social endorsement of healthcare providers' performance?

    PubMed

    Ruelas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, under the influence of continuing improvement and total quality strategies, efforts to improve the quality of healthcare have been generated from within each healthcare organization. External mechanisms, such as accreditation, that drive quality improvement from without, have existed for much longer. However, these accreditation systems incorporated the need to demonstrate the existence of continuing improvement processes as a standard barely 10 years ago; thus, the external mechanism included the development of internal processes as yet another requirement. As Dobrow, Langer, Angus and Sullivan state in the lead article, the existence of a whole evidence-based culture that has spread the concern about quality is beyond doubt; I would add that it has also intensified this concern. Several factors have contributed to this trend, which now seems irreversible. On the one hand, as the paper points out, one of these factors is the growing requirement to allocate resources according to performance. On the other, there is the growing evidence of errors committed by health systems that cause harm to patients. The latter has created increasing demand for reliable information, conceived not only to allow the detection of these situations, but also to invest greater reliability in the health systems in the eyes of patients and general public. In both cases, however, the question remains: Who defines and who measures quality levels in such a way that the information is credible? PMID:16651858

  15. Chinese HIV-positive patients and their healthcare providers: contrasting Confucian versus Western notions of secrecy and support.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ti; Starks, Helene; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Simoni, Jane; Zhang, Fujie; Pearson, Cynthia; Zhao, Hongxin

    2007-01-01

    In this qualitative study, 29 HIV-positive, Chinese patients reported highly favorable impressions of their healthcare providers, who were seen as providing important medical-related, financial, and emotional support. Generally, the patient-provider relationship positively impacted the participants and their ability to maintain their health and was especially critical when patients were isolated from familial sources of support due to intense AIDS stigma. Often family members were informed of an HIV diagnosis before the patient, revealing tensions between Confucian principles of collectivism and familial authority and increasingly prevalent Western ideals of individual autonomy and the privileged status of personal health information. PMID:18025868

  16. Are Healthcare Providers Asking about Environmental Exposures? A Community-Based Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Zierold, Kristina M.; Sears, Clara G.

    2015-01-01

    People living near environmental hazards may develop symptoms and health conditions that require specialized monitoring and treatment by healthcare providers. One emerging environmental hazard is coal ash. Coal ash is comprised of small particles containing heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and radioactive elements. The overall purpose of this study was to explore whether healthcare providers ask patients if they live near an environmental hazard like coal ash storage sites and to assess what health conditions prompt a provider inquiry. Focus groups were conducted in 2012 and a cross-sectional survey was administered in 2013. Overall, 61% of survey respondents reported that their healthcare providers never asked if they lived near an environmental hazard. One focus group member stated “No, they don't ask that. They just always blame stuff on you….” Respondents with asthma and other lung conditions were significantly more likely to be asked by a healthcare provider if they lived near an environmental hazard. Due to the unique exposures from environmental hazards and the low prevalence of patients being asked about environmental hazards, we recommend that healthcare providers take environmental health histories in order to understand patients' exposures, to monitor symptoms of exposure, and to assist with education about reducing exposure. PMID:26557853

  17. Are healthcare providers asking about environmental exposures? A community-based mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Zierold, Kristina M; Sears, Clara G

    2015-01-01

    People living near environmental hazards may develop symptoms and health conditions that require specialized monitoring and treatment by healthcare providers. One emerging environmental hazard is coal ash. Coal ash is comprised of small particles containing heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and radioactive elements. The overall purpose of this study was to explore whether healthcare providers ask patients if they live near an environmental hazard like coal ash storage sites and to assess what health conditions prompt a provider inquiry. Focus groups were conducted in 2012 and a cross-sectional survey was administered in 2013. Overall, 61% of survey respondents reported that their healthcare providers never asked if they lived near an environmental hazard. One focus group member stated "No, they don't ask that. They just always blame stuff on you…." Respondents with asthma and other lung conditions were significantly more likely to be asked by a healthcare provider if they lived near an environmental hazard. Due to the unique exposures from environmental hazards and the low prevalence of patients being asked about environmental hazards, we recommend that healthcare providers take environmental health histories in order to understand patients' exposures, to monitor symptoms of exposure, and to assist with education about reducing exposure. PMID:26557853

  18. Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior of Healthcare Providers towards Breast Cancer in Malaysia: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Eman; Gillani, Syed Wasif; Siddiqui, Ammar; Shammary H A, Al; Poh, Vinci; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Baig, Mirza

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Malaysia. Therefore, it is highly important for the public to be educated on breast cancer and to know the steps to detect it early on. Healthcare providers are in the prime position to provide such education to the public due to their high knowledge regarding health and their roles in healthcare. The present systematic review involved studies conducted in recent years to analyze the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Malaysian healthcare providers regarding breast cancer, in attempts to obtain an overall picture of how well equipped our healthcare providers are to provide optimal breast cancer education, and to see their perceptions and actual involvement in said education. The systematic review was conducted via a primary search of various databases and journal websites, and a secondary search of references used by eligible studies. Criteria for eligibility included being published from the year 2008 till present, being conducted in Malaysia, and being written in the English language. A total of two studies were eligible for this review. Findings show that Malaysian future and current healthcare providers have moderate knowledge on breast cancer, have a positive towards involvement of breast cancer education, but have poor actual involvement. PMID:26225658

  19. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of and Experiences with an Integrated Healthcare Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westheimer, Joshua M.; Steinley-Bumgarner, Michelle; Brownson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined the experiences of primary care providers participating in an integrated healthcare service between mental health and primary care in a university health center. In this program, behavioral health providers work collaboratively with primary care providers in the treatment of students. Participants…

  20. Perceptions of Obesity Treatment Options Among Healthcare Providers and Low-Income Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Betty M.; Kennedy, Kathleen B.; Sarpong, Daniel F.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary care is a key component of medical care delivery and has a role to play in reducing obesity in the United States. The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes and perceptions about obesity in low-income primary care patients and to identify preferences for weight management interventions from the patient and healthcare provider perspectives. Methods: A convenience sample of 28 patients and 6 healthcare providers from across the state of Louisiana participated in 1 of 5 structured focus groups. Demographic information was collected from both the patients and healthcare providers using survey instruments. Results: Patients and healthcare providers were more similar than dissimilar in their perceptions of obesity in that both groups selected referral to a nutritionist, use of medication, and prescribed exercise as the top 3 strategies that would have the greatest impact on losing weight. Referral to a nutritionist was selected as the easiest strategy to implement. Conclusion: Receiving feedback from both patients and healthcare providers gives researchers the opportunity to acquire useful knowledge that may be beneficial in designing and conducting interventions suitable for patients desiring to lose weight, especially those in primary care settings. PMID:27303227

  1. Physicians, nonphysician healthcare providers, and patients communicating in hepatitis C: an in-office sociolinguistic study.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Heidi E; Gordon, Cynthia; Nelson, Meaghan; Kerbleski, Marian

    2006-01-01

    In-office conversations about hepatitis C can impact patients' perceptions of outcomes, as well as medication adherence. This study analyzed interactions between physicians, nonphysician healthcare providers (including nurses), and patients with hepatitis C virus infection in order to examine differences based on number and type of providers participating. Gastroenterologists, nonphysician healthcare providers, and patients with hepatitis C virus infection were video- and audio-recorded during regularly scheduled visits. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. Thirty-four visits took place with a physician only, 4 with a nonphysician healthcare provider only, and 25 with both providers (9 concurrent and 16 consecutive). Differences among the participant schema included visit length, patient "talk-time," and motivation provided. When providers saw patients consecutively, differing information was sometimes provided. In visits where providers saw the patient concurrently, competing authority between providers and exclusion of the patient through use of medical jargon were obstacles to ideal communication. Differences in hepatitis C-related interactions based on the number and type of participants suggest opportunities for improved communication. In visits with multiple providers, physicians and nurses should attempt to ensure that they (a) avoid supplying differing information, (b) present a "unified front" to avoid competing authority, and (c) minimize the use of medical jargon, which excludes patients from participating in their own healthcare. PMID:17038837

  2. Factors affecting the motivation of healthcare professionals providing care to Emiratis with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alhyas, Layla; Nielsen, Jessica D Jones; Dawoud, Dalia; Majeed, Azeem

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to identify facilitators of and barriers to healthcare professionals' motivation in a diabetes centre in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design A qualitative research approach was employed using semistructured interviews to assess perception of and attitudes regarding healthcare professionals' motivation in providing good quality diabetes care. Setting A diabetes centre located in Abu-Dhabi, UAE. Participants Healthcare professionals including specialist physicians, dieticians, podiatrists, health educators and nurses were recruited through purposive sampling. Main outcome measures After data collection, the audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to content analysis. Results Nine semistructured interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals of various professional backgrounds. Important facilitators and barriers related to patient, professional, organization and cultural factors were identified. Barriers that related to heavy workload, disjointed care, lack of patient compliance and awareness, and cultural beliefs and attitudes about diabetes were common. Key facilitators included the patient's role in achieving therapeutic outcomes as well as compliance, cooperation and communication. Conclusion This qualitative study provides some unique insights about factors affecting healthcare professionals' motivation in providing good quality care. To improve the motivation of healthcare professionals in the management of diabetes and therefore the quality of diabetes care, several steps are needed. Importantly, the role of primary care should be reinforced and strengthened regarding the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, privacy of the consultation time should be highly protected and regulated, and awareness of the Emirate culture and its impact on health should be disseminated to the healthcare professionals providing care to Emirates with diabetes. Also, greater emphasis should be placed on educating Emiratis with

  3. Mandatory pre-suit mediation: local malpractice reform benefiting patients and healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Randall C; Warren, Lindsay A; Gravenstein, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    The Florida Patient Safety and Pre-Suit Mediation Program (FLPSMP) was implemented as a pilot program to provide patients of healthcare providers and facilities associated with the University of Florida Health Science Center with timely and fair compensation when injured and to combat rising healthcare legal liability expenses. Prior to filing a formal lawsuit, participants of the FLPSMP join in a confidential and nonbinding pre-suit mediation conducted by a neutral third-party mediator. The process fosters confidential and candid communication between doctors and patients, saving thousands of dollars in legal expenses for both patients and providers. PMID:20979162

  4. Oral health care in residential aged care services: barriers to engaging health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Slack-Smith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The oral health of older people living in residential aged care facilities has been widely recognised as inadequate. The aim of this paper is to identify barriers to effective engagement of health-care providers in oral care in residential aged care facilities. A literature review was conducted using MEDline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and PsychInfo between 2000 and 2013, with a grey literature search of government and non-government organisation policy papers, conference proceedings and theses. Keywords included: dental/oral care, residential aged care, health-care providers, barriers, constraints, and limitations. A thematic framework was used to synthesise the literature according to a series of oral health-care provision barriers, health-care provider barriers, and cross-sector collaborative barriers. A range of system, service and practitioner level barriers were identified that could impede effective communication/collaboration between different health-care providers, residents and carers regarding oral care, and these were further impeded by internal barriers at each level. Findings indicated several areas for investigation and consideration regarding policy and practice improvements. While further research is required, some key areas should be addressed if oral health care in residential aged care services is to be improved. PMID:25155109

  5. Comparing the quality of preconception care provided in healthcare centers in Mashhad in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sardasht, Fatemeh Ghaffari; Shourab, Nahid Jahani; Jafarnejad, Farzaneh; Esmaily, Habibollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improving the quality of healthcare services is considered as the main strategy to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes. Providing appropriate healthcare for mothers and their newborn children is facilitated significantly by considering the mothers’ health and welfare before pregnancy occurs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the quality of preconception care provided to women of reproductive age provided by five health centers in Mashhad in 2012 and 2013. Methods: Multi-stage sampling was used to select the participants in this descriptive study. As a result, 360 women of reproductive age and 39 healthcare providers from 24 healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected to participate. The data gathering tool was a checklist based on the Donabedian model that includes the three dimensions of structure, process, and outcome. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5), Kruskal-Wallis tests, ANOVA, and Spearman rank correlation. Results: The results showed that preconception care at the 24 healthcare centers had essentially the same conditions. But in the process and outcome components, the quality of the preconception care at five of the health centers was significantly different (p=0.008). The highest quality of care processes was identified at health center number 3. The difference in the component of outcomes being followed up by the healthcare providers at five of the health centers was statistically significant (p=0.000); however, there were no significant differences found among the satisfaction and awareness of the women who participated at the five health centers. Conclusion: The results showed that the performance of health personnel in providing preconception care and providing follow-up care was not satisfactory. PMID:26120412

  6. Using Publicly Available Data to Characterize Consumers Use of Email to Communicate with Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Sandefer, Ryan H; Khairat, Saif S; Pieczkiewicz, David S; Speedie, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    The use of patient focused technology has been proclaimed as a means to improve patient satisfaction and improve care outcomes. The Center for Medicaid/Medicare Services, through its EHR Incentive Program, has required eligible hospitals and professionals to send and receive secure messages from patients in order to receive financial incentives and avoid reimbursement penalties. Secure messaging between providers and patients has the potential to improve communication and care outcomes. The purpose of this study was to use National Health Interview Series (NHIS) data to identify the patient characteristics associated with communicating with healthcare providers via email. Individual patient characteristics were analyzed to determine the likelihood of emailing healthcare providers. The use of email for this purpose is associated with educational attainment, having a usual place of receiving healthcare, income, and geography. Publicly available data such as the NHIS may be used to better understand trends in adoption and use of consumer health information technologies. PMID:26262080

  7. Beliefs and practices of healthcare providers regarding obesity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Filipa Valente; Pais-Ribeiro, José Luis; Maia, Ângela Rosa Pinho da Costa

    2012-01-01

    Despite the implementation of various intervention measures, the number of obese individuals remain high; thus, it is important to consider what is contributing to this scenario. Authors have been striving to understand the role healthcare providers, especially in primary healthcare, seem to play in this context. The present review aims to synthesize the main investigation results regarding beliefs, attitudes, and practices of healthcare providers, as they seem to negatively influence the practitioner's actions. The words "obesity", "beliefs", "healthcare professionals", "general practitioners", "attitudes", "practices", "health physicians", and "family practitioners" were entered into databases, such as EBSCOHost, ScienceDirect, Psychlnfo, PubMed, and SciELO. Thirteen studies from 1991 to 2011 were reviewed. The data indicate a lack of appropriate understanding and adequate competence regarding obesity, which likely contributes to ambivalent belief development and negative attitudes toward obese individuals, who are described as unmotivated, lazy, and lacking self-control. These professionals consider it hard to deal with obesity, manifesting low expectations of success regarding weight loss, thus considering themselves unsuccessful. Their practices are inconsistent, mirroring a certain skepticism towards the efficacy of available interventions. Either during graduation or as active practitioners, it is imperative to make healthcare providers aware of the impact their beliefs regarding obesity can exert on their practices, as these may impair appropriate and effective treatment delivery to obese individuals. PMID:22569623

  8. Pumping Insulin during Exercise: What Healthcare Providers and Diabetic Patients Need To Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colberg, Sheri R.; Walsh, John

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can decrease insulin resistance. Insulin pumps deliver precise insulin adjustments that improve fuel availability and provide glycemic control to help people with diabetes overcome obstacles to exercise. Physicians, patients, and healthcare providers should be familiar with the features and nuances of specific pump models and follow basic…

  9. The Role of Healthcare Providers and Caregivers in Educating Older Adults about Foodborne Illness Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlgenant, Kelly C.; Cates, Sheryl C.; Godwin, Sandria L.; Speller-Henderson, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Adults aged 60 or older are more likely than younger adults to experience severe complications or even death as a result of foodborne infections. This study investigated which specific groups of healthcare providers or other caregivers are most receptive to providing food safety information to older adults. Telephone-based focus groups were…

  10. General Public Expectation from the Communication Process with their Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Hassali, Ma; Shafie, Aa; Khan, Tm

    2012-07-01

    The current study aimed to explore the public views and expectation about a successful communication process between the healthcare providers/physicians and patients in Penang Island, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Penang Island using a 14-item questionnaire. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 15.0(®) were used to analyze the collected data. A nonparametric statistics was applied; the Chi-square test was applied to measure the association among the variables. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of N (500) respondents have shown willingness to participate in the study with a response rate of 83.3%. The majority 319 (63.9%) have disclosed to communicate with their healthcare providers in the Malay language and about 401 (80.4%) of the respondents were found satisfied with the information provided by the physician. It was a common expectation by the most of the sample to focus more on the patient history before prescribing any medicine. Moreover, about 60.0% of the respondents expected that the healthcare providers must show patience to the patient's queries. The level of satisfaction with the information shared by the healthcare providers was higher among the respondents with a higher education level. Furthermore, patients with higher level of education expect that physician shouldwell understand their views and medical history to prescribe a better therapeutic regimen. PMID:23112539

  11. Personal Health Records: Beneficial or Burdensome for Patients and Healthcare Providers?

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Melissa; Boateng, Samuel; Studeny, Jana; Coustasse, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) have been mandated to be made available to patients to provide increased access to medical care information, encourage participation in healthcare decision making, and enable correction of errors within medical records. The purpose of this study was to analyze the usefulness of PHRs from the perspectives of patients and providers. The methodology of this qualitative study was a literature review using 34 articles. PHRs are powerful tools for patients and healthcare providers. Better healthcare results and correction of medical records have been shown to be positive outcomes of the use of PHRs. PHRs have also been shown to be difficult for patients to use and understand, and providers had concerns about correct information transferring to the portals and patients eliminating information from the record. Concerns regarding patient understanding of medical records, legal liability, and the response time required of providers were also identified. For the PHR to succeed in the US healthcare system, assurance that the information will be protected, useful, and easily accessed is necessary. PMID:27134613

  12. Rapid Deterioration of Basic Life Support Skills in Dentists With Basic Life Support Healthcare Provider.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Shogo; Ichiyama, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between basic life support skills in dentists who had completed the American Heart Association's Basic Life Support (BLS) Healthcare Provider qualification and time since course completion. Thirty-six dentists who had completed the 2005 BLS Healthcare Provider course participated in the study. We asked participants to perform 2 cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a mannequin and evaluated basic life support skills. Dentists who had previously completed the BLS Healthcare Provider course displayed both prolonged reaction times, and the quality of their basic life support skills deteriorated rapidly. There were no correlations between basic life support skills and time since course completion. Our results suggest that basic life support skills deteriorate rapidly for dentists who have completed the BLS Healthcare Provider. Newer guidelines stressing chest compressions over ventilation may help improve performance over time, allowing better cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dental office emergencies. Moreover, it may be effective to provide a more specialized version of the life support course to train the dentists, stressing issues that may be more likely to occur in the dental office. PMID:27269662

  13. Providing Healthcare Services at Home-A Necessity in Iran: A Narrative Review Article

    PubMed Central

    NIKBAKHT-NASRABADI, Alireza; SHABANY-HAMEDAN, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing hospital costs and its social and cultural problems has led to the idea of providing healthcare services at home. Because of infrastructural and implementation problems, providing healthcare at home in Iran has not been initiated yet. Therefore, this study set out to elaborate the need for a comprehensive system in order to provide this service in Iran. Methods: All articles published in indexing sites with the defined keywords in English or Farsi were gathered. The indexing websites included Iran Medex, PubMed Central, Elsevier journals, WHO publications and Google scholar from 1985 to 2014 were surveyed. Other documents included the related books and regulations. Results: Despite of having dominant religious values and constitution laws related to stability of family relations and establishment of clinical services and health care at home in Iran, providing health care services faces some harsh challenges including ignoring entrepreneurship and lack of required infrastructures such as lack of required insurance regulations, the inappropriate and indifferent performance of some activists home services and absence of registration and identification system in this domain. Conclusion: Because of the increasing number of elderly people in Iran and healthcare costs becoming more and more expensive, establishing a system for providing healthcare at home is inevitable. PMID:27516992

  14. Exploring the phenomenon of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital based healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janie J; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Kolobova, Irina; Lamson, Angela L; Sira, Natalia; Musick, David

    2015-01-01

    Hospital chaplaincy and spiritual care services are important to patients' medical care and well-being; however, little is known about healthcare providers' experiences receiving spiritual support. A phenomenological study examined the shared experience of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital-based healthcare providers (HBHPs). Six distinct themes emerged from the in-depth interviews: Awareness of chaplain availability, chaplains focus on building relationships with providers and staff, chaplains are integrated in varying degrees on certain hospital units, chaplains meet providers' personal and professional needs, providers appreciate chaplains, and barriers to expanding hospital chaplains' services. While HBHPs appreciated the care received and were able to provide better patient care as a result, participants reported that administrators may not recognize the true value of the care provided. Implications from this study are applied to hospital chaplaincy clinical, research, and training opportunities. PMID:26207904

  15. Swedish healthcare providers' perceptions of preconception expanded carrier screening (ECS)-a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Matar, A; Kihlbom, U; Höglund, A T

    2016-07-01

    Reproductive autonomy, medicalization, and discrimination against disabled and parental responsibility are the main ongoing ethical debates concerning reproductive genetic screening. To examine Swedish healthcare professionals' views on preconception expanded carrier screening (ECS), a qualitative study involving academic and clinical institutions in Sweden was conducted in September 2014 to February 2015. Eleven healthcare professionals including clinicians, geneticists, a midwife, and a genetic counselor were interviewed in depth using a semi-structured interview guide. The questionnaire was constructed after reviewing the main literature and meetings with relevant healthcare providers. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and content analyzed for categories and subcategories. Participants nurtured many ethical and non-ethical concerns regarding preconception ECS. Among the ethical concerns were the potential for discrimination, medicalization, concerns with prioritization of healthcare resources, and effects on reproductive freedom. The effects of implementation of preconception ECS, its stakeholders, regulations, and motivation are some of non-ethical concerns. These concerns, if not addressed, may affect the uptake and usage of carrier screening within Swedish healthcare system. As this is a qualitative study with a small non-random sample size, the findings cannot be generalized. The participants had little to no working experience with expanded screening panels. Moreover, the interviews were conducted in English, a second language for the participants, which might have limited the expression of their views. However, the authors claim that the findings may be pertinent to similar settings in other Scandinavian countries. PMID:27225888

  16. Working for a sustainable future: healthcare leaders provide input for new model.

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    With each tick of the clock, healthcare leaders are coming face to face with a pressing quandary: How can they best guide their organizations to success and sustainability in a rocky and ever-changing healthcare environment? A new "model of sustainability," developed with input from nine CEOs of top medical institutions, may provide some guidance. The model includes six leadership imperatives that underscore critical approaches to supporting the hospital of the future: Build strong organization-wide leadership, become the employer of choice, generate financial strength, redesign structures and processes, develop productive physician relationships, and engage consumers. PMID:12854246

  17. Athletics for All: Providing Opportunities for Students of All Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmer, Regina

    2013-01-01

    The glory days of high school sports are no longer reserved for dream team athletes, as athletic directors are increasingly opening up sports to all students, regardless of ability, and seeing winning results on the field and off. This push is reflected in the most recent National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) survey, which…

  18. Risks and Crises for Healthcare Providers: The Impact of Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Glasberg, Ronald; Hartmann, Michael; Tamm, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    We analyze risks and crises for healthcare providers and discuss the impact of cloud computing in such scenarios. The analysis is conducted in a holistic way, taking into account organizational and human aspects, clinical, IT-related, and utilities-related risks as well as incorporating the view of the overall risk management. PMID:24707207

  19. Electronic retrieval of health information by healthcare providers to improve practice and patient care

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Jessie; Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Hannes, Karin; Deane, Katherine; Labrecque, Michel; Welch, Vivian; Tugwell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background The movement towards evidence-based practice makes explicit the need for access to current best evidence to improve health. Advances in electronic technologies have made health information more available, but does availability affect the rate of use of evidence in practice? Objectives To assess the effectiveness of interventions intended to provide electronic retrieval (access to information) to health information by healthcare providers to improve practice and patient care. Search methods We obtained studies from computerized searches of multiple electronic bibliographic databases, supplemented by checking reference lists, and consultation with experts. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including cluster randomized trials (CRCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCT), and interrupted time series analyses (ITS) of any language publication status examining interventions of effectiveness of electronic retrieval of health information by healthcare providers. Data collection and analysis Duplicate relevancy screening of searches, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment was undertaken. Main results We found two studies that examined this question. Neither study found any changes in professional behavior following an intervention that facilitated electronic retrieval of health information. There was some evidence of improvements in knowledge about the electronic sources of information reported in one study. Neither study assessed changes in patient outcomes or the costs of provision of the electronic resource and the implementation of the recommended evidence-based practices. Authors’ conclusions Overall there was insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of electronic retrieval of healthcare information by healthcare providers to improve practice and patient care. PMID:19588361

  20. Risks and crises for healthcare providers: the impact of cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Glasberg, Ronald; Hartmann, Michael; Draheim, Michael; Tamm, Gerrit; Hessel, Franz

    2014-01-01

    We analyze risks and crises for healthcare providers and discuss the impact of cloud computing in such scenarios. The analysis is conducted in a holistic way, taking into account organizational and human aspects, clinical, IT-related, and utilities-related risks as well as incorporating the view of the overall risk management. PMID:24707207

  1. A pilot study: Reiki for self-care of nurses and healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Brathovde, Angela

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Reiki energy therapy, level I, was taught as a self-care practice to healthcare providers, would their caring perceptions change? Methodological triangulation technique, including a self-report caring scale and interviews, was used, demonstrating positive changes in perceptions of participants' caring behaviors. PMID:16518156

  2. Fever and Pain Management in Childhood: Healthcare Providers' and Parents' Adherence to Current Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, Genny; Orenti, Annalisa; Gambino, Monia; Peves Rios, Walter; Bosis, Samantha; Bianchini, Sonia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the adherence of healthcare providers and parents to the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management, randomized samples of 500 healthcare providers caring for children and 500 families were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. The 378 health care providers (HCPs) responding to the survey (75.6%) included 144 primary care pediatricians (38.1%), 98 hospital pediatricians (25.9%), 62 pediatric residents (16.4%), and 71 pediatric nurses (19.6%); the 464 responding parents (92.8%) included 175 whose youngest (or only) child was ≤5 years old (37.7%), 175 whose youngest (or only) child was aged 6-10 years (37.7%), and 114 whose youngest (or only) child was aged 11-14 years (24.6%). There were gaps in the knowledge of both healthcare providers and parents. Global adherence to the guidelines was lower among the pediatric nurses than the other healthcare providers (odds ratio 0.875; 95% confidence interval 0.795-0.964). Among the parents, those of children aged 6-10 and 11-14 years old, those who were older, and those without a degree answered the questions correctly significantly less frequently than the others. These findings suggest that there is an urgent need to improve the dissemination of the current recommendations concerning fever and pain management among healthcare providers and parents in order to avoid mistaken and sometimes risky attitudes, common therapeutic errors, and the unnecessary overloading of emergency department resources. Pediatric nurses and parents with older children, those who are older, and those with a lower educational level should be the priority targets of educational programmes. PMID:27187436

  3. Why are employers prodding health-care providers to adopt new management systems?: reducing the cost of health care.

    PubMed

    De Feo, Joseph A

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly concerned about the escalating costs of health-care insurance coverage, the quality of health-care delivery, and the escalating costs of delivering clinical services, employers are taking action. They are prodding health-care providers and insurers to adopt breakthrough management systems aimed at reducing costs related to poorly performing services and processes--and at the same time improving clinical outcomes. Doing this will require all members of the health-care value chain to work together to improve each and every process and procedure, whether clinical or administrative. This development presents formidable challenges to all health-care providers, insurers, employees, and patients. PMID:15085703

  4. Patient Perceptions and Expectations From Primary Health-care Providers in India

    PubMed Central

    Ardey, Rashmi; Ardey, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The study of patient satisfaction at the primary care level has been mostly neglected in India. Aim: This objective of this study was to assess indices of Patient Satisfaction at the level of the family physician which is usually the first point of contact between the patient and the health-care system. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out at a Private Primary Health-Care Center in a semirural area in New Delhi, by exit interviews in the form of a questionnaire from patients randomly selected from people visiting the center during the study period. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out on the data collected. Results: The findings revealed that 83.58% of the patients were satisfied with the general experience and the behavior of the health-care provider and 85.9% were satisfied with the treatment and care provided, only 65.5% were satisfied with the physical environment of the clinic. However, the percentage of patients who would recommend the facility to their friends was overwhelming (94.6%). Conclusion: These results show that private health-care providers are still the first choice for any form of medical care. However, there was definitely a gap between the increasing expectations of the patients for more information, better Patient–Provider interaction, more control over the treatment process and better amenities even at the Primary Care level. It is this gap, which needs to be fulfilled to facilitate better utilization of Primary Health-Care Services in the community and reduce pressure on tertiary care services in order to ensure Universal Health Coverage. This study would also help us understand the challenges for Primary Care service providers, private and public, in a low socioeconomic urban setting. PMID:25810990

  5. Patient and Healthcare Provider Views of Depressive Symptoms and Diabetes in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Held, Rachel Forster; DePue, Judith; Rosen, Rochelle; Bereolos, Nicole; Nu'usolia, Ofeira; Tuitele, John; Goldstein, Michael; House, Megan; McGarvey, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    High type 2 diabetes prevalence, associated with recent cultural changes in diet and physical activity, characterizes the U.S. territory of American Samoa. Comorbid diabetes and depression rates are high worldwide and contribute to negative diabetes outcomes; these rates have not been assessed in American Samoa. In this study, six focus groups (FGs) were conducted with 39 American Samoan adults with diabetes; questions on perceptions of diabetes and depressive symptoms were included. Thirteen healthcare staff interviews were conducted to gain further insight into diabetes care in American Samoa. FGs and healthcare staff interviews were translated, transcribed, and entered into NVivo 8 to facilitate analysis. Thematic analysis showed that diabetes patients saw depressive symptoms as directly contributing to high blood sugar. However, these symptoms were rarely mentioned spontaneously, and providers reported they seldom assess them in patients. Many patients and healthcare staff believed the best ways to respond to feelings of depression involved relaxing, leaving difficult situations, or eating. Staff also discussed cultural stigma associated with depression and the importance of establishing rapport before discussing it. In conclusion, healthcare providers in American Samoa need training to increase their awareness of depressive symptoms' negative impact on diabetes management in patients who screen positive for depression. All providers must approach the subject in a supportive context after establishing rapport. This information will be used for cultural translation of a community health worker and primary care-coordinated intervention for adults with diabetes in American Samoa, with the goal of creating an effective and sustainable intervention. PMID:21058808

