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Sample records for heart failure comparative

  1. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  2. Endpoints for Comparative Effectiveness Research in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Larry A.; Spertus, John A.

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing availability of therapeutic strategies (drugs, devices, disease management systems) and the growing complexity of health care delivery, there is an attendant need for objective evidence of the tangible benefits of different approaches to care. This is particularly true for patients with heart failure, a common, morbid, and resource-intensive disease. There are few well-proven therapies for patients with acute decompensation or for patients with normal LVEF. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) offers an important avenue for making progress in the field. However, CER, like any well-designed research program, requires the explicit articulation of clinically important outcomes to be compared. For patients with heart failure, there is a need to develop endpoint measures that capture the totality of potential benefits and risks for alternative therapeutic approaches. Ultimately, for one therapeutic approach to be considered superior to another, it must improve one of three relevant endpoints: make patients live longer, make them feel better, or save money without adversely affecting the other two goals. Importantly, these outcomes must be measured directly and surrogates should be avoided, even if such surrogates appear to be associated with clinically meaningful, patient-centered outcomes. In this review, we discuss the available CER endpoint domains from both a clinical and a statistical perspective, summarize the wide variety of endpoints used in CER studies, and suggest steps for greater standardization of endpoints across CER studies of patients with heart failure. PMID:23168314

  3. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... together. About Rise Above HF Rise Above Heart Failure seeks to increase the dialogue about HF and improve the lives of people affected by the condition through awareness, education and support. Through the initiative, AHA strives to ...

  4. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have ...

  5. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  6. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... arrhythmias) The use of toxic substances (such as alcohol or drug abuse) Congenital heart defect (a heart problem you were born with) Diabetes Thyroid problems Diagnosis & Tests How will my doctor know if I ...

  7. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  8. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood the way it should. It can affect one or both sides of the heart. The weakening of the heart's pumping ability causes Blood and fluid to back up into the lungs The buildup of fluid in the feet, ankles and legs - called edema Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of ...

  9. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  10. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... body and the symptoms that tell you your heart failure is getting worse will help you stay healthier ...

  11. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  12. Heart failure - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your heart muscle is stiff and does not fill up with blood easily. This is called diastolic heart failure. As the heart's pumping becomes less effective, blood may back up in other areas of the body. Fluid ...

  13. Heart failure - palliative care

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic heart failure very often gets worse over time. Many people who have heart failure die of ... failure to take in enough calories and nutrients. Wasting of muscles and weight loss are part of the natural disease process. It can help to eat several small ...

  14. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  15. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... any drugs you may be taking for Diabetes, high blood pressure, or other medical conditions you have. ... of the arteries Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on ...

  16. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  17. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  18. Types of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. This content was last ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  19. Classes of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  20. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease. PMID:26756631

  1. Devices in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Shahzeb M.; Bogaev, Roberta C.; Sobash, Ed; Shankar, K. J.; Gondi, Sreedevi; Stupin, Igor V.; Robertson, Jillian; Brewer, M. Alan; Casscells, S. Ward; Delgado, Reynolds M.; Ahmed, Amany

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure has long been one of the most serious medical conditions in the United States; in fact, in the United States alone, heart failure accounts for 6.5 million days of hospitalization each year. One important goal of heart-failure therapy is to inhibit the progression of congestive heart failure through pharmacologic and device-based therapies. Therefore, there have been efforts to develop device-based therapies aimed at improving cardiac reserve and optimizing pump function to meet metabolic requirements. The course of congestive heart failure is often worsened by other conditions, including new-onset arrhythmias, ischemia and infarction, valvulopathy, decompensation, end-organ damage, and therapeutic refractoriness, that have an impact on outcomes. The onset of such conditions is sometimes heralded by subtle pathophysiologic changes, and the timely identification of these changes may promote the use of preventive measures. Consequently, device-based methods could in the future have an important role in the timely identification of the subtle pathophysiologic changes associated with congestive heart failure. PMID:18612451

  2. Reassessing guidelines for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Helmut; Wollert, Kai C

    2004-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in the last few years in the management of heart failure. In particular, several trials have given significant results. It has become apparent that heart failure may be prevented in some patients by treatment of risk factors such as coronary artery disease. Experience with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors has shown that the survival and symptomatic benefits do last in the long term, and confirm that they are the first-line treatment in heart failure. The results of a number of trials using the angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) candesartan, valsartan and losartan are presented and discussed. There is also some experience now in the use of candesartan for patients with heart failure and preserved left ventricular systolic function. The COMET trial compared the beta-blockers carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate, and suggests that there may be differences in clinical effect between beta-blockers. The selective aldosterone receptor blocker eplerenone was evaluated in the EPHESUS trial in post-MI patients with signs of heart failure. Based on these clinical trials, heart failure guidelines are now being updated. PMID:15526240

  3. Comparing exercise training modalities in heart failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Justien; Beckers, Paul; Taeymans, Jan; Vrints, Christiaan; Vissers, Dirk

    2016-10-15

    Exercise training (ET) is suggested to improve exercise capacity, prognosis, quality of life (QOL) and functional modifications of the heart in patients with heart failure (HF). However, it is not clear which modality is best. In order to assess the effectiveness of different ET modalities on prognostic cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) parameters, QOL and left ventricular remodeling, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were selected in three databases. The primary outcome data were peak oxygen uptake, ventilation over carbon dioxide slope, oxygen uptake efficiency slope, exercise oscillatory ventilation, rest and peak pulmonary end-tidal CO2. Secondary variables were QOL, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD). Twenty RCTs (n=811) met the a priori stated inclusion criteria. Studies were categorized into four different groups: "interval training (IT1) versus combined interval and strength training (IT1S)" (n=156), "continuous training (CT1) versus combined continuous and strength training (CT1S)" (n=130), "interval training (IT2) versus continuous training (CT2)" (n=501) and "continuous training (CT3) versus strength training (S3)" (n=24). No significant random effects of exercise modality were revealed assessing the CPET parameters. There was a significant improvement in QOL applying CT1S (P<0.001). Comparing IT2 with CT2, LVEDD and LVEF were significantly improved favoring IT2 (P<0.001). There is some evidence to support that interval training is more effective to improve LVEF and LVEDD. The fact that patients with HF are actively involved in any kind of ET program seems sufficient to improve the prognosis, QOL and anatomic function. PMID:27434363

  4. After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... of heart attack known as STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction). "Patients with ischemic heart disease are at the ... failure]. This includes those who have had a myocardial infarction, also called heart attack," Gho said. "Research studying ...

  5. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be. This includes advice on daily activities, work, leisure time, sex, and exercise. Your level of activity will depend on the stage of your heart failure (how severe it is). Keep all of your ... to get tests and lab work. Your doctor needs the results of these tests ...

  6. Heart failure: SGLT2 inhibitors and heart failure -- clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-04-01

    The latest findings from the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial show a 34% reduction in hospitalization for heart failure or cardiovascular death in patients receiving empagliflozin, a sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, compared with placebo. These outstanding results call for discussion of the clinical implications, and in-depth studies of the mechanisms of action of SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:26961066

  7. The medical and socioeconomic burden of heart failure: A comparative delineation with cancer.

    PubMed

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Stafylas, Panagiotis; Giamouzis, Gregory; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Parissis, John

    2016-01-15

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer represent the two leading causes of death in the Western World. Still, cardiovascular disease causes more deaths and more hospitalizations than cancer. Although mortality rates of both conditions are generally declining, this is not true for heart failure (HF). The prevalence of HF is increasing, although its incidence has been stabilized, mainly because of the population aging. The survival of patients with HF is overall worse than those with cancer. In addition, HF failure is the most common reason for hospitalization in the elderly, while hospitalization for HF is followed by adverse prognosis and represents the main contributor to the huge financial expenditure caused by the syndrome. The outcome of HF patients and thus its medical and socioeconomic burden may be improved by the more efficient in-hospital management of patients, the enhancement of adherence to guideline-recommended therapies, the identification and treatment of comorbid conditions and the introduction of more effective medical therapies. PMID:26519686

  8. After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159007.html After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure 1 in 4 survivors develops this serious ... TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Risk of heart failure appears high within a few years of ...

  9. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist ... is weakened, gets too large, and does not pump blood very well, you are at high risk ...

  10. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Terms and Conditions Copyright © 2016 Heart Failure Society of America. All Rights Reserved 2016 Board Review ... Membership Membership Information Membership in the Heart Failure Society is open to all health care professionals with ...

  11. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  12. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Cardiology; American Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the science: promoting self-care in persons with heart failure: ...

  13. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Aug 24,2016 An important part of ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  14. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  15. Pharmacogenetics of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mestroni, Luisa; Begay, Rene; Graw, Sharon L; Taylor, Matthew RG

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Novel medical approaches and personalized medicine seek to use genetic information to “individualize” and improve diagnosis, prevention, and therapy. The personalized management of cardiovascular disease involves a large spectrum of potential applications, from diagnostics of monogenic disorders, to prevention and management strategies based on modifier genes, to pharmacogenetics in which individual genetic information is used to optimize pharmacological treatments. Recent Findings Evidence suggests that common polymorphic variants of modifier genes could influence drug response in cardiovascular disease in a variety of areas including heart failure, arrhythmias, dyslipidemia and hypertension. In heart failure, common genetic variants of beta-adrenergic receptors, alpha-adrenergic receptors, and endothelin receptors (among others) have been associated with variable response to heart failure therapies. The challenge remains to develop strategies to leverage this information in ways that personalize and optimize cardiovascular therapy based on a patient's genetic profile. Summary While advances in technologies will continue to transition personalized medicine from the research to the clinical setting, health care providers will need to reshape clinical diagnostic paradigms. Ultimately, pharmacogenetics will give providers options for improving patient management on the basis of pharmacogenetic data. PMID:24717669

  16. Heart failure prognostic model

    PubMed Central

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. Methods and Results. Our lot included 101 non–consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49,5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5–65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (–0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (–0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). Discussion. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life–altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is

  17. Heart failure prognostic model.

    PubMed

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS. Our lot included 101 non-consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49.5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5-65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (-0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (-0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). DISCUSSION. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life-altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is extremely

  18. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  19. Heart Failure in South America

    PubMed Central

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Continued assessment of temporal trends in mortality and epidemiology of specific heart failure in South America is needed to provide a scientific basis for rational allocation of the limited health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk and predict the future burden of heart failure. The epidemiology of heart failure in South America was reviewed. Heart failure is the main cause of hospitalization based on available data from approximately 50% of the South American population. The main etiologies of heart failure are ischemic, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, valvular, hypertensive and chagasic etiologies. In endemic areas, Chagas heart disease may be responsible by 41% of the HF cases. Also, heart failure presents high mortality especially in patients with Chagas etiology. Heart failure and etiologies associated with heart failure may be responsible for 6.3% of causes of deaths. Rheumatic fever is the leading cause of valvular heart disease. However, a tendency to reduction of HF mortality due to Chagas heart disease from 1985 to 2006, and reduction in mortality due to HF from 1999 to 2005 were observed in selected states in Brazil. The findings have important public health implications because the allocation of health care resources, and strategies to reduce risk of heart failure should also consider the control of neglected Chagas disease and rheumatic fever in South American countries. PMID:23597301

  20. Sleep and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kimberly A; Trupp, Robin J

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs for many reasons but, when chronic in nature, has many consequences for optimal health and performance. Despite its high prevalence, sleep-disordered breathing is underrecognized and undertreated. This is especially true in the setting of heart failure, where sleep-disordered breathing affects more than 50% of patients. Although the optimal strategy to best identify patients is currently unknown, concerted and consistent efforts to support early recognition, diagnosis, and subsequent treatment should be encouraged. Optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy and concurrent treatment of sleep-disordered breathing are necessary to improve outcomes in this complex high-risk population. PMID:26567495

  1. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    When you have heart failure, your heart does not pump out enough blood. This causes fluids to build up in your body. If you ... the amount of fluids you drink: When your heart failure is not very bad, you may not have ...

  2. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  3. Copeptin in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high despite therapeutic options. Medical management consists of a neurohormonal blockade of an overly activated neurohormonal axis. No single marker has been able to predict or monitor HF with respect to disease progression, hospitalization, or mortality. New methods for diagnosis, monitoring therapy, and prognosis are warranted. Copeptin, a precursor of pre-provasopressin, is a new biomarker in HF with promising potential. Copeptin has been found to be elevated in both acute and chronic HF and is associated with prognosis. Copeptin, in combination with other biomarkers, could be a useful marker in the monitoring of disease severity and as a predictor of prognosis and survival in HF. PMID:26975969

  4. Acute Heart Failure Treatment.

    PubMed

    Levy, Phillip D; Bellou, Abdel

    2013-06-01

    Dyspnea is the predominant symptom for patients with acute heart failure and initial treatment is largely directed towards the alleviation of this. Contrary to conventional belief, not all patients present with fluid overload and the approach to management is rapidly evolving from a solitary focus on diuresis to one that more accurately reflects the complex interplay of underlying cardiac dysfunction and acute precipitant. Effective treatment thus requires an understanding of divergent patient profiles and an appreciation of various therapeutic options for targeted patient stabilization. The key principle within this paradigm is directed management that aims to diminish the work of breathing through situation appropriate ventillatory support, volume reduction and hemodynamic improvement. With such an approach, clinicians can more efficiently address respiratory discomfort while reducing the likelihood of avoidable harm. PMID:24223323

  5. Epidemiology of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Véronique L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) has been singled out as an epidemic and is a staggering clinical and public health problem, associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and healthcare expenditures, particularly among those aged 65 and older. The case mix of HF is changing over time with a growing proportion of cases presenting with preserved ejection fraction for which there is no specific treatment. Despite progress in reducing HF-related mortality, hospitalizations for HF remain very frequent and rates of readmissions continuing to rise. To prevent hospitalizations, a comprehensive characterization of predictors of readmission in patients with HF is imperative and must integrate the impact of multimorbidity related to coexisting conditions. New models of patient-centered care that draw upon community-based resources to support HF patients with complex coexisting conditions are needed to decrease hospitalizations. PMID:23989710

  6. Ivabradine: Heart Failure and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rahul; Garg, Jalaj; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Shah, Neeraj; Lanier, Gregg; Martinez, Mathew W; Freudenberger, Ronald

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure affects over 5 million people in the United States and carries a high rate of mortality. Ivabradine, a new agent has been added to the current medical options for managing heart failure. It is a selective funny current (If) inhibitor in sinoatrial node and slows its firing rate, prolonging diastolic depolarization without a negative inotropic effect. Ivabradine was only recently approved by Food and Drug administration after the results of Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the If Inhibitor Ivabradine (SHIFT) trial, for a reduction in rehospitalizations from chronic heart failure. This trial assessed patients with stable heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and a heart rate of at least 70 beats per minute at rest on maximally tolerated beta-blocker therapy and demonstrated statistically significant reduction in heart failure hospitalization and deaths. Additionally, ivabradine has been associated with reduced cardiac remodeling, reduced heart rate variability, improvement in exercise tolerance, improved heart failure class of New York Heart Association, and better quality of life. It has also been tried in other conditions, such as inappropriate sinus tachycardia and cardiogenic shock, and is currently in phase II trial for patients with newly diagnosed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. PMID:26721645

  7. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ... Cardiovascular Nursing; American Heart Association Council on Clinical ... Heart Association Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, ...

  8. New medications for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Jonathan S; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is common and results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Current guideline-based therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, including beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists aim to interrupt deleterious neurohormonal pathways and have shown significant success in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure. Continued efforts to further improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction have led to the first new-in-class medications approved for heart failure since 2005, ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Ivabradine targets the If channels in the sinoatrial node of the heart, decreasing heart rate. Sacubitril/valsartan combines a neprilysin inhibitor that increases levels of beneficial vasodilatory peptides with an angiotensin receptor antagonist. On a background of previously approved, guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure, these medications have shown improved clinical outcomes ranging from decreased hospitalizations in a select group of patients to a reduction in all-cause mortality across all pre-specified subgroups. In this review, we will discuss the previously established guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the translational research that led to the development of these new therapies, and the results from the major clinical trials of ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. PMID:27038558

  9. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:25911167

  10. Managing acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Daniel F

    2014-02-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure may occur de novo, but it most often occurs as an exacerbation of underlying chronic heart failure. Hospitalization for heart failure is usually a harbinger of a chronic disease that will require long-term, ongoing medical management. Leaders in the field generally agree that repeated inpatient admissions for treatment reflect a failure of the health care delivery system to manage the disease optimally. Newer management strategies focus on ameliorating symptoms by optimizing the hemodynamics, restoring neurohormonal balance, and making frequent outpatient adjustments when needed. PMID:24286585

  11. Heart Failure in North America

    PubMed Central

    Blair, John E. A; Huffman, Mark; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem that affects patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Within the continent of North America, differences in economic development, genetic susceptibility, cultural practices, and trends in risk factors and treatment all contribute to both inter-continental and within-continent differences in heart failure. The United States and Canada represent industrialized countries with similar culture, geography, and advanced economies and infrastructure. During the epidemiologic transition from rural to industrial in countries such as the United States and Canada, nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases made way for degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, overweight/obesity, and diabetes. This in turn has resulted in an increase in heart failure incidence in these countries, especially as overall life expectancy increases. Mexico, on the other hand, has a less developed economy and infrastructure, and has a wide distribution in the level of urbanization as it becomes more industrialized. Mexico is under a period of epidemiologic transition and the etiology and incidence of heart failure is rapidly changing. Ethnic differences within the populations of the United States and Canada highlight the changing demographics of each country as well as potential disparities in heart failure care. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction makes up approximately half of all hospital admissions throughout North America; however, important differences in demographics and etiology exist between countries. Similarly, acute heart failure etiology, severity, and management differ between countries in North America. The overall economic burden of heart failure continues to be large and growing worldwide, with each country managing this burden differently. Understanding the inter-and within-continental differences may help improve understanding of the heart failure epidemic, and may aid healthcare systems in delivering

  12. Heart failure in North America.

    PubMed

    Blair, John E A; Huffman, Mark; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2013-05-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem that affects patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Within the continent of North America, differences in economic development, genetic susceptibility, cultural practices, and trends in risk factors and treatment all contribute to both inter-continental and within-continent differences in heart failure. The United States and Canada represent industrialized countries with similar culture, geography, and advanced economies and infrastructure. During the epidemiologic transition from rural to industrial in countries such as the United States and Canada, nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases made way for degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, overweight/obesity, and diabetes. This in turn has resulted in an increase in heart failure incidence in these countries, especially as overall life expectancy increases. Mexico, on the other hand, has a less developed economy and infrastructure, and has a wide distribution in the level of urbanization as it becomes more industrialized. Mexico is under a period of epidemiologic transition and the etiology and incidence of heart failure is rapidly changing. Ethnic differences within the populations of the United States and Canada highlight the changing demographics of each country as well as potential disparities in heart failure care. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction makes up approximately half of all hospital admissions throughout North America; however, important differences in demographics and etiology exist between countries. Similarly, acute heart failure etiology, severity, and management differ between countries in North America. The overall economic burden of heart failure continues to be large and growing worldwide, with each country managing this burden differently. Understanding the inter-and within-continental differences may help improve understanding of the heart failure epidemic, and may aid healthcare systems in delivering

  13. Comparative study of myocardial high energy phosphate substrate content in slow and fast growing chicken and in chickens with heart failure and ascites.

    PubMed

    Olkowski, A A; Nain, S; Wojnarowicz, C; Laarveld, B; Alcorn, J; Ling, B B

    2007-09-01

    In order to explain the biochemical mechanisms associated with deteriorating heart function in broiler chickens, this study compared myocardial high energy phosphate substrates in leghorns, feed restricted (Broilers-Res) broilers, ad libitum fed broilers (Broilers-AL), and in broilers that developed heart failure and ascites. The profile of adenine nucleotide content in the heart tissue did not differ between leghorns and Broilers-Res, but there were significant differences among Broilers-Res, Broilers-AL, and broilers with ascites. During intensive growth periods, leghorns and Broilers-Res showed increasing trends in heart ATP levels, whereas in fast growing broilers the heart ATP declined (p<0.021). ATP:ADP and ATP:CrP ratios increased with age in both leghorn and Broilers-Res, declined in fast growing broilers, and were the lowest in broilers that developed heart failure. The changes in heart high energy phosphate profile in broilers suggest that the energy demand of the heart during a rapid growth phase may exceed the bird's metabolic capacity to supply adequate levels of high energy phosphate substrate. The insufficiency of energy substrate likely contributes to the declining heart rate. In some individuals this may lead to impaired heart pump function, and in more severe cases may progress to heart pump failure. PMID:17524693

  14. Heart failure overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart contract at the same time. A defibrillator sends an electrical pulse to stop life-threatening ... heart rhythms. These people often receive an implanted defibrillator. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ...

  15. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines: ... a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. ...

