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  1. Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Hearing Loss What is Hearing Loss? Hearing loss is a common problem caused by ... sec Click to watch this video Types of Hearing Loss Hearing loss comes in many forms. It can ...

  2. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl’s gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl’s gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain’s plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  3. Alterations in gray matter volume due to unilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingchao; Xu, Pengfei; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhenmin; Zhao, Fu; Gao, Zhixian; Xu, Lei; Luo, Yue-Jia; Fan, Jin; Liu, Pinan

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive research on neural plasticity resulting from hearing deprivation has been conducted, the direct influence of compromised audition on the auditory cortex and the potential impact of long durations of incomplete sensory stimulation on the adult cortex are still not fully understood. In this study, using voxel-based morphometry, we evaluated gray matter (GM) volume changes that may be associated with reduced hearing ability and the duration of hearing impairment in 42 unilateral hearing loss (UHL) patients with acoustic neuromas compared to 24 normal controls. We found significant GM volume increases in the somatosensory and motor systems and GM volume decreases in the auditory (i.e., Heschl's gyrus) and visual systems (i.e., the calcarine cortex) in UHL patients. The GM volume decreases in the primary auditory cortex (i.e., superior temporal gyrus and Heschl's gyrus) correlated with reduced hearing ability. Meanwhile, the GM volume decreases in structures involving high-level cognitive control functions (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex) correlated positively with hearing loss duration. Our findings demonstrated that the severity and duration of UHL may contribute to the dissociated morphology of auditory and high-level neural structures, providing insight into the brain's plasticity related to chronic, persistent partial sensory loss. PMID:27174521

  4. Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Can Help? Hearing aids. Hearing aids are electronic, battery-run devices that make sounds louder. There ... to turn up the volume. Cochlear implants. These electronic devices are for people with severe hearing loss. ...

  5. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  6. Hearing loss in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckey, J. C. Jr; Musiek, F. E.; Kline-Schoder, R.; Clark, J. C.; Hart, S.; Havelka, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporary and, in some cases, permanent hearing loss has been documented after long-duration spaceflights. METHODS: We examined all existing published data on hearing loss after space missions to characterize the losses. RESULTS: Data from Russian missions suggest that the hearing loss, when it occurs, affects mainly mid to high frequencies and that using hearing protection often might prevent the loss. Several significant questions remain about hearing loss in space. While the hearing loss has been presumed to be noise-induced, no clear link has been established between noise exposure and hearing loss during spaceflight. In one documented case of temporary hearing loss from the Shuttle-Mir program, the pattern of loss was atypical for a noise-induced loss. Continuous noise levels that have been measured on the Mir and previous space stations, while above engineering standards, are not at levels usually associated with hearing loss in ground-based studies (which have usually been limited to 8-10 h exposure periods). Attempts to measure hearing in space using threshold-based audiograms have been unsuccessful in both the American and Russian programs due to noise interference with the measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The existing data highlight the need for reliable monitoring of both hearing and noise in long-duration spaceflight.

  7. Measurement of hearing loss due to perforated tympanic membrane using image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardesai, Neha; Sardesai, Ravindra; Chang, Chein-I.

    2014-05-01

    The tympanic membrane (ear drum) is a thin tissue film that is stretched between the outer and middle ear. Sound waves travel from outside the ear, and strike the tympanic membrane resulting in its vibration. These vibrations amplify the sound waves and transmit them to the ossicles (auditory bones). The magnitude of amplification is directly proportional to vibrating area of tympanic membrane. Hence a perforation in this membrane would result in hearing loss. Pure-tone audiometry is the traditional procedure used to detect the amount of hearing loss in a patient. However, it is lengthy and less efficient, as it largely depends on the response of the patient to sound intensity and frequency of pure-tones. We present a relatively more efficient approach to determine hearing loss due to perforated tympanic membrane using image processing techniques. We describe an algorithm that uses unsharp masking to sharpen images of the perforations as well as the tympanic membrane. Then, it converts the image into a binary image using thresholding. A median filter is applied to get rid of the noise component in the image. The ratio of the area of perforation and total area of tympanic membrane will define the percentage of hearing loss. Our approach will eliminate the error introduced due to patient dependency as in the traditional method.

  8. Treatment for Progressive Hearing Loss Due to Paget's Disease of Bone - A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Tanahashi, Shigeaki; Mizuta, Keisuke; Kato, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Paget's disease is a common bone remodeling disorder that typically begins with excessive bone resorption in the elderly. Bilateral progressive hearing loss is the most frequently encountered complication of Paget's disease. The types of hearing loss identified by audiometry are conductive, sensorineural, or both. However, the precise mechanism of hearing loss remains unclear, and the treatment has been controversial. We present a 73-year-old man who suffered from bilateral progressive hearing loss due to Paget's disease. Potent bisphosphonates, oral risedronate in daily adjusted dosages for 6 months, did not decrease or suppress the worsening of the hearing loss. The Nucleus CI24 Contour electrode array was successfully inserted on the left side without surgical and postoperative complications. The Japanese open set monosyllable word recognition test in a sound field at 65 dB had a result of 74%. This cochlear implantation can be an indication for cases of profound hearing loss due to Paget's disease. PMID:26915163

  9. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  10. Living with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Living with Hearing Loss Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Fast Facts There are two main types of hearing loss. Permanent hearing loss (called sensorineural) usually involves damage ...

  11. [Presbycusis - Age Related Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Fischer, N; Weber, B; Riechelmann, H

    2016-07-01

    Presbycusis or age related hearing loss can be defined as a progressive, bilateral and symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss due to age related degeneration of inner ear structures. It can be considered a multifactorial complex disorder with environmental and genetic factors. The molecular, electrophysiological and histological damage at different levels of the inner ear cause a progressive hearing loss, which usually affects the high frequencies of hearing. The resulting poor speech recognition has a negative impact on cognitive, emotional and social function in older adults. Recent investigations revealed an association between hearing impairment and social isolation, anxiety, depression and cognitive decline in elderly. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosis and treating hearing loss in the elderly population. Hearing aids are the most commonly used devices for treating presbycusis. The technical progress of implantable hearing devices allows an effective hearing rehabilitation even in elderly with severe hearing loss. However, most people with hearing impairments are not treated adequately. PMID:27392191

  12. Sudden hearing loss due to oxaliplatin use in a patient with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Güvenç, M Güven; Dizdar, Denizhan; Dizdar, Senem Kurt; Okutur, Sadi Kerem; Demir, Gökhan

    2016-08-01

    Oxaliplatin is used to treat advanced colorectal cancer. Platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents are known to be ototoxic. However, ototoxicity is rare with newer generation platinum-derived agents, such as oxaliplatin. This case report presents a rare case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss following intravenous (IV) infusion of oxaliplatin in a 64-year-old woman with advanced colon cancer. The hearing loss was severe and did not respond to treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fifth reported case of oxaliplatin ototoxicity. Although oxaliplatin ototoxicity is rare, physicians must be aware of this important adverse effect, and an audiometric evaluation must be performed when necessary. Patients treated with oxaliplatin should be followed closely for early signs and symptoms of hearing loss, and if hearing loss is detected, treatment should be stopped immediately. PMID:25872564

  13. Low Level Laser Effect in Treatment of Patients with Intractable Tinnitus Due To Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mirvakili, Abbas; Mehrparvar, Amirhoushang; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mirvakili, Masud; Baradaranfar, Mohammadhosein; Davari, Mohammadhosein

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tinnitus is defined as a perception of sound without an external acoustic stimulus. Due to large number of causes and limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, tinnitus still remains an obscure symptom. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study on 120 patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss who were randomly divided into two groups; one group received low-level laser and the second group used the same instrument but off, for 20 sessions of 20 minutes. A tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the severity of patients’ symptoms. Severity and frequency of tinnitus were also determined using Audiometric tests. Results: The average age of the 120 patients in the two groups of study were not statistically significantly different. The mean difference of severity of tinnitus between the two groups was statistically significant at the end of the study and 3 month after completion of treatment. The VAS and THI mean differences after the treatment were statistically significant between the two groups but not statistically significant after 3 months of completion the study. Conclusion: Low level laser radiation is effective for short-term treatment of Tinnitus caused by sensorineural hearing loss and its impact may be reduced over the time. PMID:25653802

  14. Hearing Loss and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Hearing Loss and Older Adults On this page: What is ... about hearing loss and older adults? What is hearing loss? Hearing loss is a sudden or gradual decrease ...

  15. Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss The importance of hearing Hearing allows you to ... surround the soft tissue of the inner ear. Hearing loss occurs when the inner ear is damaged. What ...

  16. Prevention of Adolescents' Music-Induced Hearing Loss due to Discotheque Attendance: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, I.; Brug, J.; Van der Ploeg, C. P. B.; Raat, H.

    2009-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a significant social and public health problem, which is found in increasing numbers of adolescents. Young people are particularly likely to expose themselves to potentially damaging loud sounds during leisure activities. Visiting discotheques is one of the most popular leisure activities of young people. Only a few…

  17. Genes and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  18. Living with hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000360.htm Living with hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. If you are living with hearing loss, you know that it takes extra effort to ...

  19. Hearing Loss: Screening Newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss Screening Newborns Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... of newborns in the U.S. are screened for hearing loss before they leave the hospital. Research improves the ...

  20. [Progressive hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Reiss, M; Reiss, G

    2000-01-01

    Progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is defined as hearing loss of unknown etiology with fairly high-speed progression. Its diagnostic criteria consist of the following: that it is 1) progressive, 2) with bilateral involvement, and 3) of unknown etiology. Due to recent advances in diagnostics, imaging and management, SNHL has gained much interest from otologists in the last few years. They provide new insight into the physiology and pathophysiology of hearing. SNHL which is sudden in onset, fluctuating, and/or progressive complicates medical management, hearing aid selection, and individualized educational planning for a hearing-impaired patient. Existing hypotheses on the etiology of SNHL are judged on experimental, clinical, laboratory and radiological evidence. Cardiovascular and rheologic diseases, hereditary disorders, immunological phenomena, infections, environmental causes like noise, ototoxic drugs and industrial substances and systemic maladies must be included in the diagnostic reflections. Potential concepts of treatment include rheologic medications and corticosteroids. Hearing aids and timely cochlear implant operation are further possible forms of treatment. PMID:10893764

  1. Hearing Loss due to Infiltration of the Tympanic Membrane by Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jonathon B.; Cavaliere, Robert; Byrd, John C.; Andritsos, Leslie A.

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can present with dramatic neurologic findings or can be quite subtle, discovered only at the time of autopsy. We describe a case of CLL in a patient who presented initially with hearing loss and was ultimately found to have involvement of the tympanic membrane. She noted improvement of her hearing after induction therapy but was not aware at the time of the involvement of her CNS with CLL. Upon worsening of hearing at the time of relapse, she was evaluated by imaging and CSF analysis as well as biopsy of the tympanic membrane, and involvement of the CNS was confirmed. She has received CNS-directed therapy with intrathecal liposomal cytarabine and intravenous CNS-directed therapy and has noted improved hearing and resolution of her imaging and CSF findings. This is the first reported case of tympanic membrane involvement with CLL and describes potentially effective methods for managing this challenging complication. PMID:23198191

  2. Deafness and Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This brief overview provides information on the definition, incidence, and characteristics of children with hearing impairments and deafness. The federal definitions of hearing impairment and deafness are provided. The different types of hearing loss are noted, including: (1) conductive (caused by diseases or obstructions in the outer or middle…

  3. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies. PMID:27259171

  4. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  5. Hearing Loss and Cytomegalovirus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Melvin

    1997-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of congenital virally induced hearing loss. Maternal infection is most often asymptomatic as is the infection in the newborn. Hearing loss occurs in both clinically apparent infection and in the asymptomatic infection. Current methods of detection, treatment, and prevention and research efforts are…

  6. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  7. Hearing Loss in Children: Types of Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... the ear to the brain so that our brain pathways are part of our hearing. There are four types of hearing loss: Conductive Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by something that stops sounds from getting through the outer or middle ear. This type of hearing loss can often ...

  8. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Maggie; Heman-Ackah, Selena E.; Shaikh, Jamil A.

    2011-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is commonly encountered in audiologic and otolaryngologic practice. SSNHL is most commonly defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies occurring within a 72-hr period. Although the differential for SSNHL is vast, for the majority of patients an etiologic factor is not identified. Treatment for SSNHL of known etiology is directed toward that agent, with poor hearing outcomes characteristic for discoverable etiologies that cause inner ear hair cell loss. Steroid therapy is the current mainstay of treatment of idiopathic SSNHL in the United States. The prognosis for hearing recovery for idiopathic SSNHL is dependent on a number of factors including the severity of hearing loss, age, presence of vertigo, and shape of the audiogram. PMID:21606048

  9. [A case of ipsilateral ageusia, sensorineural hearing loss and facial sensorimotor disturbance due to pontine lesion].

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nitta, E

    2000-05-01

    We report a 58-year-old woman with pontine lesion presented with subacute onset of unilateral gustatory disturbance accompanied by facial numbness, and hearing loss. Neurologic examination revealed superficial hypesthesia and paresthesia on the right side of the face, right peripheral type facial paresis, ageusia on the right half of the tongue and right sensorineural deafness. No other neurologic signs were observed, and laboratory data were all normal. Brain MRI revealed a small lesion in the right dorsolateral tegmentum of the middle pons. Electrogustometry showed marked reduction in the sense of taste on the right half of the tongue. ABR showed diminished amplitude in the IV-V wave of the right side, while SEP and VEP were normal. The clinical diagnosis was demyelinating lesion and intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g/day) was administered for 3 consecutive days, resulting in prompt improvement in the symptoms. The lesion was suspected of affecting ipsilateral side of the spinal trigeminal nerve tract and the nucleus, the intraaxial infranuclear facial nerve fiber, the lateral lemniscus adjacent to the superior olivary nucleus and the central gustatory tract. Our case suggests that the central gustatory pathway projecting from the nucleus of the solitary tract to the parabrachial nucleus, presumed to be pontine taste area, ascends ipsilaterally and is located laterally from the medial lemniscus. PMID:11002734

  10. Occupational hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    Over time, repeated exposure to loud noise and music can cause hearing loss. Sounds above 80 decibels ( ... Airline ground maintenance Construction Farming Jobs involving loud music or machinery In the U.S., laws regulate the ...

  11. Living with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Living with Hearing Loss Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... the United States suffer some form of disordered communication. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication ...

  12. Hearing loss and music

    MedlinePlus

    ... iPod or MP3 Player The small ear bud style headphones (inserted into the ears) do not block ... Hearing Loss. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. NIH Pub. No. 14-4233. Updated: March ...

  13. Hearing loss - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... to sounds through play. These tests, known as visual response audiometry and play audiometry, can better determine ... the cause of hearing loss. Treatment may include: Speech therapy Learning sign language Cochlear implant (for those ...

  14. Individual Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Andersen, Ture; Poulsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR), held in Nyborg, Denmark, in August 2015. The following collection of papers results from some of the work that was presented and discussed at the symposium. PMID:27566802

  15. Occupational Hearing Loss in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this article, current status of noise exposure in workplaces, trend of workers with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), and prevalence of NIHL in workers by industry and job category in Korea were reviewed. In addition, trends of research on the audiological effects such as hearing loss from noise and occupational hearing loss from non-noise in Korea were addressed through reports in industrial audiology. Though noise exposure level has improved, noise still shows the highest rate of cases exceeding exposure limit among workplace hazards. NIHL is the most common occupational disease except work-related disease such as musculoskeletal disorders and cerebrovascular diseases, and NIHL prevalence is thought to be much higher than reported in official publications. Noise affecting hearing comes from various sources such as workplaces, military settings, areas with exposure to high noise, and specific noise sources. There is also occupational hearing loss by non-noise including chemicals such as organic solvents and heavy metals, barotrauma, and trauma due to welding spark. Noise affects daily life through audiological effects such as hearing loss and tinnitus, non-audiological physical effects (e.g., cardiovascular), and psychosocial and behavioral effects. Development of systematic and comprehensive hearing conservation programs for lowering the noise level in workplaces and preventing the NIHL, and preparation of technological, administrative system for its settlement at workplace are urgently needed. PMID:21258593

  16. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... SafeInSound Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Smartphone Sound Apps Music-induced Hearing Loss ... SafeInSound Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Smartphone Sound Apps Music-induced Hearing Loss ...

  17. Diagnosis of Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Seven conference papers from the U.S.S.R., India, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia consider the diagnosis of hearing loss. They are "Examination of Hearing of Children, Aged from 2 to 5, by Means of Playing Audiometry" by A. P. Kossacheva, "A Study of the Etiology and Pattern of Deafness in a School for the Deaf in Madras, South India" by Y.…

  18. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  19. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing loss. Here are the most common ones: Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Hearing aids ... list of organizations, contact: NIDCD Information Clearinghouse 1 Communication Avenue Bethesda, MD 20892-3456 Toll-free Voice: ( ...

  20. Autism and Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenhall, Ulf; Nordin, Viviann; Sandstrom, Mikael; Ahlsen, Gunilla; Gillberg, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Children and adolescents (N=199) with autistic disorder were audiologically evaluated. Mild to moderate hearing loss was diagnosed in 7.9 percent, with deafness diagnosed in 3.5 percent of all cases, which represented a prevalence considerably above that in the general population and comparable to the prevalence found in populations with mental…

  1. 76 FR 62093 - Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Preventing Occupational Hearing Loss: Stakeholder Meeting AGENCY... hearing loss. Every year, between 20,000 and 25,000 workers suffer from preventable hearing loss due to... occupational hearing loss. DATES: The date for the stakeholder meeting is November 03, 2011, from 9 a.m. to 1...

  2. Hearing Loss: Diagnosis and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zazove, Philip; Atcherson, Samuel R; Moreland, Christopher; McKee, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is a common disability in the United States, most frequent among men, elderly individuals, and veterans but is increasingly affecting other younger adults. Types of hearing loss include sensorineural, conductive, and mixed. Hearing loss in children often is related to infections, time spent in a neonatal intensive care unit, and genetic etiologies. Presbycusis (ie, age-related hearing loss) is the most common etiology in adults. Adverse effects of untreated hearing loss include isolation, depression, lower income, and higher unemployment. Hearing aid use reduces levels of disability, cognitive impairment, and psychosocial distress while improving quality of life. At least 75% of individuals with hearing loss are not receiving treatment for it. All infants should be screened for hearing loss, as should children and adults with risk factors. The Joint Commission on Infant Hearing Screening has a 1-3-6 goal for screening: identification by age 1 month, confirmation by age 3 months, and intervention by age 6 months. The presence of an ongoing physician-patient relationship increases the likelihood that a patient will admit to having a hearing loss. Adults can be screened using single-question or standardized instrument screens. All patients with suspected hearing loss should undergo audiometry by an audiology subspecialist. PMID:26161523

  3. Pediatric Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Ahmet; Koca, Çiğdem Firat

    2016-06-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is defined as sudden unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with at least 30 dB decrease in threshold in 3 contiguous test frequencies occurring over 72 hours or less. It is rare among children. The mechanism of the process and prognosis of the disorder remains unclear. The current incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss among pediatric population is unknown. The authors carried out a retrospective chart analysis of patients under 15 years of age from 2004 to 2015, who consulted to the Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department of Inonu University Medical Faculty. Age, sex, number of affected ear and side, audiometric evaluations, medical follow-up, treatment method, duration of treatment recovery, associated complaints; tinnitus and/or vertigo, presence of mumps disease were recorded for each patient. A 4-frequency pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) was calculated for each ear. Complete recovery, defined as some hearing level compared with the nonaffected ear, was observed in 3 patients (21.4 %) and there was no partial hearing recovery. The hearing loss of 11 patient remained unchanged after prednisolone treatment. Two of the 11 patients had bilaterally total sensorineural hearing loss and evaluated as appropriate for cochlear implantation. Sex of patient and laterality of hearing loss were not correlated with hearing recovery. Sensorineural hearing loss among pediatrics has been the issue of otolaryngologists. The incidence, etiology, and treatment methods should be more studied. PMID:27171971

  4. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    PubMed

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss. PMID:27392187

  5. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  6. The Stigma of Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallhagen, Margaret I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore dimensions of stigma experienced by older adults with hearing loss and those with whom they frequently communicate to target interventions promoting engagement and positive aging. Design and Methods: This longitudinal qualitative study conducted interviews over 1 year with dyads where one partner had hearing loss. Participants…

  7. Hearing Loss in Children: Screening and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Hearing Loss in Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hearing Loss Homepage Facts Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Genetics of ...

  8. Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epidemiology Use of Hearing Aids by Adults with Hearing Loss [text version] Note: Higher numbers are better. *This ... 2010 and 2020. The number of persons with hearing loss is calculated based on National Health and Nutrition ...