  6. HIV-Related Stigma Among Healthcare Providers in the Deep South.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Kristi L; Turan, Bulent; McCormick, Lisa; Durojaiye, Modupeoluwa; Nyblade, Laura; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette; Lichtenstein, Bronwen; Turan, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    Stigma towards people living with HIV (PLWH) in healthcare settings is a barrier to optimal treatment. However, our understanding of attitudes towards PLWH from healthcare providers' perspective in the United States is limited and out-of-date. We assessed HIV-related stigma among healthcare staff in Alabama and Mississippi, using online questionnaires. Participants included 651 health workers (60 % White race; 83 % female). Multivariate regression suggests that several factors independently predict stigmatizing attitudes: Protestant compared to other religions (β = 0.129, p ≤ 0.05), White race compared to other races (β = 0.162, p ≤ 0.001), type of clinic (HIV/STI clinic: β = 0.112, p ≤ 0.01), availability of post-exposure prophylaxis (yes: β = -0.107, p ≤ 0.05), and perceptions of policy enforcement (policies not enforced: β = 0.058, p = p ≤ 0.05). These findings may assist providers wishing to improve the quality care for PLWH. Enforcement of policies prohibiting discrimination may be a useful strategy for reducing HIV-related stigma among healthcare workers. PMID:26650383

  7. The involvement of parents in the healthcare provided to hospitalzed children

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Elsa Maria de Oliveira Pinheiro; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; de Mello, Débora Falleiros

    2014-01-01

    Objective to analyze the answers of parents and health care professionals concerning the involvement of parents in the care provided to hospitalized children. Method exploratory study based on the conceptual framework of pediatric healthcare with qualitative data analysis. Results three dimensions of involvement were highlighted: daily care provided to children, opinions concerning the involvement of parents, and continuity of care with aspects related to the presence and participation of parents, benefits to the child and family, information needs, responsibility, right to healthcare, hospital infrastructure, care delivery, communication between the parents and health services, shared learning, and follow-up after discharge. Conclusion the involvement of parents in the care provided to their children has many meanings for parents, nurses and doctors. Specific strategies need to be developed with and for parents in order to mobilize parental competencies and contribute to increasing their autonomy and decision-making concerning the care provided to children. PMID:25029054

  8. Self-fill oxygen technology: benefits for patients, healthcare providers and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Hex, Nick; Setters, Jo; Little, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    “Non-delivery” home oxygen technologies that allow self-filling of ambulatory oxygen cylinders are emerging. They can offer a relatively unlimited supply of ambulatory oxygen in suitably assessed people who require long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT), providing they can use these systems safely and effectively. This allows users to be self-sufficient and facilitates longer periods of time away from home. The evolution and evidence base of this technology is reported with the experience of a national service review in Scotland (UK). Given that domiciliary oxygen services represent a significant cost to healthcare providers globally, these systems offer potential cost savings, are appealing to remote and rural regions due to the avoidance of cylinder delivery and have additional lower environmental impact due to reduced fossil fuel consumption and subsequently reduced carbon emissions. Evidence is emerging that self-fill/non-delivery oxygen systems can meet the ambulatory oxygen needs of many patients using LTOT and can have a positive impact on quality of life, increase time spent away from home and offer significant financial savings to healthcare providers. Educational aims Provide update for oxygen prescribers on options for home oxygen provision. Provide update on the evidence base for available self-fill oxygen technologies. Provide and update for healthcare commissioners on the potential cost-effective and environmental benefits of increased utilisation of self-fill oxygen systems. PMID:27408629

  9. Exploring care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Kevin T; Abbott, Amy A; Norris, Joan F

    2013-08-01

    Care transitions involve coordination of patient care across multiple care settings. Many problems occur during care transitions resulting in negative patient outcomes and unnecessary readmissions. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of care transitions from patient, caregiver, and health-care provider perspectives in a single metropolitan Midwest city. A qualitative descriptive design was used to solicit patients', caregivers', and health-care providers' perceptions of care transitions, their role within the process, barriers to effective care transitions, and strategies to overcome these barriers. Five themes emerged: preplanned admissions are ideal; lack of needed patient information upon admission; multiple services are needed in preparing patients for discharge; rushed or delayed discharges lead to patient misunderstanding; and difficulties in following aftercare instructions. Findings illustrated provider difficulty in meeting multiple care needs, and the need for patient-centered care to achieve positive outcomes associated with quality measures, reduced readmissions, and care transitions. PMID:23113935

  10. Healthcare Hackathons Provide Educational and Innovation Opportunities: A Case Study and Best Practice Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Silver, Julie K; Binder, David S; Zubcevik, Nevena; Zafonte, Ross D

    2016-07-01

    Physicians and other healthcare professionals are often the end users of medical innovation; however, they are rarely involved in the beginning design stages. This often results in ineffective healthcare solutions with poor adoption rates. At the early design stage, innovation would benefit from input from healthcare professionals. This report describes the first-ever rehabilitation hackathon-an interdisciplinary and competitive team event aimed at accelerating and improving healthcare solutions and providing an educational experience for participants. Hackathons are gaining traction as a way to accelerate innovation by bringing together a diverse group of interdisciplinary professionals from different industries who work collaboratively in teams and learn from each other, focus on a specific problem ("pain point"), develop a solution using design thinking techniques, pitch the solution to participants, gather fast feedback and quickly alter the prototype design ("pivoting"). 102 hackers including 19 (18.6 %) physicians and other professionals participated, and over the course of 2 days worked in teams, pitched ideas and developed design prototypes. Three awards were given for prototypes that may improve function in persons with disabilities. 43 hackers were women (42.2 %) and 59 men (57.8 %); they ranged in age from 16 to 79 years old; and, of the 75 hackers who reported their age, 63 (84 %) were less than 40 years old and 12 (16 %) were 40 years or older. This report contributes to the emerging literature on healthcare hackathons as a means of providing interdisciplinary education and training and supporting innovation. PMID:27277278

  11. The eICU research institute - a collaboration between industry, health-care providers, and academia.

    PubMed

    McShea, Michael; Holl, Randy; Badawi, Omar; Riker, Richard R; Silfen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As the volume of data that is electronically available promliferates, the health-care industry is identifying better ways to use this data for patient care. Ideally, these data are collected in real time, can support point-of-care clinical decisions, and, by providing instantaneous quality metrics, can create the opportunities to improve clinical practice as the patient is being cared for. The business-world technology supporting these activities is referred to as business intelligence, which offers competitive advantage, increased quality, and operational efficiencies. The health-care industry is plagued by many challenges that have made it a latecomer to business intelligence and data-mining technology, including delayed adoption of electronic medical records, poor integration between information systems, a lack of uniform technical standards, poor interoperability between complex devices, and the mandate to rigorously protect patient privacy. Efforts at developing a health care equivalent of business intelligence (which we will refer to as clinical intelligence) remains in its infancy. Until basic technology infrastructure and mature clinical applications are developed and implemented throughout the health-care system, data aggregation and interpretation cannot effectively progress. The need for this approach in health care is undisputed. As regional and national health information networks emerge, we need to develop cost-effective systems that reduce time and effort spent documenting health-care data while increasing the application of knowledge derived from that data. PMID:20659837

  12. Secondary traumatization in pediatric healthcare providers: compassion fatigue, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Meadors, Patrick; Lamson, Angela; Swanson, Mel; White, Mark; Sira, Natalia

    The primary aim for this research was to explore the overlap and differences between the concepts related to secondary traumatization: posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), secondary traumatic stress (STS), compassion fatigue (CF), and burnout (BRN). A secondary aim for this research was to examine the impact of secondary traumatization and some of the personal and professional elements that affect how pediatric healthcare providers experience PTSD, STS, CF, and BRN. An online survey was sent via e-mail to numerous list serves for healthcare providers who had worked on PICU, NICU, or PEDS units within the last year. The analyses revealed that a significant overlap existed between the terms of STS, PTSD, BRN, CS, and CF for PICU, NICU, and PEDS providers. However, a hierarchical linear regression revealed a significant amount of unique contributions to the variance in CF based on each of the measured concepts. Despite previous literature that indicates that the terms STS and CF can be used interchangeably, the two most prominent measures utilized in the assessment of CF and STS are actually capturing at least some unique elements. Given these results, future researchers should examine and conceptualize the difference in etiology, prevalence, symptoms, and treatment efficacy for CF and STS as separate but related entities and then return their focus to understanding secondary traumatization in healthcare providers. PMID:20222232

  13. Cultural acceptance of robotic telestroke medicine among patients and healthcare providers in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khathaami, Ali M.; Alshahrani, Saeed M.; Kojan, Suleiman M.; Al-Jumah, Mohammed A.; Alamry, Ahmed A.; El-Metwally, Ashraf A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the degree of satisfaction and acceptance of stroke patients, their relatives, and healthcare providers toward using telestroke technology in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and December 2012 at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard Affairs, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The Remote Presence Robot (RPR), the RP-7i® (FDA- cleared) provided by InTouch Health was used in the study. Patients and their relatives were informed that the physician would appear through a screen on top of a robotic device, as part of their clinical care. Stroke patients admitted through the emergency department, and their relatives, as well as healthcare providers completed a self-administered satisfaction questionnaire following the telestroke consultation sessions. Results: Fifty participants completed the questionnaire. Most subjects agreed that the remote consultant interview was useful and that the audiovisual component of the intervention was of high quality; 98% agreed that they did not feel shy or embarrassed during the remote interview, were able to understand the instruction of the consultant, and recommended its use in stroke management. Furthermore, 92% agreed or strongly agreed that the use of this technology can efficiently replace the physical presence of a neurologist. Conclusion: Results suggest that the use of telestroke medicine is culturally acceptable among stroke patients and their families in Saudi Arabia and favorably received by healthcare providers. PMID:25630777

  14. An empirical study of healthcare providers and patients' perceptions of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Comandé, Giovanni; Nocco, Luca; Peigné, Violette

    2015-04-01

    This paper is the result of a legal and policy analysis of a statistical poll focused on the area of Livorno conducted by the LIDER-Lab of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna (Pisa, Italy). Information were gathered by submitting questionnaires to both healthcare providers and their patients. The scope was to evaluate the interest engendered by the application of technology on health data processing along with the needs, expectations and concerns of patients and healthcare providers. The paper leads to the main policy proposals of increasing financial investments in e-health (or at least preserve this area from the generalized budget constraints public health is suffering nowadays) and introducing incentives to use computers for general practitioners. PMID:24674011

  15. Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among Women in Southern Malawi: Healthcare Providers' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Modeste, Naomi N.; Lee, Jerry W.; Gleason, Peter C.; Maynard-Tucker, Gisele

    2014-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare providers' perspectives on antiretroviral (ART) adherence in two ART clinics in southern Malawi. Nonadherence to ART is a significant hindrance to the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Methods. A one-on-one semistructured interview was conducted with eight healthcare providers in two ART clinics in rural and urban southern Malawi. The interviews were focused on factors facilitating or hindering ART adherence and strategies to improve adherence. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and content-analyzed with the use of the constant comparison approach. Results. Of the eight participants, 63% were between the ages of 20 and 30 years and 37% were HIV counselors. Factors facilitating adherence include patients' belief and knowledge, HIV/AIDS education, and a supportive network. Barriers to adherence include discrimination, nondisclosure of HIV status, food insecurity, medication side effects, religion, misinformation, and staff and drug shortages. Strategies to improve adherence were identified by participants to include nutritional/food supplementation for malnourished or undernourished patients and patient counseling. Conclusions. There is a need for collaborative efforts between healthcare providers, patients, and faith-based organizations to identify and address hindrances and facilitators to patients' adherence. Further research is needed to develop strategies addressing religion, staff, and drug shortages. PMID:25610641

  16. Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among Women in Southern Malawi: Healthcare Providers' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Ogbochi; Modeste, Naomi N; Lee, Jerry W; Gleason, Peter C; Maynard-Tucker, Gisele

    2014-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to explore healthcare providers' perspectives on antiretroviral (ART) adherence in two ART clinics in southern Malawi. Nonadherence to ART is a significant hindrance to the success of HIV/AIDS treatment. Methods. A one-on-one semistructured interview was conducted with eight healthcare providers in two ART clinics in rural and urban southern Malawi. The interviews were focused on factors facilitating or hindering ART adherence and strategies to improve adherence. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and content-analyzed with the use of the constant comparison approach. Results. Of the eight participants, 63% were between the ages of 20 and 30 years and 37% were HIV counselors. Factors facilitating adherence include patients' belief and knowledge, HIV/AIDS education, and a supportive network. Barriers to adherence include discrimination, nondisclosure of HIV status, food insecurity, medication side effects, religion, misinformation, and staff and drug shortages. Strategies to improve adherence were identified by participants to include nutritional/food supplementation for malnourished or undernourished patients and patient counseling. Conclusions. There is a need for collaborative efforts between healthcare providers, patients, and faith-based organizations to identify and address hindrances and facilitators to patients' adherence. Further research is needed to develop strategies addressing religion, staff, and drug shortages. PMID:25610641

  17. Who pays for providing spiritual care in healthcare settings? The ethical dilemma of taxpayers funding holistic healthcare and the first amendment requirement for separation of church and state.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Carla Jean Pease

    2009-12-01

    All US governmental, public, and private healthcare facilities and their staff fall under some form of regulatory requirement to provide opportunities for spiritual health assessment and care as a component of holistic healthcare. As often the case with regulations, these facilities face the predicament of funding un-reimbursable care. However, chaplains and nurses who provide most patient spiritual care are paid using funds the facility obtains from patients, private, and public sources. Furthermore, Veteran healthcare services, under the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), are provided with taxpayer funds from local, state, and federal governments. With the recent legal action by the Freedom From Religion Foundation, Inc. (FFRF) against the Veterans Administration, the ethical dilemma surfaces between taxpayers funding holistic healthcare and the first amendment requirement for separation of church and state. PMID:19890722

  18. Quality of assistance provided to children with sickle cell disease by primary healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ludmila Mourão Xavier; Reis, Tatiana Carvalho; Vieira, Magda Mendes; de Andrade-Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Caldeira, Antônio Prates

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of healthcare provided to sickle cell disease children by primary healthcare services in a region of high prevalence. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed by interviewing members of families with sickle cell disease children. The children had been identified from the Neonatal Screening Program in Minas Gerais state over the last 12 years in towns of the Montes Claros-Bocaiuva microregion. A structured questionnaire specially developed for this study and based on three axes was used: indicators of the child's health (immunization, growth and development, prophylaxis antibiotic therapy), perception of care by the family (health education and accessibility) and knowledge of the family about the disease. Results Sixty-three of 71 families with children identified as having sickle cell disease were interviewed. The predominant genotypes were Hb SS (44.4%) and Hb SC (41.2%). Adequate monitoring of growth and development was recorded for the first year of life in 23 children (36.6%) and for the second year of life in 18 children (28.6%). The basic vaccination schedule was completed by 44 children (69.8%) but 62 vaccination record cards (98.4%) identified delays of special vaccines. Regular use of prophylactic penicillin was reported by 55 caregivers (87.3%). The family's perception of the care provided suggests poor accessibility to health services and lack of opportunities to answer doubts. The average performance of families in knowledge testing was 59.8%. Conclusion The quality of healthcare is unsatisfactory. The care provided to children with sickle cell disease in primary healthcare services needs improvements. PMID:23049319

  19. [How to deal with blast injuries. 15 tips for healthcare providers].

    PubMed

    Haerkens, M H T M; Tan, E C T H; Bleeker, C; van der Hoeven, J H

    2016-01-01

    The recent terror attacks in Paris and Brussels have made the subject of injuries caused by explosives, also known as 'blast injuries', a very current one. The Netherlands has limited experience with terrorist attacks. This means that Dutch medical care providers possibly do not have sufficient knowledge about dealing with blast injuries. After explaining the mechanisms of explosions and the effects that these have on the human body, we go on to provide 15 tips on the main principles of treating blast injuries. These tips will help healthcare providers to deal with the complex requirements of victims of terror. PMID:27096485

  20. Global burden of hepatitis C: considerations for healthcare providers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Averhoff, Francisco M; Glass, Nancy; Holtzman, Deborah

    2012-07-01

    An estimated 2%-3% of the world's population is living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and each year, >350 000 die of HCV-related conditions, including cirrhosis and liver cancer. The epidemiology and burden of HCV infection varies throughout the world, with country-specific prevalence ranging from <1% to >10%. In contrast to the United States and other developed countries, HCV transmission in developing countries frequently results from exposure to infected blood in healthcare and community settings. Hepatitis C prevention, care, and treatment programs must recognize country-specific epidemiology, which varies by setting and level of economic development. Awareness of the global epidemiology of HCV infection is important for US healthcare providers treating foreign-born patients from countries where HCV infection is endemic and for counseling patients who travel to these countries. Countries with a high burden of HCV infection also would benefit from establishing comprehensive prevention, care, and treatment programs. PMID:22715208

  1. Embedded sensor systems for health - providing the tools in future healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Maria; Björkman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Wearable, embedded sensor systems for health applications are foreseen to be enablers in the future healthcare. They will provide ubiquitous monitoring of multiple parameters without restricting the person to stay at home or in the hospital. By following trend changes in the health status, early deteriorations will be detected and treatment can start earlier. Also health prevention will be supported. Such future healthcare requires technology development, including miniaturized sensors, smart textiles and wireless communication. The tremendous amount of data generated by these systems calls for both signal processing and decision support to guarantee the quality of data and avoid overflow of information. Safe and secure communications have to protect the integrity of the persons monitored. PMID:24851983

  2. Healthcare Provider-Patient Communication: A Satisfaction Study in the Outpatient Clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur

    PubMed Central

    AZIZAM, Nor Azmaniza; SHAMSUDDIN, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing interest in research on patient satisfaction with healthcare provider (HCP) communication as a measure of healthcare quality and HCPs’ communication competency. This study aimed to determine the levels of patient satisfaction with healthcare provider-patient communication (HCP-PC) and its associated factors at the outpatient clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample in July 2012 using self-administered questionnaires for the data collection. Both overall and domain-specific satisfaction were measured, with the three domains being exchanging information (EI), socio-emotional behaviour (SB), and communication style (CS). Results: The findings show that 92.8% of the 283 respondents were satisfied with overall HCP-PC, 89.5% with EI, 91.3% with SB, and 72.2% with CS. Satisfaction was statistically higher among Malays for CS and higher among those with low education and poor health for EI, SB and CS. EI and overall communication satisfaction were also higher among patients who reported short wait times, and patients who were in gender concordance with their HCPs showed higher SB satisfaction. Conclusion: Basic and continuous communication skills training and patient activation programs should be established to increase patient satisfaction. Health information technology use should be actively promoted to allow for structured and standardised information exchange between HCPs and patients. PMID:26715897

  3. Satisfaction Level of New Mothers with Prenatal Care and the Healthcare Professionals Who Provide It

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Cano, MD; Castillo, RF; Guillen, J Francisco; Florido, J; García García, I

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Prenatal care is a key strategy to reduce maternal mortality. The aims of this work were to ascertain the level of satisfaction of new mothers with their pregnancy monitoring and with the medical professionals who provided prenatal care. Subject and methods: A descriptive study was conducted on 265 new mothers, 18-43 years of age, who had given birth at the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital and the San Cecilio University Hospital in Granada (Spain) in April and May 2012. The data were collected with a questionnaire consisting of 28 items that elicited information from the subjects about their pregnancy, prenatal care activities, the healthcare professionals that provided the care, and those that they would like to monitor future pregnancies. There were also two open questions. The first was about the perceived needs of the participants and the second asked them to suggest ways that prenatal care could be improved. Results: The majority of the subjects (59.6%) had given birth for the first time. The midwife was the healthcare professional who performed most of the monitoring activities and resolved their doubts and problems (32.74%), gave the subjects tranquillity and security (37.86%) and listened to their worries (34.53%). The subjects' satisfaction with the healthcare professionals was generally high. This was particularly true of the midwife (90.75%). Half of the subjects surveyed said that they wanted the midwife, obstetrician and general practitioner to monitor their pregnancy. They also underlined the need for longer and more visits with the midwife as well as more consultations with the obstetrician and higher number of ultrasounds. Conclusions: The subjects were very satisfied with the work of the healthcare professionals that monitored their pregnancy, particularly with the midwife. However, they also highlighted expectations and needs that, if met, would increase their satisfaction. PMID:25867581

  4. Gender Differences in Response to Deployment Among Military Healthcare Providers in Afghanistan and Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Edward J.; Barnett, Scott D.; Herbig-Wall, Pamela L.; Watts, Dorraine D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite their growing numbers in the United States military, little has been published on healthcare providers (HCP) or female service members from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The purpose of this secondary analysis of data from the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel was to determine gender differences in reaction to the impact of operational stress in deployed military healthcare providers. Methods The unweighted study sample selected for this data analysis included results from female and male active duty military personnel over the age of 18 years (n=16,146) deployed at least once to Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) within the past 3 years (n=1,425), for a final sample consisting of either officer (healthcare officer) or enlisted (healthcare specialist) personnel (n=455) (weighted n=23,440). Indices of psychologic distress and social relations were explored and compared. Results Enlisted female HCPs were more likely to be African American (42.3%) and single (63.0%) and represented the greater percentage with significant psychologic difficulties, as shown by serious psychologic distress endorsement (11.3%) and positive screen results for depression (32.2%). More harmful drinking patterns (Alcohol Use Disorders Identifications Test [AUDIT] score 8–15) were found in more female HCPs (enlisted 61.8%, officers 76.4%) compared with males (enlisted 41.1%, officers 67.1%). Conclusions Female HCPs serving in the current military conflicts are reporting significant psychologic distress that may adversely impact their performance within the military, in theaters of operations, and in their lives at home. Implications for clinical care of female service members and veterans of current wars are addressed. PMID:22224844

  5. Identifying the HIV Testing Beliefs of Healthcare Provider Staff at a University Student Health Center: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Cornelia A.

    2012-01-01

    This research project examined the views and perceptions of healthcare provider staff regarding HIV testing and the implementation of HIV testing as a routine part of medical practice in a university student health center at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU). This study further explored whether healthcare provider staff promoted…

  6. "You're never really off time": Healthcare providers' interpretations of optimal timing for HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Henrikson, Nora B; Tuzzio, Leah; Gilkey, Melissa B; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2016-12-01

    Healthcare providers have a strong influence on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination decisions, yet they often fail to recommend the vaccine to the 11- and 12-year-olds who are targeted by practice guidelines. We sought to understand how providers interpret and value age-based guidelines. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from two qualitative studies of healthcare providers' HPV vaccination attitudes and practices. Participants were physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in Minnesota (n = 27) and in Washington (n = 17) interviewed in 2012 and 2014 respectively. Verbatim transcripts from each study were analyzed independently using content analysis, and collective findings were then jointly analyzed. The research team worked via consensus to derive codes and describe representative themes. A high proportion of providers reported either a lack of concern about HPV vaccine completion, or concern beginning several years past the recommended target age. Many providers perceived a gradient of HPV vaccination timeliness ranging from age 12 to 26. Instead of age-based recommendations, providers timed recommendations based on perceptions of access to care and patient risk. They often offered "gentle" recommendations and deferred vaccination discussions as a tool to building trust with families. Interventions aimed at helping providers deliver effective recommendations for timely HPV vaccination are needed. Our findings suggest that changing the norm of provider culture to one in which "catch-up" schedules are seen as a suboptimal way to achieve vaccine uptake may be an important goal. PMID:27413667

  7. The challenge of vaccinating adults: attitudes and beliefs of the Canadian public and healthcare providers

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, D M; Halperin, B A; MacKinnon-Cameron, D; Li, Li; McNeil, S A; Langley, J M; Halperin, S A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Vaccine coverage for recommended vaccines is low among adults. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviours of adults and healthcare providers related to four vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccines (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, zoster, pneumococcus and influenza). Design We undertook a survey and focus groups of Canadian adults and healthcare providers (doctors, nurses, pharmacists). A total of 4023 adults completed the survey and 62 participated in the focus groups; 1167 providers completed the survey and 45 participated in the focus groups. Results Only 46.3% of adults thought they were up-to-date on their vaccines; 30% did not know. In contrast, 75.6% of providers reported being up-to-date. Only 57.5% of adults thought it was important to receive all recommended vaccines (compared to 87.1–91.5% of providers). Positive attitudes towards vaccines paralleled concern about the burden of illness and confidence in the vaccines, with providers being more aware of disease burden and confident in vaccine effectiveness than the public. Between 55.0% and 59.7% of adults reported willingness to be vaccinated if recommended by their healthcare provider. However, such recommendations were variable; while 77.4% of the public reported being offered and 52.8% reported being recommended the influenza vaccine by their provider, only 10.8% were offered and 5.6% recommended pertussis vaccine. Barriers and facilitators to improved vaccine coverage in adults, such as trust-mistrust of health authorities, pharmaceutical companies and national recommendations, autonomy versus the public good and logistical issues (such as insufficient time and lack of vaccination status tracking), were identified by both the public and providers. Conclusions Despite guidelines for adult vaccination, there are substantial gaps in knowledge and attitudes and beliefs among both the public and healthcare providers that lead to low vaccine

  8. Photodynamic Therapy: Occupational Hazards and Preventative Recommendations for Clinical Administration by Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Steven E.; Vesper, Benjamin J.; Paradise, William A.; Radosevich, James A.; Colvard, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a medical treatment for cancers is an increasing practice in clinical settings, as new photosensitizing chemicals and light source technologies are developed and applied. PDT involves dosing patients with photosensitizing drugs, and then exposing them to light using a directed energy device in order to manifest a therapeutic effect. Healthcare professionals providing PDT should be aware of potential occupational health and safety hazards posed by these treatment devices and photosensitizing agents administered to patients. Materials and methods: Here we outline and identify pertinent health and safety considerations to be taken by healthcare staff during PDT procedures. Results: Physical hazards (for example, non-ionizing radiation generated by the light-emitting device, with potential for skin and eye exposure) and chemical hazards (including the photosensitizing agents administered to patients that have the potential for exposure via skin, subcutaneous, ingestion, or inhalation routes) must be considered for safe use of PDT by the healthcare professional. Conclusions: Engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment controls are recommendations for the safe use and handling of PDT agents and light-emitting technologies. PMID:23859750

  9. Does distrust in providers affect health-care utilization in China?

    PubMed Central

    Duckett, Jane; Hunt, Kate; Munro, Neil; Sutton, Matt

    2016-01-01

    How trust affects health-care utilization is not well-understood, especially in low- and middle-income countries. This article focuses on China, a middle-income country where low trust in health-care settings has become a prominent issue, but actual levels of distrust and their implications for utilization are unknown. We conducted a nationally representative survey of the Chinese population (November 2012 to January 2013), which resulted in a sample of 3680 adult men and women. Respondents rated their trust in different types of health-care providers. Using multivariate logistic and negative binomial regression models, we estimated the association between distrust in clinics and respondents’ hospital visits in the last year; whether they had sought hospital treatment first for two common symptoms (headache, cold) in the last 2 months; and whether they said they would go first to a hospital if they had a minor or major illness. We analysed these associations before and after adjusting for performance evaluations of clinics and hospitals, controlling for sex, age, education, income, insurance status, household registration and self-assessed health. We found that distrust in hospitals is low, but distrust in clinics is high and strongly associated with increased hospital utilization, especially for minor symptoms and illnesses. Further research is needed to understand the reasons for distrust in clinics because its effects are not fully accounted for by poor evaluations of their competence. PMID:27117483

  10. Gaps in understanding health and engagement with healthcare providers across common long-term conditions: a population survey of health literacy in 29 473 Danish citizens

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Karina; Lasgaard, Mathias; Osborne, Richard H; Maindal, Helle T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) quantify levels of subjective health literacy in people with long-term health conditions (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, musculoskeletal disorders, cancer and mental disorders) and compare these to levels in the general population and (2) examine the association between health literacy, socioeconomic characteristics and comorbidity in each long-term condition group. Design Population-based survey in the Central Denmark Region (n=29 473). Main outcome measures Health literacy was measured using two scales from the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ): (1) Ability to understand health information and (2) Ability to actively engage with healthcare providers. Results People with long-term conditions reported more difficulties than the general population in understanding health information and actively engaging with healthcare providers. Wide variation was found between disease groups, with people with cancer having fewer difficulties and people with mental health disorders having more difficulties in actively engaging with healthcare providers than other long-term condition groups. Having more than one long-term condition was associated with more difficulty in engaging with healthcare providers and understanding health information. People with low levels of education had lower health literacy than people with high levels of education. Conclusions Compared with the general population, people with long-term conditions report more difficulties in understanding health information and engaging with healthcare providers. These two dimensions are critical to the provision of patient-centred healthcare and for optimising health outcomes. More effort should be made to respond to the health literacy needs among individuals with long-term conditions, multiple comorbidities and low education levels, to improve health outcomes and to reduce social inequality in health. PMID:26769783

  11. Patient-Held Maternal and/or Child Health Records: Meeting the Information Needs of Patients and Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kathleen E.; Fuller, Sherrilynne

    2011-01-01

    Though improvements in infant and maternal mortality rates have occurred over time, women and children still die every hour from preventable causes. Various regional, social and economic factors are involved in the ability of women and children to receive adequate care and prevention services. Patient-held maternal and/or child health records have been used for a number of years in many countries to help track health risks, vaccinations and other preventative health measures performed. Though these records are primarily designed to record patient histories and healthcare information and guide healthcare workers providing care, because the records are patient-held, they also allow families a greater ability to track their own health and prevention strategies. A literature search was performed to answer these questions: (1) What are maternal information needs regarding pregnancy, post-natal and infant healthcare, especially in developing countries? (2) What is known about maternal information seeking behavior in developing countries? (3) What is the history and current state of maternal and/or child patient-held healthcare records, do they provide for the information needs of the healthcare provider and what are the effects and outcomes of patient-held records in general and for maternal and/or child health in particular? Specific information needs of pregnant women and mothers are rarely studied. The small numbers of maternal information behavior results available indicate that mothers, in general, prefer to receive health information directly from their healthcare provider as opposed to from other sources (written, etc.) Overall, in developing countries, patient-held maternal and/or child healthcare records have a mostly positive effect for both patient and care provider. Mothers and children with records tend to have better outcomes in healthcare and preventative measures. Further research into the information behaviors of pregnant women and mothers to determine