  16. [Metabolic therapy for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Loiacono, Ferdinando; Alberti, Luca; Lauretta, Ludovica; Puccetti, Patrizia; Silipigni, Carmen; Margonato, Alberto; Fragasso, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure may promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation, and determining an increased utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates for energy production. In fact, fasting blood ketone bodies as well as fat oxidation have been shown to be increased in patients with heart failure. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. A direct approach to manipulate cardiac energy metabolism consists in modifying substrate utilization by the failing heart. To date, the most effective metabolic treatments include several pharmacological agents that directly inhibit fatty acid oxidation. The results of current research are supporting the concept that shifting the energy substrate preference away from fatty acid metabolism and toward glucose metabolism could be an effective adjunctive treatment in patients with heart failure. Trimetazidine is the most studied drug in this context. Several small studies have evidenced the usefulness of such additional therapeutic tools for heart failure. More specifically, recent meta-analyses and a multicenter retrospective study have shown that additional use of trimetazidine in patients with heart failure, along with symptoms and cardiac function improvement, also provides a significant protective effect on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and hospitalization due to cardiac causes. Nevertheless, the exact role of metabolic therapy in heart failure is yet to be established, and a large multicenter randomized trial is necessary. PMID:25072544

  17. [Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF). Together against heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Börste, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most urgent medical and socio-economic challenges of the 21(st) century. Up to three million people are affected in Germany; this means one in ten people over the age of 65  live with heart failure. The current demographic changes will accentuate the importance of this grave health problem. The care of patients with heart failure, as well as the associated research mandates a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF) pursues this objective. CNHF is a research alliance with 11 sites in Germany and was funded by the Federal Ministry of Research (BMBF) from 2003 through 2014. Since January 2015, the network has been an associate cooperating partner of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). During the 12-year funding period by the BMBF, scientists in the field of heart failure from 30 university hospitals, 5 research institutes, 7 heart centers, 17 cardiovascular clinics, over 200 general practitioners, 4 rehabilitation clinics, as well as numerous organizations and associations were involved in cooperative CNHF research. In the context of 22 projects, the CNHF covered basic, clinical, and health care research, and generated numerous groundbreaking insights into disease mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, which are documented in more than 350 publications. With its central study database and bank of biomaterials, the network has set up a Europe-wide unique research resource, which can be used in the future for national and international cooperations with the DZHK and other partners. Furthermore, the CNHF strongly promotes nation- and Europe-wide public relations and heart failure awareness activities. PMID:26979718

  18. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... 70. You can have a normal ejection fraction reading and still have heart failure (called HFpEF or ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ...

  19. The pathophysiology of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Clinton D; Conte, John V

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results when the heart is unable to provide sufficient blood flow to meet metabolic requirements or accommodate systemic venous return. This common condition affects over 5 million people in the United States at a cost of $10-38 billion per year. Heart failure results from injury to the myocardium from a variety of causes including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Less common etiologies include cardiomyopathies, valvular disease, myocarditis, infections, systemic toxins, and cardiotoxic drugs. As the heart fails, patients develop symptoms which include dyspnea from pulmonary congestion, and peripheral edema and ascites from impaired venous return. Constitutional symptoms such as nausea, lack of appetite, and fatigue are also common. There are several compensatory mechanisms that occur as the failing heart attempts to maintain adequate function. These include increasing cardiac output via the Frank-Starling mechanism, increasing ventricular volume and wall thickness through ventricular remodeling, and maintaining tissue perfusion with augmented mean arterial pressure through activation of neurohormonal systems. Although initially beneficial in the early stages of heart failure, all of these compensatory mechanisms eventually lead to a vicious cycle of worsening heart failure. Treatment strategies have been developed based upon the understanding of these compensatory mechanisms. Medical therapy includes diuresis, suppression of the overactive neurohormonal systems, and augmentation of contractility. Surgical options include ventricular resynchronization therapy, surgical ventricular remodeling, ventricular assist device implantation, and heart transplantation. Despite significant understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in heart failure, this disease causes significant morbidity and carries a 50% 5-year mortality. PMID:22227365

  20. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ACE inhibitors (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors) and ARBs (angiotensin II receptor blockers) work by opening blood vessels and lowering blood pressure. These medicines can: Reduce the work your heart has to do Help ...

  1. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Update

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, John R; Alburikan, Khalid; Metra, Marco; Rodgers, Jo E

    2015-01-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) continues to increase in prevalence and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity including frequent hospitalizations. The American Heart Association is predicting that more than eight million Americans will have heart failure by 2030 and that the total direct costs associated with the disease will rise from $21 billion in 2012 to $70 billion in 2030. The increase in the prevalence and cost of HF is primarily the result of shifting demographics and a growing population. Although many large, randomized, controlled clinical trials have been conducted in patients with chronic heart failure, it was not until recently that a growing number of studies began to address the management of ADHF. It is the intent of this review to update the clinician regarding the evaluation and optimal management of ADHF. PMID:24251454

  2. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E′, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in

  3. Diastolic function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by "diastolic function". The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E', etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo "equilibrium volume" of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic "ringing" of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually "repair" the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in alleviation of

  4. Understand Your Risk for Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Causes and Risks for Heart Failure Updated:Jul 29,2016 Who Develops Heart Failure ( ... HF. This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  5. Updated Heart Failure Treatment Guidelines Issued

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158956.html Updated Heart Failure Treatment Guidelines Issued Two new drugs added to ... drugs to the list of treatment options for heart failure. In people with the condition, the heart can' ...

  6. Heart failure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pump that moves blood through your body. Heart failure occurs when blood does not move well and ... often, fluid collects in your lungs and legs. Heart failure most often occurs because your heart muscle is ...

  7. Telemonitoring in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Ayesha; Paul, Vince

    2011-06-01

    Clinical management of refractory heart failure remains challenging, with a high rate of rehospitalizations despite advances in medical and device therapy. Care can be provided in person, via telehomecare (by telephone), or telemonitoring, which involves wireless technology for remote follow-up. Telemonitoring wirelessly transmits parameters such as weight, heart rate, or blood pressure for review by health-care professionals. Cardiac implantable devices (defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy) also transmit continually interrogated physiological data, such as heart rate variability or intrathoracic impedance, which may be of value to predict patients at greater risk of hospitalization for heart failure. The use of remote monitoring techniques facilitates a rapid and regular review of such data by health-care workers as part of a heart failure management programme. Current evidence supports the feasibility of such an approach but routinely assessed parameters have been shown not to impact patient outcomes. Devices that directly assess cardiac haemodynamic status through invasive measurement of pressures are currently under investigation and could potentially increase the sensitivity and specificity of predicting heart failure events. The current evidence for telemonitoring and remote monitoring, including implantable haemodynamic devices, will be reviewed. PMID:21289040

  8. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  9. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart muscle that are not moving well. This test uses x-ray contrast fluid to fill the ... BUN) and serum creatinine tests help monitor how well your kidneys are working. You will need these test regularly if: You are taking medicines called ACE ...

  10. [Anemia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Grau-Amorós, J; Formiga, F; Urrutia, A

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward. However, although there is evidence supporting its treatment to improve the functional capacity of the patients and to reduce the new admissions rate, the clinical practice guidelines do not provide any directives regarding its approach. This is an ideal clinical problem for the internist due to its multifactorial origin and the comprehensive point of view needed to approach the group of syndromes that occur in these patients (anemia, heart failure, geriatric syndromes, diabetes, etc.) The choice of treatment strategy, if such treatment is decided, should always begin after correcting the congestive signs in the outpatient with optimal treatment of heart failure. PMID:21620391

  11. Anemia in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrakis, Michael G.; Tsirakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a very common disease, with severe morbidity and mortality, and a frequent reason of hospitalization. Anemia and a concurrent renal impairment are two major risk factors contributing to the severity of the outcome and consist of the cardio renal anemia syndrome. Anemia in heart failure is complex and multifactorial. Hemodilution, absolute or functional iron deficiency, activation of the inflammatory cascade, and impaired erythropoietin production and activity are some pathophysiological mechanisms involved in anemia of the heart failure. Furthermore other concomitant causes of anemia, such as myelodysplastic syndrome and chemotherapy, may worsen the outcome. Based on the pathophysiology of cardiac anemia, there are several therapeutic options that may improve hemoglobin levels, tissues' oxygenation, and probably the outcome. These include administration of iron, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and blood transfusions but still the evidence provided for their use remains limited. PMID:22536520

  12. Depression and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Guck, Thomas P; Elsasser, Gary N; Kavan, Michael G; Barone, Eugene J

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence rates of depression in congestive heart failure patients range from 24%-42%. Depression is a graded, independent risk factor for readmission to the hospital, functional decline, and mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. Physicians can assess depression by using the SIG E CAPS + mood mnemonic, or any of a number of easily administered and scored self-report inventories. Cognitive-behavior therapy is the preferred psychological treatment. Cognitive-behavior therapy emphasizes the reciprocal interactions among physiology, environmental events, thoughts, and behaviors, and how these may be altered to produce changes in mood and behavior. Pharmacologically, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are recommended, whereas the tricyclic antidepressants are not recommended for depression in congestive heart failure patients. The combination of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with cognitive-behavior therapy is often the most effective treatment. PMID:12826775

  13. Optimization of Cardiac Metabolism in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Rosano, Giuseppe M. C; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2011-01-01

    The derangement of the cardiac energy substrate metabolism plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates, such as fatty acids, is the predominant metabolic pathway in the normal heart, because this provides the highest energy yield per molecule of substrate metabolized. In contrast, glucose becomes an important preferential substrate for metabolism and ATP generation under specific pathological conditions, because it can provide greater efficiency in producing high energy products per oxygen consumed compared to fatty acids. Manipulations that shift energy substrate utilization away from fatty acids toward glucose can improve the cardiac function and slow the progression of heart failure. However, insulin resistance, which is highly prevalent in the heart failure population, impedes this adaptive metabolic shift. Therefore, the acceleration of the glucose metabolism, along with the restoration of insulin sensitivity, would be the ideal metabolic therapy for heart failure. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of modifying substrate utilization to optimize cardiac metabolism in heart failure. PMID:21933140

  14. Optimization of cardiac metabolism in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2011-12-01

    The derangement of the cardiac energy substrate metabolism plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates, such as fatty acids, is the predominant metabolic pathway in the normal heart, because this provides the highest energy yield per molecule of substrate metabolized. In contrast, glucose becomes an important preferential substrate for metabolism and ATP generation under specific pathological conditions, because it can provide greater efficiency in producing high energy products per oxygen consumed compared to fatty acids. Manipulations that shift energy substrate utilization away from fatty acids toward glucose can improve the cardiac function and slow the progression of heart failure. However, insulin resistance, which is highly prevalent in the heart failure population, impedes this adaptive metabolic shift. Therefore, the acceleration of the glucose metabolism, along with the restoration of insulin sensitivity, would be the ideal metabolic therapy for heart failure. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of modifying substrate utilization to optimize cardiac metabolism in heart failure. PMID:21933140

  15. Model for heart failure education.

    PubMed

    Baldonado, Analiza; Dutra, Danette; Abriam-Yago, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the heart's inability to meet the body's need for blood and oxygen. According to the American Heart Association 2013 update, approximately 5.1 million people are diagnosed with HF in the United States in 2006. Heart failure is the most common diagnosis for hospitalization. In the United States, the HF direct and indirect costs are estimated to be US $39.2 billion in 2010. To address this issue, nursing educators designed innovative teaching frameworks on HF management both in academia and in clinical settings. The model was based on 2 resources: the American Association of Heart Failure Nurses (2012) national nursing certification and the award-winning Pierce County Responsive Care Coordination Program. The HF educational program is divided into 4 modules. The initial modules offer foundational levels of Bloom's Taxonomy then progress to incorporate higher-levels of learning when modules 3 and 4 are reached. The applicability of the key components within each module allows formatting to enhance learning in all areas of nursing, from the emergency department to intensive care units to the medical-surgical step-down units. Also applicable would be to provide specific aspects of the modules to nurses who care for HF patients in skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation centers, and in the home-health care setting. PMID:25140745

  16. [Epidemiology of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Montes-Santiago, Julio; Arévalo Lorido, José Carlos; Cerqueiro González, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    In Spain, as in all other developed countries, heart failure is a colossal healthcare challenge. It is estimated that more than 1,300,000 people have heart failure in Spain. Each year, there are more than 100,000 hospital admissions for this process and the numbers are progressively increasing. Approximately 2% of emergency visits are related to this condition. Nearly 50% of inpatients are older than 75 years and have multiple comorbidities. Readmissions are common. Mortality at 1 year is around 16% after discharge but is close to 60% at 10 years. The associated annual overall costs are around 2,500 million euros. Every year more than 17,000 people die from heart failure, which is the fourth most frequent cause of death in Spain. Mortality rates have been reduced but, because of more advanced age at admission and the associated multiple comorbidities, in-hospital mortality has remained largely unchanged during the last 12 years and is nearly 10%. De novo heart failure causes greater morbidity and mortality and consequently there is a need for early identification and treatment. Strategies to coordinate healthcare levels and develop effective preventive programs are needed to tackle this formidable problem. PMID:24930076

  17. Comparative Effectiveness of Different Forms of Telemedicine for Individuals with Heart Failure (HF): A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Ahmed; Cameron, Chris; Hsieh, Shuching; Wells, George

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies on telemedicine have either focused on its role in the management of chronic diseases in general or examined its effectiveness in comparison to standard post-discharge care. Little has been done to determine the comparative impact of different telemedicine options for a specific population such as individuals with heart failure (HF). Methods and Findings Systematic reviews (SR) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined telephone support, telemonitoring, video monitoring or electrocardiographic monitoring for HF patients were identified using a comprehensive search of the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and The Cochrane Library. Studies were included if they reported the primary outcome of mortality or any of the following secondary outcomes: all-cause hospitalization and heart failure hospitalization. Thirty RCTs (N = 10,193 patients) were included. Compared to usual care, structured telephone support was found to reduce the odds of mortality(Odds Ratio 0.80; 95% Credible Intervals [0.66 to 0.96]) and hospitalizations due to heart failure (0.69; [0.56 to 0.85]). Telemonitoring was also found to reduce the odds of mortality(0.53; [0.36 to 0.80]) and reduce hospitalizations related to heart failure (0.64; [0.39 to 0.95]) compared to usual post-discharge care. Interventions that involved ECG monitoring also reduced the odds of hospitalization due to heart failure (0.71; [0.52 to 0.98]). Limitations Much of the evidence currently available has focused on the comparing either telephone support or telemonitoring with usual care. This has therefore limited our current understanding of how some of the less common forms of telemedicine compare to one another. Conclusions Compared to usual care, structured telephone support and telemonitoring significantly reduced the odds of deaths and hospitalization due to heart failure. Despite being the most widely studied forms of telemedicine, little has been done to directly compare

  18. Can complexity decrease in congestive heart failure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Banerjee, Santo; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Rondoni, Lamberto; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of a signal can be measured by the Recurrence period density entropy (RPDE) from the reconstructed phase space. We have chosen a window based RPDE method for the classification of signals, as RPDE is an average entropic measure of the whole phase space. We have observed the changes in the complexity in cardiac signals of normal healthy person (NHP) and congestive heart failure patients (CHFP). The results show that the cardiac dynamics of a healthy subject is more complex and random compare to the same for a heart failure patient, whose dynamics is more deterministic. We have constructed a general threshold to distinguish the border line between a healthy and a congestive heart failure dynamics. The results may be useful for wide range for physiological and biomedical analysis.

  19. Heart failure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000224.htm Heart failure - what to ask your doctor To use the ... a pump that moves blood through your body. Heart failure occurs when blood does not move well and ...

  20. Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159059.html Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise You'll feel better and maybe even live ... with heart failure should not be scared of exercise damaging them or killing them," said principal investigator ...

  1. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure. PMID:24216080

  2. Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160932.html Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study The more you smoke and the ... Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking leads to heart failure by causing thickened heart walls and reducing ...

  3. Is Heart Rate a Norepiphenomenon in Heart Failure?

    PubMed

    Hensey, Mark; O'Neill, James

    2016-09-01

    There has been an increased focus on heart rate as a target in the management of cardiovascular disease and more specifically in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in recent years with several studies showing the benefit of a lower resting heart rate on outcomes. This review paper examines the pathophysiology behind the benefits of lowering heart rate in heart failure and also the evidence for and against the pharmacological agents available to achieve this. PMID:27457085

  4. Thyroid hormones and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Felipe

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem and its relationship to thyroid dysfunction has been increasingly investigated in recent years. Since it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormones (TH) and mainly T3 have cardioprotective effects, it is easy to understand that in the scenario of thyroid disorder, cardiac function may be damaged, and inversely in cardiac dysfunction thyroid dysregulation may be seen. The increase in plasma TH produces a clear neurohormonal activation which impacts negatively on cardiac function. In hypothyroidism, and in addition to extracardiac dysfunction, myocardial and vascular remodelling is altered and they contribute to cardiac failure. Abnormal low plasma TSH has also been shown to be a risk factor for developing HF in several recent studies, and they suggest that TSH is an independent predictor of clinical outcome including death and cardiac hospitalizations. Therefore, physicians should consider all these concepts when managing a patient with heart failure, not only for a clear diagnosis, but also for better and accurate treatment. PMID:27098905

  5. Heart Failure Update: Outpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Wojnowich, Katherine; Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Outpatient management of heart failure (HF) is aimed at treating symptoms and preventing hospitalizations and readmissions. Management is initiated in a stepwise approach. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system is a cornerstone of therapy and should be started, along with beta blockers, as soon as the diagnosis of HF is made. Other drugs, including diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, hydralazine, and nitrates, may be added based on symptoms and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage. Despite a great interest in and theoretical benefit of naturoceutical products in the mitigation of oxidative stress and HF progression, none has been proven to be beneficial, and concerns exist regarding their interactions with standard HF drugs. Other nonpharmacologic interventions, including sodium restriction, regular exercise, and/or cardiac rehabilitation, should be initiated at diagnosis. HF often is progressive, and clinicians should be aware of late stage management options, including implantable devices, cardiac transplantation, and hospice care. PMID:26974001

  6. Heart Failure and Loss of Metabolic Control

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Li, Dan L.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, currently affecting 5 million Americans. A syndrome defined on clinical terms, heart failure is the end-result of events occurring in multiple heart diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, genetic mutations and diabetes, and metabolic dysregulation is a hallmark feature. Mounting evidence from clinical and preclinical studies suggests strongly that fatty acid uptake and oxidation are adversely affected, especially in end-stage heart failure. Moreover, metabolic flexibility, the heart’s ability to move freely among diverse energy substrates, is impaired in heart failure. Indeed, impairment of the heart’s ability to adapt to its metabolic milieu, and associated metabolic derangement, are important contributing factors in heart failure pathogenesis. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms governing metabolic control in heart failure will provide critical insights into disease initiation and progression, raising the prospect of advances with clinical relevance. PMID:24336014

  7. Socioeconomic Inequalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Toro, Felipe; Verdejo, Hugo E; Castro, Pablo F

    2015-10-01

    Prevalence and incidence of chronic heart failure (CHF) has increased during the past decades. Beyond its impact on mortality rates, CHF severely impairs quality of life, particularly with the elderly and vulnerable population. Several studies have shown that CHF takes its toll mostly on the uneducated, low-income population, who exhibit impaired access to health care systems, less knowledge regarding its pathology and poorer self-care behaviors. This review summarizes the available evidence linking socioeconomic inequalities and CHF, focusing on the modifiable factors that may explain the impaired health outcomes in socioeconomically deprived populations. PMID:26462090

  8. Scope of heart failure hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Butler, Javed; Marti, Catherine; Pina, Ileana; DeFilippi, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The growing heart failure (HF) epidemic places an enormous clinical and economic burden on the health care system. The clinical and financial burden related to HF hospitalizations has led to great interest in both improving related outcomes and decreasing costs of care. Besides adhering to existing guidelines, newer approaches to managing these patients, both in terms of monitoring and developing novel therapeutic approaches, are needed. Significant opportunities exist to improve the outcomes for patients with HF, especially those who have been hospitalized. These efforts are even more important now that readmission rates for HF have quality and reimbursement implications. PMID:22891800

  9. Frailty in Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Emer

    2016-07-01

    Frailty is defined as a biological syndrome reflecting impaired physiologic reserve and heightened vulnerability to stressors. The evolving profile of heart failure (HF), increased survival of aging patients with complex comorbidities in parallel with the growing population undergoing mechanical circulatory support as lifetime therapy, means that advanced HF specialists are becoming aware of the burden of frailty and its downstream consequences on postintervention outcomes in these patients. The limited data available to date suggest that frailty is highly prevalent in patients with advanced HF and appears to provide prognostic information not captured by traditional risk assessment. PMID:27371513

  10. [Diuretic therapy in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luís; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-02-20

    Many of the primary clinical manifestations of heart failure (HF) are due to fluid retention, and treatments targeting congestion play a central role in HF management. Diuretic therapy remains the cornerstone of congestion treatment, and diuretics are prescribed to the majority of HF patients. Despite this ubiquitous use, there is limited evidence from prospective randomized studies to guide the use of diuretics. With the chronic use of diuretic and usually in advanced stages of HF, diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention. This review describes the mechanism of action of available diuretic classes, reviews their clinical use based on scientific evidence and discusses strategies to overcome diuretic resistance. PMID:23768854

  11. Tolvaptan, hyponatremia, and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zmily, Hammam D; Daifallah, Suleiman; Ghali, Jalal K

    2011-01-01

    Tolvaptan is the first FDA-approved oral V2 receptor antagonist for the treatment of euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, in patients with conditions associated with free water excess such as heart failure, cirrhosis, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Tolvaptan inhibits the binding of arginine vasopressin to the V2 receptors on the collecting ducts of the kidneys resulting in aquaresis, the electrolytes sparing excretion of water. This article reviews the accumulated experience with tolvaptan and all the major clinical trials that were conducted to study its safety and efficacy and concludes by summarizing clinicians’ views of its current application in clinical practice. PMID:21694950

  12. Palliative Care in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hupcey, Judith E; Kitko, Lisa; Alonso, Windy

    2015-12-01

    The number of patients with heart failure is growing; the associated morbidity and mortality remains dismal. Advance care planning, end-of-life conversations, and palliative care referrals are appropriate, but do not occur regularly. Palliative care focuses on patients and families from diagnosis, to hospice, death, and bereavement. It is delivered as basic palliative care by all providers and by specialty-certified palliative care specialists. Nurses are well-positioned to provide basic. Nurses are also instrumental in initiating referrals to the specialized palliative care team as the patient's needs become too complex or the disease progresses and the patient approaches the end of life. PMID:26567500