  9. Vertigo and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Newman-Toker, David E; Della Santina, Charles C; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms referable to disorders affecting the inner ear and vestibulocochlear nerve (eighth cranial nerve) include dizziness, vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss, in various combinations. Similar symptoms may occur with involvement of the central nervous system, principally the brainstem and cerebellum, to which the vestibular and auditory systems are connected. Imaging choices should be tailored to patient symptoms and the clinical context. Computed tomography (CT) should be used primarily to assess bony structures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be used primarily to assess soft-tissue structures. Vascular imaging by angiography or venography should be obtained when vascular lesions are suspected. No imaging should be obtained in patients with typical presentations of common peripheral vestibular or auditory disorders. In current clinical practice, neuroimaging is often overused, especially CT in the assessment of acute dizziness and vertigo in the emergency department. Despite low sensitivity for ischemic strokes, CT is often used to rule out neurologic causes. When ischemic stroke is the principal concern in acute vestibular presentations, imaging should almost always be by MRI with diffusion-weighted images, rather than CT. In this chapter, we describe recommended strategies for audiovestibular imaging based on patient symptoms and signs. PMID:27430449

  10. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Catlin, F I

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. PMID:2938482

  11. Intellectual Disabilities and Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herer, Gilbert R.

    2012-01-01

    Undetected/untreated hearing loss imposes significant limitations upon individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). It can interfere with cognitive development, impede communicative and social interactions, and limit vocational aspirations. Over the past decade, the hearing of 9961 people with ID was evaluated at Special Olympics sports…

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  13. Hearing Loss in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nelia; Wallhagen, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Age-related hearing loss is remarkably common, affecting more than 60% of adults over the age of 75. Moreover, hearing loss has detrimental effects on quality of life and communication, outcomes that are central to palliative care. Despite its high prevalence, there is remarkably little written on the impact of hearing loss in the palliative care literature. Objective: The objective was to emphasize its importance and the need for further study. We use a case as a springboard for discussing what is known and unknown about the epidemiology, presentation, screening methodologies, and treatment strategies for age-related hearing loss in palliative care. Discussion: The case describes a 65-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) that has progressed despite treatment. No concerns are raised about communication challenges during conversations between the palliative care team and the patient in his quiet room. However, in the midst of a family meeting, shortly after discussing prognosis, the patient reports that he cannot hear what anyone is saying. Conclusion: We describe simple methods of screening patients for hearing loss, and suggest that practical approaches should be used universally in patient encounters. These include facing the patient, pitching one's voice low, using a pocket talker, and creating a hearing-friendly environment when planning a family or group meeting. PMID:25867966

  14. Resounding Facts on Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfel, Robert E.

    1977-01-01

    Provides a brief description of the physiology of the human ear. The effect of sustained noise levels on hearing loss is discussed, as well as the establishment of maximum noise levels for American industries. (CP)

  15. Occupational hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... risks connected with recreation such as shooting a gun, driving snowmobiles, or other, similar activities. Learn how ... hearing from recreational activities such as shooting a gun or driving snowmobiles. Do not listen to loud ...

  16. Devices for hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... bring the sound from your TV, radio, or music player directly to your inner ear. Many listening devices now work through a wireless link and can connect directly to your hearing aid. There is also television closed-captioning, which ...

  17. Pigmentary anomalies and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Toriello, Helga V

    2011-01-01

    A number of syndromes that include hearing loss in the phenotype also have pigmentary anomalies as a component manifestation. One of the most common of these is Waardenburg syndrome, which includes hypopigmentation and sensorineural hearing loss in the phenotype. There are four types of Waardenburg syndrome, distinguishable from each other by clinical findings. However, there are several other syndromes which include not only hypopigmentation, but also hyperpigmentation in the phenotype. This paper serves as a review of many of these syndromes. PMID:21358185

  18. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Michael C

    2005-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a major hazard in many workplaces and in society. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health estimates that more than 30 million workers (almost 1 in 10) are exposed to unsafe noise levels on the job. Helicopter emergency medical services crews work in an environment in which exposure to aviation noise makes the issue of hearing loss and prevention strategies salient. Applying the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard for a regulated hearing conservation program through controlling noise exposure will benefit helicopter emergency medical services professionals. PMID:15741953

  19. Non-organic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sarah C

    2012-12-01

    Annual hearing tests are compulsory in the British Armed Forces. This case report presents a 24-year old soldier who was found to have severe deterioration on her annual audiogram without any significant noise exposure. After two years of specialist audiological investigations she was diagnosed with non-organic hearing loss; further interrogation of her social circumstances suggested potential psychosocial triggers. This diagnosis should be considered early in military primary care in those with objective hearing loss on audiogram where there has been no exposure to significant noise. PMID:23402072

  20. Occupational hearing loss in farmers.

    PubMed Central

    Plakke, B L; Dare, E

    1992-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a great deal of high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss among farmers. The studies have failed, however, to differentiate farmers who have occupational noise exposure only from other potential hearing loss etiologies. This study, through extensive case history information, has isolated a farm noise-exposure group and matched its members by age with persons with no significant noise exposure. Results indicate that farmers exposed only to noise from farming have significantly poorer hearing sensitivity than persons not exposed to noise. PMID:1561302

  1. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents If ... gov Internet: www.nidcd.nih.gov Read More "Hearing Loss" Articles Managing Hearing Loss / Symptoms, Devices, Prevention & Research / ...

  2. Hearing loss in shipyard employees

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Tsouvaltzidou, Thomaella

    2015-01-01

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most prevalent occupational illnesses, with a higher incidence in the heavy industry. Objectives of the Study: The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of NIHL in Greece and explore its correlations with other job and individual-related factors. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were administered, and audiograms were conducted to 757 employees of a shipyard company in Greece, both white- and blue-collar, during the period 2006–2009. A modification of the 1979' equation of the American Academy of Otolaryngology was used to calculate hearing loss. Statistical analysis was conducted by means of the SPSS v. 17. Results: A 27.1% of the employees were hearing handicap. Hearing loss was correlated with age, past medical history of ear disease (Meniere's disease, acoustic neuroma, otosclerosis) or injury, hyperlipidemia, job title and level of education. A few questions on subjective hearing ability and symptoms showed strong discriminatory power of hearing pathology. Conclusions: The results of this study emphasize the burden of disease in the shipyard industry, and the need for continuous monitoring, implementation of preventive measures and hearing conservation programs. PMID:26023266

  3. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.

    2008-01-01

    Ben is a 16-year-old student who resides with his family in an unnamed School District. He is eligible for special education by reason of specific learning disability and ADHD. His parents requested a due process hearing, alleging that the District failed to provide him with a free appropriate public education (FAPE) and requesting reimbursement…

  4. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.; Jones, Marni Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a due process hearing case study of a mother who contended that his son, D.J., has been denied of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) of his School District after being suspended from school. D.J., an elementary student, had been described as hyperactive, inattentive, defiant, and often volatile. He was identified…

  5. Genetics of Hearing Loss: Syndromic.

    PubMed

    Koffler, Tal; Ushakov, Kathy; Avraham, Karen B

    2015-12-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is one of the most common birth defects in developed countries and is a diverse pathologic condition with different classifications. One of these is based on the association with other clinical features, defined as syndromic hearing loss (SHL). Determining the cause of the HL in these patients is extremely beneficial as it enables a personalized approach to caring for the individual. Early screening can further aid in optimal rehabilitation for a child's development and growth. The advancement of high-throughput sequencing technology is facilitating rapid and low-cost diagnostics for patients with SHL. PMID:26443487

  6. Age-related hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... is no known single cause of age-related hearing loss. Most commonly, it is caused by changes in the inner ear that occur as you grow older. Your genes and loud noise (from rock concerts or music headphones) may play a large role. The following ...

  7. Hearing Loss in HIV-Infected Children in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Hrapcak, Susan; Kuper, Hannah; Bartlett, Peter; Devendra, Akash; Makawa, Atupele; Kim, Maria; Kazembe, Peter; Ahmed, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    hearing loss was conductive in nature, likely due to frequent ear infections, and many children with hearing loss qualified for hearing aids. Screening strategies need to be developed and tested since caregivers were not reliable at identifying hearing loss, and often mis-identified children with normal hearing as having hearing loss. Children with frequent ear infections, ear drainage, TB, severe HIV disease, or low BMI should receive more frequent ear assessments and hearing evaluations. PMID:27551970

  8. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Davis, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment. PMID:23257577

  9. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing ... learning important speech and language skills. Types of hearing loss Conductive hearing loss is a form of hearing ...

  10. Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Hearing Loss Signals Need for Diagnosis Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... or serious ear condition and lead to further hearing loss or other complications. “The problem might be as ...

  11. Talking to someone with hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000361.htm Talking to someone with hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, ... It may be hard for a person with hearing loss to understand a conversation with another person. Being ...

  12. Drug Induced Hearing Loss: What Is Ototoxicity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Drug-Induced Hearing Loss What Is Ototoxicity? Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table ... of patients taking these drugs." "Antibiotics Caused My Hearing Loss..." Gulab Lalwani Photo Courtesy of: Gulab Lalwani When ...

  13. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... exposure and other causes. 10 Ways to Identify Hearing Loss Take the following quiz to help determine if ...

  14. Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers Page Content Article ... temporary or permanent hearing loss. This is called acoustic trauma. How loud is 85 decibels? Surprisingly, not ...

  15. SOX10 mutations mimic isolated hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pingault, V; Faubert, E; Baral, V; Gherbi, S; Loundon, N; Couloigner, V; Denoyelle, F; Noël-Pétroff, N; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Bondurand, N; Marlin, S

    2015-10-01

    Ninety genes have been identified to date that are involved in non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 300 different forms of syndromic hearing impairment have been described. Mutations in SOX10, one of the genes contributing to syndromic hearing loss, induce a large range of phenotypes, including several subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome and Kallmann syndrome with deafness. In addition, rare mutations have been identified in patients with isolated signs of these diseases. We used the recent characterization of temporal bone imaging aspects in patients with SOX10 mutations to identify possible patients with isolated hearing loss due to SOX10 mutation. We selected 21 patients with isolated deafness and temporal bone morphological defects for mutational screening. We identified two SOX10 mutations and found that both resulted in a non-functional protein in vitro. Re-evaluation of the two affected patients showed that both had previously undiagnosed olfactory defects. Diagnosis of anosmia or hyposmia in young children is challenging, and particularly in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SOX10 mutations can mimic non-syndromic hearing impairment. MRI should complete temporal bones computed tomographic scan in the management of congenital deafness as it can detect brain anomalies, cochlear nerve defects, and olfactory bulb malformation in addition to inner ear malformations. PMID:25256313

  16. Radiation Therapy and Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Jackson, Andrew; Eisbruch, Avraham; Pan, Charlie C.; Flickinger, John C.; Antonelli, Patrick; Mendenhall, William M.

    2010-03-01

    A review of literature on the development of sensorineural hearing loss after high-dose radiation therapy for head-and-neck tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma is presented. Because of the small volume of the cochlea a dose-volume analysis is not feasible. Instead, the current literature on the effect of the mean dose received by the cochlea and other treatment- and patient-related factors on outcome are evaluated. Based on the data, a specific threshold dose to cochlea for sensorineural hearing loss cannot be determined; therefore, dose-prescription limits are suggested. A standard for evaluating radiation therapy-associated ototoxicity as well as a detailed approach for scoring toxicity is presented.

  17. Unilateral sudden hearing loss: a rare symptom of Moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Gül, Fatih; Berçin, Sami; Müderris, Togay; Yalçıner, Gökhan; Ünal, Özkan; Kırış, Muzaffer

    2016-01-01

    A 38-year-old female patient experienced a sudden onset of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss due to Moyamoya disease. A detailed summary of audiological and neurological findings indicated that the sudden hearing loss might be due to Moyamoya disease resulting in occlusion of posterior and middle cerebral arteries. Intravenous prednisolone and trimetazidine dihydrochloride may improve hearing thresholds and speech understanding. To our knowledge, this is the first article in the literature reporting a case of sudden hearing loss as the first manifestation of Moyamoya disease in a young adult. PMID:26890714

  18. Self-Esteem in Children and Adolescents With Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Betty A.; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = − .60, p < .0001). No significant correlations emerged between self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  19. Self-esteem in children and adolescents with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D; Loy, Betty A; Evans, Christine; Wetsel, Ashton; Tobey, Emily A

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines the influence of generic factors unrelated to hearing loss (e.g., age, gender, temperament) and specific factors associated with hearing loss (e.g., age at identification, communication skills) on how children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids appraise self-esteem. Fifty children with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = - .60, p < .0001). No significant correlations emerged between self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population. PMID:25755025

  20. Psychosocial Aspects of Hearing Loss in Children.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Donna L; Gates-Ulanet, Patricia; Mellon, Nancy K

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric hearing loss changed more in the past two decades than it had in the prior 100 years with children now identified in the first weeks of life and fit early with amplification. Dramatic improvements in hearing technology allow children the opportunity to listen, speak and read on par with typically hearing peers. National laws mandate that public and private schools, workplaces, and anywhere people go must be accessible to individuals with disabilities. In 2015, most children with hearing loss attended mainstream schools with typically hearing peers. Psychosocial skills still present challenges for some children with hearing loss. PMID:26429333

  1. Navigating Your Child's Hearing Loss Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trapp Petty, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    For hearing parents, receiving a hearing loss diagnosis for their child can be a shocking event. For some parents, the diagnosis is the fulfillment of a hunch; confirmation of the suspected, but still scary verdict. Recent research finds that the period directly after hearing loss diagnosis is the most stressful and burdensome for parents,…

  2. Hearing loss among high school farm students.

    PubMed Central

    Broste, S K; Hansen, D A; Strand, R L; Stueland, D T

    1989-01-01

    To study the prevalence of hearing loss among teen-aged farm children in central Wisconsin, audiometric threshold testing of 872 vocational agriculture students was carried out over a three-year period. The results indicate an increased prevalence of hearing loss among students actively involved in farm work, as compared to their peers not involved in farm work. Findings also suggest that use of hearing protection may reduce the risk of hearing loss among students who work on the farm, although few students report the use of such devices. These data also suggest that the hearing loss often observed in adult farmers may begin in childhood. PMID:2784948

  3. Call centers and noise-induced hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Beyan, Ayse Coskun; Demiral, Yucel; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Ergor, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Noise is defined as unwelcome sound. It has been estimated that 16% of adult hearing loss in the world is due to noise exposure at the workplace. This report offers a case that diagnosed with hearing loss of whom working as a call center operator at home. Home agent operators should be explored. PMID:26960789

  4. Call centers and noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Beyan, Ayse Coskun; Demiral, Yucel; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Ergor, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Noise is defined as unwelcome sound. It has been estimated that 16% of adult hearing loss in the world is due to noise exposure at the workplace. This report offers a case that diagnosed with hearing loss of whom working as a call center operator at home. Home agent operators should be explored. PMID:26960789

  5. Progressive hearing loss associated with a unique cervical node due to a homozygous SLC29A3 mutation: a very mild phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jonard, Laurence; Couloigner, Vincent; Pierrot, Sébastien; Louha, Malek; Gherbi, Souad; Denoyelle, Françoise; Marlin, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, SLC29A3 has been implicated in a syndromic form of genodermatosis: H syndrome. The major features encountered in H syndrome are Hearing loss, Hyperglycaemia, Heart anomalies, Hypertrichosis, Hyperpigmentation, Hepatomegaly and Hypogonadism. More recently, SLC29A3 mutations have been described in families presenting syndromes associating generalized histiocytosis to systemic progressive features: severe camptodactyly, hearing loss, hypogonadism, hepatomegaly, heart defects and skin hyperpigmentation. We have identified a homozygous missense SLC29A3 mutation in a patient presenting with only a progressive sensorineural hearing impairment and a single cervical node (Rosai Dorfman). SLC29A3 mutations appear to be involved in a large phenotypic continuum which should prompt physicians to study this gene even in mild clinical presentations. PMID:21888995

  6. Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts and Childhood Hearing Loss On this page: ... more information about enlarged vestibular aqueducts? What are vestibular aqueducts? The inner ear Credit: NIH Medical Arts ...

  7. Hearing Loss in the Elderly: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Blakley, Brian W.

    1989-01-01

    Loss of hearing is tragic, yet most of those afflicted can be helped. Surgery is sometimes appropriate, but for the majority a hearing aid is the best answer. This article reviews what happens in different hearing losses, and gives an overview of hearing aids for the physician who lacks an extensive technical background but wishes to understand these devices a little better. Simple tips for investigation of hearing-aid complaints are included, as well as some tips for communication with hard-of-hearing persons. PMID:21249000

  8. Familial hearing loss and cisplatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B J; Torkelson, J L

    1998-01-01

    Familial high-tone hearing loss in males is a recessive trait often unrecognized. Cisplatin chemotherapy may be associated with hearing loss. A review was made of audiograms in 85 patients with testicular carcinoma prior to cisplatin chemotherapy to determine the extent of preexisting familial hearing loss. Clinical histories defined patients exposed to high noise levels and other common causes of hearing loss. Audiometric findings were classified according to normal hearing or mild, moderate, and severe hearing impairment. Pretreatment audiograms were normal in 51 patients and abnormal in 19 patients with histories of high-level noise exposure, and in 15 patients with high-frequency hearing loss there was no history of noise exposure, ear infection, or other potential causes of hearing loss. These last 15 patients were judged to have recessive familial hearing loss. Awareness of familial hearing loss is important in male patients in whom cisplatin chemotherapy is planned. Pretreatment hearing assessment, including audiograms, is recommended for such male patients. PMID:9589029

  9. [Steroid-responsive sensorineural hearing loss with low tone loss].

    PubMed

    Toriya, R; Yamashita, H; Hisashi, K; Komune, S; Komiyama, S

    1995-11-01

    Five cases of sensorineural hearing loss of sudden onset were reviewed. They were not responsive to administration of ATP and Vit. B12, but very responsive to steroid administration. All the patients were male and showed hearing loss in low frequencies in pure tone audiogram. Administration of steroid recovered hearing impairment immediately. However, cessation of steroid aggravated the recovered hearing. Serological and immunological examinations did not show any abnormal findings on all the patients. It was considered that these five patients had characteristics of both steroid-sensitive and low tone-loss type sensorineural hearing losses. PMID:8566929

  10. Mechanisms and Treatment of Blast Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to provide an overview of the basic mechanisms of blast induced hearing loss and review pharmacological treatments or interventions that can reduce or inhibit blast induced hearing loss. The mechanisms of blast induced hearing loss have been studied in experimental animal models mimicking features of damage or injury seen in human. Blast induced hearing loss is characterized by perforation and rupture of the tympanic membrane, ossicular damage, basilar membrane damage, inner and outer hair cell loss, rupture of round window, changes in chemical components of cochlear fluid, vasospasm, ischemia, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, hematoma, and hemorrhage in both animals and humans. These histopathological consequences of blast exposure can induce hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and headache. The pharmacological approaches to block or inhibit some of the auditory pathological consequences caused by blast exposure have been developed with antioxidant drugs such as 2,4-disulfonyl α-phenyl tertiary butyl nitrone (HXY-059, now called HPN-07) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). A combination of antioxidant drugs (HPN-07 and NAC) was administered to reduce blast induced cochlear damage and hearing loss. The combination of the antioxidant drugs can prevent or treat blast induced hearing loss by reducing damage to the mechanical and neural component of the auditory system. Although information of the underlying mechanisms and treatment of blast induced hearing loss are provided, further and deep research should be achieved due to the limited and controversial knowledge. PMID:24653882

  11. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Minimal Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chin Saeng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of patients who did not match the audiometric criteria of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) but complained of acute hearing loss. Methods By thorough medical chart reviews, historical cohort study was performed with consecutive data of 589 patients complaining of acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss without identifiable causes between 2005 and 2013. Those patients demonstrating a hearing loss of at least 30 dB at three consecutive frequencies based on pure tone audiometry were classified as group I; the others were classified as group II. Patients' characteristics, final hearing, and hearing improvement rate (HIR) between the two groups were compared. Results Group II exhibited distinctive characteristics, including an early age of onset of the hearing loss (P<0.01), an absence of accompanying diabetes (P<0.01) and hypertension (P<0.01), and better unaffected hearing and final hearing compared with group I (P<0.001). However, the HIR of the patients in the two groups was not significantly different (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients who did not meet the audiological criteria of SSNHL exhibited distinctive characteristics compared to SSNHL patients. PMID:26622953

  12. Noise and Hearing Loss: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Background: Noise-induced hearing loss is a major cause of deafness and hearing impairment in the United States. Though genetics and advanced age are major risk factors, temporary and permanent hearing impairments are becoming more common among young adults and children especially with the increased exposure to portable music players. Though…

  13. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in the management of tinnitus due to noise-induced hearing loss: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Shokouh, Pedram; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Bahaloo, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background. Several remedial modalities for the treatment of tinnitus have been proposed, but an effective standard treatment is still to be confirmed. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy on tinnitus accompanied by noise-induced hearing loss. Methods. This was a double-blind randomized clinical trial on subjects suffering from tinnitus accompanied by noise-induced hearing loss. The study intervention was 20 sessions of low-level laser therapy every other day, 20 minutes each session. Tinnitus was assessed by three methods (visual analog scale, tinnitus handicap inventory, and tinnitus loudness) at baseline, immediately and 3 months after the intervention. Results. All subjects were male workers with age range of 30-51 years. The mean tinnitus duration was 1.85 ± 0.78 years. All three measurement methods have shown improved values after laser therapy compared with the placebo both immediately and 3 months after treatment. Laser therapy revealed a U-shaped efficacy throughout the course of follow-up. Nonresponse rate of the intervention was 57% and 70% in the two assessment time points, respectively. Conclusion. This study found low-level laser therapy to be effective in alleviating tinnitus in patients with noise-induced hearing loss, although this effect has faded after 3 months of follow-up. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand clinical trials registry with identifier ACTRN12612000455864). PMID:24288494

  14. Efficacy of Low-Level Laser Therapy in the Management of Tinnitus due to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background. Several remedial modalities for the treatment of tinnitus have been proposed, but an effective standard treatment is still to be confirmed. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy on tinnitus accompanied by noise-induced hearing loss. Methods. This was a double-blind randomized clinical trial on subjects suffering from tinnitus accompanied by noise-induced hearing loss. The study intervention was 20 sessions of low-level laser therapy every other day, 20 minutes each session. Tinnitus was assessed by three methods (visual analog scale, tinnitus handicap inventory, and tinnitus loudness) at baseline, immediately and 3 months after the intervention. Results. All subjects were male workers with age range of 30–51 years. The mean tinnitus duration was 1.85 ± 0.78 years. All three measurement methods have shown improved values after laser therapy compared with the placebo both immediately and 3 months after treatment. Laser therapy revealed a U-shaped efficacy throughout the course of follow-up. Nonresponse rate of the intervention was 57% and 70% in the two assessment time points, respectively. Conclusion. This study found low-level laser therapy to be effective in alleviating tinnitus in patients with noise-induced hearing loss, although this effect has faded after 3 months of follow-up. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand clinical trials registry with identifier ACTRN12612000455864). PMID:24288494

  15. Hearing Loss in Children: Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing loss is intellectual disability (23%), followed by cerebral palsy (10%), autism spectrum disorder (7%), and/or vision ... without other related conditions (such as intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, or vision loss) were employed. [ Read summary ] ...