  12. The Hepatitis B Vaccine Protects Re-Exposed Healthcare Workers, but Does Not Provide Sterilizing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jens M.; Abdalla, Adil; Gara, Naveen; Ghany, Marc G.; Rehermann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be prevented by vaccination with HBV surface (HBs) antigen, which induces HBs-specific antibodies and T cells. However, the duration of vaccine-induced protective immunity is poorly defined for healthcare workers who were vaccinated as adults. Methods We investigated the immune mechanisms (antibody and T cell responses) of long-term protection by the HBV vaccine in 90 healthcare workers with occupational exposure to HBV, 10–28 y after vaccination. Results Fifty-nine of 90 health-care workers (65%) had levels of antibodies against HBs (anti-HBs) above the cut-off (>12 mIU/ml) and 30/90 (33%) had HBs-specific T cells that produced interferon (IFN)γ. Anti-HBs titers correlated with numbers of HBs-specific IFNγ-producing T cells, but not with time after vaccination. Whereas occupational exposure to HBV after vaccination did not induce antibodies to the HBV core protein (HBcore), the standard biomarker for HBV infection, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells against HBcore and polymerase antigens were detected. Similar numbers of HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in health-care workers with occupational exposure to HBV and in patients who acquired immunity via HBV infection. Most of the HBcore- and polymerase-specific T cells were CD45RO+CCR7−CD127− effector memory cells in exposed health-care workers and in patients with acquired immunity. In contrast, most of the vaccine-induced HBs-specific T cell cells were CD45RO−CCR7−CD127− and terminally differentiated. Conclusions HBsAg vaccine-induced immunity protects against future infection but does not provide sterilizing immunity, as evidenced by HBcore- and polymerase-specific CD8+ T cells in vaccinated health care workers with occupational exposure to HBV. The presence of HBcore- and HBV polymerase-specific T-cell responses is a more sensitive indicator of HBV exposure than detection of HBcore-specific antibodies. PMID:23916846

  13. What Is the Role of Informal Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sudhinaraset, May; Ingram, Matthew; Lofthouse, Heather Kinlaw; Montagu, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    Informal health care providers (IPs) comprise a significant component of health systems in developing nations. Yet little is known about the most basic characteristics of performance, cost, quality, utilization, and size of this sector. To address this gap we conducted a comprehensive literature review on the informal health care sector in developing countries. We searched for studies published since 2000 through electronic databases PubMed, Google Scholar, and relevant grey literature from The New York Academy of Medicine, The World Bank, The Center for Global Development, USAID, SHOPS (formerly PSP-One), The World Health Organization, DFID, Human Resources for Health Global Resource Center. In total, 334 articles were retrieved, and 122 met inclusion criteria and chosen for data abstraction. Results indicate that IPs make up a significant portion of the healthcare sector globally, with almost half of studies (48%) from Sub-Saharan Africa. Utilization estimates from 24 studies in the literature of IP for healthcare services ranged from 9% to 90% of all healthcare interactions, depending on the country, the disease in question, and methods of measurement. IPs operate in a variety of health areas, although baseline information on quality is notably incomplete and poor quality of care is generally assumed. There was a wide variation in how quality of care is measured. The review found that IPs reported inadequate drug provision, poor adherence to clinical national guidelines, and that there were gaps in knowledge and provider practice; however, studies also found that the formal sector also reported poor provider practices. Reasons for using IPs included convenience, affordability, and social and cultural effects. Recommendations from the literature amount to a call for more engagement with the IP sector. IPs are a large component of nearly all developing country health systems. Research and policies of engagement are needed. PMID:23405101

  14. The ethics of intercountry adoption: why it matters to healthcare providers and bioethicists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this paper is both modest and ambitious. The modest goal is to show that intercountry adoption should be considered by ethicists and healthcare providers. The more ambitious goal is to introduce the many ethical issues that intercountry adoption raises. Intercountry adoption is an alternative to medical, assisted reproduction option such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection, third party egg and sperm donation and surrogacy. Health care providers working with assisted reproduction are in a unique position to introduce their clients to intercountry adoption; however, providers should only do so if intercountry adoption is ethically equal or superior to the alternatives. This paper first presents a brief history of intercountry adoption. The second section compares intercountry adoption with medical alternatives. The third section examines the unique ethical challenges that are not shared by other medical alternatives. The final section concludes that it is simplistic for a healthcare provider to promote intercountry adoption unconditionally; however, in situation where intercountry adoption is practiced conscientiously it poses no greater ethical concern than several medical alternatives. This conclusion is preliminary and is intended as a start for further discussion. PMID:20690919

  15. User friendly web site a winner. San Diego's Sharp HealthCare provides wealth of information.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    The Sharp HealthCare, San Diego, web site, a winner of the 2002 Medicine on the Net Web Excellence Award, provides a wealth of information without wasting space or confusing the visitor. The web site, www.sharp.com, can be viewed in both English and Spanish, a valuable consideration for those living in the California-Mexico border area served by Sharp. The integrated health network operates seven hospitals and three medical group practices. It has 2,541 physicians on medical staffs and more than 11,000 employees. PMID:12807120

  16. Association Between Healthcare Provider Type and Intent to Breastfeed Among Expectant Mothers.

    PubMed

    Balyakina, Elizabeth; Fulda, Kimberly G; Franks, Susan F; Cardarelli, Kathryn M; Hinkle, Kollier

    2016-05-01

    Background The primary purpose of this study was to determine the association between type of healthcare provider delivering prenatal care and intent to exclusively breastfeed. Methods A self-report survey was administered to 455 expectant mothers. Logistic regression was performed to determine the association between prenatal care provider type [obstetrician; other primary care physician (family doctor/general practitioner/internist/or other physician); midwife/nurse midwife; more than one provider; and other] with intent to breastfeed (exclusive/non-exclusive). Results Having a midwife/nurse midwife as a prenatal care provider was associated with intent to breastfeed compared to having an obstetrician (OR 2.544, 95 % CI 1.385-4.675). There was no difference in intent between women with another primary care physician and an obstetrician. Women with another type of health care provider, no prenatal care from a health professional, or no knowledge of who is providing prenatal care were less likely to intend to breastfeed (OR 0.228, CI 0.068-0.766) as compared to those with an obstetrician. Discussion/Conclusions Provider type is associated with intent to breastfeed among pregnant women. Women's intent to breastfeed is an important predictor of breastfeeding initiation, continuation, and duration that may be assessed by healthcare providers during the prenatal period. A consideration of what features of provider care are associated with improved breastfeeding outcomes and characteristics of women seeking prenatal care with midwives may serve to formulate future prenatal care policies and education during prenatal care visits. PMID:26699790

  17. Implementing a care coordination program for children with special healthcare needs: partnering with families and providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, April; Lizzi, Michele; Marx, Alison; Chilkatowsky, Maryann; Trachtenberg, Symme W; Ogle, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Care coordination has been a key theme in national forums on healthcare quality, design, and improvement. This article describes the characteristics of a care coordination program aimed at supporting families in building care coordination competencies and providers in the coordination of care across multiple specialties. The program included implementation of a Care Coordination Counselor (CC Counselor) and several supporting tools-Care Binders, Complex Scheduling, Community Resources for Families Database, and a Care Coordination Network. Patients were referred by a healthcare provider to receive services from the CC Counselor or to receive a Care Binder organizational tool. To assess the impact of the counselor role, we compared patient experience survey results from patients receiving CC Counselor services to those receiving only the Care Binder. Our analysis found that patients supported by the CC Counselor reported greater agreement with accessing care coordination resources and identifying a key point person for coordination. Seventy-five percent of CC Counselor patients have graduated from the program. Our findings suggest that implementation of a CC Counselor role and supporting tools offers an integrative way to connect patients, families, and providers with services and resources to support coordinated, continuous care. PMID:22913270

  18. Mumps Virus: Modification of the Identify-Isolate-Inform Tool for Frontline Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Kristi L.; Shastry, Siri; Mzahim, Bandr; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection that became rare in most industrialized countries following the introduction of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine in 1967. The disease, however, has been re-emerging with several outbreaks over the past decade. Many clinicians have never seen a case of mumps. To assist frontline healthcare providers with detecting potential cases and initiating critical actions, investigators modified the “Identify-Isolate-Inform” tool for mumps infection. The tool is applicable to regions with rare incidences or local outbreaks, especially seen in college students, as well as globally in areas where vaccination is less common. Mumps begins with a prodrome of low-grade fever, myalgias and malaise/anorexia, followed by development of nonsuppurative parotitis, which is the pathognomonic finding associated with acute mumps infection. Orchitis and meningitis are the two most common serious complications, with hearing loss and infertility occurring rarely. Providers should consider mumps in patients with exposure to a known case or international travel to endemic regions who present with consistent signs and symptoms. If mumps is suspected, healthcare providers must immediately implement standard and droplet precautions and notify the local health department and hospital infection control personnel. PMID:27625709

  19. Mumps Virus: Modification of the Identify-Isolate-Inform Tool for Frontline Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Shastry, Siri; Mzahim, Bandr; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection that became rare in most industrialized countries following the introduction of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine in 1967. The disease, however, has been re-emerging with several outbreaks over the past decade. Many clinicians have never seen a case of mumps. To assist frontline healthcare providers with detecting potential cases and initiating critical actions, investigators modified the "Identify-Isolate-Inform" tool for mumps infection. The tool is applicable to regions with rare incidences or local outbreaks, especially seen in college students, as well as globally in areas where vaccination is less common. Mumps begins with a prodrome of low-grade fever, myalgias and malaise/anorexia, followed by development of nonsuppurative parotitis, which is the pathognomonic finding associated with acute mumps infection. Orchitis and meningitis are the two most common serious complications, with hearing loss and infertility occurring rarely. Providers should consider mumps in patients with exposure to a known case or international travel to endemic regions who present with consistent signs and symptoms. If mumps is suspected, healthcare providers must immediately implement standard and droplet precautions and notify the local health department and hospital infection control personnel. PMID:27625709

  20. Factors influencing the role of primary care providers as gatekeepers in the Malaysian public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Ang, K T; Ho, B K; Mimi, O; Salmah, N; Salmiah, M S; Noridah, M S

    2014-01-01

    Primary care providers play an important gatekeeping role in ensuring appropriate referrals to secondary care facilities. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the level, pattern and rate of referrals from health clinics to hospitals in the public sector, and whether the placement of resident family medicine specialist (FMS) had made a significant difference. The study was carried out between March and April in 2012, involving 28 public primary care clinics. It showed that the average referral rate was 1.56% for clinics with resident FMS and 1.94% for those without resident FMS, but it was not statistically significant. Majority of referred cases were considered appropriate (96.1%). Results of the multivariate analysis showed that no prior consultation with senior healthcare provider and illnesses that were not severe and complex were independently associated with inappropriate referrals. Severity, complexity or uncertain diagnosis of patients' illness or injury significantly contributed to unavoidable referrals. Adequate facilities or having more experienced doctors could have avoided 14.5% of the referrals. The low referral rate and very high level of appropriate referrals could indicate that primary care providers in the public sector played an effective role as gatekeepers in the Malaysian public healthcare system. PMID:26425299

  1. Association of intimate partner violence and health-care provider-identified obesity.

    PubMed

    Davies, Rhian; Lehman, Erik; Perry, Amanda; McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S

    2016-07-01

    The association of physical and nonphysical intimate partner violence (IPV) with obesity was examined. Women (N = 1,179) were surveyed regarding demographics, obesity, and IPV exposure using humiliate-afraid-rape-kick (HARK), an IPV screening tool. A three-level lifetime IPV exposure variable measured physical, nonphysical or no IPV. Health-care provider-identified obesity was defined if participants were told by a medical provider within the past 5 years that they were obese. Bivariate analyses examined obesity by IPV and demographics. Multivariable logistic regression assessed odds of obesity by IPV type, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, education, and marital status. Among participants, 44% reported lifetime IPV (25% physical, 19% nonphysical), and 24% reported health-care provider-identified obesity. In unadjusted analyses, obesity was more prevalent among women exposed to physical IPV (30%) and nonphysical IPV (27%), compared to women without IPV (20%, p = .002). In multivariable models, women reporting physical IPV had 1.67 times greater odds of obesity (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20, 2.33), and women reporting nonphysical IPV had 1.46 times greater odds of obesity (95% CI 1.01, 2.10), compared to women reporting no exposure. This study extends prior data by showing, not only an association between physical IPV and obesity, but also an association between obesity and nonphysical IPV. PMID:26495745

  2. Development and psychometric assessment of the healthcare provider cultural competence instrument.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Joshua L; Witte, Raymond; Sellers, Sherrill L; Luzadis, Rebecca A; Weiner, Judith L; Domingo-Snyder, Eloiza; Page, James E

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the measurement properties of 5 scales used in the Healthcare Provider Cultural Competence Instrument (HPCCI). The HPCCI measures a health care provider's cultural competence along 5 primary dimensions: (1) awareness/sensitivity, (2) behaviors, (3) patient-centered communication, (4) practice orientation, and (5) self-assessment. Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated that the 5 scales were distinct, and within each scale items loaded as expected. Reliability statistics indicated a high level of internal consistency within each scale. The results indicate that the HPCCI effectively measures the cultural competence of health care providers and can provide useful professional feedback for practitioners and organizations seeking to increase a practitioner's cultural competence. PMID:25911617

  3. Current Challenges for Healthcare Services and the Opportunities Created by the Marketing Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Purcărea, T; Purcărea, LV; Raţiu, M

    2008-01-01

    Life is changing dramatically, market position as part of life is becoming more and more important, and marketing, considered a key cultural architect of nowadays that involves voluntary relation exchanges between the communicating partners, is placing the patient in the center of most adequate action towards the medical future which represents his life quality. We think that the moment has come to resort to marketing as a new method to identify innovation opportunities in healthcare services' delivery, considering that the high quality of healthcare services, answering to demands of healthcare systems' consumers, represents a well recognized priority for the European citizens. Consequently, the model of ‘healthcare business’ has to rely on the value for patient by creating competition concerning the results at medical condition level. PMID:20108474

  4. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Kaur, Harparkash; Dike, Nkem; Shu, Elvis; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Hanson, Kara; Okoye, Viola; Okonkwo, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural) in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples), which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Findings It was found that 60 (37%) of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46%) and SP formulations (39%) were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors). Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs. PMID:19208221

  5. Preferred Primary Healthcare Provider Choice Among Insured Persons in Ashanti Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Boachie, Micheal Kofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In early 2012, National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) members in Ashanti Region were allowed to choose their own primary healthcare providers. This paper investigates the factors that enrolees in the Ashanti Region considered in choosing preferred primary healthcare providers (PPPs) and direction of association of such factors with the choice of PPP. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, the study sampled 600 NHIS enrolees in Kumasi Metro area and Kwabre East district. The sampling methods were a combination of simple random and systematic sampling techniques at different stages. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse demographic information and the criteria for selecting PPP. Multinomial logistic regression technique was used to ascertain the direction of association of the factors and the choice of PPP using mission PPPs as the base outcome. Results: Out of the 600 questionnaires administered, 496 were retained for further analysis. The results show that availability of essential drugs (53.63%) and doctors (39.92%), distance or proximity (49.60%), provider reputation (39.52%), waiting time (39.92), additional charges (37.10%), and recommendations (48.79%) were the main criteria adopted by enrolees in selecting PPPs. In the regression, income (-0.0027), availability of doctors (-1.82), additional charges (-2.14) and reputation (-2.09) were statistically significant at 1% in influencing the choice of government PPPs. On the part of private PPPs, availability of drugs (2.59), waiting time (1.45), residence (-2.62), gender (-2.89), and reputation (-2.69) were statistically significant at 1% level. Presence of additional charges (-1.29) was statistically significant at 5% level. Conclusion: Enrolees select their PPPs based on such factors as availability of doctors and essential drugs, reputation, waiting time, income, and their residence. Based on these findings, there is the need for healthcare providers to improve on their quality levels

  6. Does the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competence Survey provide equivalent measurement across English and Spanish versions?

    PubMed Central

    Carle, Adam C.; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The English and Spanish versions of the Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) Cultural Competence Survey (CAHP-CC) assess patients’ experiences with culturally competent care. The possibility exists that even when Spanish and an English speakers experience the same levels of culturally competent care, responses describing their care may differ. This is called measurement bias. To deliver reliable and valid information across language, responses must provide equivalent measurement across versions. In this study, we examined whether measurement bias on the CAHPS-CC impedes valid measurement across the English and Spanish versions. METHODS We used multiple group (MG) confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) to examine measurement bias across English (n = 851) and Spanish (n = 113) speakers. Participants came from a 2008 sample of two Medicaid managed care plans, in New York and California. RESULTS MG-CFA provided general support for the equivalence of the CAHPS-CC in measuring Doctor Communication-Positive Behaviors, Doctor Communication-Negative Behaviors, Doctor Communication-Preventative Care, Equitable Treatment, and Trust. We did observe statistically significant differences in the thresholds associated with the item asking whether a doctor gave easier to understand instructions. However, analyses indicated that bias did not meaningfully influence conclusions about average experiences using the English and Spanish versions of the CAHPS-CC. CONCLUSIONS Our results support the use of the English and Spanish versions of the CAHPS-CC. Though we found some bias, analyses demonstrated that it did not substantively impact conclusions for the studied domains. Health providers can place confidence in the two different CAHPS-CC translations. PMID:22895229

  7. Brief Interventions for Tobacco Users: Using the Internet to Train Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Kelly M.; Cohn, Leslie G.; Glynn, Lisa H.; Stoner, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    One fifth of Americans smoke; many have no plans to quit. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an effective approach to intervention with precontemplative smokers, yet a substantial number of healthcare practitioners lack training in this approach. Two interactive online tutorials were developed to teach practitioners to deliver brief tobacco cessation interventions grounded in the MI approach. The tutorials emphasized the unique aspects of working with precontemplative smokers, incorporating audio and video examples of best practices, interactive exercises, targeted feedback, and practice opportunities. One hundred and fifty-two healthcare providers-in-training were randomly assigned to use the online tutorials or to read training material that was matched for content. A virtual standardized patient evaluation was given before and after the training. Both groups improved their scores from pre- to posttest; however, the tutorial group scored significantly better than the reading group at posttest. The results of this study demonstrate the promise of interactive online tutorials as an efficient and effective way to deliver clinical education. PMID:22096413

  8. Immunization of Health-Care Providers: Necessity and Public Health Policies.

    PubMed

    Maltezou, Helena C; Poland, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Health-care providers (HCPs) are at increased risk for exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs) in the workplace. The rationale for immunization of HCPs relies on the need to protect them and, indirectly, their patients from health-care-associated VPDs. Published evidence indicates significant immunity gaps for VPDs of HCPs globally. Deficits in knowledge and false perceptions about VPDs and vaccines are the most common barriers for vaccine uptake and may also influence communication about vaccines between HCPs and their patients. Most countries have immunization recommendations for HCPs; however, there are no universal policies and significant heterogeneity exists between countries in terms of vaccines, schedules, frame of implementation (recommendation or mandatory), and target categories of HCPs. Mandatory influenza immunization policies for HCPs have been implemented with high vaccine uptake rates. Stronger recommendations for HCP immunization and commitment at the level of the health-care facility are critical in order to achieve high vaccine coverage rates. Given the importance to health, mandatory immunization policies for VPDs that can cause serious morbidity and mortality to vulnerable patients should be considered. PMID:27490580

  9. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  10. Inpatient healthcare provider bypassing by women and their children in urban Bo, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Lila C; Ansumana, Rashid; Bockarie, Alfred; Alejandre, Joel; Bangura, Umaru; Jimmy, David Henry; Waters, Nigel; Baghi, Heibatollah; Stenger, David; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bypassing refers to a person's decision to seek care at a healthcare facility that is not the nearest one of its type to the person's home. Methods This study examined inpatient care facility bypassing in urban Bo, Sierra Leone using data from 1,980 women with children 15 years of age and younger who were interviewed in 2010-2011. The locations of residential structures and hospitals were identified using a geographic information system (GIS), and the road distances from participating households to the nearest and preferred inpatient care facilities were measured. Results Nine inpatient care facilities serve Bo residents, but more than 70% of the participating women reported that the city's main public hospital (Bo Government Hospital), located in the city center, was their preferred inpatient care provider. Participants resided within a median distance of 0.9 km (Interquartile range (IQR): 0.6, 1.8) from their closest inpatient facility, but they would travel a median distance of 2.4 km (IQR: 1.0, 3.3) to reach their preferred providers. About 87% of the women would bypass their nearest inpatient care facility to access care at a preferred provider. Bypassing rates were similar for various demographic and socioeconomic groups, but higher for women living farther from the city center. Conclusion Although Bo has a diverse healthcare marketplace, access to affordable advanced care options is limited. Most women in Bo would choose to bypass facilities nearer to their homes to seek the low-cost and comprehensive care offered by Bo Government Hospital. PMID:27279971

  11. Do the Preferences of Healthcare Provider Selection Vary among Rural and Urban Patients with Different Income and Cause Different Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kuo-Piao; Wei, Chung-Jen; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2016-01-01

    Background Equal access to healthcare facilities and high-level quality of care are important strategies to eliminate the disparity in outcome of care. However, the existing literature regarding how urban or rural dwelling patients with different income level select healthcare providers is insufficient. The purposes of this study were to examine whether differences of healthcare provider selection exist among urban and rural coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) patients with different income level. If so, we further investigated the associated impact on mortality. Methods A retrospective, multilevel study design was conducted using claims data from 2007–2011 Taiwan’s Universal Health Insurance Scheme. Healthcare providers’ performance and patients’ travelling distance to hospitals were used to define the patterns of healthcare provider selection. Baron and Kenny’s procedures for mediation effect were conducted. Results There were 10,108 CABG surgeries included in this study. The results showed that urban dwelling and higher income patients were prone to receive care from better-performance providers. The travelling distances of urban dwelling patients was 15 KM shorter, especially when they received better-performance provider’s care. The results also showed that the difference of healthcare provider selection and mortality rate existed between rural and urban dwelling patients with different income levels. After the procedure of mediation effect testing, the results showed that the healthcare provider selection partially mediated the relationships between patients’ residential areas with different income levels and 30-day mortality. Conclusion Preferences of healthcare provider selection vary among rural and urban patients with different income, and such differences partially mediated the outcome of care. Health authorities should pay attention to this issue, and propose appropriate solutions to eliminate the disparity in outcome of CABG care. PMID

  12. Healthcare decision-tools a growing Web trend: three-pronged public relations campaign heightens presence, recognition for online healthcare information provider.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Schwartz Communications, LLC, executes a successful PR campaign to position Subimo, a provider of online healthcare decision tools, as a leader in the industry that touts names such as WebMD.com and HealthGrades.com. Through a three-pronged media relations strategy, Schwartz and Subimo together branded the company as an industry thought-leader. PMID:16509388

  13. Percentile-based Empirical Distribution Function Estimates for Performance Evaluation of Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, Susan M.; Louis, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Hierarchical models are widely-used to characterize the performance of individual healthcare providers. However, little attention has been devoted to system-wide performance evaluations, the goals of which include identifying extreme (e.g., top 10%) provider performance and developing statistical benchmarks to define high-quality care. Obtaining optimal estimates of these quantities requires estimating the empirical distribution function (EDF) of provider-specific parameters that generate the dataset under consideration. However, the difficulty of obtaining uncertainty bounds for a square-error loss minimizing EDF estimate has hindered its use in system-wide performance evaluations. We therefore develop and study a percentile-based EDF estimate for univariate provider-specific parameters. We compute order statistics of samples drawn from the posterior distribution of provider-specific parameters to obtain relevant uncertainty assessments of an EDF estimate and its features, such as thresholds and percentiles. We apply our method to data from the Medicare End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program, a health insurance program for people with irreversible kidney failure. We highlight the risk of misclassifying providers as exceptionally good or poor performers when uncertainty in statistical benchmark estimates is ignored. Given the high stakes of performance evaluations, statistical benchmarks should be accompanied by precision estimates. PMID:21918583

  14. Acceptance Of The HPV Vaccine Among Women, Parents, Community Leaders, and Healthcare Providers In Ohio Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Mira L.; Reiter, Paul L.; Heaner, Sarah; Ruffin, Mack T.; Post, Douglas M.; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    To assess HPV vaccine acceptability, focus groups of women (18–26 years), parents, community leaders, and healthcare providers were conducted throughout Ohio Appalachia. Themes that emerged among the 23 focus groups (n=114) about the HPV vaccine were: barriers (general health and vaccine specific), lack of knowledge (cervical cancer and HPV), cultural attitudes, and suggestions for educational materials and programs. Important Appalachian attitudes included strong family ties, privacy, conservative views, and lack of trust of outsiders to the region. There are differences in HPV vaccine acceptability among different types of community members highlighting the need for a range of HPV vaccine educational materials/programs to be developed that are inclusive of the Appalachian culture. PMID:19389447

  15. ELEMENTS OF PATIENT-HEALTHCARE PROVIDER COMMUNICATION RELATED TO CARDIOVASCULAR REHABILITATION REFERRAL

    PubMed Central

    Pourhabib, Sanam; Chessex, Caroline; Murray, Judy; Grace, Sherry L

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) has been designed to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease. This study described (1) patient-healthcare provider (HCP) interactions regarding CR, and (2) which discussion elements were related to patient referral. This was a prospective study of cardiovascular patients and their HCPs. Discussion utterances were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Discussion between 26 HCPs and 50 patients were recorded. CR referral was related to greater HCP interactivity (Odds Ratio [OR]=2.82, 95% CI 1.01–7.86), and less patient concern and worry (OR=0.64, 95% CI 0.45–0.89). Taking time for reciprocal discussion and allaying patient anxiety may promote greater referral. PMID:24740975

  16. Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems: An Ethical Leadership Dilemma to Satisfy Patients.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E; Tallman, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the parameters and the dynamics of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) that create an ethical leadership dilemma to satisfy patients in the hospital setting while still ensuring appropriate care for quality clinical outcomes. Under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and health care systems are in a high-stakes struggle of winners and losers based on HCAHPS scores. This high-stakes struggle creates unintended consequences of an ethical dilemma of doing what is right for the patient versus doing whatever it takes to please the patient in order to achieve high scores of satisfaction that are tied to better reimbursements. This article also reports the results of a national survey of 500 chief executive officers by the authors about the attitudes and frustrations of chief executive officers confronting the wild unrest caused by HCAHPS. PMID:27111687

  17. Why and how is compassion necessary to provide good quality healthcare?

    PubMed Central

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Recent disclosures of failures of care in the National Health Service (NHS) in England have led to debates about compassion deficits disallowing health professionals to provide high quality responsive care. While the link between high quality care and compassion is often taken for granted, it is less obvious how compassion – often originating in the individual’s emotional response – can become a moral sentiment and lead to developing a system of norms and values underpinning ethics of care. In this editorial, I argue why and how compassion might become a foundation of ethics guiding health professionals and a basis for ethics of care in health service organisations. I conclude by discussing a recent case of prominent healthcare failure in the NHS to highlight the relationship between compassion as an aspect of professional ethics on the one hand, and values and norms that institutions and specific policies promote on the other hand. PMID:25844380

  18. Yoga for Depression and Anxiety: A Review of Published Research and Implications for Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Uebelacker, Lisa A; Broughton, Monica K

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of yoga as way to manage or treat depression and anxiety. Yoga is afford- able, appealing, and accessible for many people, and there are plausible cognitive/affective and biologic mechanisms by which yoga could have a positive impact on depression and anxiety. There is indeed preliminary evidence that yoga may be helpful for these problems, and there are several ongoing larger-scale randomized clinical trials. The current evidence base is strongest for yoga as efficacious in reducing symptoms of unipolar depression. However, there may be risks to engaging in yoga as well. Healthcare providers can help patients evaluate whether a particular community-based yoga class is helpful and safe for them. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-03.asp, free with no login]. PMID:26929966

  19. Community and Healthcare Providers' Perspectives on Male Circumcision: A Multi-Centric Qualitative Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Nagarajan, Karikalan; Mehendale, Sanjay; Deb, Sibnath; Gupta, Abhilasha; Bharat, Shalini; Bhatt, Shripad; Kumar, Athokpam Bijesh; Kanthe, Vidisha; Sinha, Anju; Chandhiok, Nomita

    2014-01-01

    Background Although male circumcision (MC) is recommended as an HIV prevention option, the religious, cultural and biomedical dimensions of its feasibility, acceptability and practice in India have not been explored till date. This study explores beliefs, experiences and understanding of the community and healthcare providers (HCPs) about adult MC as an HIV prevention option in India. Methods This qualitative study covered 134 in-depth interviews from Belgaum, Kolkata, Meerut and Mumbai cities of India. Of these, 62 respondents were the members of circumcising (CC)/non-circumcising communities (NCC); including medically and traditionally circumcised men, parents of circumcised children, spouses of circumcised men, and religious clerics. Additionally, 58 registered healthcare providers (RHCPs) such as general and pediatric surgeons, pediatricians, skin and venereal disease specialists, general practitioners, and operation theatre nurses were interviewed. Fourteen traditional circumcisers were also interviewed. The data were coded and analyzed in QSR NUD*IST ver. 6.0. The study has not explored the participants' views about neonatal versus adult circumcision. Results Members of CC/NCC, traditional circumcisers and RCHPs expressed sharp religious sensitivities around the issue of MC. Six themes emerged: Male circumcision as the religious rite; Multiple meanings of MC: MC for ‘religious identity/privilege/sacrifice’ or ‘hygiene’; MC inflicts pain and cost; Medical indications outweigh faith; Hesitation exists in accepting ‘foreign’ evidence supporting MC; and communication is the key for acceptance of MCs. Medical indications could make members of NCC accept MC following appropriate counseling. Majority of the RHCPs demanded local in-country evidence. Conclusion HCPs must educate high-risk groups regarding the preventive and therapeutic role of MC. Communities need to discuss and create new social norms about male circumcision for better societal acceptance

  20. Dental knowledge of educators and healthcare providers working with children with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate dental knowledge and attitudes toward oral health care among healthcare providers and educators working with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in central Saudi Arabia. Methods: There were 305 questionnaires distributed to 7 special-needs centers between September and November 2014. A total of 217 questionnaires were collected with a response rate of 71.1%. The study took place in the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Results: Approximately 50.2% of the participants did not offer any toothbrushing advice, and 73.3% never recommended dental checkup visits to parents, and 75.6% never performed dental examinations to children under their care. Ten percent thought that children should have their first dental visit after 6 years of age. Almost all participants agreed that children should practice oral hygiene, and 60.4% think they should brush twice per day. In general, the participants choose toothbrushes and toothpaste as the main tools to perform oral hygiene. There were 35% of participants who believed that parents should be responsible for the children’s oral hygiene, and a few participants mentioned teachers and therapists to be responsible. Most of the participants (71.4%) did not receive any dental information from dental professional resources, only 14.3% of participants believed bacteria to be the cause of dental cavities. Conclusion: There is a clear lack of dental knowledge and attitudes, and its practical application among the participating group of healthcare providers working with children with ASD in Riyadh. PMID:26620991