  13. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-12-01

    In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into mechanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:25006413

  14. Right heart failure: toward a common language

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into mechanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:25006413

  15. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2014-02-01

    In this perspective, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into echanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:24268184

  16. Insomnia and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Don; Anstead, Michael I; Ho, Julia; Phillips, Barbara A

    2009-09-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease including chronic heart failure (CHF) and is a significant contributing factor to fatigue and poor quality of life. The pathophysiology of CHF often leads to fatigue, due to nocturnal symptoms causing sleep disruption, including cough, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and nocturia. Inadequate cardiac function may lead to hypoxemia or poor perfusion of the cerebrum, skeletal muscle, or visceral body organs, which result in organ dysfunction or failure and may contribute to fatigue. Sleep disturbances negatively affect all dimensions of quality of life and is related to increased risk of comorbidities, including depression. This article reviews insomnia in CHF, cardiac medication side-effects related to sleep disturbances, and treatment options. PMID:18758945

  17. Comparative evaluation of calcium-sensitizing agents, pimobendan and SCH00013, on the myocardial function of canine pacing-induced model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hamabe, Lina; Kawamura, Keisuke; Kim, Soo-Min; Yoshiyuki, Rieko; Fukayama, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Miki; Fukushima, Ryuji; Tanaka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Pimobendan and SCH00013 are calcium sensitizers that possess dual action of calcium sensitization and phosphodiesterase-III inhibition. This study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the effect of these medications on the myocardial function of the canine pacing-induced heart failure model using echocardiography. Heart failure was induced in 20 dogs, to which pimobendan and two different doses of SCH00013 were administered orally to 15 dogs for 3 weeks, and the remaining 5 dogs served as the control. Cardiac evaluations were performed at baseline, week 1, week 2, and week 3. Significant thinning and dilation of the left ventricles, with systolic dysfunction, indicated by reduction of fractional shortening (FS) and strain values, were observed with a low dose of SCH00013. Whereas, although systolic dysfunction was observed with reduction of FS and radial strain, significant dilation and thinning of the left ventricles and reduction of circumferential strain were not observed with pimobendan. Pimobendan had a potent positive inotropic effect, with little effect on synchronicity, while low-dose SCH00013 had a weaker positive inotropic effect but was able to sustain synchronicity. Although, it failed to show significant statistical differences, the results of this study allow speculations that administration of pimobendan and SCH00013 may have differing effect on the myocardial function in the canine pacinginduced heart failure model. PMID:24599141

  18. A Mobile Health Intervention Supporting Heart Failure Patients and Their Informal Caregivers: A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Chen, Jenny; Trivedi, Ranak B; Aron, David C; Fisher, Lawrence; Aikens, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile health (mHealth) interventions may improve heart failure (HF) self-care, but standard models do not address informal caregivers’ needs for information about the patient’s status or how the caregiver can help. Objective We evaluated mHealth support for caregivers of HF patients over and above the impact of a standard mHealth approach. Methods We identified 331 HF patients from Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient clinics. All patients identified a “CarePartner” outside their household. Patients randomized to “standard mHealth” (n=165) received 12 months of weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls including questions about their health and self-management. Based on patients’ responses, they received tailored self-management advice, and their clinical team received structured fax alerts regarding serious health concerns. Patients randomized to “mHealth+CP” (n=166) received an identical intervention, but with automated emails sent to their CarePartner after each IVR call, including feedback about the patient’s status and suggestions for how the CarePartner could support disease care. Self-care and symptoms were measured via 6- and 12-month telephone surveys with a research associate. Self-care and symptom data also were collected through the weekly IVR assessments. Results Participants were on average 67.8 years of age, 99% were male (329/331), 77% where white (255/331), and 59% were married (195/331). During 15,709 call-weeks of attempted IVR assessments, patients completed 90% of their calls with no difference in completion rates between arms. At both endpoints, composite quality of life scores were similar across arms. However, more mHealth+CP patients reported taking medications as prescribed at 6 months (8.8% more, 95% CI 1.2-16.5, P=.02) and 12 months (13.8% more, CI 3.7-23.8, P<.01), and 10.2% more mHealth+CP patients reported talking with their CarePartner at least twice per week at the 6-month follow-up (P=.048

  19. Linoleate-rich high-fat diet decreases mortality in hypertensive heart failure rats compared with lard and low-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Chicco, Adam J; Sparagna, Genevieve C; McCune, Sylvia A; Johnson, Christopher A; Murphy, Robert C; Bolden, David A; Rees, Meredith L; Gardner, Ryan T; Moore, Russell L

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that high-fat diets may attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction in chronic hypertension. However, it is unclear whether consuming a high-fat diet improves prognosis in aged individuals with advanced hypertensive heart disease or the extent to which differences in its fatty acid composition modulate its effects in this setting. In this study, aged spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats were administered a standard high-carbohydrate diet or high-fat diet (42% of kilocalories) supplemented with high-linoleate safflower oil or lard until death to determine their effects on disease progression and mortality. Both high-fat diets attenuated cardiac hypertrophy, left ventricular chamber dilation, and systolic dysfunction observed in rats consuming the high-carbohydrate diet. However, the lard diet significantly hastened heart failure mortality compared with the high-carbohydrate diet, whereas the linoleate diet significantly delayed mortality. Both high-fat diets elicited changes in the myocardial fatty acid profile, but neither had any effect on thromboxane excretion or blood pressure. The prosurvival effect of the linoleate diet was associated with a greater myocardial content and linoleate-enrichment of cardiolipin, an essential mitochondrial phospholipid known to be deficient in the failing heart. This study demonstrates that, despite having favorable effects on cardiac morphology and function in hypertension, a high-fat diet may accelerate or attenuate mortality in advanced hypertensive heart disease depending on its fatty acid composition. The precise mechanisms responsible for the divergent effects of the lard and linoleate-enriched diets merit further investigation but may involve diet-induced changes in the content and/or composition of cardiolipin in the heart. PMID:18663155

  20. Heart failure and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Castagna, Francesco; Mattaliano, Paola; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of sleep-related disorders in patients with cardiovascular diseases is growing. In particular, sleep-disordered breathing, short sleep time, and low sleep quality are frequently reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Sleep-disordered breathing, which includes obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and central sleep apnoea (CSA), is common in patients with HF and has been suggested to increase the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Both OSA and CSA are associated with increased sympathetic activation, vagal withdrawal, altered haemodynamic loading conditions, and hypoxaemia. Moreover, OSA is strongly associated with arterial hypertension, the most common risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Intrathoracic pressure changes are also associated with OSA, contributing to haemodynamic alterations and potentially affecting overexpression of genes involved in ventricular remodelling. HF treatment can decrease the severity of both OSA and CSA. Indeed, furosemide and spironolactone administration, exercise training, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and eventually heart transplantation have shown a positive effect on OSA and CSA in patients with HF. At present, whether CSA should be treated and, if so, which is the optimal therapy is still debated. By contrast, more evidence is available on the beneficial effects of OSA treatment in patients with HF. PMID:27173772

  1. Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Taylor said exercise may benefit heart failure patients in several ways. It improves ... But talk to a doctor before starting an exercise program. "Discuss it with your ... Taylor added. "Personalizing interventions and targeting resources ...

  2. Updated Heart Failure Treatment Guidelines Issued

    MedlinePlus

    ... as Corlanor, according to the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Heart Failure ... best fits which treatment." Yancy is chief of cardiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in ...

  3. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a pocket, or hung around your neck. Nuclear Heart Scan A nuclear heart scan shows how well blood is flowing ... blood is reaching your heart muscle. During a nuclear heart scan, a safe, radioactive substance called a ...

  4. Malnutrition and Cachexia in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Adam; Jafry, Syed; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Nagpal, A Dave; Pisani, Barbara; Agarwala, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Heart failure is a growing public health concern. Advanced heart failure is frequently associated with severe muscle wasting, termed cardiac cachexia This process is driven by systemic inflammation and tumor necrosis factor in a manner common to other forms of disease-related wasting seen with cancer or human immunodeficiency virus. A variable degree of malnutrition is often superimposed from poor nutrient intake. Cardiac cachexia significantly decreases quality of life and survival in patients with heart failure. This review outlines the evaluation of nutrition status in heart failure, explores the pathophysiology of cardiac cachexia, and discusses therapeutic interventions targeting wasting in these patients. PMID:25634161

  5. Polypharmacy in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Mastromarino, Vittoria; Casenghi, Matteo; Testa, Marco; Gabriele, Erica; Coluccia, Roberta; Rubattu, Speranza; Volpe, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    In heart failure (HF), the progressive use of multiple drugs and a complex therapeutic regimen is common and is recommended by international guidelines. With HF being a common disease in the elderly, patients often have numerous comorbidities that require additional specific treatment, thus producing a heavy pill burden. Polypharmacy, defined as the chronic use of five or more medications, is an underestimated problem in the management of HF patients. However, polypharmacy has an important impact on HF treatment, as it often leads to inappropriate drug prescription, poor adherence to pharmacological therapies, drug-drug interactions, and adverse effects. The growing complexity of HF patients, whose mean age increases progressively and who present multiple comorbidities, suggests the need for newer models of primary care to improve the management of HF patients. Self-care, telemonitoring, and natriuretic peptide-guided therapy represent promising new HF care models to face the complexity of the disease and its therapeutic regimen. PMID:24493574

  6. Alcohol Consumption and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Djoussé, Luc; Gaziano, J. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) remains a major public health issue. It is estimated that about 500,000 Americans per year are diagnosed with HF. Despite advanced medical and surgical treatments for HF, mortality after the onset of HF is still high, thereby underscoring the importance of primary prevention. Among modifiable lifestyle factors, alcohol consumption appears to play a role in the development of HF. Although excessive drinking has been known to lead to alcoholic cardiomyopathy and light-to-moderate drinking may confer some cardiovascular benefits, recent studies suggest it is not only the quantity, but also drinking patterns and genetic factors, that may influence the relation between alcohol consumption and cardiovascular disease. This article reviews current evidence on the association between alcohol consumption and HF. PMID:18417065

  7. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF. PMID:27335803

  8. Heart failure: Novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, C; Deoghare, S

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorders that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Despite effective medical interventions, mortality and morbidity remain substantial. There have been significant advances in the therapy of HF in recent decades, such as the introduction of beta-blockers and antagonists of the renin–angiotensin system but still there is a major unmet need for better therapies for HF. In the present era, pathophysiology of HF has been explored. Various novel pathways, molecular sites have been identified, which contribute to the progression of the disease. By targeting these sites, newer pharmacological agents have been developed, which can play a promising role in the treatment of HF. This article focuses on recent advancements in pharmacotherapy of HF, which include agents targeting myocardial contractility, cytokines and inflammation, fibrosis and remodeling, myocardial metabolism, oxidative stress, and other newly defined pathways. PMID:25766342

  9. Angiotensin-converting enzyme and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition with developing heart failure: comparative effects on left ventricular function and geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElmurray, J. H. 3rd; Mukherjee, R.; New, R. B.; Sampson, A. C.; King, M. K.; Hendrick, J. W.; Goldberg, A.; Peterson, T. J.; Hallak, H.; Zile, M. R.; Spinale, F. G.

    1999-01-01

    The progression of congestive heart failure (CHF) is left ventricular (LV) myocardial remodeling. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to tissue remodeling and therefore MMP inhibition may serve as a useful therapeutic target in CHF. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition favorably affects LV myocardial remodeling in CHF. This study examined the effects of specific MMP inhibition, ACE inhibition, and combined treatment on LV systolic and diastolic function in a model of CHF. Pigs were randomly assigned to five groups: 1) rapid atrial pacing (240 beats/min) for 3 weeks (n = 8); 2) ACE inhibition (fosinopril, 2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. orally) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 3) MMP inhibition (PD166793 2 mg/kg/day p.o.) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 4) combined ACE and MMP inhibition (2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. and 2 mg/kg/day, respectively) and rapid pacing (n = 8); and 5) controls (n = 9). LV peak wall stress increased by 2-fold with rapid pacing and was reduced in all treatment groups. LV fractional shortening fell by nearly 2-fold with rapid pacing and increased in all treatment groups. The circumferential fiber shortening-systolic stress relation was reduced with rapid pacing and increased in the ACE inhibition and combination groups. LV myocardial stiffness constant was unchanged in the rapid pacing group, increased nearly 2-fold in the MMP inhibition group, and was normalized in the ACE inhibition and combination treatment groups. Increased MMP activation contributes to the LV dilation and increased wall stress with pacing CHF and a contributory downstream mechanism of ACE inhibition is an effect on MMP activity.

  10. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure. PMID:26798459

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  12. Heart Failure Update: Inpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (HF) is one of most common reasons for hospitalization among individuals older than 65 years. A thorough evaluation, including history, physical examination, and laboratory assessment, is required to optimize care of these patients. In uncertain cases, serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP level, stress testing, and/or invasive coronary angiography may be helpful in establishing the diagnosis. The hospital setting provides an opportunity to identify etiologies and stabilize the patient. The primary goal of inpatient HF therapy is systemic and pulmonary decongestion, achieved most effectively using intravenous diuretic therapy. Rate and rhythm control may be needed for patients with concurrent atrial fibrillation and, in American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage D HF, intravenous inotropes may become necessary. New pharmacologic or device therapies also are considered as a means of transitioning patients, especially those with severe disease, to the outpatient setting. Patients hospitalized for acute decompensated HF have high postdischarge mortality and rehospitalization rates and, thus, should be monitored carefully. PMID:26974002

  13. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... about Alcohol and Heart Disease . Avoiding or limiting caffeine Consume only a moderate amount of caffeine per day, no more than a cup or two of coffee. Learn more about Caffeine and Heart Disease . Eating a heart-healthy diet ...

  14. Congestive heart failure in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rengo, F; Acanfora, D; Trojano, L; Furgi, G; Picone, C; Iannuzzi, G L; Vitale, D F; Rengo, C; Ferrara, N

    1996-01-01

    Several aspects of congestive heart failure are discussed in the light of international literature and of recent findings of our group. The annual incidence of heart failure in elderly subjects, aged >or=75y, is 13 to 50/1000, while it is 1.6/1000 in people aged 45-54 y. The prevalence of heart failure is about 3% in subjects aged 45-64% in subjects aged more than 65 y and 10% in subjects aged more than 75 y. These data are confirmed by our population based study in elderly subjects. The etiology of congestive heart failure is similar in elderly and middle-aged patients. However, several anatomo-functional, hormonal and autonomic nervous system changes, typical of congestive heart failure, occur during physiologic ageing processes also. These findings may explain the dramatic evolution of congestive heart failure in elderly patients. Moreover, some features of the elderly - e.g. comorbidity, atypical clinical presentations, loss of autonomy, increased iatrogen risk should be considered. No specific drugs exist for the pharmacologic treatment of heart failure in the elderly, so that the geriatric specificity in the treatment of heart failure can be recognized in the art of drug choice and dosage, to obtain the best results with the least side effects. The multiple etiology of congestive heart failure, the comorbidity, the loss of autonomy and the deterioration of cognitive functions suggest the need for multidimensional approach and continuative intervention in elderly patients with heart disease, and in particular with congestive heart failure. Further studies on disease- and age-related changes are necessary to develop new and more potent strategies to secure 'successful ageing'. PMID:15374141

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of Eplerenone Compared to Usual Care in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure and NYHA Class II Symptoms, an Australian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ademi, Zanfina; Pasupathi, Kumar; Liew, Danny

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of eplerenone compared with usual care in patients with chronic heart failure and New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II symptoms.A Markov model was constructed with 5 health states to reflect NYHA symptom status (Classes I-IV) and death. All subjects began in the "Class II" health state and then moved to other symptom health states or died. Subjects could also be hospitalized for HF in any cycle. Transition probabilities were derived from the Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization And Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) study. Decision analysis was applied to compare an Eplerenone Group with a Usual Care Group (UCG). In the UCG, 47.3% of subjects in Class II and 93.7% of subjects in Classes III and IV were assumed to be taking spironolactone (as per published data). In the Eplerenone Group, all subjects in Classes II, III, and IV were assumed to be taking eplerenone. The efficacy of spironolactone was assumed to be the same as eplerenone. Cost and utility data were derived from published sources. A discount rate of 5.0% was applied to future costs and benefits. The outcome of interest was incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) (cost per year of live saved (YoLS) and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained).Over 10 years the model predicted that for each patient compared with usual care, eplerenone would lead to 0.26 YoLS (discounted) and 0.19 QALYs gained (discounted), at a net cost of AUD $6961 (discounted). These equate to ICERs of AUD 28,001 per YoLS and AUD 37,452 per QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated a 99.0% likelihood of eplerenone being cost-effective compared with usual care at a willingness to pay threshold of AUD 50,000 per QALY gained.From an Australian healthcare perspective, the addition of eplerenone in management of patients with chronic heart failure and NYHA Class II symptoms represents a cost-effective strategy compared with usual care. PMID

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of Eplerenone Compared to Usual Care in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure and NYHA Class II Symptoms, an Australian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ademi, Zanfina; Pasupathi, Kumar; Liew, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of eplerenone compared with usual care in patients with chronic heart failure and New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II symptoms. A Markov model was constructed with 5 health states to reflect NYHA symptom status (Classes I–IV) and death. All subjects began in the “Class II” health state and then moved to other symptom health states or died. Subjects could also be hospitalized for HF in any cycle. Transition probabilities were derived from the Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization And Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) study. Decision analysis was applied to compare an Eplerenone Group with a Usual Care Group (UCG). In the UCG, 47.3% of subjects in Class II and 93.7% of subjects in Classes III and IV were assumed to be taking spironolactone (as per published data). In the Eplerenone Group, all subjects in Classes II, III, and IV were assumed to be taking eplerenone. The efficacy of spironolactone was assumed to be the same as eplerenone. Cost and utility data were derived from published sources. A discount rate of 5.0% was applied to future costs and benefits. The outcome of interest was incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) (cost per year of live saved (YoLS) and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained). Over 10 years the model predicted that for each patient compared with usual care, eplerenone would lead to 0.26 YoLS (discounted) and 0.19 QALYs gained (discounted), at a net cost of AUD $6961 (discounted). These equate to ICERs of AUD 28,001 per YoLS and AUD 37,452 per QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated a 99.0% likelihood of eplerenone being cost-effective compared with usual care at a willingness to pay threshold of AUD 50,000 per QALY gained. From an Australian healthcare perspective, the addition of eplerenone in management of patients with chronic heart failure and NYHA Class II symptoms represents a cost-effective strategy compared with

  17. "Playboy bunny" sign of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hokama, Akira; Arakaki, Shingo; Shibata, Daisuke; Maeshiro, Tatsuji; Kinjo, Fukunori; Fujita, Jiro

    2011-11-01

    In emergency, ultrasound has been widely used as a noninvasive and effective examination to evaluate congestive heart failure. We highlight "Playboy Bunny" sign as a reliable marker and an important clue to the diagnosis of passive hepatic congestion, caused by congestive heart failure. PMID:22224133

  18. [Acute heart failure: precipitating factors and prevention].

    PubMed

    Aramburu Bodas, Oscar; Conde Martel, Alicia; Salamanca Bautista, Prado

    2014-03-01

    Acute heart failure episodes, whether onset or decompensation of a chronic form, are most often precipitated by a concurrent process or disease, described as precipitating factors of heart failure. In this article, we review these precipitating factors, their proportions and clinical relevance in general and in subgroups of patients, their relationship with prognosis, and their possible prevention. PMID:24930077

  19. The systemic inflammatory response in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anderson

    2000-09-01

    The physiologic diagnosis of heart failure has changed very little over the past several decades: heart failure is the inability of the cardiac output to meet the metabolic demands of the organism. The clinical definition of heart failure (also relatively unchanged) describes it as ventricular dysfunction that is accompanied by reduced exercise tolerance. Our understanding of the true pathophysiologic processes involved in heart failure have, however, changed. We have moved from thinking of heart failure as primarily a circulatory phenomenon to seeing it as a pathophysiologic state under the control of multiple complex systems. Over the past several years the dramatic explosion of research in the fields of immunology and immunopathology have added an additional piece to the puzzle that defines heart failure and have lead to an understanding of heart failure, at least in some part, as an 'inflammatory disease'. In this review we will examine several of the key inflammatory mediators as they relate to heart failure while at the same time attempting to define the source(s) of these mediators. We will examine key elements of the inflammatory cascade as they relate to heart failure such as: cytokines, 'proximal mediators' (e.g. NF-kappaB), and distal mediators (e.g. nitric oxide). We will end with a discussion of the potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory strategies in the future treatment of heart failure. Also, throughout the review we will examine the potential pitfalls encountered in applying bench discoveries to the bedside as have been learned in the field of septic shock research. PMID:10978715

  20. How Is Heart Failure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have surgery or as a long-term treatment. Heart transplant . A heart transplant is an operation in which a person’s diseased ... with a healthy heart from a deceased donor. Heart transplants are done as a life-saving measure for ...