  16. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidman, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    This article provides an overview of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the leading cause of occupationally induced hearing loss in industrialized countries. It discusses causes of NIHL and compelling evidence that reactive oxygen metabolites and cochlear hypoprefusion are responsible for the destruction of cochlear hair cells. Prevention is also…

  17. Economic losses due to catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    Worldwide economic loss due to catastrophic events added up to US140 billion in 2013, with insured losses adding up to 45 billion, according to a report by the insurance provider Swiss Re. Though these numbers are down from 196 billion in economic losses and 81 billion in insurance losses in 2012, Swiss Re reports an upward trend in losses.

  18. Amplification considerations for children with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss and unilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    McKay, Sarah; Gravel, Judith S; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2008-03-01

    Children with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss and unilateral hearing loss are at higher risk for academic, speech-language, and social-emotional difficulties than their normal hearing peers. The choice to fit infants with moderate or greater degrees of bilateral hearing loss has been standard practice for most clinicians, but for those with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss, the fitting of hearing technology must be based on limited data. Evidence does not yet exist to support all the management decisions that an audiologist must make upon identifying an infant with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss. It is not yet known which children are at the greatest risk for educational problems nor is it known if the provision of early amplification in this population will help a child avoid later difficulties. Some of these considerations and current hearing technology options for children with minimal or mild bilateral hearing loss or unilateral hearing loss are reviewed in this article. PMID:18270178

  19. Musical hallucination associated with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Tanit Ganz; Rocha, Savya Cybelle Milhomem; Knobel, Keila Alessandra Baraldi; Kii, Márcia Akemi; Santos, Rosa Maria Rodrigues dos; Pereira, Cristiana Borges

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the fact that musical hallucination have a significant impact on patients' lives, they have received very little attention of experts. Some researchers agree on a combination of peripheral and central dysfunctions as the mechanism that causes hallucination. The most accepted physiopathology of musical hallucination associated to hearing loss (caused by cochlear lesion, cochlear nerve lesion or by interruption of mesencephalon or pontine auditory information) is the disinhibition of auditory memory circuits due to sensory deprivation. Concerning the cortical area involved in musical hallucination, there is evidence that the excitatory mechanism of the superior temporal gyrus, as in epilepsies, is responsible for musical hallucination. In musical release hallucination there is also activation of the auditory association cortex. Finally, considering the laterality, functional studies with musical perception and imagery in normal individuals showed that songs with words cause bilateral temporal activation and melodies activate only the right lobe. The effect of hearing aids on the improvement of musical hallucination as a result of the hearing loss improvement is well documented. It happens because auditory hallucination may be influenced by the external acoustical environment. Neuroleptics, antidepressants and anticonvulsants have been used in the treatment of musical hallucination. Cases of improvement with the administration of carbamazepine, meclobemide and donepezil were reported, but the results obtained were not consistent. PMID:21625772

  20. Asymmetric and Unilateral Hearing Loss in Children

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Peter; Lieu, Judith E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric and unilateral hearing losses in children have traditionally been underappreciated, but health care practitioners are now beginning to understand their effect on development and the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. The common wisdom among medical and educational professionals has been that at least one normal hearing or near-normal hearing ear was sufficient for typical speech and language development in children. The objective of this review is to illustrate to the non-otolaryngologist the consequences of asymmetric and unilateral hearing loss in children on developmental and educational outcomes. In the process, etiology, detection, and management are discussed. Lastly, implications for further research are considered. PMID:26004144

  1. Managing Hearing Loss | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain medications, or long-term exposure to loud noises. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when there is damage ... Many people may have a combination of both noise-induced hearing loss and hearing loss from aging. ...

  2. Sudden hearing loss after dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Leyla; Yilmaz, Ismail

    2013-08-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with impaired balance, tinnitus, sensation of blockage, and hearing loss in his left ear, which developed after dental treatment for dental pain 4 days previously. Treatment of the carious left upper second molar tooth had included pulp extirpation, canal expansion, and tooth filling under local anesthesia with articaine and epinephrine. Impaired balance decreased spontaneously within 3 days of dental treatment, but tinnitus and hearing loss persisted. Pure tone audiogram showed profound sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear, with a downslope from 40 to 100 dB, and an abnormal speech discrimination score (50%). Treatment included intravenous prednisolone, intratympanic dexamethasone, and oral betahistine and trimetazidine. The patient had improved hearing and resolution of tinnitus. Sudden hearing loss is rare after dental treatment, and awareness of this complication may prompt early referral for treatment and may improve recovery and prognosis. PMID:23642550

  3. 20 CFR 702.441 - Claims for loss of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Supervision Hearing Loss Claims § 702.441 Claims for loss of hearing. (a) Claims for hearing loss... regulations. (b) An audiogram shall be presumptive evidence of the amount of hearing loss on the date... report must set forth the testing standards used and describe the method of evaluating the hearing...

  4. Hearing loss in speech-language delayed children.

    PubMed

    Psarommatis, I M; Goritsa, E; Douniadakis, D; Tsakanikos, M; Kontrogianni, A D; Apostolopoulos, N

    2001-05-11

    An infant begins to communicate with his/her environment from the first months of life. However, true words do not appear until the age of 12-15 months, following a rather predictable sequence. Delay or failure of normal language development is not a rare situation in childhood and may be due to a variety of reasons. Among these, hearing undoubtedly plays a leading part in the language acquisition process. The purpose of this study was to assess the percentage of hearing-impaired children in a group of phenotypically healthy children presenting with speech-language delay. Between March 1993 and March 1999, 726 speech-language delayed children were examined in our department. In 72 of them, various diseases or syndromes had already been diagnosed and so they were excluded from the study. The remaining 654 apparently healthy children entered the study and underwent a thorough audiological assessment for determination of their hearing thresholds. Eighty-seven children (13.3%) showed various degrees of hearing loss. Most of them (55 children, 8.4%) suffered from sensorineural hearing impairment, while in 32 children (4.9%) a conductive hearing loss was discovered. The increased prevalence of hearing impairment found in our population mandates a thorough hearing evaluation for every case of speech-language delay, even for those children who show no evidence of other handicaps. This will help in the early diagnosis of hearing loss, allowing proper management to be instituted as early as possible. PMID:11335007

  5. Coping with Hearing Loss and High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 2010

    2010-01-01

    High school can be a bumpy road for teenagers, especially since most teenagers are trying to fit in and start to define their own individuality and future. Now imagine if a teenager has hearing loss. Besides not being able to hear their instructors or friends as well as their classmates, self image problems can be magnified if they need to wear…

  6. 20 CFR 702.441 - Claims for loss of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Care and Supervision Hearing Loss Claims § 702.441 Claims for loss of hearing. (a) Claims for hearing... regulations. (b) An audiogram shall be presumptive evidence of the amount of hearing loss on the date... report must set forth the testing standards used and describe the method of evaluating the hearing...

  7. 20 CFR 702.441 - Claims for loss of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Care and Supervision Hearing Loss Claims § 702.441 Claims for loss of hearing. (a) Claims for hearing... regulations. (b) An audiogram shall be presumptive evidence of the amount of hearing loss on the date... report must set forth the testing standards used and describe the method of evaluating the hearing...

  8. 20 CFR 702.441 - Claims for loss of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Care and Supervision Hearing Loss Claims § 702.441 Claims for loss of hearing. (a) Claims for hearing... regulations. (b) An audiogram shall be presumptive evidence of the amount of hearing loss on the date... report must set forth the testing standards used and describe the method of evaluating the hearing...

  9. 20 CFR 702.441 - Claims for loss of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Care and Supervision Hearing Loss Claims § 702.441 Claims for loss of hearing. (a) Claims for hearing... regulations. (b) An audiogram shall be presumptive evidence of the amount of hearing loss on the date... report must set forth the testing standards used and describe the method of evaluating the hearing...

  10. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Andersen, Ture; Poulsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR), held in Nyborg, Denmark, in August 2015. The following collection of papers results from some of the work that was presented and discussed at the symposium. PMID:27566802

  11. Drug Induced Hearing Loss: Researchers Study Strategies to Preserve Hearing

    MedlinePlus

    ... dying due to ototoxic drugs. Please describe the benefits of your findings. Our results advance our understanding ... hearing is critical to their developing speech and language skills. Our goal is to improve the lives ...

  12. Due Process Hearings: An Update. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahearn, Eileen M.

    This report presents data from all 50 states on due process hearings concerning the education of students with disabilities for the years 1992, 1993, and 1994. Data were gathered from a 1996 survey conducted by the National Association of State Directors of Special Education. This survey updates due process statistics from a 1994 survey that…

  13. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention: Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... SafeInSound Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Smartphone Sound Apps Music-induced Hearing Loss ... SafeInSound Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Smartphone Sound Apps Music-induced Hearing Loss ...

  14. Hearing and hearing loss: Causes, effects, and treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Richard A.

    2003-04-01

    Hearing loss can have multiple causes. The outer and middle ears are conductive pathways for acoustic energy to the inner ear (cochlea) and help shape our spectral sensitivity. Conductive hearing loss is mechanical in nature such that the energy transfer to the cochlea is impeded, often from eardrum perforations or middle ear fluid buildup. Beyond the middle ear, the cochlea comprises three interdependent systems necessary for normal hearing. The first is that of basilar-membrane micromechanics including the outer hair cells. This system forms the basis of the cochlear amplifier and is the most vulnerable to noise and drug exposure. The second system comprises the ion pumps in the lateral wall tissues of the cochlea. These highly metabolic cells provide energy to the cochlear amplifier in the form of electrochemical potentials. This second system is particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging. The third system comprises the inner hair cells and their associated sensory nerve fibers. This system is the transduction stage, changing mechanical vibrations to nerve impulses. New treatments for hearing loss are on the horizon; however, at present the best strategy is avoidance of cochlear trauma and the proper use of hearing aids. [Work supported by NIA and MUSC.

  15. [Extensive hearing loss and deafness in adults].

    PubMed

    Laszig, R

    1993-09-01

    Hearing and understanding are two related, yet different processes. Hearing is the perception of sound. It can be of enormous value to patients with severely impaired hearing, as it facilitates acoustic orientation. An understanding of speech, however, remains virtually impossible for most of these patients. Nevertheless, early habituation to their acoustic situation makes lip-reading much easier, thus enabling conversations to be possible in good listening environments. Severely impaired patients, however, are still not in a position to follow conversation in larger groups. Even with hearing aids and the deployment of the latest technology, sufficient help is not always given. Before making a decision on the use of these technical aids, the ENT specialist should discuss the needs of the particular individual with the hearing-aid specialist. Provided that residual hearing can be used to understand speech with the help of a hearing aid, intracochlear implantation of an electronic prosthesis is not indicated. A cochlear implant is indicated when there is a complete hearing loss on both sides. Such a profound loss means that sufficient understanding of speech is no longer possible, even with the assistance of the latest hearing aids. For most adults, deafness is a postlingual phenomenon. Adults who were born deaf or who lost their hearing in childhood tend to be unsuitable for cochlear implantation. Up to the age of six years, however, children born deaf can benefit considerably from a cochlear implant. Children who are provided with a cochlear implant shortly after becoming deaf also have a good chance of being capable of learning and understanding speech. PMID:8273025

  16. A causal relationship between hearing loss and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Kim, Min Jung; Sikandaner, Huerxidan; Kim, Dong-Kee; Yeo, Sang Won; Park, Shi Nae

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion Moderate hearing loss in young mice caused decreases in cognition associated with spatial working and recognition memories in 6 months. These results provide evidence for a causal relationship between hearing loss and cognitive impairment. Objectives Hypothesized mechanisms to connect sensory and cognitive functions include the sensory-deprivation, information-degradation, and common-cause hypotheses. This study intended to investigate the effect of hearing loss on cognitive function, as estimated by radial arm maze (RAM) and novel object recognition (NOR) tasks in mice through age- and hearing-matched longitudinal work during a 6-month period. Methods Twenty-four male C57BL/6 mice aged 1 month with normal ABR thresholds were used. Twelve mice in the hearing loss (HL) group were exposed to white noise at 110 dB SPL for 60 min every day for 20 days. At post-noise 6 months, all mice underwent RAM and one-trial NOR test. RAM performance measures and NOR discrimination index were compared between two groups. Results At 6 months after noise exposure, all mice in the experimental group had moderate hearing loss. Most of the RAM performances improved gradually within each group across five trials, probably due to learning effect. The HL group showed lower performance scores than the control group in several trial points in the RAM task. The contact time with the novel object was shorter in the HL group than in the control group. PMID:26808715

  17. Fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss in children.

    PubMed

    Brookhouser, Patrick E

    2002-08-01

    Childhood sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) that fluctuates or is progressive enhances parental concern and complicates medical management, hearing aid selection, and individualized educational planning for the affected child. Despite intensive multidisciplinary evaluation and intervention, continued threshold fluctuation or a gradual decline in auditory acuity may proceed unabated in a significant percentage of these youngsters. With the adoption of universal newborn hearing screening mandates by an increasing number of states, any challenges to the accurate determination of auditory thresholds must be addressed within the first few months of life. PMID:12487089

  18. Prognostic Factors in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atay, Gamze; Kayahan, Bahar; çınar, Betül çiçek; Saraç, Sarp; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is still a complex and challenging process which requires clinical evidence regarding its etiology, treatment and prognostic factors. Therefore, determination of prognostic factors might aid in the selection of proper treatment modality. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze whether there is correlation between SSNHL outcomes and (1) systemic steroid therapy, (2) time gap between onset of symptoms and initiation of therapy and (3) audiological pattern of hearing loss. Study Design: Retrospective chart review. Methods: Patients diagnosed at our clinic with SSNHL between May 2005 and December 2011 were reviewed. A detailed history of demographic features, side of hearing loss, previous SSNHL and/or ear surgery, recent upper respiratory tract infection, season of admission, duration of symptoms before admission and the presence of co-morbid diseases was obtained. Radiological and audiological evaluations were recorded and treatment protocol was assessed to determine whether systemic steroids were administered or not. Treatment started ≤5 days was regarded as “early” and >5 days as “delayed”. Initial audiological configurations were grouped as “upward sloping”, “downward sloping”, “flat” and “profound” hearing loss. Significant recovery was defined as thresholds improved to the same level with the unaffected ear or improved ≥30 dB on average. Slight recovery was hearing improvement between 10–30dB on average. Hearing recovery less than 10 dB was accepted as unchanged. Results: Among the 181 patients who met the inclusion criteria, systemic steroid was administered to 122 patients (67.4%), whereas 59 (32.6%) patients did not have steroids. It was found that steroid administration did not have any statistically significant effect in either recovered or unchanged hearing groups. Early treatment was achieved in 105 patients (58%) and 76 patients (42%) had delayed treatment. Recovery

  19. Childhood hearing health: educating for prevention of hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Lacerda, Giselle; Lobato, Diolén Conceição Barros; Santos, Luciana; Moreira, Aline Carlezzo; Ribas, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies for awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1%) presented hearing alterations. Conclusion The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential. PMID:25992146

  20. Childhood Hearing Health: Educating for Prevention of Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Adriana Bender Moreira; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Lacerda, Giselle; Lobato, Diolén Conceição Barros; Santos, Luciana; Moreira, Aline Carlezzo; Ribas, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The presence of noise in our society has attracted the attention of health professionals, including speech-language pathologists, who have been charged along with educators with developing hearing conservation programs in schools. Objective To describe the results of three strategies for awareness and hearing preservation in first to fourth grades in public elementary schools. Methods The level of environmental noise in classrooms was assessed, and 638 elementary school students from first to fourth grades, 5 to 10 years of age, were audiologically evaluated. After the evaluations, educational activities were presented to children and educators. Results The noise level in the classroom ranged from 71.8 to 94.8 A-weighted decibels. The environment of the classroom was found to promote sound reverberation, which hinders communication. Thirty-two students (5.1%) presented hearing alterations. Conclusion The application of strategies for a hearing conservation program at the school showed that noise is present in the room, and hearing loss, sometimes silent, affects schoolchildren. Students and teachers were aware that hearing problems can be prevented. Avoiding exposure to noise and improving the acoustics in classrooms are essential. PMID:25992146

  1. Managing Hearing Loss | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nerve pathways from the ear to the brain. Many people may have a combination of both noise-induced hearing loss and hearing loss from aging. Noise-induced hearing loss can be prevented by lowering the volume, moving away from the noise, or wearing hearing ...

  2. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss; Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, Dass; Neha, Goel; Surinder K, Singhal; Ravi, Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a frightening and frustrating symptom for the patient as well as the physician. Prognosis is affected by multiple factors including duration of hearing loss, presence of associated vertigo and tinnitus, and co-morbidities such as hypertension and diabetes. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects presenting to our department with features of sudden hearing loss were included in the study. Detailed otological history and examination, serial audiometric findings and course of disease were studied. Results: Subjects presenting late (in older age), having associated vertigo, hypertension and diabetes had a significantly lower rate of recovery. Conclusion: Only 60–65% of patients experiencing SSNHL recover within a period of 1 month; this rate is further affected by presence of multiple prognostic indicators. PMID:26568939

  3. Sensorineural hearing loss in chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    MacAndie, C; O'Reilly, B F

    1999-06-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated an association between chronic otitis media (COM) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), there still remains disagreement about the relationship. A retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between sensorineural hearing loss and chronic otitis media. Forty-one patients met the following criteria: unilateral COM and no history of head injury, meningitis or previous otological surgery. The differences in preoperative bone conduction threshold between diseased and control (contralateral normal) ear were statistically significant (P < 0.01) and varied from 5.24 to 9.02 dB across the frequency range. The effect of duration of disease on the degree of SNHL was also analysed but no correlation was found. The presence of cholesteatoma and/or ossicular erosion was not associated with a significantly increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:10384849

  4. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  5. Genetics of Nonsyndromic Congenital Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Kalcioglu, M Tayyar

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hearing impairment affects nearly 1 in every 1000 live births and is the most frequent birth defect in developed societies. Hereditary types of hearing loss account for more than 50% of all congenital sensorineural hearing loss cases and are caused by genetic mutations. HL can be either nonsyndromic, which is restricted to the inner ear, or syndromic, a part of multiple anomalies affecting the body. Nonsyndromic HL can be categorised by mode of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant (called DFNA), autosomal recessive (DFNB), mitochondrial, and X-linked (DFN). To date, 125 deafness loci have been reported in the literature: 58 DFNA loci, 63 DFNB loci, and 4 X-linked loci. Mutations in genes that control the adhesion of hair cells, intracellular transport, neurotransmitter release, ionic hemeostasis, and cytoskeleton of hair cells can lead to malfunctions of the cochlea and inner ear. In recent years, with the increase in studies about genes involved in congenital hearing loss, genetic counselling and treatment options have emerged and increased in availability. This paper presents an overview of the currently known genes associated with nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and mutations in the inner ear. PMID:26989561

  6. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update.