  1. Texting While Driving: Does the New Law Work Among Healthcare Providers?

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Anitha E.; Houry, Debra; Dente, Christopher J.; Salomone, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study assessed whether Georgia Senate Bill 360, a statewide law passed in August 2010, that prohibits text messaging while driving, resulted in a decrease in this behavior among emergency medicine (EM) and general surgery (GS) healthcare providers. Methods: Using SurveyMonkey®, we created a web-based survey containing up to 28 multiple choice and free-text questions about driving behaviors. EM and GS healthcare providers at a southeastern medical school and its affiliate county hospital received an email inviting them to complete this survey in February 2011. We conducted all analyses in SPSS (version 19.0, Chicago, IL, 2010), using chi-squared tests and logistic regression models. The primary outcome of interest was a change in participant texting or emailing while driving after passage of the texting ban in Georgia. Results: Two hundred and twenty-six providers completed the entire survey (response rate 46.8%). Participants ranged in age from 23 to 71 years, with an average age of 38 (SD=10.2; median=35). Only three-quarters of providers (n=173, 76.6%) were aware of a texting ban in the state. Out of these, 60 providers (36.6%) reported never or rarely sending texts while driving (0 to 2 times per year), and 30 engaged in this behavior almost daily (18.9%). Almost two-thirds of this group reported no change in texting while driving following passage of the texting ban (n=110, 68%), while 53 respondents texted less (31.8%). Respondents younger than 40 were more than twice as likely to report no change in texting post-ban compared to older participants (OR=2.31, p=0.014). Providers who had been pulled over for speeding in the previous 5 years were about 2.5 times as likely to not change their texting-while-driving behavior following legislation passage compared to those without a history of police stops for speeding (OR=2.55, p=0.011). Each additional ticket received in the past 5 years for a moving violation lessened the odds of reporting a

  2. Knowledge of Healthcare Coverage for Refugee Claimants: Results from a Survey of Health Service Providers in Montreal.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Casares, Mónica; Cleveland, Janet; Oulhote, Youssef; Dunkley-Hickin, Catherine; Rousseau, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Following changes to the Interim Federal Health (IFH) program in Canada in 2012, this study investigates health service providers' knowledge of the healthcare coverage for refugee claimants living in Quebec. An online questionnaire was completed by 1,772 staff and physicians from five hospitals and two primary care centres in Montreal. Low levels of knowledge and significant associations between knowledge and occupational group, age, and contact with refugees were documented. Social workers, respondents aged 40-49 years, and those who reported previous contact with refugee claimants seeking healthcare were significantly more likely to have 2 or more correct responses. Rapid and multiple changes to the complex IFH policy have generated a high level of confusion among healthcare providers. Simplification of the system and a knowledge transfer strategy aimed at improving healthcare delivery for IFH patients are urgently needed, proposing easy avenues to access rapidly updated information and emphasizing ethical and clinical issues. PMID:26789844

  3. Health-care provider screening for tobacco smoking and advice to quit - 17 countries, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    2013-11-22

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable mortality in the world. Article 14 of the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) states that countries should promote cessation of tobacco use and adequate treatment for tobacco dependence. Health-care providers asking all patients about their tobacco use and advising tobacco users to quit are evidence-based strategies that increase tobacco abstinence. This report examines the proportion of tobacco smokers in 17 countries responding to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) who saw a health-care provider in the past year and who reported that a health-care provider asked them about smoking and advised them to quit. Respondents were tobacco smokers aged ≥15 years surveyed during 2008-2011 in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Russia, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, and Vietnam. The proportion of smokers who had visited a health-care provider during the previous 12 months ranged from 21.6% in Egypt to 62.3% in Poland. Among these, the proportion reporting that a health-care provider asked if they smoked ranged from 34.9% in Vietnam to 82.1% in Romania. Among those screened for tobacco use, those who reported their health-care providers advised them to quit ranged from 17.3% in Mexico to 67.3% in Romania. In most countries, persons aged ≥45 years were more likely to report being screened and advised to quit than were persons aged ≤24 years. Health-care providers should identify smokers and provide advice and assistance in quitting at each visit as an adjunct to effective community interventions (e.g., increased price of tobacco products; smoke-free policies, mass media campaigns, and tobacco quitlines). PMID:24257201

  4. Health-Care Provider Preferences for Time-Sensitive Communications from Public Health Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Revere, Debra; Painter, Ian; Oberle, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Rapid Emergency Alert Communication in Health (REACH) Trial was a randomized control trial to systematically compare and evaluate the effectiveness of traditional and mobile communication modalities for public health agencies to disseminate time-sensitive information to health-care providers (HCPs). We conducted a sub-study to identify the communication channels by which HCPs preferred receiving public health alerts and advisories. Methods Enrolled HCPs were blindly randomized into four message delivery groups to receive time-sensitive public health messages by e-mail, fax, or short message service (SMS) or to a no-message control group. Follow-up interviews were conducted 5–10 days after the message. In the final interview, additional questions were asked regarding HCP preferences for receiving public health alerts and advisories. We examined the relationship between key covariates and preferred method of receiving public health alert and advisory messages. Results Gender, age, provider type, and study site showed statistically significant associations with delivery method preference. Older providers were more likely than younger providers to prefer e-mail or fax, while younger providers were more likely than older providers to prefer receiving messages via SMS. Conclusions There is currently no evidence-based research to guide or improve communication between public health agencies and HCPs. Understanding the preferences of providers for receiving alerts and advisories may improve the effectiveness of vital public health communications systems and, in turn, may enhance disease surveillance, aid in early detection, and improve case finding and situational awareness for public health emergencies. PMID:25355977

  5. Knowledge of Healthcare Coverage for Refugee Claimants: Results from a Survey of Health Service Providers in Montreal

    PubMed Central

    Dunkley-Hickin, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Following changes to the Interim Federal Health (IFH) program in Canada in 2012, this study investigates health service providers’ knowledge of the healthcare coverage for refugee claimants living in Quebec. An online questionnaire was completed by 1,772 staff and physicians from five hospitals and two primary care centres in Montreal. Low levels of knowledge and significant associations between knowledge and occupational group, age, and contact with refugees were documented. Social workers, respondents aged 40–49 years, and those who reported previous contact with refugee claimants seeking healthcare were significantly more likely to have 2 or more correct responses. Rapid and multiple changes to the complex IFH policy have generated a high level of confusion among healthcare providers. Simplification of the system and a knowledge transfer strategy aimed at improving healthcare delivery for IFH patients are urgently needed, proposing easy avenues to access rapidly updated information and emphasizing ethical and clinical issues. PMID:26789844

  6. Primary healthcare provider knowledge, beliefs and clinic-based practices regarding alternative tobacco products and marijuana: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bascombe, Ta Misha S; Scott, Kimberly N; Ballard, Denise; Smith, Samantha A; Thompson, Winifred; Berg, Carla J

    2016-06-01

    Use prevalence of alternative tobacco products and marijuana has increased dramatically. Unfortunately, clinical guidelines have focused on traditional cigarettes with limited attention regarding these emerging public health issues. Thus, it is critical to understand how healthcare professionals view this issue and are responding to it. This qualitative study explored knowledge, beliefs and clinic-based practices regarding traditional and alternative tobacco products (cigar-like products, smokeless tobacco, hookah, e-cigarettes) and marijuana among rural and urban Georgia primary healthcare providers. The sample comprised 20 healthcare providers in primary care settings located in the Atlanta Metropolitan area and rural southern Georgia who participated in semi-structured interviews. Results indicated a lack of knowledge about these products, with some believing that some products were less harmful than traditional cigarettes or that they may be effective in promoting cessation or harm reduction. Few reported explicitly assessing use of these various products in clinic. In addition, healthcare providers reported a need for empirical evidence to inform their clinical practice. Healthcare providers must systematically assess use of the range of tobacco products and marijuana. Evidence-based recommendations or information sources are needed to inform clinical practice and help providers navigate conversations with patients using or inquiring about these products. PMID:26802106

  7. Outpatient clinic waiting time, provider communication styles and satisfaction with healthcare in India.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Payal

    2016-08-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of extended waiting time on patients' perceptions of provider communication skills and in-clinic satisfaction, in three major cities in India. Design/methodology/approach - In total, 625 patients were interviewed. The multivariate general linear model was used to determine the causality and relationship between the independent and the dependent variable. A moderation analysis was also conducted to assess waiting time role as a potential moderator in doctor-patient communication. Findings - Results show that patients with higher waiting time were less satisfied with health care quality. Male patients and patients of male providers were more affected by extended waiting time than female patients and patients of female providers. The advanced regression analysis, however, suggests weak support for waiting time and its effect on overall satisfaction with clinic quality. Waiting time did not moderate the relationship between satisfaction with dominant communication style, and overall satisfaction at the outpatient clinic. Research limitations/implications - A cross-sectional study does not easily lend itself to explaining causality with certainty. Thus, sophisticated techniques, such as structural equation modelling may also be utilized to assess the influence of extended waiting time on satisfaction with healthcare at outpatient clinics. Practical implications - Findings are relevant for providers as the onus is on them to ensure patient satisfaction. They should initiate a workable waiting time assessment model at the operational level. Originality/value - There has been a relatively lesser focus on patient waiting time in patient-provider satisfaction studies. In India, this aspect is still vastly unexplored especially in the context of outpatient clinics. Gender wise pattern of patient satisfaction and waiting time is also missing in most studies. PMID:27477932

  8. Tick Bite Prophylaxis: Results From a 2012 Survey of Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Perea, A E; Hinckley, A F; Mead, P S

    2015-08-01

    In a recent national survey, over 30% of healthcare providers (HCPs) reported prescribing tick bite prophylaxis in the previous year. To clarify provider practices, we surveyed HCPs to determine how frequently and for what reasons they prescribed tick bite prophylaxis. We included four questions regarding tick bite prophylaxis in the DocStyles 2012 survey, a computer-administered questionnaire of 2205 US primary care physicians, paediatricians and nurse practitioners. Responses in 14 states with high Lyme disease incidence (high LDI) were compared with responses from other states (low LDI). Overall, 56.4% of 1485 providers reported prescribing tick bite prophylaxis at least once in the previous year, including 73.9% of HCPs in high LDI and 48.2% in low LDI states. The reasons given were 'to prevent Lyme disease' (76.9%), 'patients request it' (40.4%) and 'to prevent other tickborne diseases' (29.4%). Among HCPs who provided prophylaxis, 45.2% did so despite feeling that it was not indicated. Given a hypothetical scenario involving a patient with an attached tick, 38.1% of HCPs from high LDI states and 15.1% from low LDI states would prescribe a single dose of doxycycline; 19.0% from high LDI states and 27.5% from low LDI states would prescribe a full course of doxycycline. HCPs prescribe tick bite prophylaxis frequently in areas where Lyme disease is rare and for tickborne diseases for which it has not been shown effective. HCPs may be unaware of current tick bite prophylaxis guidelines or find them difficult to implement. More information is needed regarding the efficacy of tick bite prophylaxis for diseases other than Lyme disease. PMID:25244410

  9. Experience of Behvarzes (Iranian primary healthcare providers) from giving primary health services in health houses

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary healthcare (PHC) providers play a major role in provision of public health in rural areas in Iran. They are considered as the key elements of health development in rural population. There is limited research on clarification of their experiences from provision of health services in their working conditions. This study aimed to clarify the experience of PHC providers from working conditions in giving primary health services in health houses (district branches of rural health care centers). Materials and Methods: This is a content analysis qualitative study, conducted through personal and group interviews with 12 health workers working in health care centers in rural areas in Isfahan province, 2010. Sampling continued until data saturation. Data were analyzed through conventional content analysis and constant comparative method. Results: Data analysis led to extraction of 11 categories, and finally, four themes of “ignoring the rights,” “causing tension in working climate,” “pressure or overload of expectations beyond the power,” and “occupational worn out” were yielded from the categories. These themes reveal the concepts and nature of PHC providers’ experiences from giving health care at health houses as the first level of PHC centers. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the PHC providers work in a tense condition in health houses. Although they devote themselves to the health of society members, their own health is neglected. Policy makers and authorities should amend working conditions of PHC providers through modification of resources and making supportive and collaborative strategies to improve the quality of services and promote the health level of the service receivers. PMID:27512699

  10. Making It Happen: Training health-care providers in emergency obstetric and newborn care.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Charles A; van den Broek, Nynke

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 289,000 maternal deaths, 2.6 million stillbirths and 2.4 million newborn deaths occur globally each year, with the majority occurring around the time of childbirth. The medical and surgical interventions to prevent this loss of life are known, and most maternal and newborn deaths are in principle preventable. There is a need to build the capacity of health-care providers to recognize and manage complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the post-partum period. Skills-and-drills competency-based training in skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care and early newborn care (EmONC) is an approach that is successful in improving knowledge and skills. There is emerging evidence of this resulting in improved availability and quality of care. To evaluate the effectiveness of EmONC training, operational research using an adapted Kirkpatrick framework and a theory of change approach is needed. The Making It Happen programme is an example of this. PMID:25911056

  11. Computer-Supported Feedback Message Tailoring for Healthcare Providers in Malawi: Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Douglas, Gerald P; Hochheiser, Harry; Kam, Matthew; Gadabu, Oliver; Bwanali, Mwatha; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Although performance feedback has the potential to help clinicians improve the quality and safety of care, healthcare organizations generally lack knowledge about how this guidance is best provided. In low-resource settings, tools for theory-informed feedback tailoring may enhance limited clinical supervision resources. Our objectives were to establish proof-of-concept for computer-supported feedback message tailoring in Malawi, Africa. We conducted this research in five stages: clinical performance measurement, modeling the influence of feedback on antiretroviral therapy (ART) performance, creating a rule-based message tailoring process, generating tailored messages for recipients, and finally analysis of performance and message tailoring data. We retrospectively generated tailored messages for 7,448 monthly performance reports from 11 ART clinics. We found that tailored feedback could be routinely generated for four guideline-based performance indicators, with 35% of reports having messages prioritized to optimize the effect of feedback. This research establishes proof-of-concept for a novel approach to improving the use of clinical performance feedback in low-resource settings and suggests possible directions for prospective evaluations comparing alternative designs of feedback messages. PMID:26958217

  12. Healthcare and Listening: A Relationship for Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Janis; Foley, Amy; Crigger, Nancy; Brannigan, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The optimal relationship between healthcare provider and patient is one of trust. This therapeutic relationship is dependent on the ability of the healthcare provider to communicate effectively with the patient. Research indicates that when healthcare providers listen to patients, there is more compliance with medical regimens, patient…

  13. Assessing healthcare providers' knowledge and practices relating to insecticide-treated nets and the prevention of malaria in Ghana, Laos, Senegal and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research evidence is not always being disseminated to healthcare providers who need it to inform their clinical practice. This can result in the provision of ineffective services and an inefficient use of resources, the implications of which might be felt particularly acutely in low- and middle-income countries. Malaria prevention is a particularly compelling domain to study evidence/practice gaps given the proven efficacy, cost-effectiveness and disappointing utilization of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). Methods This study compares what is known about ITNs to the related knowledge and practices of healthcare providers in four low- and middle-income countries. A new questionnaire was developed, pilot tested, translated and administered to 497 healthcare providers in Ghana (140), Laos (136), Senegal (100) and Tanzania (121). Ten questions tested participants' knowledge and clinical practice related to malaria prevention. Additional questions addressed their individual characteristics, working context and research-related activities. Ordinal logistic regressions with knowledge and practices as the dependent variable were conducted in addition to descriptive statistics. Results The survey achieved a 75% response rate (372/497) across Ghana (107/140), Laos (136/136), Senegal (51/100) and Tanzania (78/121). Few participating healthcare providers correctly answered all five knowledge questions about ITNs (13%) or self-reported performing all five clinical practices according to established evidence (2%). Statistically significant factors associated with higher knowledge within each country included: 1) training in acquiring systematic reviews through the Cochrane Library (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.30-4.73); and 2) ability to read and write English well or very well (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.05-2.70). Statistically significant factors associated with better clinical practices within each country include: 1) reading scientific journals from their own country (OR 1.67, 95% CI

  14. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns among healthcare providers in the prevention of recurrent kidney stones in Northern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Derek; Abara, Emmanuel; Parmar, Malvinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Introducton: Kidney stone recurrence is common. Preventive measures can lead to improved quality of life and costs savings to the individual and healthcare system. Guidelines to prevent recurrent kidney stones are published by various urological societies. Adherence to guidelines amongst healthcare professionals in general is poor, while adherence to preventive management guidelines regarding stone disease is unknown. To understand this issue, we conducted an online study to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of healthcare practitioners in Northern Ontario. Methods: We used the database of healthcare providers affiliated with the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, in Sudbury (East Campus) and Thunder Bay (West Campus), Ontario. We designed the survey based on current best practice guidelines for the management of recurrent kidney stones. Questions covered 3 domains: knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns. Demographic data were also collected. The survey was distributed electronically to all participants. Results: A total of 68 healthcare providers completed the survey. Of these, most were primary care physicians (72%). To keep uniformity, we analyzed the data of this homogenous group. A total of 70% of the respondents were aware of the current guidelines; however, only 43% applied their knowledge in clinical practice. Most participants lacked confidence while answering most items in the attitude domain. Conclusions: Most primary care physician respondents were aware of the appropriate preventive measures for recurrent kidney stones; however, they do not appear to apply this knowledge effectively in clinical practice. A low response rate is a limitation of our study. Further studies involving a larger sample size may lead to information sharing and collaborative care among healthcare providers. PMID:25485006

  15. Assessing Knowledge and Attitudes of U.S. Healthcare Providers about Benefits and Risks of Consuming Seafood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Doris T.; Pivarnik, Lori F.; Richard, Nicole Leydon; Gable, Robert K.; Morrissey, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    An online needs assessment survey of healthcare providers was developed and implemented to determine knowledge and attitudes about the benefits and risks of consuming seafood along with how this might impact patient/clientele counseling. Only 6 of the 45 knowledge items queried (13%) met the 80% subject mastery or proficiency with a total…

  16. Brief Interventions for Tobacco Users: Using the Internet to Train Healthcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Kelly M.; Cohn, Leslie G.; Glynn, Lisa H.; Stoner, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    One fifth of Americans smoke; many have no plans to quit. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an effective approach to intervention with precontemplative smokers, yet a substantial number of healthcare practitioners lack training in this approach. Two interactive online tutorials were developed to teach practitioners to deliver brief tobacco…

  17. Patients in acute care settings. Which health-care services are provided?

    PubMed

    Dugan, J; Mosel, L

    1992-07-01

    Studies have shown that early discharge planning, multidisciplinary care, and a focus on functional abilities for older adults do reduce acute care hospital readmissions. Of the 101 records reviewed of acute care admissions 75 years of age and older, 36 had no multidisciplinary service documented and 75 had no discharge planning documented within 48 hours of admission. Eleven functional activities were assessed and documented in one record with a range of 4 to 11 activities assessed in the remaining 100 documents. Identifying and filling gaps in care provided to this age group might provide substantial cost savings, improve care, and decrease complications. Advocacy, coordination of care, and greater knowledge may be keys to narrowing these service gaps. PMID:1629531

  18. Considerations in the selection of healthcare providers for mothers and children in Bo, Sierra Leone: reputation, cost and location.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Ansumana, Rashid; Abdirahman, Hafsa A; Bockarie, Alfred S; Bangura, Umaru; Meehan, Kate A; Jimmy, David H; Malanoski, Anthony P; Sundufu, Abu J; Stenger, David A

    2012-12-01

    The factors that influence the selection of a healthcare provider once the decision to seek care has been made can be summarized using a triad of cost, location and reputation. The goal of this study was to identify which of these factors is the primary consideration when women in urban Bo, Sierra Leone, select a healthcare provider for themselves or their children. We interviewed 1091 mothers during a household census of two neighbourhoods of Bo in April 2010. Reputation was the top consideration for about half of the women, cost was the second most common priority, and the location of the healthcare facility was the primary consideration for less than 7% of the participants. The majority of women said they would select a new provider if cost was not a barrier. Socioeconomic characteristics were not significant predictors of whether cost, location or reputation was selected as the highest-ranked consideration. This evidence for the importance of reputation in healthcare decision-making even in low-resource areas highlights the need for health systems to address issues of quality and responsiveness, and not just cost, in order to increase access to and utilization of health services. PMID:24029678

  19. Maternal Healthcare Providers in Uttar Pradesh, India: How to Position Informal Practitioners within the System?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chesta; Mukherjee, Kanchan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To understand the knowledge and services of informal providers and to explore their role in addressing the human resource gap in Uttar Pradesh, India, within the context of maternal health. Materials and methods: The study is exploratory in nature, conducted in four blocks of four districts of Uttar Pradesh state, India. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 114 informal providers. Results: More than one-third (38%) providers have some formal education and unrecognized degrees. Approximately three-fourths (74%) of them have more than 5 years of work experience. They also provide delivery and in-patient services and have basic equipment available. However, they lack essential knowledge about maternal health. They have mixed opinion about their contribution towards maternal health but the only ones available. Therefore, despite lacking requisite knowledge, training and services, they become indispensable due to lack of emergency and timely public health services, and being the only ones existing in the community. Conclusion: Informal sector practitioners are a critical link in reaching out to population for health services in developing countries. As opposed to the general notion, they possess years of formal education, experience, informal trainings along with trust of communities. Thus, it becomes important to accept their presence and manage them to the best of their abilities even for specialized care like maternal health. PMID:25530771

  20. Environmental Factors that Influence Communication between People with Communication Disability and Their Healthcare Providers in Hospital: A Review of the Literature within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda

    2008-01-01

    The importance of effective healthcare communication between healthcare providers and people needing healthcare is well established. People with communication disabilities are at risk of not being able to communicate effectively with their healthcare providers and this might directly compromise their health, healthcare and their right to…

  1. [Data coding in the Israeli healthcare system - do choices provide the answers to our system's needs?].

    PubMed

    Zelingher, Julian; Ash, Nachman

    2013-05-01

    The IsraeLi healthcare system has undergone major processes for the adoption of health information technologies (HIT), and enjoys high Levels of utilization in hospital and ambulatory care. Coding is an essential infrastructure component of HIT, and ts purpose is to represent data in a simplified and common format, enhancing its manipulation by digital systems. Proper coding of data enables efficient identification, storage, retrieval and communication of data. UtiLization of uniform coding systems by different organizations enables data interoperability between them, facilitating communication and integrating data elements originating in different information systems from various organizations. Current needs in Israel for heaLth data coding include recording and reporting of diagnoses for hospitalized patients, outpatients and visitors of the Emergency Department, coding of procedures and operations, coding of pathology findings, reporting of discharge diagnoses and causes of death, billing codes, organizational data warehouses and national registries. New national projects for cLinicaL data integration, obligatory reporting of quality indicators and new Ministry of Health (MOH) requirements for HIT necessitate a high Level of interoperability that can be achieved only through the adoption of uniform coding. Additional pressures were introduced by the USA decision to stop the maintenance of the ICD-9-CM codes that are also used by Israeli healthcare, and the adoption of ICD-10-C and ICD-10-PCS as the main coding system for billing purpose. The USA has also mandated utilization of SNOMED-CT as the coding terminology for the ELectronic Health Record problem list, and for reporting quality indicators to the CMS. Hence, the Israeli MOH has recently decided that discharge diagnoses will be reported using ICD-10-CM codes, and SNOMED-CT will be used to code the cLinical information in the EHR. We reviewed the characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of these two coding

  2. Updated CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus-infected health-care providers and students.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    This report updates the 1991 CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected health-care providers and students to reduce risk for transmitting HBV to patients during the conduct of exposure-prone invasive procedures (CDC. Recommendations for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus to patients during exposure-prone invasive procedures. MMWR 1991;40[No. RR-8]). This update reflects changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in the United States and advances in the medical management of chronic HBV infection and policy directives issued by health authorities since 1991. The primary goal of this report is to promote patient safety while providing risk management and practice guidance to HBV-infected health-care providers and students, particularly those performing exposure-prone procedures such as certain types of surgery. Because percutaneous injuries sustained by health-care personnel during certain surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures provide a potential route of HBV transmission to patients as well as providers, this report emphasizes prevention of operator injuries and blood exposures during exposure-prone surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures. These updated recommendations reaffirm the 1991 CDC recommendation that HBV infection alone should not disqualify infected persons from the practice or study of surgery, dentistry, medicine, or allied health fields. The previous recommendations have been updated to include the following changes: no prenotification of patients of a health-care provider's or student's HBV status; use of HBV DNA serum levels rather than hepatitis B e-antigen status to monitor infectivity; and, for those health-care professionals requiring oversight, specific suggestions for composition of expert review panels and threshold value of serum HBV DNA considered "safe" for practice (<1,000 IU/ml). These recommendations also explicitly address the issue of medical and

  3. Stigma Toward Men Who Have Sex with Men Among Future Healthcare Providers in Malaysia: Would More Interpersonal Contact Reduce Prejudice?

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, Valerie A; Jin, Harry; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; John, Jacob; Lim, Sin How; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) living in countries with strong stigma toward MSM are vulnerable to HIV and experience significant barriers to HIV care. Research is needed to inform interventions to reduce stigma toward MSM in these countries, particularly among healthcare providers. A cross-sectional survey of 1158 medical and dental students was conducted at seven Malaysian universities in 2012. Multivariate analyses of variance suggest that students who had interpersonal contact with MSM were less prejudiced toward and had lower intentions to discriminate against MSM. Path analyses with bootstrapping suggest stereotypes and fear mediate associations between contact with prejudice and discrimination. Intervention strategies to reduce MSM stigma among healthcare providers in Malaysia and other countries with strong stigma toward MSM may include facilitating opportunities for direct, in-person or indirect, media-based prosocial contact between medical and dental students with MSM. PMID:26324078

  4. High-Ability Students: New Ways to Conceptualize Giftedness and Provide Psychological Services in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicpon, Megan Foley; Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2011-01-01

    Psychologists working in the schools have an opportunity to affect in new and exciting ways the services they provide to high-ability students. A talent development framework offers a unique lens through which gifted services is conceptualized. The framework moves school psychologists beyond viewing giftedness and high IQ as synonymous to…

  5. Participatory approaches involving community and healthcare providers in family planning/contraceptive information and service provision: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Petrus S; Cordero, Joanna Paula; Gichangi, Peter; Smit, Jennifer A; Nkole, Theresa; Kiarie, James; Temmerman, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    As efforts to address unmet need for family planning and contraception (FP/C) accelerate, voluntary use, informed choice and quality must remain at the fore. Active involvement of affected populations has been recognized as one of the key principles in ensuring human rights in the provision of FP/C and in improving quality of care. However, community participation continues to be inadequately addressed in large-scale FP/C programmes. Community and healthcare providers' unequal relationship can be a barrier to successful participation. This scoping review identifies participatory approaches involving both community and healthcare providers for FP/C services and analyzes relevant evidence. The detailed analysis of 25 articles provided information on 28 specific programmes and identified three types of approaches for community and healthcare provider participation in FP/C programmes. The three approaches were: (i) establishment of new groups either health committees to link the health service providers and users or implementation teams to conduct specific activities to improve or extend available health services, (ii) identification of and collaboration with existing community structures to optimise use of health services and (iii) operationalization of tools to facilitate community and healthcare provider collaboration for quality improvement. Integration of community and healthcare provider participation in FP/C provision were conducted through FP/C-only programmes, FP/C-focused programmes and/or as part of a health service package. The rationales behind the interventions varied and may be multiple. Examples include researcher-, NGO- or health service-initiated programmes with clear objectives of improving FP/C service provision or increasing demand for services; facilitating the involvement of community members or service users and, in some cases, may combine socio-economic development and increasing self-reliance or control over sexual and reproductive health

  6. Knowledge and practices of healthcare providers about essential newborn care and resuscitation in a district of Haryana.