  1. Gene Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vinge, Leif Erik; Raake, Philip W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    With increasing knowledge of basic molecular mechanisms governing the development of heart failure (HF), the possibility of specifically targeting key pathological players is evolving. Technology allowing for efficient in vivo transduction of myocardial tissue with long-term expression of a transgene enables translation of basic mechanistic knowledge into potential gene therapy approaches. Gene therapy in HF is in its infancy clinically with the predominant amount of experience being from animal models. Nevertheless, this challenging and promising field is gaining momentum as recent preclinical studies in larger animals have been carried out and, importantly, there are 2 newly initiated phase I clinical trials for HF gene therapy. To put it simply, 2 parameters are needed for achieving success with HF gene therapy: (1) clearly identified detrimental/beneficial molecular targets; and (2) the means to manipulate these targets at a molecular level in a sufficient number of cardiac cells. However, several obstacles do exist on our way to efficient and safe gene transfer to human myocardium. Some of these obstacles are discussed in this review; however, it primarily focuses on the molecular target systems that have been subjected to intense investigation over the last decade in an attempt to make gene therapy for human HF a reality. PMID:18566312

  2. Health Literacy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Cajita, Maan Isabella; Cajita, Tara Rafaela; Han, Hae-Ra

    2015-01-01

    Background Low health literacy affects millions of Americans, putting those who are affected at a disadvantage and at risk for poorer health outcomes. Low health literacy can act as a barrier to effective disease self-management; this is especially true for chronic diseases such as heart failure (HF) that require complicated self-care regimens. Purpose This systematic review examined quantitative research literature published between 1999 and 2014 to explore the role of health literacy among HF patients. The specific aims of the systematic review are to (1) describe the prevalence of low health literacy among HF patients, (2) explore the predictors of low health literacy among HF patients, and (3) discuss the relationship between health literacy and HF self-care and common HF outcomes. Methods A systematic search of the following databases was conducted, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Embase, PsycINFO, and Scopus, using relevant keywords and clear inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusions An average of 39% of HF patients have low health literacy. Age, race/ethnicity, years of education, and cognitive function are predictors of health literacy. In addition, adequate health literacy is consistently correlated with higher HF knowledge and higher salt knowledge. Clinical Implications Considering the prevalence of low health literacy among in the HF population, nurses and healthcare professionals need to recognize the consequences of low health literacy and adopt strategies that could minimize its detrimental effect on the patient's health outcomes. PMID:25569150

  3. Heart Failure in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Butrous, Hoda; Hummel, Scott L

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality in older adults and a growing public health problem placing a huge financial burden on the health care system. Many challenges exist in the assessment and management of HF in geriatric patients, who often have coexisting multimorbidity, polypharmacy, cognitive impairment, and frailty. These complex "geriatric domains" greatly affect physical and functional status as well as long-term clinical outcomes. Geriatric patients have been under-represented in major HF clinical trials. Nonetheless, available data suggest that guideline-based medical and device therapies improve morbidity and mortality. Nonpharmacologic strategies, such as exercise training and dietary interventions, are an active area of research. Targeted geriatric evaluation, including functional and cognitive assessment, can improve risk stratification and guide management in older patients with HF. Clinical trials that enroll older patients with multiple morbidities and HF and evaluate functional status and quality of life in addition to mortality and cardiovascular morbidity should be encouraged to guide management of this age group. PMID:27476982

  4. Chronic heart failure and micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Witte, K K; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G

    2001-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with weight loss, and cachexia is a well-recognized complication. Patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and lose muscle bulk early in the course of the disease. Basal metabolic rate is increased in HF, but general malnutrition may play a part in the development of cachexia, particularly in an elderly population. There is evidence for a possible role for micronutrient deficiency in HF. Selective deficiency of selenium, calcium and thiamine can directly lead to the HF syndrome. Other nutrients, particularly vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, are antioxidants and may have a protective effect on the vasculature. Vitamins B6, B12 and folate all tend to reduce levels of homocysteine, which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and creatine supplementation have resulted in improved exercise capacity in patients with HF in some studies. In this article, we review the relation between micronutrients and HF. Chronic HF is characterized by high mortality and morbidity, and research effort has centered on pharmacological management, with the successful introduction of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-adrenergic antagonists into routine practice. There is sufficient evidence to support a large-scale trial of dietary micronutrient supplementation in HF. PMID:11401109

  5. Liver diseases in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Majid; Vakilian, Farveh; Amin, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a growing public health concern as a consequence of the ageing of the population and the improved survival of patients with HF. HF is defined as impaired organ perfusion and/or high filling pressure. It is a systemic and chronic disease and as such involves many organs, not least the liver and kidney. The complex vascular system of the liver and its high metabolic activity render it vulnerable to circulation disturbances and trigger many molecular and haemodynamic changes in patients. There are many studies describing the impact of liver disease on patient outcomes. Hepatic dysfunction is commonly seen in HF patients and is closely correlated with a poor outcome. Knowledge about the mechanisms and impacts of liver disease in HF helps us to know the stage of the disease and treat it properly. Moreover, many drugs and toxins that are metabolised in the liver and contribute to drug interactions should also be taken into account when prescribing medication for HF patients. In light of the above-mentioned points, the authors have compiled this review on congestive hepatopathy with the aim of providing physicians and cardiologists with a succinct and useful guide on the role of the liver in HF. PMID:27326014

  6. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  7. Diabetes Drug Victoza Might Not Help Advanced Heart Failure Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... and stroke, or from any cause, compared with placebo. "Clearly, the treatment of heart failure in people ... to daily injections of Victoza or an inactive placebo. Over six months, the researchers looked for the ...

  8. Emerging Novel Therapies for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M; Dang, Sophia; Li, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Heart function fails when the organ is unable to pump blood at a rate proportional to the body’s need for oxygen or when this function leads to elevated cardiac chamber filling pressures (cardiogenic pulmonary edema). Despite our sophisticated knowledge of heart failure, even so-called ejection fraction-preserved heart failure has high rates of mortality and morbidity. So, novel therapies are sorely needed. This review discusses current standard therapies for heart failure and launches an exploration into emerging novel treatments on the heels of recently-approved sacubitril and ivbradine. For example, Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) is protective of the heart, so in the absence of VIP, VIP knockout mice have dysregulation in key heart failure genes: 1) Force Generation and Propagation; 2) Energy Production and Regulation; 3) Ca+2 Cycling; 4) Transcriptional Regulators. VIP administration leads to coronary dilation in human subjects. In heart failure patients, VIP levels are elevated as a plausible endogenous protective effect. With the development of elastin polymers to stabilize VIP and prevent its degradation, VIP may therefore have a chance to satisfy the unmet need as a potential treatment for acute heart failure. PMID:26512208

  9. Glucagonoma-induced acute heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Lukas J; Praeger, Damaris; Baumann, Gert; Knebel, Fabian; Quinkler, Marcus; Roepke, Torsten K

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) represent a broad spectrum of tumours, of which the serotonin-producing carcinoid is the most common and has been shown to cause right ventricular heart failure. However, an association between heart failure and NETs other than carcinoid has not been established so far. In this case report, we describe a 51-year-old patient with a glucagon-producing NET of the pancreas who developed acute heart failure and even cardiogenic shock despite therapy. Heart failure eventually regressed after initialising i.v. treatment with the somatostatin analogue octreotide. Chromogranin A as a tumour marker was shown to be significantly elevated, and it decreased with clinical improvement of the patient. The effects of long-time stimulation of glucagon on the myocardium have not been studied yet; however, sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak can be discussed as a possible mechanism for glucagon-induced heart failure. Learning points Glucagonoma can be a cause for heart failure. i.v. infusion of octreotide can be successfully used to treat glucagonoma-induced acute heart failure. We suggest that cardiac function should be monitored in all NET patients. PMID:25520848

  10. Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Dunlay, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Multimorbidity is common among older adults with heart failure and creates diagnostic and management challenges. Diagnosis of heart failure may be difficult, as many conditions commonly found in older persons produce dyspnea, exercise intolerance, fatigue, and weakness; no singular pathognomonic finding or diagnostic test differentiates them from one another. Treatment may also be complicated, as multimorbidity creates high potential for drug-disease and drug-drug interactions in settings of polypharmacy. The authors suggest that management of multimorbid older persons with heart failure be patient, rather than disease-focused, to best meet patients' unique health goals and minimize risk from excessive or poorly-coordinated treatments. PMID:27113146

  11. Carvedilol in the treatment of chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Moe, G

    2001-05-01

    Along with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), the beta-adrenergic receptor blockers have gradually emerged to be standard in the therapy of heart failure. Individual beta-blockers that have been shown to reduce all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure include bisoprolol, metoprolol and carvedilol. Carvedilol distinguishes from the other beta-blockers as being a non-selective beta(1)- and beta(2)-receptor blocker with (1)-receptor blockade effect and anti-oxidant properties. The drug does not have sympathomimetic activity and has vasodilatory effects attributable to its (1)-receptor blockade property. Experimental and clinical studies have confirmed carvedilol's vasodilator, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, which may contribute to its effect in reversing cardiac remodelling in animal models and patients with heart failure. These pharmacological properties render carvedilol a potentially useful agent in the treatment of patients with heart failure. Early studies of carvedilol in heart failure have reported beneficial haemodynamic effects but variable effects on exercise tolerance and clinical well being. The large-scale US Carvedilol Heart Failure Program and the Australian/New Zealand Heart Failure Collaborative Research Group reported beneficial effects of carvedilol on mortality, morbidity and clinical well being in patients with mild-to-moderate heart failure. The recently reported but yet unpublished preliminary results of the COPERNICUS study suggest that carvedilol improves mortality and morbidity in patients with advanced heart failure and severe symptoms. At this time, it is unclear whether the ancillary pharmacological properties of carvedilol can be translated to more superior clinical benefit compared to the other beta-blockers. Preliminary studies examining surrogate end points suggest that carvedilol may improve left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) more than metoprolol. More conclusive information regarding

  12. Heart failure and orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Oleg; Feldman, Leonid; Cohen, Natan

    2016-09-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is traditionally defined as a fall of ≥20 mmHg in systolic and/or ≥10 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure within 3 min of active standing. OH is a common comorbidity among patients with heart failure (HF). A comprehensive review regarding the relationship between OH and HF has not been published in the English literature. Here we provide current information about concomitant HF and OH, including: pathophysiology, methods of evaluation, prevalence, risk factors, prognosis and management of OH in HF patients, as well as the incidence of HF among patients with OH. The prevalence of OH in HF ranges from 8 % among community-living individuals to 83 % in elderly hospitalized patients. Dizziness and palpitations are the most frequent OH symptoms. Main predisposing factors for OH are HF severity, non-ischemic HF etiology, prolonged bed rest, hypertension and polypharmacy. OH in HF is generally managed according to recommendations for treatment of OH in the non-HF population. However, since acceptable pharmacotherapy with fludrocortisone and midodrine is problematic in HF due to adverse effects, the management of OH is based mainly on non-pharmacologic interventions. Several prospective epidemiological studies reported that OH is independently associated with an increased risk of developing HF. Since OH is a common and frequently symptomatic condition in HF patients, its clinical implications should be emphasized. Longitudinal studies should be conducted to investigate the prognostic significance and optimal management of OH in the HF population. PMID:26880254

  13. Atrial natriuretic factor binding sites in experimental congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Thibault, G.; Wrobel-Konrad, E.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1989-10-01

    A quantitative in vitro autoradiographic study was performed on the aorta, renal glomeruli, and adrenal cortex of cardiomyopathic hamsters in various stages of heart failure and correlated, in some instances, with in vivo autoradiography. The results indicate virtually no correlation between the degree of congestive heart failure and the density of 125I-labeled atrial natriuretic factor ((Ser99, Tyr126)ANF) binding sites (Bmax) in the tissues examined. Whereas the Bmax was increased in the thoracic aorta in moderate and severe heart failure, there were no significant changes in the zona glomerulosa. The renal glomeruli Bmax was lower in mild and moderate heart failure compared with control and severe heart failure. The proportion of ANF B- and C-receptors was also evaluated in sections of the aorta, adrenal, and kidney of control and cardiomyopathic hamsters with severe heart failure. (Arg102, Cys121)ANF (des-(Gln113, Ser114, Gly115, Leu116, Gly117) NH2) (C-ANF) at 10(-6) M displaced approximately 505 of (Ser99, Tyr126)125I-ANF bound in the aorta and renal glomeruli and approximately 20% in the adrenal zona glomerulosa in both series of animals. These results suggest that ANF may exert a buffering effect on the vasoconstriction of heart failure and to a certain extent may inhibit aldosterone secretion. The impairment of renal sodium excretion does not appear to be related to glomerular ANF binding sites at any stage of the disease.

  14. Mechanical circulatory support in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Suliga, Kamil; Rempega, Grzegorz; Rajwa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of end-stage heart failure patients eligible for heart transplant and the disproportionately low number of donor hearts have led to increased interest in ventricular assist devices (VAD). These devices can be used as a bridge to decision, bridge to recovery, or bridge to candidacy. The main advantage of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is the improvement of organ perfusion and function, which leads to better quality of life and survival. The MCS can also be used as a destination therapy in end-stage heart failure patients who are not eligible for heart transplant. It should be remembered that, despite the tangible benefits, VAD implantation may also be associated with the risk of serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, arrhythmias, blood clots, right ventricular failure, and cardiovascular events. This study presents an up-to-date overview of the current knowledge on the role of MCS in modern medicine. PMID:27516785

  15. Telerehabilitation for patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Tousignant, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic and progressive condition that is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Even though cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to be beneficial to heart failure patients, only a very small proportion of them will actually be referred and eventually participate. The low participation rate is due in part to accessibility and travel difficulties. Telerehabilitation is a new approach in the rehabilitation field that allows patients to receive a complete rehabilitation program at home in a safe manner and under adequate supervision. We believe that by increasing accessibility to CR, telerehabilitation programs will significantly improve heart failure patients’ functional capacity and quality of life. However, it is crucial to provide policy makers with evidence-based data on cardiac telerehabilitation if we want to see its successful implementation in heart failure patients. PMID:25774353

  16. Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools and Resources • Personal Stories HF Resources For Life What is Heart Failure? | Spanish How Can I ... How Can Physical Activity Become a Way of Life? | Spanish How Can I Make My Lifestyle Healthier? ...

  17. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center for Professionals • Personal Stories HF Resources For Life What is Heart Failure? | Spanish How Can I ... How Can Physical Activity Become a Way of Life? | Spanish How Can I Make My Lifestyle Healthier? ...

  18. Telerehabilitation for patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tousignant, Michel; Mampuya, Warner Mbuila

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure is a chronic and progressive condition that is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Even though cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to be beneficial to heart failure patients, only a very small proportion of them will actually be referred and eventually participate. The low participation rate is due in part to accessibility and travel difficulties. Telerehabilitation is a new approach in the rehabilitation field that allows patients to receive a complete rehabilitation program at home in a safe manner and under adequate supervision. We believe that by increasing accessibility to CR, telerehabilitation programs will significantly improve heart failure patients' functional capacity and quality of life. However, it is crucial to provide policy makers with evidence-based data on cardiac telerehabilitation if we want to see its successful implementation in heart failure patients. PMID:25774353

  19. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide. PMID:26088867

  20. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gladden, James D.; Linke, Wolfgang A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of this series devoted to heart failure (HF), we review the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Gaps in knowledge and needed future research are discussed. PMID:24663384

  1. Recent advances in treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kitai, Takeshi; Tang, WH Wilson

    2015-01-01

    With the total cases and economic burden of heart failure continuing to rise, there is an overwhelming need for novel therapies. Several drugs for heart failure have succeeded in preclinical and early-phase clinical trials, but most of them failed to show the real benefit in pivotal clinical trials. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two promising new drugs to treat heart failure: ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Furthermore, some of the newer agents in testing offer the potential for significant progress in addition to these drugs. Patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate are attractive agents that are expected to prevent hyperkalemia during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition, and serelaxin and urodilatin are promising drugs in the treatment of acute heart failure. Future clinical trials with more appropriate study designs, optimal clinical endpoints, and proper patient selection are mandatory to assess the true efficacy of these attractive compounds in clinical practice. PMID:26918130

  2. ▼ Sacubitril valsartan for heart failure.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    ▼ Sacubitril valsartan (Entresto-Novartis) is a new oral drug licensed for the treatment of symptomatic chronic heart failure in adults with reduced ejection fraction.(1) It is described as an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor and contains the neprilysin inhibitor, sacubitril and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist, valsartan.(1-3) Here, we review the evidence for sacubitril valsartan and consider its place in the management of heart failure. PMID:27284124

  3. Home Medical Care for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yumino, Dai

    2016-01-01

    As heart failure progresses to the end stage, it becomes more difficult to maintain the same level of quality of life using the established therapy for the heart failure patients. We believe that an innovative home medical care for heart failure therapy that focuses on the individual's quality of daily living and early intervention is necessary. The roles of home medical care include: early discharge to home as opposed to long hospitalization; the prevention of re-hospitalization; the provision of good care; treatment of any exacerbations; and options available at the end of the patient's life at home. Being able to provide all of the above will allow heart failure patients to live at their home. Home medical care for heart failure requires collaborative teamwork among multiple institutions and medical professionals. Among this collaborative group, the role of pharmacists is critical. Since many of the elderly with heart failure are taking multiple medications, it is important to evaluate the compliance and to intervene for improvement. Pharmacists visiting the patient's home will be able to check the patient's living environment, to evaluate medication compliance, to reconsider the necessary medications for the specific patient, and to consult physicians. Pharmacists can also explain clearly to patients and their family members any changes in medical therapy, as the conditions for an end-stage heart failure patient may change drastically in a short time. By achieving all of the above, it may be possible to prevent re-hospitalization and to help maintain the quality of life for heart failure patients. PMID:27477731

  4. Air pollution and heart failure: Relationship with the ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Abreu-Afonso, Javier; Rodríguez, Sergio; Juarez-Prera, Ruben A; Arroyo-Ucar, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Yenny; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Avanzas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the concentrations of particulate matter in ambient air are associated with hospital admission due to heart failure in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and reduced ejection fraction. METHODS: We studied 353 consecutive patients admitted into a tertiary care hospital with a diagnosis of heart failure. Patients with ejection fraction of ≥ 45% were classified as having heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and those with an ejection fraction of < 45% were classified as having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. We determined the average concentrations of different sizes of particulate matter (< 10, < 2.5, and < 1 μm) and the concentrations of gaseous pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and ozone) from 1 d up to 7 d prior to admission. RESULTS: The heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population was exposed to higher nitrogen dioxide concentrations compared to the heart failure with reduced ejection fraction population (12.95 ± 8.22 μg/m3 vs 4.50 ± 2.34 μg/m3, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that nitrogen dioxide was a significant predictor of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (odds ratio ranging from (1.403, 95%CI: 1.003-2.007, P = 0.04) to (1.669, 95%CI: 1.043-2.671, P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that short-term nitrogen dioxide exposure is independently associated with admission in the heart failure with preserved ejection fraction population. PMID:23538391

  5. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications. PMID:26169327

  6. In-hospital worsening heart failure.

    PubMed

    Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kelkar, Anita; Fonarow, Gregg C; Anker, Stefan; Greene, Stephen J; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Collins, Sean; Ruschitzka, Frank; Yancy, Clyde W; Teerlink, John R; Adams, Kirkwood; Cotter, Gadi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Felker, G Michael; Metra, Marco; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-11-01

    Acute worsening heart failure (WHF) is seen in a sizable portion of patients hospitalized for heart failure, and is increasingly being recognized as an entity that is associated with an adverse in-hospital course. WHF is generally defined as worsening heart failure symptoms and signs requiring an intensification of therapy, and is reported to be seen in anywhere from 5% to 42% of heart failure admissions. It is difficult to ascertain the exact epidemiology of WHF due to varying definitions used in the literature. Studies indicate that WHF cannot be precisely predicted on the basis of baseline variables assessed at the time of admission. Recent data suggest that some experimental therapies may reduce the risk of development of WHF among hospitalized heart failure patients, and this is associated with a reduction in risk of subsequent post-discharge cardiovascular mortality. In this respect, WHF holds promise as a endpoint for acute heart failure clinical trials to better elucidate the benefit of targeted novel therapies. Better understanding of the pathophysiology and a consensus on the definition of WHF will further improve our epidemiological and clinical understanding of this entity. PMID:26235192

  7. Heart Failure in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Barasa, Felix A; Doll, Jacob A; Velazquez, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    The heart failure syndrome has been recognized as a significant contributor to cardiovascular disease burden in sub-Saharan African for many decades. Seminal knowledge regarding heart failure in the region came from case reports and case series of the early 20th century which identified infectious, nutritional and idiopathic causes as the most common. With increasing urbanization, changes in lifestyle habits, and ageing of the population, the spectrum of causes of HF has also expanded resulting in a significant burden of both communicable and non-communicable etiologies. Heart failure in sub-Saharan Africa is notable for the range of etiologies that concurrently exist as well as the healthcare environment marked by limited resources, weak national healthcare systems and a paucity of national level data on disease trends. With the recent publication of the first and largest multinational prospective registry of acute heart failure in sub-Saharan Africa, it is timely to review the state of knowledge to date and describe the myriad forms of heart failure in the region. This review discusses several forms of heart failure that are common in sub-Saharan Africa (e.g., rheumatic heart disease, hypertensive heart disease, pericardial disease, various dilated cardiomyopathies, HIV cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, endomyocardial fibrosis, ischemic heart disease, cor pulmonale) and presents each form with regard to epidemiology, natural history, clinical characteristics, diagnostic considerations and therapies. Areas and approaches to fill the remaining gaps in knowledge are also offered herein highlighting the need for research that is driven by regional disease burden and needs. PMID:23597299

  8. General public awareness of heart failure: results of questionnaire survey during Heart Failure Awareness Day 2011

    PubMed Central

    Letonja, Mitja; Kovacic, Dragan; Hodoscek, Lea Majc; Marolt, Apolon; Bartolic, Cvetka Melihen; Mulej, Marija; Penko, Meta; Poles, Janez; Ravnikar, Tinkara; Iskra, Mojca Savnik; Pusnik, Cirila Slemenik; Jug, Borut