    PubMed

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne; Burgess, Lawrence

    2016-06-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  7. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Primary Care Update

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Marcia A; Flaherty, Anna; Zhang, Julia A; Hara, Jared; Barber, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The primary care physician's role in recognizing sudden sensorineural hearing (SSNHL) loss and delivering initial treatment is critical in the management of the syndrome. This role involves recognizing its clinical symptoms, distinguishing it from conductive hearing loss with the Weber tuning fork or the Rauch hum test, and urgent administration of high dose oral corticosteroids. Diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed for audiometric testing or referral to otolaryngology. This paper provides an update on the initial evaluation and treatment of this syndrome based on the literature and clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:27413627

  8. Hearing Loss in Children: Treatment and Intervention Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... coordinator to find available services in your state. Technology Many people who are deaf or hard-of- ... of-hearing person has is called "residual hearing". Technology does not "cure" hearing loss, but may help ...

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Varun; Etinger, Veronica; Orjuela, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a common nonspecific vasculitis seen in childhood. The most significant long-term sequela is coronary artery aneurysm. However, the spectrum of complications involves not only the heart, but also other organs such as the eyes, skin, kidneys, gallbladder, liver, and central nervous system. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a relatively unrecognized complication of the disease. Although most of the complications (except coronary artery aneurysm) are self-limiting, SNHL can be persistent. It is, especially important in infants and young children who might not be able to report the hearing deficits and are most likely to have cognitive and speech delays if this hearing loss is not addressed in a timely manner. We report a child with Kawasaki disease who had SNHL during the 2(nd) week of the illness. The aim of this article is to briefly review the pathophysiology behind this hearing loss and strongly emphasize the importance of universal hearing evaluation in all children diagnosed with Kawasaki disease. This screening in children with Kawasaki disease may provide some timely intervention if needed. Since most Kawasaki disease patients will be seen by cardiologists, we hope to create more awareness about this complication to the cardiology community as well. PMID:27011703

  10. Downsloping High-Frequency Hearing Loss Due to Inner Ear Tricellular Tight Junction Disruption by a Novel ILDR1 Mutation in the Ig-Like Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung K. D.; Higashi, Tomohito; Lee, Kyoung Yeul; Kim, Ah Reum; Kitajiri, Shin-ichiro; Kim, Min Young; Chang, Mun Young; Kim, Veronica; Oh, Seung-Ha; Kim, Dongsup; Furuse, Mikio; Park, Woong-Yang; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1) gene encodes angulin-2/ILDR1, a recently discovered tight junction protein, which forms tricellular tight junction (tTJ) structures with tricellulin and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) at tricellular contacts (TCs) in the inner ear. Previously reported recessive mutations within ILDR1 have been shown to cause severe to profound nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), DFNB42. Whole-exome sequencing of a Korean multiplex family segregating partial deafness identified a novel homozygous ILDR1 variant (p.P69H) within the Ig-like domain. To address the pathogenicity of p.P69H, the angulin-2/ILDR1 p.P69H variant protein, along with the previously reported pathogenic ILDR1 mutations, was expressed in angulin-1/LSR knockdown epithelial cells. Interestingly, partial mislocalization of the p.P69H variant protein and tricellulin at TCs was observed, in contrast to a severe mislocalization and complete failure of tricellulin recruitment of the other reported ILDR1 mutations. Additionally, three-dimensional protein modeling revealed that angulin-2/ILDR1 contributed to tTJ by forming a homo-trimer structure through its Ig-like domain, and the p.P69H variant was predicted to disturb homo-trimer formation. In this study, we propose a possible role of angulin-2/ILDR1 in tTJ formation in the inner ear and a wider audiologic phenotypic spectrum of DFNB42 caused by mutations within ILDR1. PMID:25668204

  11. Alcohol use among students with and without hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P

    2015-01-01

    We compared alcohol use among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Adolescents with hearing loss reported consuming less alcohol, less binge drinking, fewer episodes of drunkenness, and a higher age at first drunkenness than their hearing peers. Alcohol use did not vary between students who were deaf or hard of hearing or between students with congenital versus acquired hearing loss. Although higher age, male gender, and larger friend networks predicted higher alcohol consumption among adolescents with and without hearing loss, worse grades at school were associated only with alcohol use among hearing students. Lower alcohol use among students with hearing loss when compared with hearing peers was, in part, explained by their lower level of peer-group integration. Although alcohol use is a less serious problem among students with hearing loss, a minority with risky consumption would benefit from interventions aimed at reducing alcohol use. PMID:25318927

  12. Chronic bilateral hearing loss in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Asli G.; Nazliel, Bijen; Oner, Yusuf; Erdem, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Congenital, infectious, toxic, and demyelinating disorders are common etiological causes of deafness. Tuberculous meningitis, as one of the infectious causes, should be considered in the differential diagnosis since tuberculosis represents an endemic public health problem in developing countries. Multiple cranial nerve palsies can be expected due to basal meningitis; however, presentation with bilateral hearing loss is quite rare. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent mortality and residual neurologic deficits. The focus of this discussion is a 42-year-old female presenting with bilateral hearing loss and nonspecific complaints who was finally diagnosed with chronic tuberculous meningitis. We also demonstrate the characteristic radiological and histopathological findings. PMID:25274594

  13. Survey of commercial airline pilots' hearing loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, D. R.; Wenzel, E. M.; Tran, L. L.; Anderson, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    64 commercial airline pilots (ages 35-64 yr, Mdn: 53) were surveyed regarding hearing loss and tinnitus. Within specific age groups, the proportions responding positively exceed the corresponding proportions in the general population reported by the National Center for Health Statistics.

  14. Screening for Hearing Loss in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Alice E.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    The results of an auditory screening protocol administered to 342 adolescents (ages 10-20) suggest a high level of noise exposure in the adolescent population. Overall failure rate was 25%. Significant correlations were found between firearm use and hearing loss at 6000 Hertz. Screening and education efforts are urged. (Author/CR)

  15. Alcohol Use among Students with and without Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinquart, Martin; Pfeiffer, Jens P.

    2015-01-01

    We compared alcohol use among adolescents with and without hearing loss. Adolescents with hearing loss reported consuming less alcohol, less binge drinking, fewer episodes of drunkenness, and a higher age at first drunkenness than their hearing peers. Alcohol use did not vary between students who were deaf or hard of hearing or between students…

  16. Print Knowledge of Preschool Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werfel, Krystal L.; Lund, Emily; Schuele, C. Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Measures of print knowledge were compared across preschoolers with hearing loss and normal hearing. Alphabet knowledge did not differ between groups, but preschoolers with hearing loss performed lower on measures of print concepts and concepts of written words than preschoolers with normal hearing. Further study is needed in this area.

  17. Relationship Between Hair Cell Loss and Hearing Loss in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to intense sound or ototoxic chemicals can damage the auditory hair cells of vertebrates, resulting in hearing loss. Although the relationship between such hair cell damage and auditory function is fairly established for terrestrial vertebrates, there are limited data available to understand this relationship in fishes. Although investigators have measured either the morphological damage of the inner ear or the functional deficits in the hearing of fishes, very few have directly measured both in an attempt to find a relationship between the two. Those studies that have examined both auditory hair cell damage in the inner ear and the resulting hearing loss in fishes are reviewed here. In general, there is a significant linear relationship between the number of hair cells lost and the severity of hearing threshold shifts, although this varies between species and different hair cell-damaging stimuli. After trauma to the fish ear, auditory hair cells are able to regenerate to control level densities. With this regeneration also comes a restoration of hearing. Thus there is also a significant relationship between hair cell recovery and hearing recovery in fishes. PMID:26611069

  18. Frequency selectivity in canaries with a hereditary hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Amanda M.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2002-05-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is associated with reduced frequency selectivity due to the broadening of the auditory filters in mammals. In European starlings, hearing loss caused by the ototoxic drug kanamycin results in the widening of auditory filters at 5 kHz [Marean et al. (1998)]. In the present study, we examine frequency selectivity in a bird with a permanent hereditary hearing impairment, the Belgian Waterslager (BWS) canary. This strain of canary has long been bred for its loud, low-frequency song, and has been shown to have a hearing loss primarily at higher frequencies (2 kHz and above). Using operant conditioning and the method of constant stimuli, thresholds for detecting pure tones in flat-spectrum broadband noise were measured in BWS and non-BWS canaries. Critical ratios were calculated for comparison with other species of birds. At higher frequencies, critical ratios for BWS canaries were much larger than those of non-BWS canaries and other birds, suggesting reduced frequency selectivity in the region of the birds' hearing loss. [Work supported by NIDCD R01DC001372 to RJD and Brenda M. Ryals.

  19. A Taxonomy of Fatigue Concepts and Their Relation to Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, Benjamin W Y; Naylor, Graham; Bess, Fred H

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is common in individuals with a variety of chronic health conditions and can have significant negative effects on quality of life. Although limited in scope, recent work suggests persons with hearing loss may be at increased risk for fatigue, in part due to effortful listening that is exacerbated by their hearing impairment. However, the mechanisms responsible for hearing loss-related fatigue, and the efficacy of audiologic interventions for reducing fatigue, remain unclear. To improve our understanding of hearing loss-related fatigue, as a field it is important to develop a common conceptual understanding of this construct. In this article, the broader fatigue literature is reviewed to identify and describe core constructs, consequences, and methods for assessing fatigue and related constructs. Finally, the current knowledge linking hearing loss and fatigue is described and may be summarized as follows: Hearing impairment may increase the risk of subjective fatigue and vigor deficits; adults with hearing loss require more time to recover from fatigue after work and have more work absences; sustained, effortful, listening can be fatiguing; optimal methods for eliciting and measuring fatigue in persons with hearing loss remain unclear and may vary with listening condition; and amplification may minimize decrements in cognitive processing speed during sustained effortful listening. Future research is needed to develop reliable measurement methods to quantify hearing loss-related fatigue, explore factors responsible for modulating fatigue in people with hearing loss, and identify and evaluate potential interventions for reducing hearing loss-related fatigue. PMID:27355763

  20. The Effect of Hearing Loss on Identification of Asynchronous Double Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Jennifer J.; Marsh, Shavon L.

    2006-01-01

    This study determined whether listeners with hearing loss received reduced benefits due to an onset asynchrony between sounds. Seven normal-hearing listeners and 7 listeners with hearing impairment (HI) were presented with 2 synthetic, steady-state vowels. One vowel (the late-arriving vowel) was 250 ms in duration, and the other (the…

  1. The Relationship between Nonverbal Cognitive Functions and Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zekveld, Adriana A.; Deijen, Jan Berend; Goverts, S. Theo; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between hearing loss and memory and attention when nonverbal, visually presented cognitive tests are used. Method: Hearing loss (pure-tone audiometry) and IQ were measured in 30 participants with mild to severe hearing loss. Participants performed cognitive tests of pattern recognition memory,…

  2. A survey of hearing loss in Army aircrew.

    PubMed

    Owen, M J

    1996-02-01

    Military aircrew are exposed to excessive noise at work, with the concurrent risks of acquiring Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL). Past studies have related aircrew NIHL to a variety of factors; however, no clear causal relationship has been shown. The difficulty of establishing NIHL due to flying remains when many other confounders are present, especially age and exposure to firearms noise in the military environment. A cross sectional prevalence study of hearing loss in Army Air Corps aircrew has been undertaken. One hundred and twenty one aircrew who had more than ten years flying experience were studied and the results show that there appears to be a threshold shift in excess of that expected from the ISO levels for otologically normal males of the same age. The hearing threshold shift was found to correlate with the number of years flying and aircrew age, with the number of flying hours being less significant. PMID:8672796

  3. Observations From a Musician With Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Extensive personal experience with professional recording and audio signal processing technology has enabled the author to continue his music career after experiencing sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The iPhone™ is one such device that has been found useful for many music and general listening situations that would otherwise be intractable. Additional techniques and technologies are described that the author has found useful for specific situations, including music composition, rehearsal, and enjoyment. PMID:23203415

  4. Conductive hearing loss in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schick, B; Brors, D; Prescher, A; Draf, W

    1999-05-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is a rare genetic overgrowth syndrome presenting with organomegaly, abdominal wall defects, macroglossia, and postnatal hypoglycemia. Head and neck manifestations of this abnormality include flame nevus of the forehead and characteristic sulci of the ear lobe. We present a 7-year-old child with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and a rare finding of conductive hearing loss on both sides due to congenital malleus and stapedial fixation. Small fenestra stapedotomy and mobilization of malleus fixation in the epitympanum improved the child's hearing. The bony fixation of the malleus and stapes is explained as atavism of the processus anterior mallei and peripheral lamina stapedialis in embryological development. PMID:10375044

  5. Designer aminoglycosides prevent cochlear hair cell loss and hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Huth, Markus E.; Han, Kyu-Hee; Sotoudeh, Kayvon; Hsieh, Yi-Ju; Effertz, Thomas; Vu, Andrew A.; Verhoeven, Sarah; Hsieh, Michael H.; Greenhouse, Robert; Cheng, Alan G.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent a rapidly growing challenge to human health. Aminoglycosides are widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, but they inflict permanent hearing loss in up to ~50% of patients by causing selective sensory hair cell loss. Here, we hypothesized that reducing aminoglycoside entry into hair cells via mechanotransducer channels would reduce ototoxicity, and therefore we synthesized 9 aminoglycosides with modifications based on biophysical properties of the hair cell mechanotransducer channel and interactions between aminoglycosides and the bacterial ribosome. Compared with the parent aminoglycoside sisomicin, all 9 derivatives displayed no or reduced ototoxicity, with the lead compound N1MS 17 times less ototoxic and with reduced penetration of hair cell mechanotransducer channels in rat cochlear cultures. Both N1MS and sisomicin suppressed growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with N1MS exhibiting superior activity against extended spectrum β lactamase producers, despite diminished activity against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Moreover, systemic sisomicin treatment of mice resulted in 75% to 85% hair cell loss and profound hearing loss, whereas N1MS treatment preserved both hair cells and hearing. Finally, in mice with E. coli–infected bladders, systemic N1MS treatment eliminated bacteria from urinary tract tissues and serially collected urine samples, without compromising auditory and kidney functions. Together, our findings establish N1MS as a nonototoxic aminoglycoside and support targeted modification as a promising approach to generating nonototoxic antibiotics. PMID:25555219

  6. Vision loss and hearing loss in painting and musical composition.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    This article considers the impact of vision and hearing loss on great painters and musical composers. The visual work of Mary Cassatt, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edgar Degas, and Claude Monet all showed alterations as their vision failed. In contrast, Gabriel Fauré, Bedřich Smetana, and Ludwig von Beethoven wrote many of their best compositions while totally deaf, and Georg Friedrich Handel and Frederick Delius struggled to compose late in life when they lost their vision (although their hearing remained excellent). There are 2 major distinctions between the role of vision and hearing for these artistic disciplines. First, there is a surrogate means of "hearing" music, through the musical score, which allows composers to write and edit music while totally deaf. The greatest problem with deafness for a skilled composer is interference from internal noise (tinnitus). There is no surrogate for vision to allow a painter to work when the subject is a blur or the colors on the canvas cannot be distinguished. Second, although the appreciation of art is visual and that of music is auditory, the transcription of both art and musical composition is visual. Thus, visual loss does pose a problem for a composer accustomed to working with good sight, because it disrupts habitual methods of writing and editing music. PMID:24565744

  7. Introduction to auditory perception in listeners with hearing losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentine, Mary; Buus, Søren

    2003-04-01

    Listeners with hearing losses cannot hear low-level sounds. In addition, they often complain that audible sounds do not have a comfortable loudness, lack clarity, and are difficult to hear in the presence of other sounds. In particular, they have difficulty understanding speech in background noise. The mechanisms underlying these complaints are not completely understood, but hearing losses are known to alter many aspects of auditory processing. This presentation highlights alterations in audibility, loudness, pitch, spectral and temporal processes, and binaural hearing that may result from hearing losses. The changes in these auditory processes can vary widely across individuals with seemingly similar amounts of hearing loss. For example, two listeners with nearly identical thresholds can differ in their ability to process spectral and temporal features of sounds. Such individual differences make rehabilitation of hearing losses complex. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  8. Personal Sound Amplifiers for Adults with Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Mamo, Sara K; Reed, Nicholas S; Nieman, Carrie L; Oh, Esther S; Lin, Frank R

    2016-03-01

    Age-related hearing loss is highly prevalent and often untreated. Use of hearing aids has been associated with improvements in communication and quality of life, but such treatment is unaffordable or inaccessible for many adults. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical guide for physicians who work with older adults who are experiencing hearing and communication difficulties. Specifically, we review direct-to-consumer amplification products that can be used to address hearing loss in adults. Helping adults with hearing loss navigate hearing loss treatment options ranging from being professionally fitted with hearing aids to using direct-to-consumer amplification options is important for primary care clinicians to understand given our increasing understanding of the impact of hearing loss on cognitive, social, and physical functioning. PMID:26498713

  9. Delayed loss of hearing after hearing preservation cochlear implantation: Human temporal bone pathology and implications for etiology.

    PubMed

    Quesnel, Alicia M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Rosowski, John J; Hansen, Marlan R; Gantz, Bruce J; Nadol, Joseph B

    2016-03-01

    After initially successful preservation of residual hearing with cochlear implantation, some patients experience subsequent delayed hearing loss. The etiology of such delayed hearing loss is unknown. Human temporal bone pathology is critically important in investigating the etiology, and directing future efforts to maximize long term hearing preservation in cochlear implant patients. Here we present the temporal bone pathology from a patient implanted during life with an Iowa/Nucleus Hybrid S8 implant, with initially preserved residual hearing and subsequent hearing loss. Both temporal bones were removed for histologic processing and evaluated. Complete clinical and audiologic records were available. He had bilateral symmetric high frequency severe to profound hearing loss prior to implantation. Since he was implanted unilaterally, the unimplanted ear was presumed to be representative of the pre-implantation pathology related to his hearing loss. The implanted and contralateral unimplanted temporal bones both showed complete degeneration of inner hair cells and outer hair cells in the basal half of the cochleae, and only mild patchy loss of inner hair cells and outer hair cells in the apical half. The total spiral ganglion neuron counts were similar in both ears: 15,138 (56% of normal for age) in the unimplanted right ear and 13,722 (51% of normal for age) in the implanted left ear. In the basal turn of the implanted left cochlea, loose fibrous tissue and new bone formation filled the scala tympani, and part of the scala vestibuli. Delayed loss of initially preserved hearing after cochlear implantation was not explained by additional post-implantation degeneration of hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons in this patient. Decreased compliance at the round window and increased damping in the scala tympani due to intracochlear fibrosis and new bone formation might explain part of the post-implantation hearing loss. Reduction of the inflammatory and immune response to

  10. Severe sensory hearing loss in del(6q)-syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Maria; Lohscheller, Jörg; Kummer, Peter; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Rosanowski, Frank

    2003-11-01

    6q-syndrome is a rare disorder characterised by a combination of anatomic anomalies, and mental and motor retardation due to a monosomy or trisomy 6q. So far only 12 suspected cases of monosomies 6q have been reported. Hearing loss does not seem to be characteristic for this syndrome. We present the case of a girl with partial monosomy 6q. A bilateral severe sensory hearing loss was confirmed by subjective and objective audiometry at the age of 12 years. The girl was successfully equipped with hearing aids. Other features of the syndrome, i.e. mental retardation, microcephaly, asymmetric face, broad nasal bridge, hypertelorism, epicanthus, strabism, high arched palate, ventricular septum defect and seizures were seen. Additionally, a tetraplegy and diaphragmal hernia had been diagnosed. The girl was equipped with a gastrostomy tube because of nutritional disorders. In the literature, the possibility of hearing disorders in monosomy 6q is rarely mentioned, although limited verbal speech skills have been reported. A syndromic character of hearing disorders in 6q-syndrome cannot be excluded. We advise detailed and early audiological testing of children with monosomy 6q. PMID:14597381

  11. Reiter's syndrome and hearing loss: a possible association?

    PubMed Central

    Monsanto, Rafael C; Neto, Arlindo C L; Lorenzetti, Fábio T M

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Patient complained of hearing loss and tinnitus after the onset of Reiter's syndrome. Audiometry confirmed the hearing loss on the left ear; blood work showed increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C3 fraction of the complement. Genotyping for HLA-B27 was positive. Treatment with prednisolone did not improve the hearing levels. PMID:25548635

  12. Loss of osteoprotegerin expression in the inner ear causes degeneration of the cochlear nerve and sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan; Kempfle, Judith S; Jensen, Jane B; Perez-Fernandez, Deborah; Lysaght, Andrew C; Edge, Albert S; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2013-08-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a key regulator of bone remodeling. Mutations and variations in the OPG gene cause many human diseases that are characterized by not only skeletal abnormalities but also poorly understood hearing loss: Paget's disease, osteoporosis, and celiac disease. To gain insight into the mechanisms of hearing loss in OPG deficiency, we studied OPG knockout (Opg(-/-)) mice. We show that they develop sensorineural hearing loss, in addition to conductive hearing loss due to abnormal middle-ear bones. OPG deficiency caused demyelination and degeneration of the cochlear nerve in vivo. It also activated ERK, sensitized spiral ganglion cells (SGC) to apoptosis, and inhibited proliferation and survival of cochlear stem cells in vitro, which could be rescued by treatment with exogenous OPG, an ERK inhibitor, or bisphosphonate. Our results demonstrate a novel role for OPG in the regulation of SGC survival, and suggest a mechanism for sensorineural hearing loss in OPG deficiency. PMID:23607938

  13. 34 CFR 300.511 - Impartial due process hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Impartial due process hearing. 300.511 Section 300.511... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards Due Process Procedures for Parents and Children § 300.511 Impartial due process hearing. (a) General. Whenever a due process complaint is received under § 300.507...