    PubMed

    Louis, Deepak; Kumar, Praveen; Gupta, Ashish

    2013-02-01

    In India, institutionalisation of deliveries is happening at a fast pace. Evaluating the knowledge and practices of healthcare providers in these institutions is a priority in this current scenario. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and practices regarding essential newborn care and resuscitation among healthcare providers in Panchkula district of Haryana. A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey of healthcare personnel working in one district hospital, 2 community health centres, 5 primary health centres and 2 subcentres, each with at least 100 deliveries per year, was done. Fifty-eight medical personnel comprising of 27 staff nurses, 11 auxiliary nurse midwives, 15 doctors and 5 multipurpose health workers were interviewed. Of them, 33 (57%) had received training in newborn care, but only 9 (16%) knew all the initial steps of resuscitation. Twenty-eight (48%) had knowledge of positive pressure ventilation while 8 (13%) could provide chest compression or drugs during resuscitation. Thirty-three (57%) practiced holding the baby upside down after delivery. Early and exclusive breastfeeding including colostrum was advised by all. All practiced hand washing prior to delivery and kept the cord clean anddry. At least one danger sign was told to the mother at the time of discharge by 48 (83%). However, kangaroo mother care was rarely advised to mothers of preterm babies. It was found that majority of healthcare personnel had good awareness about breastfeeding and clean practices while conducting delivery. In contrast, knowledge about neonatal resuscitation and some aspects of essential newborn care was poor. PMID:24003568

  7. Long-term Psychological and Occupational Effects of Providing Hospital Healthcare during SARS Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Lancee, William J.; Balderson, Kenneth E.; Bennett, Jocelyn P.; Borgundvaag, Bjug; Evans, Susan; Fernandes, Christopher M.B.; Goldbloom, David S.; Gupta, Mona; Hunter, Jonathan J.; Hall, Linda McGillis; Nagle, Lynn M.; Pain, Clare; Peczeniuk, Sonia S.; Raymond, Glenna; Read, Nancy; Rourke, Sean B.; Steinberg, Rosalie J.; Stewart, Thomas E.; Coke, Susan VanDeVelde; Veldhorst, Georgina G.; Wasylenki, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) found the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) to be stressful, but the long-term impact is not known. From 13 to 26 months after the SARS outbreak, 769 HCWs at 9 Toronto hospitals that treated SARS patients and 4 Hamilton hospitals that did not treat SARS patients completed a survey of several adverse outcomes. Toronto HCWs reported significantly higher levels of burnout (p = 0.019), psychological distress (p<0.001), and posttraumatic stress (p<0.001). Toronto workers were more likely to have reduced patient contact and work hours and to report behavioral consequences of stress. Variance in adverse outcomes was explained by a protective effect of the perceived adequacy of training and support and by a provocative effect of maladaptive coping style and other individual factors. The results reinforce the value of effective staff support and training in preparation for future outbreaks. PMID:17326946

  8. A WIC-based curriculum to enhance parent communication with healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Alma D; Inkelas, Moira; Whaley, Shannon E; Kuo, Alice A

    2013-10-01

    The objectives describe a curriculum to support parent-provider communication about child development, and to demonstrate its impact and effectiveness when delivered by staff from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). A curriculum was developed by a university-WIC partnership for a WIC center-based health education class to teach parents about child development and how to talk to their child's doctor about development. During a 90-min training session, university pediatricians used this curriculum and trained WIC paraprofessionals to conduct a 20-30 min center-based education session. WIC paraprofessionals completed an on-line survey to obtain their demographic characteristics, and their attitudes and perceptions about the training sessions and their experiences teaching the center-based health education session to parents. Approximately 500 WIC paraprofessionals received the 90-min training session across 60 centers in the Public Health Foundation Enterprises WIC Program in Southern California. About 250 WIC paraprofessionals completed the on-line survey and over 80 % of WIC staff reported that they had learned new information about child development as a result of the training, and 87 % of the WIC staff reported that the training was sufficient to feel comfortable teaching the class content to parents. We demonstrated the ability to build WIC paraprofessional capacity to promote parental participation in child developmental surveillance and communication with their child's doctor. With appropriate training, WIC staff are interested in supporting population-based efforts to improve parent-physician communication about child development that can complement WIC's existing maternal and child health topics. PMID:23760769

  9. The Impact of Learning Style on Healthcare Providers' Preference for Voice Advisory Manikins versus Live Instructors in Basic Life Support Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiovanni, Lisa Marie

    2013-01-01

    The American Heart Association's HeartCode[TM] Healthcare Provider (HCP) Basic Life Support (BLS) e-learning program with voice-advisory manikins was implemented in an acute care hospital as the only teaching method offered for BLS certification. On course evaluations, healthcare provider staff commented that the VAM technology for skills…

  10. The role of provider interactions on comprehensive sexual healthcare among young men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Meanley, Steven; Gale, Alyssa; Harmell, Chelsea; Jadwin-Cakmak, Laura; Pingel, Emily; Bauermeister, José A

    2015-02-01

    Testing for both HIV and STIs is an essential component of comprehensive sexual healthcare for young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Using data collected from YMSM living in the Detroit metropolitan area (N = 304, ages 18-29; 51% Black, 25% White, 14% Latino), we examined YMSM's access to a medical provider in the prior year and tested whether a provider's conversation regarding HIV/STI prevention was associated with their type of testing behavior: Non-Testers, HIV-Only Testing, and HIV and STI Testing. Over half (56.7%) reported a routine provider visit in the previous year. Visits were associated with having insurance, provider comfort, and prior HIV and/or STI testing. Among YMSM who visited a doctor, our multinomial regression exhibited that those whose provider discussed HIV/STI prevention were most likely to have tested for both HIV and STIs, as compared to the HIV Only and Never Tester categories. Patient-provider communication regarding HIV/STI prevention is critical to motivate comprehensive sexual healthcare access among YMSM. Strategies that enable providers to discuss HIV/STI prevention with YMSM in a sex-positive manner may help maximize comprehensive testing. PMID:25646727

  11. Understanding the context of healthcare utilization: assessing environmental and provider-related variables in the behavioral model of utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, K A; Morrison, K R; Andersen, R; Aday, L A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The behavioral model of utilization, developed by Andersen, Aday, and others, is one of the most frequently used frameworks for analyzing the factors that are associated with patient utilization of healthcare services. However, the use of the model for examining the context within which utilization occurs-the role of the environment and provider-related factors-has been largely neglected. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review and analysis to determine if studies of medical care utilization that have used the behavioral model during the last 20 years have included environmental and provider-related variables and the methods used to analyze these variables. We discuss barriers to the use of these contextual variables and potential solutions. DATA SOURCES: The Social Science Citation Index and Science Citation Index. We included all articles from 1975-1995 that cited any of three key articles on the behavioral model, that included all articles that were empirical analyses and studies of formal medical care utilization, and articles that specifically stated their use of the behavioral model (n = 139). STUDY DESIGN: Design was a systematic literature review. DATA ANALYSIS: We used a structured review process to code articles on whether they included contextual variables: (1) environmental variables (characteristics of the healthcare delivery system, external environment, and community-level enabling factors); and (2) provider-related variables (patient factors that may be influenced by providers and provider characteristics that interact with patient characteristics to influence utilization). We also examined the methods used in studies that included contextual variables. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty-five percent of the studies included environmental variables and 51 percent included provider-related variables. Few studies examined specific measures of the healthcare system or provider characteristics or used methods other than simple regression analysis

  12. Contrasting views of animal healthcare providers on worm control practices for sheep and goats in an arid environment.

    PubMed

    Saddiqi, H A; Jabbar, A; Babar, W; Sarwar, M; Iqbal, Z; Cabaret, J

    2012-02-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the worm control practices and anthelmintic usage of 150 key respondents involved in sheep and goat production in the arid Thal area of Pakistan. The information was collected by visiting farms, and interviewing the key respondents which included veterinary officers (n = 15), veterinary assistants (n = 51), traditional practitioners (n = 24), and small and large scale sheep/goat farm herders and owners (n = 60). Among all interviewed animal healthcare providers, the veterinary officers had the highest level of awareness of parasitic infection and advocated the use of modern available anthelmintics according to the predefined schedule. The farmers on the other hand, had the lowest level of knowledge about parasitic infections. They used modern anthelmintics at low frequencies (every six months) following an unusual practice of diluting the medicine. Veterinary assistants had a medium level of awareness about the parasitic infections using anthelmintic treatments when they deemed necessary rather than following a predefined treatment schedule. Traditional practitioners were also aware of parasitic infections and used traditional anthelmintics or a combination of the traditional and modern anthelmintics. The animal health providers had a different awareness and knowledge of parasitic infections which resulted in contrasting proposals for its' control. The farmers used worm control measures in accordance with their own views and those of animal healthcare advisors, combining modern and traditional treatments. This study provides the first insight into the differing views of those animal healthcare providers who form the basis for effective parasitic control within the sheep and goat industry of an arid region. PMID:22314240

  13. Assessing Safety Attitudes among Healthcare Providers after a Hospital-Wide High-Risk Patient Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Je, Sang Mo; Kim, Hyun Jong; You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Cho, Junho; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is commonly performed in high-risk, high intensity situations and is therefore a good procedure around which to develop and implement safety culture strategies in the hospital. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a hospital-wide quality improvement program on the management of sudden cardiac arrests by assessing healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Materials and Methods This study was designed as a prospective cohort study at a single academic medical center. The comprehensive hospital-based safety program included steps to identify areas of hazard, partner units with the Resuscitation Committee, and to conduct a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The SAQ evaluated 35 questions in seven domains to assess changes in patient safety culture by comparing the results before and after the hospital-wide high risk patient care improvement program. Results The response rates of the pre- and post-SAQ survey were 489 out of 1121 (43.6%) and 575 out of 1270 (45.3%), respectively. SAQ survey responses revealed significant improvement in all seven domains of the questionnaire (p-values of 0.006 and lower). In a subgroup analysis, doctors and nurses showed improvement in five domains. Both doctors and nurses did not show improvement in the "sharing information" domain. Conclusion A hospital-wide quality improvement program for high-risk, high reliability patient care involving CPR care was shown to be associated with a change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Through an immersive and active program on CPR care, change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety was initiated. PMID:24532527

  14. Understanding Barriers to Routine HIV Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Healthcare Providers in King County, Washington

    PubMed Central

    Shirreffs, Alexandra; Lee, David P.; Henry, Jsani; Golden, Matthew R.; Stekler, Joanne D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended routine HIV screening in healthcare settings for persons between 13 and 64 years old. In 2010, the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) was changed to align testing rules with these recommendations. We designed this survey to ascertain the current state of HIV testing and barriers to routine screening in King County, Washington. Methods Between March 23 and April 16, 2010, a convenience sample of healthcare providers completed an online survey. Providers answered true-false and multiple choice questions about national recommendations and the WAC, policies in their primary clinical settings, and their personal HIV testing practices. Providers were asked to agree or disagree whether commonly reported barriers limited their implementation of routine HIV screening. Results Although 76% of the 221 respondents knew that the CDC recommended routine HIV screening for persons regardless of their risk, 99 (45%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy to target testing based on patient risk factors. Forty-four (20%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy of routine HIV screening, 54 (25%) reported no official policy, and 15 (7%) did not know whether a policy existed. Only 11 (5%) providers offer HIV testing to all patients at initial visits. When asked about barriers to routine screening, 57% of providers agreed that perception that their patient population is low risk limits the number of HIV tests they perform. Only 26 (13%) providers agreed that concern about reimbursement posed a barrier to testing. Conclusions Most providers participating in this survey continue to target HIV testing, despite knowledge of national recommendations. Efforts are still needed to educate providers and policymakers, clarify the recent WAC revisions, and implement structural changes in order to increase HIV testing in Washington State. PMID:22970215

  15. Development of Clinical Pharmacy services at King Khalid University Hospital and its impact on the quality of healthcare provided.

    PubMed

    Saddique, Abdulaziz A

    2012-07-01

    Clinical Pharmacy is a unique service provided by the leading pharmacy departments in the United States. The concept of Clinical Pharmacy evolved after the significant increase in number of pharmaceuticals in the market and the increasing potential of drug interactions. However, the Clinical Pharmacist is not merely an individual who advises on drug interactions. There are a number of functions which include but are not limited to; the design of appropriate drug therapy, such as Pharmacokinetic assessment and evaluation to optimize drug therapy, drug information dissemination to the physicians and other healthcare providers and participation as a toxicology consultant in Poison management. At the King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) the first Clinical Pharmacy services program began in 1983. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of our Clinical Pharmacy program on the patients' care as well as its perception by the Medical staff that came from different parts of the world. Our Clinical Pharmacists were asked to record any suggestions or interventions in the form. The forms were all collected at the end of each day and entered into a database for analysis. Each intervention was analyzed in order to assess the merit of the action in terms of the therapeutic, financial and direct cost impact. The study showed a positive impact on the patients' care as well as on the economy of the drugs prescribed. Meanwhile, the service was very much appreciated by the Medical staff as well as other healthcare providers. PMID:23960800

  16. Perceptions of Medical Interactions between Healthcare Providers and American Indian Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Sarkisian, Natalia; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra; Beals, Janette

    2008-01-01

    Cultural competence models assume that culture affects medical encounters, yet little research uses objective measures to examine how this may be true. Do providers and racial/ethnic minority patients interpret the same interactions similarly or differently? How might patterns of provider-patient concordance and discordance vary for patients with different cultural characteristics? We collected survey data from 115 medical visits with American Indian older adults at a clinic operated by the Cherokee Nation (in Northeastern Oklahoma, USA), asking providers and patients to evaluate 9 affective and instrumental interactions. Examining data from the full sample, we found that provider and patient ratings were significantly discordant for all interactions (Wilcoxon test p ≤ .02). However, discordance typically reflected a trend in which providers were more critical of their own behaviors than were patients. These findings suggest that providers serving American Indian patients often create greater satisfaction than they believe. We then distinguished cultural subgroups of patients, comparing magnitude of provider-patient discordance on specific interactions for patients at different levels of American Indian and White American cultural identity. Patients who affiliated strongly with American Indian cultural identity more closely shared providers' reduced evaluation for several variables related to information exchange, as compared to patients who identified weakly. These results flag interactions that providers and their most culturally distinctive patients both experience as challenging. PMID:18524443

  17. Perceptions of medical interactions between healthcare providers and American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Sarkisian, Natalia; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra; Beals, Janette

    2008-08-01

    Cultural competence models assume that culture affects medical encounters, yet little research uses objective measures to examine how this may be true. Do providers and racial/ethnic minority patients interpret the same interactions similarly or differently? How might patterns of provider-patient concordance and discordance vary for patients with different cultural characteristics? We collected survey data from 115 medical visits with American Indian older adults at a clinic operated by the Cherokee Nation (in Northeastern Oklahoma, USA), asking providers and patients to evaluate nine affective and instrumental interactions. Examining data from the full sample, we found that provider and patient ratings were significantly discordant for all interactions (Wilcoxon signed-rank test pproviders were more critical of their own behaviors than were patients. These findings suggest that providers serving American Indian patients often create greater satisfaction than they believe. We then distinguished cultural subgroups of patients, comparing magnitude of provider-patient discordance on specific interactions for patients at different levels of American Indian and White American cultural identity. Patients who affiliated strongly with American Indian cultural identity more closely shared providers' reduced evaluation for several variables related to information exchange, as compared to patients who identified weakly. These results flag interactions that providers and their most culturally distinctive patients both experience as challenging. PMID:18524443

  18. Integration Between Mental Health-Care Providers and Traditional Spiritual Healers: Contextualising Islam in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nayeefa

    2016-10-01

    In the United Arab Emirates, neuropsychiatric disorders are estimated to contribute to one-fifth of the global burden of disease. Studies show that the UAE citizens' apathy towards seeking professional mental health services is associated with the 'religious viewpoints' on the issue, societal stigma, lack of awareness of mental health and lack of confidence in mental health-care providers. Mental health expenditures by the UAE government health ministry are not available exclusively. The majority of primary health-care doctors and nurses have not received official in-service training on mental health within the last 5 years. Efforts are to be made at deconstructing the position of mental illness and its treatments in the light of Islamic Jurisprudence; drafting culturally sensitive and relevant models of mental health care for Emirati citizens; liaising between Imams of mosques and professional mental health service providers; launching small-scale pilot programs in collaboration with specialist institutions; facilitating mentoring in line with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) outreach programmes for senior school Emirati students concerning mental health; and promoting mental health awareness in the wider community through participation in events open to public. PMID:27156001

  19. Perspective of patients, patients’ families, and healthcare providers towards designing and delivering hospice care services in a middle income Country

    PubMed Central

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Aghaei, Mir Hossein; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad; Asgarlo, Zoleikha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In view of the recent surge in chronic disease rates and elderly population in the developing countries, there is an urgent felt need for palliative and hospice care services. The present study investigates the views and attitudes of patients and their families, physicians, nurses, healthcare administrators, and insurers regarding designing and delivering hospice care service in a middle income country. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, the required data was collected using semi structured interviews and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Totally 65 participants from hospitals and Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively to achieve data saturation. Results: Analyzing the data, five main themes (barriers, facilitators, strategies, attitudes, and service provider) were extracted. Barriers included financial issues, cultural-religious beliefs, patient and family-related obstacles, and barriers related to healthcare system. Facilitators included family-related issues, cultural-religious beliefs, as well as facilitators associated with patients, healthcare status, and benefits of hospice service. Most participants (79%) had positive attitude towards hospice care service. Participant suggested 10 ways to design and deliver effective and efficient hospice care service. They thought the presence of physicians, nurses, and psychologists and other specialists and clergy were necessary in the hospice care team. Conclusion: Due to lack of experience in hospice care in developing countries, research for identifying probable barriers and appropriate management for reducing unsuccessfulness in designing and delivering hospice care service seems necessary. Input from the facilitators and their suggested solutions can be useful in planning the policy for hospice care system. PMID:26600704

  20. Stigmatized Attitude of Healthcare Providers: A Barrier for Delivering Health Services to HIV Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Nooshin; Joulaei, Hassan; Darabi, Elahe; Fararouei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the success of developed countries in preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS, the disease is expanding in developing countries where an unfavorable attitude exists among people, health professionals and employees. This study aimed to assess the stigmatized attitude among health care providers toward people living with HIV (PLWHA). Methods: The study is a cross-sectional survey. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire. The study sample included 575 health care providers of public and private hospitals in Shiraz. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire in spring 2014. Data analysis was carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 21. Results: The most dominant attitude of the health care providers toward HIV/AIDS patients was related to fear (42.42%). According to the results of this study, there was a significant relationship between stigmatized attitude of the health care providers and their religious beliefs, society stigmatized attitude, and knowledge of transmission routes. The relationship between social stigmatized attitude of health care providers and their knowledge of transmission routes, with their willingness to provide services to patients is significant, as well (P<0.05). 39.6% and 46.2% of the respondents preferred not to provide services to the prostitutes and homosexual patients. Conclusion: Fear of contamination and social stigmatized attitude are the main impediments to dealing with patients and providing services to them. Hence, it seems that creating an effective knowledge about transmission and correcting the socio-cultural beliefs of health providers are two key strategies to tackle this problem. PMID:26448956

  1. Challenges facing providers of imported malaria-related healthcare services for Africans visiting friends and relatives (VFRs)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many non-malarious countries, imported malaria disproportionately affects Africans visiting friends and relatives (VFRs). Most previous research has focused on understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of these travellers, but has not examined the quality of prevention, diagnosis and treatment services provided. The aim of this study was to understand the perspective of providers of malaria-related healthcare services to VFRs about factors impacting on the quality of these and to make recommendations about improvements. Methods Thirty semi-structured interviews were conducted with practice nurses providing pre-travel health advice (n = 10), general practitioners (GPs) (n = 10), hospital consultants (n = 3), and community pharmacists (n = 7) working in areas of London with large African communities and a relatively high burden of imported malaria. A thematic analysis of the results was undertaken. Results Time constraints in GPs’ surgeries and competing priorities, lack of confidence in issuing advice on mosquito avoidance, the cost of chemoprophylaxis and travel at short notice prevented the provision of adequate malaria prevention advice. Long GP waiting times, misdiagnoses, lack of disclosure by VFRs about recent travel, and the issue of where malaria treatment should be provided were raised as potential barriers to diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions Some issues raised by respondents are relevant to all travellers, irrespective of their reason for travel. The challenge for healthcare providers to reduce the burden of imported malaria in VFRs is to provide services of sufficient quality to persuade them to adopt these in preference to those with which they may be familiar in their country of birth. Although no single intervention will significantly lower the burden of imported malaria, addressing the issues raised in this research could make a significant impact. PMID:24405512

  2. Job Satisfaction of Primary Health-Care Providers (Public Sector) in Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pawan; Khan, Abdul Majeed; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Job satisfaction is determined by a discrepancy between what one wants in a job and what one has in a job. The core components of information necessary for what satisfies and motivates the health work force in our country are missing at policy level. Therefore present study will help us to know the factors for job satisfaction among primary health care providers in public sector. Materials and Methods: Present study is descriptive in nature conducted in public sector dispensaries/primary urban health centers in Delhi among health care providers. Pretested structured questionnaire was administered to 227 health care providers. Data was analyzed using SPSS and relevant statistical test were applied. Results: Analysis of study reveals that ANMs are more satisfied than MOs, Pharmacist and Lab assistants/Lab technicians; and the difference is significant (P < 0.01). Age and education level of health care providers don’t show any significant difference in job satisfaction. All the health care providers are dissatisfied from the training policies and practices, salaries and opportunities for career growth in the organization. Majority of variables studied for job satisfaction have low scores. Five factor were identified concerned with job satisfaction in factor analysis. Conclusion: Job satisfaction is poor for all the four groups of health care providers in dispensaries/primary urban health centers and it is not possible to assign a single factor as a sole determinant of dissatisfaction in the job. Therefore it is recommended that appropriate changes are required at the policy as well as at the dispensary/PUHC level to keep the health work force motivated under public sector in Delhi. PMID:24479088

  3. Trust and trust relations from the providers' perspective: the case of the healthcare system in India.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sumit; Calnan, Michael; Radkar, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Commentators suggest that there is an erosion of trust in the relations between different actors in the health system in India. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study of the situation of providers in an urban setting in western India, the nature of their relations in terms of trust and what influences these relations. The data on relationships of trust were collected through interviews and focus group discussions with key informants, including public and private providers, regulators, managers and societal actors, such as patients/citizens, politicians and the media. PMID:26228048

  4. [Assessment of financial performance improves the quality of healthcare provided by medical organizations].

    PubMed

    Afek, Arnon; Meilik, Ahuva; Rotstein, Zeev

    2009-01-01

    Today, medical organizations have to contend with a highly competitive environment, an atmosphere saturated with a multitude of innovative new technologies and ever-increasing costs. The ability of these organizations to survive and to develop and expand their services mandates adoption of management guidelines based on the world of finance/commerce, adapted to make them relevant to the world of medical service. In this article the authors chose to present a management administration assessment which is a process that ensures that the management will effectively administer the organization's resources, and meet the goals set by the organization. The system demands that hospital "centers of responsibility" be defined, a management information system be set up, activities be priced, budget be defined and the expenses assessed. These processes make it possible to formulate a budget and assess any possible deviation between the budget and the actual running costs. An assessment of deviations will reveal any possible deviation of the most significant factor--efficiency. Medical organization managers, with the cooperation of the directors of the "centers of responsibility", can assess subunit activities and gain an understanding of the significance of management decisions and thus improve the quality of management, and the medical organization. The goal of this management system is not only to Lower costs and to meet the financial goals that were set; it is a tool that ensures quality. Decreasing expenditure is important in this case, but is only secondary in importance and will be a result of reducing the costs incurred by services lacking in quality. PMID:19320392

  5. Barriers to effective communication between veterans with chronic kidney disease and their healthcare providers

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Swati; Fischer, Michael J.; Gordon, Howard S.; Wadhwa, Anuradha; Popli, Subhash; Gordon, Elisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have insufficient knowledge about CKD, which is associated with poorer health outcomes. Effective patient–provider communication can improve CKD patients' knowledge, thereby augmenting their participation in self-care practices. However, barriers to addressing CKD patients' information needs have not been previously characterized. Methods Adults with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or on chronic dialysis or with a kidney transplant were recruited from a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) nephrology clinic. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted to assess patients' CKD information needs and demographic characteristics. A qualitative approach was used to analyze interview transcripts and identify themes pertaining to communication dynamics. Results Thirty-two patients participated. The mean age of participants was 63 years; most were male (94%) and non-Hispanic white (53%). CKD severity groups represented included CKD-3 (eGFR 30–59 mL/min/1.73 m2; 34%), CKD-4 (eGFR 15–29 mL/min/1.73 m2; 25%), CKD-5 (eGFR <15 mL/min/1.73 m2; 16%), end-stage kidney disease on dialysis (13%) and kidney transplant recipients (12%). Several key themes emerged about barriers to patient–provider communication based on patients' reported care at both VA and non-VA facilities, including patients perceived their role as a ‘listener’, reported limited CKD knowledge, did not understand physicians' explanations and were dissatisfied with the patient–provider relationship. Conclusions Several barriers to patient–provider communication prevent patients from meeting their information needs and perpetuate patient passivity. Future research should evaluate whether interventions that empower CKD patients to actively participate in their care increase knowledge and improve health outcomes. PMID:26613037

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use in women during pregnancy: do their healthcare providers know?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health reported in 2007 that approximately 38% of United States adults have used at least one type of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). There are no studies available that assess general CAM use in US pregnant women. The objectives of our study were to determine the prevalence and type of CAM use during pregnancy at one medical center; understand who is using CAM and why they are using it; and assess the state of patients’ CAM use disclosure to their obstetrical providers. Methods A cross-sectional survey study of post-partum women was done to assess self-reported CAM use during pregnancy. Results of this survey were compared to results from a previous survey performed by this research team in 2006. Data were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Results In 2013, 153 women completed the survey, yielding a response rate of 74.3%. Seventy-two percent and 68.5% of participants reported CAM use during their pregnancies in 2006 and 2013 respectively. The percentage of participants who reported discussing CAM use with their obstetrical providers was less than 1% in 2006 and 50% in 2013. Increased use of different CAM therapies was associated with increased maternal age, primagravida, being US-born, and having a college education (p ≤ 0.05). However, these factors were poor predictors of CAM use. Conclusions Given the frequency of CAM use and the difficulty in predicting who is using it, obstetrical providers should consider being informed about CAM and incorporating discussions about its use into routine patient assessments. PMID:24592860

  7. Exploring Ayurvedic Knowledge on Food and Health for Providing Innovative Solutions to Contemporary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Payyappallimana, Unnikrishnan; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine that originated over three millennia ago in the South Asian region, offers extensive insights about food and health based on certain unique conceptual as well as theoretical positions. Health is defined as a state of equilibrium with one’s self (svasthya) but which is inextricably linked to the environment. Ayurvedic principles, such as the tridosa (three humors) theory, provide the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm that can be applied in day-to-day practice. Classical Ayurveda texts cover an array of themes on food ranging from diversity of natural sources, their properties in relation to seasons and places and to their specific function both in physiological and pathological states. The epistemic perspective on health and nutrition in Ayurveda is very different from that of biomedicine and modern nutrition. However, contemporary knowledge is reinventing and advancing several of these concepts in an era of systems biology, personalized medicine, and the broader context of a more holistic transition in sciences in general. Trans-disciplinary research could be important not only for pushing the boundaries of food and health sciences but also for providing practical solutions for contemporary health conditions. This article briefly reviews the parallels in Ayurveda and biomedicine and draws attention to the need for a deeper engagement with traditional knowledge systems, such as Ayurveda. It points out that recreation of the methodologies that enabled the holistic view point about health in Ayurveda may unravel some of the complex connections with Nature. PMID:27066472

  8. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery: Informing healthcare practitioners and providers while improving patient safety.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, R; Birch, J; Armstrong, A P

    2011-02-01

    Travelling abroad for surgery is a phenomenon reported internationally. It is particularly likely for aesthetic procedures not undertaken routinely by national health services. We assessed the impact of these patients presenting to the UK National Health Service (NHS) with concerns or complications on their return. All 326 UK consultant members of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) were asked to complete a short questionnaire about patients that had presented to the NHS with complications or concerns following surgery abroad. The results were subsequently presented to the Department of Health (DH). 203 (62%) UK consultant plastic surgeons responded. 76 (37%) of the 203 respondents had seen such patients in their NHS practice, most commonly following breast or abdominal procedures. A quarter underwent emergency surgery, a third out-patient treatment and a third elective surgical revision. In response to these findings, the DH clarified that NHS teams should provide emergency care to such patients but should not undertake any elective revision procedures. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery may reduce its cost. However, aesthetic procedures have high minor complication rates, and peri-operative travel is associated with increased risks. Fully informed consent is unlikely when patients do not meet their surgeon prior to paying and travelling for surgery, and national health services are used to provide a free safety net on their return. To help minimise the potential risks, BAPRAS has clarified the responsibilities of the NHS and is acting to better inform UK patients considering travelling abroad. PMID:20462822

  9. Exploring Ayurvedic Knowledge on Food and Health for Providing Innovative Solutions to Contemporary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Payyappallimana, Unnikrishnan; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine that originated over three millennia ago in the South Asian region, offers extensive insights about food and health based on certain unique conceptual as well as theoretical positions. Health is defined as a state of equilibrium with one's self (svasthya) but which is inextricably linked to the environment. Ayurvedic principles, such as the tridosa (three humors) theory, provide the relationship between the microcosm and the macrocosm that can be applied in day-to-day practice. Classical Ayurveda texts cover an array of themes on food ranging from diversity of natural sources, their properties in relation to seasons and places and to their specific function both in physiological and pathological states. The epistemic perspective on health and nutrition in Ayurveda is very different from that of biomedicine and modern nutrition. However, contemporary knowledge is reinventing and advancing several of these concepts in an era of systems biology, personalized medicine, and the broader context of a more holistic transition in sciences in general. Trans-disciplinary research could be important not only for pushing the boundaries of food and health sciences but also for providing practical solutions for contemporary health conditions. This article briefly reviews the parallels in Ayurveda and biomedicine and draws attention to the need for a deeper engagement with traditional knowledge systems, such as Ayurveda. It points out that recreation of the methodologies that enabled the holistic view point about health in Ayurveda may unravel some of the complex connections with Nature. PMID:27066472

  10. Are Providers More Likely to Contribute to Healthcare Disparities Under High Levels of Cognitive Load? How Features of the Healthcare Setting May Lead to Biases in Medical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Diana J.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews of healthcare disparities suggest that clinicians’ diagnostic and therapeutic decision making varies by clinically irrelevant characteristics, such as patient race, and that this variation may contribute to healthcare disparities. However, there is little understanding of the particular features of the healthcare setting under which clinicians are most likely to be inappropriately influenced by these characteristics. This study delineates several hypotheses to stimulate future research in this area. It is posited that healthcare settings in which providers experience high levels of cognitive load will increase the likelihood of racial disparities via 2 pathways. First, providers who experience higher levels of cognitive load are hypothesized to make poorer medical decisions and provide poorer care for all patients, due to lower levels of controlled processing (H1). Second, under greater levels of cognitive load, it is hypothesized that healthcare providers’ medical decisions and interpersonal behaviors will be more likely to be influenced by racial stereotypes, leading to poorer processes and outcomes of care for racial minority patients (H2). It is further hypothesized that certain characteristics of healthcare settings will result in higher levels of cognitive load experienced by providers (H3). Finally, it is hypothesized that minority patients will be disproportionately likely to be treated in healthcare settings in which providers experience greater levels of cognitive load (H4a), which will result in racial disparities due to lower levels of controlled processing by providers (H4b) and the influence of racial stereotypes (H4c).The study concludes with implications for research and practice that flow from this framework. PMID:19726783

  11. Mixed Methods Survey of Zoonotic Disease Awareness and Practice among Animal and Human Healthcare Providers in Moshi, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Helen L.; Mnzava, Kunda W.; Mitchell, Sarah T.; Melubo, Matayo L.; Kibona, Tito J.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Kazwala, Rudovick R.; Crump, John A.; Sharp, Joanne P.; Halliday, Jo E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Zoonoses are common causes of human and livestock illness in Tanzania. Previous studies have shown that brucellosis, leptospirosis, and Q fever account for a large proportion of human febrile illness in northern Tanzania, yet they are infrequently diagnosed. We conducted this study to assess awareness and knowledge regarding selected zoonoses among healthcare providers in Moshi, Tanzania; to determine what diagnostic and treatment protocols are utilized; and obtain insights into contextual factors contributing to the apparent under-diagnosis of zoonoses. Methodology/Results We conducted a questionnaire about zoonoses knowledge, case reporting, and testing with 52 human health practitioners and 10 livestock health providers. Immediately following questionnaire administration, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 of these respondents, using the findings of a previous fever etiology study to prompt conversation. Sixty respondents (97%) had heard of brucellosis, 26 (42%) leptospirosis, and 20 (32%) Q fever. Animal sector respondents reported seeing cases of animal brucellosis (4), rabies (4), and anthrax (3) in the previous 12 months. Human sector respondents reported cases of human brucellosis (15, 29%), rabies (9, 18%) and anthrax (6, 12%). None reported leptospirosis or Q fever cases. Nineteen respondents were aware of a local diagnostic test for human brucellosis. Reports of tests for human leptospirosis or Q fever, or for any of the study pathogens in animals, were rare. Many respondents expressed awareness of malaria over-diagnosis and zoonoses under-diagnosis, and many identified low knowledge and testing capacity as reasons for zoonoses under-diagnosis. Conclusions This study revealed differences in knowledge of different zoonoses and low case report frequencies of brucellosis, leptospirosis, and Q fever. There was a lack of known diagnostic services for leptospirosis and Q fever. These findings emphasize a need for improved diagnostic

  12. Providing Interactive Access to Cave Geology for All Students, Regardless of Physical Ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, C. `; Stredney, D.; Hittle, B.; Irving, K.; Toomey, R. S., III; Lemon, N. N.; Price, A.; Kerwin, T.