    2014-01-01

    Introduction General public views about heart failure (HF) alone and in comparison with other chronic conditions are largely unknown; thus we conducted this survey to evaluate general public awareness about HF and HF disease burden relative to common chronic disease. Material and methods This was a cross-sectional survey during European Heart Failure Awareness Day 2011. People visiting the stands and other activities in 12 Slovenian cities were invited to complete a 14-item questionnaire. Results The analysis included 850 subjects (age 56 ±15 years, 44% men, 55% completed secondary education or higher). Overall, 83% reported to have heard about HF, 58% knew someone with HF, and 35% believed that HF is a normal consequence of ageing. When compared to other chronic diseases, HF was perceived as less important than cancer, myocardial infarction, stroke and diabetes with only 6%, 12%, 7%, and 5% of subjects ranking HF as number 1 in terms of prevalence, cost, quality of life, and survival. A typical patient with HF symptoms was recognized by 30%, which was comparable to the description of myocardial ischemia (33%) and stroke (39%). Primary care physicians (53%) or specialists (52%) would be primary sources of information about HF. If experiencing HF, 83% would prefer their care to be focused on quality of life rather than on survival (14%). Conclusions Many participants reported to have heard about heart failure but the knowledge was poor and with several misbeliefs. Heart failure was perceived as less important than several other chronic diseases, where cancer appears as a main concern among the general public. PMID:24904672

  9. Comparative effects of long-acting and short-acting loop diuretics on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yae; Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Funada, Ryuichi; Takama, Noriaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Ichikawa, Shuichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya; Sato, Yuichi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Short-acting loop diuretics are known to enhance cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The effects of two loop diuretics—long-acting azosemide and short-acting furosemide—on CSNA were evaluated using 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy in patients with CHF. Methods The present study was a subanalysis of our previously published study, which had reported that serial 123I-MIBG studies were the most useful prognostic indicator in patients with CHF. Patients with CHF (n=208, left ventricular ejection fraction <45%) but no history of cardiac events for at least 5 months prior to the study were identified according to their histories of acute decompensated heart failure requiring hospitalisation. Patients underwent 123I-MIBG scintigraphy immediately before hospital discharge and at a 6-month follow-up. The delayed % denervation, delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio and washout rate (WR) were determined using 123I-MIBG scintigraphy. A total of 108 patients were selected, and propensity score matching was used to compare patients treated with either oral azosemide (n=54) or furosemide (n=54). Results After treatment, 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters improved in both groups. However, the degree of change in % denervation was −13.8±10.5 in the azosemide group and −5.7±12.7 in the furosemide group (p<0.01), the change in H/M ratio was 0.20±0.16 in the azosemide group and 0.06±0.19 in the furosemide group (p<0.01), and the change in WR was −11.3±9.2% in the azosemide group and −3.0±12.7% in the furosemide group (p<0.01). Moreover, multivariate analysis showed an independent and significant positive relationship between furosemide and δ-WR from hospital discharge to 6 months after treatment in patients with CHF (p=0.001). Conclusions These findings indicate that azosemide suppresses CSNA compared with furosemide in patients with CHF. Trial registration number UMIN000000626

  10. [Transition of myocardial ischemia to heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Fraccarollo, D; Gaudron, P; Hu, K; Laser, A; Neubauer, S; Schorb, W

    1998-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia results in myocardial dysfunction. Recovery may be delayed ("stunning"), or persistent if perfusion remains reduced ("hibernation") and ischemia may go on to necrosis, thus, contributing to chronic heart failure. In addition, myocardium not directly affected by ischemia may undergo adaptive processes like hypertrophy and dilatation, which may result in chronic left heart failure. This process is characterized by hemodynamic, neurohumoral, and progressive morphologic changes of the heart which are closely interrelated. Hemodynamic changes basically consist of an increase in left ventricular filling pressure and a decrease in global ejection fraction, and, in most cases years after myocardial infarction, in an increase in systemic vascular resistance and right atrial pressure. Neurohumoral changes consist of an increase in plasma catecholamines, atrial natriuretic factor and vasopressin, and in an activation of the renin-angiotensin-system. Plasma endothelin-1 was recently reported to be increased in patients with heart failure, and prognosis was related to endothelin levels. Diminished response of vessels to endothelium (EDRF/NO) dependent vasodilatation suggests impairment of vascular endothelium in heart failure. Local changes of cardiac neurohumoral systems could contribute to structural changes of the heart, e.g., systemic activation to hemodynamic changes. Structural changes of the heart are characterized by an increase in volume and thickness of surviving myocardium and an expansion of ischemic and necrotic myocardium. Molecular control of these processes which include various cell types, such as cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, are currently an issue of intense research and could result in specific therapeutic importance. PMID:9816648

  11. Atrial Fibrillation, Congestive Heart Failure, and the Middle Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Ameriso, S F; Sager, P; Fisher, M

    1992-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure are risk factors for ischemic stroke usually attributed to cardiac embolism. To define potential alternative mechanisms, patients with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure were investigated by transcranial Doppler. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocities were analyzed in neurologically asymptomatic patients with nonvalvular (n = 10) and valvular (n = 13) atrial fibrillation, patients in normal sinus rhythm with congestive heart failure (n = 13), and control subjects (n = 11). Compared to patients in sinus rhythm with congestive heart failure and to control subjects, patients in both atrial fibrillation groups had significantly greater beat-to-beat variation in peak, mean, and diastolic velocities and in pulsatility index. Peak, mean, and diastolic MCA velocities in patients with atrial fibrillation and those with congestive heart failure were significantly less than those in control subjects. Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation had a higher pulsatility index compared to each of the other three groups. These findings demonstrate substantial nonemboligenic alterations of the intracranial circulation associated with atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, and also provide an intracranial hemodynamic profile that may distinguish valvular from nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. PMID:27309151

  12. Palliative care in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    McIlvennan, Colleen K; Allen, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients, siloed care, lack of knowledge, overlay of comorbidity and frailty, life saving devices with complex trade-offs, and a limited evidence base. This review will summarize the current literature on the emerging role of palliative care in patients with heart failure and the challenges and opportunities for its integration into routine care. It will discuss current initiatives and future directions of the collaborative relationship between the palliative care and heart failure disciplines. PMID:27079896

  13. Heart Failure After Heart Attack Tied to Cancer Risk in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159804.html Heart Failure After Heart Attack Tied to Cancer Risk in Study Preliminary finding ... News) -- People who develop heart failure after a heart attack may also face a higher risk of cancer, ...

  14. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27226153

  15. Developing New Treatments for Heart Failure: Focus on the Heart.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Larson, Christopher J; Shah, Sanjiv J; Greene, Stephen J; Cleland, John G F; Colucci, Wilson S; Dunnmon, Preston; Epstein, Stephen E; Kim, Raymond J; Parsey, Ramin V; Stockbridge, Norman; Carr, James; Dinh, Wilfried; Krahn, Thomas; Kramer, Frank; Wahlander, Karin; Deckelbaum, Lawrence I; Crandall, David; Okada, Shunichiro; Senni, Michele; Sikora, Sergey; Sabbah, Hani N; Butler, Javed

    2016-05-01

    Compared with heart failure (HF) care 20 to 30 years ago, there has been tremendous advancement in therapy for ambulatory HF with reduced ejection fraction with the use of agents that block maladaptive neurohormonal pathways. However, during the past decade, with few notable exceptions, the frequency of successful drug development programs has fallen as most novel therapies have failed to offer incremental benefit or raised safety concerns (ie, hypotension). Moreover, no therapy has been approved specifically for HF with preserved ejection fraction or for worsening chronic HF (including acutely decompensated HF). Across the spectrum of HF, preliminary results from many phase II trials have been promising but are frequently followed by unsuccessful phase III studies, highlighting a disconnect in the translational process between basic science discovery, early drug development, and definitive clinical testing in pivotal trials. A major unmet need in HF drug development is the ability to identify homogeneous subsets of patients whose underlying disease is driven by a specific mechanism that can be targeted using a new therapeutic agent. Drug development strategies should increasingly consider therapies that facilitate reverse remodeling by directly targeting the heart itself rather than strictly focusing on agents that unload the heart or target systemic neurohormones. Advancements in cardiac imaging may allow for more focused and direct assessment of drug effects on the heart early in the drug development process. To better understand and address the array of challenges facing current HF drug development, so that future efforts may have a better chance for success, the Food and Drug Administration facilitated a meeting on February 17, 2015, which was attended by clinicians, researchers, regulators, and industry representatives. The following discussion summarizes the key takeaway dialogue from this meeting. PMID:27166246

  16. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    ElGuindy, Ahmed; Yacoub, Magdi H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has recently emerged as a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Contrary to initial beliefs, HFpEF is now known to be as common as heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and carries an unacceptably high mortality rate. With a prevalence that has been steadily rising over the past two decades, it is very likely that HFpEF will represent the dominant heart failure phenotype over the coming few years. The scarcity of trials in this semi-discrete form of heart failure and lack of unified enrolment criteria in the studies conducted to date might have contributed to the current absence of specific therapies. Understanding the epidemiological, pathophysiological and molecular differences (and similarities) between these two forms of heart failure is cornerstone to the development of targeted therapies. Carefully designed studies that adhere to unified diagnostic criteria with the recruitment of appropriate controls and adoption of practical end-points are urgently needed to help identify effective treatment strategies. PMID:25610841

  17. A reappraisal of loop diuretic choice in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J; Pitt, Bertram; Eisenstein, Eric L; Anstrom, Kevin J; Velazquez, Eric J; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2015-03-01

    The health and economic burden of heart failure is significant and continues to grow each year. Loop diuretics are an integral part of symptom management in heart failure. Furosemide is used disproportionately compared with other loop diuretics, and there is currently no guidance for physicians regarding which agent to choose. However, there exist pharmacologic differences as well as other mechanistic differences that appear to favor torsemide use over furosemide. Compared with furosemide, torsemide improves surrogate markers of heart failure severity such as left ventricular function, plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels, and New York Heart Association functional class and may also reduce hospitalizations, readmissions, and mortality. Data suggest that these benefits could be mediated through torsemide's ability to positively affect the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Specifically, torsemide has been shown to inhibit aldosterone secretion, synthesis, and receptor binding in vitro, as well as decrease transcardiac extraction of aldosterone, myocardial collagen production, and cardiac fibrosis in patients with heart failure. We identified pertinent literature using keyword MEDLINE searches and cross-referencing prior bibliographies. We summarize the available data suggesting potential benefits with torsemide over furosemide, and call attention to the need for a reappraisal of diuretic use in heart failure patients and also for a well-powered, randomized control trial assessing torsemide versus furosemide use. PMID:25728721

  18. A reappraisal of loop diuretic choice in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Buggey, Jonathan; Mentz, Robert J.; Pitt, Bertram; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Velazquez, Eric J.; O’Connor, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The health and economic burden of heart failure is significant, and continues to grow each year. Loop diuretics are an integral part of symptom management in heart failure. Furosemide is used disproportionately compared to other loop diuretics and there is currently no guidance for physicians regarding which agent to choose. However, there exist pharmacologic differences as well as other mechanistic differences that appear to favor torsemide use over furosemide. Compared to furosemide, torsemide improves surrogate markers of heart failure severity such as left ventricular function, plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels, and New York Heart Association functional class and may also reduce hospitalizations, readmissions, and mortality. Data suggest these benefits could be mediated through torsemide’s ability to positively affect the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Specifically, torsemide has been shown to inhibit aldosterone secretion, synthesis, and receptor binding in vitro, as well as decrease transcardiac extraction of aldosterone, myocardial collagen production and cardiac fibrosis in patients with heart failure. We identified pertinent literature using keyword MEDLINE searches and cross-referencing prior bibliographies. We summarize the available data suggesting potential benefits with torsemide over furosemide, and call attention to the need for a reappraisal of diuretic use in heart failure patients and also for a well powered, randomized control trial assessing torsemide versus furosemide use. PMID:25728721

  19. Heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cermakova, P; Eriksdotter, M; Lund, L H; Winblad, B; Religa, P; Religa, D

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that heart failure is a risk factor for Alzheimer′s disease. Decreased cerebral blood flow and neurohormonal activation due to heart failure may contribute to the dysfunction of the neurovascular unit and cause an energy crisis in neurons. This leads to the impaired clearance of amyloid beta and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein, resulting in the formation of amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the relationship between heart failure and Alzheimer′s disease based on epidemiological studies, brain imaging research, pathological findings and the use of animal models. The importance of atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, blood pressure and valve disease as well as the effect of relevant medications will be discussed. PMID:25041352

  20. Serelaxin for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Moin, Danyaal S; Bloom, Michelle W; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Butler, Javed

    2016-06-01

    Outcomes for patients with acute heart failure remain suboptimal and treatments principally target improvement of symptoms. To date there has been no therapy approved for acute heart failure shown to improve mortality or readmission risk post-discharge. Serelaxin, a recombinant form of the naturally occurring polypeptide hormone relaxin, has demonstrated promise in preclinical and early clinical trials as a potentially novel therapy for acute heart failure. It is postulated through its anti-fibrotic and vasodilatory effects that this agent can improve outcomes in both the short and long term in these patients. Randomized clinical data has suggested that the medication is safe and well tolerated. However, definitive outcomes data is currently being assessed in a large multi-center trial. PMID:27045761

  1. [Systolic heart failure in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Normann, Jeanette

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure is becoming more and more important because of an increasing prevalence in elderly people. Even in healthy elderly individuals there are physiological changes in the cardiovascular system which can be modified by cardiac risk factors and comorbidities and trigger the onset of heart failure. The symptoms in the elderly are often atypical and can be difficult to diagnose in the presence of comorbidities. Echocardiography is important for the diagnosis of heart failure and can be easily and non-invasively performed. This can be complemented by further imaging methods and serological tests, such as determination of the concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and n-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP). In elderly patients the problem of polypharmacy often arises. Therapeutic goals are in particular improvement in the quality of life and of symptoms. PMID:25592178

  2. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, A A; Liu, T T

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, fission and fusion, were first identified in yeast with investigation in heart cells beginning only in the last 5 to 7 years. In the ensuing time, it has become evident that these processes are not only required for healthy mitochondria, but also, that derangement of these processes contributes to disease. The fission and fusion proteins have a number of functions beyond the mitochondrial dynamics. Many of these functions are related to their membrane activities, such as apoptosis. However, other functions involve other areas of the mitochondria, such as OPA1's role in maintaining cristae structure and preventing cytochrome c leak, and its essential (at least a 10 kDa fragment of OPA1) role in mtDNA replication. In heart disease, changes in expression of these important proteins can have detrimental effects on mitochondrial and cellular function. PMID:26756641

  3. Clinical service organisation for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephanie JC; Bestall, Janine C; Cotter, Sarah; Falshaw, Margaret; Hood, Sonja G; Parsons, Suzanne; Wood, Lesley; Underwood, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a serious, common condition associated with frequent hospitalisation. Several different disease management interventions (clinical service organisation interventions) for patients with CHF have been proposed. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of disease management interventions for patients with CHF. Search methods We searched: Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials (to June 2003); MEDLINE (January 1966 to July 2003); EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2003); CINAHL (January 1982 to July 2003); AMED (January 1985 to July 2003); Science Citation Index Expanded (searched January 1981 to March 2001); SIGLE (January 1980 to July 2003); DARE (July 2003); National Research Register (July 2003); NHS Economic Evaluations Database (March 2001); reference lists of articles and asked experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing disease management interventions specifically directed at patients with CHF to usual care. Data collection and analysis At least two reviewers independently extracted data information and assessed study quality. Study authors were contacted for further information where necessary. Main results Sixteen trials involving 1,627 people were included. We classified the interventions into three models: multidisciplinary interventions (a holistic approach bridging the gap between hospital admission and discharge home delivered by a team); case management interventions (intense monitoring of patients following discharge often involving telephone follow up and home visits); and clinic interventions (follow up in a CHF clinic). There was considerable overlap within these categories, however the components, intensity and duration of the interventions varied. Case management interventions tended to be associated with reduced all cause mortality but these findings were not statistically significant (odds ratio 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.67 to 1.10, P = 0.23), although the

  4. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation. PMID:26972039

  5. Autonomic Regulation Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Una; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic Regulation Therapy (ART) is a rapidly emerging therapy in the management of congestive heart failure secondary to systolic dysfunction. Modulation of the cardiac neuronal hierarchy can be achieved with bioelectronics modulation of the spinal cord, cervical vagus, baroreceptor, or renal nerve ablation. This review will discuss relevant preclinical and clinical research in ART for systolic heart failure. Understanding mechanistically what is being stimulated within the autonomic nervous system by such device-based therapy and how the system reacts to such stimuli is essential for optimizing stimulation parameters and for the future development of effective ART. PMID:26054327

  6. Heart failure in pregnancy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, W A Wan; Khanom, M; Yaakob, Z H

    2011-08-01

    The treatment of heart failure in pregnant women is more difficult than in non-pregnant women, and should always involve a multidisciplinary team approach. Knowledge required includes hemodynamic changes in pregnancy and the resultant effect on women with pre-existing or pregnancy-related cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular drugs in pregnancy, ethical issues and challenges regarding saving mother and baby. In addition, women having high risk cardiac lesions should be counselled strongly against pregnancy and followed up regularly. Pregnancy with heart failure is an important issue, demanding more comprehensive studies. PMID:21762308

  7. Autonomic Regulation Therapy in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Una; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2015-08-01

    Autonomic regulation therapy (ART) is a rapidly emerging therapy in the management of congestive heart failure secondary to systolic dysfunction. Modulation of the cardiac neuronal hierarchy can be achieved with bioelectronics modulation of the spinal cord, cervical vagus, baroreceptor, or renal nerve ablation. This review will discuss relevant preclinical and clinical research in ART for systolic heart failure. Understanding mechanistically what is being stimulated within the autonomic nervous system by such device-based therapy and how the system reacts to such stimuli is essential for optimizing stimulation parameters and for the future development of effective ART. PMID:26054327

  8. Intercellular communication lessons in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bang, Claudia; Antoniades, Charalambos; Antonopoulos, Alexios S; Eriksson, Ulf; Franssen, Constantijn; Hamdani, Nazha; Lehmann, Lorenz; Moessinger, Christine; Mongillo, Marco; Muhl, Lars; Speer, Thimoteus; Thum, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Cell-cell or inter-organ communication allows the exchange of information and messages, which is essential for the coordination of cell/organ functions and the maintenance of homeostasis. It has become evident that dynamic interactions of different cell types play a major role in the heart, in particular during the progression of heart failure, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Heart failure is associated with compensatory structural and functional changes mostly in cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, which finally lead to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Intercellular communication within the heart is mediated mostly via direct cell-cell interaction or the release of paracrine signalling mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. However, recent studies have focused on the exchange of genetic information via the packaging into vesicles as well as the crosstalk of lipids and other paracrine molecules within the heart and distant organs, such as kidney and adipose tissue, which might all contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this review, we discuss emerging communication networks and respective underlying mechanisms which could be involved in cardiovascular disease conditions and further emphasize promising therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:26398116

  9. Arrhythmias and Electrocardiographic Changes in Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Ashok; Bakhit, Ahmed; Dufresne, Alix; Oo, Aung Naing; Parajuli, Premraj; Manhas, Saveena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart failure is a common condition that that leads to hospitalization. It is associated with various atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Aim: The aim of this study is to find common arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes in hospitalized patients who have systolic heart failure. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of medical records, and electrocardiograms (EKGs) of 157 patients admitted to our hospital who had systolic heart failure with ejection fraction (EF) <50% on echocardiogram. Based on EF, the patients were divided into two groups; one with EF ≤ 35% and the other with EF > 35%. Twelve-lead EKG of these patients was studied to identify common arrhythmia and demographic variables; laboratory results were compared to identify the differences. Results: A total of 157 patients with systolic heart failure, 63.7% had an EF ≤ 35%. Hypertension 82.8%, diabetes 49%, coronary artery disease 40.8%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or bronchial asthma 22.3%, and stroke 12.1% were common associated co-morbidities. On analysis of EKG, 28.6% had tachycardia, 21.9% had prolonged PR > 200 ms, 16.3% had wide QRS > 120 ms, 70.7% had prolonged corrected QT (QTc), and 42.2% had left axis deviation. The most common arrhythmias were sinus tachycardia and atrial fibrillation/flutter which were found in 14.6% and 13.4%, respectively. The left ventricular hypertrophy was a common abnormality found in 22.4% followed by ventricular premature contractions 18.4%, atrial premature contractions 9.5%, and left bundle branch block 6.1%. Patients with severe systolic heart failure had prolonged QRS (P = 0.02) and prolonged QTc (P = 0.01) as compared to the other group. Conclusions: Sinus tachycardia and atrial fibrillation/flutter were common arrhythmias in patients with systolic heart failure. Patients with severe systolic heart failure had statistically significant prolongation of the QRS duration and QTc interval. PMID:27213140

  10. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology heart failure nurse curriculum.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jillian P; Astin, Felicity; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa G; Deaton, Christi M; Kienhorst, Jens; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; McDonagh, Theresa A; Rushton, Claire A; Stromberg, Anna; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in care and management of heart failure have improved outcome, largely as a result of the developing evidence basis for medications, implantable devices and the organization of heart failure follow-up. Such developments have also increased the complexity of delivering and coordinating care. This has led to a change to the way in which heart failure services are organized and to the traditional role of the heart failure nurse. Nurses in many countries now provide a range of services that include providing care for patients with acute and with chronic heart failure, working in and across different sectors of care (inpatient, outpatient, community care, the home and remotely), organising care services around the face-to-face and the remote collection of patient data, and liaising with a wide variety of health-care providers and professionals. To support such advances the nurse requires a skill set that goes beyond that of their initial education and training. The range of nurses' roles across Europe is varied. So too is the nature of their educational preparation. This heart failure nurse curriculum aims to provide a framework for use in countries of the European Society of Cardiology. Its modular approach enables the key knowledge, skills, and behaviours for the nurse working in different care settings to be outlined and so facilitate nursing staff to play a fuller role within the heart failure team. PMID:27220672

  11. Heart Failure - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Heart Failure - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional ( ...