  14. A Long-Term Follow-up of Pontine Hemorrhage With Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Ki; Kim, Ae Ryoung; Kim, Joon Yeop

    2015-01-01

    A pontine intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) evokes several neurological symptoms, due to the various nuclei and nerve fibers; however, hearing loss from a pontine ICH is rare. We have experienced a non-traumatic pontine ICH patient, with hearing loss. A 43-year-old male patient had a massive pontine hemorrhage; his brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed the hemorrhage on the bilateral dorsal pons, with the involvement of the trapezoid body. Also, profound hearing loss on the pure-tone audiogram and abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potential were noticed. Fifty-two months of long-term follow-up did not reveal any definite improvement on the patient's hearing ability. PMID:26361602

  15. Effects of hearing loss on the subcortical representation of speech cues.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Drehobl, Sarah; Kraus, Nina

    2013-05-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss often report frustration with speech being loud but not clear, especially in background noise. Despite advanced digital technology, hearing aid users may resort to removing their hearing aids in noisy environments due to the perception of excessive loudness. In an animal model, sensorineural hearing loss results in greater auditory nerve coding of the stimulus envelope, leading to a relative deficit of stimulus fine structure. Based on the hypothesis that brainstem encoding of the temporal envelope is greater in humans with sensorineural hearing loss, speech-evoked brainstem responses were recorded in normal hearing and hearing impaired age-matched groups of older adults. In the hearing impaired group, there was a disruption in the balance of envelope-to-fine structure representation compared to that of the normal hearing group. This imbalance may underlie the difficulty experienced by individuals with sensorineural hearing loss when trying to understand speech in background noise. This finding advances the understanding of the effects of sensorineural hearing loss on central auditory processing of speech in humans. Moreover, this finding has clinical potential for developing new amplification or implantation technologies, and in developing new training regimens to address this relative deficit of fine structure representation. PMID:23654406

  16. Reported Causes of Hearing Loss for Hearing Impaired Students; United States 1970-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Augustine; Rambin, J. Bentley

    Reported are causes of hearing loss for 41,109 hearing impaired students enrolled in 555 special educational programs as part of a national annual survey during the 1970-71 school year. Data is provided on the relationship between hearing loss etiology and the following variables: age and sex of students, additional handicapping conditions, family…

  17. Normative data for the Attitudes towards Loss of Hearing Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Gabrielle H; Cienkowski, Kathleen M; Forsline, Anna; Fausti, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    Investigations have shown that patient attitudes toward hearing loss and hearing aids impact self-reported handicap and disability, hearing aid benefit, and hearing aid use. The Attitudes towards Loss of Hearing Questionnaire (ALHQ) was developed by Saunders and Cienkowski (1996) to examine some of the psychosocial factors underlying the use and acquisition of hearing aids. Here we report data from a new version of questionnaire (ALHQ v2.1), which examines attitudes towards hearing loss and hearing aids on five scales: Denial of Hearing Loss, Negative Associations, Negative Coping Strategies, Manual Dexterity and Vision, and Hearing-Related Esteem. Reliability values, internal consistency values, and cut points for typical and atypical scores are provided, along with comparison of the scores of women, men, current hearing aid users, non-hearing aid users, and paying versus nonpaying individuals. The ALHQ takes about ten minutes to complete and identifies for the clinician some of the issues that might jeopardize successful hearing aid outcome. PMID:16515136

  18. Course of hearing recovery according to frequency in patients with acute acoustic sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hirofumi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Imamura, Akihide

    2008-01-01

    Through pure-tone audiometry, we studied the course of hearing recovery in 24 ears of 20 men (ages 18-48 years) who had acute acoustic sensorineural hearing loss (ASHL). All subjects were members of the Japanese Self-Defense Force. The hearing level in 5 ears returned to normal, the hearing level of 13 ears recovered but was not within the normal range, and the hearing level of 6 ears was unchanged. The time from noise exposure to presentation was longer in patients with unchanged hearing than in other patients. Recovery of hearing was poorest at 4,000 Hz, followed by 8,000 and 2,000 Hz. We concluded that hearing in patients with acute ASHL is likely to return to normal when the hearing level at 4,000 Hz recovers gradually; partial recovery of hearing is expected when the hearing level at 4,000 Hz reaches an early plateau. PMID:18616091

  19. Preliminary comparison of infants speech with and without hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Richard S.; Nittrouer, Susan; Chenausky, Karen

    2005-04-01

    The speech of ten children with hearing loss and ten children without hearing loss aged 12 months is examined. All the children with hearing loss were identified before six months of age, and all have parents who wish them to become oral communicators. The data are from twenty minute sessions with the caregiver and child, with their normal prostheses in place, in semi-structured settings. These data are part of a larger test battery applied to both caregiver and child that is part of a project comparing the development of children with hearing loss to those without hearing loss, known as the Early Development of Children with Hearing Loss. The speech comparisons are in terms of number of utterances, syllable shapes, and segment type. A subset of the data was given a detailed acoustic analysis, including formant frequencies and voice quality measures. [Work supported by NIDCD R01 006237 to Susan Nittrouer.

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Chisato

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is involved in several apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways in auditory tissues. These pathways are the major causes of most types of sensorineural hearing loss, including age-related hearing loss, hereditary hearing loss, ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss, and noise-induced hearing loss. ROS production can be triggered by dysfunctional mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increases or decreases in ROS-related enzymes. Although apoptotic cell death pathways are mostly activated by ROS production, there are other pathways involved in hearing loss that do not depend on ROS production. Further studies of other pathways, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress and necrotic cell death, are required. PMID:25874222

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Paparella, M M; Morizono, T; Le, C T; Mancini, F; Sipilä, P; Choo, Y B; Lidén, G; Kim, C S

    1984-01-01

    Additional evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that both acute purulent otitis media (POM) and chronic suppurative otitis media (COM) can cause high frequency sensorineural hearing loss. In selected patients and in animals (chinchillas) in a pilot study using electrophysiological methods, both temporary threshold shifts and permanent threshold shifts of basal cochlear turn involvement were demonstrated in POM. Data of cochlear involvement in 475 ears with bilateral COM, 607 ears with unilateral COM, and 607 ears serving as controls were obtained from six centers in five countries. In group 1 (15 dB or greater), 43% of ears with unilateral COM and 42% of ears with bilateral COM showed losses, for a combined odds ratio eight times that in controls. In group 2 (30 dB or greater), 16% of ears with unilateral COM and 17% of ears with bilateral COM demonstrated, respectively, seven and ten times that in controls. These statistically significant findings influence clinical considerations. PMID:6508134

  2. Is Sudden Hearing Loss Associated with Atherosclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Rajati, Mohsen; Azarpajooh, Mahmoud Reza; Mouhebati, Mohsen; Nasrollahi, Mostafa; Salehi, Maryam; Khadivi, Ehsan; Nourizadeh, Navid; Hashemi, Firoozeh; Bakhshaee, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing-loss (SSNHL) patients constitute approximately 2–3% of referrals to ear, nose and throat (ENT) clinics. Several predisposing factors have been proposed for this condition; one of which is vascular disorders and perfusion compromise. In this research the atherosclerotic changes and their known risk factors are studied in SSNHL patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty SSNHL patients and 30 controls were evaluated with regard to cardiovascular risks including history, heart examination, blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, electrocardiogram, blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP); also, carotid artery color Doppler study was undertaken to measure intima media thickness(IMT). Results: IMT and HSCRP showed an increased risk in the case group compared with the controls (P= 0.005 & P=0.001). However, waist circumference, history of smoking, fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and electrocardiogram revealed no significant difference between the two groups. Interestingly, blood pressure and body mass index were higher in the controls in this study. Conclusion: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:27429947

  3. Consanguinity and hereditary hearing loss in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Giorgia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Vuckovic, Dragana; Vozzi, Diego; Khalifa Alkowari, Moza; Gasparini, Paolo; Badii, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Qatar is a sovereign state located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula in the Persian Gulf. Its native population consists of 3 major subgroups: people of Arabian origin or Bedouins, those from an Eastern or Persian ancestry and individuals with African admixture. Historically, all types of consanguineous marriages have been and still are common in the Qatari population, particularly among first and double-first cousins. Thus, there is a higher risk for most inherited diseases including hereditary hearing loss (HHL). In particular, a hearing loss prevalence of 5.2% has been reported in Qatar, with parental consanguinity being more common among affected individuals as compared with unaffected ones. Our recent molecular results confirm a high homogeneity and level of inbreeding in Qatari HHL patients. Among all HHL genes, GJB2, the major player worldwide, accounts for a minor proportion of cases and at least 3 additional genes have been found to be mutated in Qatari patients. Interestingly, one gene, BDP1, has been described to cause HHL only in this country. These results point towards an unexpected level of genetic heterogeneity despite the high level of inbreeding. This review provides an up-to-date picture of HHL in Qatar and of the impact of consanguinity on this disease. PMID:25060281

  4. Prevalence and Factors Associated With Hearing Loss and Hearing Aid Use in Korean Elders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined hearing loss prevalence and hearing aid usage rates among Korean elders by comparing the differences between those with and without hearing loss, and between those who used and did not use hearing aids. Methods: This study was based on data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010–2012). The study sample consisted of 5,447 Koreans aged ≥60 years who received a hearing assessment. Hearing loss was measured using a pure tone audiometry test and classified according to the World Health Organization’s criteria. Hearing aid use was assessed by self-report. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the associations between hearing loss, hearing aid use, and related variables. Results: Hearing loss was found in 16.8% of the elders and only 15.9% of them used a hearing aid. Male (95% CI: 1.27–2.15), tinnitus (95% CI: 1.58–2.32), dizziness (95% CI: 1.05–1.73), and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.32–2.38) were the variables most strongly associated with hearing loss after multivariate adjustment. Tinnitus (95% CI: 1.34–4.13) and occupational noise exposure (95% CI: 1.01–5.02) were strongly associated with hearing aid use after multivariate adjustment. Conclusion: More than half of South Korean elders aged ≥60 and older have hearing loss but the rate of hearing aid use is very low. An aural public health program should address modifiable risk factors, such as tinnitus and noise exposure, and non-modifiable risk factors associated with hearing loss in the elderly. PMID:25905073

  5. Eye color as a risk factor for acquired sensorineural hearing loss: a review.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Mota, Mario A; Schermbrucker, Jonah; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-02-01

    Eye color may be an indicator of inner ear melanin content and has been associated with hearing loss. There is controversy as to whether eye color has an effect on acquired causes of sensorineural hearing loss. This review was conducted to analyze the literature evaluating the relationship between eye color and causes of sensorineural hearing loss. Six databases were searched to identify eligible studies. Included articles were independently assessed for quality by two authors. Eighteen articles were eligible for review. Eye color was not found to have an effect in the non-exposed population or in presbycusis. In noise-induced sensorineural hearing loss, light-eyed patients had more significant loss following noise exposure, although the variability reported due to eye color was modest (r(2) = 0.01-0.14). Two out of three studies reported that dark eye color is associated with cisplatin ototoxicity. In one study, green-eyed patients were found to be at higher risk of radiation-induced hearing loss. Eye color does not appear to play a role in hearing loss in non-exposed individuals or presbycusis. It is possible that dark-eyed individuals, with greater inner ear melanin content, are better protected against noise-induced hearing loss. Evidence suggests that melanin can be protective against radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss, but may predispose individuals to cisplatin ototoxicity. Future studies are required to support these conclusions. PMID:25529530

  6. Immersive simulation of hearing loss and auditory prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Desloge, Joseph G.

    2001-05-01

    Simulation of hearing loss is useful for demonstrating the communication challenges facing hearing-impaired people. However, current simulations, most of which are only recordings, do not actually elevate thresholds; i.e., they do not simulate hearing loss, per se. The hearing loss simulator described in this talk is immersive; the user's detection thresh- olds for ambient sounds are shifted by a prescribed degree. This threshold shift is achieved through a combination of passive attenuation (from muff-type hearing protectors) and additive masking noise (introduced by within-muff earphones). Acoustic signals picked up by microphones near each ear are processed through bandpass AGC channels and delivered via the earphones to complete the simulation of frequency-dependent hearing loss and loudness recruitment. Preliminary results validating the accuracy of specified threshold shift will be presented, along with speech-reception data comparing simulated with actual hearing losses. Subjective reactions of users engaged in one-on-one conversation suggest that strong feelings of communication disability are engendered by even moderate degrees of simulated hearing loss. The system, which is capable of simulating any degree of recruiting hearing loss along with hearing aids or cochlear implants, can provide effective interactive demonstrations of both auditory communication handicap and rehabilitation options. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  7. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype.

    PubMed

    Heckenberg, S G B; Brouwer, M C; van der Ende, A; Hensen, E F; van de Beek, D

    2012-09-01

    We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in two prospective nationwide cohort studies performed from April 1998 through to October 2002 and March 2006 through to January 2009. Hearing loss was evaluated on admission and discharge for all patients. Severe hearing loss was assessed by pure tone average on audiology and corrected for age, or by the combination of hearing loss on discharge and a score on the Glasgow Outcome Scale below 5, which could not be explained by other neurological sequelae. A total of 531 episodes of pneumococcal meningitis with non-lethal outcome were included. Predisposing conditions for pneumococcal meningitis were present in the majority of patients (64%), most commonly otitis (36%). Hearing loss was present at discharge in 116 patients (22%) and was classified as mild in 53% and severe in 47%. Hearing loss was related to otitis (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-4.02; p < 0.001) and inversely related to serotype 23 F infection (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13-0.98; p = 0.025), but not with parameters of disease severity or indicators of cerebrospinal fluid inflammation severity. Meningitis due to pneumococcal serotype 3 was associated with the highest rate of hearing loss. Hearing loss frequently complicates pneumococcal meningitis. Risk factors for hearing loss were infection with pneumococcal serotype 23 F and otitis, but not disease severity. Otitis and resulting perilympathic inflammation contribute to meningitis-associated hearing loss. PMID:21958295

  8. Bringing Text Display Digital Radio to Consumers with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Ellyn G.; Starling, Michael; Schwab, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Radio is migrating to digital transmission, expanding its offerings to include captioning for individuals with hearing loss. Text display radio requires a large amount of word throughput with minimal screen display area, making good user interface design crucial to its success. In two experiments, we presented hearing, hard-of-hearing, and deaf…

  9. Including Children with Hearing Loss in Early Childhood Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Laurie; Schery, Teris K.

    2006-01-01

    These are typical scenarios of children with hearing loss who are being included increasingly in early childhood settings. Recent federal legislation encourages states to develop programs to screen the hearing of all infants before they leave the hospital, and currently 39 states have adopted newborn infant hearing screening mandates (ASHA 2005).…

  10. Isolated Sensorineural Hearing Loss as a Sequela after Lightning Strike.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mahfuz; Kalkan, Ferhat; Bozan, Nazım; Özçalimli, İsa; Zeki Erdem, Mehmet; Yalınkılıç, Abdülaziz; Garca, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-01-01

    In most of the surviving patients after a lightning strike, audiovestibular abnormalities have been reported. The most frequently reported type of abnormalities is a tympanic membrane perforation with hearing loss and external ear canal burn. However a sensor neural hearing loss and mixed type hearing loss can also occur, but these occur rarely. A nineteen-year-old female patient had, after a lightning strike, serious burns on the left ear, behind the ear, and on the chest and neck. She also had in her left ear 108 dB hearing loss with irregular central perforation and in her right ear 52 dB sensorineural hearing loss. There was no hearing loss before the strike. A hearing aid was recommended for the right ear and good care and follow-up were recommended for the left ear. A lightning strike can cause serious audiological damage. Therefore, it is necessary to make a careful audiovestibular evaluation of the patients. Although there exist rarely healed cases from sensorineural hearing loss after lightning strike in literature, in our case hearing loss occurred bilaterally and then it healed unilaterally. This condition is quite rare in literature. PMID:26161278

  11. Hearing loss and tinnitus in adolescents and young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Alice

    2001-05-01

    Little attention has been paid to hearing abilities and the effects of noise on the normal adolescent and young adult population. A series of studies will be presented on the prevalence of hearing loss and reported effects of hearing loss and tinnitus in adolescents and young adults from different cultural backgrounds. Adolescents and young adults from different backgrounds may tend to seek or avoid various noise environments that could be detrimental to their hearing and cause tinnitus. Attitudes and exposures to noise environments were evaluated to see if these may be correlated with their hearing losses and/or tinnitus. In addition, these adolescent and young adult subjects reported how often they used hearing protection in various noise environments. Finally, the issues of quality of life and the need for hearing conservation programs with these populations will be presented.

  12. A case of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with contralateral psychogenic hearing loss induced by gunshot noise.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young-Ho; Mun, Seog-Kyun

    2011-10-01

    The reasons behind sudden sensorineural hearing loss are mostly unknown, but viral infections, blood disorders, ototoxicity, noise trauma, autoimmune disease, acoustic tumor, and even mental stress may be related to the disease. In cases of hearing loss as a result of psychogenic factors, early diagnosis and adequate treatment under collaboration with the psychiatric department are crucial, since failure to take appropriate measures may result in permanent sequela. We report a case, with a review of the literature, of sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss with contralateral psychogenic hearing loss induced by gunshot noise. PMID:22128658

  13. 38 CFR 3.385 - Disability due to impaired hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disability due to... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.385 Disability due to impaired hearing. For the purposes of applying the laws administered by VA, impaired hearing will be considered to be a disability when...

  14. 38 CFR 3.385 - Disability due to impaired hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disability due to... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.385 Disability due to impaired hearing. For the purposes of applying the laws administered by VA, impaired hearing will be considered to be a disability when...

  15. 38 CFR 3.385 - Disability due to impaired hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disability due to... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.385 Disability due to impaired hearing. For the purposes of applying the laws administered by VA, impaired hearing will be considered to be a disability when...

  16. 38 CFR 3.385 - Disability due to impaired hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disability due to... Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.385 Disability due to impaired hearing. For the purposes of applying the laws administered by VA, impaired hearing will be considered to be a disability when...

  17. Hearing loss severity: impaired processing of formant transition duration.

    PubMed

    Coez, A; Belin, P; Bizaguet, E; Ferrary, E; Zilbovicius, M; Samson, Y

    2010-08-01

    Normal hearing listeners exploit the formant transition (FT) detection to identify place of articulation for stop consonants. Neuro-imaging studies revealed that short FT induced less cortical activation than long FT. To determine the ability of hearing impaired listeners to distinguish short and long formant transitions (FT) from vowels of the same duration, 84 mild to severe hearing impaired listeners and 5 normal hearing listeners were asked to detect 10 synthesized stimuli with long (200 ms) or short (40 ms) FT among 30 stimuli of the same duration without FT. Hearing impaired listeners were tested with and without hearing aids. The effect of the difficulty of the task (short/long FT) was analysed as a function of the hearing loss with and without hearing aids. Normal hearing listeners were able to detect every FT (short and long). For hearing impaired listeners, the detection of long FT was better than that of short ones irrespective of their degree of hearing loss. The use of hearing aids improved detection of both kinds of FT; however, the detection of long FT remained much better than the detection of the short ones. The length of FT modified the ability of hearing impaired patients to detect FT. Short FT had access to less cortical processing than long FT and cochlea damages enhanced this specific deficit in short FT brain processing. These findings help to understand the limit of deafness rehabilitation in the time domain and should be taken into account in future devices development. PMID:20600193

  18. [Hearing loss associated with smoking in male workers].