    2013-12-01

    Based on an identified need to accommodate students with mobility impairments in field-based instructional experiences, this presentation will discuss current efforts to promote participation, broaden diversity, and impart a historical perspective in the geosciences through the use of an interactive virtual environment. Developed through the integration of emerging simulation technologies, this prototypical virtual environment is created from LIDAR data of the Historic Tour route of Mammoth Cave National Park. The educational objectives of the simulation focus on four primary locations within the tour route that provide evidence of the hydrologic impact on the cave and karst formation. The overall objective is to provide a rich experience of a geological field-based learning for all students, regardless of their physical abilities. Employing a virtual environment that interchangeably uses two and three-dimensional representation of geoscience content, this synthetic field-based cave and karst module will provide an opportunity to assess the effectiveness in engaging the student community, and its efficacy in the curriculum when used as an alternative representation of a traditional field experience. The expected outcome is that based on the level of interactivity, the simulated environment will provide adequate pedagogical representation for content transfer without the need for physical experience in the uncontrolled field environment. Additionally, creating such an environment will impact all able-bodied students by providing supplemental resources that can both precede a traditional field experience and allow for students to re-examine a field site long after a the field experience, in both current formal and informal educational settings.

  13. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries. PMID:11326572

  14. Secondary use of clinical data in healthcare providers - an overview on research, regulatory and ethical requirements.

    PubMed

    Wiesenauer, Matthias; Johner, Christian; Röhrig, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hospital providers, physicians and researchers are interested in a cross-institutional use of their data for clinical research. This interest has led to the question whether the scientific potential of the data stored in so many different systems can be unfolded by the establishment of a cross-institutional medical data warehouse. The aim of this paper is to describe the ethical and regulatory requirements and to develop a solution architecture considering technical and organisational aspects. The present paper uses a structured approach to collect user requirements. The requirements are discussed with legal experts. The work was complemented by extended literature research. An essential requirement is the cross-institutional merging of the data. Here, aspects of data protection as the informed consent, or transparency must be considered. In addition it is essential to protect the researchers through transparency from accusations on publication bias. Technical and organisational solutions in combination of data protection, and data security enable an operation of a central medical data warehouse in compliance with the law. The usage of this infrastructure for research can contribute to an improvement of the treatment quality, and patient safety if there is an appropriate transparency. This contributes to innovation and added value of a hospital group. PMID:22874264

  15. "There's rural, and then there's rural": advice from nurses providing primary healthcare in northern remote communities.

    PubMed

    Martin Misener, Ruth; MacLeod, Martha L P; Banks, Kathy; Morton, A Michel; Vogt, Carolyn; Bentham, Donna

    2008-01-01

    Nursing practice in remote northern communities is highly complex, with unique challenges created by isolation, geography and cultural dynamics. This paper, the second of two focusing on the advice offered by nurses interviewed in the national study, The Nature of Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada, considers suggestions from outpost nurses. Their advice to new nurses was: know what you are getting into; consider whether your personal qualities are suited for northern practice; learn to listen and listen to learn; expect a steep learning curve, even if you are experienced; and take action to prevent burnout. Recommendations for educators were to offer programs that prepare nurses for the realities of outpost nursing and provide opportunities for accessible, flexible, relevant continuing education. The outpost nurses in this study counselled administrators to stay in contact with and listen to the perspectives of nurses at the "grassroots," and not merely to fill positions but instead to recruit outpost nurses effectively and remunerate them fairly. The study findings highlighted the multiple interrelated strategies that nurses, educators and administrators can use to optimize practice in remote northern communities. PMID:18815471

  16. Communicating about eating behaviors. A qualitative study of Chilean women and their health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Patricia; Valencia, Alejandra; Palomino, Ana M; Cataldo, Marjorie; Schwingel, Andiara

    2015-01-01

    Good communication between health care providers (HCPs) and patients is critical in achieving positive health outcomes. The purpose of this article was to compare the perceptions of Chilean woman and their HCPs with respect to determinants of eating behaviors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women (n=15) visiting a public health care center in Chile and with their HCPs (n=8) who were in charge of promoting healthy eating behaviors among women. Data from the interviews indicated similarities and inconsistencies in determinants of eating behaviors between the groups. Both mentioned many important factors that influence women's eating behaviors, including food preferences, dietary knowledge, self-control and self-efficacy, family, food cost, and food availability. HCPs appeared to be less aware of the role that personality traits and past experiences play as potential determinants which women mentioned. In contrast, women were less aware of the influence of anxiety and low self-esteem on eating choices, which HCPs noted as key factors. Although it was encouraging to see agreement between women and their HCPs in some areas, it is important to work on increasing understanding among the groups with respect to the important role psychological factors play in influencing eating behavior. We suggest that HCPs should focus on the importance of women's personality traits and past eating behaviors, as well as work on improving women's self-esteem and helping to decrease their anxiety levels. HCPs should be encouraged to develop good communication with each person in order to help them understand the roles that external and internal factors play in eating behaviors. PMID:25661846

  17. Communicating about eating behaviors. A qualitative study of Chilean women and their health-care providers

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Patricia; Valencia, Alejandra; Palomino, Ana M.; Cataldo, Marjorie; Schwingel, Andiara

    2015-01-01

    Good communication between health care providers (HCPs) and patients is critical in achieving positive health outcomes. The purpose of this article was to compare the perceptions of Chilean woman and their HCPs with respect to determinants of eating behaviors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women (n=15) visiting a public health care center in Chile and with their HCPs (n=8) who were in charge of promoting healthy eating behaviors among women. Data from the interviews indicated similarities and inconsistencies in determinants of eating behaviors between the groups. Both mentioned many important factors that influence women's eating behaviors, including food preferences, dietary knowledge, self-control and self-efficacy, family, food cost, and food availability. HCPs appeared to be less aware of the role that personality traits and past experiences play as potential determinants which women mentioned. In contrast, women were less aware of the influence of anxiety and low self-esteem on eating choices, which HCPs noted as key factors. Although it was encouraging to see agreement between women and their HCPs in some areas, it is important to work on increasing understanding among the groups with respect to the important role psychological factors play in influencing eating behavior. We suggest that HCPs should focus on the importance of women's personality traits and past eating behaviors, as well as work on improving women's self-esteem and helping to decrease their anxiety levels. HCPs should be encouraged to develop good communication with each person in order to help them understand the roles that external and internal factors play in eating behaviors. PMID:25661846

  18. An Experimental Analysis of Children's Ability to Provide a False Report about a Crime.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Joshua; Foster, Ida; Talwar, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has evaluated children's lie-telling behaviors and skills(1-2); however, limitations with the tasks used for eliciting false testimonies and interviewing children have restricted the generalizability of the findings. The primary aim of the current study is to provide an easy-to-administer and ecologically valid method for measuring the veracity and quality of school-aged children's (ages 6-11) testimonies when they are asked to provide different types of true and false reports. Moreover, the methodology enables researchers to examine the social and developmental factors that could influence the credibility of a child's testimony. In the current study, children will witness a theft, and are then asked to either falsely deny the transgression, falsely accuse a researcher of the theft, or tell the truth. Afterwards, children are to be interviewed by a second researcher using a thorough and ecologically valid interview protocol that requires children to provide closed-ended and free-recall responses about the events with the instigator (E1). Coders then evaluate the length and number of theft-related details the children give throughout the interview, as well as their ability to maintain their true and false reports. The representative results indicate that the truth and lie-telling conditions elicit the intended behaviors from the children. The open-ended interview questions encouraged children to provide free-recall information about their experiences with E1. Moreover, findings from the closed-ended questions suggest that children are significantly better at maintaining their lies with age, and when producing a false denial compared to a false accusation. Results from the current study can be used to develop a greater understanding of the characteristics of children's true and false testimonies about crime, which can potentially benefit law enforcement, legal staff and professionals who interview children. PMID:27168278

  19. Understanding Afghan healthcare providers: a qualitative study of the culture of care in a Kabul maternity hospital

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, R; van Teijlingen, E; Ryan, K; Holloway, I

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the culture of a Kabul maternity hospital to understand the perspectives of healthcare providers on their roles, experiences, values and motivations and the impact of these determinants on the care of perinatal women and their babies. Design Qualitative ethnographic study. Setting A maternity hospital, Afghanistan. Population Doctors, midwives and care assistants. Methods Six weeks of observation followed by 22 semi-structured interviews and four informal group discussions with staff, two focus group discussions with women and 41 background interviews with Afghan and non-Afghan medical and cultural experts. Main outcome measures The culture of care in an Afghan maternity hospital. Results A large workload, high proportion of complicated cases and poor staff organisation affected the quality of care. Cultural values, social and family pressures influenced the motivation and priorities of healthcare providers. Nepotism and cronyism created inequality in clinical training and support and undermined the authority of management to improve standards of care. Staff without powerful connections were vulnerable in a punitive inequitable environment—fearing humiliation, blame and the loss of employment. Conclusions Suboptimal care put the lives of women and babies at risk and was, in part, the result of conflicting priorities. The underlying motivation of staff appeared to be the socio-economic survival of their own families. The hospital culture closely mirrored the culture and core values of Afghan society. In setting priorities for women's health post-2015 Millennium Development Goals, understanding the context-specific pressures on staff is key to more effective programme interventions and sustainability. PMID:25394518

  20. Healthcare providers balancing norms and practice: challenges and opportunities in providing contraceptive counselling to young people in Uganda – a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Mandira; Näsström, Sara B.; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie; Kiggundu, Charles; Larsson, Elin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancies among young women force girls to compromise education, resulting in low educational attainment with subsequent poverty and vulnerability. A pronounced focus is needed on contraceptive use, pregnancy, and unsafe abortion among young women. Objective This study aims to explore healthcare providers’ (HCPs) perceptions and practices regarding contraceptive counselling to young people. Design We conducted 27 in-depth interviews with doctors and midwives working in seven health facilities in central Uganda. Interviews were open-ended and allowed the participant to speak freely on certain topics. We used a topic guide to cover areas topics of interest focusing on post-abortion care (PAC) but also covering contraceptive counselling. Transcripts were transcribed verbatim and data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results The main theme, HCPs' ambivalence to providing contraceptive counselling to sexually active young people is based on two sub-themes describing the challenges of contraceptive counselling: A) HCPs echo the societal norms regarding sexual practice among young people, while at the same time our findings B) highlights the opportunities resulting from providers pragmatic approach to contraceptive counselling to young women. Providers expressed a self-identified lack of skill, limited resources, and inadequate support from the health system to successfully provide appropriate services to young people. They felt frustrated with the consultations, especially when meeting young women seeking PAC. Conclusions Despite existing policies for young people's sexual and reproductive health in Uganda, HCPs are not sufficiently equipped to provide adequate contraceptive counselling to young people. Instead, HCPs are left in between the negative influence of social norms and their pragmatic approach to address the needs of young people, especially those seeking PAC. We argue that a clear policy supported by a clear strategy with practical

  1. Vulnerabilities of Local Healthcare Providers in Complex Emergencies: Findings from the Manipur Micro-level Insurgency Database 2008-2009

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Samrat; David, Siddarth; Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research on healthcare delivery in zones of conflict requires sustained and systematic attention. In the context of the South Asian region, there has been an absence of research on the vulnerabilities of health care workers and institutions in areas affected by armed conflict. The paper presents a case study of the varied nature of security challenges faced by local healthcare providers in the state of Manipur in the North-eastern region of India, located in the Indo-Myanmar frontier region which has been experiencing armed violence and civil strife since the late 1960s. . The aim of this study was to assess longitudinal and spatial trends in incidents involving health care workers in Manipur during the period 2008 to 2009. Methods: We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the Manipur Micro-level Insurgency Database 2008-2009, created by using local newspaper archives to measure the overall burden of violence experienced in the state over a two year period. Publicly available press releases of armed groups and local hospitals in the state were used to supplement the quantitative data. Simple linear regression was used to assess longitudinal trends. Data was visualized with GIS-software for spatial analysis. Results: The mean proportion of incidents involving health care workers per month was 2.7% and ranged between 0 and 6.1% (table 2). There was a significant (P=0.037) month-to-month variation in the proportion of incidents involving health care workers, as well as a upward trend of about 0.11% per month. Spatial analysis revealed different patterns depending on whether absolute, population-adjusted, or incident-adjusted frequencies served as the basis of the analysis. Conclusions: The paper shows a small but steady rise in violence against health workers and health institutions impeding health services in Manipur’s pervasive violence. More evidence-building backed by research along with institutional obligations and commitment is essential

  2. [Symptom prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in health-care providers in central Sivas].

    PubMed

    Doğan, Omer Tamer; Berk, Serdar; Ozşahin, Sefa Levent; Arslan, Sülhattin; Düzenli, Hasan; Akkurt, Ibrahim

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is the most common sleep disorder that can lead to serious complications. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of OSAHS. Unfortunately, PSG studies are expensive, time-consuming, requiring special team and equipment. Therefore, it is possible to determine the cases likely to have OSAHS requiring at least PSG by type A studies. There isn't enough data about the prevalence of OSAHS in Turkey. The aim of this study was to estimate the symptom prevalence of OSAHS in health-care providers in central Sivas. The questionnaire asking demographic features, additional diseases, habits, the symptoms related with OSAHS was performed in total of 1202 health care providers. We also performed Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) to determine excessive daytime sleepiness. Snoring was detected in 267 participants. Snoring rates were 38% and 10.9% in men and in women, respectively. The rate of witnessed sleep apnea in all cases was 4.4% (n=53). Witnessed sleep apnea was reported by 42 of men (8.4%) and 11 of women (1.6%). A total of 338 participants had excessive daytime sleepiness. There was a significant relation between three major symptoms of OSAHS and excessive sleepiness while driving. All three major symptoms were detected in 22 cases (1.8%), of which 21 were males. This study suggested that OSAHS symptom prevalence is quite high helth-care provides in our region and, therefore expanded usage of PSG studies is required. PMID:19123076

  3. The practice of commissioning healthcare from a private provider: learning from an in-depth case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    innovation adoption in the healthcare context. The case identifies ‘negotiated order’, managerial performance of providers and disciplinary control as three media of power used in combination by commissioners. The case lends support for stewardship and resource dependency governance theories as explanations of the underpinning conditions for effective commissioning in certain circumstances within a quasi marketised healthcare system. PMID:23735082

  4. Development Of An Educational Video To Improve Patient Knowledge And Communication With Their Healthcare Providers About Colorectal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Mira L.; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J.; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider and system level barriers. Purpose To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. Methods Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of an educational video and focus groups of patients provided initial feedback about the developed CRC screening educational video. Medical personnel reviewed the video and made recommendations prior to final editing of the video. Results Patients identified CRC screening barriers and made suggestions about the information to include in the educational video. Their suggestions included using a healthcare provider to state the importance of completing CRC screening, demonstrate how to complete the fecal occult blood test, and that men and women from diverse ethnic groups and races could be included in the same video. Participants reviewed the developed video and mentioned that their suggestions were portrayed correctly, the video was culturally appropriate, and the information presented in the video was easy to understand. Medical personnel made suggestions on ways to improve the content and the delivery of the medical information prior to final editing of the video. Discussion Participants provided valuable information in the development of an educational video to improve patient knowledge and patient-provider communication about CRC screening. The educational video developed was based on the Protection Motivation Theory and addressed the colon cancer screening barriers identified in this mostly minority and low-income patient population. Future research will determine if CRC screening increases among patients who watch the educational video. Translation to Health Education Practice Educational videos can provide important information about CRC and CRC screening to average-risk adults. PMID:20209024

  5. Evaluation of Knowledge, Practices, and Possible Barriers among Healthcare Providers regarding Medical Waste Management in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Mohammad Abul Bashar; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md.; Hirosawa, Tomoya; Hai, Md. Shaheen Bin Abdul; Siddique, Md. Ruhul Furkan; Sakamoto, Junichi; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Improper handling of medical wastes, which is common in Bangladesh, could adversely affect the hospital environment and community at large, and poses a serious threat to public health. We aimed to assess the knowledge and practices regarding medical waste management (MWM) among healthcare providers (HCPs) and to identify possible barriers related to it. Material/Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out during June to September, 2012 including 1 tertiary, 3 secondary, and 3 primary level hospitals in Dhaka division, Bangladesh through 2-stage cluster sampling. Data were collected from 625 HCPs, including 245 medical doctors, 220 nurses, 44 technologists, and 116 cleaning staff who were directly involved in MWM using a self-administered (researcher-administered for cleaning staff), semi-structured questionnaire. Results Nearly one-third of medical doctors and nurses and two-thirds of technologists and cleaning staff had inadequate knowledge, and about half of medical doctors (44.0%) and cleaning staff (56.0%) had poor practices. HCPs without prior training on MWM were more likely to have poor practices compared to those who had training. Lack of personal protective equipment, equipment for final disposal, MWM-related staff, proper policy/guideline, and lack of incinerator were identified as the top 5 barriers. Conclusions Strengthening and expansion of ongoing educational programs/training is necessary to improve knowledge and practices regarding MWM. The government should take necessary steps and provide financial support to eliminate the possible barriers related to proper MWM. PMID:25488747

  6. Can patients be ‘attached’ to healthcare providers? An observational study to measure attachment phenomena in patient–provider relationships

    PubMed Central

    Maunder, Robert G; Hunter, Jonathan J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To develop and assess the validity of measures of patients' attachment-related perceptions of experiences with healthcare providers (HCPs). Setting Online survey. Participants 181 people provided consent and 119 completed the survey (66%). Most participants were women (80%). Primary and secondary outcome measures Questions were developed to assess possible attachment functions served by an HCP and patients' attachment-related attitudes towards an HCP. Scales were constructed based on exploratory factor analysis. Measures of adult attachment, therapeutic alliance, perceived HCP characteristics and health utilisation were used to validate scales. Results Possible safe haven and secure base functions served by HCPs were strongly endorsed. A model with good fit (root mean square error of approximation=0.056) yielded 3 factors: ‘HCP experienced as supportive and safe’ (SUPPORT, α=0.94), ‘HCP experienced as aversive’ (AVERSE, α=0.86) and ‘more and closer contact wanted with HCP’ (WANT, α=0.85). SUPPORT was correlated with positive HCP characteristics and not with attachment insecurity. AVERSE was inversely correlated with positive HCP attributes and correlated with attachment insecurity. WANT was unrelated to positive HCP attributes, but correlated with attachment insecurity. Frequency of HCP contact was related to WANT (Kruskal-Wallis=21.9, p<0.001) and SUPPORT (Kruskal-Wallis=13.2, p=0.02), but not to AVERSE (Kruskal-Wallis=1.7, p=0.89). Conclusions Patients attribute attachment functions of secure base and safe haven to HCPs. SUPPORT is related to positive appraisal of HCP characteristics; AVERSE is associated with discomfort in the HCP relationship that is related with perceived HCP characteristics and patients' insecure attachment; WANT is associated with unmet needs for connection with an HCP related to insecure attachment, but not to perceived HCP characteristics. These scales may be useful in studying the application of attachment theory

  7. The assessment of job satisfaction for the healthcare providers in university clinics of Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Mundongo, Tshamba Henri; Ditend, Yav Grevisse; VanCaillie, Didier; Malonga, Kaj Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the world, the health policies are necessary to satisfy with efficiency the requirements of the quality management in the health sector. The laboratory of the academic clinics of Lubumbashi in Africa was inspired by the EFQM model to improve its performance and the quality of its services offered to the community. The aim of this survey is to evaluate the level of job satisfaction of the healthcare providers after implementation of the model. Methods Qualitative study used an anonymous questionnaire consisted of 16 semi directional dichotomous and 12 according to four modality of the Likert's scale; to evaluate the job satisfaction of the healthcare providers. 40 workers are concerned and their informed consent is obtained. Epi Info 3.5.3 and SPSS 19.0 software, the Student t test and Chi-square test and the threshold set at p ≤ 0.05 were used. The mean score was calculated. Cronbach's ‘ coefficient and principal component analysis allowed the validity measurement of the questionnaire, and the correlations has been calculated. Results This survey had a rate of answer of 80% on a set of all questionnaires. The Cronbach's coefficient of reliability is 0.72 on 40 complete observations with 12 questions. The Kaiser Meyer Olkin (0.564) and the Bartlett test is significant (χ2= 57, 30, p=0.001). The Physicians are very dissatisfied (2.363) against the nurses, and the biologists who are moderately dissatisfied (3 and 3.312). The relative results to the global satisfaction of the workers show a meaningful difference between the workers satisfied versus those non satisfied (p = 0.003). More of the half of the workers is satisfied after the setting up of the EFQM model. Conclusion A certain number of the factors act together and simultaneously on the satisfaction of the workers particular in the health sector. The EFQM model permits the job satisfaction in the hospital because it combines several factors acting on the individuals. PMID:25852808

  8. Association between Women Veterans’ Experiences with VA Outpatient Healthcare and Designation as a Women’s Health Provider in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Lori A.; Trentalange, Mark; Murphy, Terrence E.; Brandt, Cynthia; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Maisel, Natalya C.; Wright, Steven M.; Gaetano, Vera S.; Allore, Heather; Skanderson, Melissa; Reyes-Harvey, Evelyn; Yano, Elizabeth M.; Rose, Danielle; Haskell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Women Veterans comprise a small percentage of VA healthcare users. Prior research on women Veterans’ experiences with primary care has focused on VA site differences and not individual provider characteristics. In 2010, the VA established policy requiring the provision of comprehensive women’s healthcare by designated women’s health providers (DWHPs). Little is known about the quality of healthcare delivered by DWHPs and women Veterans’ experience with care from these providers. Methods Secondary data were obtained from the VA Survey of Healthcare Experience of Patients (SHEP) using the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) patient-centered medical home (PCMH) survey from March 2012 through February 2013, a survey designed to measure patient experience with care and the DWHPs Assessment of Workforce Capacity (DAWC) that discerns between DWHPs versus non-DWHPs. Findings Of the 28,994 surveys mailed to women Veterans, 24,789 were seen by primary care providers and 8,151 women responded to the survey (response rate 32%). A total of 3,147 providers were evaluated by the SHEP-CAHPS-PCMH survey (40%; n=1,267 were DWHPs). In a multivariable model, patients seen by DWHPs (RR=1.02 95% CI=1.01−1.04) reported higher overall experiences with care compared to patients seen by non-DWHPs. Conclusions The main finding is that women Veterans’ overall experiences with outpatient healthcare are slightly better for those receiving care from DWHPs compared to those receiving care from non-DWHPs. Our findings have important policy implications for how to continue to improve women Veterans’ experiences. Our work provides support to increase access to DWHPs at VA primary care clinics. PMID:25442706

  9. The Challenges of Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Summary of a Summit on Patient and Healthcare Provider Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bray, Judith; Fernandes, Aida; Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Otley, Anthony R; Heatherington, Joan; Stretton, Jennifer; Bollegala, Natasha; Benchimol, Eric I

    2016-01-01

    Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the disease represents a significant health, social, and economic burden. There is currently no cure for IBD, although earlier diagnosis and new therapies have improved the overall health outcomes and quality of life for patients. Crohn's and Colitis Canada is Canada's only national, volunteer-based charity dedicated to finding cures for IBD and improving the lives of those affected, through research, education, patient programs, advocacy, and increased awareness. On April 30, 2015, Crohn's and Colitis Canada hosted the "Patient and Healthcare Professional Summit on the Burden of Disease in IBD" to obtain a deeper understanding of the unmet needs of IBD patients and their caregivers. Through personal vignettes, patients articulated a pressing need to increase understanding of the challenges faced by people suffering from IBD among both health care professionals and the general public, develop best practices for navigating life transitions and addressing the unique challenges faced by children with IBD, and provide equitable access to appropriate, effective, and affordable treatments. The recommendations that emerged from the summit will inform about efforts to increase public awareness, inform about advocacy strategies, and contribute to the development of research priorities. PMID:27446878

  10. Exploring intentions to discriminate against patients living with HIV/AIDS among future healthcare providers in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Jin, Harry; Wickersham, Jeffrey; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; John, Jacob; Altice, Frederick L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Stigma towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is strong in Malaysia. Although stigma has been understudied, it may be a barrier to treating the approximately 81 000 Malaysian PLWHA. The current study explores correlates of intentions to discriminate against PLWHA among medical and dental students, the future healthcare providers of Malaysia. METHODS An online, cross-sectional survey of 1296 medical and dental students was conducted in 2012 at seven Malaysian universities; 1165 (89.9%) completed the survey and were analysed. Sociodemographic characteristics, stigma-related constructs and intentions to discriminate against PLWHA were measured. Linear mixed models were conducted, controlling for clustering by university. RESULTS The final multivariate model demonstrated that students who intended to discriminate more against PLWHA were female, less advanced in their training, and studying dentistry. They further endorsed more negative attitudes towards PLWHA, internalised greater HIV-related shame, reported more HIV-related fear and disagreed more strongly that PLWHA deserve good care. The final model accounted for 38% of the variance in discrimination intent, with 10% accounted for by sociodemographic characteristics and 28% accounted for by stigma-related constructs. CONCLUSIONS It is critical to reduce stigma among medical and dental students to eliminate intentions to discriminate and achieve equitable care for Malaysian PLWHA. Stigma-reduction interventions should be multipronged, addressing attitudes, internalised shame, fear and perceptions of deservingness of care. PMID:24666546

  11. A qualitative study of healthcare provider awareness and informational needs regarding the nine-valent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kasting, Monica L; Wilson, Shannon; Dixon, Brian E; Downs, Stephen M; Kulkarni, Amit; Zimet, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    The 9-valent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, 9vHPV, was licensed in the U.S. in December, 2014. We assessed healthcare provider (HCP) awareness of the newly approved vaccine and identified questions HCPs have about the vaccine. As part of a larger study, we used semi-structured interviews to ask 22 pediatric HCPs about their awareness of 9vHPV, questions they have about the vaccine, and questions they anticipate from patients and parents. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed then analyzed using inductive content analysis. Over half were aware of the vaccine but few HCPs claimed to be familiar with it. HCPs indicated several questions with common themes pertaining to efficacy, side effects, and cost. Only half of HCPs believed patients or parents would have questions. The results suggest strategies and areas for health systems and public health organizations to target in order to resolve unmet educational needs among HCPs regarding 9vHPV. PMID:26859240

  12. The Challenges of Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Summary of a Summit on Patient and Healthcare Provider Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Judith; Fernandes, Aida; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Otley, Anthony R.; Heatherington, Joan; Stretton, Jennifer; Bollegala, Natasha; Benchimol, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the disease represents a significant health, social, and economic burden. There is currently no cure for IBD, although earlier diagnosis and new therapies have improved the overall health outcomes and quality of life for patients. Crohn's and Colitis Canada is Canada's only national, volunteer-based charity dedicated to finding cures for IBD and improving the lives of those affected, through research, education, patient programs, advocacy, and increased awareness. On April 30, 2015, Crohn's and Colitis Canada hosted the “Patient and Healthcare Professional Summit on the Burden of Disease in IBD” to obtain a deeper understanding of the unmet needs of IBD patients and their caregivers. Through personal vignettes, patients articulated a pressing need to increase understanding of the challenges faced by people suffering from IBD among both health care professionals and the general public, develop best practices for navigating life transitions and addressing the unique challenges faced by children with IBD, and provide equitable access to appropriate, effective, and affordable treatments. The recommendations that emerged from the summit will inform about efforts to increase public awareness, inform about advocacy strategies, and contribute to the development of research priorities. PMID:27446878

  13. Internet-based ICRP resource for healthcare providers on the risks and benefits of medical imaging that uses ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Demeter, S; Applegate, K E; Perez, M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 Working Party was to update the 2001 web-based module 'Radiation and your patient: a guide for medical practitioners' from ICRP. The key elements of this task were: to clearly identify the target audience (such as healthcare providers with an emphasis on primary care); to review other reputable sources of information; and to succinctly publish the contribution made by ICRP to the various topics. A 'question-and-answer' format addressing practical topics was adopted. These topics included benefits and risks of imaging using ionising radiation in common medical situations, as well as pertaining to specific populations such as pregnant, breast-feeding, and paediatric patients. In general, the benefits of medical imaging and related procedures far outweigh the potential risks associated with ionising radiation exposure. However, it is still important to ensure that the examinations are clinically justified, that the procedure is optimised to deliver the lowest dose commensurate with the medical purpose, and that consideration is given to diagnostic reference levels for particular classes of examinations. PMID:27012846

  14. Interprofessional collaborative practice incorporating training for alcohol and drug use screening for healthcare providers in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Kathy; Mitchell, Ann M; Albrecht, Susan A; Frank, Linda R; Kane, Irene; Hagle, Holly; Lindsay, Dawn; Lee, Heeyoung; Fioravanti, Marie; Talcott, Kimberly S

    2016-07-01

    Interprofessional collaborative practice expands resources in rural and underserved communities. This article explores the impact of an online education programme on the perceptions of healthcare providers about interprofessional care within alcohol and drug use screening for rural residents. Nurses, behavioural health counsellors, and public health professionals participated in an evidence-based practice (screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment-SBIRT) model that targets individuals who use alcohol and other drugs in a risky manner. SBIRT is recommended by the United States Preventive Services Task Force as a universal, evidence-based screening tool. Online modules, case simulation practice, and interprofessional dialogues are used to deliver practice-based learning experiences. A quasi-experimental method with pre-tests and post-tests was utilised. Results indicate increased perceptions of professional competence, need for cooperation, actual cooperation, and role values pre-to-post training. Implications suggest that online interprofessional education is useful but the added component of professional dialogues regarding patient cases offers promise in promoting collaborative practice. PMID:27295396

  15. Comparing Telephone versus Mail Dissemination of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System Survey (HCAHPS) among Patients with Low Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fike, Geraldine C.