  12. Geographic differences in heart failure trials.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Pedro; Girerd, Nicolas; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-09-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are essential to develop advances in heart failure (HF). The need for increasing numbers of patients (without substantial cost increase) and generalization of results led to the disappearance of international boundaries in large RCTs. The significant geographic differences in patients' characteristics, outcomes, and, most importantly, treatment effect observed in HF trials have recently been highlighted. Whether the observed regional discrepancies in HF trials are due to trial-specific issues, patient heterogeneity, structural differences in countries, or a complex interaction between factors are the questions we propose to debate in this review. To do so, we will analyse and review data from HF trials conducted in different world regions, from heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-PEF), heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF), and acute heart failure (AHF). Finally, we will suggest objective and actionable measures in order to mitigate regional discrepancies in future trials, particularly in HF-PEF where prognostic modifying treatments are urgently needed and in which trials are more prone to selection bias, due to a larger patient heterogeneity. PMID:26198782

  13. Oxygen free radicals and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Belch, J J; Bridges, A B; Scott, N; Chopra, M

    1991-01-01

    Plasma lipid peroxides (malondialdehyde) and thiols were measured in 45 patients with congestive heart failure and 45 controls. Malondialdehyde concentrations were significantly higher in the patients with congestive heart failure (median 9.0 nmol/ml interquartile range (IQR) 7.9-10.2) than in the controls (median 7.7 nmol/ml (IQR 6.9-9.2)). Plasma thiols were significantly lower in congestive heart failure (median 420 mumol/l (IQR 379-480)) than in the controls (median 463 mumol/l (IQR 445-525)). There was a significant but weak negative correlation between malondialdehyde and left ventricular ejection fraction (r = -0.35) and a positive correlation between plasma thiols and left ventricular ejection fraction (r = 0.39). This study provides clinical support for experimental data indicating that free radicals may be important in heart failure. It also suggests that the degree of free radical production may be linked to the severity of the disease. PMID:2039668

  14. Managing congestive heart failure using home telehealth.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nina M

    2004-10-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is the leading cause of rehospitalization and loss of revenue for home care agencies and hospitals. This article outlines how an agency used telehealth to provide CHF patients quality care and improved outcomes while decreasing the number of skilled home nursing visits and reducing rehospitalization rates to 1.2%. PMID:15486513

  15. Imaging Techniques in Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnosis of heart failure. In patients with a clinical picture of acute decompensation, prognosis is largely determined by early implementation of general measures and treatment of the underlying cause. Given its diagnostic yield and portability, ultrasound has become an essential tool in the setting of acute heart failure, and is currently found in all medical departments involved in the care of the critically ill patient. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography allow detailed characterization of multiple aspects of cardiac structure and function that were previously unavailable. This helps guide and monitor many of the treatment decisions in the acute heart failure population in an entirely noninvasive way. This article aims to review the usefulness of the imaging techniques that are clinically relevant in the context of an episode of acute heart failure. We discuss the indications and limitations of these techniques in detail and describe the general principles for the appropriate interpretation of results. PMID:26002273

  16. The Readmitted Patient with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Centrella-Nigro, Andrea; Bognar, Lora; Burke, Kathleen; Faber, Kathy; Flynn, Virginia; LaForgia, Mabel; Wiklinski, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A multi-site descriptive retrospective study of physiologic, demographic, and psychosocial factors associated with 30-day readmissions for heart failure was conducted in six Magnet-designated hospitals. Results can be used to plan effective nursing interventions to target readmitted patients. PMID:27522843

  17. New Management Strategies in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Owens, Anjali Tiku; Brozena, Susan C; Jessup, Mariell

    2016-02-01

    Despite >100 clinical trials, only 2 new drugs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic heart failure in more than a decade: the aldosterone antagonist eplerenone in 2003 and a fixed dose combination of hydralazine-isosorbide dinitrate in 2005. In contrast, 2015 has witnessed the Food and Drug Administration approval of 2 new drugs, both for the treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: ivabradine and another combination drug, sacubitril/valsartan or LCZ696. Seemingly overnight, a range of therapeutic possibilities, evoking new physiological mechanisms, promise great hope for a disease that often carries a prognosis worse than many forms of cancer. Importantly, the newly available therapies represent a culmination of basic and translational research that actually spans many decades. This review will summarize newer drugs currently being used in the treatment of heart failure, as well as newer strategies increasingly explored for their utility during the stages of the heart failure syndrome. PMID:26846642

  18. Combination stem cell therapy for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) that are not eligible for transplantation have limited therapeutic options. Stem cell therapy such as autologous bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or purified cells thereof has been used clinically since 2001. To date over 1000 patients have received cellular therapy as part of randomized trials, with the general consensus being that a moderate but statistically significant benefit occurs. Therefore, one of the important next steps in the field is optimization. In this paper we discuss three ways to approach this issue: a) increasing stem cell migration to the heart; b) augmenting stem cell activity; and c) combining existing stem cell therapies to recapitulate a "therapeutic niche". We conclude by describing a case report of a heart failure patient treated with a combination stem cell protocol in an attempt to augment beneficial aspects of cord blood CD34 cells and mesenchymal-like stem cells. PMID:20398245

  19. Remote monitoring of heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    "The Teledactyl (Tele, far; Dactyl, finger--from the Greek) is a future instrument by which it will be possible for us to 'feel at a distance.' This idea is not at all impossible, for the instrument can be built today with means available right now. It is simply the well known telautograph, translated into radio terms, with additional refinements. The doctor of the future, by means of this instrument, will be able to feel his patient, as it were, at a distance...The doctor manipulates his controls, which are then manipulated at the patient's room in exactly the same manner. The doctor sees what is going on in the patient's room by means of a television screen." -Hugo Gernsback, Science and Invention Magazine, February 1925 Heart failure continues to be a major burden on our health care system. As the number of patients with heart failure increases, the cost of hospitalization alone is contributing significantly to the overall cost of this disease. Readmission rate and hospital length of stay are emerging as quality markers of heart failure care along with reimbursement policies that force hospitals to optimize these outcomes. Apart from maintaining quality assurance, the disease process of heart failure per-se requires demanding and close attention to vitals, diet, and medication compliance to prevent acute decompensation episodes. Remote patient monitoring is morphing into a key disease management strategy to optimize care for heart failure. Innovative implantable technologies to monitor intracardiac hemodynamics also are evolving, which potentially could offer better and substantial parameters to monitor. PMID:23519115

  20. Remote Monitoring of Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    “The Teledactyl (Tele, far; Dactyl, finger — from the Greek) is a future instrument by which it will be possible for us to ‘feel at a distance.’ This idea is not at all impossible, for the instrument can be built today with means available right now. It is simply the well known telautograph, translated into radio terms, with additional refinements. The doctor of the future, by means of this instrument, will be able to feel his patient, as it were, at a distance…The doctor manipulates his controls, which are then manipulated at the patient’s room in exactly the same manner. The doctor sees what is going on in the patient’s room by means of a television screen.” —Hugo Gernsback, Science and Invention Magazine, February 1925 Heart failure continues to be a major burden on our health care system. As the number of patients with heart failure increases, the cost of hospitalization alone is contributing significantly to the overall cost of this disease. Readmission rate and hospital length of stay are emerging as quality markers of heart failure care along with reimbursement policies that force hospitals to optimize these outcomes. Apart from maintaining quality assurance, the disease process of heart failure per-se requires demanding and close attention to vitals, diet, and medication compliance to prevent acute decompensation episodes. Remote patient monitoring is morphing into a key disease management strategy to optimize care for heart failure. Innovative implantable technologies to monitor intracardiac hemodynamics also are evolving, which potentially could offer better and substantial parameters to monitor. PMID:23519115

  1. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenergetics must keep up with the cardiac hypertrophic phenotype. We review data regarding the mitochondrial proteomic and energetic remodeling in cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the temporal and causal relationship between mitochondrial failure to match the increased energy demand and progression to cardiac decompensation. We suggest that the maladaptive effect of sustained neuroendocrine signals on mitochondria leads to bioenergetic fading which contributes to the progression from cardiac hypertrophy to failure. PMID:22982369

  2. Devices in heart failure: potential methods for device-based monitoring of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Munir, Shahzeb M; Bogaev, Roberta C; Sobash, Ed; Shankar, K J; Gondi, Sreedevi; Stupin, Igor V; Robertson, Jillian; Brewer, M Alan; Casscells, S Ward; Delgado, Reynolds M; Ahmed, Amany

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure has long been one of the most serious medical conditions in the United States; in fact, in the United States alone, heart failure accounts for 6.5 million days of hospitalization each year. One important goal of heart-failure therapy is to inhibit the progression of congestive heart failure through pharmacologic and device-based therapies. Therefore, there have been efforts to develop device-based therapies aimed at improving cardiac reserve and optimizing pump function to meet metabolic requirements. The course of congestive heart failure is often worsened by other conditions, including new-onset arrhythmias, ischemia and infarction, valvulopathy, decompensation, end-organ damage, and therapeutic refractoriness, that have an impact on outcomes. The onset of such conditions is sometimes heralded by subtle pathophysiologic changes, and the timely identification of these changes may promote the use of preventive measures. Consequently, device-based methods could in the future have an important role in the timely identification of the subtle pathophysiologic changes associated with congestive heart failure. PMID:18612451

  3. Telerehabilitation in heart failure patients: The evidence and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Piepoli, Massimo F; Jaarsma, Tiny; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Coats, Andrew J S; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Corrà, Ugo; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Dickstein, Kenneth; Seferović, Petar M; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Ponikowski, Piotr P

    2016-10-01

    Accessibility to the available traditional forms of cardiac rehabilitation programs in heart failure patients is not adequate and adherence to the programs remains unsatisfactory. The home-based telerehabilitation model has been proposed as a promising new option to improve this situation. This paper's aims are to discuss the tools available for telemonitoring, and describing their characteristics, applicability, and effectiveness in providing optimal long term management for heart failure patients who are unable to attend traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs. The critical issues of psychological support and adherence to the telerehabilitation programs are outlined. The advantages and limitations of this long term management modality are presented and compared with alternatives. Finally, the importance of further research, multicenter studies of telerehabilitation for heart failure patients and the technological development needs are outlined, in particular interactive remotely controlled intelligent telemedicine systems with increased inter-device compatibility. PMID:27390963

  4. Heart Failure in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Nonpharmacologic Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    LeMond, Lisa; Mai, Tuan; Broberg, Craig S; Muralidaran, Ashok; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-11-01

    In early stages, heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains an elusive diagnosis. Many ACHD patients seem well-compensated owing to chronic physical and psychological adaptations. HF biomarkers and cardiopulmonary exercise tests are often markedly abnormal, although patients report stable health and good quality of life. Treatment differs from acquired HF. Evidence for effective drug therapy in ACHD-related HF is lacking. Residual ventricular, valvular, and vascular abnormalities contribute to HF pathophysiology, leading to an emphasis on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies. This article reviews emerging perspectives on nonpharmacologic treatment strategies, including catheter-based interventions, surgical correction, and palliative care. PMID:26471822

  5. Neural modulation for hypertension and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Smith, S; Rossignol, P; Willis, S; Zannad, F; Mentz, R; Pocock, S; Bisognano, J; Nadim, Y; Geller, N; Ruble, S; Linde, C

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and heart failure (HF) have a significant global impact on health, and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in pharmacologic and device therapy for these conditions, there is a need for additional treatment modalities. Patients with sub-optimally treated HTN have increased risk for stroke, renal failure and heart failure. The outcome of HF patients remains poor despite modern pharmacological therapy and with established device therapies such as CRT and ICDs. Therefore, the potential role of neuromodulation via renal denervation, baro-reflex modulation and vagal stimulation for the treatment of resistant HTN and HF is being explored. In this manuscript, we review current evidence for neuromodulation in relation to established drug and device therapies and how these therapies may be synergistic in achieving therapy goals in patients with treatment resistant HTN and heart failure. We describe lessons learned from recent neuromodulation trials and outline strategies to improve the potential for success in future trials. This review is based on discussions between scientists, clinical trialists, and regulatory representatives at the 11th annual CardioVascular Clinical Trialist Forum in Washington, DC on December 5-7, 2014. PMID:27085120

  6. Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158046.html Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Heart Failure Inserting new ... who suffer from heart failure: A trial using gene therapy appears to have boosted patients' cardiac function. "This ...

  7. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure? The most common ... lungs. The condition requires emergency treatment. Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms The image shows the major signs ...

  8. Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise Against Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158122.html Stem Cell Therapy Shows Promise Against Heart Failure A second ... 4, 2016 MONDAY, April 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cell therapy shows promise for people battling heart failure, ...

  9. Pattern of arrhythmias among Nigerians with congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Olufemi E; Abiodun, Olugbenga O; Akintomide, Anthony O; Adebayo, Rasaaq A; Ogunyemi, Suraj A; Balogun, Michael O; Bamikole, Olaniyi J; Ajibare, Adeola O; Ajayi, Adesuyi A

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with heart failure, death is often sudden due to life-threatening arrhythmias. This work was carried out to evaluate the pattern of arrhythmias in Nigerians with heart failure. Materials and methods Thirty subjects with congestive heart failure (CHF), 30 subjects with hypertensive heart disease, and 15 normal subjects with no obvious features of heart disease were evaluated with resting and 24-hour electrocardiographic monitoring and transthoracic echocardiography. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance with post hoc Duncan’s analysis, Fisher’s exact test, and linear regression analysis using SPSS version 16. Results CHF subjects had more instances of supraventricular tachycardia (P=0.005), ventricular extrasystoles (P<0.001), bigeminy (P<0.001), trigeminy (P<0.001), couplets (P<0.001), triplets (P<0.001), and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) (P=0.003) than the other two control groups. They also showed a significantly longer VT duration (4.6±5.6 seconds) compared with the other groups (P<0.001). Linear regression analysis showed a significant direct relationship between VT and the maximum number of ventricular extrasystoles per hour (P=0.001). Conclusion Cardiac arrhythmias are common in subjects with CHF and are more frequent when compared with patients with hypertensive heart disease and normal subjects. PMID:25870514

  10. Comparative Effects of Statin Therapy versus Renin-Angiotensin System Blocking Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jumin; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun

    2016-01-01

    Statins and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers are key drugs for treating patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study was designed to show the association between treatment with statins or RAS blockers and clinical outcomes and the efficacy of two drug combination therapies in patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF) who underwent revascularization for an AMI. A total of 804 AMI patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% who undertook percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were analyzed using the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR). They were divided into four groups according to the use of medications [Group I: combination of statin and RAS blocker (n=611), Group II: statin alone (n=112), Group III: RAS blocker alone (n=53), Group IV: neither treatment (n=28)]. The cumulative incidence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) and independent predictors of MACCEs were investigated. Over a median follow-up study of nearly 1 year, MACCEs had occurred in 48 patients (7.9%) in Group I, 16 patients (14.3%) in Group II, 3 patients (5.7%) in Group III, 7 patients (21.4%) in Group IV (p=0.013). Groups using RAS blocker (Group I and III) showed better clinical outcomes compared with the other groups. By multivariate analysis, use of RAS blockers was the most powerful independent predictor of MACCEs in patients with IHF who underwent PCI (odds ratio 0.469, 95% confidence interval 0.285-0.772; p=0.003), but statin therapy was not found to be an independent predictor. The use of RAS blockers, but not statins, was associated with better clinical outcomes in patients with IHF who underwent PCI. PMID:27231678

  11. Coronary Sinus Biomarker Sampling Compared to Peripheral Venous Blood for Predicting Outcomes In Patients with Severe Heart Failure Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The BIOCRT Study

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Quynh A.; Januzzi, James L.; Szymonifka, Jackie; Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Lavender, Zachary; Sharma, Umesh; Sandoval, Ryan M.; Grunau, Zachary S.; Basnet, Sandeep; Babatunde, Adefolakemi; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Min, James K.; Singh, Jagmeet P.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant minority of patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remain non-responsive to this intervention. Objective To determine whether coronary sinus (CS) or baseline peripheral venous (PV) levels of established and emerging heart failure (HF) biomarkers are predictive of CRT outcomes. Methods In 73 patients (age 68±12; 83% male; ejection fraction 27 7%) with CS and PV blood drawn simultaneously at the time of CRT implantation, we measured amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), galectin-3 (gal-3), and soluble (s)ST2 levels. NT-proBNP concentrations>2000 pg/mL, gal-3>25.9 ng/mL, and sST2>35 ng/mL were considered positive, based on established PV cutpoints for identifying “high risk” individuals with HF. CRT response was adjudicated by HF Clinical Composite Score. Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was defined as the composite endpoint of death, cardiac transplant, left ventricular assist device, and HF hospitalization at 2 years. Results NT-proBNP concentrations were 20% higher in the CS than periphery, while gal-3 and sST2 were 10% higher in periphery than CS (all p<0.001). There were 45% CRT non-responders at 6 months and 22% MACE. Triple positive CS values yielded the highest specificity of 95% for predicting CRT non-response. Consistently, CS strategies identified patients at higher risk for developing MACE, with over 11-fold adjusted increase for triple positive CS patients compared to triple negative patients (all p≤0.04). PV strategies were not predictive of MACE. Conclusions Our findings suggest that coronary sinus sampling of HF biomarkers may be better than peripheral venous blood levels for predicting CRT outcomes. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25014756

  12. Nutrient Intake in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, Daurice A.; O’Brien, Marian C.; Clark, Patricia C.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Research Objective Approximately 50% of heart failure (HF) patients are thought to be malnourished, and macronutrient and micronutrient deficiencies may potentially aggravate HF symptoms. Thus, concerns have been raised about the overall nutrient composition of diets in HF populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the macronutrient and micronutrient intake by caloric adequacy among community-dwelling adults with HF. Participants and Methods A secondary analysis of baseline data of participants in an HF lifestyle intervention study was conducted. Participants (n = 45) were predominantly male (55.6%), white, and non-Hispanic (64.4%); had a mean age of 61 years (SD, 11 years) and mean body mass index of 31.2 kg/m2 (SD, 7.3 kg/m2); were of New York Heart Association functional classes II and III (77.8%); and had a mean ejection fraction of 31.9% (SD,13.2%); and 69% had a college or higher level of education. The Block Food Habits Questionnaire was used to assess the intake of macronutrients and micronutrients. Analysis included descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results and Conclusions Individuals reporting inadequate daily caloric intake reported a lower intake of macronutrients and micronutrients as well as other differences in dietary patterns compared with individuals reporting adequate daily caloric intake. More than half of the individuals reporting adequate caloric intake did not meet the recommended dietary allowance for magnesium and vitamin E. Interventions aimed at increasing overall intake and nutrient density are suggested. Further research is needed to better understand the relationship between dietary factors and outcomes in HF. PMID:18596500

  13. HeartWare left ventricular assist device for the treatment of advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Rojas, Sebastian V; Avsar, Murat; Bara, Christoph; Ismail, Issam; Haverich, Axel; Schmitto, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    The importance of mechanical circulatory support in the therapy of advanced heart failure is steadily growing. The rapid developments in the field of mechanical support are characterized by continuous miniaturization and enhanced performance of the assist devices, providing increased pump durability and prolonged patient survival. The HeartWare left ventricular assist device system (HeartWare Inc., Framingham, MA, USA) is a mechanical ventricular assist device with over 8000 implantations worldwide. Compared with other available assist devices it is smaller in size and used in a broad range of patients. The possibility of minimally invasive procedures is one of the major benefits of the device - allowing implants and explants, as well as exchanges of the device with reduced surgical impact. We present here a review of the existing literature on the treatment of advanced heart failure using the HeartWare left ventricular assist device system. PMID:26597386

  14. Water and Sodium Regulation in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is the pathophysiological state characterized by ventricular dysfunction and associated clinical symptoms. Decreased cardiac output or peripheral vascular resistance lead to arterial underfilling. That is an important signal which triggers multiple neurohormonal systems to maintain adequate arterial pressure and peripheral perfusion of the vital organs. The kidney is the principal organ affected when cardiac output declines. Alterations of hemodynamics and neurohormonal systems in heart failure result in renal sodium and water retention. Activation of sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and non-osmotic vasopressin release stimulate the renal tubular reabsorption of sodium and water. Dysregulation of aquaporin-2 and sodium transporters also play an important role in the pathogenesis of renal sodium and water retention. PMID:21468184

  15. Exhaled Breath Analysis in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana G; Batista, Guilherme Lopes; Bacal, Fernando; Gutz, Ivano

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a clinical condition that presents high morbidity and mortality and is one of the main reasons for hospital admissions all over the world. Although biochemical processes that occur in the body during heart failure are known, this syndrome is still associated to poor prognosis. Exhaled breath analysis has emerged as a promising noninvasive tool in different clinical conditions and, recently, it has been also tested in patients with HF. This review presents the main breath HF biomarkers, which reflect metabolic changes that occur in this complex syndrome. It also discusses the diagnostic and prognostic value of exhaled breath compounds for HF and makes a short description of the main technologies involved in this analysis. Some perspectives on the area are presented as well. PMID:27287200

  16. Renal Dysfunction in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Woo

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute heart failure (AHF), worsening renal function is often complicated and results in a complex clinical course. Furthermore, renal dysfunction is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes in patients with AHF. Traditionally, the predominant cause of renal dysfunction has been attributed to impairment of cardiac output and relative underfilling of arterial perfusion. Recently, emerging data have led to the importance of venous congestion and elevated intra-abdominal pressure rather than confining it to impaired forward cardiac output as the primary driver of renal impairment. Relief of congestion is a major objective of AHF treatment but therapy is still based on the administration of loop diuretics. The results of the recently performed controlled studies for the assessment of new treatments to overcome resistance to diuretic treatment to protect kidneys from untoward effects have been mostly neutral. Better treatment of congestion in heart failure remains a major problem. PMID:22125554

  17. Current Management of Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is still one of the most common causes of death in our society. Treatment should be approached systematically with a set of well-defined objectives, which include rest, a low-sodium diet, inotropic agents, diuretics, and peripheral vasodilators. Patients receiving treatment for congestive heart failure should be examined daily for symptomatic improvement, cardiac signs, and accurate recording of total fluid intake and output. Serum electrolyte levels and chest X-ray films should also be checked intermittently. When using powerful diuretics or vasodilators, the physician should be aware of the risk-benefit ratio because many of these drugs, alone or in combination, may produce undesirable or even fatal side-effects. PMID:20469506

  18. Heart Failure - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Heart Failure Insuficiência Cardíaca - português (Portuguese) Bilingual PDF ...