    PubMed

    Takata, Yasumitsu

    2011-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was designed to examine the effect of smoking habit on hearing loss at 1000 and 4000 Hz in the workplace. Among 1,875 male workers, including 287 subjects with occupational noise exposure, the ratio of the number with hearing loss at 1000 or 4000 Hz increased with smoking habits and that relation at 4000 Hz was statistically significant. These hearing losses showed a significant relation with age but not with working- duration under occupational noise exposure by multiple regression analysis. The amount of smoking showed a weak but significant association with hearing loss at 4000 Hz. However, among the 287 male subjects with occupational noise exposure, there was no significant relation between smoking habits and hearing loss. Therefore, both hearing loss induced by occupational noise exposure and that related with smoking habit were well controlled in this workplace. These results indicate that hearing check-ups and education to prevent noise-induced hearing impairment in the workplace might be useful to prevent the hearing loss associated with smoking habit among male workers. PMID:21438339

  19. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  20. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Hartmut; Rählmann, Sebastian; Walger, Martin; Margolf-Hackl, Sabine; Kießling, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons. Methods Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated. Results Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity – as determined by the fluid intelligence measure – was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered. Conclusion The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive function in experienced hearing aid users. However, it was found that lower fluid intelligence scores were related to higher hearing thresholds. Since greater hearing loss was associated with a greater objective benefit, these results strongly support the advice of using hearing aids regardless of age and cognitive function to counter hearing loss and the adverse effects of age-related hearing impairment. Still

  1. Noise-related hearing loss can be avoided

    SciTech Connect

    Istre, C.O. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The physiological changes in the auditory organ are described with the protective equipment available for prevention of occupationally related hearing losses. Since most affected employees are unaware of the hearing loss until the damage is irreversible the author stresses that protective equipment usage must be mandatory for supervisory as well as active workers. Mechanical movement, combustion, and high pressure venting are all listed as detrimental to human hearing. (PSB)

  2. Auditory Sequential Organization among Children with and without a Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jutras, Benoit; Gagne, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    Forty-eight children, either with or without a sensorineural hearing loss and either young (6 and 7 years old) or older (9 and 10 years old) reproduced sequences of acoustic stimuli that varied in number, temporal spacing, and type. Results suggested that the poorer performance of the hearing-impaired children was due to auditory processing…

  3. Arts Education: Diminishing Communications Barriers for Students with Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Susan D.

    1996-01-01

    The writer, an individual with progressive hearing loss, describes the isolation and powerlessness experienced by people with hearing loss and comments on the great value that participation in the arts and art education can have in moderating this isolation and empowering individuals to find their own identity. (DB)

  4. A Young Man With Progressive Vision and Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nathan H; Bucelli, Robert C; Van Stavern, Renee B; Goebel, Joel A; Van Stavern, Gregory P

    2016-07-01

    A 37-year-old man with a history of progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss presented to a neuro-ophthalmology clinic with an acute left homonymous hemianopsia. In this article, we discuss the clinical approach and differential diagnosis of progressive combined vision and hearing loss and guide the reader to discover the patient's ultimate diagnosis. PMID:27213952

  5. Mild and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Implications for Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstrum, W. June; Biernath, Krista; McKay, Sarah; Ross, Danielle S.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn hearing screening has become a standard practice in most birthing hospitals in the United States. Historically, the primary target for the identification of hearing loss has been infants with permanent bilateral loss of moderate degree or greater (i.e., greater than 40 dB). However, research indicates that without early identification and…

  6. Effective Identification of Functional Hearing Loss Using Behavioral Threshold Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlauch, Robert S.; Koerner, Tess K.; Marshall, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Four functional hearing loss protocols were evaluated. Method: For each protocol, 30 participants feigned a hearing loss first on an audiogram and then for a screening test that began a threshold search from extreme levels (-10 or 90 dB HL). Two-tone and 3-tone protocols compared thresholds for ascending and descending tones for 2 (0.5…

  7. Hearing loss in children with very low birth weight: current review of epidemiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Cristobal, R; Oghalai, J S

    2008-11-01

    An association between birth weight <1500 g (very low birth weight (VLBW)) and hearing loss has been long recognised. As universal hearing screening programmes have become widely implemented and the survival rate of VLBW babies in modern intensive care units has increased, we have gained a substantially better understanding of the nature of this problem. However, many gaps in our knowledge base exist. This review describes recent data on hearing loss in the VLBW population and explains the current level of understanding about the physiological basis underlying the auditory deficits in these patients. Although VLBW alone may not have a severe impact on hearing, it is commonly associated with multiple other risk factors that can alter hearing in a synergistic fashion. Therefore, the risk of hearing loss is substantially higher than in the general newborn population. Also, it is important to perform a more comprehensive audiometric evaluation than standard otoacoustic emission screening for infants who are in the neonatal intensive care unit in order not to miss hearing loss due to retrocochlear pathology. Furthermore, children with VLBW are also at increased risk of experiencing progressive or delayed-onset hearing loss, and thus should continue to have serial hearing evaluations after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:18941031

  8. Hearing loss in children with very low birth weight: current review of epidemiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cristobal, R; Oghalai, J S

    2013-01-01

    An association between birth weight <1500 g (very low birth weight (VLBW)) and hearing loss has been long recognised. As universal hearing screening programmes have become widely implemented and the survival rate of VLBW babies in modern intensive care units has increased, we have gained a substantially better understanding of the nature of this problem. However, many gaps in our knowledge base exist. This review describes recent data on hearing loss in the VLBW population and explains the current level of understanding about the physiological basis underlying the auditory deficits in these patients. Although VLBW alone may not have a severe impact on hearing, it is commonly associated with multiple other risk factors that can alter hearing in a synergistic fashion. Therefore, the risk of hearing loss is substantially higher than in the general newborn population. Also, it is important to perform a more comprehensive audiometric evaluation than standard otoacoustic emission screening for infants who are in the neonatal intensive care unit in order not to miss hearing loss due to retrocochlear pathology. Furthermore, children with VLBW are also at increased risk of experiencing progressive or delayed-onset hearing loss, and thus should continue to have serial hearing evaluations after discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:18941031

  9. Hearing in young adults. Part I: The effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Vinck, Bart

    2015-01-01

    There is great concern regarding the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in youth caused by high sound levels during various leisure activities. Health-orientated behavior of young adults might be linked to the beliefs and attitudes toward noise, hearing loss, and hearing protector devices (HPDs). The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of attitudes and beliefs toward noise, hearing loss, and HPDs on young adults’ hearing status. A questionnaire and an audiological test battery were completed by 163 subjects (aged 18-30 years). The questionnaire contained the Youth Attitude to Noise Scale (YANS) and Beliefs about Hearing Protection and Hearing Loss (BAHPHL). A more positive attitude or belief represented an attitude where noise or hearing loss is seen as unproblematic and attitudes and beliefs regarding HPDs is worse. Hearing was evaluated using (high frequency) pure tone audiometry (PTA), transient evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. First, mean differences in hearing between the groups with different attitudes and beliefs were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Second, a χ2 test was used to examine the usage of HPDs by the different groups with different attitudes and beliefs. Young adults with a positive attitude had significantly more deteriorated hearing and used HPDs less than the other subjects. Hearing conservation programs (HCPs) for young adults should provide information and knowledge regarding noise, hearing loss, and HPDs. Barriers wearing HPDs should especially be discussed. Further, those campaigns should focus on self-experienced hearing related symptoms that might serve as triggers for attitudinal and behavioral changes. PMID:26356365

  10. Screening of Connexin 26 in Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Danielle; Silva, Daniela da; Lopez, Priscila; Mantovani, Jair Cortez

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The first locus for nonsyndromic autosomal recessive hearing loss is on chromosome 13q11–22. The 35delG mutation is present in 80% of cases in which GJB2 is involved, which makes the study of this mutation very important. The viability and benefits of screening for mutations in the connexin 26 gene are now beginning to change the diagnostic evaluation and identification of the etiology of hearing loss. Objective To investigate the occurrence of the 35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and their first degree relatives. Methods This transversal study included 72 patients from the local hospital. The patients were divided into three groups: group A, sensorineural hearing loss (n = 58); group B, first-degree relatives of group A with sensorineural hearing loss (n = 09); and group C, first-degree relatives of patients from group A without hearing loss (n = 05). All patients had audiological evaluation and genetic testing of the 35delG mutation. Results The 35delG mutation was found in four heterozygous mutations (three of them found in the same family). The other heterozygous mutation was found in a female patient with bilateral, moderate, prelingual, sensorineural hearing loss. A single homozygous mutation was found in a male patient, with severe sensorineural hearing loss in his right ear and profound hearing loss in the left ear. Conclusions The 35delG mutation was found in 7% of the cases. The test is easy to perform and inexpensive, but it is necessary to investigate other genes related to hearing loss. PMID:25992148

  11. Current aspects of hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise

    PubMed Central

    Plontke, S.; Zenner, H.-P.

    2004-01-01

    Hearing loss from occupational and leisure noise numbers amongst the most frequent causes of an acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Here we present a review of up-to-date findings on the pathophysiology of acoustic injury to the inner ear, with special attention being paid to its molecular-biological and genetic aspects. Epidemiological aspects shall also be dealt with, as shall the roles of lacking recovery from occupational noise due to additional exposure by leisure noise and the combined exposure of noise and chemicals. Based on the epidemiological and pathophysiological findings and against the background of published animal-experimental, pre-clinical and clinical findings, the various approaches for prevention, protection and therapeutic intervention with acoustic trauma are discussed. Pharmacological strategies involving anti-oxidative, anti-excitotoxic and anti-apoptotic substances as well as non-pharmacological strategies like "sound conditioning" are given attention. Furthermore, systemic and local substance application as well as the therapy of acute acoustic trauma and chronic hearing problems (including modern therapy forms for comorbidities such as tinnitus) shall be delved into. PMID:22073048

  12. Hearing Outcomes After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas : Mechanism of Hearing Loss and How to Preserve Hearing.

    PubMed

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Jung, Hee-Won

    2016-01-01

    The use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) expanded to include the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs) in 1969; since then, efforts to increase tumour control and to reduce cranial neuropathy have continued. Using the currently recommended marginal dose of 12-13 Gy, long-term reported outcomes after SRS include not only excellent tumour control rates of 92-100 % but also outstanding functional preservation of the trigeminal and facial nerves, with values of 92-100 % and 94-100 %, respectively. Nonetheless, hearing preservation remains in the range of 32-81 %. Previous studies have suggested possible prognostic factors of hearing preservation such as the Gardner-Robertson grade, radiation dose to the cochlea, transient volume expansion (TVE) after SRS, length of irradiated cochlear nerve, marginal dose to the tumour, and age. However, we still do not clearly understand why patients lose their hearing after SRS for VS.Relevant to these considerations, one study recently reported that the auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave V latency and waves I and V interval (IL_I-V) correlated well with intracanalicular pressure values and even with hearing level. The demonstration that ABR values, especially wave V latency and IL_I-V, correlate well with intracanalicular pressure suggests that patients with previously elevated intracanalicular pressure might have an increased chance of hearing loss on development of TVE, which has been recognised as a common phenomenon after SRS or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for intracranial schwannomas.In our experience, the ABR IL_I-V increased during the first 12 months after SRS for VSs in patients who lost their serviceable hearing. The effect of increased ABR IL_I-V on hearing outcome also became significant over time, especially at 12 months after SRS, and was more prominent in patients with poor initial pure-tone average (PTA) and/or ABR values. We hypothesise that patients with considerable intracanalicular pressure at the

  13. Positive, Neutral, and Negative Connotations Associated with Social Representation of 'Hearing Loss' and 'Hearing Aids'

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Gretchen; Danermark, Berth; Germundsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives In our previous studies we explored the social representation of hearing loss and hearing aids. In this study we aimed at exploring if the positive, neutral and negative connotations associated with the social representation of 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids' for the same categories vary across countries. In addition, we also looked at if there is an association between connotations and demographic variables. Subjects and Methods A total of 404 individuals from four countries were asked to indicate the words and phrases that comes to mind when they think about 'hearing loss' and 'hearing aids'. They also indicated if the words and phrases they reported had positive, neutral or negative association, which were analyzed and reported in this paper. Results There are considerable differences among the countries in terms of positive, neutral and negative associations report for each category in relation to hearing loss and hearing aids. However, there is limited connection between demographic variables and connotations reported in different countries. Conclusions These results suggesting that the social representation about the phenomenon hearing loss and hearing aids are relatively stable within respondents of each country. PMID:26771011

  14. Changes in auditory perceptions and cortex resulting from hearing recovery after extended congenital unilateral hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Firszt, Jill B.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Holden, Timothy A.; Burton, Harold; Chole, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Monaural hearing induces auditory system reorganization. Imbalanced input also degrades time-intensity cues for sound localization and signal segregation for listening in noise. While there have been studies of bilateral auditory deprivation and later hearing restoration (e.g., cochlear implants), less is known about unilateral auditory deprivation and subsequent hearing improvement. We investigated effects of long-term congenital unilateral hearing loss on localization, speech understanding, and cortical organization following hearing recovery. Hearing in the congenitally affected ear of a 41 year old female improved significantly after stapedotomy and reconstruction. Pre-operative hearing threshold levels showed unilateral, mixed, moderately-severe to profound hearing loss. The contralateral ear had hearing threshold levels within normal limits. Testing was completed prior to, and 3 and 9 months after surgery. Measurements were of sound localization with intensity-roved stimuli and speech recognition in various noise conditions. We also evoked magnetic resonance signals with monaural stimulation to the unaffected ear. Activation magnitudes were determined in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex regions via an interrupted single event design. Hearing improvement following 40 years of congenital unilateral hearing loss resulted in substantially improved sound localization and speech recognition in noise. Auditory cortex also reorganized. Contralateral auditory cortex responses were increased after hearing recovery and the extent of activated cortex was bilateral, including a greater portion of the posterior superior temporal plane. Thus, prolonged predominant monaural stimulation did not prevent auditory system changes consequent to restored binaural hearing. Results support future research of unilateral auditory deprivation effects and plasticity, with consideration for length of deprivation, age at hearing correction and degree and type of hearing loss. PMID

  15. Disrupted functional brain connectome in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Fan, Wenliang; Zhao, Xueyan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenjuan; Lei, Ping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Haha; Cheng, Huamao; Shi, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is generally defined as sensorineural hearing loss of 30 dB or greater over at least three contiguous audiometric frequencies and within a three-day period. This hearing loss is usually unilateral and can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. The pathogenesis of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss is still unknown, and the alterations in the functional connectivity are suspected to involve one possible pathogenesis. Despite scarce findings with respect to alterations in brain functional networks in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss, the alterations of the whole brain functional connectome and whether these alterations were already in existence in the acute period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations of brain functional connectome in two large samples of unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients and to investigate the correlation between unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss characteristics and changes in the functional network properties. Pure tone audiometry was performed to assess hearing ability. Abnormal changes in the peripheral auditory system were examined using conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The graph theoretical network analysis method was used to detect brain connectome alterations in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Compared with the control groups, both groups of unilateral SSNHL patients exhibited a significantly increased clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency but a significantly decreased characteristic path length. In addition, the primary increased nodal strength (e.g., nodal betweenness, hubs) was observed in several regions primarily, including the limbic and paralimbic systems, and in the auditory network brain areas. These findings suggest that the alteration of network organization already exists in unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients within the acute period

  16. Chronic Conductive Hearing Loss Leads to Cochlear Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, M. Charles; Liberman, Leslie D.; Maison, Stéphane F.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses between cochlear nerve terminals and hair cells are the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear in both noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, and this neuropathy is exacerbated in the absence of efferent feedback from the olivocochlear bundle. If age-related loss is dominated by a lifetime of exposure to environmental sounds, reduction of acoustic drive to the inner ear might improve cochlear preservation throughout life. To test this, we removed the tympanic membrane unilaterally in one group of young adult mice, removed the olivocochlear bundle in another group and compared their cochlear function and innervation to age-matched controls one year later. Results showed that tympanic membrane removal, and the associated threshold elevation, was counterproductive: cochlear efferent innervation was dramatically reduced, especially the lateral olivocochlear terminals to the inner hair cell area, and there was a corresponding reduction in the number of cochlear nerve synapses. This loss led to a decrease in the amplitude of the suprathreshold cochlear neural responses. Similar results were seen in two cases with conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media. Outer hair cell death was increased only in ears lacking medial olivocochlear innervation following olivocochlear bundle cuts. Results suggest the novel ideas that 1) the olivocochlear efferent pathway has a dramatic use-dependent plasticity even in the adult ear and 2) a component of the lingering auditory processing disorder seen in humans after persistent middle-ear infections is cochlear in origin. PMID:26580411

  17. Hearing Loss and Older Adults’ Perceptions of Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jessica R.; Barnett, Steven; Smith, Maureen A.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether hard-of-hearing older adults were more likely to report difficulties and delays in accessing care and decreased satisfaction with healthcare access than those without hearing loss. The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2003–2006 wave, N = 6,524) surveyed respondents regarding hearing, difficulties/delays in accessing care, satisfaction with healthcare access, socio-demographics, chronic conditions, self-rated health, depression, and length of relationship with provider/site. We used multivariate regression to compare access difficulties/delays and satisfaction by respondents’ hearing status (hard-of-hearing or not). Hard-of-hearing individuals comprised 18% of the sample. Compared to those not hard-of-hearing, hard-of-hearing individuals were significantly more likely to be older, male and separated/divorced. They had a higher mean number of chronic conditions, including atherosclerotic vascular disease, diabetes and depression. After adjustment for potential confounders, hard-of-hearing individuals were more likely to report difficulties in accessing healthcare (Odds Ratio 1.85; 95% Confidence Interval 1.19–2.88). Satisfaction with healthcare access was similar in both groups. Our findings suggest healthcare access difficulties will be heightened for more of the population because of the increasing prevalence of hearing loss. The prevalence of hearing loss in this data is low and our findings from a telephone survey likely underestimate the magnitude of access difficulties experienced by hard-of-hearing older adults. Further research which incorporates accessible surveys is needed. In the meantime, clinicians should pay particular attention to assessing barriers in healthcare access for hard-of-hearing individuals. Resources should be made available to proactively address these issues for those who are hard-of-hearing and to educate providers about the specific needs of this population. PMID:21301940

  18. Prelinguistic Vocal Development in Infants with Typical Hearing and Infants with Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Oller, D. Kimbrough

    2008-01-01

    Delays in the onset of canonical babbling with hearing loss are extensively documented. Relatively little is known about other aspects of prelinguistic vocal development and hearing loss. Eight infants with typical hearing and eight with severe-to-profound hearing loss were matched with regard to a significant vocal development milestone, the…

  19. Differential pathologies resulting from sound exposure: Tinnitus vs hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longenecker, Ryan James

    The first step in identifying the mechanism(s) responsible for tinnitus development would be to discover a neural correlate that is differentially expressed in tinnitus-positive compared to tinnitus negative animals. Previous research has identified several neural correlates of tinnitus in animals that have tested positive for tinnitus. However it is unknown whether all or some of these correlates are linked to tinnitus or if they are a byproduct of hearing loss, a common outcome of tinnitus induction. Abnormally high spontaneous activity has frequently been linked to tinnitus. However, while some studies demonstrate that hyperactivity positively correlates with behavioral evidence of tinnitus, others show that when all animals develop hyperactivity to sound exposure, not all exposed animals show evidence of tinnitus. My working hypothesis is that certain aspects of hyperactivity are linked to tinnitus while other aspects are linked to hearing loss. The first specific aim utilized the gap induced prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (GIPAS) to monitor the development of tinnitus in CBA/CaJ mice during one year following sound exposure. Immediately after sound exposure, GIPAS testing revealed widespread gap detection deficits across all frequencies, which was likely due to temporary threshold shifts. However, three months after sound exposure these deficits were limited to a narrow frequency band and were consistently detected up to one year after exposure. This suggests the development of chronic tinnitus is a long lasting and highly dynamic process. The second specific aim assessed hearing loss in sound exposed mice using several techniques. Acoustic brainstem responses recorded initially after sound exposure reveal large magnitude deficits in all exposed mice. However, at the three month period, thresholds return to control levels in all mice suggesting that ABRs are not a reliable tool for assessing permanent hearing loss. Input/output functions of

  20. A Case of the Vibrant Soundbridge Stapes Coupler in Patients with Mixed Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Jeon, Ju Hyun; Choi, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    The Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) with stapes clip coupler placement at the stapes head has been used successfully to treat mixed hearing loss. Coupling between the floating mass transducer of the VSB and the stapes head is technically less demanding than incus vibroplasty and is more likely to generate a positive outcome without significantly changing residual hearing or resulting in medical or surgical complications. A 65-year-old man with bilateral mixed hearing loss and chronic otitis media underwent vibroplasty with a stapes clip coupler. Speech discrimination scores in both quiet and noise environments showed better functional gain with the VSB than with the use of a conventional hearing aid. The results of the present case show the feasibility of implanting a VSB with a stapes coupler in patients with mixed hearing loss due to chronic otitis media. PMID:25279233

  1. Hearing loss in hydrocephalus: a review, with focus on mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Satzer, David; Guillaume, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    While neither hydrocephalus nor cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt placement is traditionally considered in the differential diagnosis of hearing loss, there is substantial evidence that CSF circulation and pressure abnormalities can produce auditory dysfunction. Several indirect mechanisms may explain association between hydrocephalus and hearing loss, including mass effect, compromise of the auditory pathway, complications of prematurity, and genetically mediated hydrocephalus and hearing loss. Nevertheless, researchers have proposed a direct mechanism, which we term the hydrodynamic theory. In this hypothesis, the intimate relationship between CSF and inner ear fluids permits relative endolymphatic or perilymphatic hydrops in the setting of CSF pressure disturbances. CSF is continuous with perilymph, and CSF pressure changes are known to produce parallel perilymphatic pressure changes. In support of the hydrodynamic theory, some studies have found an independent association between hydrocephalus and hearing loss. Moreover, surgical shunting of CSF has been linked to both resolution and development of auditory dysfunction. The disease burden of hydrocephalus-associated hearing loss may be large, and because hydrocephalus and over-shunting are reversible, this relationship merits broader recognition. Hydrocephalic patients should be monitored for hearing loss, and hearing loss in a patient with shunted hydrocephalus should prompt further evaluation and possibly adjustment of shunt settings. PMID:26280639

  2. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. Objectives  To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an early diagnosis of metabolic disorders and diabetes. Methods  Retrospective study of 376 patients with inner ear symptoms suggestive of disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism. The authors present patientś clinical symptoms and clinical evaluations, with emphasis on the glucose and insulin essays. Results  Authors based their conclusions on otolaryngological findings, diagnostic procedures and treatment principles. They found that auditory and vestibular symptoms usually occur prior to other manifestations of metabolic changes, leading to an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, intestinal sugar malabsorption or diabetes. Previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus type II was found in 39 patients. Conclusions  The identification of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances is important not only to minimize the patients' clinical symptoms, but also to help maintain their general health. PMID:27413410

  3. Hearing Loss and Deafness. An Annotated Bibliography of Children's Books about Hearing Loss, Deafness, and Hearing Impaired People. Have You Ever Wondered About...?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldman-Brown, Deborah

    The annotated bibliography lists children's books about hearing loss, deafness, and hearing-impaired persons. The first section lists books about Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan, Keller's teacher. In section 2, each of the fiction entries features at least one major character with hearing impairment. Section 3 contains non-fiction books about…

  4. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey

    PubMed Central

    Størmer, Carl Christian Lein; Laukli, Einar; Høydal, Erik Harry; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of Tromsø. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians. PMID:26572701

  5. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey.