    2012-01-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Survey (HCAHPS) is a standardized survey instrument used by many hospitals for the purpose of measuring patient's perspectives regarding care received during their hospitalization. The survey provides national benchmark information enabling consumers to make comparisons of…

  16. Healthcare Providers' Knowledge of Disordered Sleep, Sleep Assessment Tools, and Nonpharmacological Sleep Interventions for Persons Living with Dementia: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cary A.; Jones, Allyson; Crick, Katelyn

    2014-01-01

    A large proportion of persons with dementia will also experience disordered sleep. Disordered sleep in dementia is a common reason for institutionalization and affects cognition, fall risk, agitation, self-care ability, and overall health and quality of life. This report presents findings of a survey of healthcare providers' awareness of sleep issues, assessment practices, and nonpharmacological sleep interventions for persons with dementia. There were 1846 participants, with the majority being from nursing and rehabilitation. One-third worked in long-term care settings and one-third in acute care. Few reported working in the community. Findings revealed that participants understated the incidence of sleep deficiencies in persons with dementia and generally lacked awareness of the relationship between disordered sleep and dementia. Their knowledge of sleep assessment tools was limited to caregiver reports, self-reports, and sleep diaries, with few using standardized tools or other assessment methods. The relationship between disordered sleep and comorbid conditions was not well understood. The three most common nonpharmacological sleep interventions participants identified using were a regular bedtime routine, increased daytime activity, and restricted caffeine. Awareness of other evidence-based interventions was low. These findings will guide evidence-informed research to develop and test more targeted and contextualized sleep and dementia knowledge translation strategies. PMID:24851185

  17. Providing Self-Healing Ability for Wireless Sensor Node by Using Reconfigurable Hardware

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shenfang; Qiu, Lei; Gao, Shang; Tong, Yao; Yang, Weiwei

    2012-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have received tremendous attention over the past ten years. In engineering applications of WSNs, a number of sensor nodes are usually spread across some specific geographical area. Some of these nodes have to work in harsh environments. Dependability of the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) is very important for its successful applications in the engineering area. In ordinary research, when a node has a failure, it is usually discarded and the network is reorganized to ensure the normal operation of the WSN. Using appropriate WSN re-organization methods, though the sensor networks can be reorganized, this causes additional maintenance costs and sometimes still decreases the function of the networks. In those situations where the sensor networks cannot be reorganized, the performance of the whole WSN will surely be degraded. In order to ensure the reliable and low cost operation of WSNs, a method to develop a wireless sensor node with self-healing ability based on reconfigurable hardware is proposed in this paper. Two self-healing WSN node realization paradigms based on reconfigurable hardware are presented, including a redundancy-based self-healing paradigm and a whole FPAA/FPGA based self-healing paradigm. The nodes designed with the self-healing ability can dynamically change their node configurations to repair the nodes' hardware failures. To demonstrate these two paradigms, a strain sensor node is adopted as an illustration to show the concepts. Two strain WSN sensor nodes with self-healing ability are developed respectively according to the proposed self-healing paradigms. Evaluation experiments on self-healing ability and power consumption are performed. Experimental results show that the developed nodes can self-diagnose the failures and recover to a normal state automatically. The research presented can improve the robustness of WSNs and reduce the maintenance cost of WSNs in engineering applications. PMID:23202176

  18. How Healthcare Provider Talk with Parents of Children Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury is Perceived in Early Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Teresa A.; Grant, Gerald; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare provider talk with parents in early acute care following children’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects parents’ orientations to these locales, but this connection has been minimally studied. This lack of attention to this topic in previous research may reflect providers’ and researchers’ views that these locales are generally neutral or supportive to parents’ subsequent needs. This secondary analysis used data from a larger descriptive phenomenological study (2005 – 2007) with parents of children following moderate to severe TBI recruited from across the United States. Parents of children with severe TBI consistently had strong negative responses to the early acute care talk processes they experienced with providers, while parents of children with moderate TBI did not. Transcript data were independently coded using discourse analysis in the framework of ethnography of speaking. The purpose was to understand the linguistic and paralinguistic talk factors parents used in their meta-communications that could give a preliminary understanding of their cultural expectations for early acute care talk in these settings. Final participants included 27 parents of children with severe TBI from 23 families. We found the human constructed talk factors that parents reacted to were: a) access to the child, which is where information was; b) regular discussions with key personnel; c) updated information that is explained; d) differing expectations for talk in this context; and, e) perceived parental involvement in decisions. We found that the organization and nature of providers’ talk with parents was perceived by parents to positively or negatively shape their early acute care identities in these locales, which influenced how they viewed these locales as places that either supported them and decreased their workload or discounted them and increased their workload for getting what they needed. PMID:23746606

  19. Provider-Directed Imaging Stress Testing Reduces Health-Care Expenditures in Lower-Risk Chest Pain Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hoekstra, James W.; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Mahler, Simon; Diercks, Deborah B.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Background Among intermediate to high-risk patients with chest pain, we have shown that a cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) stress-test strategy implemented in an observation unit (OU) reduces 1-year healthcare costs compared to inpatient care. In this study, we compare two OU strategies to determine among lower-risk patients if a mandatory CMR stress test strategy was more effective than a physicians’ ability to select a stress test modality. Methods and Results Upon ED arrival and referral to the OU for management of low to intermediate-risk chest pain, 120 individuals were randomized to receive an a) CMR stress imaging test (n=60), or b) a provider selected stress test (n=60: stress echo [62%], CMR (32%), cardiac catheterization (3%), nuclear (2%), and coronary CT [2%]). No differences were detected in length of stay (median CMR = 24.2 hours vs 23.8 hours, p=0.75), catheterization without revascularization (CMR=0% vs 3%), appropriateness of admission decisions (CMR 87% vs 93%, p=0.36), or 30-day ACS (both 3%). Median cost was higher among those randomized to the CMR mandated group ($2005 vs $1686, p<0.001). Conclusions In patients with lower-risk chest pain receiving ED-directed OU care, the ability of a physician to select a cardiac stress imaging modality (including echocardiography, CMR, or radionuclide testing) was more cost effective than a pathway that mandates a CMR stress test. Contrary to prior observations in individuals with intermediate to high-risk chest pain, in those with lower risk chest pain, these results highlight the importance of physician-related choices during ACS diagnostic protocols. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00869245. PMID:22128195

  20. “Completely out-at-sea” with “two-gender medicine”: A qualitative analysis of physician-side barriers to providing healthcare for transgender patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the transgender community have identified healthcare access barriers, yet a corresponding inquiry into healthcare provider perspectives has lagged. Our aim was to examine physician perceptions of barriers to healthcare provision for transgender patients. Methods This was a qualitative study with physician participants from Ontario, Canada. Semi-structured interviews were used to capture a progression of ideas related to barriers faced by physicians when caring for trans patients. Qualitative data were then transcribed verbatim and analysed with an emergent grounded theory approach. Results A total of thirteen (13) physician participants were interviewed. Analysis revealed healthcare barriers that grouped into five themes: Accessing resources, medical knowledge deficits, ethics of transition-related medical care, diagnosing vs. pathologising trans patients, and health system determinants. A centralising theme of “not knowing where to go or who to talk to” was also identified. Conclusions The findings of this study show that physicians perceive barriers to the care of trans patients, and that these barriers are multifactorial. Access barriers impede physicians when referring patients to specialists or searching for reliable treatment information. Clinical management of trans patients is complicated by a lack of knowledge, and by ethical considerations regarding treatments—which can be unfamiliar or challenging to physicians. The disciplinary division of responsibilities within medicine further complicates care; few practitioners identify trans healthcare as an interest area, and there is a tendency to overemphasise trans status in mental health evaluations. Failure to recognise and accommodate trans patients within sex-segregated healthcare systems leads to deficient health policy. The findings of this study suggest potential solutions to trans healthcare barriers at the informational level—with increased awareness of clinical guidelines

  1. Police Officer, Deal-Maker, or Healthcare Provider? Moving to a Patient-Centered Framework for Chronic Opioid Management

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaidis, Christina

    2016-01-01

    How we frame our thoughts about chronic opioid therapy greatly influences our ability to practice patient-centered care. Even providers who strive to be non-judgmental may approach clinical decision-making about opioids by considering if the pain is real or they can trust the patient. Not only does this framework potentially lead to poor or unshared decision-making, it likely adds to provider and patient discomfort by placing the provider in the position of a police officer or judge. Similarly, providers often find themselves making deals with patients using a positional bargaining approach. Even if a compromise is reached, this framework can potentially inadvertently weaken the therapeutic relationship by encouraging the idea that the patient and provider have opposing goals. Reframing the issue can allow the provider to be in a more therapeutic role. As recommended in the APS/AAPM guidelines, providers should decide whether the benefits of opioid therapy are likely to outweigh the harms for a specific patient (or sometimes, for society) at a specific time. This paper discusses how providers can use a benefit-to-harm framework to make and communicate decisions about the initiation, continuation, and discontinuation of opioids for managing chronic non-malignant pain. Such an approach focuses decisions and discussions on judging the treatment, not the patient. It allows the provider and the patient to ally together and make shared decisions regarding a common goal. Moving to a risk-benefit framework may allow providers to provide more patient-centered care, while also increasing provider and patient comfort with adequately monitoring for harm. PMID:21539703

  2. Can Health Technology Assessment (HTA) provide a solution to tackle the increasing health-care expenditure in India?

    PubMed

    Dang, Amit; Vallish, B N

    2016-01-01

    The private health-care system in India is effective but expensive. Due to the absence of a comprehensive and well-penetrated insurance scheme that caters to the majority of the Indian population, most of the private health care consultations are out-of-pocket (OOP), and this is pushing many people to poverty. In this article, we describe the concept of health technology assessment (HTA), and review its possible role in improving the health-care system in India. We additionally comment on its present status and possible role of its implementation in the Indian context. PMID:27350708

  3. Does Ownership Matter? An Overview of Systematic Reviews of the Performance of Private For-Profit, Private Not-For-Profit and Public Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Cristian A.; Rada, Gabriel; Kuhn-Barrientos, Lucy; Barrios, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ownership of healthcare providers has been considered as one factor that might influence their health and healthcare related performance. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of what is known about the effects on economic, administrative and health related outcomes of different types of ownership of healthcare providers -namely public, private non-for-profit (PNFP) and private for-profit (PFP)- based on the findings of systematic reviews (SR). Methods and Findings An overview of systematic reviews was performed. Different databases were searched in order to select SRs according to an explicit comprehensive criterion. Included SRs were assessed to determine their methodological quality. Of the 5918 references reviewed, fifteen SR were included, but six of them were rated as having major limitations, so they weren't incorporated in the analyses. According to the nine analyzed SR, ownership does seem to have an effect on health and healthcare related outcomes. In the comparison of PFP and PNFP providers, significant differences in terms of mortality of patients and payments to facilities have been found, both being higher in PFP facilities. In terms of quality and economic indicators such as efficiency, there are no concluding results. When comparing PNFP and public providers, as well as for PFP and public providers, no clear differences were found. Conclusion PFP providers seem to have worst results than their PNFP counterparts, but there are still important evidence gaps in the literature that needs to be covered, including the comparison between public and both PFP and PNFP providers. More research is needed in low and middle income countries to understand the impact on and development of healthcare delivery systems. PMID:25437212

  4. Acceptability, feasibility and challenges of implementing an HIV prevention intervention for people living with HIV/AIDS among healthcare providers in Mozambique: results of a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Jaiantilal, Prafulta; Gutin, Sarah A; Cummings, Beverley; Mbofana, Francisco; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2015-01-01

    Despite the Mozambique government's efforts to curb human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), national prevalence is 11.5% and support is needed to expand HIV-related services and improve program quality. Positive prevention (PP) programs, which prioritize HIV prevention with people living with HIV and AIDS (PLHIV), have been recognized as an important intervention for preventing new HIV infections. To address this, an evidence-based PP training intervention was implemented with HIV healthcare providers in Mozambique. This study focuses on the acceptability and feasibility of a PP intervention in HIV clinics from the healthcare provider perspective. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 healthcare providers from three provinces who participated in PP trainings in Mozambique. Interview data were coded using content analysis. Study data suggest that healthcare providers found PP acceptable, feasible to implement in their HIV work in clinic settings, and valued this strategy to improve HIV prevention. The PP training also led providers to feel more comfortable counseling their patients about prevention, with a more holistic approach that included HIV testing, treatment and encouraging PLHIV to live positively. While overall acceptance of the PP training was positive, several barriers to feasibility surfaced in the data. Patient-level barriers included resistance to disclosing HIV status due to fear of stigma and discrimination, difficulty negotiating for condom use, difficulty engaging men in testing and treatment, and the effects of poverty on accessing care. Providers also identified work environment barriers including high patient load, time constraints, and frequent staff turnover. Recognizing PP as an important intervention, healthcare providers should be trained to provide comprehensive prevention, care and treatment for PLHIV. Further work is needed to explore the complex social dynamics and cultural challenges such as

  5. Acceptability, feasibility and challenges of implementing an HIV prevention intervention for people living with HIV/AIDS among healthcare providers in Mozambique: Results of a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jaiantilal, Prafulta; Gutin, Sarah A.; Cummings, Beverley; Mbofana, Francisco; Rose, Carol Dawson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the Mozambique government's efforts to curb human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), national prevalence is 11.5% and support is needed to expand HIV-related services and improve program quality. Positive prevention (PP) programs, which prioritize HIV prevention with people living with HIV and AIDS (PLHIV), have been recognized as an important intervention for preventing new HIV infections. To address this, an evidence-based PP training intervention was implemented with HIV healthcare providers in Mozambique. This study focuses on the acceptability and feasibility of a PP intervention in HIV clinics from the healthcare provider perspective. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 healthcare providers from three provinces who participated in PP trainings in Mozambique. Interview data were coded using content analysis. Study data suggest that healthcare providers found PP acceptable, feasible to implement in their HIV work in clinic settings, and valued this strategy to improve HIV prevention. The PP training also led providers to feel more comfortable counseling their patients about prevention, with a more holistic approach that included HIV testing, treatment and encouraging PLHIV to live positively. While overall acceptance of the PP training was positive, several barriers to feasibility surfaced in the data. Patient-level barriers included resistance to disclosing HIV status due to fear of stigma and discrimination, difficulty negotiating for condom use, difficulty engaging men in testing and treatment, and the effects of poverty on accessing care. Providers also identified work environment barriers including high patient load, time constraints, and frequent staff turnover. Recognizing PP as an important intervention, healthcare providers should be trained to provide comprehensive prevention, care and treatment for PLHIV. Further work is needed to explore the complex social dynamics and cultural challenges

  6. Evaluation of a Theory-Driven E-Learning Intervention for Future Oral Healthcare Providers on Secondary Prevention of Disordered Eating Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBate, Rita D.; Severson, Herbert H.; Cragun, Deborah L.; Gau, Jeff M.; Merrell, Laura K.; Bleck, Jennifer R.; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott L.; Brown, Kelli R. McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A.; Hendricson, William

    2013-01-01

    Oral healthcare providers have a clinical opportunity for early detection of disordered eating behaviors because they are often the first health professionals to observe overt oral and physical signs. Curricula regarding early recognition of this oral/systemic medical condition are limited in oral health educational programs. Web-based learning…

  7. Barriers to nutrition education for older adults, and nutrition and aging training opportunities for educators, healthcare providers,volunteers and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Meck Higgins, Mary; Barkley, Mary Clarke

    2004-01-01

    Literature citations of barriers to nutrition education found in those who teach and care for older adults, as well as within older adults themselves, are discussed. No attempt was made to compare educational barriers for learners of varying ages. These obstacles need to be addressed in order for nutrition to be taught or learned effectively so that nutrition practices and health improve. Barriers for healthcare professionals to providing nutrition education include misconceptions and stereotypes about older adults and about their nutritional concerns; lack of attention to and lack of funding for older adult educational programs; and difficulties recruiting older learners. Hindrances for older adults in responding to nutrition education can be categorized as attitudinal, motivational, environmental, and related to low literacy and poverty. Published examples of opportunities for education and training about nutrition and aging that are in place for health educators, healthcare providers, volunteers and caregivers regarding nutrition and aging are discussed. Suggestions are presented regarding future efforts to minimize educational barriers and to provide training for healthcare professionals, volunteers and caregivers. New research is needed in this field of study in order to realize the potential quality of life benefits and reduced healthcare costs associated with providing effective nutrition education to older adults. This is one of a series of reviews of recent literature on nutrition education for older adults. PMID:15149943

  8. The road to ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation: forecasting the transition for providers, payers, and other healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Tekla B; Bowens, Felicia M; Pierce, William; Stasher-Booker, Bridgette; Thompson, Erica Q; Jones, Warren A

    2012-01-01

    This article will examine the benefits and challenges of the US healthcare system's upcoming conversion to use of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS) and will review the cost implications of the transition. Benefits including improved quality of care, potential cost savings from increased accuracy of payments and reduction of unpaid claims, and improved tracking of healthcare data related to public health and bioterrorism events are discussed. Challenges are noted in the areas of planning and implementation, the financial cost of the transition, a shortage of qualified coders, the need for further training and education of the healthcare workforce, and the loss of productivity during the transition. Although the transition will require substantial implementation and conversion costs, potential benefits can be achieved in the areas of data integrity, fraud detection, enhanced cost analysis capabilities, and improved monitoring of patients' health outcomes that will yield greater cost savings over time. The discussion concludes with recommendations to healthcare organizations of ways in which technological advances and workforce training and development opportunities can ease the transition to the new coding system. PMID:22548024

  9. The impact of accreditation of primary healthcare centers: successes, challenges and policy implications as perceived by healthcare providers and directors in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2009, the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) launched the Primary Healthcare (PHC) accreditation program to improve quality across the continuum of care. The MOPH, with the support of Accreditation Canada, conducted the accreditation survey in 25 PHC centers in 2012. This paper aims to gain a better understanding of the impact of accreditation on quality of care as perceived by PHC staff members and directors; how accreditation affected staff and patient satisfaction; key enablers, challenges and strategies to improve implementation of accreditation in PHC. Methods The study was conducted in 25 PHC centers using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach; all staff members were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire whereas semi-structured interviews were conducted with directors. Results The scales measuring Management and Leadership had the highest mean score followed by Accreditation Impact, Human Resource Utilization, and Customer Satisfaction. Regression analysis showed that Strategic Quality Planning, Customer Satisfaction and Staff Involvement were associated with a perception of higher Quality Results. Directors emphasized the benefits of accreditation with regards to documentation, reinforcement of quality standards, strengthened relationships between PHC centers and multiple stakeholders and improved staff and patient satisfaction. Challenges encountered included limited financial resources, poor infrastructure, and staff shortages. Conclusions To better respond to population health needs, accreditation is an important first step towards improving the quality of PHC delivery arrangement system. While there is a need to expand the implementation of accreditation to cover all PHC centers in Lebanon, considerations should be given to strengthening their financial arrangements as well. PMID:24568632

  10. Frequency of Hand Decontamination of Intraoperative Providers and Reduction of Postoperative Healthcare-Associated Infections: A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Novel Hand Hygiene System.

    PubMed

    Koff, Matthew D; Brown, Jeremiah R; Marshall, Emily J; O'Malley, A James; Jensen, Jens T; Heard, Stephen O; Longtine, Karen; O'Neill, Melissa; Longtine, Jaclyn; Houston, Donna; Robison, Cindy; Moulton, Eric; Patel, Hetal M; Loftus, Randy W

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND Healthcare provider hands are an important source of intraoperative bacterial transmission events associated with postoperative infection development. OBJECTIVE To explore the efficacy of a novel hand hygiene improvement system leveraging provider proximity and individual and group performance feedback in reducing 30-day postoperative healthcare-associated infections via increased provider hourly hand decontamination events. DESIGN Randomized, prospective study. SETTING Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in New Hampshire and UMass Memorial Medical Center in Massachusetts. PATIENTS Patients undergoing surgery. METHODS Operating room environments were randomly assigned to usual intraoperative hand hygiene or to a personalized, body-worn hand hygiene system. Anesthesia and circulating nurse provider hourly hand decontamination events were continuously monitored and reported. All patients were followed prospectively for the development of 30-day postoperative healthcare-associated infections. RESULTS A total of 3,256 operating room environments and patients (1,620 control and 1,636 treatment) were enrolled. The mean (SD) provider hand decontamination event rate achieved was 4.3 (2.9) events per hour, an approximate 8-fold increase in hand decontamination events above that of conventional wall-mounted devices (0.57 events/hour); P<.001. Use of the hand hygiene system was not associated with a reduction in healthcare-associated infections (odds ratio, 1.07 [95% CI, 0.82-1.40], P=.626). CONCLUSIONS The hand hygiene system evaluated in this study increased the frequency of hand decontamination events without reducing 30-day postoperative healthcare-associated infections. Future work is indicated to optimize the efficacy of this hand hygiene improvement strategy. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:888-895. PMID:27267310

  11. Healthcare Financial Management Association, Principles and Practices Board. Statement no. 15: Valuation and financial statement presentation of charity service and bad debts by institutional healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    Principles and Practices Board (P&P Board) Statement No. 2, issued in 1978, provided a basis for differentiating between charity service and bad debts. The statement acknowledged that, while the differentiation was helpful, the financial accounting and reporting of charity service and bad debts were the same. In 1990, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) published (after review and approval by the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the Governmental Accounting Standards Board) an extensive revision of the guide titled "Audits of Providers of Health Care Services." The revised guide substantially changed the reporting of bad debts and eliminated charity service from revenue. Disclosure of the entity's policy for providing charity service and the level of charity service provided is required by the revised guide. The P&P Board decided that a substantive revision of its Statement No. 2 was required to bring it into conformity with the revised guide and to provide direction on implementation of the revised guide's requirements. This statement supersedes Statement No. 2 and deals with the same issues, including bad debts. PMID:10145753

  12. Measuring the impact of Hurricane Katrina on access to a personal healthcare provider: the use of the National Survey of Children's Health for an external comparison group.

    PubMed

    Stehling-Ariza, Tasha; Park, Yoon Soo; Sury, Jonathan J; Abramson, David

    2012-04-01

    This paper examined the effect of Hurricane Katrina on children's access to personal healthcare providers and evaluated the use of propensity score methods to compare a nationally representative sample of children, as a proxy for an unexposed group, with a smaller exposed sample. 2007 data from the Gulf Coast Child and Family Health (G-CAFH) Study, a longitudinal cohort of households displaced or greatly impacted by Hurricane Katrina, were matched with 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) data using propensity score techniques. Propensity scores were created using poverty level, household educational attainment, and race/ethnicity, with and without the addition of child age and gender. The outcome was defined as having a personal healthcare provider. Additional confounders (household structure, neighborhood safety, health and insurance status) were also examined. All covariates except gender differed significantly between the exposed (G-CAFH) and unexposed (NSCH) samples. Fewer G-CAFH children had a personal healthcare provider (65 %) compared to those from NSCH (90 %). Adjusting for all covariates, the propensity score analysis showed exposed children were 20 % less likely to have a personal healthcare provider compared to unexposed children in the US (OR = 0.80, 95 % CI 0.76, 0.84), whereas the logistic regression analysis estimated a stronger effect (OR = 0.28, 95 % CI 0.21, 0.39). Two years after Hurricane Katrina, children exposed to the storm had significantly lower odds of having a personal health care provider compared to unexposed children. Propensity score matching techniques may be useful for combining separate data samples when no clear unexposed group exists. PMID:22456985

  13. Trickle-down theory. Anthem's expensive acquisition of Trigon Healthcare raises question of whether local providers may end up with the bill.

    PubMed

    Benko, Laura B

    2002-08-12

    Anthem's acquisition of Trigon Healthcare, its largest deal to date at $4 billion in cash and stock, gives the insurer a sturdy foothold in the Southeast while rewarding Trigon's shareholders with a profit. Anthem CEO Larry Glasscock (right) and Trigon CEO Thomas Snead expect a smooth transition. Anthem has taken a pricey step toward becoming the No. 1 Blues plan consolidator. But will local providers end up footing much of the bill? PMID:12224117

  14. A nationwide postal survey on the perception of Malaysian public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists' (PERMFAMS) clinical performance, professional attitudes and research visibility.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon-How; Yasin, Mazapuspavina Md; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan A; Hamzah, Zuhra; Ismail, Mastura; Ali, Norsiah; Bashah, Baizury; Mohd-Salleh, Noridah

    2015-01-01

    Perception of healthcare providers who worked with family medicine specialists (FMSs) could translate into the effectiveness of primary healthcare delivery in daily practices. This study examined perceptions of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) on FMSs at public health clinics throughout Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study in 2012-2013 using postal method targeting PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely health clinics, health offices and hospitals. A structured questionnaire was developed to assess PHCP's perception of FMS's clinical competency, safety practice, ethical and professional values, and research involvement. It consists of 37 items with Likert scale of strongly disagree (a score of 1) to strongly agree (a score of 5). Interaction and independent effect of the independent variables were tested and adjusted means score were reported. The participants' response rate was 58.0% (780/1345) with almost equal proportion from each of the three public healthcare facilities. There were more positive perceptions than negative among the PHCPs. FMSs were perceived to provide effective and safe treatment to their patients equally disregards of patient's social background. However, there were some concerns of FMSs not doing home visits, not seeing walk-in patients, had long appointment time, not active in scientific research, writing and publication. There were significant differences in perception based on a respondent's health care facility (p < 0.0001) and frequency of encounter (p < 0.0001). PHCPs had overall positive perceptions on FMSs across all the domains investigated. PHCPs from different health care facilities and frequency of encounter with FMSs had different perception. Practicing FMSs could improve on the critical service areas that were perceived to be important but lacking. FMSs might need further support in conducting research and writing for publication. PMID:25992310

  15. Impact of Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management on Healthcare Quality and Utilization in Recently Discharged Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Jordan D.; Davis, Amanda Z.; Hoel, Robert W.; Armon, Jeffrey J.; Odell, Laura J.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    all 25 patients at baseline, representing 15 (60%) patients with ≥1 missing medications. Overall, 55 drug therapy problems were identified at baseline, 24 (43.6%) of which remained unresolved at 30-day follow-up. Conclusion The use of a pharmacist-provided MTM program did not achieve a significant difference compared with usual care in an existing CTP; however, the findings demonstrated frequent utilization of inappropriate medications as well as medication underuse, and many drug therapy problems remained unresolved. The small size of the study may have limited the ability to detect a difference between the intervention and usual care groups.

  16. Health sector reforms and changes in prevalence of untreated morbidity, choice of healthcare providers among the poor and rural population in India

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soumitra

    2014-01-01

    Background: India’s health sector witnessed some major policy changes in 1990s that aimed at making health services more accessible to the population. Methods: In this paper, I tried to present some preliminary results of the significant changes that occurred between 1995/6 and 2004, especially in relation to the question of access to healthcare for the poor and rural population using data from 52nd (1995–6) and 60th round (2004) of National Sample Survey Organization on ‘morbidity and healthcare’. Results: The analysis suggests that overall utilization of healthcare services have declined and the odds of not seeking care due to financial inability has further increased among the poor and rural population during the period of reforms. Results of the multivariate logit regression model indicate that the non-poor, middle and above educated people were having greater likelihood of using services from private health care provider. Conclusion: Interestingly, poor and rural residents were more likely to have used healthcare from public facilities in 2004 than in 1995–6, suggesting that the shift from private to public sector is encouraging, provided they receive good quality health care services at public facilities and do not face catastrophic health expenditures. PMID:24757689

  17. Quality of interaction between primary health-care providers and patients with type 2 diabetes in Muscat, Oman: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Abdulhadi, Nadia; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed Ali; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Vernby, Åsa; Wahlström, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    Background A good patient-physician interaction is particularly important in chronic diseases like diabetes. There are so far no published data regarding the interaction between the primary health-care providers and patients with type 2 diabetes in Oman, where diabetes is a major and growing health problem. This study aimed at exploring how health-care providers interact with patients with type 2 diabetes at primary health-care level in Muscat, Oman, focusing on the consultation environment, and some aspects of care and information. Methods Direct observations of 90 consultations between 23 doctors and 13 diabetes nurses concerned with diabetes management during their consultations with type 2 diabetes patients in six primary health-care centres in the Muscat region, using checklists developed from the National Diabetes Guidelines. Consultations were assessed as optimal if more than 75% of observed aspects were fulfilled and sub-optimal if less than 50% were fulfilled. Results Overall 52% of the doctors' consultations were not optimal. Some important aspects for a positive consultation environment were fulfilled in only about half of the doctors' consultations: ensuring privacy of consultation (49%), eye contact (49%), good attention (52%), encouraging asking questions (47%), and emphasizing on the patients' understanding of the provided information (52%). The doctors enquired about adverse effects of anti-diabetes drugs in less than 10% of consultations. The quality of the nurses' consultations was sub-optimal in about 75% of 85 consultations regarding aspects of consultation environment, care and information. Conclusion The performance of the primary health-care doctors and diabetes nurses needs to be improved. The role of the diabetes nurses and the teamwork should be enhanced. We suggest a multidisciplinary team approach, training and education to the providers to upgrade their skills regarding communication and care. Barriers to compliance with the guidelines

  18. Preliminary observations on the ability of hyperspectral imaging to provide detection and visualization of bloodstain patterns on black fabrics.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Rebecca L; Kish, Paul E; Plese, Cara A

    2012-11-01

    The analysis of bloodstain patterns can assist investigators in understanding the circumstances surrounding a violent crime. Bloodstains are routinely subjected to pattern analysis, which is inherently dependent upon the ability of the examiner to locate and visualize bloodstain patterns on items of evidence. Often, the ability to properly visualize bloodstain patterns is challenging, especially when the stain patterns occur on dark and/or patterned substrates. In this study, preliminary research was performed to better understand how near-infrared reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) could be used to observe bloodstain patterns on commonly encountered black fabrics. The ability of HSI to visualize latent bloodstains on several commonly encountered substrates is demonstrated. The images acquired through HSI are of sufficient quality to allow for differentiation between stains produced from an impact mechanism or a transfer mechanism. This study also serves as a proof of concept in the differentiation of multiple staining materials. Because of its ability to generate spectral data, the data provide a preliminary separation of stains where more than one type of stain existed. PMID:22563710

  19. Understanding the roles of faith-based health-care providers in Africa: review of the evidence with a focus on magnitude, reach, cost, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jill; Tsimpo, Clarence; Gemignani, Regina; Shojo, Mari; Coulombe, Harold; Dimmock, Frank; Nguyen, Minh Cong; Hines, Harrison; Mills, Edward J; Dieleman, Joseph L; Haakenstad, Annie; Wodon, Quentin

    2015-10-31

    At a time when many countries might not achieve the health targets of the Millennium Development Goals and the post-2015 agenda for sustainable development is being negotiated, the contribution of faith-based health-care providers is potentially crucial. For better partnership to be achieved and for health systems to be strengthened by the alignment of faith-based health-providers with national systems and priorities, improved information is needed at all levels. Comparisons of basic factors (such as magnitude, reach to poor people, cost to patients, modes of financing, and satisfaction of patients with the services received) within faith-based health-providers and national systems show some differences. As the first report in the Series on faith-based health care, we review a broad body of published work and introduce some empirical evidence on the role of faith-based health-care providers, with a focus on Christian faith-based health providers in sub-Saharan Africa (on which the most detailed documentation has been gathered). The restricted and diverse evidence reported supports the idea that faith-based health providers continue to play a part in health provision, especially in fragile health systems, and the subsequent reports in this Series review controversies in faith-based health care and recommendations for how public and faith sectors might collaborate more effectively. PMID:26159398