  19. Natriuretic peptide-guided management in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Macarie, Cezar; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that manifests from various cardiac and noncardiac abnormalities. Accordingly, rapid and readily accessible methods for diagnosis and risk stratification are invaluable for providing clinical care, deciding allocation of scare resources, and designing selection criteria for clinical trials. Natriuretic peptides represent one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic tools available for the care of heart failure patients. Natriuretic peptide testing has the distinct advantage of objectivity, reproducibility, and widespread availability.The concept of tailoring heart failure management to achieve a target value of natriuretic peptides has been tested in various clinical trials and may be considered as an effective method for longitudinal biomonitoring and guiding escalation of heart failure therapies with overall favorable results.Although heart failure trials support efficacy and safety of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy as compared with usual care, the relationship between natriuretic peptide trajectory and clinical benefit has not been uniform across the trials, and certain subgroups have not shown robust benefit. Furthermore, the precise natriuretic peptide value ranges and time intervals of testing are still under investigation. If natriuretic peptides fail to decrease following intensification of therapy, further work is needed to clarify the optimal pharmacologic approach. Despite decreasing natriuretic peptide levels, some patients may present with other high-risk features (e.g. elevated troponin). A multimarker panel investigating multiple pathological processes will likely be an optimal alternative, but this will require prospective validation.Future research will be needed to clarify the type and magnitude of the target natriuretic peptide therapeutic response, as well as the duration of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy in heart failure patients. PMID:27110656

  20. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (P<0.05) despite similar blood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  1. Anger Proneness, Gender, and the Risk of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kucharska-Newton, Anna M.; Williams, Janice E.; Chang, Patricia P.; Stearns, Sally C.; Sueta, Carla A.; Blecker, Saul B.; Mosley, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence concerning the association of anger-proneness with incidence of heart failure is lacking. Methods Anger proneness was ascertained among 13,171 black and white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study cohort using the Spielberger Trait Anger Scale. Incident heart failure events, defined as occurrence of ICD-9-CM code 428.x, were ascertained from participants’ medical records during follow-up 1990–2010. Relative hazard of heart failure across categories of trait anger was estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. Results Study participants (mean age 56.9 (SD 5.7) years) experienced 1,985 incident HF events during 18.5 (SD 4.9) years of follow-up. Incidence of HF was greater among those with high, as compared to those with low or moderate trait anger, with higher incidence observed for men as compared to women. The relative hazard of incident HF was modestly high among those with high trait anger, as compared to those with low or moderate trait anger (age-adjusted HR for men=1.44 (95% CI 1.23, 1.69). Adjustment for comorbidities and depressive symptoms attenuated the estimated age-adjusted relative hazard in men to 1.26 (95% CI 1.00, 1.60). Conclusion Assessment of anger proneness may be necessary in successful prevention and clinical management of heart failure, especially in men. PMID:25284390

  2. Chronic Heart Failure: Contemporary Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Gautam V.; Uber, Patricia A.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) remains the only cardiovascular disease with an increasing hospitalization burden and an ongoing drain on health care expenditures. The prevalence of CHF increases with advancing life span, with diastolic heart failure predominating in the elderly population. Primary prevention of coronary artery disease and risk factor management via aggressive blood pressure control are central in preventing new occurrences of left ventricular dysfunction. Optimal therapy for CHF involves identification and correction of potentially reversible precipitants, target-dose titration of medical therapy, and management of hospitalizations for decompensation. The etiological phenotype, absolute decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction and a widening of QRS duration on electrocardiography, is commonly used to identify patients at increased risk of progression of heart failure and sudden death who may benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement with or without cardiac resynchronization therapy. Patients who transition to advanced stages of disease despite optimal traditional medical and device therapy may be candidates for hemodynamically directed approaches such as a left ventricular assist device; in selected cases, listing for cardiac transplant may be warranted. PMID:20118395

  3. Chronic heart failure: contemporary diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Gautam V; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2010-02-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) remains the only cardiovascular disease with an increasing hospitalization burden and an ongoing drain on health care expenditures. The prevalence of CHF increases with advancing life span, with diastolic heart failure predominating in the elderly population. Primary prevention of coronary artery disease and risk factor management via aggressive blood pressure control are central in preventing new occurrences of left ventricular dysfunction. Optimal therapy for CHF involves identification and correction of potentially reversible precipitants, target-dose titration of medical therapy, and management of hospitalizations for decompensation. The etiological phenotype, absolute decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction and a widening of QRS duration on electrocardiography, is commonly used to identify patients at increased risk of progression of heart failure and sudden death who may benefit from prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement with or without cardiac resynchronization therapy. Patients who transition to advanced stages of disease despite optimal traditional medical and device therapy may be candidates for hemodynamically directed approaches such as a left ventricular assist device; in selected cases, listing for cardiac transplant may be warranted. PMID:20118395

  4. Liver failure in total artificial heart therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Dapunt, Otto; Knez, Igor; Wasler, Andrae; Oberwalder, Peter; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Background Congestive hepatopathy (CH) and acute liver failure (ALF) are common among biventricular heart failure patients. We sought to evaluate the impact of total artificial heart (TAH) therapy on hepatic function and associated clinical outcomes. Methods A total of 31 patients received a Syncardia Total Artificial Heart. Preoperatively 17 patients exhibited normal liver function or mild hepatic derangements that were clinically insignificant and did not qualify as acute or chronic liver failure, 5 patients exhibited ALF and 9 various hepatic derangements owing to CH. Liver associated mortality and postoperative course of liver values were prospectively documented and retrospectively analyzed. Results Liver associated mortality in normal liver function, ALF and CH cases was 0%, 20% (P=0.03) and 44.4% (P=0.0008) respectively. 1/17 (5.8%) patients with a normal liver function developed an ALF, 4/5 (80%) patients with an ALF experienced a markedly improvement of hepatic function and 6/9 (66.6%) patients with CH a significant deterioration. Conclusions TAH therapy results in recovery of hepatic function in ALF cases. Patients with CH prior to surgery form a high risk group with increased liver associated mortality. PMID:27499942

  5. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  6. Coexisting Frailty, Cognitive Impairment, and Heart Failure: Implications for Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Brittany; Gary, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review some of the proposed pathways that increase frailty risk in older persons with heart failure and to discuss tools that may be used to assess for changes in physical and cognitive functioning in this population in order to assist with appropriate and timely intervention. Methods Review of the literature. Results Heart failure is the only cardiovascular disease that is increasing by epidemic proportions, largely due to an aging society and therapeutic advances in disease management. Because heart failure is largely a cardiogeriatric syndrome, age-related syndromes such as frailty and cognitive impairment are common in heart failure patients. Compared with age-matched counterparts, older adults with heart failure 4 to 6 times more likely to be frail or cognitively impaired. The reason for the high prevalence of frailty and cognitive impairment in this population is not well known but may likely reflect the synergistic effects of heart failure and aging, which may heighten vulnerability to stressors and accelerate loss of physiologic reserve. Despite the high prevalence of frailty and cognitive impairment in the heart failure population, these conditions are not routinely screened for in clinical practice settings and guidelines on optimal assessment strategies are lacking. Conclusion Persons with heart failure are at an increased risk for frailty, which may worsen symptoms, impair self-management, and lead to worse heart failure outcomes. Early detection of frailty and cognitive impairment may be an opportunity for intervention and a key strategy for improving clinical outcomes in older adults with heart failure. PMID:26594103

  7. Heterogenous haemodynamic effects of adaptive servoventilation therapy in sleeping patients with heart failure and Cheyne-Stokes respiration compared to healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Spießhöfer, Jens; Fox, Henrik; Lehmann, Roman; Efken, Christina; Heinrich, Jessica; Bitter, Thomas; Körber, Britta; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the haemodynamic effects of adaptive servoventilation (ASV) in heart failure (HF) patients with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) versus healthy controls. Twenty-seven HF patients with CSR and 15 volunteers were ventilated for 1 h using a new ASV device (PaceWave™). Haemodynamics were continuously and non-invasively recorded at baseline, during ASV and after ventilation. Prior to the actual study, a small validation study was performed to validate non-invasive measurement of Stroke volume index (SVI). Non-invasive measurement of SVI showed a marginal overall difference of -0.03 ± 0.41 L/min/m(2) compared to the current gold standard (Thermodilution-based measurement). Stroke volume index (SVI) increased during ASV in HF patients (29.7 ± 5 to 30.4 ± 6 to 28.7 ± 5 mL/m(2), p < 0.05) and decreased slightly in volunteers (50.7 ± 12 to 48.6 ± 11 to 47.9 ± 12 mL/m(2)). Simultaneously, 1 h of ASV was associated with a trend towards an increase in parasympathetic nervous activity (PNA) in HF patients and a trend towards an increase in sympathetic nervous activity (SNA) in healthy volunteers. Blood pressure (BP) and total peripheral resistance response increased significantly in both groups, despite marked inter-individual variation. Effects were independent of vigilance. Predictors of increased SVI during ASV in HF patients included preserved right ventricular function, normal resting BP, non-ischaemic HF aetiology, mitral regurgitation and increased left ventricular filling pressures. This study confirms favourable haemodynamic effects of ASV in HF patients with CSR presenting with mitral regurgitation and/or increased left ventricular filling pressures, but also identified a number of new predictors. This might be mediated by a shift towards more parasympathetic nervous activity in those patients. PMID:26296413

  8. Telemonitoring in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sarwat I.; Mattera, Jennifer A.; Curtis, Jeptha P.; Spertus, John A.; Herrin, Jeph; Lin, Zhenqiu; Phillips, Christopher O.; Hodshon, Beth V.; Cooper, Lawton S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small studies suggest that telemonitoring may improve heart-failure outcomes, but its effect in a large trial has not been established. METHODS We randomly assigned 1653 patients who had recently been hospitalized for heart failure to undergo either telemonitoring (826 patients) or usual care (827 patients). Telemonitoring was accomplished by means of a telephone-based interactive voice-response system that collected daily information about symptoms and weight that was reviewed by the patients’ clinicians. The primary end point was readmission for any reason or death from any cause within 180 days after enrollment. Secondary end points included hospitalization for heart failure, number of days in the hospital, and number of hospitalizations. RESULTS The median age of the patients was 61 years; 42.0% were female, and 39.0% were black. The telemonitoring group and the usual-care group did not differ significantly with respect to the primary end point, which occurred in 52.3% and 51.5% of patients, respectively (difference, 0.8 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], −4.0 to 5.6; P = 0.75 by the chi-square test). Readmission for any reason occurred in 49.3% of patients in the telemonitoring group and 47.4% of patients in the usual-care group (difference, 1.9 percentage points; 95% CI, −3.0 to 6.7; P = 0.45 by the chi-square test). Death occurred in 11.1% of the telemonitoring group and 11.4% of the usual care group (difference, −0.2 percentage points; 95% CI, −3.3 to 2.8; P = 0.88 by the chi-square test). There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the secondary end points or the time to the primary end point or its components. No adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS Among patients recently hospitalized for heart failure, telemonitoring did not improve outcomes. The results indicate the importance of a thorough, independent evaluation of disease-management strategies before their adoption. (Funded by

  9. Mechano-signaling in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Buyandelger, Byambajav; Mansfield, Catherine; Knöll, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    Mechanosensation and mechanotransduction are fundamental aspects of biology, but the link between physical stimuli and biological responses remains not well understood. The perception of mechanical stimuli, their conversion into biochemical signals, and the transmission of these signals are particularly important for dynamic organs such as the heart. Various concepts have been introduced to explain mechanosensation at the molecular level, including effects on signalosomes, tensegrity, or direct activation (or inactivation) of enzymes. Striated muscles, including cardiac myocytes, differ from other cells in that they contain sarcomeres which are essential for the generation of forces and which play additional roles in mechanosensation. The majority of cardiomyopathy causing candidate genes encode structural proteins among which titin probably is the most important one. Due to its elastic elements, titin is a length sensor and also plays a role as a tension sensor (i.e., stress sensation). The recent discovery of titin mutations being a major cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) also underpins the importance of mechanosensation and mechanotransduction in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here, we focus on sarcomere-related mechanisms, discuss recent findings, and provide a link to cardiomyopathy and associated heart failure. PMID:24531746

  10. Dilemmas in end-stage heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Scarabelli, Carol; Saravolatz, Louis; Hirsh, Benjamin; Agrawal, Pratik; Scarabelli, Tiziano M.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF), a complex clinical syndrome due to structural or functional disorder of the heart, is a major global health issue, with a prevalence of over 5.8 million in the USA alone, and over 23 million worldwide. As a leading cause of hospitalizations among patients aged 65 years or older, HF is a major consumer of healthcare resources, creating a substantial strain on the healthcare system. This paper discusses the epidemiology of HF, financial impact, and multifaceted predicaments in end-stage HF care. A search was conducted on the U.S. National Library of Medicine website (www.pubmed.gov) using keywords such as end-stage heart failure, palliative care, ethical dilemmas. Despite the poor prognosis of HF (worse than that for many cancers), many HF patients, caregivers, and clinicians are unaware of the poor prognosis. In addition, the unpredictable clinical trajectory of HF complicates the planning of end-of-life care, such as palliative care and hospice, leading to underutilization of such resources. In conclusion, ethical dilemmas in end-stage HF are numerous, embroiling not only the patient, but also the caregiver, healthcare team, and society. PMID:25678905

  11. Heart rate recovery and prognosis in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Kubrychtova, Vera; Bailey, Kent R.; Thapa, Prabin; Allison, Thomas G.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of heart rate recovery (HRRec) for assessing risk of death in heart failure (HF) patients. Echocardiographic and clinical exercise data were analyzed retrospectively on 712 HF patients (EF ≤ 45%). HRRec was calculated as peak exercise heart rate – heart rate at 1 min of active recovery. Patients were followed for all-cause mortality (5.9 ± 3.3 years follow-up). Groups were identified according to HRRec: group-1 (HRR ≤ 4 bpm), group-2 (5 ≤ HRR ≤ 9 bpm), and group-3 (HRR ≥ 10). Kaplan–Meier analysis estimated survival of 91, 64, and 43% (group-1); 94, 76, and 63% (group-2); and 92, 82, and 70% (group-3) at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Ranked HRRec independently predicted mortality after adjusting for age, gender, NYHA class, LVEF and BMI, but was not independent of exercise time, peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 at nadir. HRRec is a useful prognostic marker in patients with HF, particularly when gas exchange measures are not available. PMID:18797918

  12. Modeling Pathologies of Diastolic and Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Genet, M; Lee, L C; Baillargeon, B; Guccione, J M; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is a medical condition that involves structural and functional changes of the heart and a progressive reduction in cardiac output. Heart failure is classified into two categories: diastolic heart failure, a thickening of the ventricular wall associated with impaired filling; and systolic heart failure, a dilation of the ventricles associated with reduced pump function. In theory, the pathophysiology of heart failure is well understood. In practice, however, heart failure is highly sensitive to cardiac microstructure, geometry, and loading. This makes it virtually impossible to predict the time line of heart failure for a diseased individual. Here we show that computational modeling allows us to integrate knowledge from different scales to create an individualized model for cardiac growth and remodeling during chronic heart failure. Our model naturally connects molecular events of parallel and serial sarcomere deposition with cellular phenomena of myofibrillogenesis and sarcomerogenesis to whole organ function. Our simulations predict chronic alterations in wall thickness, chamber size, and cardiac geometry, which agree favorably with the clinical observations in patients with diastolic and systolic heart failure. In contrast to existing single- or bi-ventricular models, our new four-chamber model can also predict characteristic secondary effects including papillary muscle dislocation, annular dilation, regurgitant flow, and outflow obstruction. Our prototype study suggests that computational modeling provides a patient-specific window into the progression of heart failure with a view towards personalized treatment planning. PMID:26043672

  13. Management of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dec, G William

    2007-06-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is the most common cause for hospitalization among patients over 65 years of age. It may result from new onset of ventricular dysfunction or, more typically, exacerbation of chronic heart failure symptoms. In-hospital mortality remains high for both systolic and diastolic forms of the disease. Therapy is largely empirical as few randomized, controlled trials have focused on this population and consensus practice guidelines are just beginning to be formulated. Treatment should be focused upon correction of volume overload, identifying potential precipitating causes, and optimizing vasodilator and beta-adrenergic blocker therapy. The majority of patients (>90%) will improve without the use of positive inotropic agents, which should be reserved for patients with refractory hypotension, cardiogenic shock, end-organ dysfunction, or failure to respond to conventional oral and/or intravenous diuretics and vasodilators. The role of aldosterone antagonists, biventricular pacing, and novel pharmacological agents including vasopressin antagonists, endothelin blockers, and calcium-sensitizing agents is also reviewed. PMID:17531903

  14. How should COMET influence heart failure practice?

    PubMed

    Adams, Kirkwood F

    2004-07-01

    Much clinical experience has led us to assume that the administration of a b-blocker, regardless of dose or frequency, would produce similar mortality benefits in patients with heart failure. The results from the recently published Carvedilol or Metoprolol European Trial (COMET), which found greater benefit of carvedilol than immediate-release metoprolol on mortality, clearly demonstrated this is not true. In heart failure, the COMET results strongly support the use of beta-blockers that have proven effective in large-scale clinical trials. The primary disagreement regarding COMET concerns the explanation of the efficacy difference between the two b-blockers tested. Pharmacodynamic considerations and hemodynamic data from the COMET trial itself suggest there were unequal degrees of b1-blockade between patients receiving carvedilol and immediate-release metoprolol. Failure to achieve a similar degree of b1-receptor blockade in the two groups prevents conclusions regarding the potential incremental benefits of selective versus nonselective adrenergic blockade. Further studies are needed to determine whether there are additional clinical benefits from the inhibition of adrenergic receptors beyond the proven benefits of b1-blockade. PMID:16036027

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of beta blockers in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Robert L

    2004-04-01

    Although beta-blockers have been used for nearly three decades in the management of heart failure, only recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated substantial benefit in reducing morbidity and mortality. Carvedilol, metoprolol succinate and bisprolol have evidence supporting their use in heart failure while other beta blockers either lack evidence supporting their use or have not been shown to be useful in heart failure. The only currently approved beta-blockers in the U.S. for heart failure are metoprolol succinate and carvedilol.Beta-blockers differ in their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. It should not be assumed that potential benefit in heart failure is a class effect since differences in the half-life, volume of distribution, protein binding, and route of elimination may give rise to differences in duration of beta blockade and potential drug interactions. Furthermore, pharmacodynamic differences exist because of selectivity for beta(1), beta(2) or alpha(1) adrenoreceptor blockade among the beta-blockers. Receptor kinetics also differ among the beta-blockers and this may influence the extent and duration of beta and alpha blockade across the category. Carvedilol is an inherently long-acting beta-blocker while the duration of beta blockade for metoprolol is dependent on the salt and formulation, which is used. Metoprolol tartrate is a short-acting form of metoprolol while metoprolol succinate is a longer acting salt and the commercially available product is designed as a once daily formulation. A recently published trial, the Carvedilol or Metoprolol European Trial (COMET) tested carvedilol given twice daily versus metoprolol tartrate given twice daily in patients with chronic heart failure. Although carvedilol reduced all cause mortality when compared with metoprolol tartrate, extrapolation to similar findings with metoprolol succinate are not possible since the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of these two formulations are

  16. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y. Y.; Nguyen, Albert; Lioe, Jocelyn; Tumiati, Laura C.; Kozuszko, Stella; Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rao, Vivek; Dunn, Shannon E.; Persinger, Michael A.; Levy, Gary A.; Ross, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen). Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient sample, has

  17. Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Andrade, Lúcia; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure. PMID:23644863

  18. Primary Graft Failure after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Arjun; Kumarasinghe, Gayathri; Hicks, Mark; Watson, Alasdair; Gao, Ling; Doyle, Aoife; Keogh, Anne; Kotlyar, Eugene; Hayward, Christopher; Dhital, Kumud; Granger, Emily; Jansz, Paul; Pye, Roger; Spratt, Phillip; Macdonald, Peter Simon

    2011-01-01

    Primary graft failure (PGF) is a devastating complication that occurs in the immediate postoperative period following heart transplantation. It manifests as severe ventricular dysfunction of the donor graft and carries significant mortality and morbidity. In the last decade, advances in pharmacological treatment and mechanical circulatory support have improved the outlook for heart transplant recipients who develop this complication. Despite these advances in treatment, PGF is still the leading cause of death in the first 30 days after transplantation. In today's climate of significant organ shortages and growing waiting lists, transplant units worldwide have increasingly utilised “marginal donors” to try and bridge the gap between “supply and demand.” One of the costs of this strategy has been an increased incidence of PGF. As the threat of PGF increases, the challenges of predicting and preventing its occurrence, as well as the identification of more effective treatment modalities, are vital areas of active research and development. PMID:21837269