    PubMed

    Størmer, Carl Christian Lein; Laukli, Einar; Høydal, Erik Harry; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of TromsØ. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians. PMID:26572701

  6. The role of mitochondria in age-related hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hengchao; Tang, Jianguo

    2014-02-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), the hearing loss associated with aging, is a vital problem in present society. The severity of hearing loss is possibly associated with the degeneration of cochlear cells. Mitochondria play a key role in the energy supply, cellular redox homeostasis, signaling, and regulation of programmed cell death. In this review, we focus on the central role of mitochondria in ARHL. The mitochondrial redox imbalance and mitochondrial DNA mutation might collaboratively involve in the process of cochlear senescence in response to the aging stress. Subsequent responses, including alteration of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitophagy, apoptosis and paraptosis, participate in the aging process from different respects. PMID:24202185

  7. Hearing loss and the high speed dental handpiece.

    PubMed Central

    Zubick, H H; Tolentino, A T; Boffa, J

    1980-01-01

    A pure tone air conduction audiometric evaluation was administered to 137 dentists and 80 physicians. The physicians were found to have better hearing threshold levels, notably in the 4000HZ center frequency range. The left ear of right handed dentists showed a greater loss of hearing ostensibly related to proximity to the noise source. Dental specialists showed a loss pattern similar to those of the general dentists. The findings suggest that there may be a cause and effect relationship between hearing loss and use of the highspeed dental handpiece. PMID:6990802

  8. Sensorineural hearing loss in Lassa fever: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lassa fever is an acute arena viral haemorrhagic fever with varied neurological sequelae. Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the rare complications which occur usually during the convalescent stage of the infection. Case presentation The cases of two female patients aged 19 and 43 years old, respectively, with clinical features suggestive of Lassa fever and confirmed by immunoserological/Lassa-virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are presented. Both patients developed severe sensorineural hearing loss at acute phases of the infections. Conclusion Sensorineural hearing loss from Lassa fever infections can occur in both acute and convalescent stages and is probably induced by an immune response. PMID:19178735

  9. Ear Infection and Hearing Loss Amongst Headphone Users

    PubMed Central

    Mazlan, R.; Saim, L.; Thomas, A.; Said, R.; Liyab, B.

    2002-01-01

    The use of headphone has been thought to cause infection in the ear canal and contribute to hearing loss. In this study, we examined 136 Customer Service Representative from Celcom (Malaysia) Sdn. Bhd. who use headphone throughout their working hours. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of ear canal infection and other related diseases of the ear, nose and throat. Their hearing thresholds were also determined using the Amplaid 309 Clinical Audiometer. We found no incidence of infection of the external ear canal amongst the subjects. There were 4 cases of chronic middle ear infection and 4 cases of impacted wax. Hearing impairment was found in 25 subjects (21.2%). However, there was no significant association between hearing loss and the exposure to sound from headphone usage because the high frequencies were not predominantly affected. There was also no association between hearing loss and duration of service. PMID:22844220

  10. Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss: Some Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Benjamin W. Y.; Werfel, Krystal; Camarata, Stephen; Bess, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined the effect of hearing loss on subjective reports of fatigue in school-age children using a standardized measure. Methods As part of a larger ongoing study, the authors obtained subjective ratings of fatigue using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (Varni, Burwinkle, Katz, Meeske, & Dickinson, 2002). This standardized scale provides a measure of general fatigue, sleep/rest fatigue, cognitive fatigue, and an overall composite measure of fatigue. To date, data from 10 children with hearing loss (CHL) and 10 age-matched children with normal hearing (CNH) have been analyzed. Results These preliminary results show that subjective fatigue is increased in school-age children with hearing loss (Cohen's d = 0.78–1.90). In addition, the impact of hearing loss on fatigue in school-age children appears pervasive across multiple domains (general, sleep/rest, and cognitive fatigue). Conclusion School-age CHL reported significantly more fatigue than did CNH. These preliminary data are important given the negative academic and psychosocial consequences associated with fatigue. Further research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for this increased fatigue in school-age children with hearing loss, and to identify factors that may modulate (e.g., degree of loss) and mediate (e.g., hearing aid or cochlear implant use) its impact. PMID:23824428

  11. Hearing Loss in Middle-Age Persons with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenhuis, H. M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study assessed the hearing function of 35 middle-aged adults with Down's syndrome by means of otoscopy, impedance audiometry, brainstem evoked response audiometry, and pure tone audiometry. The study found brainstem evoked response audiometry useful for routine audiological assessment, as it identified hearing losses of 20 to 90 decibels in…

  12. 76 FR 31543 - Controlled Groups; Deferral of Losses; Hearing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... Register on Thursday, April 21, 2011 (76 FR 22336). Persons who wish to present oral comments at the... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI92 Controlled Groups; Deferral of Losses; Hearing AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice of public hearing on proposed rulemaking....

  13. Identifying Hearing Loss in Young Children: Technology Replaces the Bell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiserman, William; Shisler, Lenore

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss can too easily be misdiagnosed or overlooked by providers serving young children. Parents and professionals may observe a language delay--an "invisible" condition--while failing to identify the underlying cause. Otoacoustic emissions (OAE) hearing screening technology, used extensively with newborns, is becoming an essential tool,…

  14. Toward a Diagnostic Test for Hidden Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Plack, Christopher J; Léger, Agnès; Prendergast, Garreth; Kluk, Karolina; Guest, Hannah; Munro, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear synaptopathy (or hidden hearing loss), due to noise exposure or aging, has been demonstrated in animal models using histological techniques. However, diagnosis of the condition in individual humans is problematic because of (a) test reliability and (b) lack of a gold standard validation measure. Wave I of the transient-evoked auditory brainstem response is a noninvasive electrophysiological measure of auditory nerve function and has been validated in the animal models. However, in humans, Wave I amplitude shows high variability both between and within individuals. The frequency-following response, a sustained evoked potential reflecting synchronous neural activity in the rostral brainstem, is potentially more robust than auditory brainstem response Wave I. However, the frequency-following response is a measure of central activity and may be dependent on individual differences in central processing. Psychophysical measures are also affected by intersubject variability in central processing. Differential measures may help to reduce intersubject variability due to unrelated factors. A measure can be compared, within an individual, between conditions that are affected differently by cochlear synaptopathy. Validation of the metrics is also an issue. Comparisons with animal models, computational modeling, auditory nerve imaging, and human temporal bone histology are all potential options for validation, but there are technical and practical hurdles and difficulties in interpretation. Despite the obstacles, a diagnostic test for hidden hearing loss is a worthwhile goal, with important implications for clinical practice and health surveillance. PMID:27604783

  15. Prospective Study of Alcohol Consumption and Self-reported Hearing Loss in Women

    PubMed Central

    Curhan, Sharon G.; Eavey, Roland; Wang, Molin; Stampfer, Meir J.; Curhan, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic excess alcohol intake has been associated with irreversible hearing loss and acute alcohol intake may temporarily impair auditory function; however, some evidence suggests that long-term moderate alcohol intake may be related to lower risk of hearing loss. This study prospectively examined the association between total alcohol and individual alcoholic beverage consumption and risk of hearing loss in women. Data were prospectively collected from 65,424 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II) aged 27–44 years at baseline (follow-up 1991–2009). Alcohol consumption was assessed using a validated questionnaire every 4 years. An incident case was defined as self-reported hearing problem that began after 1991. Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. During 1,024,555 person-years of follow-up, 12,384 cases of hearing loss occurred. After multivariate adjustment, there was no significant association between total alcohol consumption and risk of hearing loss. In exploratory analyses, beer consumption was associated with increased risk and wine consumption was associated with reduced risk. No significant association was observed for consumption of liquor. Total alcohol consumption is not associated with risk of hearing loss in women. The modest associations observed for beer (direct) and wine (inverse) may be due to chance or residual confounding but merit further study. PMID:25468591

  16. The Socioeconomic Impact of Hearing Loss in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Emmett, Susan D.; Francis, Howard W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the associations between hearing loss and educational attainment, income, and unemployment/underemployment in US adults. Study design National cross-sectional survey. Setting Ambulatory examination centers. Patients Adults aged 20-69 years who participated in the 1999-2002 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) audiometric evaluation and income questionnaire (n = 3379). Intervention(s) Pure tone audiometry, with hearing loss defined by World Health Organization criteria of bilateral pure tone average >25 decibels (0.5,1,2,4 kHz). Main outcome measure(s) Low educational attainment, defined as not completing high school; low income, defined as family income less than $20,000/year, and unemployment or underemployment, defined as not having a job or working less than 35 hours per week. Results Individuals with hearing loss had 3.21 times higher odds of low educational attainment (95% CI: 2.20-4.68) compared to normal-hearing individuals. Controlling for education, age, sex, and race, individuals with hearing loss had 1.58 times higher odds of low income (95% CI: 1.16-2.15) and 1.98 times higher odds of being unemployed or underemployed (95% CI: 1.38-2.85) compared to normal-hearing individuals. Conclusions Hearing loss is associated with low educational attainment in US adults. Even after controlling for education and important demographic factors, hearing loss is independently associated with economic hardship, including both low income and unemployment/underemployment. The societal impact of hearing loss is profound in this nationally representative study and should be further evaluated with longitudinal cohorts. PMID:25158616

  17. Comparisons of Social Competence in Young Children With and Without Hearing Loss: A Dynamic Systems Framework

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michael F.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-01-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5–5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that, due to deficits in oral language, children who were deaf would display lower levels of social competence than their hearing peers. Furthermore, language age would predict social competence scores. Social competence was measured with a general and deaf-specific measure. Results showed that children with hearing loss performed significantly worse than hearing peers on the general measure but better than the norms on the deaf-specific measure. Controlling for maternal education and income, regression analyses indicated that hearing status and language age predicted social competence in both groups. Among children with hearing loss, correlations were also found between age at diagnosis, age at amplification, and two of the general social competence measures. Results supported our hypothesis that deficits in language would have cascading negative effects on the development of social competence in young deaf children. Development of early intervention programs that target both language and social skills are needed for this population. PMID:25583707

  18. Comparisons of social competence in young children with and without hearing loss: a dynamic systems framework.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michael F; Quittner, Alexandra L; Cejas, Ivette

    2015-04-01

    This study compared levels of social competence and language development in 74 young children with hearing loss and 38 hearing peers aged 2.5-5.3 years. This study was the first to examine the relationship between oral language and social competence using a dynamic systems framework in children with and without hearing loss. We hypothesized that, due to deficits in oral language, children who were deaf would display lower levels of social competence than their hearing peers. Furthermore, language age would predict social competence scores. Social competence was measured with a general and deaf-specific measure. Results showed that children with hearing loss performed significantly worse than hearing peers on the general measure but better than the norms on the deaf-specific measure. Controlling for maternal education and income, regression analyses indicated that hearing status and language age predicted social competence in both groups. Among children with hearing loss, correlations were also found between age at diagnosis, age at amplification, and two of the general social competence measures. Results supported our hypothesis that deficits in language would have cascading negative effects on the development of social competence in young deaf children. Development of early intervention programs that target both language and social skills are needed for this population. PMID:25583707

  19. Audiological results with Baha in conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, Flurin; Caversaccio, Marco-Domenico; Kompis, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The level of improvement in the audiological results of Baha(®) users mainly depends on the patient's preoperative hearing thresholds and the type of Baha sound processor used. This investigation shows correlations between the preoperative hearing threshold and postoperative aided thresholds and audiological results in speech understanding in quiet of 84 Baha users with unilateral conductive hearing loss, bilateral conductive hearing loss and bilateral mixed hearing loss. Secondly, speech understanding in noise of 26 Baha users with different Baha sound processors (Compact, Divino, and BP100) is investigated. Linear regression between aided sound field thresholds and bone conduction (BC) thresholds of the better ear shows highest correlation coefficients and the steepest slope. Differences between better BC thresholds and aided sound field thresholds are smallest for mid-frequencies (1 and 2 kHz) and become larger at 0.5 and 4 kHz. For Baha users, the gain in speech recognition in quiet can be expected to lie in the order of magnitude of the gain in their hearing threshold. Compared to its predecessor sound processors Baha(®) Compact and Baha(®) Divino, Baha(®) BP100 improves speech understanding in noise significantly by +0.9 to +4.6 dB signal-to-noise ratio, depending on the setting and the use of directional microphone. For Baha users with unilateral and bilateral conductive hearing loss and bilateral mixed hearing loss, audiological results in aided sound field thresholds can be estimated with the better BC hearing threshold. The benefit in speech understanding in quiet can be expected to be similar to the gain in their sound field hearing threshold. The most recent technology of Baha sound processor improves speech understanding in noise by an order of magnitude that is well perceived by users and which can be very useful in everyday life. PMID:21389707

  20. [Sudden hearing loss and the cranio-cervical junction].

    PubMed

    Bernal Sprekelsen, M; Hörmann, K; Weh, L

    1990-01-01

    Morphological alterations of the craniocervical junction as basilar impressions, a ponticulus posterior, an atlas assimilation, an intervertebral narrowing and spondylosis deformans, were found radiologically in patients with sudden hearing loss. There were no radiological differences to a healthy population. No relationship could be established between static morphological changes of the craniocervical junction of the upper cervical spine and the sudden hearing loss. However, there was a statistically significant reduction of the mobility in the upper cervical spine in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss. Very high standard deviations in the atlanto-occipital and the atlanto-odontoid joints are interpreted as hyper- as well as hypomobile joints. These results indicate a possible correlation between sudden hearing loss and a functional pathology of the craniocervical junction. PMID:2221307

  1. Auditory Evoked Potential Response and Hearing Loss: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Paulraj, M. P; Subramaniam, Kamalraj; Yaccob, Sazali Bin; Adom, Abdul H. Bin; Hema, C. R

    2015-01-01

    Hypoacusis is the most prevalent sensory disability in the world and consequently, it can lead to impede speech in human beings. One best approach to tackle this issue is to conduct early and effective hearing screening test using Electroencephalogram (EEG). EEG based hearing threshold level determination is most suitable for persons who lack verbal communication and behavioral response to sound stimulation. Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is a type of EEG signal emanated from the brain scalp by an acoustical stimulus. The goal of this review is to assess the current state of knowledge in estimating the hearing threshold levels based on AEP response. AEP response reflects the auditory ability level of an individual. An intelligent hearing perception level system enables to examine and determine the functional integrity of the auditory system. Systematic evaluation of EEG based hearing perception level system predicting the hearing loss in newborns, infants and multiple handicaps will be a priority of interest for future research. PMID:25893012

  2. Automatic hearing loss detection system based on auditory brainstem response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldonate, J.; Mercuri, C.; Reta, J.; Biurrun, J.; Bonell, C.; Gentiletti, G.; Escobar, S.; Acevedo, R.

    2007-11-01

    Hearing loss is one of the pathologies with the highest prevalence in newborns. If it is not detected in time, it can affect the nervous system and cause problems in speech, language and cognitive development. The recommended methods for early detection are based on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) and/or auditory brainstem response (ABR). In this work, the design and implementation of an automated system based on ABR to detect hearing loss in newborns is presented. Preliminary evaluation in adults was satisfactory.