  20. Truth-telling to the patient, family, and the sexual partner: a rights approach to the role of healthcare providers in adult HIV disclosure in China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Walker, Simon Thomas; Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Patients’ rights are central in today's legislation and social policies related to health care, including HIV care, in not only Western countries but around the world. However, given obvious socio-cultural differences it is often asked how or to what extent patients’ rights should be respected in non-Western societies such as China. In this paper, it is argued that the patients’ rights framework is compatible with Chinese culture, and that from the perspective of contemporary patient rights healthcare providers have a duty to disclose truthfully the diagnosis and prognosis to their patients, that the Chinese cultural practice of involving families in care should – with consent from the patient – be promoted out of respect for patients’ rights and well-being, and that healthcare providers should be prepared to address the issue of disclosing a patient's HIV status to sexual partner(s). Legally, the provider should be permitted to disclose without consent from the patient but not obliged to in all cases. The decision to do this should be taken with trained sensitivity to a range of ethically relevant considerations. Post-disclosure counseling or psychological support should be in place to address the concerns of potentially adverse consequences of provider-initiated disclosure and to maximize the psychosocial and medical benefits of the disclosure. There is an urgent need for healthcare providers to receive training in ethics and disclosure skills. This paper concludes also with some suggestions for improving the centerpiece Chinese legislation, State Council's “Regulations on AIDS Prevention and Control” (2006), to further safeguard the rights and well-being of HIV patients. PMID:26616129

  1. A Descriptive Study to Determine the Level of Crisis Preparedness Frontline Leaders Are Trained to Perform during an Exploding Crisis in Los Angeles County Healthcare Facilities, Providing Emergency Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbaley, Salomay Rose

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of crisis leadership preparedness facility administrators report frontline healthcare leaders are trained to perform during an exploding crisis in Los Angeles County healthcare facilities, providing emergency services. Methodology: This was a mixed method descriptive study. The…

  2. Mapping the risk perception and communication gap between different professions of healthcare providers in cancer care: a cross-sectional protocol

    PubMed Central

    Stub, Trine; Musial, Frauke; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A; Salamonsen, Anita; Kristoffersen, Agnete; Berntsen, Gro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies show that patients with cancer who use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) have a poorer survival prognosis than those who do not. It remains unclear whether this is due to a priori poorer prognosis that makes patients turn to CAM, or whether there is a factor associated with CAM use itself that influences the prognosis negatively. Healthcare providers should assist patients in safeguarding their treatment decision. However, the current non-communication between CAM and conventional providers leaves it up to the patients themselves to choose how to best integrate the two worlds of therapy. In this study, an interactive shared decision-making (SDM) tool will be developed to enable patients and health professionals to make safe health choices. Methods and analysis We will delineate, compare and evaluate perception and clinical experience of communication of risk situations among oncology experts, general practitioners and CAM practitioners. To accomplish this, we will develop a pilot and implement a large-scale survey among the aforementioned health professionals in Norway. Guided by the survey results, we will develop a β-version of a shared decision-making tool for healthcare providers to use in guiding patients to make safe CAM decisions. Ethics and dissemination Participants must give their informed and written consent before inclusion. They will be informed about the opportunity to drop out from the study followed by deletion of all data registered. The study needs no approval from The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics because all participants are healthcare professionals. Results from this study will be disseminated in peer-reviewed medical journals. PMID:26338839

  3. Achieving pregnancy safely: perspectives on timed vaginal insemination among HIV-serodiscordant couples and health-care providers in Kisumu, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mmeje, Okeoma; van der Poel, Sheryl; Workneh, Meklit; Njoroge, Betty; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    In female-positive HIV-serodiscordant couples desiring children, home timed vaginal insemination (TVI) of semen during the fertile period along with consistent condom use may reduce the risk of HIV transmission when the man is HIV-uninfected. In sub-Saharan Africa, up to 45% of HIV-infected women desire to have more children. HIV viral load assessment is not routinely available in low-resource countries for monitoring adherence and response to antiretroviral therapy. Therefore, in these settings, timed unprotected intercourse without assurance of HIV viral suppression may pose unnecessary risks. TVI, a simple and affordable intervention, can be considered an adjunct method and option of safer conception for HIV prevention with treatment of the HIV-infected partner and/or pre-exposure prophylaxis. We conducted five mixed and single-sex focus group discussions comprised of 33 HIV-serodiscordant couples and health-care providers in the Nyanza region of Kenya to assess the acceptability and feasibility of TVI as a safer method of conception. The transcribed data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. We found that educating and counseling HIV-serodiscordant couples on TVI could make it an acceptable and feasible safer conception method when associated with frequent communication and home visits by health-care providers. The findings of this study indicate that implementation studies that integrate training and counseling of HIV-serodiscordant couples and health-care providers on TVI combined with consistent condom use are needed. Acknowledging and supporting the reproductive choice and needs of female positive, male negative HIV-serodiscordant couples who desire children should also include the use of assisted reproductive services at the same time as pharmaceutical options that prevent sexual HIV transmission. PMID:25105422

  4. Provider Link: Facilitating Healthcare Providers’ Support of Web-based Smoking Cessation Efforts via Secure E-mail

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Kashyap; Bansod, Aditya; Frysinger, Dan; Perkins, Dawna; Cabanting, Jeannette; Lenert, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    Provider Link is a system designed to enhance the efficacy of a web-based intervention for smoking cessation by helping health care providers support their patients via e-mail. The system is designed to maintain confidentiality while allowing providers rapid access to patient data collected over the web. A trial of Provider Link is currently underway. PMID:14728539

  5. Knowledge, Beliefs and Practices Regarding Antiretroviral Medications for HIV Prevention: Results from a Survey of Healthcare Providers in New England

    PubMed Central

    Krakower, Douglas S.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Mitty, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Ira B.; Kurth, Ann E.; Maloney, Kevin M.; Gallagher, Donna; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatment for HIV-infection before immunologic decline (early ART) and pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) can prevent HIV transmission, but routine adoption of these practices by clinicians has been limited. Methods Between September and December 2013, healthcare practitioners affiliated with a regional AIDS Education and Training Center in New England were invited to complete online surveys assessing knowledge, beliefs and practices regarding early ART and PrEP. Multivariable models were utilized to determine characteristics associated with prescribing intentions and practices. Results Surveys were completed by 184 practitioners. Respondent median age was 44 years, 58% were female, and 82% were white. Among ART-prescribing clinicians (61% of the entire sample), 64% were aware that HIV treatment guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services recommended early ART, and 69% indicated they would prescribe ART to all HIV-infected patients irrespective of immunologic status. However, 77% of ART-prescribing clinicians would defer ART for patients not ready to initiate treatment. Three-fourths of all respondents were aware of guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending PrEP provision, 19% had prescribed PrEP, and 58% of clinicians who had not prescribed PrEP anticipated future prescribing. Practitioners expressed theoretical concerns and perceived practical barriers to prescribing early ART and PrEP. Clinicians with higher percentages of HIV-infected patients (aOR 1.16 per 10% increase in proportion of patients with HIV-infection, 95% CI 1.01–1.34) and infectious diseases specialists (versus primary care physicians; aOR 3.32, 95% CI 0.98–11.2) were more likely to report intentions to prescribe early ART. Higher percentage of HIV-infected patients was also associated with having prescribed PrEP (aOR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.34), whereas female gender (aOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.10–0.71) was associated

  6. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S. M. Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A.; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  7. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  8. Evaluation of a theory-driven e-learning intervention for future oral healthcare providers on secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors.

    PubMed

    DeBate, Rita D; Severson, Herbert H; Cragun, Deborah L; Gau, Jeff M; Merrell, Laura K; Bleck, Jennifer R; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott L; McCormack Brown, Kelli R; Tedesco, Lisa A; Hendricson, William

    2013-06-01

    Oral healthcare providers have a clinical opportunity for early detection of disordered eating behaviors because they are often the first health professionals to observe overt oral and physical signs. Curricula regarding early recognition of this oral/systemic medical condition are limited in oral health educational programs. Web-based learning can supplement and reinforce traditional learning and has the potential to develop skills. The study purpose was to determine the efficacy of a theory-driven Web-based training program to increase the capacity of oral health students to perform behaviors related to the secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance evaluation framework, a longitudinal group-randomized controlled trial involving 27 oral health classes from 12 oral health education programs in the United States was implemented to assess the efficacy of the Web-based training on attitudes, knowledge, self-efficacy and skills related to the secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Mixed-model analysis of covariance indicated substantial improvements among students in the intervention group (effect sizes: 0.51-0.83) on all six outcomes of interest. Results suggest that the Web-based training program may increase the capacity of oral healthcare providers to deliver secondary prevention of disordered eating behaviors. Implications and value of using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance framework are discussed. PMID:23564725

  9. A nationwide survey on the expectation of public healthcare providers on family medicine specialists in Malaysia—a qualitative analysis of 623 written comments

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Hamzah, Zuhra; A-Rashid, Mohd-Radzniwan; Md-Yasin, Mazapuspavina; Ali, Norsiah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the expectation of public healthcare providers/professionals (PHCPs) who are working closely with family medicine specialists (FMSs) at public health clinics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting This study is part of a larger national study on the perception of the Malaysian public healthcare professionals on FMSs. Participants PHCPs from three categories of health facilities, namely hospitals, health clinics and health offices. Main outcome measures Qualitative analysis of written comments of respondents’ expectation of FMSs. Results The participants’ response rate was 58% (780/1345) with an almost equal proportion from each public healthcare facility. We identified 21 subthemes for the 623 expectation comments. The six emerging themes are (1) need for more FMSs, (2) clinical roles and functions of FMSs, (3) administrative roles of FMSs, (4) contribution to community and public health, (5) attributes improvement and (6) research and audits. FMSs were expected to give attention to clinical duty. Delivering this responsibility with competence included having the latest medical knowledge in their own and others’ medical disciplines, practising evidence-based medicine in prehospital and posthospital care, better supervision of staff and doctors under their care, fostering effective teamwork, communicating more often with hospital specialists and making appropriate referral. Expectations ranged from definite and strong for more FMSs at the health clinics to low expectation for FMSs’ involvement in research; to mal-expectation on FMSs’ involvement in community and public health programmes. Conclusions There were some remarkable differences in expectations on FMSs from the three different PHCPs. These ranged from being clinically competent and administratively available for patients and staff at the health clinics, to mal-expectations on FMSs to engage in public health affairs. Relevant parties, including FMSs themselves, could take

  10. HIV testing among pregnant women living with HIV in India: are private healthcare providers routinely violating women’s human rights?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In India, approximately 49,000 women living with HIV become pregnant and deliver each year. While the government of India has made progress increasing the availability of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) services, only about one quarter of pregnant women received an HIV test in 2010, and about one-in-five that were found positive for HIV received interventions to prevent vertical transmission of HIV. Methods Between February 2012 to March 2013, 14 HIV-positive women who had recently delivered a baby were recruited from HIV positive women support groups, Government of India Integrated Counseling and Testing Centers, and nongovernmental organizations in Mysore and Pune, India. In-depth interviews were conducted to examine their general experiences with antenatal healthcare; specific experiences around HIV counseling and testing; and perceptions about their care and follow-up treatment. Data were analyzed thematically using the human rights framework for HIV testing adopted by the United Nations and India’s National AIDS Control Organization. Results While all of the HIV-positive women in the study received HIV and PMTCT services at a government hospital or antiretroviral therapy center, almost all reported attending a private clinic or hospital at some point in their pregnancy. According to the participants, HIV testing often occurred without consent; there was little privacy; breaches of confidentiality were commonplace; and denial of medical treatment occurred routinely. Among women living with HIV in this study, violations of their human rights occurred more commonly in private rather than public healthcare settings. Conclusions There is an urgent need for capacity building among private healthcare providers to improve standards of practice with regard to informed consent process, HIV testing, patient confidentiality, treatment, and referral of pregnant women living with HIV. PMID:24656059

  11. Construction of the recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidation ability.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Radlinska, Monika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2015-02-20

    The plasmid pSinA of Sinorhizobium sp. M14 was used as a source of functional phenotypic modules, encoding proteins involved in arsenite oxidation and arsenic resistance, to obtain recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidative ability. An arsenite oxidation module was cloned into pBBR1MCS-2 vector yielding plasmid vector pAIO1, while an arsenic resistance module was cloned into pCM62 vector yielding plasmid pARS1. Both plasmid constructs were introduced (separately and together) into the cells of phylogenetically distant (representing Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria) and physiologically diversified (unable to oxidize arsenite and susceptible/resistant to arsenite and arsenate) bacteria. Functional analysis of the modified strains showed that: (i) the plasmid pARS1 can be used for the construction of strains with an increased resistance to arsenite [up to 20mM of As(III), (ii) the presence of the plasmid pAIO1 in bacteria previously unable to oxidize As(III) to As(V), contributes to the acquisition of arsenite oxidation abilities by these cells, (iii) the highest arsenite utilization rate are observed in the culture of strains harbouring both the plasmids pAIO1 and pARS1, (iv) the strains harbouring the plasmid pAIO1 were able to grow on arsenic-contaminated mine waters (∼ 3.0 mg As L(-1)) without any supplementation. PMID:25617684

  12. The Ebony Sex Survey and the sex lives of African-American women: a call to healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Hope E

    2005-01-01

    Abuse, sexual satisfaction, and sexual dysfunction are issues that are not readily addressed in the African-American population, but they are on the minds of many. Ebony decided to pose these and other questions to African-American women in a survey titled, "Are You Satisfied?" Respondents were subscribers to Ebony as well as newsstand readership. Participants either filled out the survey on the Ebony website or sent in a paper copy to be tabulated. African-American women (N=7800) from all walks of life responded and discussed their abuse histories, their relationships, their ability or inability to reach orgasm, their medical histories and level of comfort in discussing their problems with their physicians, as well as many other issues. Results indicate that 37% of the sample self-reported early sexual abuse at the hands of immediate and/or extended family members; 15%-18% have been treated for high blood pressure, STDs/HIV, and/or fibroids; and 33% have experienced an inability to achieve orgasm in the last year. Of the sample 47% stated that they had not discussed these problems with their physicians. PMID:15822837

  13. Are physician and non-physician providers of outpatient mental healthcare substitutes or complements? a conceptual clarification.

    PubMed

    Okunade, Albert A; Murthy, Vasudeva N R

    2008-12-01

    Solving the health care consumers' (producers') utility maximization (cost minimization) problem could entail the substitution of alternative care providers (factor inputs) when the relative out-of-pocket costs (factor prices) change, ceteris paribus. The conceptual advancement in this contribution is illustrated with an earlier paper (P. Deb and A. Holmes, Health Economics 7(4):347-362, 1998) on the economic relationship of physicians (M.D.s) and 'other providers' (Ph.D.s, other) in the US outpatient demand for mental health care services. Many aspects of our conceptual progress are insightful. Foremost, our conclusion on whether M.D. and non-M.D. providers of outpatient mental health care are economic complements or substitutes depends on the alternative measure of the substitution elasticity used. Second, when correctly measured the expenditure-minimizing substitutions among mental health providers can be useful policy decision guides for consumers covered under traditional indemnity insurance with deductibles or managed care plans with user co-payments. Finally, our conceptual clarification should motivate future investigators of health services demand (or use) and cost models to consider a wider conceptual foundation for assessing the structure and implications of provider relationships. PMID:18998598

  14. Satisfaction of health-care providers with electronic health records and perceived barriers to its implementation in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Bani-Issa, Wegdan; Al Yateem, Nabeel; Al Makhzoomy, Ibtihal Khalaf; Ibrahim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The integration of electronic health records (EHRs) has shown promise in improving health-care quality. In the United Arab Emirates, EHRs have been recently adopted to improve the quality and safety of patient care. A cross-sectional survey of 680 health-care providers (HCPs) was conducted to assess the satisfaction of HCPs in the United Arab Emirates with EHRs' impact on access/viewing, documentation and medication administration and to explore the barriers encountered in their use. Data were collected over 6 months from April to September 2014. High overall satisfaction with EHRs was reported by HCPs, suggesting their acceptance. Physicians reported the greatest overall satisfaction with EHRs, although nurses showed significantly higher satisfaction with the impact on medication administration compared with other HCPs. The most significant barriers reported by nurses were lack of belief in the value of EHRs for patients and lack of adequate computer skills. Given the large investment in technology, additional research is necessary to promote the full utilization of EHRs. Nurses need to be aware of the value of EHRs for patient care and be involved in all stages of EHR implementations to maximize its meaningful use for better clinical outcomes. PMID:27481126

  15. Breast and colorectal cancer risk communication approaches with low-income African-American and Hispanic women: implications for healthcare providers.

    PubMed Central

    Royak-Schaler, Renee; Blocker, Deborah E.; Yali, Ann Marie; Bynoe, Monica; Briant, Katherine Josa; Smith, Shannon

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information on breast and colorectal cancer risk factors is widely available to women and the physicians who provide their healthcare; however, many women are unable to identify the major risk factors, continue to misperceive their personal risk of developing these cancers, and do not engage in routine early detection. METHODS: Qualitative methods were used to investigate breast and colorectal cancer risk knowledge, perceptions, behaviors, and risk communication formats with low-income African-American and Hispanic study participants in Harlem, NY, aged 40-60 years. RESULTS: Focus group results indicated strong participant interest in strategies necessary to understand and reduce the risk of developing breast and colorectal cancers. Preferred risk communication tools presented information about family history and personal risk in graphic and quantitative formats. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare professionals who serve low-income African-American and Hispanic female populations should deliver information to them about the personal risk of developing targeted cancers and ways to reduce this risk in formats that are meaningful and effectively address the special needs of these populations. PMID:15160974

  16. Development of an Educational Video to Improve Patient Knowledge and Communication with Their Healthcare Providers about Colorectal Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Mira L.; Heaner, Sarah; Reiter, Paul; van Putten, Julie; Murray, Lee; McDougle, Leon; Cegala, Donald J.; Post, Douglas; David, Prabu; Slater, Michael; Paskett, Electra D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Low rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening persist due to individual, provider, and system level barriers. Purpose: To develop and obtain initial feedback about a CRC screening educational video from community members and medical professionals. Methods: Focus groups of patients were conducted prior to the development of the CRC…

  17. Bridging the gaps among research, policy and practice in ten low- and middle-income countries: Development and testing of a questionnaire for health-care providers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The reliability and validity of instruments used to survey health-care providers' views about and experiences with research evidence have seldom been examined. Methods Country teams from ten low- and middle-income countries (China, Ghana, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Laos, Mexico, Pakistan, Senegal and Tanzania) participated in the development, translation, pilot-testing and administration of a questionnaire designed to measure health-care providers' views and activities related to improving their clinical practice and their awareness of, access to and use of research evidence, as well as changes in their clinical practice that they attribute to particular sources of research evidence that they have used. We use internal consistency as a measure of the questionnaire's reliability and, whenever possible, we use explanatory factor analyses to assess the degree to which questions that pertain to a single domain actually address common themes. We assess the questionnaire's face validity and content validity and, to a lesser extent, we also explore its criterion validity. Results The questionnaire has high internal consistency, with Cronbach's alphas between 0.7 and 0.9 for 16 of 20 domains and sub-domains (identified by factor analyses). Cronbach's alphas are greater than 0.9 for two domains, suggesting some item redundancy. Pre- and post-field work assessments indicate the questionnaire has good face validity and content validity. Our limited assessment of criterion validity shows weak but statistically significant associations between the general influence of research evidence among providers and more specific measures of providers' change in approach to preventing or treating a clinical condition. Conclusion Our analysis points to a number of strengths of the questionnaire - high internal consistency (reliability) and good face and content validity - but also to areas where it can be shortened without losing important conceptual domains. PMID:20205838

  18. A National Initiative for Women and Healthcare Providers: CDC’s Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Sun Hee; Polonec, Lindsey; Stewart, Sherri L.; Gelb, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    The Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. It encourages women to pay attention to their bodies and know what is normal for them so they can recognize the warning signs of gynecologic cancers and seek medical care. This report provides an overview of the development of this national campaign. PMID:21933006

  19. Firm-Level Perspectives on Public Sector Engagement with Private Healthcare Providers: Survey Evidence from Ghana and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Neeraj; Burger, Nicholas; Yoong, Joanne; Kopf, Dan; Spreng, Connor

    2011-01-01

    Background Health systems in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are in urgent need of improvement. The private health sector is a major provider of care in the region and it will remain a significant actor in the future. Any efforts by SSA governments to improve health systems performance therefore has to account for the private health sector. Regional and international actors increasingly recognize importance of effectively engaging with the private health sector, and initiatives to improve engagement are underway in several countries. However, there is little systematic analysis of private health providers' view and experience with engagement. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we surveyed private health facilities in Kenya and Ghana to understand the extent to which and how governments interact and engage with these facilities. The results suggest that government engagement with private health facilities is quite limited. The primary focus of this engagement is “command-and-control” type regulations to improve the quality of care. There is little attention paid to building the capacity of health care businesses through either technical or financial assistance. The vast majority of these facilities also receive no government assistance in meeting public health and social goals. Finally, government engagement with private pharmacies is often neglected and clinics receive a disproportionate share of government assistance. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our findings suggest that there may be considerable untapped potential for greater engagement with private health facilities—particularly pharmacies. Improving engagement will likely help governments with limited resources to better take advantage of the private sector capacity to meet access and equity objectives and to accelerate the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. PMID:22132092

  20. Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal and the Ethical and Legal Obligations of Healthcare Providers.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Timothy; Duijst, Wilma; Bos, Mike; Chassis, Iris; Codreanu, Igor; Danovitch, Gabriel; Gill, John; Ivanovski, Ninoslav; Shin, Milbert

    2016-02-01

    Physicians and other health care professionals seem well placed to play a role in the monitoring and, perhaps, in the curtailment of the trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal. They serve as important sources of information for patients and may have access to information that can be used to gain a greater understanding of organ trafficking networks. However, well-established legal and ethical obligations owed to their patients can create challenging policy tensions that can make it difficult to implement policy action at the level of the physician/patient. In this article, we explore the role-and legal and ethical obligations-of physicians at 3 key stages of patient interaction: the information phase, the pretransplant phase, and the posttransplant phase. Although policy challenges remain, physicians can still play a vital role by, for example, providing patients with a frank disclosure of the relevant risks and harms associated with the illegal organ trade and an honest account of the physician's own moral objections. They can also report colleagues involved in the illegal trade to an appropriate regulatory authority. Existing legal and ethical obligations likely prohibit physicians from reporting patients who have received an illegal organ. However, given the potential benefits that may accrue from the collection of more information about the illegal transactions, this is an area where legal reform should be considered. PMID:27500253

  1. Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal and the Ethical and Legal Obligations of Healthcare Providers

    PubMed Central

    Caulfield, Timothy; Duijst, Wilma; Bos, Mike; Chassis, Iris; Codreanu, Igor; Danovitch, Gabriel; Gill, John; Ivanovski, Ninoslav; Shin, Milbert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physicians and other health care professionals seem well placed to play a role in the monitoring and, perhaps, in the curtailment of the trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal. They serve as important sources of information for patients and may have access to information that can be used to gain a greater understanding of organ trafficking networks. However, well-established legal and ethical obligations owed to their patients can create challenging policy tensions that can make it difficult to implement policy action at the level of the physician/patient. In this article, we explore the role—and legal and ethical obligations—of physicians at 3 key stages of patient interaction: the information phase, the pretransplant phase, and the posttransplant phase. Although policy challenges remain, physicians can still play a vital role by, for example, providing patients with a frank disclosure of the relevant risks and harms associated with the illegal organ trade and an honest account of the physician's own moral objections. They can also report colleagues involved in the illegal trade to an appropriate regulatory authority. Existing legal and ethical obligations likely prohibit physicians from reporting patients who have received an illegal organ. However, given the potential benefits that may accrue from the collection of more information about the illegal transactions, this is an area where legal reform should be considered. PMID:27500253

  2. Evaluation of a Statewide HIV-HCV-STD Online Clinical Education Program by Healthcare Providers - A Comparison of Nursing and Other Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongwen; Luque, Amneris E

    2016-01-01

    The New York State HIV-HCV-STD Clinical Education Initiative (CEI) has developed a large repository of online resources and disseminated them to a wide range of healthcare providers. To evaluate the CEI online education program and in particular to compare the self-reported measures by clinicians from different disciplines, we analyzed the data from 1,558 course completions in a study period of three months. The results have shown that the overall evaluations by the clinicians were very positive. Meanwhile, there were significant differences across the clinical disciplines. In particular, physicians and nurse practitioners were the most satisfied. In contrast, pharmacists and case/care managers recorded lower than average responses. Nurses and counselors had mixed results. Nurse practitioners' responses were very similar to physicians on most measures, but significantly different from nurses in many aspects. For more effective knowledge dissemination, online education programs should consider the unique needs by clinicians from specific disciplines. PMID:27332204

  3. Healthcare provider attitudes towards the problem list in an electronic health record: a mixed-methods qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The problem list is a key part of the electronic health record (EHR) that allows practitioners to see a patient’s diagnoses and health issues. Yet, as the content of the problem list largely represents the subjective decisions of those who edit it, patients’ problem lists are often unreliable when shared across practitioners. The lack of standards for how the problem list is compiled in the EHR limits its effectiveness in improving patient care, particularly as a resource for clinical decision support and population management tools. The purpose of this study is to discover practitioner opinions towards the problem list and the logic behind their decisions during clinical situations. Materials and methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at two major Boston teaching hospitals. Practitioners’ opinions about the problem list were collected through both in-person interviews and an online questionnaire. Questions were framed using vignettes of clinical scenarios asking practitioners about their preferred actions towards the problem list. Results These data confirmed prior research that practitioners differ in their opinions over managing the problem list, but in most responses to a questionnaire, there was a common approach among the relative majority of respondents. Further, basic demographic characteristics of providers (age, medical experience, etc.) did not appear to strongly affect attitudes towards the problem list. Conclusion The results supported the premise that policies and EHR tools are needed to bring about a common approach. Further, the findings helped identify what issues might benefit the most from a defined policy and the level of restriction a problem list policy should place on the addition of different types of information. PMID:23140312

  4. Healthcare provider perspectives on barriers to HIV-care access and utilisation among Latinos living with HIV in the US-Mexico border

    PubMed Central

    Servin, Argentina E.; Muñoz, Fátima A.; Zúñiga, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Latinos living with HIV residing in the US-Mexico border region frequently seek care on both sides of the border. Given this fact, a border health perspective to understanding barriers to care is imperative to improve patient health outcomes. This qualitative study describes and compares experiences and perceptions of Mexican and US HIV care providers regarding barriers to HIV care access for Latino patients living in the US-Mexico border region. In 2010, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with HIV care providers in Tijuana (n = 10) and San Diego (n = 9). We identified important similarities and differences between Mexican and US healthcare provider perspectives on HIV care access and barriers to service utilisation. Similarities included the fact that HIV-positive Latino patients struggle with access to ART medication, mental health illness, substance abuse and HIV-related stigma. Differences included Mexican provider perceptions of medication shortages and US providers feeling that insurance gaps influenced medication access. Differences and similarities have important implications for cross-border efforts to coordinate health services for patients who seek care in both countries. PMID:24592920

  5. Communicating with limited English proficiency (LEP) patients: question of health-care access.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the ability to understand English plays an essential role in how well patients and health-care providers communicate. This article highlights the concerns of providers, differential health-care outcomes, and risk management concerns of providing health care in an increasingly diverse and polyglot population. PMID:15500018

  6. Treating hepatitis C in American Indians/Alaskan Natives: A survey of Project ECHO® (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) utilization by Indian Health Service providers

    PubMed Central

    Pindyck, Talia; Kalishman, Summers; Flatow-Trujillo, Lainey; Thornton, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Background: American Indians/Alaskan Natives have a high mortality associated with hepatitis C virus, yet treatment rates are low. The ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) model™, a videoconferencing technology for primary care providers, is underutilized at Indian Health Service facilities. Purpose: To ascertain Indian Health Service providers’ benefit of and barriers to utilizing hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinics. Methods: We electronically sent an Active Participant Survey to Indian Health Service providers utilizing hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinic and a Non-Participant Survey to other Indian Health Service providers interested in this clinic. Results: In total, 100% of Active Participant Survey respondents perceive moderate to major benefit of hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinic in managing hepatitis C virus, and 67% of Non-Participant Survey respondents reported lack of administrative time as the major barrier to utilizing this resource. Conclusion: Indian Health Service providers participating in hepatitis C virus TeleECHO clinic perceive this resource as highly beneficial, but widespread utilization may be impractical without allocating time for participation. PMID:26770809

  7. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ... manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  8. Occupational Health for Healthcare Providers

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries Allergy-causing substances Violence Stress Follow good job safety and injury prevention practices. They can reduce your ... find ways to manage stress. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  9. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for Safer Conception Among Serodifferent Couples: Findings from Healthcare Providers Serving Patients with HIV in Seven US Cities.

    PubMed

    Finocchario-Kessler, Sarah; Champassak, Sofie; Hoyt, Mary Jo; Short, William; Chakraborty, Rana; Weber, Shannon; Levison, Judy; Phillips, Joanne; Storm, Deborah; Anderson, Jean

    2016-03-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce the risk of HIV transmission among serodifferent couples trying to conceive, yet provider knowledge, attitudes, and experience utilizing PrEP for this purpose are largely unexamined. Trained interviewers conducted phone interviews with healthcare providers treating patients with HIV in seven cities (Atlanta, Baltimore, Houston, Kansas City, Newark, Philadelphia, and San Francisco, N = 85 total). Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed to describe experience, concerns, and perceived barriers to prescribing PrEP for safer conception. Providers (67.1% female, 43 mean years of age, 70.4% white, 10 mean years treating HIV+ patients, 56% in academic vs. community facilities, 62.2% MD) discussed both benefits and concerns of PrEP for safer conception among serodifferent couples. Only 18.8% of providers reported experience prescribing PrEP, 74.2% were willing to prescribe it under ideal circumstances, and 7.0% were not comfortable prescribing PrEP. Benefits included added protection and a greater sense of control for the HIV-negative partner. Concerns were categorized as clinical, system-level, cost, or behavioral. Significant differences in provider characteristics existed across sites, but experience with PrEP for safer conception did not, p = 0.14. Despite limited experience, most providers were open to recommending PrEP for safer conception as long as patients understood the range of concerns and could make informed decisions. Strategies to identify and link serodifferent couples to PrEP services and clinical guidance specific to PrEP for safer conception are needed. PMID:26824425

  10. The Flynn Effect Puzzle: A 30-Year Examination from the Right Tail of the Ability Distribution Provides Some Missing Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, Jonathan; Putallaz, Martha

    2011-01-01

    The Flynn effect is the rise in IQ scores across the last eighty or more years documented in the general distribution of both industrialized and developing nations primarily on tests that require problem solving and non-verbal reasoning. However, whether the effect extends to the right tail (i.e., the top 5% of ability) remains unknown. The…