  19. Ovarian carcinoid presenting with right heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Damen, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with a pelvic mass as well as a 6-month history of progressive bilateral peripheral oedema with more recent breathlessness and abdominal distension. She was found to have significant right heart failure (RHF) which was extensively investigated. No significant lung disease or pulmonary embolism was identified to explain the findings. Severe tricuspid incompetence was thus thought to be secondary to the systemic effects of a carcinoid tumour, confirmed to be ovarian in origin (on positron emission tomography/CT scan and histopathology). Prior to major pelvic surgery for removal of the ovarian mass, she underwent tricuspid and pulmonary valve replacement surgery due to the deteriorating right heart function. She had an uneventful recovery after both operations and continues to be followed up closely with serial ovarian and carcinoid tumour markers. PMID:24872492

  20. Multidisciplinary Approach for Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Fröhlich, Hanna; Cleland, John G F

    2015-10-01

    Acute heart failure describes the rapid deterioration, over minutes, days or hours, of symptoms and signs of heart failure. Its management is an interdisciplinary challenge that requires the cooperation of various specialists. While emergency providers, (interventional) cardiologists, heart surgeons, and intensive care specialists collaborate in the initial stabilization of acute heart failure patients, the involvement of nurses, discharge managers, and general practitioners in the heart failure team may facilitate the transition from inpatient care to the outpatient setting and improve acute heart failure readmission rates. This review highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to acute heart failure with particular focus on the chain-of-care delivered by the various services within the healthcare system. PMID:26409892

  1. The Path From Heart Failure to Cardiac Transplant.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Regi; Koerner, Erika; Clark, Courtney; Halabicky, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a progressive and fatal disease impacting millions of American each year. Divided into stages, heart failure presents with progressive symptoms requiring a wide range of medical treatments. Treatments include diet and lifestyle changes, medications, electrical therapies (defibrillator and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy), as well as mechanical circulatory support. Cardiac transplant is the gold standard treatment of heart failure, although the availability of donors limits the utility of a cardiac transplant. This article outlines heart failure treatments and the indications, contraindications, and pretransplant evaluation for a cardiac transplant. Information on the allocation of donor hearts and donor characteristics is also included for the reader. PMID:27254637

  2. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates <75, an association was significant for mortality only for both SR and AF patients. Conclusions Among older patients hospitalized with heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  3. Targeting microRNAs in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Duygu, Burcu; de Windt, Leon J; da Costa Martins, Paula A

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs play pivotal roles in cardiac disease, and their therapeutic modulation raises exciting and unique opportunities, as well as challenges in the path toward clinical development and implementation. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of recent studies highlighting the important role of microRNAs in heart failure (HF) and the potential use of microRNA-based technology for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of HF. We will focus on the strategies presently used for microRNA-based therapy by discussing their use and drawbacks, as well as the challenges and future directions for their development in the context of human HF. PMID:26119078

  4. Ventricular-Vascular Interaction in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Borlaug, Barry A.; Kass, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Nearly half of all patients with heart failure have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). HFpEF patients tend to be older, female, and hypertensive, and characteristically display increased ventricular and arterial stiffening. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of abnormal ventriculoarterial stiffening and how the latter affects ventricular function, cardiovascular hemodynamics, reserve capacity, and symptoms. We conclude by exploring how novel treatment strategies targeting abnormal ventricular-arterial interaction might prove useful in the treatment of patients with HFpEF. PMID:18313622

  5. [Chronic heart failure in the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Chivite, David; Franco, Jhonatan; Formiga, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of heart failure (HF) is increasing, especially in the elderly population, and is becoming a major geriatric problem. Elderly patients with HF usually show etiopathogenic, epidemiological, and even clinical characteristics significantly different from those present in younger patients. Their treatment, however, derives from clinical trials performed with only a few elderly subjects. Moreover, beyond the cardiovascular disease itself, it is essential to evaluate the patient as a whole, given the interrelationship between HF and the characteristic geriatric syndromes of the elderly patient. This review examines the peculiarities in the most prevalent "real world" HF patient. PMID:25962334

  6. [Telemedicine and wireless devices in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Billeci, Lucia; Guerriero, Lorenzo; L'Abbate, Antonio; Pioggia, Giovanni; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Trivella, Maria Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    Telemedicine has the potential to constitute the central element of the future primary care and become an effective means of prevention and early warning of acute exacerbation of chronic diseases. Up to now, the application of telemedicine has found a variety of difficulties, regarding the types and methods of acquisition and transmission of biological signals, the acceptance and cooperation of the patient, etc. The latest technological developments involve the combined use of wireless technologies and smartphones, for the collection and the transmission of data, and specific softwares for their automatic analysis. This paper examines some of the critical aspects in the application of new technologies for heart failure remote management. PMID:24873944

  7. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2015-11-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an 'aged' population.As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department,intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  8. Neuroimmune mechanisms of depression in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Jessica A; Mills, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major and costly public health concern, and its prognosis is grim-with high hospitalization and mortality rates. It is well documented that HF patients experience disproportionately high rates of depression and that depressed HF patients have worse clinical outcomes than their non-depressed counterparts. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the reader to the study of depression in HF, and how psychoneuroimmunologic principals have been applied to further elucidate the mechanisms (i.e., neurohormonal and cytokine activation) linking these co-morbid disorders. PMID:22933146

  9. Rescue of Heart Failure by Mitochondrial Recovery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a multifactorial disease brought about by numerous, and oftentimes complex, etiological mechanisms. Although well studied, HF continues to affect millions of people worldwide and current treatments can only prevent further progression of HF. Mitochondria undoubtedly play an important role in the progression of HF, and numerous studies have highlighted mitochondrial components that contribute to HF. This review presents an overview of the role of mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore in HF, discusses ongoing studies that attempt to address the disease through mitochondrial targeting, and provides an insight on how these studies can affect future research on HF treatment. PMID:27032551

  10. Mechanisms of Cardiotoxicity and the Development of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S

    2015-12-01

    Cardiotoxicity is a broad term that refers to the negative effects of toxic substances on the heart. Cancer drugs can cause cardiotoxicity by effects on heart cells, thromboembolic events, and/or hypertension that can lead to heart failure. Rheumatoid arthritis biologics may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and cause/worsen heart failure. Long-term and heavy alcohol use can result in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and decreased contractile protein function. Cocaine use results in sympathetic nervous system stimulation of heart and smooth muscle cells and leads to cardiotoxicity and evolution of heart failure. The definition of cardiotoxicity is likely to evolve along with knowledge about detecting subclinical myocardial injury. PMID:26567492

  11. Crosstalk between the heart and peripheral organs in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Jahng, James Won Suk; Song, Erfei; Sweeney, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Mediators from peripheral tissues can influence the development and progression of heart failure (HF). For example, in obesity, an altered profile of adipokines secreted from adipose tissue increases the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI). Less appreciated is that heart remodeling releases cardiokines, which can strongly impact various peripheral tissues. Inflammation, and, in particular, activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors with pyrin domain (NLRP3) inflammasome are likely to have a central role in cardiac remodeling and mediating crosstalk with other organs. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cardiac injury induces the production and secretion of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. In addition to having local effects in the myocardium, these pro-inflammatory cytokines are released into circulation and cause remodeling in the spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The collective effects of various cardiokines on peripheral organs depend on the degree and duration of myocardial injury, with systematic inflammation and peripheral tissue damage observed as HF progresses. In this article, we review mechanisms regulating myocardial inflammation in HF and the role of factors secreted by the heart in communication with peripheral tissues. PMID:26964833

  12. Interventional heart failure: a new field.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-05-17

    With the rapid expansion of interventional therapies for structural heart disease, it is no surprise that the field of interventional heart failure (HF) is now an established reality. Why is there a need for interventional treatment of HF? Despite critical advances in the treatment of some forms of HF, there are still major unmet needs in the HF field (e.g., HF with preserved ejection fraction and right ventricular failure), and HF-related morbidity and mortality remain high. Furthermore, there are several advantages to device-based therapies for HF: they may help reduce polypharmacy and the need for patient compliance with pharmacotherapies, both of which continue to plague the treatment of HF. For these reasons and others, there has been a plethora of development within the interventional HF field, with therapies ranging from interatrial shunt devices to left ventricular partition devices. Here we discuss the current unmet need for interventional HF therapies, lessons learned from prior successes and challenges in the development of device-based HF therapeutics, novel interventional therapies on the horizon for HF patients, and future challenges that will be critical for all those in the field to consider when developing interventional therapies for HF. PMID:27174120

  13. Insulin Resistance and Heart Failure: Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aroor, Annayya R.; Mandavia, Chirag H.; Sowers, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and associated reductions in cardiac insulin metabolic signaling is emerging as a major factor for the development of heart failure and assumes more importance because of an epidemic increase in obesity and the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and our aging population. Major factors contributing to the development of cardiac insulin resistance are oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, dysregulated secretion of adipokines/cytokines and inappropriate activation of renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the sympathetic nervous system. The effects of cardiac insulin resistance are exacerbated by metabolic, endocrine and cytokine alterations associated with systemic insulin resistance. The aggregate of these various alterations leads to an insulin resistant phenotype with metabolic inflexibility, impaired calcium handling, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, dysregulated myocardial-endothelial interactions resulting in energy deficiency, impaired diastolic dysfunction, myocardial cell death and cardiac fibrosis. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms linking insulin resistance and heart failure may help to design new and more effective mechanism-based drugs to improve myocardial and systemic insulin resistance. PMID:22999243

  14. Heart Failure: Diagnosis, Management and Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Arati A.; Inamdar, Ajinkya C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement in medicine, management of heart failure (HF), which usually presents as a disease syndrome, has been a challenge to healthcare providers. This is reflected by the relatively higher rate of readmissions along with increased mortality and morbidity associated with HF. In this review article, we first provide a general overview of types of HF pathogenesis and diagnostic features of HF including the crucial role of exercise in determining the severity of heart failure, the efficacy of therapeutic strategies and the morbidity/mortality of HF. We then discuss the quality control measures to prevent the growing readmission rates for HF. We also attempt to elucidate published and ongoing clinical trials for HF in an effort to evaluate the standard and novel therapeutic approaches, including stem cell and gene therapies, to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Finally, we discuss the appropriate utilization/documentation and medical coding based on the severity of the HF alone and with minor and major co-morbidities. We consider that this review provides an extensive overview of the HF in terms of disease pathophysiology, management and documentation for the general readers, as well as for the clinicians/physicians/hospitalists. PMID:27367736

  15. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics. PMID:24930082

  16. Medical management of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Arai, A. E.; Greenberg, B. H.

    1990-01-01

    The syndrome of congestive heart failure can result from a variety of cardiac disorders of which left ventricular dysfunction is the most common. The clinical presentation is determined by the interaction between cardiac dysfunction and a series of compensatory mechanisms that are activated throughout the body. Therapy for this disorder is best approached through an understanding of this complex relationship and an appreciation for the influence of preload, afterload, and contractility on cardiac performance. Recent important advances in therapy include the use of combined diuretic therapy, a better understanding of the value of the digitalis glycosides, and evidence that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors can relieve symptoms and prolong life. More intensive therapy earlier in the course of congestive heart failure appears to have some clinical benefit. The use of ACE inhibitors during this phase may delay progression of the underlying left ventricular dysfunction. Future therapy will be influenced by the results of ongoing trials that are testing both new agents and expanded indications for drugs that are currently available. PMID:2244376

  17. Heart Failure: Diagnosis, Management and Utilization.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Arati A; Inamdar, Ajinkya C

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement in medicine, management of heart failure (HF), which usually presents as a disease syndrome, has been a challenge to healthcare providers. This is reflected by the relatively higher rate of readmissions along with increased mortality and morbidity associated with HF. In this review article, we first provide a general overview of types of HF pathogenesis and diagnostic features of HF including the crucial role of exercise in determining the severity of heart failure, the efficacy of therapeutic strategies and the morbidity/mortality of HF. We then discuss the quality control measures to prevent the growing readmission rates for HF. We also attempt to elucidate published and ongoing clinical trials for HF in an effort to evaluate the standard and novel therapeutic approaches, including stem cell and gene therapies, to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Finally, we discuss the appropriate utilization/documentation and medical coding based on the severity of the HF alone and with minor and major co-morbidities. We consider that this review provides an extensive overview of the HF in terms of disease pathophysiology, management and documentation for the general readers, as well as for the clinicians/physicians/hospitalists. PMID:27367736

  18. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. PMID:24774396

  19. Khat Use: History and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that 20 million people worldwide are regularly using khat as a stimulant, even though the habit of chewing khat is known to cause serious health issues. Historical evidence suggests khat use has existed since the 13th century in Ethiopia and the southwestern Arabian regions even before the cultivation and use of coffee. In the past three decades, its availability and use spread all over the world including the United States and Europe. Most of the consumers in the Western world are immigrant groups from Eastern Africa or the Middle East. The global transport and availability of khat has been enhanced by the development of synthetic forms of its active component. The World Health Organization considers khat a drug of abuse since it causes a range of health problems. However, it remains lawful in some countries. Khat use has long been a part of Yemeni culture and is used in virtually every social occasion. The main component of khat is cathinone, which is structurally and functionally similar to amphetamine and cocaine. Several studies have demonstrated that khat chewing has unfavorable cardiovascular effects. The effect on the myocardium could be explained by its effect on the heart rate, blood pressure, its vasomotor effect on the coronary vessels, and its amphetamine–like effects. However, its direct effect on the myocardium needs further elaboration. To date, there are few articles that contribute death among khat chewers to khat-induced heart failure. Further studies are needed to address the risk factors in khat chewers that may explain khat-induced cardiotoxicity, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. PMID:25960830

  20. Addressing Heart Failure Challenges through Illness-Informed Social Work.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Faith Pratt; Camp, Jessica K; Perry, Tam E

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the role of social workers in addressing the needs of people with heart failure. Although previous studies have explored the role of social workers in health care settings, few studies have addressed the challenges of specific chronic diseases such as heart failure. To address this gap in the literature, this study used qualitative interviews with health care social workers (n = 8) to obtain in-depth information about activities and challenges related to heart failure care. Findings suggest that health care social workers perceive heart failure as characterized by an uncertain illness trajectory, frequent hospitalizations, and difficulties accessing formal and informal care. These findings suggest the importance of what we term illness-informed social work, a practice that combines heart failure knowledge with social work competencies to address the complex psychosocial issues in heart failure care. PMID:26285359

  1. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Jean M; Sieg, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal glands that has several regulatory functions to help the body maintain normal volume status and electrolyte balance. Studies have shown significantly higher levels of aldosterone secretion in patients with congestive heart failure compared with normal patients. Elevated levels of aldosterone have been shown to elevate blood pressure, cause left ventricular hypertrophy, and promote cardiac fibrosis. An appreciation of the true role of aldosterone in patients with chronic heart failure did not become apparent until the publication of the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study. Until recently, the use of aldosterone receptor antagonists has been limited to patients with severe heart failure and patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) study added additional evidence to support the expanded use of aldosterone receptor antagonists in heart failure patients. The results of the EMPHASIS-HF trial showed that patients with mild-to-moderate (New York Heart Association Class II) heart failure had reductions in mortality and hospitalizations from the addition of eplerenone to optimal medical therapy. Evidence remains elusive about the exact mechanism by which aldosterone receptor antagonists improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. The benefits of aldosterone receptor antagonist use in heart failure must be weighed against the potential risk of complications, ie, hyperkalemia and, in the case of spironolactone, possible endocrine abnormalities, in particular gynecomastia. With appropriate monitoring, these risks can be minimized. We now have evidence that patients with mild-to-severe symptoms associated with systolic heart failure will benefit from the addition of an aldosterone receptor antagonist to the standard therapies of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta

  2. Quality of congestive heart failure care

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Heather; Marshall, J. Neil; Stewart, Moira; Terry, Amanda L.; Cejic, Sonny; Hammond, Jo-Anne; Jordan, John; Chevendra, Vijaya; Denomme, Louisa Bestard; Thind, Amardeep

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To study the feasibility of using electronic medical record (EMR) data from the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information (DELPHI) database to measure quality of care for patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) in primary care and to determine the percentage of patients with CHF receiving the recommended care. DESIGN Items listed on the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Heart Failure Patient Care Flow Sheet (CHF flow sheet) were assessed and measured using EMRs of patients diagnosed with CHF between October 1, 2005, and September 30, 2008. SETTING Ten primary health care practices in southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Four hundred eighty-eight patients who were considered to have CHF because at least 1 of the following was indicated in their EMRs: an International Classification of Diseases billing code for CHF (category 428), an International Classification of Primary Care diagnosis code for heart failure (ie, K77), or “CHF” reported on the problem list. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of CHF flow sheet items that were measurable using EMR data from the DELPHI database. Percentage of patients with CHF receiving required quality-of-care items since the date of diagnosis. RESULTS The DELPHI database contained information on 60 (65.9%) of the 91 items identified using the CHF flow sheet. The recommended tests and procedures were recorded infrequently: 55.5% of patients with CHF had chest radiographs; 32.6% had electrocardiograms; 32.2% had echocardiograms; 30.5% were prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; 20.9% were prescribed β-blockers; and 15.8% were prescribed angiotensin II receptor blockers. CONCLUSION Low frequencies of recommended care items for patients with CHF were recorded in the EMR. Physicians explained that CHF care was documented in areas of the EMR that contained patient identifiers, such as the encounter notes, and was therefore not part of the DELPHI database. Extractable information from the EMR

  3. Antidepressant No Help to Heart Failure Patients: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure and depression to Lexapro (escitalopram) or a placebo in addition to heart failure treatments. Over 18 ... as did 64 percent of those taking the placebo, the researchers found. Moreover, no significant improvement in ...

  4. Update on heart failure, heart transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Almenar, Luis; Zunzunegui, José Luis; Barón, Gonzalo; Carrasco, José Ignacio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Comín, Josep; Barrios, Vivencio; Subirana, M Teresa; Díaz-Molina, Beatriz

    2013-04-01

    In the year 2012, 3 scientific sections-heart failure and transplant, congenital heart disease, and clinical cardiology-are presented together in the same article. The most relevant development in the area of heart failure and transplantation is the 2012 publication of the European guidelines for heart failure. These describe new possibilities for some drugs (eplerenone and ivabradine); expand the criteria for resynchronization, ventricular assist, and peritoneal dialysis; and cover possibilities of percutaneous repair of the mitral valve (MitraClip(®)). The survival of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome in congenital heart diseases has improved significantly. Instructions for percutaneous techniques and devices have been revised and modified for the treatment of atrial septal defects, ostium secundum, and ventricular septal defects. Hybrid procedures for addressing structural congenital heart defects have become more widespread. In the area of clinical cardiology studies have demonstrated that percutaneous prosthesis implantation has lower mortality than surgical implantation. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc criteria and of new anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is also recommended. In addition, the development of new sequencing techniques has enabled the analysis of multiple genes. PMID:24775619

  5. Preventing Heart Failure in Inflammatory and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Serhal, Maya; Longenecker, Chris T.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk for heart failure due to ischemic heart disease and other causes including heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Using rheumatoid arthritis and treated HIV infection as two prototypical examples, we review the epidemiology and potential therapies to prevent heart failure in these populations. Particular focus is given to anti-inflammatory therapies including statins and biologic disease modifying drugs. There is also limited evidence for lifestyle changes and blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. We conclude by proposing how a strategy for heart failure prevention, such as the model tested in the Screening To Prevent Heart Failure (STOP-HF) trial, may be adapted to chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:26316924

  6. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  7. Sleep Apnea, Heart Failure, and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Javaheri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Despite the emergence of sleep apnea (SA) as a significant risk factor for heart failure (HF) mortality, data indicate that SA remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Less well established, though perhapsmore emphasized, is the role of sleep apnea in pulmonary hypertension (PH). SA occurs in approximately 50 % of HF patients, and its consequences include intermittent hypoxemia, arousal, and intrathoracic pressure swings leading to neurohormonal stimulation, oxidative stress and inflammation. While SA is also considered a cause of PH, severe PH due solely to SA is rare. Combining the results of several studies using Swan-Ganz catheters for diagnosis of PH, approximately 10 % of patients with OSA have PH. Effective treatment of SA in HF is associated with improved survival, while treatment of SA in PH is typically associated with modest hemodynamic improvement. PMID:24097114

  8. Exercise oscillatory ventilation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Corrà, Ugo

    2016-03-01

    Ventilation inefficiency has become a matter of interest for heart failure (HF) specialists, the most remarkable being exertional oscillatory ventilation (EOV). EOV is an abnormal ventilatory phenomenon, originally described as anecdotal, but now considered a marker of disease severity and worst prognosis in HF. EOV is a cyclic fluctuation of minute ventilation (VE) and expired gas kinetics occurring during exercise: it is a slow, prominent, consistent rather than random, fluctuation in VE that may be evanescent or transient and can follow several distinct patterns. In contrast to the periodic breathing observed in Cheyne-Stokes respiration and central sleep apnea, the gradual increase and decrease in minute ventilation (VE) are not spaced by periods of apnea. This review will discuss EOV in HF and the overlap with Cheyne-Stokes respiration. PMID:26935880

  9. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  10. Nutritional Deficiency in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sciatti, Edoardo; Lombardi, Carlo; Ravera, Alice; Vizzardi, Enrico; Bonadei, Ivano; Carubelli, Valentina; Gorga, Elio; Metra, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Although evidence-based treatments have substantially improved outcomes, prognosis remains poor with high costs for health care systems. In patients with HF, poor dietary behaviors are associated with unsatisfactory quality of life and adverse outcome. The HF guidelines have not recommended a specific nutritional strategy. Despite the role of micronutrient deficiency it has been extensively studied, and data about the efficacy of supplementation therapy in HF are not supported by large randomized trials and there is limited evidence regarding the outcomes. The aim of the present review is to analyze the state-of-the-art of nutritional deficiencies in HF, focusing on the physiological role and the prognostic impact of micronutrient supplementation. PMID:27455314