  3. Hearing Loss in Patients with Shunt-Treated Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Panova, Margarita V; Geneva, Ina E; Madjarova, Kalina I; Bosheva, Miroslava N

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common manifestation of the long-term complications in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus along with motor development disturbance, cognitive and visual impairment, epilepsy and endocrine disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alterations of hearing in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus of non-tumor etiology and at least one year after implantation of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, as well as their impact on the quality of life of patients. The study included 70 patients (age range 1.25 years - 21.25 years) with shunted non-tumor hydrocephalus and at least one year after placement of the shunt system. Hearing alterations were proved by measuring the brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) for children up to 5 years of age and children with mental retardation; audiograms was used for children older than 5 years with normal neuro-psychological development (NPD). Of the 70 studied patients 17 (24%) had hearing loss (10 bilateral and 7-unilateral) and all of them had sensorineural hearing loss, which is associated with low weight at birth, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and brainstem symptoms at the time of diagnosis of hydrocephalus. Hearing pathology was found more often in shunt-treated patients with NPD retardation, poor functional status and low quality of life. Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus have hearing loss of sensorineural type. Children with brain stem symptomatology at diagnosing hydrocephalus and children with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus show higher risk of hearing loss. Children with shunted hydrocephalus and hearing loss show lower NPD, lower quality of life and lower functional status. PMID:27180348

  4. Hearing Loss: Communicating With the Patient Who Is Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael M; Moreland, Christopher; Atcherson, Samuel R; Zazove, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss impairs health care communication and adversely affects patient satisfaction, treatment adherence, and use of health services. Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition among older patients after hypertension and arthritis, but only 15% to 18% of older adults are screened for hearing loss during health maintenance examinations. Patients with hearing loss may be reluctant to disclose it because of fear of ageism, perceptions of disability, and vanity. Lipreading and note writing often are ineffective ways to communicate with deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) patients who use American Sign Language; use of medical sign language interpreters is preferred. A variety of strategies can improve the quality of health care communication for DHH patients, such as the physician facing the patient, listening attentively, and using visual tools. Physicians should learn what hearing loss means to the DHH patient. Deaf American Sign Language users may not perceive hearing loss as a disability but as a cultural identity. Patients' preferred communication strategies will vary. Relay services, electronic communication, and other telecommunications methods can be helpful, but family physicians and medical staff should learn from each DHH patient about which communication strategies will work best. PMID:26161525

  5. Pediatric sensorineural hearing loss, part 2: syndromic and acquired causes.

    PubMed

    Huang, B Y; Zdanski, C; Castillo, M

    2012-03-01

    This article is the second in a 2-part series reviewing neuroimaging in childhood SNHL. Previously, we discussed the clinical work-up of children with hearing impairment, the classification of inner ear malformations, and congenital nonsyndromic causes of hearing loss. Here, we review and illustrate the most common syndromic hereditary and acquired causes of childhood SNHL, with an emphasis on entities that demonstrate inner ear abnormalities on cross-sectional imaging. Syndromes discussed include BOR syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Pendred syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, and X-linked hearing loss with stapes gusher. We conclude the article with a review of acquired causes of childhood SNHL, including infections, trauma, and neoplasms. PMID:21596810

  6. Speech Coding in the Midbrain: Effects of Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Carney, Laurel H; Kim, Duck O; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    In response to voiced speech sounds, auditory-nerve (AN) fibres phase-lock to harmonics near best frequency (BF) and to the fundamental frequency (F0) of voiced sounds. Due to nonlinearities in the healthy ear, phase-locking in each frequency channel is dominated either by a single harmonic, for channels tuned near formants, or by F0, for channels between formants. The alternating dominance of these factors sets up a robust pattern of F0-synchronized rate across best frequency (BF). This profile of a temporally coded measure is transformed into a mean rate profile in the midbrain (inferior colliculus, IC), where neurons are sensitive to low-frequency fluctuations. In the impaired ear, the F0-synchronized rate profile is affected by several factors: Reduced synchrony capture decreases the dominance of a single harmonic near BF on the response. Elevated thresholds also reduce the effect of rate saturation, resulting in increased F0-synchrony. Wider peripheral tuning results in a wider-band envelope with reduced F0 amplitude. In general, sensorineural hearing loss reduces the contrast in AN F0-synchronized rates across BF. Computational models for AN and IC neurons illustrate how hearing loss would affect the F0-synchronized rate profiles set up in response to voiced speech sounds. PMID:27080684

  7. The Influence of Hearing Aid Use on Outcomes of Children with Mild Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Holte, Lenore; McCreery, Ryan W.; Spratford, Meredith; Page, Thomas; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of consistent hearing aid (HA) use on outcomes in children with mild hearing loss (HL). Method: Five- or 7-year-old children with mild HL were separated into 3 groups on the basis of patterns of daily HA use. Using analyses of variance, we compared outcomes between groups on speech and language tests and a…

  8. Informational Masking and Spatial Hearing in Listeners with and without Unilateral Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothpletz, Ann M.; Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed selective listening for speech in individuals with and without unilateral hearing loss (UHL) and the potential relationship between spatial release from informational masking and localization ability in listeners with UHL. Method: Twelve adults with UHL and 12 normal-hearing controls completed a series of monaural and…

  9. RNA Interference Prevents Autosomal-Dominant Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Seiji B; Ranum, Paul T; Moteki, Hideaki; Pan, Bifeng; Goodwin, Alexander T; Goodman, Shawn S; Abbas, Paul J; Holt, Jeffrey R; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-06-01

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory deficit. It is frequently caused by the expression of an allele carrying a single dominant missense mutation. Herein, we show that a single intracochlear injection of an artificial microRNA carried in a viral vector can slow progression of hearing loss for up to 35 weeks in the Beethoven mouse, a murine model of non-syndromic human deafness caused by a dominant gain-of-function mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane channel-like 1). This outcome is noteworthy because it demonstrates the feasibility of RNA-interference-mediated suppression of an endogenous deafness-causing allele to slow progression of hearing loss. Given that most autosomal-dominant non-syndromic hearing loss in humans is caused by this mechanism of action, microRNA-based therapeutics might be broadly applicable as a therapy for this type of deafness. PMID:27236922

  10. Awarding and promoting excellence in hearing loss prevention

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Morata, Thais C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the rationale and creation of a national award to recognize and promote hearing loss prevention. Design In 2007, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health partnered with the National Hearing Conservation Association to create the Safe-in-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Award™ (www.safeinsound.us). The objectives of this initiative were to recognize organizations that document measurable achievements and to share leading edge information to a broader community. Results An expert committee developed specific and explicit award evaluation criteria of excellence in hearing loss prevention for organizations in different industrial sectors. The general approach toward award criteria was to incorporate current ‘best practices’ and familiar benchmarks of hearing loss prevention programs. This approach was reviewed publicly. In addition, mechanisms were identified to measure the impact of the award itself. Interest in the award was recorded through the monitoring of the visitor traffic registered by the award web site and is increasing yearly. Specific values and strategies common across award winners are presented. Conclusion The Safe-in-Sound Award™ has obtained high quality field data; identified practical solutions, disseminated successful strategies to minimize the risk of hearing loss, generated new partnerships, and shared practical solutions with others in the field. PMID:22264064

  11. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Attenuate Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Hill, Kayla; Sha, Su-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Loss of auditory sensory hair cells is the major pathological feature of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Currently, no established clinical therapies for prevention or amelioration of NIHL are available. The absence of treatments is due to our lack of a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying noise-induced damage. Our previous study indicates that epigenetic modification of histones alters hair cell survival. In this study, we investigated the effect of noise exposure on histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) in the inner ear of adult CBA/J mice and determined if inhibition of histone deacetylases by systemic administration of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) could attenuate NIHL. Our results showed that H3K9ac was decreased in the nuclei of outer hair cells (OHCs) and marginal cells of the stria vascularis in the basal region after exposure to a traumatic noise paradigm known to induce permanent threshold shifts (PTS). Consistent with these results, levels of histone deacetylases 1, 2, and 3 (HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3) were increased predominately in the nuclei of cochlear cells. Silencing of HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC3 with siRNA reduced the expression of the target HDAC in OHCs, but did not attenuate noise-induced PTS, whereas treatment with the pan-HDAC inhibitor SAHA, also named vorinostat, reduced OHC loss, and attenuated PTS. These findings suggest that histone acetylation is involved in the pathogenesis of noise-induced OHC death and hearing loss. Pharmacological targeting of histone deacetylases may afford a strategy for protection against NIHL. PMID:27095478

  12. Hearing loss in elderly patients in a family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, J F; Gerace, T M; Seewald, R C

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate hearing loss in elderly patients. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Family practice. PATIENTS: All ambulatory patients 65 years of age or older who attended the practice from June to August 1989. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly--Screening Version (HHIE-S) and the Welch-Allyn Audioscope. Patients who failed one or both of the screening tests were referred to a speech and hearing clinic for audiologic assessment and treatment recommendations. Those with hearing aids were excluded from the main study but were given the opportunity to have them assessed at the clinic. MAIN RESULTS: Of 157 eligible patients 42 were excluded: 16 refused to participate, 13 already had hearing aids, and 13 could not be contacted. Of the remaining 115, 34 failed one or both of the tests (14 failed the HHIE-S, 9 failed the audioscope test, and 11 failed both). Of the 34, 25 completed the audiologic assessment at the clinic. Fifteen were found to have severe hearing impairment; the recommendation was hearing aids for 12, further assessment for 2 and no treatment for 1. Of the remaining 10 patients it was thought that 6 would benefit from hearing aids. Ten of the 11 patients with hearing aids who agreed to undergo testing at the clinic were found to need an adjustment or replacement of their devices. CONCLUSIONS: Hearing loss is a significant problem in elderly patients in primary practice. Further study is required to determine which of the two screening tools is most effective. Most elderly patients with hearing aids may require modification or replacement of their devices. PMID:2009476

  13. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss – A Common Hereditary Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, Jeffrey C.; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. However, there is no apparent, demonstrable relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel) functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Cx30 (GJB6), Cx29 (GJC3), Cx31 (GJB3), and Cx43 (GJA1) mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation-induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes remain unclear. Also, little is known about specific mutation-induced pathological changes in vivo and little information is available for humans. Such further studies are urgently required. PMID:26074771

  14. Cochlear microphonics in sensorineural hearing loss: lesson from newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Ahmmed, Ansar; Brockbank, Christopher; Adshead, June

    2008-08-01

    The diagnostic dilemma surrounding the presence of cochlear microphonics (CM) coupled with significantly elevated auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds in babies failing the newborn hearing screening is highlighted. A case report is presented where initial electo-diagnostic assessment could not help in differentiating between Auditory Neuropathy/Auditory Dys-synchrony (AN/AD) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In line with the protocol and guidelines provided by the national Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in the UK (NHSP) AN/AD was suspected in a baby due to the presence of CM at 85 dBnHL along with click evoked ABR thresholds of 95 dBnHL in one ear and 100 dBnHL in the other ear. Significantly elevated thresholds for 0.5 and 1kHz tone pip ABR fulfilled the audiological diagnostic criteria for AN/AD. However, the possibility of a SNHL could not be ruled out as the 85 dBnHL stimuli presented through inserts for the CM would have been significantly enhanced in the ear canals of the young baby to exceed the threshold level of the ABR that was carried out using headphones. SNHL was eventually diagnosed through clinical and family history, physical examination and imaging that showed enlarged vestibular aqueducts. Presence of CM in the presence of very high click ABR thresholds only suggests a pattern of test results and in such cases measuring thresholds for 0.5 and 1 kHz tone pip ABR may not be adequate to differentiate between SNHL and other conditions associated with AN/AD. There is a need for reviewing the existing AN/AD protocol from NHSP in the UK and new research to establish parameters for CM to assist in the differential diagnosis. A holistic audiological and medical approach is essential to manage babies who fail the newborn hearing screening. PMID:18571245

  15. 38 CFR 20.717 - Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts-motion for new hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rule 717. Loss of hearing... on Appeal § 20.717 Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts—motion for new hearing. (a) Motion... motion include, but will not be limited to, the extent of the loss of the record in those cases...

  16. 38 CFR 20.717 - Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts-motion for new hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rule 717. Loss of hearing... on Appeal § 20.717 Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts—motion for new hearing. (a) Motion... motion include, but will not be limited to, the extent of the loss of the record in those cases...

  17. 38 CFR 20.717 - Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts-motion for new hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rule 717. Loss of hearing... on Appeal § 20.717 Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts—motion for new hearing. (a) Motion... motion include, but will not be limited to, the extent of the loss of the record in those cases...

  18. 38 CFR 20.717 - Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts-motion for new hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 717. Loss of hearing... on Appeal § 20.717 Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts—motion for new hearing. (a) Motion... motion include, but will not be limited to, the extent of the loss of the record in those cases...

  19. 38 CFR 20.717 - Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts-motion for new hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rule 717. Loss of hearing... on Appeal § 20.717 Rule 717. Loss of hearing tapes or transcripts—motion for new hearing. (a) Motion... motion include, but will not be limited to, the extent of the loss of the record in those cases...

  20. Temporary Hearing Loss and Rock Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danenberg, Mary A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Pre- and post-exposure testing of normal-hearing secondary school students (N=20) and adult chaperones (N=7) exposed to live rock music indicated that almost all subjects experienced at least a five-decibel threshold shift, with most also reporting tinnitus. Of six subjects retested three days later, four demonstrated partial recovery. (Author/CB)

  1. Evidence for hearing loss in amblyopsid cavefishes

    PubMed Central

    Niemiller, Matthew L.; Higgs, Dennis M.; Soares, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    The constant darkness of caves and other subterranean habitats imposes sensory constraints that offer a unique opportunity to examine evolution of sensory modalities. Hearing in cavefishes has not been well explored, and here we show that cavefishes in the family Amblyopsidae are not only blind but have also lost a significant portion of their hearing range. Our results showed that cave and surface amblyopsids shared the same audiogram profile at low frequencies but only surface amblyopsids were able to hear frequencies higher than 800 Hz and up to 2 kHz. We measured ambient noise in aquatic cave and surface habitats and found high intensity peaks near 1 kHz for streams underground, suggesting no adaptive advantage in hearing in those frequencies. In addition, cave amblyopsids had lower hair cell densities compared with their surface relative. These traits may have evolved in response to the loud high-frequency background noise found in subterranean pools and streams. This study represents the first report of auditory regression in a subterranean organism. PMID:23536444

  2. Predictors of hearing aid use time in children with mild-severe hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Spratford, Meredith; Moeller, Mary Pat; Oleson, Jacob; Ou, Hua; Roush, Patricia; Jacobs, Shana

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated predictors of hearing aid (HA) use time for children with mild-severe hearing loss. Barriers to consistent HA use and reliability of parent report measures were also examined. Method Participants included parents of 272 children with hearing loss. Parents estimated the amount of time the child used HAs daily. Regression analysis examined the relationships among independent variables and HA use time. To determine parental accuracy of HA use time, datalogging from the HA was compared to parental estimates. Results Longer HA use related to older age, poorer hearing, and higher maternal education. Parental consistency ratings revealed similar findings; younger children and children with milder hearing losses wore HAs less consistently than older children and children with more severe hearing loss. Parents’ estimates and datalogging were significantly correlated; however, results suggested parents overestimate the amount of time their children wear their hearing aids. Conclusions The findings provide evidence that certain variables were significantly related to the amount of time children wore their HAs. Consistency rating scales provided insight into circumstances that were challenging for families. Use of both parental reports and datalogging may allow clinicians and researchers to obtain a general estimate of HA use time. PMID:22869089

  3. [Recovery of hearing: results of delayed medical treatment in patients with idiopathic sudden hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Maassen, M M; Pfister, M; Plontke, S; Koitschev, A; Vögler, A; Löwenheim, H

    2002-12-01

    For the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), a variety of studies about intravenous drug administration with the beginning of treatment in the early period of less then one week after the onset of hearing loss have been performed. In contrast, very little information is available about the efficacy of intravenous drug therapy for ISSNHL with the beginning of treatment later than four weeks after the onset of hearing loss. In a retrospective chart review we studied the treatment results of 57 patients with ISSNHL with beginning of treatment later than four weeks after the onset of hearing loss with no spontaneous recovery of hearing. Patients received a treatment with intravenous administration of Dextran (concentration 40 g/l with NaCl 0.9%) and Procain-HCl (a derivative of the local anaesthetic lidocaine,400-800 mg in a 500 ml rheologic infusion of Dextran 40). 25% of the patients showed a significant improvement of 10 dB or more in hearing threshold at 1000 Hz measured in bone-conducted pure tone audiometry. In a subjective evaluation 53% of the patients noticed a subjective improvement of their individual hearing thresholds. PMID:12474128

  4. Hearing loss and the central auditory system: Implications for hearing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisina, Robert D.

    2003-04-01

    Hearing loss can result from disorders or damage to the ear (peripheral auditory system) or the brain (central auditory system). Here, the basic structure and function of the central auditory system will be highlighted as relevant to cases of permanent hearing loss where assistive devices (hearing aids) are called for. The parts of the brain used for hearing are altered in two basic ways in instances of hearing loss: (1) Damage to the ear can reduce the number and nature of input channels that the brainstem receives from the ear, causing plasticity of the central auditory system. This plasticity may partially compensate for the peripheral loss, or add new abnormalities such as distorted speech processing or tinnitus. (2) In some situations, damage to the brain can occur independently of the ear, as may occur in cases of head trauma, tumors or aging. Implications of deficits to the central auditory system for speech perception in noise, hearing aid use and future innovative circuit designs will be provided to set the stage for subsequent presentations in this special educational session. [Work supported by NIA-NIH Grant P01 AG09524 and the International Center for Hearing & Speech Research, Rochester, NY.

  5. Automated Screening for High-Frequency Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Robert C.; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hearing loss at high frequencies produces perceptual difficulties and is often an early sign of a more general hearing loss. This study reports the development and validation of two new speech-based hearing screening tests in English that focus on detecting hearing loss at frequencies above 2000 Hz. Design: The Internet-delivered, speech-in noise tests used closed target-word sets of digit triplets or consonant–vowel–consonant (CVC) words presented against a speech-shaped noise masker. The digit triplet test uses the digits 0 to 9 (excluding the disyllabic 7), grouped in quasi-random triplets. The CVC test uses simple words (e.g., “cat”) selected for the high-frequency spectral content of the consonants. During testing, triplets or CVC words were identified in an adaptive procedure to obtain the speech reception threshold (SRT) in noise. For these new, high-frequency (HF) tests, the noise was low-pass filtered to produce greater masking of the low-frequency speech components, increasing the sensitivity of the test for HF hearing loss. Individual test tokens (digits, CVCs) were first homogenized using a group of 10 normal-hearing (NH) listeners by equalizing intelligibility across tokens at several speech-in-noise levels. Both tests were then validated and standardized using groups of 24 NH listeners and 50 listeners with hearing impairment. Performance on the new high frequency digit triplet (HF-triplet) and CVC (HF-CVC) tests was compared with audiometric hearing loss, and with that on the unfiltered, broadband digit triplet test (BB-triplet) test, and the ASL (Adaptive Sentence Lists) speech-in-noise test. Results: The HF-triplet and HF-CVC test results (SRT) both correlated positively and highly with high-frequency audiometric hearing loss and with the ASL test. SRT for both tests as a function of high-frequency hearing loss increased at nearly three times the rate as that of the BB-triplet test. The intraindividual variability (SD) on the

  6. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh, Amir Hossain; Bakhshaee, Mehdi; Mahdavi, Ebrahim; Movahhed, Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: It has been shown that low levels of pigmentation increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in humans. For this reason, white populations develop more pronounced noise- induced hearing loss in comparison to black populations. Similarly, blue-eyed individuals exhibit greater temporary threshold shift than brown-eyed subjects; still, no strong correlation has been verified between the lightness of hair color and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. This study was performed with the purpose of investigating a possible association between hair color and the degree of hearing loss due to firing noise. Study Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: A tertiary referral center with an accredited otorhinolaryngology-head & neck surgery department. Materials and Methods: A total of 57 military recruits were divided into two groups; light-colored (blond and light brown) and dark-colored hair (dark brown and black). The two groups were matched based on history of firing noise exposure (number of rounds; type of weapon) and the level of hearing loss at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz sound frequencies was compared between them. Results: The results showed that the mean level of hearing loss of light-colored hair individuals (20.5±17dB) was significantly greater than that of dark-haired subjects (13.5±11dB), (P=0.023). Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black) can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended. PMID:24303403

  7. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Roed, Henrik; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

  8. MRPS18CP2 alleles and DEFA3 absence as putative chromosome 8p23.1 modifiers of hearing loss due to mtDNA mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Ballana, Ester; Mercader, Josep Maria; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Estivill, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations account for at least 5% of cases of postlingual, nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Among them, mutation A1555G is frequently found associated with aminoglycoside-induced and/or nonsyndromic hearing loss in families presenting with extremely variable clinical phenotypes. Biochemical and genetic data have suggested that nuclear background is the main factor involved in modulating the phenotypic expression of mutation A1555G. However, although a major nuclear modifying locus was located on chromosome 8p23.1 and regardless intensive screening of the region, the gene involved has not been identified. Methods With the aim to gain insights into the factors that determine the phenotypic expression of A1555G mutation, we have analysed in detail different genetic and genomic elements on 8p23.1 region (DEFA3 gene absence, CLDN23 gene and MRPS18CP2 pseudogene) in a group of 213 A1555G carriers. Results Family based association studies identified a positive association for a polymorphism on MRPS18CP2 and an overrepresentation of DEFA3 gene absence in the deaf group of A1555G carriers. Conclusion Although none of the factors analysed seem to have a major contribution to the phenotype, our findings provide further evidences of the involvement of 8p23.1 region as a modifying locus for A1555G 12S rRNA gene mutation. PMID:18154640

  9. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist in the workplace and lead to workers' hearing damage. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCP in preventing further hearing loss in workers with audiograms suggestive of NIHL. The audiometric tests and medical records of 28 furniture company workers exposed to noise were reviewed and monitored for 2 years. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined five audiometric tests in the medical records (on admission and every semester) of 28 workers in a furniture company (totaling 140 audiometric exams) following the introduction of the HCP. Results Data analysis showed no differences between the audiometric tests conducted on admission and those performed every semester. Conclusions The HCP implemented was effective in preventing the worsening of hearing loss in workers already with NIHL when exposed to occupational noise. Therefore, such a measure could be useful for the employment of workers with hearing loss in job sectors that have noise exposure. PMID:26722345

  10. Prevention of the Evolution of Workers' Hearing Loss from Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Noisy Environments through a Hearing Conservation Program.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Vinicius Ribas; Marques, Jair; Panegalli, Flavio; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Souza, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious problem for workers and therefore for businesses. The hearing conservation program (HCP) is a set of coordinated measures to prevent the development or evolution of occupational hearing loss, which involves a continuous and dynamic process of implementation of hearing conservation routines through anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and subsequent control of the occurrence of existing environmental risks or of those that may exist in the workplace and lead to workers' hearing damage. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HCP in preventing further hearing loss in workers with audiograms suggestive of NIHL. The audiometric tests and medical records of 28 furniture company workers exposed to noise were reviewed and monitored for 2 years. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined five audiometric tests in the medical records (on admission and every semester) of 28 workers in a furniture company (totaling 140 audiometric exams) following the introduction of the HCP. Results Data analysis showed no differences between the audiometric tests conducted on admission and those performed every semester. Conclusions The HCP implemented was effective in preventing the worsening of hearing loss in workers already with NIHL when exposed to occupational noise. Therefore, such a measure could be useful for the employment of workers with hearing loss in job sectors that have noise exposure. PMID:26722345